Science.gov

Sample records for exchange transfusion het

  1. Harvesting the noncirculating pool of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in rats by hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET): yield and functional assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.H. Jr.; Moser, K.M.; Ulich, T.; Cairo, M.S.

    1987-11-01

    Isolation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) provides an opportunity to study PMN activity in vitro and to label PMN for study of in vivo kinetics. However, simple phlebotomy (SP) of a small animal frequently yields too few PMN for in vitro handling, while PMN harvested from an induced-peritonitis may not accurately reflect PMN in a less stimulated state. We report a novel method of harvesting PMN from the circulation of rats, using hetastarch exchange transfusion (HET), which is both time and animal sparing. HET harvested 8-fold more PMN than SP. In vitro cell function was examined with assays of adherence, chemotaxis, bacterial killing, and superoxide generation. No significant (p less than 0.05) difference was found between PMN obtained by HET and pooled-PMN obtained by SP. In vivo function was examined following labeling with indium 111-oxine. The kinetics pattern described suggested normal migratory activity when compared to previous reports. The data demonstrate that rats possess a relatively large, noncirculating pool of PMN which is readily accessible by HET.

  2. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... her back, usually under a radiant warmer. The umbilical vein is catheterized with a fluid-filled catheter. ... plasma is injected. After the exchange transfusion, an umbilical catheter may be left in place in case ...

  3. Exchange Transfusion in Severe Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khatib, Khalid Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Malaria is endemic in India with the incidence of P. falciparum Malaria increasing gradually over the last decade. Severe malaria is an acute disease, caused by P. falciparum, but increasingly also by P. vivax with major signs of organ dysfunction and/or high levels of parasitaemia (>10%) in blood smear. Use of exchange transfusion with antimalarial drug therapy as an additional modality of treatment in severe Falciparum malaria is controversial and is unclear. We report a case of severe malaria complicated by multiorgan failure and ARDS. Patient responded well to manual exchange transfusion with standard artesunate-based chemotherapy. PMID:27042503

  4. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura treated with plasma exchange or exchange transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, K. V.; Fishleder, A.; Lucas, F. V.; Goormastic, M.; Bukowski, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Of 40 patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, 17 were treated with plasma exchange, 15 with exchange transfusions, and 6 with both types of therapy. One patient died before being treated and another patient was seen but not treated. Plasma exchange was performed daily for a mean of seven exchanges per patient. The replacement fluid during plasma exchange was fresh frozen plasma in all cases. The complete response rates for each type of treatment were as follows: 88% for plasma exchange (15 patients), 47% for exchange transfusions (7 patients), and 67% for exchange transfusions and plasma exchange (4 patients). Clinical and laboratory factors were examined for any statistically significant association with therapy response. Treatment with plasma exchange was statistically the initial factor most strongly associated with prognosis. Paresis, paresthesias, seizures, mental status change, and coma showed no association with response to treatment. Some of the laboratory factors that did not show significant association with treatment response were the initial creatinine, hemoglobin, platelet count, lactate dehydrogenase, and total bilirubin. This study supports the hypothesis that plasma exchange has significantly improved the prognosis of patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. These patients should be treated aggressively regardless of the severity of their symptoms. PMID:1877181

  5. Exchange transfusion in complicated pediatric malaria: A critical appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Barman, Himesh

    2015-01-01

    Complicated falciparum malaria is a killer disease resulting in high mortality in spite of appropriate treatment. Some workers have reported improved survival when adjunct exchange blood transfusion is included in the treatment modality while others opine against it. This review is an effort to address and critically appraise current evidence for the treatment mode for severe malaria. The literature was searched with a specified search strategy to identify reports of children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe malaria. Total 23 children who underwent exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria published by 9 authors were identified. Age ranged from 5 months to 16 years with a mean age of 6.4 years. The average preprocedure parasite index (PI) was 41.4% (95confidence interval [CI]; 31.2-51.4). The average blood volume exchanged was 118.6% (95% CI; 94.7-143) of the circulating blood volume. The average postexchange reduction in PI was 34.1% (95% CI; 25.4-42.8). Three out of 23 children encountered some complications. All the children survivedKeywords: Exchange blood transfusion, parasite index, pediatric Intensive Care Unit, red cell exchange, severe falciparum malaria. PMID:25878429

  6. Exchange transfusion of a patient with fulminant Lassa fever.

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, D.; Bennett, D.; Machin, S. J.

    1991-01-01

    We report a patient with fulminant Lassa fever who responded dramatically to a 2.5-litre exchange transfusion of whole blood. On admission he was semicomatose with facial oedema and oral haemorrhage; his platelets showed markedly depressed aggregation to ADP; and his plasma inhibited the aggregation responses of normal platelets in vitro. Exchange transfusion resulted in rapid clinical improvement, recovery of platelet function, and disappearance of platelet-inhibitory activity in plasma. The patient died 2 weeks later from an acute encephalopathy. His initial response was sufficiently impressive to suggest that further evaluation of this therapeutic approach is justified in selected patients with overwhelming Lassa virus infection. PMID:2041853

  7. Haemodynamic and oxygen transport response during exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria.

    PubMed

    Beards, S C; Joynt, G M; Lipman, J

    1994-11-01

    We describe the haemodynamic and oxygen transport response in a patient undergoing exchange transfusion for severe falciparum malaria. We found that exchange transfusion produced a significant increase in left ventricular stroke work index, systemic oxygen delivery and oxygen consumption. This potentially beneficial effect of exchange transfusion has not been reported previously. PMID:7824413

  8. Exchange Transfusion for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia in Johannesburg, South Africa, from 2006 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Rugamba, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Background. Severe hyperbilirubinaemia requiring exchange transfusion has become less common in recent years; however, kernicterus still occurs. The aim of this study was to review babies undergoing exchange transfusion for severe hyperbilirubinaemia in a Johannesburg hospital. Methodology. This was a retrospective review of babies who required exchange transfusion in both the neonatal and the paediatric wards from June 1, 2006, to December 31, 2011. Results. There were 64 patients who underwent 67 exchange transfusions. Isoimmune haemolysis (both Rh and ABO incompatibility) was the cause of jaundice in 9/64 (14%). Most babies who underwent exchange transfusion were sick or preterm and were admitted in hospital after birth (38/64; 59.5%); three of these babies died, but not during the exchange transfusion (3/38; 7.9%); all three had signs suggestive of neonatal sepsis. The remaining 26 babies (40.6%) were readmitted to the paediatric wards for exchange transfusion. Six of these babies (6/26; 23.0%) had signs of kernicterus. The most significant complication of exchange transfusion was apnoea requiring mechanical ventilation in three patients (3/64; 4.6%). Conclusion. Despite a relatively low number of babies undergoing exchange transfusion, kernicterus still occurs and must be prevented. Proper protocols for screening and management of severe hyperbilirubinaemia need to be enforced.

  9. Babesia in a Nonsplenectomized Patient Requiring Exchange Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Dikshya; Mudduluru, Bindu; Moussaly, Elias; Mobarakai, Neville; Hurford, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is a tick born zoonosis caused by red blood cell parasites of the genus Babesia. It is caused predominantly by B. microti and B. divergens, microti being more common in the US. The parasites are transmitted by Ixodes tick to their host but infection can also spread by blood transfusion and perinatally. Clinical manifestations vary from subclinical infection to fulminating disease depending upon the immune status of the patient. About half of patients, hospitalized with babesiosis, develop complication with fatality rates of 6 to 9% which increase up to 21% among those with immunosuppression. A case of 58-year-old previously healthy man, infected by B. microti, was reported on 2000 who presented with severe disease characterized by severe anemia, DIC, and renal and respiratory failure. First case of overwhelming septic shock without respiratory involvement due to babesiosis in a healthy patient with an intact spleen was published in a case report on 2011. Since our patient here is an immunocompetent healthy male with intact spleen presenting with severe babesiosis requiring exchange transfusion, this presentation of Babesia is rare and warrants further study. PMID:26693364

  10. A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction after partial exchange transfusion for sickle cell disease in pregnancy: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Brumfield, C G; Huddleston, J F; DuBois, L B; Harris, B A

    1984-03-01

    A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction that occurred after a prophylactic partial exchange transfusion for sickle-cell disease in pregnancy is described. The clinical presentation and laboratory findings of delayed transfusion reactions are discussed, with special emphasis on problems associated in the sickle-cell disease patient. Suggestions on how to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions in the pregnant sickle-cell disease patient are given. PMID:6700873

  11. Exchange transfusion in severe hyperbilirubinemia: an experience in northwest Iran.

    PubMed

    Hosseinpour Sakha, Seddigheh; Gharehbaghi, Manizheh Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the indications for exchange transfusion (ECT) and the rates of ECT-related adverse events in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. We reviewed retrospectively the medical charts of all newborns that had undergone ECT over three years from January 2006 to December 2008. Causes of jaundice, demographic data of the patients, and details of ECT and ECT-related adverse events were recorded. A total of 176 ECT procedures were performed in 150 neonates in the three-year study period. The mean total serum bilirubin before ECT was 29.59 +/- 6.88 mg/dl. Those infants requiring more than one ECT had higher total serum bilirubin than neonates with single ECT, but the difference was not significant (35.66 +/- 12.21 vs. 29.12 +/- 6.30 mg/dl, p = 0.09). The most common cause of ECT was ABO incompatibility (49.3%), Rh disease (7.3%) and idiopathic (28%). Among the adverse events related to ECT, thrombocytopenia (36.4%), hypocalcemia (25.5%), apnea (20%), and infection (10.9%) were noted commonly. No case of ECT-related mortality was observed. All of the adverse events resolved completely before discharge. ABO isoimmunization was the most common cause of ECT in this study. The majority of adverse events associated with ECT are asymptomatic and reversible. PMID:21043381

  12. Association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events: ASPEN syndrome.

    PubMed

    Siegel, J F; Rich, M A; Brock, W A

    1993-11-01

    Priapism and acute neurological events are believed to be unrelated complications of sickle cell hemoglobinopathy. We describe a syndrome based on our experience and a review of the literature of significant neurological events after partial exchange transfusion to treat priapism in sicklemic patients. Severe headache is often the initiating symptom of this complex. The ensuing neurological events range from seizure activity to obtundation requiring ventilatory support. The proposed pathophysiology of these neurological events is related to cerebral ischemia after an acute increase in per cent total hemoglobin, concomitant decrease in per cent hemoglobin S and subsequent release of vasoactive substances during penile detumescence. We have termed this constellation of events the ASPEN syndrome, an eponym for association of sickle cell disease, priapism, exchange transfusion and neurological events. Early recognition and aggressive medical management resulted in complete reversal of neurological sequela. PMID:8411432

  13. A pilot study of manual chronic partial exchange transfusion in children with sickle disease.

    PubMed

    Aloni, Michel Ntetani; Lê, Phu-Quoc; Heijmans, Catherine; Huybrechts, Sophie; Devalck, Christine; Azzi, Nadira; Ngalula-Mujinga, Malou; Ferster, Alina

    2015-06-01

    Objective Red cell exchange transfusion is frequently used in the management of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) either electively or chronically to maintain hemoglobin S (HbS) <30%. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the results of manual chronic partial exchange transfusion (MCPET) on level of Hb and HbS, on iron load and on the need for chelation, on risk of immunization, monitoring transfusion-transmitted viral infection, and clinical outcome. Methods We reviewed the long-term effect of MCPET in 10 children (six men and four women) with SCD and evaluated the iron balance during a median follow-up of 20 months (range: 6-36) in which 248 exchanges were performed. Results The pre-exchange median Hb value was 9.5 g/dl (range: 7.7-10.9 g/dl) and the median post-exchange value was 9.4 g/dl (range: 8.4-11.1 g/dl).The majority of patients reached an HbS of <50% with a median HbS value of 40.04% (range: 30-54). At start of the MCPET program, the median ferritin was 439 ng/ml (range: 80-1704 ng/ml). In the final evaluation, the median value of ferritin was 531 ng/ml (range: 84-3840 ng/ml). The annual calculated iron balance was 0. 28 ± 0.08 mg/kg/day. MCPET was well tolerated, and adverse effects were limited. Discussion MCPET in children with SCD is safe to prevent iron overload, and is effective and easy to use in our cohort. Conclusion Indication for chronic exchange blood transfusion is essential for patients with SCD with recurrent and frequent crises who do not respond to hydroxyurea. However, there is no consensual study for the period at which chronic transfusion can safely be stopped and further research in large population of patients with SCD will need to clarify this question. PMID:25133935

  14. Exchange transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease of the newborn Severe disturbances in body chemistry Severe newborn jaundice that does not respond to ... possible complications include: Blood clots Changes in blood chemistry (high or low potassium, low calcium, low glucose, ...

  15. Exchange transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... in the blood due to diseases such as sickle cell anemia. The procedure involves slowly removing the person's blood ... needs to be repeated. In diseases such as sickle cell anemia, blood is removed and replaced with donor blood. ...

  16. Exchange Transfusion for Severe Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia: 17 Years' Experience from Vojvodina, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Bujandric, Nevenka; Grujic, Jasmina

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the frequency of the main risk factors for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia, to determine the incidence of exchange transfusion (ET) in the Autonomous Province of Vojvodina (the northern part of Serbia) and to describe the experience with ET performed in premature and term infants during the past 17 years. We performed a retrospective data analysis of 398 newborn infants who underwent a double volume ET from 1997 to 2013. During the 17 year study period, a decreasing incidence of ET, expressed per thousand newborns, was observed. A total of 468 double volume ET were performed: 328 (82.4 %) infants had one treatment and 70 (17.6 %) had repeated treatments. A total of 262,830 mLs of blood were transfused, an average of 660 mLs per child. There were 221 male and 177 female infants, with a sex ratio 1.25:1. The frequencies of risk factors for developing hyperbilirubinemia were as follows: (1) 38 % RhD incompatibility; (2) 38 % ABO incompatibility (26 % group A infant of group O mother, 12 % group B infant of group O mother); (3) 7 % low birth weight/preterm birth; (4) 17 % other factors. Risk factors for neurotoxicity were identified in 56.3 % of infants. No deaths or complications were reported arising from the treatment. ABO and Rh incompatibilities were found to be the main risk factors for severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in Vojvodina. Exchange transfusion, used as therapy for severe hyperbilirubinemia, trended downwards over the period of this study. PMID:27065585

  17. Acute liver function decompensation in a patient with sickle cell disease managed with exchange transfusion and endoscopic retrograde cholangiography

    PubMed Central

    Ona, Mel A.; Changela, Kinesh; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Jelin, Abraham; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Sickle cell intrahepatic cholestasis is a relatively uncommon complication of homozygous sickle cell anemia, which may lead to acute hepatic failure and death. Treatment is mainly supportive, but exchange transfusion is used as salvage therapy in life threatening situations. We describe a case of a 16-year-old female with homozygous sickle cell anemia who presented to the emergency room with fatigue, malaise, dark urine, lower back pain, scleral icterus and jaundice. She was found to have marked hyperbilirubinemia, which persisted after exchange transfusion. Because of the concomitant presence of gallstones and choledocholithiasis, the patient underwent endoscopic ultrasound and laparoscopic cholecystectomy followed by endoscopic retrograde cholangiography and sphincterotomy. PMID:25177368

  18. Exchange transfusion with fluorocarbon for studying synaptically evoked optical signal in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Y; Fujii, F; Sato, C; Nemoto, M; Tamura, M

    2000-02-01

    . Zieglgansberger, The intrinsic optical signal evoked by chiasm stimulation in the rat suprachiasmatic nuclei exhibits GABAergic day-night variation, Eur. J. Neurosci. 8 (1996) 319-328] [3] [9] [13] [24]. A spectral fitting method with three components is used for the analysis of intrinsic optical signal [M. Nemoto, Y. Nomura, C. Sato, M. Tamura, K. Houkin, I. Koyanagi, H. Abe, Analysis of optical signals evoked by peripheral nerve stimulation in rat somatosensory cortex: dynamic changes in hemoglobin concentration and oxygenation, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 19 (1999) 246-259] [17]. In order to validate the analysis, we need the knowledge on contribution of signal resulted from hemoglobin to total intrinsic optical signal. The exchange transfusion with fluorocarbon has the advantage that can change the spectral contribution of hemoglobin [M. Ferrari, M.A. Williams, D.A. Wilson, N.V. Thakor, R.J. Traystman, D.F. Hanley, Cat brain cytochrome-c oxidase redox changes induced by hypoxia after blood-fluorocarbon exchange transfusion, Am. J. Physiol. 269 (1995) H417-H424; A.L. Sylvia, C.A. Piantadosi, O(2) dependence of in vivo brain cytochrome redox responses and energy metabolism in bloodless rats, J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab. 8 (1988) 163-172] [6] [23]. Here we describe a new method of the reduction of hemoglobin signal from somatosensory evoked optical intrinsic signal in rat cortex by the combination of exchange transfusion with fluorocarbon and imaging system of thinned skull cranial window. The method allows for the study of the synaptically evoked changes in light scattering as well as fluorescence of calcium indicator or voltage-sensitive dye without absorption of hemoglobin. PMID:10719260

  19. Origin of the impedance cardiogram investigated in the dog by exchange transfusion with a stroma-free haemoglobin solution.

    PubMed

    Visser, K R; Lamberts, R; Poelmann, A M; Zijlstra, W G

    1977-03-11

    In an anaesthetized dog an exchange transfusion was carried out with stroma-free haemoglobin solution. The total circulating blood volume was kept constant. The heart-syncronous changes in the thoracic electrical impedance (Zo) were measured before and after the exchange transfusion. Zo consists of a parallel connection of a tissue impedance (Zt) and a blood impedance (Zb). With the aid of this model for Zo the relative variations in Zb (delta Zb/Zb) were calculated from the relative variations in Zo (delta Zo/Zo). The marked decrease of delta Zb/Zb during the experiment can only be explained by the fact that apart from the heart-synchronous changes in vascular volume the impedance changes are also caused by flow dependent changes in the electrical conductivity of blood caused by variations in orientation of the erythrocytes. PMID:558590

  20. [Combined exchange transfusion and peritoneal dialysis treatment in a neonatal case of methylmalonic acidemia with severe hyperammonemia].

    PubMed

    Sanjurjo, P; Jaquotot, C; Vallo, A; Uriarte, R; Prats, J M; Ugarte, M; Rodríguez Soriano, J

    1982-10-01

    A case of methyl-malonic acidemia with severe neonatal hyperammoniemia is presented. Treatment during the first days of live with exchange-transfusion, with protein-free blood and peritoneal dialysis induced a decrease of blood ammonia values from 1360 to 270 micrograms/dl and the correction of systemic metabolic acidosis. Continuation of treatment by dietary means was followed by normalization of clinical status and almost total correction of the urinary excretion of methyl-malonic and propionic acids, but the patient died at 33 days of life due to an intercurrent infection. This case, together with a case previously reported of propionic acidemia with neonatal hyperammoniemia and prolonged survival, demonstrates that complementary treatment by means of exchange transfusion and peritoneal dialysis is mandatory in all cases of neonatal hyperammoniemia of metabolic origin, since survival without irreversible neurological damage is possible. PMID:6818879

  1. Outcome of Exchange Blood Transfusions Done for Neonatal Jaundice in Abakaliki, South Eastern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ibekwe, Roland C.; Ibekwe, MaryAnn U.; Muoneke, Vivian U.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Neonatal jaundice (NNJ) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among neonates in Nigeria and exchange blood transfusion (EBT) is a common modality of its treatment in Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital (EBSUTH), Abakaliki. This communication aims to audit this service. Materials and Methods: A 3-year retrospective review of the case files of all neonates that had EBT for NNJ at the new born special care unit of EBSUTH. Result: Two hundred and thirty seven (17.25%) out of 1374 neonatal admissions had NNJ. EBT was performed for 40 (16.9%) of them. The commonest indications for EBT were low birth weight/prematurity, ABO blood group incompatibility, sepsis and glucose 6 phosphate deficiencies. The mean serum bilirubin at which EBT was done was 28.3 mg/dl. The EBT was uneventful in 36 cases while in four (10%) cases there were reported adverse events. Seven neonates (17.5%) died after the procedure and documented causes of death include bilirubin encephalopathy, respiratory failure, and septic shock and disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. Conclusion: There is high rate of EBT use in the management of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia with significant morbidity and mortality in this study site. There is need to review the contribution of factors such as late presentation in the hospital to this and proffer solutions to it. PMID:24027683

  2. Facility-based constraints to exchange transfusions for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings

    PubMed Central

    Mabogunje, Cecilia A; Olaifa, Sarah M; Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2016-01-01

    Several clinical guidelines for the management of infants with severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia recommend immediate exchange transfusion (ET) when the risk or presence of acute bilirubin encephalopathy is established in order to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus. However, the literature is sparse concerning the interval between the time the decision for ET is made and the actual initiation of ET, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with significant resource constraints but high rates of ET. This paper explores the various stages and potential delays during this interval in complying with the requirement for immediate ET for the affected infants, based on the available evidence from LMICs. The vital role of intensive phototherapy, efficient laboratory and logistical support, and clinical expertise for ET are highlighted. The challenges in securing informed parental consent, especially on religious grounds, and meeting the financial burden of this emergency procedure to facilitate timely ET are examined. Secondary delays arising from post-treatment bilirubin rebound with intensive phototherapy or ET are also discussed. These potential delays can compromise the effectiveness of ET and should provide additional impetus to curtail avoidable ET in LMICs. PMID:27170928

  3. Hearing and Neurological Impairment in Children with History of Exchange Transfusion for Neonatal Hyperbilirubinemia

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Cruz, Carlos F.; García Alonso-Themann, Patricia; Cedillo-Rodríguez, Ileana A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective was to determine frequency of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), identified by abnormal threshold in evoked potentials, absence of otoacoustic emissions and behavioral responses, auditory neuropathy (AN) (absence of evoked potentials, with preservation of otoacoustic emissions), and neurological comorbidity in infants with hyperbilirubinemia (HB) treated with exchange-transfusion (ET). From a total of 7,219 infants, ET was performed on 336 (4.6%). Inclusion criteria were fulfilled in 102; 234 children did not meet criteria (182 outside of the study period, 34 did not have complete audiological evaluation, and 18 rejected the followup). Thirty-five children (34%) were born at-term and 67 (66%) were preterm. Children had a mean age of 5.5 ± 3.9 years. Main causes of ET were Rh isoimmunization in 48 (47%), ABO incompatibility in 28 (27.5%), and multifactorial causes in 26 (25.5%). Fifteen (15%) children presented with SNHL. Preterm newborns presented more often with SNHL. Indirect bilirubin level was higher in children with SNHL (22.2 versus 18.7 mg/dL, P = 0.02). No cases of AN were documented. An increased risk of neurologic sequelae was observed in children with SNHL. In conclusion, we disclosed a high frequency of SNHL in children with neonatal HB and ET and neurological alterations. No cases of AN were observed. PMID:24678325

  4. Facility-based constraints to exchange transfusions for neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Mabogunje, Cecilia A; Olaifa, Sarah M; Olusanya, Bolajoko O

    2016-05-01

    Several clinical guidelines for the management of infants with severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia recommend immediate exchange transfusion (ET) when the risk or presence of acute bilirubin encephalopathy is established in order to prevent chronic bilirubin encephalopathy or kernicterus. However, the literature is sparse concerning the interval between the time the decision for ET is made and the actual initiation of ET, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with significant resource constraints but high rates of ET. This paper explores the various stages and potential delays during this interval in complying with the requirement for immediate ET for the affected infants, based on the available evidence from LMICs. The vital role of intensive phototherapy, efficient laboratory and logistical support, and clinical expertise for ET are highlighted. The challenges in securing informed parental consent, especially on religious grounds, and meeting the financial burden of this emergency procedure to facilitate timely ET are examined. Secondary delays arising from post-treatment bilirubin rebound with intensive phototherapy or ET are also discussed. These potential delays can compromise the effectiveness of ET and should provide additional impetus to curtail avoidable ET in LMICs. PMID:27170928

  5. A decision-making tool for exchange transfusions in infants with severe hyperbilirubinemia in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Olusanya, B O; Iskander, I F; Slusher, T M; Wennberg, R P

    2016-05-01

    Late presentation and ineffective phototherapy account for excessive rates of avoidable exchange transfusions (ETs) in many low- and middle-income countries. Several system-based constraints sometimes limit the ability to provide timely ETs for all infants at risk of kernicterus, thus necessitating a treatment triage to optimize available resources. This article proposes a practical priority-setting model for term and near-term infants requiring ET after the first 48 h of life. The proposed model combines plasma/serum bilirubin estimation, clinical signs of acute bilirubin encephalopathy and neurotoxicity risk factors for predicting the risk of kernicterus based on available evidence in the literature. PMID:26938921

  6. Exchange Transfusion in the Treatment of Neonatal Septic Shock: A Ten-Year Experience in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Pugni, Lorenza; Ronchi, Andrea; Bizzarri, Bianca; Consonni, Dario; Pietrasanta, Carlo; Ghirardi, Beatrice; Fumagalli, Monica; Ghirardello, Stefano; Mosca, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Septic shock, occurring in about 1% of neonates hospitalized in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), is a major cause of death in the neonatal period. In the 1980s and 90s, exchange transfusion (ET) was reported by some authors to be effective in the treatment of neonatal sepsis and septic shock. The main aim of this retrospective study was to compare the mortality rate of neonates with septic shock treated only with standard care therapy (ScT group) with the mortality rate of those treated with ScT and ET (ET group). All neonates with septic shock admitted to our NICU from 2005 to 2015 were included in the study. Overall, 101/9030 (1.1%) neonates had septic shock. Fifty neonates out of 101 (49.5%) received one or more ETs. The mortality rate was 36% in the ET group and 51% in the ScT group (p = 0.16). At multivariate logistic regression analysis, controlling for potentially confounding factors significantly associated with death (gestational age, serum lactate, inotropic drugs, oligoanuria), ET showed a marked protective effect (Odds Ratio 0.21, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.06–0.71; p = 0.01). The lack of observed adverse events should encourage the use of this procedure in the treatment of neonates with septic shock. PMID:27171076

  7. Blood transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: After knee or hip replacement surgery, or other ... your body cannot make enough blood A blood transfusion is a safe and common procedure during which ...

  8. Neonatal transfusion.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anne M; Williamson, Lorna M

    2013-11-01

    Neonates and particularly preterm neonates are frequent recipients of large volumes of blood products relative to their size. Good quality evidence for transfusion practice in this patient group has been lacking but is now increasing. Triggers for red cell transfusion are now better defined, with on-going trials of platelet transfusions likely to yield similar evidence. Transfusion is now extremely safe, but complications such as transfusion associated acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) are likely to be under recognised, particularly in the sick extremely preterm neonate with respiratory symptoms. This review summarises the rationale and current practice with regard to blood component therapy. Background data on component specifications and hazards of transfusion are provided. Indications for transfusion of specific products including red cells, platelets, and plasma are discussed, and their use is illustrated by case examples. PMID:24095206

  9. Exchange transfusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... mild disorder. The most commonly used treatment is fluorescent light exposure, in which the infant is placed ... frequently, when neonatal jaundice is more severe, and fluorescent light therapy is unable to break down all ...

  10. Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... might be the red blood cells, platelets or plasma . Rarely is whole blood (red cells, plasma, platelets, and white cells) used for a transfusion. ... of other blood components, such as platelets and plasma , may take less time. After the transfusion, you ...

  11. Manual blood exchange transfusion does not significantly contribute to parasite clearance in artesunate-treated individuals with imported severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exchange transfusion (ET) has remained a controversial adjunct therapy for the treatment of severe malaria. In order to assess the relative contribution of ET to parasite clearance in severe malaria, all patients receiving ET as an adjunct treatment to parenteral quinine or to artesunate were compared with patients treated with parenteral treatment with quinine or artesunate but who did not receive ET. ET was executed using a standardized manual isovolumetric exchange protocol. Methods All patients in the Rotterdam Malaria Cohort treated for severe P. falciparum malaria at the Institute for Tropical Diseases of the Harbour Hospital between 1999 and 2011 were included in this retrospective follow-up study. Both a two-stage approach and a log-linear mixed model approach were used to estimate parasite clearance times (PCTs) in patients with imported malaria. Severe malaria was defined according to WHO criteria. Results A total of 87 patients with severe malaria was included; 61 received intravenous quinine, whereas 26 patients received intravenous artesunate. Thirty-nine patients received ET as an adjunct treatment to either quinine (n = 23) or artesunate (n = 16). Data from 84 of 87 patients were suitable for estimation of parasite clearance rates. PCTs were significantly shorter after administration of artesunate as compared with quinine. In both models, ET did not contribute significantly to overall parasite clearance. Conclusion Manual exchange transfusion does not significantly contribute to parasite clearance in artesunate-treated individuals. There may be a small effect of ET on parasite clearance under quinine treatment. Institution of ET to promote parasite clearance in settings where artesunate is available is not recommended, at least not with manually executed exchange procedures. PMID:23537187

  12. Possible Risks of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... transfusions are done Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To ... Topic How blood transfusions are done Next Topic Alternatives to blood transfusions Possible risks of blood transfusions Although blood transfusions ...

  13. Transfusion medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Murawski, K.; Peetoom, F.

    1986-01-01

    These proceedings contain 24 selections, including papers presented at the conference of American Red Cross held in May 1985, on the Subject of transfusion medicine. Some of the titles are: Fluosol/sup R/-DA in Radiation Therapy; Expression of Cloned Human Factor VIII and the Molecular Basis of Gene Defects that Cause Hemophilia; DNA-Probing Assay in the Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Genome in Human Peripheral Blood Cells; and Monoclonal Antibodies: Convergence of Technology and Application.

  14. Massive transfusion and massive transfusion protocol

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijaya; Shetmahajan, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Haemorrhage remains a major cause of potentially preventable deaths. Rapid transfusion of large volumes of blood products is required in patients with haemorrhagic shock which may lead to a unique set of complications. Recently, protocol based management of these patients using massive transfusion protocol have shown improved outcomes. This section discusses in detail both management and complications of massive blood transfusion. PMID:25535421

  15. Blood transfusion: friend or foe.

    PubMed

    Katz, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of transfusions is often compromised by adverse reactions. Common transfusion reactions (hemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immunomodulation) are reviewed, including pathogenesis, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and treatment. In addition, artificial blood substitutes are discussed as a way to mitigate the risk of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality. PMID:19411873

  16. Types of Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... especially in the joints (knees, ankles, and elbows). Plasma Transfusions Plasma is the liquid part of your blood. It's ... or a severe infection, you may need a plasma transfusion. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: January 30, ...

  17. Transfusion reaction - hemolytic

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood you receive. Most of the time, a blood transfusion between compatible groups (such as O+ to O+) does not cause a problem. Blood transfusions between incompatible groups (such as A+ to O-) cause an immune ...

  18. Blood transfusion in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Nigam, A; Prakash, A; Saxena, P

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion of blood and blood components is a common practice in obstetric wards but it is not without risk. The incidence of transfusion reactions varies from 4 in every hundred transfusions for non-haemolytic reactions to one in every 40,000 for haemolytic transfusion reactions. The physiological basis of blood transfusion is outlined in this article. Most of the donated blood is processed into components: packed red cells (PRBCs), platelets, and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) or cryoprecipitate. Various alternatives to blood transfusion exist and include autotransfusion, pre-autologous blood storage, use of oxygen carrying blood substitutes and intraoperative cell salvage. Despite the risks associated with transfusions, obstetricians are frequently too aggressive in transfusing blood and blood products to their patients. Acute blood loss in obstetrics is usually due to placenta praevia, postpartum blood loss and surgery related. An early involvement of a consultant obstetrician, anaesthetist, haematologist and the blood bank is essential. There are no established criteria for initiating red cell transfusions and the decision is purely based on clinical and haematological parameters, which have been discussed along with the general principles of blood transfusion in obstetrics and some practical guidelines. PMID:24899337

  19. The Mechanism of Toxicity in HET-S/HET-s Prion Incompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Seuring, Carolin; Greenwald, Jason; Wasmer, Christian; Wepf, Roger; Saupe, Sven J.; Meier, Beat H.; Riek, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The HET-s protein from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina is a prion involved in a cell death reaction termed heterokaryon incompatibility. This reaction is observed at the point of contact between two genetically distinct strains when one harbors a HET-s prion (in the form of amyloid aggregates) and the other expresses a soluble HET-S protein (96% identical to HET-s). How the HET-s prion interaction with HET-S brings about cell death remains unknown; however, it was recently shown that this interaction leads to a relocalization of HET-S from the cytoplasm to the cell periphery and that this change is associated with cell death. Here, we present detailed insights into this mechanism in which a non-toxic HET-s prion converts a soluble HET-S protein into an integral membrane protein that destabilizes membranes. We observed liposomal membrane defects of approximately 10 up to 60 nm in size in transmission electron microscopy images of freeze-fractured proteoliposomes that were formed in mixtures of HET-S and HET-s amyloids. In liposome leakage assays, HET-S has an innate ability to associate with and disrupt lipid membranes and that this activity is greatly enhanced when HET-S is exposed to HET-s amyloids. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses revealed that HET-s induces the prion-forming domain of HET-S to adopt the β-solenoid fold (previously observed in HET-s) and this change disrupts the globular HeLo domain. These data indicate that upon interaction with a HET-s prion, the HET-S HeLo domain partially unfolds, thereby exposing a previously buried ∼34-residue N-terminal transmembrane segment. The liberation of this segment targets HET-S to the membrane where it further oligomerizes, leading to a loss of membrane integrity. HET-S thus appears to display features that are reminiscent of pore-forming toxins. PMID:23300377

  20. [Transfusions in geriatrics].

    PubMed

    Moulias, Sophie; Lesure, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Elderly people are Darticularlv Drone to anaemia and the need for transfusions. However, in response to the known adverse effects of red blood cell transfusions, particularly in the context of chronic anaemia, new recommendations have been issued. it is always necessary to consider this procedure on a case-by-case basis, analysing the risk-benefit ratio. PMID:25966521

  1. Alternatives to Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... in cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic colorectal resection: risk factors and impact on survival. Tech Coloproctol. 2013 Oct;17(5):549-554. Hay SN, Scanga L, Brecher ME. Life, death, and the risk of transfusion: a university hospital experience. Transfusion . 2006;46(9):1491-1493. ...

  2. [Respiratory complications after transfusion].

    PubMed

    Bernasinski, M; Mertes, P-M; Carlier, M; Dupont, H; Girard, M; Gette, S; Just, B; Malinovsky, J-M

    2014-05-01

    Respiratory complications of blood transfusion have several possible causes. Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) is often the first mentioned. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI), better defined since the consensus conference of Toronto in 2004, is rarely mentioned. French incidence is low. Non-hemolytic febrile reactions, allergies, infections and pulmonary embolism are also reported. The objective of this work was to determine the statistical importance of the different respiratory complications of blood transfusion. This work was conducted retrospectively on transfusion accidents in six health centers in Champagne-Ardenne, reported to Hemovigilance between 2000 and 2009 and having respiratory symptoms. The analysis of data was conducted by an expert committee. Eighty-three cases of respiratory complications are found (316,864 blood products). We have counted 26 TACO, 12 TRALI (only 6 cases were identified in the original investigation of Hemovigilance), 18 non-hemolytic febrile reactions, 16 cases of allergies, 5 transfusions transmitted bacterial infections and 2 pulmonary embolisms. Six new TRALI were diagnosed previously labeled TACO for 2 of them, allergy and infection in 2 other cases and diagnosis considered unknown for the last 2. Our study found an incidence of TRALI 2 times higher than that reported previously. Interpretation of the data by a multidisciplinary committee amended 20% of diagnoses. This study shows the imperfections of our system for reporting accidents of blood transfusion when a single observer analyses the medical records. PMID:24814817

  3. Intraoperative transfusion practices in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Meier, J.; Filipescu, D.; Kozek-Langenecker, S.; Llau Pitarch, J.; Mallett, S.; Martus, P.; Matot, I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Transfusion of allogeneic blood influences outcome after surgery. Despite widespread availability of transfusion guidelines, transfusion practices might vary among physicians, departments, hospitals and countries. Our aim was to determine the amount of packed red blood cells (pRBC) and blood products transfused intraoperatively, and to describe factors determining transfusion throughout Europe. Methods. We did a prospective observational cohort study enrolling 5803 patients in 126 European centres that received at least one pRBC unit intraoperatively, during a continuous three month period in 2013. Results. The overall intraoperative transfusion rate was 1.8%; 59% of transfusions were at least partially initiated as a result of a physiological transfusion trigger- mostly because of hypotension (55.4%) and/or tachycardia (30.7%). Haemoglobin (Hb)- based transfusion trigger alone initiated only 8.5% of transfusions. The Hb concentration [mean (sd)] just before transfusion was 8.1 (1.7) g dl−1 and increased to 9.8 (1.8) g dl−1 after transfusion. The mean number of intraoperatively transfused pRBC units was 2.5 (2.7) units (median 2). Conclusion. Although European Society of Anaesthesiology transfusion guidelines are moderately implemented in Europe with respect to Hb threshold for transfusion (7–9 g dl−1), there is still an urgent need for further educational efforts that focus on the number of pRBC units to be transfused at this threshold. Clinical trial registration. NCT 01604083. PMID:26787795

  4. Blood Transfusion (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help to clot the blood and control bleeding. Plasma , the pale yellow liquid part of whole blood. ... patients with bleeding problems, transfusions with platelets or plasma can help to control or prevent bleeding complications. ...

  5. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood banks carefully screen donated blood. The risk of catching ... or more times before the surgery. A blood bank will store your blood for your use. NIH: ...

  6. Nonhemolytic, noninfectious transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Barton, J C

    1981-04-01

    The delivery of optimal transfusion therapy requires that the physician first have a thorough understanding of his patient's disease and prior transfusion history. Sometimes the need for blood product administration is more apparent than real. In the selection of necessary therapy, particular blood components, their volumes, and the timing of their administration should be carefully planned. The transfusion of whole blood, particularly as single-unit transfusions, is rarely indicated. Often forgotten, autotransfusion represents a means whereby many subjects who have repeated, unusual, or severe reactions may receive safe treatment. An appreciation of the frequency and manifestations of transfusion-related problems permits effective treatment of ongoing reactions. The prophylactic measures which should be taken against future reactions in most patients are specific, and are the responsibility of the clinician, based upon his bedside observations and laboratory studies. Problems should be discussed with either a hematologist, pathologist, or blood banking expert without hesitation. These guidelines help conserve a precious resource and assure that safe, effective, and economical transfusion therapy is available for all patients in need. PMID:6164098

  7. Interacting with the HET Queue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, N. I.; Cornell, M. E.

    1998-12-01

    The Hobby*Eberly telescope (HET) is a 9.2m effective aperture telescope located at McDonald Observatory in West Texas. The HET is operated by McDonald Observatory on behalf of the University of Texas, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University, Ludsiwg--Maximilians--Universitat Muchen, and Georg-August-Universitat Gotingen. The fixed elevation of the HET restricts its sky coverage. Because the HET cannot point to all objects above the horizon at a given time, it is usually inefficient to schedule observations by awarding entire nights to a single PI. To maximize scientific output, we have developed a queued observing system to allow PIs to instruct resident astronomers at the HET how, when, and what to observe. Our system uses the now familiar Phase I/II architecture for requesting and submitting remote observations with a real time scheduling system for scheduling and executing observations. During Phase I, the PI uses simple planning tools to determine if and how a project may be done. Once projects are approved by a TAC at a partner institution, the PI creates a detailed plan for their observations. Plans are submitted electronically to the HET operations staff. Upon receipt, the plans are integrated into the HET's observing database. Resident astronomers use this database and the current and forecasted conditions to schedule observations. PIs are informed of new data by e-mail and may retrieve data to verify its quality in semi-realtime. PIs may make changes to their plans based on this data. In this poster we will discuss the flow of information from the initial proposal phase through the delivery of data and plan revision. We will talk about some of the details of the planning and scheduling software developed for this project. We will also discuss the results of our initial experience with our system in the Fall and Winter of 1998.

  8. Chimerism in transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Patricia AR

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion therapy is complicated by the production of alloantibodies to antigens present in the donor and lacking in the recipient through the poorly-understood but likely multi-factorial process of alloimmunization. The low prevalence of alloimmunization in transfused patients (6.1%)1 suggests that processes central to immunologic tolerance may be operating in the vast majority of transfused patients who do not produce alloantibodies. Using RhD as a prototype, evidence is reviewed that the ability to make antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens may result in part from immunologic tolerance acquired in utero. These ideas are extended to other examples of maternal microchimerism (MMc) of other non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA). An evolutionary argument is offered that multi-generational immunity supports the hypothesis that MMc may partly explain the “non-responder” phenotype in RBC alloimmunization. PMID:24196285

  9. Alternatives to blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Donat R; Goodnough, Lawrence T

    2013-05-25

    The use of alternatives to allogeneic blood continues to rest on the principles that blood transfusions have inherent risks, associated costs, and affect the blood inventory available for health-care delivery. Increasing evidence exists of a fall in the use of blood because of associated costs and adverse outcomes, and suggests that the challenge for the use of alternatives to blood components will similarly be driven by costs and patient outcomes. Additionally, the risk-benefit profiles of alternatives to blood transfusion such as autologous blood procurement, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and haemostatic agents are under investigation. Nevertheless, the inherent risks of blood, along with the continued rise in blood costs are likely to favour the continued development and use of alternatives to blood transfusion. We summarise the current roles of alternatives to blood in the management of medical and surgical anaemias. PMID:23706802

  10. Metabolomics in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Nemkov, Travis; Hansen, Kirk C; Dumont, Larry J; D'Alessandro, Angelo

    2016-04-01

    Biochemical investigations on the regulatory mechanisms of red blood cell (RBC) and platelet (PLT) metabolism have fostered a century of advances in the field of transfusion medicine. Owing to these advances, storage of RBCs and PLT concentrates has become a lifesaving practice in clinical and military settings. There, however, remains room for improvement, especially with regard to the introduction of novel storage and/or rejuvenation solutions, alternative cell processing strategies (e.g., pathogen inactivation technologies), and quality testing (e.g., evaluation of novel containers with alternative plasticizers). Recent advancements in mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and systems biology, the bioinformatics integration of omics data, promise to speed up the design and testing of innovative storage strategies developed to improve the quality, safety, and effectiveness of blood products. Here we review the currently available metabolomics technologies and briefly describe the routine workflow for transfusion medicine-relevant studies. The goal is to provide transfusion medicine experts with adequate tools to navigate through the otherwise overwhelming amount of metabolomics data burgeoning in the field during the past few years. Descriptive metabolomics data have represented the first step omics researchers have taken into the field of transfusion medicine. However, to up the ante, clinical and omics experts will need to merge their expertise to investigate correlative and mechanistic relationships among metabolic variables and transfusion-relevant variables, such as 24-hour in vivo recovery for transfused RBCs. Integration with systems biology models will potentially allow for in silico prediction of metabolic phenotypes, thus streamlining the design and testing of alternative storage strategies and/or solutions. PMID:26662506

  11. Problems of multiple transfusions.

    PubMed

    GARDNER, F H

    1958-02-01

    The use of blood infusion in large amounts is increasing sharply. Increased knowledge of blood group antigens has alerted physicians to the possible hazards of hemolytic reactions to subgroups that must be eliminated by proper cross-matching techniques. Multiple transfusions of preserved blood often defeat their purpose in control of bleeding, for thrombocytopenia is enhanced. Careful selection of blood or preparations of plasma concentrates offer increased protection to the recipient.Plastic bag equipment increases the yield of viable platelets and keeps blood in usable condition for longer periods of storage. The use of multiple transfusions has complicated the selection of preserved blood to control pigment metabolism. PMID:13500210

  12. Noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion.

    PubMed

    Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-03-01

    As infectious complications from blood transfusion have decreased because of improved donor questionnaires and sophisticated infectious disease blood screening, noninfectious serious hazards of transfusion (NISHOTs) have emerged as the most common complications of transfusion. The category of NISHOTs is very broad, including everything from well-described and categorized transfusion reactions (hemolytic, febrile, septic, and allergic/urticarial/anaphylactic) to lesser known complications. These include mistransfusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, posttransfusion purpura, transfusion-associated graft versus host disease, microchimerism, transfusion-related immunomodulation, alloimmunization, metabolic derangements, coagulopathic complications of massive transfusion, complications from red cell storage lesions, complications from over or undertransfusion, and iron overload. In recent years, NISHOTs have attracted more attention than ever before, both in the lay press and in the scientific community. As the list of potential complications from blood transfusion grows, investigators have focused on the morbidity and mortality of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion, as well as the potential dangers of transfusing "older" versus "younger" blood. In this article, we review NISHOTs, focusing on the most recent concerns and literature. PMID:19224780

  13. Blood Transfusion and Donation

    MedlinePlus

    ... that form clots to control bleeding Plasma - the liquid part of the blood that helps clotting. You may need it if you have been badly burned, have liver failure or a severe infection. Most blood transfusions go very smoothly. Some infectious agents, such as ...

  14. Fetofetal transfusion in triplets.

    PubMed Central

    Rehan, V. K.; Menticoglou, S. M.; Seshia, M. M.; Bowman, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    A case of fetofetal transfusion syndrome (FFTS) in a monochorionic triplet pregnancy, in which all three fetuses shared a common circulation, is reported. All babies were born alive, although two died within two days of delivery. This case highlights the problem of FFTS with accompanying high perinatal morbidity and mortality in naturally occurring monochorionic triplet gestations. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7552596

  15. [Syphilis and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Serrano, J

    1991-06-01

    Along 17 years (1973-1989), syphilis screening has been performed on 146,355 blood units in the author's blood bank. A total number of 143 positive results (confirmed by MHA-TP) was registered, which means an incidence of 0.097%. Of the total number of blood units, 31,529 came from professional donors, 51 of them (0.16%) being positive, while of the 114,826 blood units from voluntary donors 92 were positive (0.08%). With respect to voluntary donations, the highest incidence of positive reactions was found between 1980 and 1982, but this period registered also the highest number of blood units studied. Along this 17 year period 8 patients have received blood products with positive syphilis test. They were transfused on urgent request with fresh blood or platelet concentrates, the transfusion being performed before knowing the results of the screening for syphilis. No special measures were taken in 2 such cases, who died shortly after the transfusion on account of their disease. Two other were treated with penicillin at the time of transfusion. The remaining four patients received preventive penicillin. Even taking into account that positive screening tests are uncommon amongst blood donors, and that only under special circumstances the patients receiving contaminated blood may develop the illness, it seems advisable for every blood bank to perform the screening for syphilis on every blood donation. PMID:1948541

  16. Ethical issues in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Elhence, Priti

    2006-01-01

    The practice of transfusion medicine involves a number of ethical issues because blood comes from human beings and is a precious resource with a limited shelf life. In 1980 the International Society of Blood Transfusion endorsed its first formal code of ethics, which was adopted by the World Health Organisation and the League of Red Crescent Societies. A revised code of ethics for donation and transfusion was endorsed in 2000. Blood donation as a gift, donor confidentiality, donor notification and donor consent, consent for transfusion, the right to refuse blood transfusion, the right to be informed if harmed, and ethical principles for establishments, are discussed in the international and Indian contexts. PMID:17223681

  17. Transfusion problems associated with transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Storb, R.; Weiden, P.L.

    1981-04-01

    Researchers have reviewed the role of blood transfusions in renal and marrow graft recipients. Striking contrasts are evident: while transfusions may promote successful kidney grafting, any transfusions before initiation of the transplant conditioning regimen may jeopardize the treatment of severe aplastic anemia by marrow transplantation. Researchers have suggested guidelines for the transfusion support of transplant candidates before transplantation and for marrow graft recipients after transplantation. It is important to recognize that after conditioning for marrow transplantation, all patients will be profoundly pancytopenic for a limited period of time, and intensive transfusion support is vital to patient survival.

  18. Iron and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel-Abramovski, Sophie; Waeber, Gérard; Gassner, Christoph; Buser, Andreas; Frey, Beat M; Favrat, Bernard; Tissot, Jean-Daniel

    2013-11-01

    Blood bankers have focused their energy to secure blood transfusion, and only recently have studies been published on the effect of blood donation on iron metabolism. In many facilities, hemoglobin measurement is only performed just before or even during blood donation, but the determination of iron stores is largely ignored. The 2013 paradox of transfusion medicine is due to the fact that blood donation may be harmful and leads to iron deficiency with or without anemia, but for other individuals, it may be a healthy measure preventing type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this review is to discuss iron metabolism in the perspective of blood donation, notably regarding their possible genetic profiles that eventually will discriminate "good" iron absorbers from "bad" iron responders. PMID:24148756

  19. Transfusion associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2014-06-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an established, but grossly under diagnosed and underreported complication of blood transfusion. We present the case of a 46-year-old diabetic and hypertensive patient admitted to our hospital for recurrent episodes of urinary retention. Over initial 3 days of the admission, the patient received multiple units of packed red blood cells (RBC) and fresh frozen plasma, uneventfully. However, the patient developed signs and symptoms suggestive of TACO with only small amount of the 4(th) unit of RBC. The patient had to be shifted to the Intensive Care Unit for further management of this complication. Etiology of TACO is more complex than a mere circulatory overload and is still not completely understood. TACO leads to a prolonged hospital stay and morbidity in the patients developing this complication. TACO thus needs to be suspected in patients at risk for this complication. PMID:24987240

  20. Acute pain transfusion reaction.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Jody; Osswald, Michael; Walker, Daniel

    2013-11-01

    A 34-year-old woman with a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH) received a double umbilical cord blood transplantation following a myeloablative chemotherapy preparative regimen with busulfan and cyclophosphamide. HLH is a rare, potentially fatal hematologic disorder characterized by the overactivation of histocytes and T lymphocytes, leading to organ infiltration and acute illness. On day 25 post-transplantation, the patient required a platelet transfusion for a platelet count of 6,000 per ml (normal range = 150,000-450,000 per ml). The patient's blood type prior to the cord blood transplantation was B positive and, although both umbilical cord blood donors were O positive, the patient was still B positive per blood bank testing on that day. Although the recipient of an allogenic stem cell transplantation will eventually become the blood type of the donor, the time for this process to occur varies for each person. That process must be monitored by the blood bank for the purpose of cross-matching blood products to decrease hemolysis as much as possible. The patient was premedicated with the facility's standard for platelet transfusions: acetaminophen 650 mg and diphenhydramine 25 mg about 30 minutes prior to the platelet transfusion. PMID:24161631

  1. [Organ transplantation and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Matignon, M; Bonnefoy, F; Lang, P; Grimbert, P

    2011-04-01

    Pretransplant blood transfusion remains a controversial subject and its history can summarize the last 40 years of transplantation. Until 1971, transfusions were widely used in patients awaiting transplantation, especially due to the anemia induced by the chronic renal dysfunction. Then, a noxious effect of preformed anti-HLA antibodies on renal grafts survival was reported and pretransplant transfusions were stopped. Between 1972 and 1977, improvement of renal graft survival in patients who received pretransplant transfusions was noted. Therefore, from 1978 on, a systematic policy of pretransplant transfusions was adopted by almost all centres of transplantation. During the eighties, it was again abandoned for several reasons: absence of graft survival improvement in patients treated by cyclosporine, HLA immunization leading to an increased incidence of acute graft rejection, risk of viral diseases transmission and human recombinant erythropoietin development. The lack of improvement in graft survival for ten years has been leading the transplant community to look for antigen-specific immunosuppressive strategies to achieve transplantation tolerance. Donor-specific transfusion may have clinical benefits, as long-term grafts survival improvement, through modulation of the recipient's cellular immune system and has been recently reconsidered, especially before living donor transplantation. The immunological mechanisms inducing a tolerance-gaining effect of transfusions are still misunderstood, but the recent discovery of immunomodulatory effects of the apoptotic cells present in cellular products could enlighten our comprehension of pretransplant transfusions benefits and could help to develop specific tolerance induction strategies in solid organ transplantation. PMID:21398160

  2. Transfusion issues in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Federici, Augusto B; Vanelli, Chiara; Arrigoni, Luisa

    2012-04-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) therapy plays a major role in the case of patients with cancer. Packed red blood cells (PRBC) are given for increased oxygen-carrying capacity, platelets concentrates (PC) and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for the cessation and prevention of bleeding due to thrombocytopenia and other defects of hemostasis associated with neoplasia. All these blood components can induce complications and/or adverse reactions in cancer patients including transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (TA-GVHD), transfusion transmitted diseases, alloimmunization to blood cell antigens, pulmonary decompensation, immunomodulation. Therefore, specific modifications such as leukocyte-reduction and irradiation of the blood components to be transfused in cancer patients should be introduced to reduce the risk of these complications. Patients undergoing hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation are a unique group and present complex concerns related to transfusion, including major and minor ABO incompatibility and chimeric blood cells. Therefore, transfusion for patients undergoing treatment with cellular therapies requires careful blood component selection. The process of HPC infusion itself carries many risks including DMSO toxicity and hemolytic reactions. In all areas of transfusion therapy, new advances such as pathogen inactivation and synthetic alternatives to blood components should help to increase the safety and tolerance of transfusion in cancer patients. PMID:22682136

  3. Reducing noninfectious risks of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Gilliss, Brian M; Looney, Mark R; Gropper, Michael A

    2011-09-01

    As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, noninfectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion, respectively. These complications and others are reviewed, and several controversial methods for prevention of noninfectious complications of transfusion are discussed, including universal leukoreduction of erythrocyte units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of erythrocyte storage age. PMID:21792054

  4. EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Boltz, J.C.

    1992-09-01

    EXCHANGE is published monthly by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), a multidisciplinary facility operated for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of EXCHANGE is to inform computer users about about recent changes and innovations in both the mainframe and personal computer environments and how these changes can affect work being performed at DOE facilities.

  5. Transfusion-associated bacterial sepsis.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, S J; Friedman, L I; Dodd, R Y

    1994-01-01

    The incidence of sepsis caused by transfusion of bacterially contaminated blood components is similar to or less than that of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis C virus infection, yet significantly exceeds those currently estimated for transfusion-associated human immunodeficiency and hepatitis B viruses. Outcomes are serious and may be fatal. In addition, transfusion of sterile allogenic blood can have generalized immunosuppressive effects on recipients, resulting in increased susceptibility to postoperative infection. This review examines the frequency of occurrence of transfusion-associated sepsis, the organisms implicated, and potential sources of bacteria. Approaches to minimize the frequency of sepsis are discussed, including the benefits and disadvantages of altering the storage conditions for blood. In addition, the impact of high levels of bacteria on the gross characteristics of erythrocyte and platelet concentrates is described. The potentials and limitations of current tests for detecting bacteria in blood are also discussed. PMID:7923050

  6. [Ethics and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Tissot, J-D; Garraud, O; Danic, B; Cabaud, J-J; Lefrère, J-J

    2013-09-01

    Blood donation is an act of solidarity. Most often, this act is done on a volunteer basis and, depending on countries and circumstances, is not remunerated. The increase in need, the always-greater number of deferral criteria, the safety issues and the changes in the structures of our societies are among the many subjects for ethical debates. Taking these into account, the actors of the transfusion must analyze certain parameters: the value of a donation, the meaning of volunteering, the appropriateness of remunerating the act of giving a part of one's self, no longer as a donation or an expression of altruism and solidarity, but as a commercial act regimented by economic laws. PMID:23916572

  7. Adverse effects of plasma transfusion.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suchitra; Vyas, Girish N

    2012-05-01

    Plasma utilization has increased over the past two decades, and there is a growing concern that many plasma transfusions are inappropriate. Plasma transfusion is not without risk, and certain complications are more likely with plasma than other blood components. Clinical and laboratory investigations of the patients suffering reactions after infusion of fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) define the etiology and pathogenesis of the panoply of adverse effects. We review here the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of the risks associated with plasma transfusion. Risks commonly associated with FFP include: 1) transfusion-related acute lung injury, 2) transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and 3) allergic and/or anaphylactic reactions. Other less common risks include 1) transmission of infections, 2) febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, 3) red blood cell alloimmunization, and 4) hemolytic transfusion reactions. The effects of pathogen inactivation or reduction methods on these risks are also discussed. Fortunately, a majority of the adverse effects are not lethal and are adequately treated in clinical practice. PMID:22578374

  8. [Economic environment and blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Durand-Zaleski, I

    2015-08-01

    The increasing pressure on healthcare resources affects blood donation and transfusion. We attempted a survey of the efficiency of different strategies, actual or proposed to improve the management of blood products. We found an important disconnect between the cost effectiveness ratio of strategies and their uptake by policy makers. In other words, the least efficient strategies are those which increase transfusion safety by increasing the number of biological markers and are those preferred by health authorities in developed countries. Other more efficient strategies are more slowly implemented and included a systematic use of transfusion guidelines, reducing blood losses or increasing pre operative blood levels in elective surgeries. PMID:26096190

  9. Acute transfusion reactions: an update.

    PubMed

    Scorer, T; Doughty, H

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of blood products by the United Kingdom (UK) military has increased significantly; with the increase in transfusion comes an increased incidence of transfusion-related incidents. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are a common consequence of transfusion, which vary widely in their severity and are likely to be under-reported, although reporting is a regulatory requirement. This paper discusses the importance of identifying ATRs and managing them appropriately. It introduces a flowchart (due to be incorporated in the next version of Joint Service Publication (JSP) 999, Clinical Guidelines for Operations (CGOs)), which is designed to assist the military multi-disciplinary team caring for patients in the operational environment. PMID:25895413

  10. Transfusion practices and infectious risks.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Lobel, Gregg P; Javidroozi, Mazyar

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections remain among the most-feared complications of allogeneic blood transfusion. Thanks to several strategies including donor screening and deferral, blood testing and pathogen inactivation, their risks have reached all-time low levels, particularly in developed nations. Nonetheless, new and emerging infections remain a threat that is likely to exacerbate in the coming years with continued globalization and climate change. More effective strategies of pathogen inactivation and more vigilant horizon screening are hoped to abate the risk. Additionally, allogeneic transfusion has repeatedly been shown to be associated with worsening of outcomes in patients, including the documented increased risk of infections (often nosocomial) in recipients of transfusions. The underlying mechanism is likely to be related to immunosuppressive effects of allogeneic blood, iron content, and bacterial contamination. This issue is best addressed by more judicious and evidence-based use of allogeneic blood components to ensure the potential benefits outweigh the risks. PMID:26959944

  11. [Alternatives to allogenous blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Cernea, Daniela; Vlădoianu, Alice; Stoica, Maria; Novac, M; Berteanu, Cristina

    2009-01-01

    Blood transfusion is usually meant to lower morbidity and mortality rates. Allogenous blood transfusion implies certain risks that can be avoided by autologous blood transfusions techniques including: preoperatory autologous blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperatory and postoperatory blood salvage. Preoperatory blood donation and acute normovolemic hemodilution are used for planned interventions with an estimated blood loss higher than 20% of blood volume. These methods imply Erythropoietin and iron treatment. Intraoperatory and postoperatory blood salvage is performed by personnel trained in blood donation, handling and storage. Autologous blood transfusions are used for certain surgical procedures that commonly require transfusions: orthopedic surgery, radical prostatectomy, cardiovascular surgery, organ transplantation. An alternative to allogenous blood transfusion is the use of artificial oxygen transporters: human or animal hemoglobin solutions or pefluorocarbonate solutions. These solutions do not require cross reactions, do not carry diseases and are generally well tolerated and easily stored in the operating room, ambulance and other transport means. They have however a slight degree of toxicity. PMID:21495338

  12. Transfusion management of trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Shaz, Beth H; Dente, Christopher J; Harris, Robert S; MacLeod, Jana B; Hillyer, Christopher D

    2009-06-01

    The management of massively transfused trauma patients has improved with a better understanding of trauma-induced coagulopathy, the limitations of crystalloid infusion, and the implementation of massive transfusion protocols (MTPs), which encompass transfusion management and other patient care needs to mitigate the "lethal triad" of acidosis, hypothermia, and coagulopathy. MTPs are currently changing in the United States and worldwide because of recent data showing that earlier and more aggressive transfusion intervention and resuscitation with blood components that approximate whole blood significantly decrease mortality. In this context, MTPs are a key element of "damage control resuscitation," which is defined as the systematic approach to major trauma that addresses the lethal triad mentioned above. MTPs using adequate volumes of plasma, and thus coagulation factors, improve patient outcome. The ideal amounts of plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate and other coagulation factors given in MTPs in relationship to the red blood cell transfusion volume are not known precisely, but until prospective, randomized, clinical trials are performed and more clinical data are obtained, current data support a target ratio of plasma:red blood cell:platelet transfusions of 1:1:1. Future prospective clinical trials will allow continued improvement in MTPs and thus in the overall management of patients with trauma. PMID:19448199

  13. Theme and variations: evolutionary diversification of the HET-s functional amyloid motif

    PubMed Central

    Daskalov, Asen; Dyrka, Witold; Saupe, Sven J.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals and fungi, Nod-like receptors (NLR) activate downstream cell death execution proteins by a prion-like mechanism. In Podospora anserina, the NWD2 NLR activates the HET-S Helo-domain pore-forming protein by converting its prion-forming domain into a characteristic β-solenoid amyloid fold. The amyloid forming region of HET-S/s comprises two repetitions of a 21 amino acid motif. Herein, we systematically analyze the sequences of C-terminal regions of fungal HeLo and HeLo-like domain proteins to identify HET-s-related amyloid motifs (HRAM). We now identify four novel HRAM subfamilies in addition to the canonical HET-S/s subfamily. These novel motifs share the pseudo-repeat structure of HET-S/s and a specific pattern of distribution of hydrophobic and polar residues. Sequence co-variance analyses predict parallel in-register β-stacking of the two repeats and residue-residue interactions compatible with the β-solenoid fold. As described for HET-S, most genes encoding the HeLo proteins are adjacent to genes encoding NLRs also displaying HRAMs. The motifs of the NLRs are similar to those of their cognate HeLo-domain protein, indicating concerted evolution between repeats. This study shows that HET-s-related amyloid motifs are more common than anticipated and that they have diversified into discrete subfamilies that apparently share a common overall fold. PMID:26219477

  14. Immunological complications of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke

    2016-01-01

    Most adverse blood transfusion (BT) events are immune-mediated and in the majority of severe reactions antibodies can be identified as causal factors. Alloimmunization not only causes symptomatic reactions, transfused cells can also be (silently) destroyed. Immunization by BT can contribute to hemolytic disease of the newborn as well as to allograft rejection after transplantation. Reversely, pregnancy and transplantation may evoke immunity hampering transfusion therapy. Besides causing mortality and morbidity, alloimmunization has a huge economic impact. Transfusion reactions prolong hospital stay, require diagnostic tests and complex donor selection procedures and create the need for typed donor registries. In the 1970s, Opeltz and colleagues described that pre-transplantation BT impaired rejection of renal transplants. Leukocytes were essential for this immunosuppressive BT effect that raised concern about negative effects on cancer growth and resistance against infections. Studies on the mechanism were however preliminary abandoned when calcineurin inhibitors for prevention of graft rejection became available and since all blood products underwent leukoreduction in most countries as precautionary measure against transmission of variant Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease. Whether current leukoreduced BT are immunosuppressive and for which patients or circumstances this may contribute to worse outcome, is unknown. The last decades of the previous century, leukoreduction of cellular blood products for leukemia patients significantly reduced the incidence of immunological platelet transfusion refractoriness. The first decade of this century the avoidance of plasma- and platelet-products from females, that may contain donor-derived leukocyte antibodies, decreased transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) by more than 30%. These were major achievements. Challenge for the near future is to further reduce alloimmunization in particular against red blood cells (RBC) as a

  15. Massive Bleeding and Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Meißner, Andreas; Schlenke, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Massive bleeding in trauma patients is a serious challenge for all clinicians, and an interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach is warranted within a limited time frame. Massive transfusion usually is defined as the transfusion of more than 10 units of packed red blood cells (RBCs) within 24 h or a corresponding blood loss of more than 1- to 1.5-fold of the body's entire blood volume. Especially male trauma patients experience this life-threatening condition within their productive years of life. An important parameter for clinical outcome is to succeed in stopping the bleeding preferentially within the first 12 h of hospital admission. Additional coagulopathy in the initial phase is induced by trauma itself and aggravated by consumption and dilution of clotting factors. Although different aspects have to be taken into consideration when viewing at bleedings induced by trauma compared to those caused by major surgery, the basic strategy is similar. Here, we will focus on trauma-induced massive hemorrhage. Currently there are no definite, worldwide accepted algorithms for blood transfusion and strategies for optimal coagulation management. There is increasing evidence that a higher ratio of plasma and RBCs (e.g. 1:1) endorsed by platelet transfusion might result in a superior survival of patients at risk for trauma-induced coagulopathy. Several strategies have been evolved in the military environment, although not all strategies should be transferred unproven to civilian practice, e.g. the transfusion of whole blood. Several agents have been proposed to support the restoration of coagulation. Some have been used for years without any doubt on their benefit-to-risk profile, whereas great enthusiasm of other products has been discouraged by inefficacy in terms of blood transfusion requirements and mortality or significant severe side effects. This review surveys current literature on fluid resuscitation, blood transfusion, and hemostatic agents currently

  16. Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias

    PubMed Central

    Musallam, Khaled M.; Rivella, Stefano; Vichinsky, Elliott; Rachmilewitz, Eliezer A.

    2013-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias include a variety of phenotypes that, unlike patients with beta (β)-thalassemia major, do not require regular transfusion therapy for survival. The most commonly investigated forms are β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E/β-thalassemia, and α-thalassemia intermedia (hemoglobin H disease). However, transfusion-independence in such patients is not without side effects. Ineffective erythropoiesis and peripheral hemolysis, the hallmarks of disease process, lead to a variety of subsequent pathophysiologies including iron overload and hypercoagulability that ultimately lead to a number of serious clinical morbidities. Thus, prompt and accurate diagnosis of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia is essential to ensure early intervention. Although several management options are currently available, the need to develop more novel therapeutics is justified by recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of disease. Such efforts require wide international collaboration, especially since non-transfusion-dependent thalassemias are no longer bound to low- and middle-income countries but have spread to large multiethnic cities in Europe and the Americas due to continued migration. PMID:23729725

  17. Pulmonary microembolism associated with massive transfusion: II. The basic pathophysiology of its pulmonary effects.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, J; Dawidson, I; Dhurandhar, H N; Miller, E; Litwin, M S

    1975-01-01

    In animals pulmonary hypertension, a decrease in total body O2 consumption and metabolic acidosis occur after transfusion of blood with an elevated screen filtration pressure (SFP) through standard blood transfusion filters. The purpose of this study was to define in detail the pulmonary abnormalities that develop following transfusion of blood with an elevated SFP through standard blood transfusion filters. Exchange transfusions of approximately twice blood volume were administered through standard commercially available blood transfusion filters (measured pore size--200 microns) to 6 animals. SFP measurements verified the presence of large numbers of aggregates in the transfusions. Although filters reduced SFP of the stored blood somewhat, numerous microaggregates passed the filters, and post-filtration SFP remained high. After transfusion average O2 consumption decreased to 77% of normal and metabolic acidosis developed. Pulmonary arterial hypertension was associated with an increase in pulmonary shunting of blood and a decrease in pulmonary diffusing capacity. The presence of extensive numbers of microemboli in the pulmonary arteriolar and capillary bed was confirmed by microscopic examination of lung tissue. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:1147710

  18. Non-infectious complications of transfusion therapy.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, P L; Snyder, E L

    2001-06-01

    Blood transfusion is considered safe when the infused blood is tested using state of the art viral assays developed over the past several decades. Only rarely are known viruses like HIV and hepatitis C transmitted by transfusion when blood donors are screened using these sensitive laboratory tests. However, there are a variety of transfusion risks which still remain that cannot be entirely eliminated, many of which are non-infectious in nature. Predominantly immune-mediated complications include the rapid intravascular or slow extravascular destruction (hemolysis) of transfused red cells or extravascular removal of platelets by pre-formed antibodies carried by the transfusion recipient. Alternatively, red cells can be damaged when exposed to excessive heat or incompatible intravenous fluids before or during the transfusion. Common complications of blood transfusion that at least partly involve the immune system include febrile non-hemolytic and allergic reactions. While these are usually not life-threatening, they can hamper efforts to transfuse a patient. Other complications include circulatory overload, hypothermia and metabolic disturbances. Profound hypotensive episodes have been described in patients on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors who receive platelet transfusions through bedside leukoreduction filters. These curious reactions appear to involve dysmetabolism of the vasoactive substance bradykinin. Products contaminated by bacteria during blood collection and transfused can cause life-threatening septic reactions. A long-term complication of blood transfusion therapy unique to chronically transfused patients is iron overload. Less common - but serious - reactions more specific to blood transfusion include transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-associated acute lung injury. Many of these complications of transfusion therapy can be prevented by adhering to well-established practice guidelines. In addition, individuals

  19. HET Spectroscopy of Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, Allen W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.

    2006-12-01

    We are currently involved in a multifaceted campaign to study extragalactic novae in the optical and IR using a variety of instruments: The Mount Laguna 1m, the Steward 2.3m, and the Liverpool 2m telescopes for optical imaging, the Hobbey-Eberly Telescope (HET) for optical spectroscopy, and the Spitzer Space Telescope for IR photometry and spectroscopy. Here, we report the initial results from our program of spectroscopic observations obtained with the LRS on the HET. Thus far, we have obtained spectra of three novae: Nova M31-2006#9 (ATEL 887), Nova M32-2006#1 (CBET 591), and Nova M33-2006#1 (CBET 655), which were taken on 24-Sep-2006 UT, 30-Sep-2006 UT, and 02-Oct-2006 UT, approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively. The spectra of Nova M31-2006#9 and Nova M33-2006#1 revealed prominent Balmer (FWHM 1600 km/s) and Fe II emission lines typical of the "Fe II" class in the classification system of Williams (1992 AJ, 104, 725). The spectrum of Nova M32-2006#1, which was obtained much longer after eruption, showed strong H-alpha (FWHM 1300 km/s), along with weaker H-beta, Fe II, and [N II] 5755, indicating that this nova is also a member of the Fe II class, and that it had entered the nebular phase at the time of our observations. In addition to these three novae, we also attempted to obtain a spectrum of Nova M31-2006#7 (CBET 615) on 23-Sep-2006 UT, approximately three weeks after discovery. However, by the time of our observations, the nova had faded to invisibility. An 1800s integration at the reported position reveled no trace of the nova. It is likely that this optical transient was an unusually fast nova, possibly of the "He/N" class. This work is being supported in part by NSF grant AST-0607682.

  20. Blood transfusion practices in sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Murthy, TVSP

    2014-01-01

    Sepsis is a clinical syndrome characterised by systemic inflammation due to infection. There is a spectrum with severity ranging from sepsis to severe sepsis and septic shock. Even with optimal treatment, mortality due to severe sepsis or septic shock is significant and poses a challenge to management. Antibiotics, source control, resuscitation with fluids, vasopressor and inotropic agents are the main-stay of treatment for septic shock. These may be supplemented with transfusion of red blood cells and or blood products, in the case of anaemia to sustain sufficient oxygen delivery[1] or to manage associated haematological issues. Transfusion in sepsis has always been a debatable issue, especially in relation to choice of the fluid and the role of blood or blood product transfusion. PMID:25535429

  1. Benchmarking: applications to transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Apelseth, Torunn Oveland; Molnar, Laura; Arnold, Emmy; Heddle, Nancy M

    2012-10-01

    Benchmarking is as a structured continuous collaborative process in which comparisons for selected indicators are used to identify factors that, when implemented, will improve transfusion practices. This study aimed to identify transfusion medicine studies reporting on benchmarking, summarize the benchmarking approaches used, and identify important considerations to move the concept of benchmarking forward in the field of transfusion medicine. A systematic review of published literature was performed to identify transfusion medicine-related studies that compared at least 2 separate institutions or regions with the intention of benchmarking focusing on 4 areas: blood utilization, safety, operational aspects, and blood donation. Forty-five studies were included: blood utilization (n = 35), safety (n = 5), operational aspects of transfusion medicine (n = 5), and blood donation (n = 0). Based on predefined criteria, 7 publications were classified as benchmarking, 2 as trending, and 36 as single-event studies. Three models of benchmarking are described: (1) a regional benchmarking program that collects and links relevant data from existing electronic sources, (2) a sentinel site model where data from a limited number of sites are collected, and (3) an institutional-initiated model where a site identifies indicators of interest and approaches other institutions. Benchmarking approaches are needed in the field of transfusion medicine. Major challenges include defining best practices and developing cost-effective methods of data collection. For those interested in initiating a benchmarking program, the sentinel site model may be most effective and sustainable as a starting point, although the regional model would be the ideal goal. PMID:22237134

  2. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome is a rare condition that occurs only in identical twins while they are in the womb. ... Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) occurs when the blood supply of 1 twin moves to the ...

  3. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI).

    PubMed

    Roberts, George H

    2004-01-01

    Transfusion is an inevitable event in the life of many individuals. Transfusion medicine personnel attempt to provide blood products that will result in a safe and harmless transfusion. However, this is not always possible since no laboratory test gives totally accurate and reliable results all the time and testing in routine transfusion services is devoted primarily to the identification of red blood cell problems. Thus, when patients are transfused, several possible adverse effects may occur in the transfused patient even though quality testing indicates no potential problem. These adverse events include infectious complications, hemolytic reactions, anaphylaxis, urticaria, circulatory overload, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease, chills and fever, immunomodulation, and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). PMID:15314887

  4. [Safer and more appropriate blood transfusion therapy].

    PubMed

    Handa, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    The risks associated with transfusion with blood components have been greatly reduced due to the implementation of innovative strategies for donor selection and testing, as well as safety measures such as universal prestorage leukocyte reduction. However, a variety of residual or unsolved risks, such as severe acute reaction of transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-transmitted infections, remain. Patients with hematological disorders are at high risk, since they receive therapeutic interventions frequently requiring transfusion. Thereby, balancing risk and benefit for patients, hematologists should prescribe blood components through evidence-based decision-making, minimize unnecessary transfusions and then conduct safe and error-free transfusion with a standard procedure involving the transfusion process at the bedside. PMID:26458457

  5. What Is a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells, white blood cells, platelets (PLATE-lets), and plasma. Blood is transfused either as whole blood (with all its parts) or, more often, as individual parts. Blood Types Every person has one of the following blood types: A, B, AB, ...

  6. [Transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Mouquet, F; Rieux, C; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Caldani, C; Boudjedir, K; Carlier, M

    2012-11-01

    A working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has been in charge of heightening awareness of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload (TACO) among physicians and nurses. This multidisciplinary group has produced the present document that focuses on epidemiological data provided by the French haemovigilance network, physiopathology, diagnosis, treatment and specific actions that could prevent or minimize the risk of TACO. PMID:23039960

  7. PATTERN, INDICATIONS AND REVIEW OF COMPLICATIONS OF NEONATAL BLOOD TRANSFUSION IN IBADAN, SOUTHWEST NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    Ayede, A.I.; Akingbola, T.S.

    2011-01-01

    Background and objectives: There is a huge need for blood transfusion in the newborn particularly due to the reduced marrow activity in the neonatal period. Despite widely use of blood products in the neonatal period, there is paucity of local data on the pattern, indications and reactions to blood transfusions in Nigerian newborns. This study evaluates the blood transfusion indications and patterns in special care baby unit and C12nd of University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Methodology: A cross sectional study was carried on the recruited newborns and structured questionnaires were used to obtain bio data, medical problems, indications for blood transfusion, type of blood products transfused and clinical signs. Urinalysis was performed out before and after the transfusion. Results: A total of 100 neonates were recruited into the study with a male: female ratio of (M: F= 1:1). The age range was 2–34 days and their weight ranged between 0.8kg to 3.6 kg with a mean weight of 1.64 kg. The main indications for transfusion were anaemia from prematurity & neonatal sepsis(NNS) 46%; (red cell replacement), NNS, Disseminated intravascular coagulation(DIC) & anaemia 24%; (partial exchange + top up + Fresh frozen plasma), neonatal jaundice(NNJ) & anaemia 14%; (whole blood), NNJ, NNS + anaemia 6%(Blood transfusion + Fresh frozen plasma), NNS + anaemia 10% (whole blood). Conclusion: Blood transfusion is still frequent in the study area and prematurity, neonatal sepsis and jaundice rank high in the indications. Transfusion reactions are rare in the evaluated neonates. PMID:25161485

  8. [Prevention of ABO-incompatible transfusion].

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasuhiko

    2011-01-01

    "Identification error between patient and blood product" is the main cause of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion, but "Phlebotomy error" also has serious consequences. In order to prevent ABO-incompatible transfusion, it is important to establish a management system of blood transfusion in the hospital, including a hospital transfusion committee and a responsible medical doctor. In addition, in large hospitals routinely carrying out a considerable number of blood transfusions, it is important to employ specialists in blood banking. More than 50 ml of ABO-incompatible blood transfusion (major ABO mismatch) causes a severe acute hemolytic reaction. Because there is little residual plasma in leukocyte-reduced red cell concentrate (RCC-LR), acute hemolysis is not detected on minor ABO mismatch blood transfusion. In the case of emergent blood transfusion, concerning the risk of acute hemolytic reaction, type-O RCC-LR blood transfusion is safer than ABO-identical RCC-LR when the blood of the patient is tested only once. When red cell antibody screening is not performed, there is a risk of hemolysis due to incompatible blood transfusion irrespective of the ABO blood group system, including a delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction. PMID:21348250

  9. Perioperative blood transfusions in orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Karthikeyan E; Kim, Thomas J; Khanuja, Harpal S

    2014-11-01

    Blood transfusion after orthopaedic surgery accounts for 10% of all packed red blood-cell transfusions, but use varies substantially across hospitals and surgeons. Transfusions can cause systemic complications, including allergic reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, graft-versus-host disease, and infections. Tranexamic acid is a new cost-effective blood management tool to reduce blood loss and decrease the risk of transfusion after total joint arthroplasty. Current clinical evidence does not justify transfusions for a hemoglobin level of >8 g/dL in the absence of symptoms. Studies have also supported the use of this trigger in patients with a history or risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25378512

  10. Delayed Serological Transfusion Reaction After Platelet Transfusion Due to Anti-e.

    PubMed

    Sachan, Deepti; Kumar, Aswin; Jothimani, Dinesh; Rela, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    Delayed serological transfusion reaction (DSTR) is defined as absence of clinical signs of hemolysis and demonstration of new, clinically-significant antibodies against red blood cells after a transfusion, by either positive direct antiglobulin test or positive antibody screen with newly identified RBC alloantibody. Various delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction cases are reported after red cell transfusions. However, the incidence of DSTR after platelet transfusion due to non-Rh(D) antibodies is not much documented. We report here a case of DSTR due to anti-e Rh antibody in a multiply red cell alloimmunized female patient after single donor platelets transfusion. PMID:27408414

  11. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-07-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas' disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  12. Transfusion-transmitted parasitic infections

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sehgal, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The transmission of parasitic organisms through transfusion is relatively rare. Of the major transfusion-transmitted diseases, malaria is a major cause of TTIP in tropical countries whereas babesiosis and Chagas’ disease pose the greatest threat to donors in the USA In both cases, this is due to the increased number of potentially infected donors. There are no reliable serologic tests available to screen donors for any of these organisms and the focus for prevention remains on adherence to donor screening guidelines that address travel history and previous infection with the etiologic agent. One goal is the development of tests that are able to screen for and identify donors potentially infectious for parasitic infections without causing the deferral of a large number of non-infectious donors or significantly increasing costs. Ideally, methods to inactivate the infectious organism will provide an element of added safety to the blood supply. PMID:20859503

  13. Transfusion medicine in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Murthi, Sarah B; Dutton, Richard P; Edelman, Bennett B; Scalea, Thomas M; Hess, John R

    2011-01-01

    Injured patients stress the transfusion service with frequent demands for uncrossmatched red cells and plasma, occasional requirements for large amounts of blood products and the need for new and better blood products. Transfusion services stress trauma centers with demands for strict accountability for individual blood component units and adherence to indications in a clinical field where research has been difficult, and guidance opinion-based. New data suggest that the most severely injured patients arrive at the trauma center already coagulopathic and that these patients benefit from prompt, specific, corrective treatment. This research is clarifying trauma system requirements for new blood products and blood-product usage patterns, but the inability to obtain informed consent from severely injured patients remains an obstacle to further research. PMID:21083009

  14. Blood transfusion economics in Greece.

    PubMed

    Kyriopoulos, J E; Michail-Merianou, V; Gitona, M

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the organizational structure and the economic impact of blood donation and transfusion in Greece and discusses some alternative aspects of its financing and its costing policy. The cost of blood transfusion is rising in Greece and amounts to nearly 15 billion drachmas per year due to the constant increase in demand and consequently, the price of each unit of blood. The production and distribution of blood on national scale involves meeting the demand for 500.000 units. Blood is mostly given by the friends and relatives of patients (55%) and by voluntary blood donation (30%). Approximately 50% of the blood produced is used in surgery, 20% for cases of beta-thalassaemia, 10% for emergencies and 20% for internal medicine cases. The blood transfusion system is totally funded by the state budget and the value to users is free of charge. The way in which blood is collected and processed differs from one geographical area to another and the unit cost depends on the size of the department concerned, ranging from 60-150 $. The need to control costs and restrain expenditure, in conjunction with guarantees of sufficiency and quality, makes it essential that measures should be taken to introduce economies of scale and encourage competition among blood providers, for increased production, components preparation and rational usage of blood. The introduction of a costing policy becomes necessary in this effort to achieve cost-containment techniques. PMID:8581182

  15. Pulmonary consequences of transfusion: TRALI and TACO.

    PubMed

    Popovsky, Mark A

    2006-06-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury and transfusion-associated circulatory overload are important, life-threatening complications of transfusion. Each adversely impact hospital length of stay and cost of healthcare. TRALI is clinically indistinguishable from the adult respiratory distress syndrome but it has a more favorable prognosis. Approximately 10% of TRALI patients die from this complication. The at-risk patient for TRALI has not been identified. The most commonly cited incidence is 1:5000 plasma-containing blood component transfusions. Although several pathways may lead to TRALI, passive transfusion of leukocyte antibodies is currently the most important association. TACO occurs in 1-8% of patients undergoing hip or knee arthroplasty. It is precipitated by positive fluid balance and high transfusion flow rates. TACO is characterized by respiratory distress and acute pulmonary edema. PMID:16872902

  16. Adverse events related to blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Sandeep; Hemlata; Verma, Anupam

    2014-01-01

    The acute blood transfusion reactions are responsible for causing most serious adverse events. Awareness about various clinical features of acute and delayed transfusion reactions with an ability to assess the serious reactions on time can lead to a better prognosis. Evidence-based medicine has changed today's scenario of clinical practice to decrease adverse transfusion reactions. New evidence-based algorithms of transfusion and improved haemovigilance lead to avoidance of unnecessary transfusions perioperatively. The recognition of adverse events under anaesthesia is always challenging. The unnecessary blood transfusions can be avoided with better blood conservation techniques during surgery and with anaesthesia techniques that reduce blood loss. Better and newer blood screening methods have decreased the infectious complications to almost negligible levels. With universal leukoreduction of red blood cells (RBCs), selection of potential donors such as use of male donors only plasma and restriction of RBC storage, most of the non-infectious complications can be avoided. PMID:25535415

  17. Transfusion medicine in small animal practice.

    PubMed

    Tocci, Lynel J

    2010-05-01

    Red blood cell transfusions in veterinary medicine have become increasingly more common and are an integral part of lifesaving and advanced treatment of the critically ill. Common situations involving transfusions are life-threatening anemia from acute hemorrhage or surgical blood loss, hemolysis from drugs or toxins, immune-mediated diseases, severe nonregenerative conditions, and neonatal isoerythrolysis. Although transfusions can be lifesaving, they are also associated with adverse events that can be life threatening. This article reviews the principles for pretransfusion blood typing and compatibility testing and the types of transfusion reactions that exist despite test performance. PMID:20471531

  18. [Pulmonary complications of transfusion (TACO-TRALI)].

    PubMed

    Renaudier, P; Rebibo, D; Waller, C; Schlanger, S; Vo Mai, M-P; Ounnoughene, N; Breton, P; Cheze, S; Girard, A; Hauser, L; Legras, J-F; Saillol, A; Willaert, B; Caldani, C

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary oedemas occurring during or after a blood transfusion appear as the most frequent serious immediate incidents in the French hemovigilance database. They include transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). TACO are a major cause of transfusion-related death in France. TRALI are more and more recognized and notified. In no case, pooled fresh frozen plasma (100 donations) treated with solvent-detergent were involved in French TRALI cases. A logigrame will allow hemovigilance officers to better classify pulmonary oedemas in e-fit, the French hemovigilance database. PMID:19446484

  19. Clinical Response and Transfusion Reactions of Sheep Subjected to Single Homologous Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Rejane Santos; Minervino, Antonio Humberto Hamad; Araújo, Carolina Akiko Sato Cabral; Rodrigues, Frederico Augusto Mazzocca Lopes; Oliveira, Francisco Leonardo Costa; Zaminhan, Janaina Larissa Rodrigues; Moreira, Thiago Rocha; Sousa, Isadora Karolina Freitas; Ortolani, Enrico Lippi; Barrêto Júnior, Raimundo Alves

    2014-01-01

    Studies in relation to blood conservation and responses to transfusion are scarce for ruminants. We evaluated the clinical manifestations of sheep that received a single homologous transfusion of whole blood, focusing on transfusion reactions. Eighteen adult sheep were subjected to a single phlebotomy to withdraw 40% of the total blood volume, which was placed into CPDA-1 bags and then divided into G0, animals that received fresh blood, and G15 and G35, animals that received blood stored for 15 or 35 days, respectively. Clinical observations were recorded throughout the transfusion, whereas heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature were assessed at the following times: 24 hours after phlebotomy and before transfusion; 30 minutes, six, twelve, 24, 48, 72, and 96 hours and eight and 16 days after transfusion. All groups presented transfusion reactions, among which hyperthermia was the most frequent (50% of animals). Tachycardia occurred most frequently in the G35 animals (50% of them). During transfusion G35 animals presented more clinical manifestation (P < 0.05). Transfusion of fresh or stored total blood improved the blood volume, but transfusion reactions occurred, demonstrating that a single transfusion of fresh or stored blood can cause inflammatory and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions in sheep. PMID:25544959

  20. Reduction of exposure to blood donors in preterm infants submitted to red blood cell transfusions using pediatric satellite packs

    PubMed Central

    Uezima, Cristina Lika; Barreto, Ariane Moreira; Guinsburg, Ruth; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Bordin, José Orlando; Barros, Melca Maria O.; dos Santos, Amélia Miyashiro N.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In preterm newborn infants transfused with erythrocytes stored up to 28 days, to compare the reduction of blood donor exposure in two groups of infants classified according to birth weight. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted with preterm infants with birth weight <1000g (Group 1) and 1000-1499g (Group 2), born between April, 2008 and December, 2009. Neonates submitted to exchange transfusions, emergency erythrocyte transfusion, or those who died in the first 24 hours of life were excluded. Transfusions were indicated according to the local guideline using pediatric transfusion satellite bags. Demographic and clinical data, besides number of transfusions and donors were assessed. . Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors associated with multiple transfusions. RESULTS: 30 and 48 neonates were included in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. The percentage of newborns with more than one erythrocyte transfusion (90 versus 11%), the median number of transfusions (3 versus 1) and the median of blood donors (2 versus 1) were higher in Group 1 (p<0.001), compared to Group 2. Among those with multiple transfusions, 14 (82%) and one (50%) presented 50% reduction in the number of blood donors, respectively in Groups 1 and 2. Factors associated with multiple transfusions were: birth weight <1000g (OR 11.91; 95%CI 2.14-66.27) and presence of arterial umbilical catheter (OR 8.59; 95%CI 1.94-38.13), adjusted for confounders. CONCLUSIONS: The efficacy of pediatrics satellites bags on blood donor reduction was higher in preterm infants with birth weight <1000g. PMID:24142309

  1. Delta excitations in heavy nuclei induced by (3He,t) and (p,n) reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esbensen, H.; Lee, T.-S. H.

    1985-12-01

    Delta excitations in heavy nuclei, induced by charge exchange reactions, are studied using the surface response model. The residual pion-exchange interaction and the self-energy of the delta in a nuclear medium is included in the random-phase-approximation response. The peak position observed in (3He,t) reactions can be explained by the self-energy of the delta extracted from pion-nucleus scattering, and the magnitude of the cross section is consistent with Glauber theory. The comparison to (p,n) data is reasonable; contributions from neutron decay of the delta, which are left out in the calculations, constitute a substantial experimental background.

  2. Transfusion-Transmitted Babesia microti.

    PubMed

    Fang, Deanna C; McCullough, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Because testing of donors for Babesia microti has become available, it is important to determine the kinds of patients who should receive B microti-tested blood. We searched PubMed, AABB abstracts, and FDA Web site to identify all cases of transfusion-transmitted babesiosis (TTB). Cases were analyzed for underlying medical condition, age, presence of spleen, and reason for transfusion in relation to 5 classes of recipient outcome severity. Sixty-seven reports included 256 transfusion cases where donor tested positive for B microti, 165 of which resulted in TTB. Sixty recipients did not develop disease or become test positive, and test results were not known for 31 more. The 165 cases of TTB involved hematologic (19%), neonate (10%), cardiovascular (8%), and gastrointestinal (6%) patients. Thirty-two (19%) of the 165 infected patients died with death attributed to babesiosis in 25 of the cases. Nine (5%) were asymptomatic, 27 (16%) were symptomatic but had uncomplicated disease, and 16 (10%) had complicated disease. The severity of disease was mixed among many disease categories. Patients >65 years of age included the largest number of recipients (59/165, 36%) and deaths (11/32, 34%), although deaths occurred in other age groups as well. TTB cases were predominantly due to red cells (133 of 140 specified units), with red blood cell units processed in a variety of ways and at all storage duration. TTB with complicated babesiosis and/or death occurred in patients of all age groups and with a variety of underlying medical conditions. PMID:27260107

  3. Operative blood transfusion quality improvement audit

    PubMed Central

    Al Sohaibani, Mazen; Al Malki, Assaf; Pogaku, Venumadhav; Al Dossary, Saad; Al Bernawi, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    Context: To determine how current anesthesia team handless the identification of surgical anaesthetized patient (right patient). And the check of blood unit before collecting and immediately before blood administration (right blood) in operating rooms where nurses have minimal duties and responsibility to handle blood for transfusion in anaesthetized patients. Aims: To elicit the degree of anesthesia staff compliance with new policies and procedures for anaesthetized surgical patient the blood transfusion administration. Settings and Design: Setting: A large tertiary care reference and teaching hospital. Design: A prospective quality improvement. Elaboration on steps for administration of transfusion from policies and procedures to anaesthetized patients; and analysis of the audit forms for conducted transfusions. Subjects and Methods: An audit form was used to get key performance indicators (KPIs) observed in all procedures involve blood transfusion and was ticked as item was met, partially met, not met or not applicable. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive statistics as number and percentage Microsoft excel 2003. Central quality improvement committee presented the results in number percentage and graphs. Results: The degree of compliance in performing the phases of blood transfusion by anesthesia staff reached high percentage which let us feel certain that the quality is assured that the internal policy and procedures (IPP) are followed in the great majority of all types of red cells and other blood products transfusion from the start of requesting the blood or blood product to the prescript of checking the patient in the immediate post-transfusion period. Conclusions: Specific problem area of giving blood transfusion to anaesthetized patient was checking KPI concerning the phases of blood transfusion was audited and assured the investigators of high quality performance in procedures of transfusion. PMID:25886107

  4. Origins and Evolution of the HET-s Prion-Forming Protein: Searching for Other Amyloid-Forming Solenoids

    PubMed Central

    Gendoo, Deena M. A.; Harrison, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    The HET-s prion-forming domain from the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina is gaining considerable interest since it yielded the first well-defined atomic structure of a functional amyloid fibril. This structure has been identified as a left-handed beta solenoid with a triangular hydrophobic core. To delineate the origins of the HET-s prion-forming protein and to discover other amyloid-forming proteins, we searched for all homologs of the HET-s protein in a database of protein domains and fungal genomes, using a combined application of HMM, psi-blast and pGenThreader techniques, and performed a comparative evolutionary analysis of the N-terminal alpha-helical domain and the C-terminal prion-forming domain of HET-s. By assessing the tandem evolution of both domains, we observed that the prion-forming domain is restricted to Sordariomycetes, with a marginal additional sequence homolog in Arthroderma otae as a likely case of horizontal transfer. This suggests innovation and rapid evolution of the solenoid fold in the Sordariomycetes clade. In contrast, the N-terminal domain evolves at a slower rate (in Sordariomycetes) and spans many diverse clades of fungi. We performed a full three-dimensional protein threading analysis on all identified HET-s homologs against the HET-s solenoid fold, and present detailed structural annotations for identified structural homologs to the prion-forming domain. An analysis of the physicochemical characteristics in our set of structural models indicates that the HET-s solenoid shape can be readily adopted in these homologs, but that they are all less optimized for fibril formation than the P. anserina HET-s sequence itself, due chiefly to the presence of fewer asparagine ladders and salt bridges. Our combined structural and evolutionary analysis suggests that the HET-s shape has “limited scope” for amyloidosis across the wider protein universe, compared to the ‘generic’ left-handed beta helix. We discuss the implications of

  5. HET Spectra of Three Recent Extragalactic Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shafter, A. W.; Coelho, E. A.; Misselt, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Darnley, M. J.; Quimby, R.

    2006-10-01

    We report optical spectroscopic observations (4280Å - 7280Å) obtained with the HET of three extragalactic novae: Nova M31 2006 No. 9 (ATEL #887), Nova M32 2006 No. 1 (CBET #591), and Nova M33 2006 No. 1 (CBET #655). The spectra were obtained on 24 Sep 2006 UT, 30 Sep 2006 UT, and 02 Oct 2006 UT, corresponding to approximately 6, 65, and 4 days post discovery, for the three novae respectively.

  6. Recurrent abortions and lymphocyte transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bjercke, S

    1994-05-01

    Normal pregnancies depend on successful implantation of the placenta in the uterus. The trophoblast which forms the ultimate interface between the fetal and maternal tissue seems to lack the foreign (allo) antigens (namely HLA/TLX) required to induce immunological rejection reactions in the mother. It was previously believed that the trophoblast expressed paternal allo antigens and that successful pregnancies were dependent on so called 'kind' (non-cytotoxic or non-complement binding) blocking antibodies in order to protect the fetal unit from maternal cytotoxic T-cells and -antibodies. Blocking antibodies attached to paternal antigens on the trophoblast were assumed to prevent maternal cytotoxic T cell and cytotoxic antibodies from recognising the trophoblast as foreign tissue. On this assumption it was reasoned that transfusions of paternal HLA-expressing lymphocytes would increase maternal antipaternal HLA (TLX) blocking antibodies and thus be beneficial to women who experienced multiple miscarriages. There is, however, no scientific evidence for a specific immune response after lymphocyte transfusions that fulfil this function. Immunological tests, as for example mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC), on peripheral blood lymphocytes do not seem to reflect the local immune state in the uterus, either in the pregnant or the non-pregnant state. Since the trophoblast forms the ultimate interface between fetal and maternal tissue, its structure, secretions, and interaction with the decidua must be of definite importance for implantation of the blastocyst and growth of the embryo. PMID:8009967

  7. Haemovigilance and transfusion safety in France.

    PubMed

    Rouger, P; Noizat-Pirenne, F; Le Pennec, P Y

    2000-01-01

    The risks associated to red cell and platelet transfusions are essentially bound to the polymorphism of blood group antigens and to transfusion transmitted agents including virus, bacterias.... In France, the haemovigilance system and several investigations allowed to measure these different kinds of risks. We also developed analysis of failures in order to prevent errors and accidents to increase blood safety. PMID:10938971

  8. Reducing transfusion requirements in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Donohue, Ciara I; Mallett, Susan V

    2015-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) was historically associated with massive blood loss and transfusion. Over the past two decades transfusion requirements have reduced dramatically and increasingly transfusion-free transplantation is a reality. Both bleeding and transfusion are associated with adverse outcomes in LT. Minimising bleeding and reducing unnecessary transfusions are therefore key goals in the perioperative period. As the understanding of the causes of bleeding has evolved so too have techniques to minimize or reduce the impact of blood loss. Surgical “piggyback” techniques, anaesthetic low central venous pressure and haemodilution strategies and the use of autologous cell salvage, point of care monitoring and targeted correction of coagulopathy, particularly through use of factor concentrates, have all contributed to declining reliance on allogenic blood products. Pre-emptive management of preoperative anaemia and adoption of more restrictive transfusion thresholds is increasingly common as patient blood management (PBM) gains momentum. Despite progress, increasing use of marginal grafts and transplantation of sicker recipients will continue to present new challenges in bleeding and transfusion management. Variation in practice across different centres and within the literature demonstrates the current lack of clear transfusion guidance. In this article we summarise the causes and predictors of bleeding and present the evidence for a variety of PBM strategies in LT. PMID:26722645

  9. Transfusion-related sepsis: a silent epidemic.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J

    2016-01-28

    In this issue of Blood, Hong et al advocate for use of additional US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)–approved safety measures for transfusion. Most patients transfused with contaminated platelets do not show immediate clinical signs. Active surveillance suggests patient risk 10- to 40-fold higher than passive hemovigilance. PMID:26823510

  10. Red blood cell transfusion in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Whyte, Robin K; Jefferies, Ann L

    2014-04-01

    Red blood cell transfusion is an important and frequent component of neonatal intensive care. The present position statement addresses the methods and indications for red blood cell transfusion of the newborn, based on a review of the current literature. The most frequent indications for blood transfusion in the newborn are the acute treatment of perinatal hemorrhagic shock and the recurrent correction of anemia of prematurity. Perinatal hemorrhagic shock requires immediate treatment with large quantities of red blood cells; the effects of massive transfusion on other blood components must be considered. Some guidelines are now available from clinical trials investigating transfusion in anemia of prematurity; however, considerable uncertainty remains. There is weak evidence that cognitive impairment may be more severe at follow-up in extremely low birth weight infants transfused at lower hemoglobin thresholds; therefore, these thresholds should be maintained by transfusion therapy. Although the risks of transfusion have declined considerably in recent years, they can be minimized further by carefully restricting neonatal blood sampling. PMID:24855419

  11. [Blood transfusion: the challenges for tomorrow?].

    PubMed

    Folléa, Gilles; Garraud, Olivier; Tiberghien, Pierre

    2015-02-01

    As any therapeutic means, blood transfusion requires regular evaluation, particularly for its indications, effectiveness and risks. The availability of randomized clinical trials, the evolution of the quality of blood components, and the economic constraints shared by all countries, all lead to rethink both transfusion therapy as a whole and the organization of the transfusion chain from donor to recipient. The main tools available to improve transfusion and the transfusion chain management are the following: programs of patient blood management (PBM) to optimize the use of blood products with a patient centred approach, blood supply management tools to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the transfusion chain, donor management tools to adapt donor collections to the patients' needs in compliance with safety requirements for patients and donors, and coordination of these activities. A better understanding of these tools and their implementation will certainly be major challenges for transfusion medicine in the near future. Integrating these evolutions in regulations through the revision of the European Directives on blood and blood components (the review process is expected to be launched in 2015) should enroll them in the long term, for the benefit of patients, donors and all other stakeholders involved in the transfusion chain. PMID:25578549

  12. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  13. A yeast toxic mutant of HET-s amyloid disrupts membrane integrity.

    PubMed

    Ta, Ha Phuong; Berthelot, Karine; Coulary-Salin, Bénédicte; Castano, Sabine; Desbat, Bernard; Bonnafous, Pierre; Lambert, Olivier; Alves, Isabel; Cullin, Christophe; Lecomte, Sophie

    2012-09-01

    Many studies have pointed out the interaction between amyloids and membranes, and their potential involvement in amyloid toxicity. Previously, we generated a yeast toxic amyloid mutant (M8) from the harmless amyloid protein by changing a few residues of the Prion Forming Domain of HET-s (PFD HET-s(218-289)) and clearly demonstrated the complete different behaviors of the non-toxic Wild Type (WT) and toxic amyloid (called M8) in terms of fiber morphology, aggregation kinetics and secondary structure. In this study, we compared the interaction of both proteins (WT and M8) with membrane models, as liposomes or supported bilayers. We first demonstrated that the toxic protein (M8) induces a significant leakage of liposomes formed with negatively charged lipids and promotes the formation of microdomains inside the lipid bilayer (as potential "amyloid raft"), whereas the non-toxic amyloid (WT) only binds to the membrane without further perturbations. The secondary structure of both amyloids interacting with membrane is preserved, but the anti-symmetric PO(2)(-) vibration is strongly shifted in the presence of M8. Secondly, we established that the presence of membrane models catalyzes the amyloidogenesis of both proteins. Cryo-TEM (cryo-transmission electron microscopy) images show the formation of long HET-s fibers attached to liposomes, whereas a large aggregation of the toxic M8 seems to promote a membrane disruption. This study allows us to conclude that the toxicity of the M8 mutant could be due to its high propensity to interact and disrupt lipid membranes. PMID:22562024

  14. Adverse blood transfusion outcomes: establishing causation.

    PubMed

    Isbister, James P; Shander, Aryeh; Spahn, Donat R; Erhard, Jochen; Farmer, Shannon L; Hofmann, Axel

    2011-04-01

    The transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) and other blood components is ingrained in modern medical practice. The rationale for administering transfusions is based on key assumptions that efficacy is established and risks are acceptable and minimized. Despite the cliché that, "the blood supply is safer than ever," data about risks and lack of efficacy of RBC transfusions in several clinical settings have steadily accumulated. Frequentist statisticians and clinicians demand evidence from randomized clinical trials (RCTs); however, causation for the recognized serious hazards of allogeneic transfusion has never been established in this manner. On the other hand, the preponderance of evidence implicating RBC transfusions in adverse clinical outcomes related to immunomodulation and the storage lesion comes from observational studies, and a broad and critical analysis to evaluate causation is overdue. It is suggested in several circumstances that this cannot wait for the design, execution, and conduct of rigorous RCTs. We begin by examining the nature and definition of causation with relevant examples from transfusion medicine. Deductive deterministic methods may be applied to most of the well-accepted and understood serious hazards of transfusion, with modified Koch's postulates being fulfilled in most circumstances. On the other hand, when several possible interacting risk factors exist and RBC transfusions are associated with adverse clinical outcomes, establishing causation requires inferential probabilistic methodology. In the latter circumstances, the case for RBC transfusions being causal for adverse clinical outcomes can be strengthened by applying modified Bradford Hill criteria to the plethora of existing observational studies. This being the case, a greater precautionary approach to RBC transfusion is necessary and equipoise that justifying RCTs may become problematic. PMID:21345639

  15. [Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation. PMID:23947177

  16. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety

    PubMed Central

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-01-01

    Summary The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322 580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21 413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a ‘back to basics’ approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  17. Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Bolton-Maggs, Paula H B; Cohen, Hannah

    2013-11-01

    The Serious Hazards of Transfusion (SHOT) UK confidential haemovigilance reporting scheme began in 1996. Over the 16 years of reporting, the evidence gathered has prompted changes in transfusion practice from the selection and management of donors to changes in hospital practice, particularly better education and training. However, half or more reports relate to errors in the transfusion process despite the introduction of several measures to improve practice. Transfusion in the UK is very safe: 2·9 million components were issued in 2012, and very few deaths are related to transfusion. The risk of death from transfusion as estimated from SHOT data in 2012 is 1 in 322,580 components issued and for major morbidity, 1 in 21,413 components issued; the risk of transfusion-transmitted infection is much lower. Acute transfusion reactions and transfusion-associated circulatory overload carry the highest risk for morbidity and death. The high rate of participation in SHOT by National Health Service organizations, 99·5%, is encouraging. Despite the very useful information gained about transfusion reactions, the main risks remain human factors. The recommendations on reduction of errors through a 'back to basics' approach from the first annual SHOT report remain absolutely relevant today. PMID:24032719

  18. The transfusion medicine we want

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Associação Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia (ABHH), through its Board of Directors, hosted a national symposium called "Forum: The Transfusion Medicine we want", to discuss proposed policies and techniques related to the area. This meeting was held in São Paulo on August 19 and 20, 2010, with the participation of experts, authorities and representatives of organized groups of patients and users. The discussions were organized around three specific issues selected from over 100 suggestions sent to the ABHH through public consultation on the web: 1. Strategies; 2. Financing; 3. Blood products. A plenary session, held at the end of the meeting, adopted recommendations that are relevant to the different discussion topics. This document contains actions proposed by the ABHH to meet the demands discussed. PMID:23284248

  19. Nurses' perceptions of transfusion training: an evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn

    Within Scottish hospitals transfusion education is mandatory for all staff involved in the process of transfusion. Currently two modes of delivery exist, face-to-face and e-learning. The researcher,a transfusion practitioner, wished to evaluate the perceptions of registered nurses within her local children's hospital to the transfusion education available. The aim of the evaluation was to ascertain whether there were perceived benefits, whether expectations were met and whether nurses perceived that there were any barriers to undertaking the education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were obtained by means of a questionnaire; all registered nurses in the hospital were invited to participate. The study indicates a high level of compliance with mandatory transfusion education and suggests both satisfaction and perceived benefits with transfusion education among those who responded. Some barriers were highlighted, but it was noted that these were not exclusive to transfusion education and in the current challenging environment with conflicting priorities on time, resolution may be complex. PMID:23634461

  20. Diagnostic approaches to acute transfusion reactions.

    PubMed

    Leo, A; Pedal, I

    2010-06-01

    The erroneous transfusion of ABO-incompatible red cells may lead to life-threatening hemolysis and complement-induced shock, resulting in death in less than 10% of cases (acute hemolytic transfusion reaction, AHTR). Identification of the cause of an erroneous transfusion is accomplished in nearly all incidents merely by checking the identity of the patient, blood sample and blood bag. The erroneous transfusion is confirmed by serological and--in the case of a fatality- immunohistochemical methods. The differential diagnosis should rule out transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), other immunologically triggered causes such as febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR) or allergic reactions, but also nonimmunological causes such as bacterial contamination of the blood components, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) and other rare events such as citrate overload or embolism (by air or debris). In the case of a fatality, evaluation of a patient's medical records, serological and microbiological analyses, autopsy and histology, taken together, clarify questions of causality. PMID:20140541

  1. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury].

    PubMed

    Tank, S; Sputtek, A; Kiefmann, R

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) developed into the leading cause of transfusion-related morbidity and mortality after the first description by Popovsky et al. approximately three decades ago. It was the most frequent reason for transfusion-related fatalities worldwide before implementation of risk minimization strategies by donor selection. Plasma-rich blood products, such as fresh frozen plasma and apheresis platelets seem to be the leading triggers of TRALI. Hypoxemia and development of pulmonary edema within 6 h of transfusion are the diagnostic criteria for TRALI. The differentiation between cardiac failure and other transfusion-related lung injuries, such astransfusion-associated circulatory overload ( TACO) is difficult and causal treatment is not available. Therapy is based on supportive measures, such as oxygen insufflationor mechanical ventilation. The exactly pathogenesis is still unknown but the most propagated hypothesis is the two-event-model. Neutrophils are primed by the underlying condition, e.g. sepsis or trauma during the first event and these primed neutrophils are activated by transfused leukoagglutinating antibodies (immunogen) or bioreactive mediators (non-immunogen) during the second-event. Transfusion of leukoagglutinating antibodies from female donors with one or more previous pregnancies is the most frequent reason. No more TRALI fatalities were reported after implementation of the donor selection in Germany in 2009. PMID:23558721

  2. Quality of transfusion products in blood banking.

    PubMed

    Franchini, Massimo; Capuzzo, Enrico; Turdo, Rosalia; Glingani, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    The primary goal in transfusion medicine and cellular therapies is to promote high standards of quality and produce ever safer and more efficacious products. The establishment of a transfusion service quality management system, which includes several organizational structures, responsibilities, policies, processes, procedures, and resources, is now mandatory and widely regulated worldwide. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the quality system in transfusion medicine as applied to the production of blood components, including red blood cells, platelets, and fresh frozen plasma. PMID:24474089

  3. [Blood transfusion and supply chain management safety].

    PubMed

    Quaranta, Jean-François; Caldani, Cyril; Cabaud, Jean-Jacques; Chavarin, Patricia; Rochette-Eribon, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    The level of safety attained in blood transfusion now makes this a discipline better managed care activities. This was achieved both by scientific advances and policy decisions regulating and supervising the activity, as well as by the quality system, which we recall that affects the entire organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, processes and resources in place to achieve quality management. So, an effective quality system provides a framework within which activities are established, performed in a quality-focused way and continuously monitored to improve outcomes. This system quality has to irrigate all the actors of the transfusion, just as much the establishments of blood transfusion than the health establishments. PMID:25578550

  4. Transfusion associated circulatory overload: a critical incident.

    PubMed

    Goodall, E

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a serious but under-recognised complication of blood transfusion. While the exact incidence rate is unknown the associated morbidity and mortality make this a transfusion reaction worthy of attention. This article provides details of a critical incident involving TACO followed by a literature review and discussion written from the perspective of a student ODP. The goal of this article is to raise awareness of TACO amongst hospital staff to facilitate faster recognition and earlier intervention in future events. PMID:24516967

  5. Post-partum sequential occurrence of two diverse transfusion reactions (transfusion associated circulatory overload and transfusion related acute lung injury).

    PubMed

    Haldar, Rudrashish; Samanta, Sukhen

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) are two dissimilar pathological conditions associated with transfusion of blood products where the time course of the events and clinical presentation overlap leading to uncertainty in establishing the diagnosis and initiating the treatment, which otherwise differs. We encountered a case where a patient of post-partum hemorrhage developed TACO in the immediate post-operative period due to aggressive resuscitative attempts with blood products. The patient's condition was appropriately diagnosed and was managed according to the clinical scenario, and the condition abated. Subsequently, on the third post-operative day the patient again required blood product transfusions following which the patient developed TRALI, the diagnosis of which was also established and adequate treatment strategy was undertaken. PMID:24339663

  6. Blood Donation and Transfusion: A Primer for Health Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felts, W. Michael; Glascoff, Mary A.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a primer for health educators about blood donation and transfusion, examining the nature of human blood, the background of blood transfusion, blood donation criteria, risks related to homologous blood transfusion, directed blood donation, potential alternatives to homologous transfusion, and resources for education on the subject. (SM)

  7. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  8. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  9. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  10. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... of transfusion reactions on a continuous basis through a CLIA-certified laboratory or a laboratory... transfusion reactions. The facility must have procedures for preventing transfusion reactions and when necessary, promptly identify, investigate, and report blood and blood product transfusion reactions to...

  11. Transfusion transmitted diseases in perioperative and intensive care settings.

    PubMed

    Das, Rekha; Hansda, Upendra

    2014-09-01

    Patients in the perioperative period and intensive care unit are commonly exposed to blood transfusion (BT). They are at increased risk of transfusion transmitted bacterial, viral and protozoal diseases. The risk of viral transmission has decreased steadily, but the risk of bacterial transmission remains same. Bacterial contamination is more in platelet concentrates than in red cells and least in plasma. The chances of sepsis, morbidity and mortality depend on the number of transfusions and underlying condition of the patient. Challenges to safe BT continue due to new emerging pathogens and various management problems. Strategies to restrict BT, optimal surgical and anaesthetic techniques to reduce blood loss and efforts to develop transfusion alternatives should be made. Literature search was performed using search words/phrases blood transfusion, transfusion, transfusion transmitted diseases, transfusion transmitted bacterial diseases, transfusion transmitted viral diseases, transfusion transmitted protozoal diseases or combinations, on PubMed and Google Scholar from 1990 to 2014. PMID:25535416

  12. The hazards of blood transfusion in historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Harvey G.

    2008-01-01

    The beginning of the modern era of blood transfusion coincided with World War II and the resultant need for massive blood replacement. Soon thereafter, the hazards of transfusion, particularly hepatitis and hemolytic transfusion reactions, became increasingly evident. The past half century has seen the near eradication of transfusion-associated hepatitis as well as the emergence of multiple new pathogens, most notably HIV. Specific donor screening assays and other interventions have minimized, but not eliminated, infectious disease transmission. Other transfusion hazards persist, including human error resulting in the inadvertent transfusion of incompatible blood, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), and transfusion-induced immunomodulation. These infectious and noninfectious hazards are reviewed briefly in the context of their historical evolution. PMID:18809775

  13. Blood doping: the flip side of transfusion and transfusion alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cacic, Daniel Limi; Hervig, Tor; Seghatchian, Jerard

    2013-08-01

    Blood doping in sports has been a hot topic of present. Longitudinal follow up of hematological parameters in different endurance sports, during the 1990s and early 2000s, has provided considerable suspicions about extensive blood manipulation, with performance enhancing effects. Recent doping revelations in the media also prove that blood doping is not an anticipated myth but it is, in fact, real. Erythropoiesis stimulating agents and autologous blood transfusions are used in synergy with substantial effect on the maximum oxygen uptake and delivery to muscles. Whilst both methods of blood manipulation represent a potential health hazard, in the context of an elevated hematocrit, nevertheless despite a number of suspicious deaths amongst athletes, this has not yet been fully documented. A reliable test for detection of recombinant human erythropoietin was implemented in 2000, but this is probably circumvented by microdose regimens. The Athlete's Biological Passport represents the progeny of the idea of an indirect approach based on long term monitoring of hematological parameters, thus making it possible to detect autologous blood doping and erythropoietin use after the substance is excreted. Nevertheless with advances in anti-doping measures it is possible that the levels of excretion of substances used can be masked. Clearly more sensitive and specific diagnostic tools and research/development in these areas of major concern are warranted, which, combined with changes in the athlete's attitude, will help in reaching the vision of fair play. PMID:23791798

  14. Association of Prehospital Shock Index and Trauma Bay Uncrossmatched Red Blood Cell Transfusion With Multiple Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Day, Darcy L; Anzelon, Kathleen M; Conde, Franscisco A

    2016-01-01

    Early resuscitation of bleeding trauma patients with multiple blood products improves outcome, yet transfusion initiation is not standardized. Shock index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) and trauma bay uncrossmatched red blood cell (RBC) transfusion were evaluated for association with multiple transfusions, defined as 6 or more RBCs during the first 6 hrs of hospital presentation. A prehospital shock index of 1 was significantly associated with multiple transfusions (p = .02). Subjects receiving uncrossmatched RBCs required more RBCs during the first 6 hrs (10.3 units, p < .01). Consideration of these simple variables may help trauma nurses anticipate the potentially bleeding patient. PMID:26953537

  15. [Correct preparation of a transfusion: Part 1].

    PubMed

    Strobel, E; Henschler, R

    2014-09-01

    The administration of blood products is strictly regulated. Several weeks before the operation the preparation for transfusion begins with optimizing the patient's hematological and hemostaseological situation. In elective surgery blood group testing and antibody screening are performed soon after admission of the patient. The identification of the blood sample is important. Informed consent of the recipient has to be obtained. On the day before the operation a further blood sample is necessary for cross-matching if red blood cells are to be transfused. Usually blood products are issued for immediate administration. Before transfusion begins the blood product has to be checked, the identity of the patient must be controlled and in the case of red blood cell transfusions the AB0 bedside test has to be performed. PMID:25085082

  16. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  17. Why an alternative to blood transfusion?

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2009-04-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusions have been associated with several risks and complications and with worse outcomes in a substantial number of patient populations and clinical scenarios. Allogeneic blood is costly and difficult to procure, transport, and store. Global and local shortages are imminent. Alternatives to transfusion provide many advantages, and their use is likely to improve outcomes as safer and more effective agents are developed. PMID:19341908

  18. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  19. Blood transfusion costs: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Forbes, J M; Anderson, M D; Anderson, G F; Bleecker, G C; Rossi, E C; Moss, G S

    1991-05-01

    The cost of delivering a unit of blood (whole blood or red cells) to a hospitalized patient was examined in 19 United States teaching hospitals. The average hospital acquisition cost was calculated by using the prices charged by regional blood centers for blood products. To this cost was added an estimate of costs incurred by hospitals for handling, testing, and administering blood. Across study sites, the average hospital cost per unit transfused was $155 and the average charge to the patient was $219. Acquisition cost, the price that hospitals pay for blood, was 37 percent of the total cost to the hospital; the other 63 percent of the hospital cost included costs for blood bank handling (13%), laboratory tests (43%), and blood administration (7%). Significant variations in blood transfusion cost were found within our sample. Most of the variability can be attributed to geographic location of the blood supply source, type of red cell product transfused, prices charged by blood transfusion services, and the frequency of laboratory tests. The results of this transfusion cost study may be helpful in determining the costs of health care delivery, especially when blood transfusions are indicated. PMID:2020994

  20. Evolution in a centralized transfusion service.

    PubMed

    AuBuchon, James P; Linauts, Sandra; Vaughan, Mimi; Wagner, Jeffrey; Delaney, Meghan; Nester, Theresa

    2011-12-01

    The metropolitan Seattle area has utilized a centralized transfusion service model throughout the modern era of blood banking. This approach has used four laboratories to serve over 20 hospitals and clinics, providing greater capabilities for all at a lower consumption of resources than if each depended on its own laboratory and staff for these functions. In addition, this centralized model has facilitated wider use of the medical capabilities of the blood center's physicians, and a county-wide network of transfusion safety officers is now being developed to increase the impact of the blood center's transfusion expertise at the patient's bedside. Medical expectations and traffic have led the blood center to evolve the centralized model to include on-site laboratories at facilities with complex transfusion requirements (e.g., a children's hospital) and to implement in all the others a system of remote allocation. This new capability places a refrigerator stocked with uncrossmatched units in the hospital but retains control over the dispensing of these through the blood center's computer system; the correct unit can be electronically cross-matched and released on demand, obviating the need for transportation to the hospital and thus speeding transfusion. This centralized transfusion model has withstood the test of time and continues to evolve to meet new situations and ensure optimal patient care. PMID:22150685

  1. [Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO)].

    PubMed

    Okazaki, Hitoshi

    2013-05-01

    In recent years, much attention has been paid to respiratory complications of transfusion. Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined as an acute lung injury that is temporally associated with blood transfusion. TRALI is one of the leading causes of mortality. Although the etiology of TRALI is not fully understood, one of its main causes is thought to be anti-leukocyte antibodies, such as HLA antibody or HNA antibody. A precautionary male-predominant plasma strategy has been implemented in many developed countries, which has resulted in considerable achievements in reducing the incidence of TRALI. Meanwhile, transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) has emerged as a major differential diagnosis of TRALI. TACO is a well-known complication of transfusion, which has been considered not as a side effect of transfusion but a result of erroneous medical practice. It has long been an under-reported complication of transfusion and has not been investigated scientifically. Recent data on transfusion mortality from the Food and Drug Administration revealed that TACO was the second highest cause of death in the United States. Our data also suggested a steep increase in the reported cases of TACO in Japan. Precautionary measures should also be implemented for this emerging complication. PMID:23947178

  2. Legal and ethical issues in safe blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, Shivaram; Kantharaj, Ambuja

    2014-01-01

    Legal issues play a vital role in providing a framework for the Indian blood transfusion service (BTS), while ethical issues pave the way for quality. Despite licensing of all blood banks, failure to revamp the Drugs and Cosmetic Act (D and C Act) is impeding quality. Newer techniques like chemiluminescence or nucleic acid testing (NAT) find no mention in the D and C Act. Specialised products like pooled platelet concentrates or modified whole blood, therapeutic procedures like erythropheresis, plasma exchange, stem cell collection and processing technologies like leukoreduction and irradiation are not a part of the D and C Act. A highly fragmented BTS comprising of over 2500 blood banks, coupled with a slow and tedious process of dual licensing (state and centre) is a hindrance to smooth functioning of blood banks. Small size of blood banks compromises blood safety. New blood banks are opened in India by hospitals to meet requirements of insurance providers or by medical colleges as this a Medical Council of India (MCI) requirement. Hospital based blood banks opt for replacement donation as they are barred by law from holding camps. Demand for fresh blood, lack of components, and lack of guidelines for safe transfusion leads to continued abuse of blood. Differential pricing of blood components is difficult to explain scientifically or ethically. Accreditation of blood banks along with establishment of regional testing centres could pave the way to blood safety. National Aids Control Organisation (NACO) and National Blood Transfusion Council (NBTC) deserve a more proactive role in the licensing process. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) needs to clarify that procedures or tests meant for enhancement of blood safety are not illegal. PMID:25535417

  3. [Single-donor protocol: Transfusion practices and multiple transfusion risk factors in neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Dollat, C; Pierron, C; Keslick, A; Billoir, E; François, A; Jarreau, P-H

    2016-09-01

    In France since 2002, the single-donor transfusion protocol, using four pediatric units from the same adult donor's packed red blood cells (PRBCs) in multiply transfused newborns, is recommended in preterm neonates to reduce the risks of infection and alloimmunization. This protocol is controversial, however, because it causes the transfusion of stored blood, which could have adverse consequences. Before the new recommendations of the French Haute Autorité de santé (National authority for health) in 2015, we conducted a national practice survey in 63 neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and a retrospective study of the characteristics of 103 children transfused within our unit, to better target beneficiaries. The practice survey showed that 30 % of French NICUs no longer used the protocol in 2014, due to logistical or financial problems, or concerns about the transfusion of stored blood. The practices were heterogeneous. Few NICUs used a written protocol. In our NICU, the use of single-donor protocol involved the use of units stored for more than 20 days in half of the cases beginning with the third unit used. Six-term newborns were mainly transfused once, which does not seem to warrant the single-donor transfusion protocol. The use of this protocol caused the loss of 50 % of the manufactured units, which go unused. In multivariate analysis, two factors were predictive of multiple transfusion within our population of 95 premature neonates undergoing transfusion: low-term and a high Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) score. The risk of multiple transfusions would be reduced by about 15 % for each additional week of gestation and approximately 16 % per point within the CRIB score. These variables integrated into a statistical model predict the risk of multiplying transfusions. According to the ROC curve, a calculated risk higher than 50 % is the appropriate cut-off value to transfuse with the single-donor transfusion protocol. This would limit its

  4. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    PubMed

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. PMID:23643789

  5. Natural Variation of Heterokaryon Incompatibility Gene het-c in Podospora anserina Reveals Diversifying Selection

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J.M.; Aanen, Duur K.; van Diepeningen, Anne D.; Saupe, Sven J.; Paoletti, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    In filamentous fungi, allorecognition takes the form of heterokaryon incompatibility, a cell death reaction triggered when genetically distinct hyphae fuse. Heterokaryon incompatibility is controlled by specific loci termed het-loci. In this article, we analyzed the natural variation in one such fungal allorecognition determinant, the het-c heterokaryon incompatibility locus of the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina. The het-c locus determines an allogenic incompatibility reaction together with two unlinked loci termed het-d and het-e. Each het-c allele is incompatible with a specific subset of the het-d and het-e alleles. We analyzed variability at the het-c locus in a population of 110 individuals, and in additional isolates from various localities. We identified a total of 11 het-c alleles, which define 7 distinct incompatibility specificity classes in combination with the known het-d and het-e alleles. We found that the het-c allorecognition gene of P. anserina is under diversifying selection. We find a highly unequal allele distribution of het-c in the population, which contrasts with the more balanced distribution of functional groups of het-c based on their allorecognition function. One explanation for the observed het-c diversity in the population is its function in allorecognition. However, alleles that are most efficient in allorecognition are rare. An alternative and not exclusive explanation for the observed diversity is that het-c is involved in pathogen recognition. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a homolog of het-c is a pathogen effector target, supporting this hypothesis. We hypothesize that the het-c diversity in P. anserina results from both its functions in pathogen-defense, and allorecognition. PMID:24448643

  6. Natural variation of heterokaryon incompatibility gene het-c in Podospora anserina reveals diversifying selection.

    PubMed

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J M; Aanen, Duur K; van Diepeningen, Anne D; Saupe, Sven J; Paoletti, Mathieu

    2014-04-01

    In filamentous fungi, allorecognition takes the form of heterokaryon incompatibility, a cell death reaction triggered when genetically distinct hyphae fuse. Heterokaryon incompatibility is controlled by specific loci termed het-loci. In this article, we analyzed the natural variation in one such fungal allorecognition determinant, the het-c heterokaryon incompatibility locus of the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina. The het-c locus determines an allogenic incompatibility reaction together with two unlinked loci termed het-d and het-e. Each het-c allele is incompatible with a specific subset of the het-d and het-e alleles. We analyzed variability at the het-c locus in a population of 110 individuals, and in additional isolates from various localities. We identified a total of 11 het-c alleles, which define 7 distinct incompatibility specificity classes in combination with the known het-d and het-e alleles. We found that the het-c allorecognition gene of P. anserina is under diversifying selection. We find a highly unequal allele distribution of het-c in the population, which contrasts with the more balanced distribution of functional groups of het-c based on their allorecognition function. One explanation for the observed het-c diversity in the population is its function in allorecognition. However, alleles that are most efficient in allorecognition are rare. An alternative and not exclusive explanation for the observed diversity is that het-c is involved in pathogen recognition. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a homolog of het-c is a pathogen effector target, supporting this hypothesis. We hypothesize that the het-c diversity in P. anserina results from both its functions in pathogen-defense, and allorecognition. PMID:24448643

  7. Platelet transfusion therapy: from 1973 to 2005.

    PubMed

    Brand, Anneke; Novotny, Vera; Tomson, Bert

    2006-06-01

    Platelet transfusions are indispensable for supportive care of patients with hematological diseases. We describe the developments in platelet products for transfusion since the 1970s, when, in particular, support for patients with allo-antibodies against human leukocyte antigens was a laborious exercise with a high failure rate. Currently, due to many stepwise innovations, platelet transfusions are of low immunogenicity and sufficiently available, they have a shelf life up to 7 days, and even matched platelets can often be routinely delivered, provided that there is good communication between all partners in the chain. Future improvements can be expected from uniform type and screen approaches for immunized patients and cross-matching by computer. For efficient use of health care resources, blood banks and stem cell donor banks could share their typed donor files. PMID:16728262

  8. When to consider transfusion therapy for patients with non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia

    PubMed Central

    Taher, A T; Radwan, A; Viprakasit, V

    2015-01-01

    Non-transfusion-dependent thalassaemia (NTDT) refers to all thalassaemia disease phenotypes that do not require regular blood transfusions for survival. Thalassaemia disorders were traditionally concentrated along the tropical belt stretching from sub-Saharan Africa through the Mediterranean region and the Middle East to South and South-East Asia, but global migration has led to increased incidence in North America and Northern Europe. Transfusionists may be familiar with β-thalassaemia major because of the lifelong transfusions needed by these patients. Although patients with NTDT do not require regular transfusions for survival, they may require transfusions in some instances such as pregnancy, infection or growth failure. The complications associated with NTDT can be severe if not properly managed, and many are directly related to chronic anaemia. Awareness of NTDT is important, and this review will outline the factors that should be taken into consideration when deciding whether to initiate and properly plan for transfusion therapy in these patients in terms of transfusion interval and duration of treatment. PMID:25286743

  9. Appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell transfusion: the international consensus conference on transfusion outcomes.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh; Fink, Arlene; Javidroozi, Mazyar; Erhard, Jochen; Farmer, Shannon L; Corwin, Howard; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim; Hofmann, Axel; Isbister, James; Ozawa, Sherri; Spahn, Donat R

    2011-07-01

    An international multidisciplinary panel of 15 experts reviewed 494 published articles and used the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to determine the appropriateness of allogeneic red blood cell (RBC) transfusion based on its expected impact on outcomes of stable nonbleeding patients in 450 typical inpatient medical, surgical, or trauma scenarios. Panelists rated allogeneic RBC transfusion as appropriate in 53 of the scenarios (11.8%), inappropriate in 267 (59.3%), and uncertain in 130 (28.9%). Red blood cell transfusion was most often rated appropriate (81%) in scenarios featuring patients with hemoglobin (Hb) level 7.9 g/dL or less, associated comorbidities, and age older than 65 years. Red blood cell transfusion was rated inappropriate in all scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 10 g/dL or more and in 71.3% of scenarios featuring patients with Hb level 8 to 9.9 g/dL. Conversely, no scenario with patient's Hb level of 8 g/dL or more was rated as appropriate. Nearly one third of all scenarios were rated uncertain, indicating the need for more research. The observation that allogeneic RBC transfusions were rated as either inappropriate or uncertain in most scenarios in this study supports a more judicious transfusion strategy. In addition, the large number of scenarios in which RBC transfusions were rated as uncertain can serve as a road map to identify areas in need of further investigation. PMID:21498040

  10. Where are the systematic reviews in transfusion medicine? A study of the transfusion evidence base.

    PubMed

    Dorée, Carolyn; Stanworth, Simon; Brunskill, Susan J; Hopewell, Sally; Hyde, Chris J; Murphy, Mike F

    2010-10-01

    Transfusion medicine has become a large and complex specialty. Although there are now systematic reviews covering many aspects of transfusion, these span a large number of clinical areas and are published across more than a hundred different medical journals, making it difficult for transfusion medicine practitioners and researchers to keep abreast of the current high-level evidence. In response to this problem, NHS Blood and Transplant's Systematic Review Initiative (SRI) has produced a comprehensive overview of systematic reviews in transfusion medicine. A systematic search (to December 2009) and screening procedure were followed by the appraisal of systematic reviews according to predefined inclusion criteria. The 340 eligible systematic reviews were mapped to 10 transfusion intervention groups and 14 topic groups within clinical medicine. Trends in the systematic review literature were examined and gaps in the literature described. The spread of systematic reviews across clinical areas was found to be very uneven, with some areas underreviewed and others with multiple systematic reviews on the same topic, making the identification of the best evidence for current transfusion practice a continuing challenge. References and links to all systematic reviews included in this overview can be freely accessed via the SRI's new online database, the Transfusion Evidence Library (www.transfusionguidelines.org). PMID:20851331

  11. [Preventing deficiencies in the transfusion process].

    PubMed

    Hergon, E; Rouger, P; Garnerin, P

    1994-01-01

    The methods of system reliability analysis represent an interesting set of tools used to follow the so-called "transfusion process", defined as all the steps from donors sensitization to recipients follow-up. FMECA, (Failure Mode Effects and Criticality Analysis), can be used as a prevention tool, independently of any dysfunction in the process. Of course, it can equally be used following a failure, in order to analyse the causes and to apply the specific corrections. Quality insurance, system reliability analysis, epidemiologic surveillance and safety monitoring operate in synergy. These three issues pertaining to transfusion safety constitute a dynamic system. PMID:7881591

  12. Platelet Transfusion and Thrombosis: More Questions than Answers.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Amy E; Refaai, Majed A; Blumberg, Neil

    2016-03-01

    Platelets perform a vital role in hemostasis and their role in inflammation is becoming increasingly evident. Blood transfusion is the most common procedure performed in hospitals and platelet transfusions comprise a significant proportion. Over the past few decades, retrospective studies and randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that blood transfusion is more harmful than previously thought and is associated with numerous complications, such as transfusion-associated lung injury, transfusion-associated cardiac overload, transfusion-associated immune modulation, and infectious diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, and hepatitis B virus. Recent data suggest an association between platelet transfusion and thrombosis. This review will highlight the mechanistic issues that may be relevant to the epidemiologic associations of platelet transfusion with thrombosis and mortality in critically ill patients. PMID:26716501

  13. [Indications and surveillance of platelet transfusions in surgery].

    PubMed

    Coffe, C; Bardiaux, L; Couteret, Y; Devillers, M; Leroy, M; Morel, P; Pouthier-Stein, F; Hervé, P

    1995-01-01

    Surgery, after hematology, is the biggest consumer of homologous platelet concentrates. Platelet transfusion is indicated to prevent or control bleeding associated with deficiencies in platelet number or function. In surgery, general patterns (in function of pre-surgery platelet count) can be adopted in most of the indications for platelets. In emergency situations, and in some particular cases (related to the patient, the type of operation, etc.), the transfusion procedure depends on the team's experience, the results of the available clinical and biological tests, and the drugs. Strict monitoring is required during the transfusion procedure. The efficacy of the transfusion must be controlled 1 h and 24 hours after the transfusion, and a number of factors must be assessed, namely the immunological impact of the transfusion (on red blood cells, leukocytes and platelets) and the occurrence of infectious diseases transmitted via transfusion. In addition, for a possible future transfusion, a strategy must be proposed. PMID:7767484

  14. Transfusion strategies in patients undergoing stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radia, Rohini; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-04-01

    Hemopoietic stem-cell transplant patients may require intensive blood component support. Complications of transfusions include transmission of viral and bacterial infections, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Alloimmunization to red cell antigens may cause difficulties in selecting compatible blood, while alloimmunization to HLA expressed on platelets may cause subsequent platelet transfusion refractoriness. It is essential to define robust transfusion policies and procedures and these should be regularly audited. This article reviews blood component transfusion in the setting of hemopoietic stem-cell transplant and specifically discusses the management of ABO-mismatched transplants, the prevention of cytomegalovirus transmission, the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and the use of granulocyte transfusions. PMID:21495930

  15. Transfusion-related acute lung injury; clinical perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongmin

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) was introduced in 1983 to describe a clinical syndrome seen within 6 h of a plasma-containing blood products transfusion. TRALI is a rare transfusion complication; however, the FDA has suggested that TRALI is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. Understanding the pathogenesis of TRALI will facilitate adopting preventive strategies, such as deferring high plasma volume female product donors. This review outlines the clinical features, pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of TRALI. PMID:25844126

  16. Why People with Cancer Might Need Blood Transfusions

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Blood Transfusion and Donation + - Text Size Download Printable Version [PDF] » TOPICS Document ... Possible risks of blood transfusions Alternatives to blood transfusions Donating blood Blood donation by cancer survivors To learn more References Previous ...

  17. Red Blood Cell Transfusion and Transfusion Alternatives in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Andreas H; Le Roux, Peter

    2012-02-01

    OPINION STATEMENT: Anemia develops in about 50% of patients hospitalized with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and is recognized as a cause of secondary brain injury. This review examines the effects of anemia and transfusion on TBI patients through a literature search to identify original research on anemia and transfusion in TBI, the effects of transfusion on brain physiology, and the role of erythropoietin or hemoglobin-based blood substitutes (HBBSs). However, the amount of high-quality, prospective data available to help make decisions about when TBI patients should be transfused is very small. Randomized transfusion trials have involved far too few TBI patients to reach definitive conclusions. Thus, it is hardly surprising that there is widespread practice variation. In our opinion, a hemoglobin transfusion threshold of 7 g/dL cannot yet be considered safe for TBI patients admitted to hospital, and in particular to the ICU, as it is for other critically ill patients. Red blood cell transfusions often have immediate, seemingly beneficial effects on cerebral physiology, but the magnitude of this effect may depend in part upon how long the cells have been stored before administration. In light of existing physiological data, we generally aim to keep hemoglobin concentrations greater than 9 g/dL during the first several days after TBI. In part, the decision is based on the patient's risk of or development of secondary ischemia or brain injury. An increasing number of centers use multimodal neurologic monitoring, which may help to individualize transfusion goals based on the degree of cerebral hypoxia or metabolic distress. When available, brain tissue oxygen tension values less than 15-20 mm Hg or a lactate:pyruvate ratio greater than 30-40 would influence us to use more aggressive hemoglobin correction (e.g., a transfusion threshold of 10 g/dL). Clinicians can attempt to reduce transfusion requirements by limiting phlebotomy, minimizing hemodilution, and

  18. [Transfusion safety. Introduction and identifying the problem].

    PubMed

    Ambriz Fernández, Raúl

    2013-01-01

    The problems that exist in our country in the security of the transfusion chain affect every step in the recruitment, donor selection, and aseptic collection, screening tests, production of blood components, storage, transportation and transfusion to recipient. Some of which can lead to fatal cases or moving slowly because of the fragmentation of our health system.With the principles of ethics, we must move towards a unified national blood system overcoming the conflicts of interest that affect the impact on administrative certifications; decrease the irrational use of resources, optimize costs and achieve a transfusion medicine security system and haemovigilance of the at the hospital. There has to be some regional blood banks well-coordinated in health institutions, with central management systems of quality and more specialized procedures,the latter can be achieved with more than 150 public blood banks, transforming them into positions of blood collection of voluntary donation of repetition. The resources would be released equip regional banks. Also required to provide education and legislation ad hoc for goals in voluntary blood donation and focused mainly the university population and centralize information for haemovigilance based computer systems specific hospitals, that reduce errors and restrict risk blood components involved in fatal cases, and reduce the possibility of punitive actions. It has international advice of the whole transfusion chain. PMID:23435078

  19. Precautions and Adverse Reactions during Blood Transfusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfused blood after it is collected. In addition to an increase in temperature, the person has chills and sometimes headache or back pain. Sometimes the person also has symptoms of an allergic reaction such as itching or a rash. Usually, acetaminophen ...

  20. [Autologous transfusion in obstetrics and fetal safety].

    PubMed

    Rech, F; Patella, A; Cecchi, A; Ippolito, M; Indraccolo, S R

    1994-06-01

    It is common knowledge that for modern medicine transfusion therapy represents a precious resource and an often mandatory option. It is equally known that autohemotransfusion (or autologous transfusion) provides further advantages: certainty of blood availability when necessary, absence of transfusion reactions, elimination of the risk of infections that is still associated with the traditional homologous transfusions. In its most widespread application, autotransfusion provides for the donation of one or more units of autologous blood, mostly before elective surgery. Even in obstetrics the practice of autologous blood donation with the aim of autotransfusion is finding increasing employment. However, there are still controversial aspects and the need is pointed out for more authoritative verifications as refers to the alleged innocuity to the fetus of acute maternal blood loss. The present study was performed to contribute personal experience to a better definition of the possible interactions between autologous blood donation during pregnancy and unborn child welfare. To this end, 80 term pregnant women underwent fetal heart rate electronic monitoring before, during and after the donation of one unit of autologous blood. Both during and after the phlebotomy there were no cardiotocographic signs of fetal hypo-oxygenation. Even the non stress tests performed at a distance of 24 hours and those that were periodically repeated afterwards were normal, confirming the safety of autologous predonation during pregnancy. However, the authors think that in obstetrics it is still premature to consider the experimental phase of autotransfusion as definitively exhausted. PMID:7936387

  1. Economic impact of blood transfusions: balancing cost and benefits.

    PubMed

    Oge, Tufan; Kilic, Cemil Hakan; Kilic, Gokhan Sami

    2014-02-01

    Blood transfusions may be lifesaving, but they inherit their own risks. Risk of transfusion to benefit is a delicate balance. In addition, blood product transfusions purchases are one of the largest line items among the hospital and laboratory charges. In this review, we aimed to discuss the transfusion strategies and share our transfusion protocol as well as the steps for hospitals to build-up a blood management program while all these factors weight in. Moreover, we evaluate the financial burden to the health care system. PMID:25610294

  2. Transfusion reaction identification and management at the bedside.

    PubMed

    Crookston, Kendall P; Koenig, Sara C; Reyes, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Blood product transfusion is one of the most common invasive procedures performed in the health care setting. In contrast to pharmaceuticals, blood is actually a liquid transplant. Transfusion complications consequently encompass complex biological processes and infectious possibilities. Changes in vital signs are regularly seen during transfusion. Knowledge of common transfusion reaction signs and symptoms enables the clinical team to differentiate a normal patient response from a life-threatening reaction. Direct care nurses responsible for this procedure play a vital role in its success. Understanding the possible complications of transfusion and how to quickly recognize reactions at the bedside helps ensure the best patient outcomes. PMID:25723832

  3. Precautions surrounding blood transfusion in autoimmune haemolytic anaemias are overestimated

    PubMed Central

    Yürek, Salih; Mayer, Beate; Almahallawi, Mohammed; Pruss, Axel; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Background It is very evident that many precautions are taken regarding transfusion of red blood cells in patients with autoimmune haemolytic anaemia. Frequently, considerable efforts are made to examine the indication and serological compatibility prior to transfusion in such patients. However, at times, this may unnecessarily jeopardize patients who urgently require a red blood cell transfusion. Materials and methods Thirty-six patients with warm-type autoimmune haemolytic anaemia were included in this study. All patients had reactive serum autoantibodies and required blood transfusion. Standard serological assays were employed for the detection and characterization of antibodies to red blood cells. Results A positive direct antiglobulin test was observed in all 36 patients, in addition to detectable antibodies in both the eluate and serum. Significant alloantibodies were detected in the serum samples of three patients (anti-c, anti-JKa, and anti-E). In 32 patients, red blood cell transfusion was administered with no significant haemolytic transfusion reactions due to auto- and/or allo-antibodies. Due to overestimation of positive cross-matches three patients received no transfusion or delayed transfusion and died, and one patient died due to unrecognised blood loss and anaemia which was attributed to an ineffective red blood cell transfusion. Discussion Many of the reported recommendations regarding transfusion of red blood cells in autoimmune haemolytic anaemia are highly questionable, and positive serological cross-matches should not result in a delay or refusal of necessary blood transfusions. PMID:26192772

  4. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    van der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Furthermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfusion of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion or irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  5. Transfusion monitoring: care practice analysis in a public teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Valesca Nunes; Paixão, Isabella Bertolin; Perrone, Ana Carolina Amaral de São José; Monteiro, Maria Inês; dos Santos, Kelli Borges

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To analyze the process of recording transfusion monitoring at a public teaching hospital. Methods A descriptive and retrospective study with a quantitative approach, analyzing the instruments to record transfusion monitoring at a public hospital in a city in the State of Minas Gerais (MG). Data were collected on the correct completion of the instrument, time elapsed from transfusions, records of vital signs, type of blood component more frequently transfused, and hospital unit where transfusion was performed. Results A total of 1,012 records were analyzed, and 53.4% of them had errors in filling in the instruments, 6% of transfusions started after the recommended time, and 9.3% of patients had no vital signs registered. Conclusion Failures were identified in the process of recording transfusion monitoring, and they could result in more adverse events related to the administration of blood components. Planning and implementing strategies to enhance recording and to improve care delivered are challenging. PMID:27074233

  6. Bar code technology improves positive patient identification and transfusion safety.

    PubMed

    Sandler, S G; Langeberg, A; Dohnalek, L

    2005-01-01

    As a result of human error, an estimated 1 in 12,000 blood transfusions is given to the wrong patient. The cause of nearly all of these errors is failure of hospital personnel to identify positively intended transfusion recipients, their blood samples for cross-matching, or their correct blood components. We describe our experience using a point-of-care bar code transfusion safety system that links patients' bar-coded wristbands, with bar-coded labels on blood sample tubes, blood component bags, and nurses' identification badges. The result was 100 % accuracy of matching patients, their blood samples, and components for transfusions. For verifying information before starting blood transfusions, nurses preferred bar code "double checks" to conventional visual "double checks" by a second nurse. Methods are needed to reinforce nurses' proficiency with technological approaches to transfusion safety, such as software-driven bar code scanning, in situations where transfusions are administered infrequently. PMID:16050151

  7. Transfusion Associated Graft Versus Host Disease Following Whole Blood Transfusion from an Unrelated Donor in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ketan K.; Ranjan, Rajiv R.; Shah, Apurva P.

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a well-known complication of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD) is much less common and nearly uniformly fatal complication of blood transfusion. The risk factors underlying the development of TA- GVHD are incompletely defined, but it is commonly seen in individuals with congenital or acquired immunodeficiency, transfusions from blood relatives, intrauterine transfusions and HLA-matched platelet transfusions. Diagnosis of TA-GVHD may be difficult at a time due to rarity in occurrence and overlapping clinical features with various infections and drug reactions. We describe a case of transfusion-associated GVHD that occurred after transfusion of whole blood from unrelated donor in an immunocompetent patient. PMID:21886390

  8. [Anemia and transfusion therapy: an update].

    PubMed

    Madrazo-González, Z; García-Barrasa, A; Rodríguez-Lorenzo, L; Rafecas-Renau, A; Alonso-Fernández, G

    2011-01-01

    Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases in the general population and is a very frequently found condition in medical and surgical patients in all medical specialties. A good evaluation of its clinical impact and its therapeutic possibilities is essential. Allogenic blood transfusion is a useful procedure in anemia management, although it has important adverse effects. It is the responsibility of the clinician to know and to take into account all the available alternatives for the treatment of anemia. Blood transfusions, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, iron therapy (oral and endovenous) and other therapeutic alternatives must be rationally used, in accordance with the currently available clinical evidence. This review article summarizes some epidemiological characteristics of anemia, its clinical evaluation and the main therapeutic possibilities based on the present knowledge, placing special emphasis on the critically ill patient. PMID:20483506

  9. Blood transfusion: patient identification and empowerment.

    PubMed

    Stout, Lynn; Joseph, Sundari

    Positive patient identification is pivotal to several steps of the transfusion process; it is integral to ensuring that the correct blood is given to the correct patient. If patient misidentification occurs, this has potentially fatal consequences for patients. Historically patient involvement in healthcare has focused on clinical decision making, where the patient, having been provided with medical information, is encouraged to become involved in the decisions related to their individualised treatment. This article explores the aspects of patient contribution to patient safety relating to positive patient identification in transfusion. When involving patients in their care, however, clinicians must recognise the diversity of patients and the capacity of the patient to be involved. It must not be assumed that all patients will be willing or indeed able to participate. Additionally, clinicians' attitudes to patient involvement in patient safety can determine whether cultural change is successful. PMID:26878405

  10. Photodynamic decontamination of blood for transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Hur, Ehud; Margolis-Nunno, H.; Gottlieb, P.; Lustigman, S.; Horowitz, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    Currently transfused cellular components of blood are not available in a sterile form and carry a small risk of transmitting viral and parasite diseases. Using phthalocyanines and red light, lipid enveloped viruses, e.g., HIV-1, can be inactivated in red blood cell concentrates (RBCC). Under conditions leading to virus sterilization the blood borne parasites Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria) could be eliminated to undetectable levels (> 4 log10 kill). RBC damage during treatment could be avoided by increasing the light fluence rate to 80 mW/cm2, and by including the free radical scavenger glutathione and the vitamin E derivative Trolox during light exposure. Similar sterilization of platelet concentrates was achieved with the psoralen derivative AMT and UVA light. Platelet damage due to PUVA treatment was avoided by including the plant flavonoid rutin during irradiation. It is concluded that elimination of the risk of transmitting pathogens during blood transfusion is feasible with photochemical treatments.

  11. Autologous Blood Transfusion in Sports: Emerging Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Salamin, Olivier; De Angelis, Sara; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    Despite being prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency, blood doping through erythropoietin injection or blood transfusion is frequently used by athletes to increase oxygen delivery to muscles and enhance performance. In contrast with allogeneic blood transfusion and erythropoietic stimulants, there is presently no direct method of detection for autologous blood transfusion (ABT) doping. Blood reinfusion is currently monitored with individual follow-up of hematological variables via the athlete biological passport, which requires further improvement. Microdosage is undetectable, and suspicious profiles in athletes are often attributed to exposure to altitude, heat stress, or illness. Additional indirect biomarkers may increase the sensitivity and specificity of the longitudinal approach. The emergence of "-omics" strategies provides new opportunities to discover biomarkers for the indirect detection of ABT. With the development of direct quantitative methods, transcriptomics based on microRNA or messenger RNA expression is a promising approach. Because blood donation and blood reinfusion alter iron metabolism, quantification of proteins involved in metal metabolism, such as hepcidin, may be applied in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. As red blood cell (RBC) storage triggers changes in membrane proteins, proteomic methods have the potential to identify the presence of stored RBCs in blood. Alternatively, urine matrix can be used for the quantification of the plasticizer di(2-ethyhexyl)phthalate and its metabolites that originate from blood storage bags, suggesting recent blood transfusion, and have an important degree of sensitivity and specificity. This review proposes that various indirect biomarkers should be applied in combination with mathematical approaches for longitudinal monitoring aimed at improving ABT detection. PMID:27260108

  12. Factors Affecting Tissue Oxygenation in Erythrocyte Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Aykut, Güçlü; Yürük, Koray; İnce, Can

    2014-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusions are used to increase the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood in anemic states. But, because of the changes during storage of blood components and the specifics of preparation, erythrocytes may have controversial effects on tissue oxygenation and microcirculation. Also, the patient situation may play a role in the differing responses in oxygenation and microcirculation. In this review, the studies concerning the effects of banked blood and patient characteristics on microcirculation and tissue oxygenation are summarized. PMID:27366403

  13. Blood transfusion before radiation for malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, T.K. )

    1989-10-27

    This editorial discusses the situation of administering blood to patients prior to radiotherapy in an attempt to increase tissue/tumor oxygen tension. The author believes that since the rate at which tumor cells consume oxygen is highly variable, the aim of achieving high cellular oxygen tension may be met better by maintaining a high blood perfusion rate. Blood volume can be maintained without relying on transfusion, and safer alternatives are available.

  14. [Necessity of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Yuji

    2003-01-01

    The preventive effects of a 24-hour system of blood transfusion testing on mistyping of transfused blood was examined. Blood transfusion tests have been performed by blood transfusion technologists during working hours and by physicians at other times. In March 2000, we introduced a system in which technologists perform blood transfusion tests after working hours. Technologists of the Blood Transfusion Unit and Central Clinical Laboratory perform the test jointly, and column agglutination technology was introduced as the test method. A computer system setup exclusively for the testing was also introduced to perform computer cross-matching. Since transfusion error is likely to occur during emergency blood transfusion, a manual was established to prioritize safety. After introduction of the system, mistyping that may have been caused by inaccurate blood test results markedly decreased, confirming the usefulness of this system for prevention of mistyping. In addition, transfusion errors also decreased in wards and the improved system increased the safety of the entire medical care system. The frequency of mistyping was about 1% when physicians performed blood typing, showing the importance of clinical technologists for blood transfusion tests. PMID:12652691

  15. How we decide when a neonate needs a transfusion.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Vidheya; Khan, Rizwan; Curley, Anna; New, Helen; Stanworth, Simon

    2013-02-01

    The decision to transfuse a neonate can be approached by addressing a series of questions that cover the cause of anaemia, alternatives to transfusion, the need for transfusion and the risks. Recent clinical trials of red cell transfusions have started to inform evidence-based transfusion practice, but have raised uncertainties about neurological outcomes when policies advocating use of fewer red cell transfusions at lower haemoglobin concentration (Hb) thresholds were tested. Red cell transfusions should be considered when the Hb <120 g/l for premature neonates requiring mechanical ventilation support, with lower thresholds applying for oxygen-dependent neonates not requiring ventilation or for late anaemia (Hb <70-100 g/l, depending on gestational and post-natal age). There is no recent high quality evidence to inform thresholds for prophylactic platelet transfusions in stable non-bleeding premature neonates with platelet count levels of 50 × 10(9) /l, although common practice has become more restrictive, using lower safe thresholds for platelet transfusion between 20 and 30 × 10(9) /l. A more appropriate transfusion strategy for fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in neonates is one that emphasizes the therapeutic use of FFP in the face of bleeding, rather than prophylactic use in stable non-bleeding neonates who often have mild to moderate apparent abnormalities of standard coagulation tests, after allowing for appropriate reference ranges. PMID:23094805

  16. Effect of blood transfusions on canine renal allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Van Der Linden, C.J.; Buurman, W.A.; Vegt, P.A.; Greep, J.M.; Jeekel, J.

    1982-04-01

    In this study significantly prolonged canine renal allograft survival has been demonstrated after transfusion of 100 ml of third-party whole blood given peroperatively. Peroperative transfusions of third-party leukocyte-free blood or pure lymphocyte cell suspensions did not influence graft survival. Futhermore, no improvement in graft survival has been found after a peroperative transfuson of irradiated whole blood (2500 rad). These data suggest that delayed graft rejection after blood transfusions can only be expected after the administration of whole blood. The role of competent lymphocytes in whole blood is questionable, since a transfusion of irradiated whole blood in combination with nonirradiated lymphocytes did not lead to prolonged graft survival. Immunosuppression of the recipient directly after transfusion seems to be essential to induce the beneficial effect of blood transfusions. This has been demonstrated for a transfusion of whole blood 14 days before transplantation. A single transfusion of 100 ml of whole blood 14 days before transplantation could effectively prolong graft survival if immunosuppression with azathioprine and prednisone was started on the day of transfusion. No improvement in graft survival has been found with such a transfusion if preoperative immunosuppression has been omitted.

  17. Successful implementation of strategies to transform Emergency Department transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, Matthew J; Kelly, Sarah-Louise; Beckwith, Hannah; Innes, Catherine J; Manson, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an important and lifesaving Emergency Department (ED) procedure. It is not however risk-free and careful consideration of its clinical benefit for each individual patient is therefore essential. In 2008, we audited the patterns of blood component usage in 2007 within our ED. This work revealed that whilst 3209 units of blood component were ordered only 39.5% were transfused, and 9.5% were unaccounted for. This was the first and only published detailed look at ED blood transfusion practices. We had to address our poor traceability (i.e. unaccounted for units), our high blood usage, and our ordering of units which were then not transfused as this can lead to wastage. Firstly, better links between the ED and the Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) were established. A set of improvement measures were then implemented including better ED medical and nursing staff education, monthly traceability reports sent to the ED clinical management teams, the introduction of an ED transfusion guideline, moving our blood fridge into the resuscitation room, having a named ED transfusion consultant and ED transfusion link nurse, ED consultant representation on the Hospital Transfusion Group and finally increasing awareness of ED emergency transfusion with a rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) research programme. In 2012, we re-audited our practice looking at our blood component usage in 2011. There was a 64% reduction in blood component ordering (3209 vs. 1034 units), a 39% reduction in blood component transfusion (1131 vs. 687 units), a 68% increase in the proportion of ordered units that were transfused and a 96% reduction in unaccounted units (289 vs. 9 units) between 2007 and 2011. In attempting to cost the savings resulting from our changes we showed that SNBTS spent £306,437 less in 2011 compared to 2007 on handling and issuing ED transfusion requests. Our improvements are immediately generalizable across the UK and the potential

  18. Blood transfusion safety: a new philosophy.

    PubMed

    Franklin, I M

    2012-12-01

    Blood transfusion safety has had a chequered history, and there are current and future challenges. Internationally, there is no clear consensus for many aspects of the provision of safe blood, although pan-national legislation does provide a baseline framework in the European Union. Costs are rising, and new safety measures can appear expensive, especially when tested against some other medical interventions, such as cancer treatment and vaccination programmes. In this article, it is proposed that a comprehensive approach is taken to the issue of blood transfusion safety that considers all aspects of the process rather than considering only new measures. The need for an agreed level of safety for specified and unknown risks is also suggested. The importance of providing care and support for those inadvertently injured as a result of transfusion problems is also made. Given that the current blood safety decision process often uses a utilitarian principle for decision making--through the calculation of Quality Adjusted Life Years--an alternative philosophy is proposed. A social contract for blood safety, based on the principles of 'justice as fairness' developed by John Rawls, is recommended as a means of providing an agreed level of safety, containing costs and providing support for any adverse outcomes. PMID:23171300

  19. [Flow cytometry: applications in transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Boval, B

    2000-06-01

    In transfusion medicine, flow cytometry (FCM) is a methodology combining laser radiation, optics and a computerized treatment of numerous results. We can measure size, cellularity and fluorescence intensity of cells or particles in suspension after the binding of appropriate fluorescent antibodies or fluorescent dyes. The main utilisation of FCM in transfusion medicine is for quality control of the process of leukocyte reduction in red cell concentrates or in platelet units, using commercial kits. In addition, it is used for the enumeration of CD 34 positive cells before bone marrow transplantation and for control of platelet function in platelet units. For clinical investigations, FCM may be used for red cell phenotyping, essentially to detect minor populations (chimerism), for the estimation of red cell survival, or for the detection of fetal erythrocytes. In the field of platelet immunology, FCM is an essential tool for detecting platelet antibodies (auto or allo), for platelet phenotyping or for cross-matching. In the future perhaps, FCM will permit us to detect bacterial contamination or prion protein in transfused blood cells. PMID:10919227

  20. [Methologic contribution to blood transfusion materials surveillance].

    PubMed

    Roussel, P; Pujol-Rey, A; Arzur, C

    2001-08-01

    To reduce seriousness and frequency of iatrogenic risk implies prevention policies and efficient operational systems for vigilance. This risk management implies definition of precise organizations and procedures able to locate and to notify quickly undesirable events. This is the case about single use medical devices (SUMD) used in blood transfusion. This article is a contribution to the organisation of the implemented material vigilance in blood transfusion, collectively carried out with actors concerned (users, manufacturers, National Commission for Material Vigilance). It presents a lot of tools and methods to favour practices harmonization, as well as preventive a curative (specifications before purchase, main part of the quality contract between customer and supplier; internal control plan; index for medical device used in transfusion; illustrated glossaries for three main families of medical devices; index about symptomatic events; definitions of seriousness levels with their operational consequences; methods to manage a single use medical device judged as defective; tool for the review of incidents according to reference and batch). Then, the management of incidents about SUMD is presented within a material vigilance system integrated into the quality system of the institution, for user as for manufacturer. This is done in a chronological order with successively description of the incident, the assessment of the impact, the management of the associated risk, the periodical review of incidents and management of matters in dispute. PMID:11642028

  1. Transfusion-related acute lung injury: transfusion, platelets and biological response modifiers.

    PubMed

    Tariket, Sofiane; Sut, Caroline; Hamzeh-Cognasse, Hind; Laradi, Sandrine; Pozzetto, Bruno; Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice

    2016-05-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) may be induced by plasma, platelet concentrates and red blood cell concentrates. The mechanism leading to TRALI is thought to involve two steps. The priming step consists of previous inflammatory pathological conditions or external factors attracting leukocytes to lung vessels and creating conditions favorable for the second step, in which anti-HLA or anti-HNA antibodies or biologically active lipids, usually in transfused blood products, stress leukocytes and inflame lung epithelia. Platelets may be involved in the pathogenesis of TRALI because of their secretory potential and capacity to interact with other immune cells. There is no drug based-prophylaxis, but transfusion strategies are used to mitigate the risk of TRALI. PMID:26855042

  2. Transfusion practice and safety: current status and possibilities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Murphy, M F; Stanworth, S J; Yazer, M

    2011-01-01

    Audits of practice and incident reporting, most notably to national haemovigilance schemes, indicate that poor hospital transfusion practice is frequent and occasionally results in catastrophic consequences for patients. Improvements in practice are needed and depend on a combined approach including a better understanding of the causes of errors; a reduction in the complexity of routine procedures taking advantage of new technology systems, which enforce agreed guidelines and policies; the setting and regular monitoring of performance standards for key aspects of the hospital transfusion process, improved organisation of transfusion in hospitals and staff training; and further research on the safe and effective use of blood and alternatives to donor blood. There needs to be a greater recognition that 'transfusion safety' applies to the hospital transfusion process as well as the contents of blood bags and that resources need to be provided for the improvement of transfusion safety and management in hospitals commensurate to their importance. PMID:21175655

  3. Recognition, Investigation and Management of Acute Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Hashmi, Sabria; Al-Arimi, Zainab; Wadsworth, Louis D.; Al-Rawas, Abdulhakim; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Daar, Shahina

    2014-01-01

    The recognition and management of transfusion reactions (TRs) are critical to ensure patient safety during and after a blood transfusion. Transfusion reactions are classified into acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) or delayed transfusion reactions, and each category includes different subtypes. Different ATRs share common signs and symptoms which can make categorisation difficult at the beginning of the reaction. Moreover, TRs are often under-recognised and under-reported. To ensure uniform practice and safety, it is necessary to implement a national haemovigilance system and a set of national guidelines establishing policies for blood transfusion and for the detection and management of TRs. In Oman, there are currently no local TR guidelines to guide physicians and hospital blood banks. This paper summarises the available literature and provides consensus guidelines to be used in the recognition, management and reporting of ATRs. PMID:25097764

  4. Platelet Transfusion – The New Immunology of an Old Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A.; Heal, Joanna M.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P.; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  5. Platelet transfusion - the new immunology of an old therapy.

    PubMed

    Stolla, Moritz; Refaai, Majed A; Heal, Joanna M; Spinelli, Sherry L; Garraud, Olivier; Phipps, Richard P; Blumberg, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Platelet transfusion has been a vital therapeutic approach in patients with hematologic malignancies for close to half a century. Randomized trials show that prophylactic platelet transfusions mitigate bleeding in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. However, even with prophylactic transfusions, as many as 75% of patients, experience hemorrhage. While platelet transfusion efficacy is modest, questions and concerns have arisen about the risks of platelet transfusion therapy. The acknowledged serious risks of platelet transfusion include viral transmission, bacterial sepsis, and acute lung injury. Less serious adverse effects include allergic and non-hemolytic febrile reactions. Rare hemolytic reactions have occurred due to a common policy of transfusing without regard to ABO type. In the last decade or so, new concerns have arisen; platelet-derived lipids are implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury after transfusion. With the recognition that platelets are immune cells came the discoveries that supernatant IL-6, IL-27 sCD40L, and OX40L are closely linked to febrile reactions and sCD40L with acute lung injury. Platelet transfusions are pro-inflammatory, and may be pro-thrombotic. Anti-A and anti-B can bind to incompatible recipient or donor platelets and soluble antigens, impair hemostasis and thus increase bleeding. Finally, stored platelet supernatants contain biological mediators such as VEGF and TGF-β1 that may compromise the host versus tumor response. This is particularly of concern in patients receiving many platelet transfusions, as for acute leukemia. New evidence suggests that removing stored supernatant will improve clinical outcomes. This new view of platelets as pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory agents suggests that innovative approaches to improving platelet storage and pre-transfusion manipulations to reduce toxicity could substantially improve the efficacy and safety of this long-employed therapy. PMID:25699046

  6. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  7. Recent Advances in Preventing Adverse Reactions to Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Thomas S; Fung, Mark K; Harm, Sarah K

    2015-01-01

    The spectrum of adverse reactions to blood product transfusion ranges from a benign clinical course to serious morbidity and mortality.  There have been many advances in technologies and transfusion strategies to decrease the risk of adverse reactions. Our aim is to address a few of the advancements in increasing the safety of the blood supply, specifically pathogen reduction technologies, bacterial contamination risk reduction, and transfusion associated acute lung injury risk mitigation strategies. PMID:27081471

  8. Reducing donor exposure in preterm infants requiring multiple blood transfusions.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, A.; Wilson, N.; Skacel, P.; Thomas, R.; Tidmarsh, E.; Yale, C.; de Silva, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preterm infants frequently require multiple blood transfusions. Traditionally, 'fresh' (less than seven days old) blood has been used but this often results in transfusions from multiple donors. To reduce donor exposure the policy for top-up transfusions was changed. A unit of blood under five days old with additional satellite packs was ordered for each infant and used up to its expiry date, allowing up to eight transfusions from a single donation to be given. The mean (SD) number of transfusions per infant in 43 infants transfused according to previous policy and in 29 transfused according to the new policy was similar at 5.6 (4.0) and 5.3 (3.1), respectively. However, donor exposure fell following the change in policy from 4.9 (3.5) to only 2.0 (0.9). Only one infant was exposed to more than three donors compared with 24 infants in the control group. Plasma potassium concentrations were not significantly different following transfusion of blood stored for up to 33 days. This simple change in policy has reduced donor exposure in infants requiring multiple top-up transfusions. PMID:7743280

  9. Potential Harm of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusion in Adult Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tau-Hong; Wong, Joshua G. X.; Leo, Yee-Sin; Thein, Tun-Linn; Ng, Ee-Ling; Lee, Linda K.; Lye, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Thrombocytopenia is a hallmark of dengue infection, and bleeding is a dreaded complication of dengue fever. Prophylactic platelet transfusion has been used to prevent bleeding in the management of dengue fever, although the evidence for its benefit is lacking. In adult dengue patients with platelet count <20,000/mm3 without bleeding, we aimed to assess if prophylactic platelet transfusion was effective in reducing clinical bleeding and other outcomes. Method We conducted a retrospective non-randomised observational study of dengue patients with platelet count < 20,000/mm3 without bleeding (except petechiae) admitted to Tan Tock Seng Hospital from January 2005 to December 2008. Baseline characteristics and clinical outcomes were compared between the non-transfused vs. transfused groups. Outcomes studied were clinical bleeding, platelet increment, hospital length of stay, intensive care unit admission and death. Results Of the 788 patients included, 486 received prophylactic platelet transfusion. There was no significant difference in the presence of clinical bleeding in the two groups (18.2% in non-transfused group vs. 23.5% in transfused group; P = 0.08). Patients in the transfused group took a median of 1 day longer than the non-transfused group to increase their platelet count to 50,000/mm3 or more (3 days vs. 2 days, P <0.0001). The median duration of hospital stay in the non-transfused group was 5 days vs. 6 days in the transfused group (P< 0.0001). There was no significant difference in the proportion requiring ICU admission (non-transfused 0.66% vs. transfused 1.23%, P = 0.44) and death (non-transfused 0% vs. transfused 0.2%, P = 0.43). Conclusion Platelet transfusion in absence of bleeding in adult dengue with platelet count <20,000/mm3 did not reduce bleeding or expedite platelet recovery. There was potential harm by slowing recovery of platelet count to >50,000/mm3 and increasing length of hospitalization. PMID:27015272

  10. Feeding during Blood Transfusions and the Association with Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Doty, Megan; Wade, Christine; Farr, Julie; Gomezcoello, Vanessa Celleri; Martin, Gregory; Nasr, Tala

    2016-07-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants who had feedings withheld during all blood transfusions had a lower incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) compared with infants who were fed during transfusions. Study Design A retrospective chart review over a 3-year period in a level-3 neonatal intensive care unit was conducted. A total of 108 inborn VLBW infants (weight range: 500-1,500 g) who had received a transfusion before 36 weeks were reviewed. Diagnosis of NEC (≥ Bell stage II), demographics, feeds, transfusions, outcomes, and variables associated with NEC were collected. Results The percentage of NEC cases was lower in infants who had feeds withheld during transfusions: 5/64 (7.8%) compared with 16/116 (13.8%) infants who were fed during transfusions. While potentially clinically important (6% absolute difference), this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.33 by two-tailed Fisher exact test). Conclusions No significant decrease in the incidence of NEC was found when feeds were withheld during blood transfusions. Holding feeds during transfusions is not without consequences such as the need for intravenous access, additional fluids, and the disruption of optimum nutrition. Further studies are needed to establish the relationship between blood transfusions, feeds, and NEC. PMID:27031053

  11. Transfusion Considerations in Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients.

    PubMed

    Bercovitz, Rachel S; Josephson, Cassandra D

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric patients with malignancies or benign hematologic diseases are a heterogeneous group with complicated underlying pathophysiologies leading to their requirements for transfusion therapy. Common practice among pediatric hematologists, oncologists, and transplant physicians is to transfuse stable patients red cells to maintain a hemoglobin greater than 7 or 8 g/dL and transfuse platelets to maintain a count greater than 10,000 or 20,000 platelets/μL. This review compiles data from myriad studies performed in pediatric patients to give readers the knowledge needed to make an informed choice when considering different management strategies for the transfusion of red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and granulocytes. PMID:27113005

  12. Transfusion-associated dyspnea--shadow or substance?

    PubMed

    Badami, K G; Joliffe, E; Stephens, M

    2015-08-01

    New Zealand Blood Service Haemovigilance uses International Society of Blood Transfusion/International Haemovigilance Network definitions to categorize transfusion reactions (TR). Transfusion-associated dyspnoea (TAD) is a category for TR with respiratory features (TRRF) that do not fit definitive entities. TRRF, including TAD, are clinically significant. TR classified as TAD were reviewed. We found that many TAD may have been transfusion-associated circulatory overload. Better information in TR reports and refining TR diagnostic criteria may result in less misclassification of TRRF. TAD may represent mild, atypical or overlap entities, and there may be a residuum of cases with currently unexplained pathophysiology. PMID:25854631

  13. Transfusion Practices Committee of a public blood bank network in Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Carvalho, Ricardo Vilas Freire; Brener, Stela; Ferreira, Angela Melgaço; do Valle, Marcele Cunha Ribeiro; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to verify the performance of blood transfusion committees in transfusion services linked to the public blood bank network of the state of Minas Gerais. Methods A cross-sectional observational study was conducted between 2007 and 2008 using questionnaires and proficiency tests to evaluate the reporting and investigation of transfusion reactions comparing transfusion services with and without transfusion committees in the public transfusion services of the state of Minas Gerais. Results Nineteen of Hemominas own transfusion services and 207 that contracted the services of the foundation located in 178 municipalities were visited between 2007 and 2008. Established transfusion committees were present in 63.4% of the services visited. Transfusion incidents were reported by 53 (36.8%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and by eight (9.6%) without transfusion committees (p < 0.001) with 543 (97.5%) and 14 (2.5%) notifications, respectively. Of the reported transfusion incidents, 40 (75.5%) transfusion services with transfusion committees and only two (25%) of those without transfusion committees investigated the causes. Conclusion The incidence of notification and investigation of the causes of transfusion reactions was higher in transfusion services where a transfusion committee was present. Despite these results, the performance of these committees was found to be incipient and a better organization and more effective operation are required. PMID:23323064

  14. Guideline on the investigation and management of acute transfusion reactions. Prepared by the BCSH Blood Transfusion Task Force.

    PubMed

    Tinegate, Hazel; Birchall, Janet; Gray, Alexandra; Haggas, Richard; Massey, Edwin; Norfolk, Derek; Pinchon, Deborah; Sewell, Carrock; Wells, Angus; Allard, Shubha

    2012-10-01

    Although acute non-haemolytic febrile or allergic reactions (ATRs) are a common complication of transfusion and often result in little or no morbidity, prompt recognition and management are essential. The serious hazards of transfusion haemovigilance organisation (SHOT) receives 30-40 reports of anaphylactic reactions each year. Other serious complications of transfusion, such as acute haemolysis, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) or transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) may present with similar clinical features to ATR. This guideline describes the approach to a patient developing adverse symptoms and signs related to transfusion, including initial recognition, establishing a likely cause, treatment, investigations, planning future transfusion and reporting within the hospital and to haemovigilance organisations. Key recommendations are that adrenaline should be used as first line treatment of anaphylaxis, and that transfusions should only be carried out where patients can be directly observed and where staff are trained in manging complications of transfusion, particularly anaphylaxis. Management of ATRs is not dependent on classification but should be guided by symptoms and signs. Patients who have experienced an anaphylactic reaction should be discussed with an allergist or immunologist, in keeping with UK resuscitation council guidelines. PMID:22928769

  15. Internet-based transfusion audit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maitan, Jacek; Haley, Rebecca

    1995-03-01

    This project is aimed at developing a cost-effective working environment for the transfusion medicine specialists of American Red Cross (ARC). In this project we are developing a multimedia-based consultation environment that uses Internet and teleconferencing to increase the quality of services and to replace currently used 800 telephone lines. Through the use of Internet/LAN/ISDN the physicians can share information and references while they discuss patient cases. A multimedia interface allows the physician to access data from the office and from the house. This paper discusses the approach, current status of the project and future plans to extend the approach to other areas of medicine.

  16. To Transfuse or not to Transfuse in Upper Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage? That is the Question

    PubMed Central

    Rockey, Don C.

    2014-01-01

    Background The hemoglobin threshold for transfusion of red cells in patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding is controversial. We compared the efficacy and safety of a restrictive transfusion strategy with those of a liberal transfusion strategy. Methods We enrolled 921 patients with severe acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding and randomly assigned 461 of them to a restrictive strategy (transfusion when the hemoglobin level fell below 7 g per deciliter) and 460 to a liberal strategy (transfusion when the hemoglobin fell below 9 g per deciliter). Randomization was stratified according to the presence or absence of liver cirrhosis. Results A total of 225 patients assigned to the restrictive strategy (51%), as compared with 65 assigned to the liberal strategy (15%), did not receive transfusions (P<0.001). The probability of survival at 6 weeks was higher in the restrictive-strategy group than in the liberal-strategy group (95% vs. 91%; hazard ratio for death with restrictive strategy, 0.55; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33 to 0.92; P = 0.02). Further bleeding occurred in 10% of the patients in the restrictive-strategy group as compared with 16% of the patients in the liberal-strategy group (P = 0.01), and adverse events occurred in 40% as compared with 48% (P = 0.02). The probability of survival was slightly higher with the restrictive strategy than with the liberal strategy in the subgroup of patients who had bleeding associated with a peptic ulcer (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.26 to 1.25) and was significantly higher in the subgroup of patients with cirrhosis and Child–Pugh class A or B disease (hazard ratio, 0.30; 95% CI, 0.11 to 0.85), but not in those with cirrhosis and Child–Pugh class C disease (hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.45 to 2.37). Within the first 5 days, the portal-pressure gradient increased significantly in patients assigned to the liberal strategy (P = 0.03) but not in those assigned to the restrictive strategy. Conclusions As compared

  17. Transfusion interventions in critical bleeding requiring massive transfusion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    McQuilten, Zoe K; Crighton, Gemma; Engelbrecht, Sunelle; Gotmaker, Robert; Brunskill, Susan J; Murphy, Michael F; Wood, Erica M

    2015-04-01

    Critical bleeding (CB) requiring massive transfusion (MT) can occur in a variety of clinical contexts and is associated with substantial mortality and morbidity. In 2011, the Australian National Blood Authority (NBA) published patient blood management guidelines for CB and MT, which found limited high-quality evidence from which only 2 recommendations could be made. The aim of this systematic review (SR) was to update these guidelines and identify evidence gaps still to be addressed. A comprehensive search was performed for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and SRs using MeSH index and free text terms in MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library (Issue 11, 2012), EMBASE, CINHAL, PUBMED, and the Transfusion Evidence Library up to July 15, 2014. The evidence was grouped according to 4 questions based on the original guideline relating to transfusion interventions: (1) effect of dose, timing, and ratio of red blood cells (RBCs) to component therapy on patient outcomes; (2) effect of RBC transfusion on patient outcomes; (3) effect of fresh frozen plasma, platelet, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, and prothrombin complex concentrate on patient outcomes; and (4) effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) on patient outcomes. From this search, 19 studies were identified: 6 RCTs and 13 SRs. Two of the RCTs were pilot/feasibility studies, 3 were investigating rFVIIa, and 1 compared restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion in upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Overall, limited new evidence was identified and substantial evidence gaps remain, particularly with regard to the effect of component therapies, including ratio of RBC to component therapies, on patient outcomes. Clinical trials to address these questions are required. PMID:25716645

  18. [Massive transfusion with the Rapid Infusion System. Its effect on core body temperature].

    PubMed

    Booke, M; Sielenkämper, A

    2001-12-01

    Extensive blood loss requires adequate volume replacement. However the infused volume cannot be adequately warmed especially when high infusion rates are necessary. Subsequently, hypothermia develops and results in hemodynamic instability and coagulopathy. The Rapid Infusion System (RIS) allows high infusion rates (up to 1.5 l/min) while at the same time guaranteeing sufficient warming. The efficacy of the RIS was investigated in 43 consecutive patients who required a massive transfusion. The average volume transfused in these patients was 31.7 +/- 4.5 l (minimum: 7.8 l; maximum: 165.3 l) which is equal to an average exchange of 6.4 times the circulating blood volume (maximum: 39.4 blood volumes). The replacement of such high blood volumes has not yet been published in a series of patients. Despite these high transfusion rates, the body core temperature was maintained at 35.85 +/- 0.1 degrees C. Only five patients had a body core temperature below 34 degrees C, all were trauma patients and four of these five patients already had a preoperative temperature below 34 degrees C. The mortality in this study was 28%, which is markedly reduced in comparison to previous publications although they all considered at patients with significantly less blood loss. Maintaining normothermia and normovolemia by the use of the RIS may explain the improved outcome. PMID:11824076

  19. Forum for debate: Safety of allogeneic blood transfusion alternatives in the surgical/critically ill patient.

    PubMed

    Muñoz Gómez, M; Bisbe Vives, E; Basora Macaya, M; García Erce, J A; Gómez Luque, A; Leal-Noval, S R; Colomina, M J; Comin Colet, J; Contreras Barbeta, E; Cuenca Espiérrez, J; Garcia de Lorenzo Y Mateos, A; Gomollón García, F; Izuel Ramí, M; Moral García, M V; Montoro Ronsano, J B; Páramo Fernández, J A; Pereira Saavedra, A; Quintana Diaz, M; Remacha Sevilla, Á; Salinas Argente, R; Sánchez Pérez, C; Tirado Anglés, G; Torrabadella de Reinoso, P

    2015-12-01

    In recent years, several safety alerts have questioned or restricted the use of some pharmacological alternatives to allogeneic blood transfusion in established indications. In contrast, there seems to be a promotion of other alternatives, based on blood products and/or antifibrinolytic drugs, which lack a solid scientific basis. The Multidisciplinary Autotransfusion Study Group and the Anemia Working Group España convened a multidisciplinary panel of 23 experts belonging to different healthcare areas in a forum for debate to: 1) analyze the different safety alerts referred to certain transfusion alternatives; 2) study the background leading to such alternatives, the evidence supporting them, and their consequences for everyday clinical practice, and 3) issue a weighted statement on the safety of each questioned transfusion alternative, according to its clinical use. The members of the forum maintained telematics contact for the exchange of information and the distribution of tasks, and a joint meeting was held where the conclusions on each of the items examined were presented and discussed. A first version of the document was drafted, and subjected to 4 rounds of review and updating until consensus was reached (unanimously in most cases). We present the final version of the document, approved by all panel members, and hope it will be useful for our colleagues. PMID:26183121

  20. Management of patients who refuse blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Chand, N Kiran; Subramanya, H Bala; Rao, G Venkateswara

    2014-01-01

    A small group of people belonging to a certain religion, called Jehovah's witness do not accept blood transfusion or blood products, based on biblical readings. When such group of people are in need of health care, their faith and belief is an obstacle for their proper treatment, and poses legal, ethical and medical challenges for attending health care provider. Due to the rapid growth in the membership of this group worldwide, physicians attending hospitals should be prepared to manage such patients. Appropriate management of such patients entails understanding of ethical and legal issues involved, providing meticulous medical management, use of prohaemostatic agents, essential interventions and techniques to reduce blood loss and hence, reduce the risk of subsequent need for blood transfusion. An extensive literature search was performed using search engines such as Google scholar, PubMed, MEDLINE, science journals and textbooks using keywords like ‘Jehovah's witness’, ‘blood haemodilution’, ‘blood salvage’ and ‘blood substitutes’. PMID:25535432

  1. Total quality management in blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Smit-Sibinga, C T

    2000-01-01

    Quality management is an ongoing development resulting in consistency products and services and ever increasing customer satisfaction. The ultimum is Total Quality Management. Quality systems and quality management in transfusion medicine have gained considerable attention since the outbreak of the AIDS epidemic. Where product orientation has long been applied through quality control, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles were introduced, shifting the developments in the direction of process orientation. Globally, and particularly in the more industrialised world people and system orientation has come along with the introduction of the ISO9001 concept. Harmonisation and a degree of uniformity are needed to implement a universally applicable Quality System and related Quality Management. Where the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) is the professional organisation with the most extensive experience in quality systems in blood transfusion, the European Union and the Council of Europe now are in the process to design a quality system and management applicable to a larger variety of countries, based on a hybrid of current GMP and ISO9001 principles. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies has developed a more universally to implement Quality Manual, with a pilot project in Honduras. It is recommendable to harmonise the various designs and bring the approaches under one common denominator. PMID:10938970

  2. [Hepatitis E virus: Blood transfusion implications].

    PubMed

    Gallian, P; Piquet, Y; Assal, A; Djoudi, R; Chiaroni, J; Izopet, J; Tiberghien, P

    2014-11-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a non-enveloped RNA virus transmitted by the fecal-oral route. Autochthonous hepatitis E occurring in developed countries is caused by genotypes 3 and 4 and is a zoonotic infection. Humans are infected mostly after ingestion of undercooked meat from infected animals. Most HEV 3 and 4 infections are clinically inapparent. However, genotype 3 (HEV 3) can lead to chronic hepatitis in immuno-compromised patients such as organ-transplant recipients and patients with haematological malignancies. In Europe, HEV 3 is implicated in transfusion-transmitted HEV infection. In France, as observed in several European countries, prevalence of HEV RNA and specific IgG antibodies are high indicating that viral circulation is important. The systematic HEV NAT screening of blood donations used for preparation of solvent detergent plasma indicate that 1 to 2218 donation is infected by HEV RNA. The need or implementation's impacts of safety measures to prevent HEV transmission by blood transfusion are under reflexion by French's health authorities. The HEV NAT screening is the only available tool of prevention. Alternative strategies are under investigation including individual or mini pool NAT testing all or part of blood donations. PMID:25267201

  3. First Implementation of Transfusion Consent Policy in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Ghafri, Naif; Zia, Fehmida; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Rawas, Abdul-Hakeem; Al-Kindi, Salam; Jose, Sachin; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Sabti, Hilal; Daar, Shahina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Transfusions are a common medical intervention. Discussion of the benefits, risks and alternatives with the patient is mandated by many legislations prior to planned transfusions. At the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman, a written transfusion consent policy was introduced in March 2014. This was the first time such a policy was implemented in Oman. This study therefore aimed to assess adherence to this policy among different specialties within SQUH. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent elective transfusions between June and August 2014 were reviewed to assess the presence of transfusion consent forms. If present, the consent forms were examined for completeness of patient, physician and witness information. Results: In total, the records of 446 transfused patients (299 adult and 147 paediatric patients) were assessed. Haematology patients accounted for 50% of adult patients and 71% of paediatric patients. Consent was obtained for 75% of adult and 91% of paediatric patients. The highest adherence rate was observed among adult and paediatric haematology specialists (95% and 97%, respectively). Consent forms were correctly filled out with all details provided for 51% and 52% of adult and paediatric patients, respectively. Among inadequately completed forms, the most common error was a lack of witness details (20–25%). Conclusion: In most cases, the pre-transfusion consent policy was successfully adhered to at SQUH. However, further work is required to ensure full compliance with the consent procedure within different specialties. Implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in the country is recommended. PMID:27606107

  4. What Are the Risks of a Blood Transfusion?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the transfusion can safely be restarted. Viruses and Infectious Diseases Some infectious agents, such as HIV, can survive in blood and infect the person receiving the blood transfusion. To keep blood safe, blood ... Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD). This disease is the human version of ...

  5. Blood transfusion in obstetrics: the pregnant women's point of view.

    PubMed

    Abu-Salem, A N; Qublan, H S

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the views and compliance of a group of pregnant women regarding obstetric-related blood transfusion. In this prospective questionnaire-based analysis, a total of 300 pregnant women who attended the antenatal care clinic were included. The mean age and gestational age of patients were 31.6 years and 27.4 weeks, respectively. All demographic and questionnaire data were recorded and analysed. A total of 41% of participants were aware of the possible need for blood transfusion in pregnancy and 88% of all women would accept blood transfusion when necessary. The remaining 12% would refuse blood transfusion, even if it was life-saving, because of the fear of blood transfusion complications. It is concluded that counselling and a management plan should be scheduled for pregnancy, and management protocols should be developed for women who refuse blood transfusion. Transfusion alternatives should be discussed with women who will not accept the allogenic blood transfusion. PMID:19358029

  6. The Efficacy and Safety of Autologous Transfusion in Unilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Moon-Jib; Ryu, Jee-Won; Kim, Jeong-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although allogeneic blood transfusion is the most common method of transfusion in total knee arthroplasty (TKA), there are reports showing significant decrease in the amount of allogeneic transfusion and incidence of side effects after combined use of autologous transfusion. The purpose of this study is to investigate the efficacy of using an autologous transfusion device in TKA. Materials and Methods Patients who underwent TKA at our institution from January 2003 to January 2014 were divided into two groups: group A (n=127) who received allogeneic transfusion only in TKA and group B (n=118) who received autologous transfusion via an autologous transfusion device and allogeneic transfusion. In both groups, the patients were transfused when the hemoglobin level was below 9 g/dL. In group B, blood collected by the autologous transfusion device was transfused only once after surgery. The total blood loss volume, total transfusion volume, and the presence of side effects were assessed based on medical records. Results Group A received 294.6 mL more allogeneic transfusion than group B (p<0.001). There were no significant differences with regard to the development of side effects between groups. Conclusions Application of an autologous transfusion device during TKA can be effective in reducing the allogeneic transfusion volume. Moreover, allogeneic transfusion was not necessary after autologous transfusion in some patients. PMID:26389070

  7. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces.

    PubMed

    Beckett, Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Elon; Tien, Homer

    2015-06-01

    Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  8. Fresh whole blood transfusion capability for Special Operations Forces

    PubMed Central

    Beckett, Maj Andrew; Callum, Jeannie; da Luz, Luis Teodoro; Schmid, Joanne; Funk, Christopher; Glassberg, Col Elon; Tien, Col Homer

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fresh whole blood (FWB) transfusion is an option for providing volume and oxygen carrying capacity to bleeding Special Operations soldiers who are injured in an austere environment and who are far from a regular blood bank. Retrospective data from recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan show an association between the use of FWB and survival. We reviewed the literature to document the issues surrounding FWB transfusion to Special Operations soldiers in the austere environment and surveyed the literature regarding best practice guidelines for and patient outcomes after FWB transfusions. Most literature regarding FWB transfusion is retrospective or historical. There is limited prospective evidence currently to change transfusion practice in tertiary care facilities, but FWB remains an option in the austere setting. PMID:26100776

  9. Transfusions for anemia in adult and pediatric patients with malignancies.

    PubMed

    Shah, Neil; Andrews, Jennifer; Goodnough, Lawrence Tim

    2015-09-01

    Anemia is present in over two-thirds of patients with malignant hematological disorders. The etiology of anemia predominates from ineffective erythropoiesis from marrow infiltration, cytokine related suppression, erythropoietin suppression, and vitamin deficiency; ineffective erythropoiesis is further exacerbated by accelerated clearance due to antibody mediated hemolysis and thrombotic microangiopathy. As the anemia is chronic in nature, symptoms are generally well tolerated and often non-specific. Transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) is a balance between providing benefit for patients while avoiding risks of transfusion. Conservative/restrictive RBC transfusion practices have shown equivalent patient outcomes compared to liberal transfusion practices, and meta-analysis has shown improved in-hospital mortality, reduced cardiac events, re-bleeding, and bacterial infections. The implications for a lower threshold for transfusion in patients with malignancies are therefore increasingly being scrutinized. Alternative management strategies for anemia with IV iron and erythropoietin stimulating agents (ESAs) should be considered in the appropriate settings. PMID:25796130

  10. Ensemble Learning Approaches to Predicting Complications of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J.; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2016-01-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  11. The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asim; Lin, Yulia; Lima, Ana; Hansen, Mark; Callum, Jeannie L

    2013-04-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is an important and potentially injurious complication of transfusion that is underappreciated by clinicians. Risk factors for TACO include being at an extreme of age, having preexisting cardiac and/or (potentially) renal dysfunction, acute myocardial infarction, and individuals receiving plasma. Keys to preventing TACO, aside from identifying high-risk individuals, should be multifaceted. We advocate for the widespread use of pretransfusion checklists and implementation of nonemergent transfusion protocols. We suggest the regular use of pretransfusion diuretics in high-risk individuals. When a transfusion is required, we believe that "critical" nursing supervision and leadership are instrumental in the coordination of slow transfusion rates on computerized infusion pumps and ensuring patients are appropriately monitored. We believe that using these methodologies on a global scale will prevent many TACO events and minimize the severity when it does occur. PMID:23465703

  12. Ensemble learning approaches to predicting complications of blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Murphree, Dennis; Ngufor, Che; Upadhyaya, Sudhindra; Madde, Nagesh; Clifford, Leanne; Kor, Daryl J; Pathak, Jyotishman

    2015-08-01

    Of the 21 million blood components transfused in the United States during 2011, approximately 1 in 414 resulted in complication [1]. Two complications in particular, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), are especially concerning. These two alone accounted for 62% of reported transfusion-related fatalities in 2013 [2]. We have previously developed a set of machine learning base models for predicting the likelihood of these adverse reactions, with a goal towards better informing the clinician prior to a transfusion decision. Here we describe recent work incorporating ensemble learning approaches to predicting TACO/TRALI. In particular we describe combining base models via majority voting, stacking of model sets with varying diversity, as well as a resampling/boosting combination algorithm called RUSBoost. We find that while the performance of many models is very good, the ensemble models do not yield significantly better performance in terms of AUC. PMID:26737958

  13. Estimation of the prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Meza, Benjamin P.L.; Lohrke, Britta; Wilkinson, Robert; Pitman, John P.; Shiraishi, Ray W.; Bock, Naomi; Lowrance, David W.; Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Mataranyika, Mary; Basavaraju, Sridhar V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute transfusion reactions are probably common in sub-Saharan Africa, but transfusion reaction surveillance systems have not been widely established. In 2008, the Blood Transfusion Service of Namibia implemented a national acute transfusion reaction surveillance system, but substantial under-reporting was suspected. We estimated the actual prevalence and rate of acute transfusion reactions occurring in Windhoek, Namibia. Methods The percentage of transfusion events resulting in a reported acute transfusion reaction was calculated. Actual percentage and rates of acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units were estimated by reviewing patients’ records from six hospitals, which transfuse >99% of all blood in Windhoek. Patients’ records for 1,162 transfusion events occurring between 1st January – 31st December 2011 were randomly selected. Clinical and demographic information were abstracted and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network criteria were applied to categorize acute transfusion reactions1. Results From January 1 – December 31, 2011, there were 3,697 transfusion events (involving 10,338 blood units) in the selected hospitals. Eight (0.2%) acute transfusion reactions were reported to the surveillance system. Of the 1,162 transfusion events selected, medical records for 785 transfusion events were analysed, and 28 acute transfusion reactions were detected, of which only one had also been reported to the surveillance system. An estimated 3.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.3–4.4) of transfusion events in Windhoek resulted in an acute transfusion reaction, with an estimated rate of 11.5 (95% CI: 7.6–14.5) acute transfusion reactions per 1,000 transfused units. Conclusion The estimated actual rate of acute transfusion reactions is higher than the rate reported to the national haemovigilance system. Improved surveillance and interventions to reduce transfusion-related morbidity and mortality

  14. Transfusion of granulocyte rich buffy coats to neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Reiss, R F; Pindyck, J; Waldman, A A; Raju, M; Kulpa, J

    1982-01-01

    Granulocyte rich buffy coats were transfused to infected neutropenic patients when leukapheresis donors were not available. Efficacy of transfusions was evaluated from data supplied by hospitals administering them. Buffy coats separated from ACD blood contained a mean of 4.9 X 10(8) granulocytes. Fifty-seven patients received a course consisting of a mean of 3.8 transfusions. Of these, 27 received a mean of 17.5 units per transfusion and had a survival rate of 44.4%, which was not significantly different from the 50.0% found in 30 who received a mean of 11.1 units per transfusion. No significant difference in survival rate was found between 31 patients with acute leukemia and 26 with other disorders or 38 patients with positive and 19 with negative cultures. Finally, no significant difference in survival rate was noted between patients who received a course of greater than or equal to four transfusions or less than or equal to three transfusions in any of the above groups. Survival rates were less than those generally reported following similar courses of leukapheresis units. Buffy coat transfusions consisting of a mean of approximately 17.5 units as produced during this study have therefore been shown to be not generally beneficial. The increased survival seen in some studies utilizing leukapheresis products may relate in part to the larger number of granulocytes they contained. Greater benefit from buffy coat transfusions might result if the number of granulocytes infused were increased. Evaluation of possible efficacy associated with transfusions of increased numbers of buffy coat units further enriched with granulocytes may be justified when leukapheresis donors are not available. PMID:7144696

  15. European strategies against the parasite transfusion risk.

    PubMed

    Reesink, H W

    2005-02-01

    Protozoal infections are endemic in mainly tropical low income countries, affecting millions of people. Malaria, American trypanosomiasis (Trypanosoma cruzi/Chagas disease) and protozoal tickborne diseases (e.g. Babesia) can be efficiently transmitted by transfusion of cellular blood components. In non-endemic areas like Europe malaria, Chagas disease and Babesia are imported diseases resulting of travelling to endemic areas and migration of autochthons from these endemic areas. A recent International Forum showed that in Europe, as well as the USA, prevention of transfusion-associated protozoal infections depend mainly on selection of donors using questionnaires. Most countries divide donors at risk for malaria in two groups: individuals who have lived in the first 5 years of their life in malaria endemic areas and those who are borne and residing in non-endemic areas and visited the endemic area(s). The first category of donors is rejected for 3 years after their last visit to the endemic area, and in one country such donors are permanently rejected. In some countries such donors are accepted after 4 months-3 years, provided a test for malaria is non-reactive. Persons from non-endemic areas, who visited the malaria endemic area, are rejected for 4-12 months. Some countries reject these donors for 3 years or permanently when they resided for more than 6 months in the endemic area. The rejection rate of donors for malaria risk in the various countries was 0.003-0.43% of all donations. Over the last decade only a few cases of TT-malaria were reported in the various countries. In several countries donors are questioned for risk of T. cruzi infection. In some countries donors are excluded when they (or their mothers) were born in South or Central America, if they received a blood transfusion in these areas and if they lived in rural areas in these endemic countries for more than 4 weeks. In none of the countries donors are asked if they had Babesia or Leishmania. At

  16. Transfusion significance of LWa allo-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Napier, J A; Rowe, G P

    1987-01-01

    An example of anti-LWa, arising as a complication during a RhD immunization programme, has been studied for evidence of its likely in vivo haemolytic properties. In vitro testing of the anti-LWa showed it to be largely IgG1 acting by the antiglobulin technique. Results of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and macrophage phagocytic assays were both negative. However, 99mTc-labelled Lw(a+) donor cells showed a slight reduction in t1/2 (18 h) compared with the normal survival of autologous cells. Despite this observation, and bearing in mind the difficulties of interpreting apparently accelerated destruction of small serologically incompatible red cells, it was concluded that the presence of this example of anti-LWa should not be a bar to urgent transfusion. PMID:3125687

  17. A Yeast Toxic Mutant of HET-s(218-289) Prion Displays Alternative Intermediates of Amyloidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Berthelot, Karine; Lecomte, Sophie; Géan, Julie; Immel, Françoise; Cullin, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Amyloids are thought to be involved in various types of neurodegenerative disorders. Several kinds of intermediates, differing in morphology, size, and toxicity, have been identified in the multistep amyloidogenesis process. However, the mechanisms explaining amyloid toxicity remain unclear. We previously generated a toxic mutant of the nontoxic HET-s(218-289) amyloid in yeast. Here we report that toxic and nontoxic amyloids differ not only in their structures but also in their assembling process. We used multiple and complementary methods to investigate the intermediates formed by these two amyloids. With the methods used, no intermediates were observed for the nontoxic amyloid; however, under the same experimental conditions, the toxic mutant displayed visible oligomeric and fibrillar intermediates. PMID:20713008

  18. [Transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI): obvious and incomprehensible].

    PubMed

    Bulanov, A Iu

    2009-01-01

    Acute transfusion-associated lung injury (TRALI) is an acute lung injury associated with and develops within 6 hours after the transfusion of components and blood preparations. Today there are no uniform views on the pathogenesis of TRALI. The discussion of immune and non-immune mechanisms is relevant. The key link of the former is that the presence of anti-leukocytic antibodies in a donor or a recipient and their interaction during transfusion with the leukocytes of the recipient or the donor, respectively; that of the latter link is the accumulation of biologically active substances in the transfusion media during storage and their passive administration to the recipient during transfusion. In both cases, the total link is drastic increased pulmonary capillary permeability. The clinical presentation of TRALI is nonspecific and generally similar to that of the adult respiratory distress syndrome and lung injuries of another genesis. It is necessary to make its differential diagnosis with allergic reactions, the transfusion of bacterially contaminated media and mainly with circulatory overload. Specific treatments for transfusion-associated lung injury are unavailable. Diferent variants of respiratory therapy are effective. Prevention of TRALI is mainly based on its immune mechanism. The leading direction of its prevention is to select donors. PMID:19938716

  19. The Use of Splenectomy to Manage Platelet Transfusion Refractoriness due to Anti-Human Leukocyte Antibodies in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Margherita; Camoglio, Francesco; Piccoli, Pierluigi; De Bortoli, Massimiliano; Balter, Rita; Pegoraro, Anna; Cesaro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    In patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), refractoriness to platelet transfusion has been associated with graft failure, delayed engraftment, early mortality and decreased overall survival. Therapeutic strategies include plasma exchange, immunoglobulins, rituximab, and splenectomy. We describe here three patients with refractoriness to platelet transfusion due to anti-human leukocyte antibodies who were splenectomized before HSCT (two cases) and after HSCT (one case) due to the lack of efficacy of other therapies. Splenectomy was uneventful. All three patients achieved a full donor engraftment. We suggest that splenectomy is feasible and effective in HSCT patients to reduce the risk of graft failure or delayed engraftment. PMID:27114815

  20. Profiles of blood and blood component transfusion recipients in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Hassall, Oliver; Faragher, Brian E.; Kajja, Isaac; Mvere, David A.; Emmanuel, Jean C.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2015-01-01

    Background There are limited published data on the characteristics of blood transfusion recipients in sub-Saharan Africa. This study describes the demographic characteristics of blood transfusion recipients and patterns of blood and blood component use in Zimbabwe. Materials and methods Data on the characteristics of the blood transfusion recipients (age, sex, blood group), blood components received (type, quantity), discharge diagnoses and outcomes following transfusion (discharge status, duration of stay in hospital), were retrospectively collected from four major hospitals for the period from January 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012. Diagnoses were grouped into broad categories according to the disease headings of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Surgical procedures were grouped into broad categories according to organ system using ICD-9. Results Most of the 1,793 transfusion recipients studied were female (63.2%) and in the reproductive age group, i.e. 15–49 years (65.3%). The median age of the recipients was 33 years (range, 0–93). The majority of these recipients (n=1,642; 91.6%) received a red blood cell transfusion. The majority of the patients were diagnosed with conditions related to pregnancy and childbirth (22.3%), and diseases of blood and blood-forming organs (17.7%). The median time spent in hospital was 8 days (range, 0–214) and in-hospital mortality was 15.4%. Discussion Our sample of blood transfusion recipients were fairly young and most of them received red blood cell transfusions. The majority of patients in the reproductive age group received blood transfusions for pregnancy and childbirth-related diagnoses. PMID:26192782

  1. A review of the application of autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J

    2016-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) has been gradually attracting more attention due to the increasingly prominent problem of blood transfusion safety and blood shortage in recent years. With the rapid development of blood conservation techniques, blood component separation technology, blood transfusion medicine and a constant increase in clinical needs, ABT technology has been expanded and innovated to a large degree. In this study, the development of preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD), acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH), intraoperative and postoperative autotransfusion, and other new technologies and theories are reviewed and existing questions are analyzed. Challenges and applications are also discussed in order to provide reference for peers. PMID:27533770

  2. Blood banking and transfusion medicine for the apheresis medicine practitioner.

    PubMed

    Jeffus, Susanne; Wehrli, Gay

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a concise overview of blood banking and transfusion medicine (BBTM) for the therapeutic apheresis medicine practitioner. It addresses the complete pathway from blood donor qualification to blood collection, to processing and storing blood components, to patient testing, to ordering blood components for therapeutic apheresis (TA) procedures, to preparing the component for transfusion, and finally to transfusion. The nurses, technologists, and physicians orchestrate these activities in concert to best serve patients undergoing TA procedures. Enhancing knowledge of these processes may improve the quality of patient care and the utilization of blood products. PMID:22532095

  3. A review of the application of autologous blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, J.

    2016-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) has been gradually attracting more attention due to the increasingly prominent problem of blood transfusion safety and blood shortage in recent years. With the rapid development of blood conservation techniques, blood component separation technology, blood transfusion medicine and a constant increase in clinical needs, ABT technology has been expanded and innovated to a large degree. In this study, the development of preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD), acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH), intraoperative and postoperative autotransfusion, and other new technologies and theories are reviewed and existing questions are analyzed. Challenges and applications are also discussed in order to provide reference for peers. PMID:27533770

  4. Problems and Approaches for Blood Transfusion in the Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David J; Field, Stephen; Delaney, Meghan; Bates, Imelda

    2016-04-01

    A safe supply of blood and the knowledge, skill, and resources for the appropriate use of blood are essential for medical services. Many problems are faced in the development of transfusion services in low- or medium-income countries (LMICs). Unfortunately, in many countries, providing safe blood is made more difficult by a lack of blood donors and the high frequency of transfusion-transmissible infections. The problems are compounded by the frequent need for urgent life-saving transfusions. This article examines the problems in supply, safety, and use of blood and how they are being addressed in LMICs, predominantly focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27040966

  5. West Nile Virus in Europe and Safety of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Pisani, Giulio; Cristiano, Karen; Pupella, Simonetta; Liumbruno, Giancarlo Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary West Nile virus (WNV) has become an increasing issue in the transfusion setting since 2002, when it was firstly shown in the USA that it can be transmitted through blood transfusion. Since then, several precautionary measures have been introduced in Europe in order to reduce the possible risk of transmission via transfusion/solid organ transplantation. In addition, the epidemiological surveillance has been tightened and the network for communication of human WNV cases strengthened. This review will focus on WNV circulation and the safety of blood in Europe. PMID:27403087

  6. Platelet transfusions: impact on hemostasis, thrombosis, inflammation and clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Refaai, Majed A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Spinelli, Sherry L.; Blumberg, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is one of the most crucial therapeutic approaches in Medicine. However, severe and fatal adverse reactions may develop. In addition to their important function in hemostasis, platelets’ role in inflammation has become more evident. Recently, platelets are also recognized as the main source of circulating soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L, (CD154)), which plays significant roles in hemostasis, platelet activation, clot stability, interactions with other cells, and upregulation of different mediators. In this review, we will briefly highlight the importance of platelet transfusion, its role in inflammatory and thrombotic transfusion reactions, and visit the most recent findings on sCD40L. PMID:21093892

  7. [The prevention of transfusion-associated circulatory overload].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y

    2014-11-01

    Hydrostatic pulmonary edema is a frequent and severe complication of blood transfusion. Recent epidemiological studies open the way for a better prevention of Transfusion-Associated Circulatory Overload. Preventive measures rely solely on the medical and nursing staff. Mitigation strategies include a careful identification of patients and conditions at-risk, a single-unit transfusion policy in patients with chronic anemia, the use of slow infusion rates, the careful monitoring of patient vital signs (particularly systemic arterial blood pressure). Peritransfusion IV diuretics use is likely to be helpful, although optimal prescribing patterns have not been defined. PMID:25277421

  8. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rappeport, J.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The clinical pathologic syndrome of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is usually a sequela of bone marrow transplantation. This disorder occurs as a result of recognition by engrafted donor-derived lymphocytes of foreign recipient transplantation antigens. GVHD may also result from engraftment of lymphocytes from other sources, including (1) transfusion of lymphocytes containing blood components, (2) transplacental maternal fetal transfusion, and (3) passive transfer of lymphocytes in solid organ transplantation. The recipients are usually severely immunodeficient and thus incapable of rejecting the transfused lymphocytes. This syndrome may, however, also develop in immunologically competent patients receiving blood products from individuals with histocompatibility antigens not recognized as foreign. 58 refs.

  9. Management of anaemia and blood transfusion in critical care - implementing national guidelines in ICU.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sethina; Kendrick, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Anaemia in intensive care is common, with approximately 50% of patients receiving a red cell transfusion. Recognised complications from transfusion include 'transfusion associated lung injury', infection, and organ failure progression. Most cohort studies show a positive relationship between red cell transfusion and adverse outcomes. In 2012, the British Committee for Standards in Haematology issued guidelines for red cell (RBC) transfusion in critical care. They recommend a haemoglobin transfusion trigger of below 70 g/dL unless the patient is bleeding, has acute sepsis, neurological injury, or an acute coronary syndrome. RBC transfusions in a single intensive care unit (ICU) were prospectively assessed for compliance with national guidance. Each transfusion was categorised with a traffic light system: red for inappropriate, green for appropriate, and amber for those that were not clearly appropriate or inappropriate. The quality improvement project began with a clinical effectiveness audit of doctors' knowledge of critical care transfusion thresholds. Two quality improvement interventions were used: 1) a local blood transfusion guideline was produced and posters were placed in the ICU 2) this guidance was attached to the transfusion prescriptions. Data was collected after each intervention. A total of 30 random adult RBC transfusions were analysed between August 2013 and February 2014. Despite good results from the effectiveness audit an assessment of RBC transfusions demonstrated room for improvement. Prior to introduction of the guideline intervention, a total of two transfusions were green, one red and seven amber. Following both interventions there were seven green transfusions and three amber. No transfusions were classed as inappropriate. According to additional trust based ICU transfusion records, there was approximately a 50% reduction (41 to 18 RBC transfusions) in overall blood transfusions following the first intervention in October 2013. Simple

  10. A Survey on Transfusion Status in Orthopedic Surgery at a Trauma Center

    PubMed Central

    Soleimanha, Mehran; Haghighi, Mohammad; Mirbolook, Ahmadreza; Sedighinejad, Abbas; Mardani-Kivi, Mohsen; Naderi-Nabi, Bahram; Chavoshi, Tahereh; Mehrnoosh, Mehrnoosh Ghandili

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increased costs and mortality associated with inappropriate blood transfusions have led to investigations about blood request and blood transfusion techniques. We investigated the transfusion status in patients who underwent orthopedic surgery in Poursina Hospital (Rasht, Iran) to optimizing blood usage and determine if a scheduled transfusion program for every orthopedic surgery could improve blood transfusion management. Method: In this descriptive-prospective study, all orthopedic surgeries in Poursina Hospital, Rasht, between April to June 2013 were reviewed. All patient information was recorded, including: demographics, type of surgery, hemoglobin level, cross-match test, duration of surgery, and blood loss, and transfusion. Based on the one-way ANOVA and independent samples test analysis, cross-match to transfusion ratio and transfusion possibility, the transfusion index, and maximal surgical blood order schedule were calculated to determine blood transfusion status. Results: Among 872 selected orthopedic surgery candidates, 318 of them were cross-matched and among those, 114 patients received a blood transfusion. In this study, the cross-match to transfusion ratio was 6.4, transfusion possibility 36.47%, transfusion index 0.6, and maximal surgical blood order schedule 0.9. Conclusion: We found that blood ordering was moderately higher than the standard; so it is highly recommended to focus on the knowledge of evidence based on transfusion and standard guidelines for blood transfusion to avoid over-ordering. PMID:26894223

  11. Geographical variations in current clinical practice on transfusions and iron chelation therapy across various transfusion-dependent anaemias

    PubMed Central

    Viprakasit, Vip; Gattermann, Norbert; Lee, Jong Wook; Porter, John B.; Taher, Ali T.; Habr, Dany; Martin, Nicolas; Domokos, Gabor; Cappellini, Maria Domenica

    2013-01-01

    Background and objectives Many patients with chronic anaemia require blood transfusions as part of their treatment regimen. As a result, iron overload will inevitably develop if not adequately managed by iron chelation therapy. There are many guidelines relating to transfusion and chelation practices for patients with transfusion-dependent anaemia; however, there is a lack of information on how treatment practices differ around the world. The objective of this manuscript is to highlight key features of current transfusion and chelation management, including similarities and differences across various anaemias and between geographical regions worldwide. Materials and methods Data collected at study entry to the multicentre Evaluation of Patients’ Iron Chelation with Exjade (EPIC) study, which recruited 1,744 patients with a variety of transfusion-dependent anaemias across 23 countries from three geographic regions, were assessed. These analyses compared transfusion and chelation treatment prior to the start of study treatment, together with iron burden assessed at study entry by serum ferritin, liver iron concentration and labile plasma iron levels. Results and conclusions Data show that transfusion and iron chelation practices differ between anaemias and between geographical regions; this may be linked to availability and accessibility of transfusion and chelation therapy, patients’ compliance, physicians’ attitudes, costs and use of treatment guidelines. Approximately 60% of these transfusion-dependent patients were severely iron overloaded with a serum ferritin level over 2,500 ng/mL, indicating that the risks of iron burden may have been underestimated and current iron chelation therapy, if considered, may not have been adequate to control iron burden. PMID:22871821

  12. Informed consent for blood transfusion: what do medicine residents tell? What do patients understand?

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mark; Arja, Wajih; Batra, Rashmi; Daniel, Sugganth; Hoehn, Daniela; Paniz, Alberto Mondolfi; Selegean, Sorin; Slova, Denisa; Srivastava, Swati; Vergara, Norge

    2012-10-01

    Blood transfusion is a common intervention in the hospital setting, and its benefits may not be clear but it has associated risks. Despite this, transfusion consent may not be obtained satisfactorily. We assessed transfusion consent effectiveness by comparing information given by residents with information understood by patients who receive transfusions. Medicine department residents who obtained consent were surveyed via telephone in conjunction with bedside surveys of adult inpatients who received transfusions. A total of 43 patient and 34 resident surveys were completed. Deficiencies in the transfusion consent process were noted. Discussed transfusion benefits (such as wound healing) were not always true benefits whereas some important risks (such as transfusion-related acute lung injury) were infrequently conferred. Risks were more often reported as "not discussed" than benefits. Only a few participants were aware of the hospital's Transfusion Health Guide, which provides information on transfusion benefits, risks, and alternatives. PMID:23010711

  13. Blood transfusion: implications of treating a Jehovah's Witness patient.

    PubMed

    Effa-Heap, Gladys

    Jehovah's Witnesses believe that an individual's life is contained within blood, and that accepting transfusion of blood and blood products is sinful. The administration of blood to a Jehovah's Witness who has refused to accept transfusion may lead to criminal or civil proceedings. From an ethical viewpoint, if a rational adult who has been fully apprised of the consequences of not receiving this treatment persists in a refusal, the decision should be respected. Medical and nursing staff faced with such a problem should explore fully with the patient any transfusion alternatives that the patient might find acceptable, such as cell salvage, volume expanders, antifibrinolytics and pharmaceutical options, such as erythropoietin. This article examines the legal and consent issues around blood transfusion in Jehovah's Witness patients and their implications for medical and surgical management. PMID:19223803

  14. Bone marrow transfusions in previously irradiated, hematologically normal syngeneic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Brecher, G.; Lawce, H.; Tjio, J.H.

    1981-03-01

    Transfusion of syngeneic marrow into normal, nonirradiated recipients results only in minimal proliferation of donor cells. However, irradiated recipients, restored to hematologic normalcy by an initial marrow transfusion, subsequently sustain proliferation which replaces approximately 10% of endogenous marrow after a single transfusion of 4 x 10/sup 7/ marrow cells of the same strain as the host. Cells from histoincompatible donors proliferate only rarely or minimally in the marrows of these irradiated, but hematologically normal recipients without reirradiation. Syngeneic male donor cells proliferate in irradiated and restored female mice, while female donor cells fail to proliferate in the marrow of syngeneic male recipients. A possible explanation is that transfused female cells respond immunologically to the abundant H-Y antigen in the male environment and are eliminated as a result.

  15. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  16. Blood Transfusion and Donation - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Blood Transfusion and Donation URL ... this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/languages/bloodtransfusionanddonation.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  17. Cell salvage for minimising perioperative allogeneic blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Carless, Paul A; Henry, David A; Moxey, Annette J; O’Connell, Dianne; Brown, Tamara; Fergusson, Dean A

    2014-01-01

    Background Concerns regarding the safety of transfused blood have prompted reconsideration of the use of allogeneic (from an unrelated donor) red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, and a range of techniques to minimise transfusion requirements. Objectives To examine the evidence for the efficacy of cell salvage in reducing allogeneic blood transfusion and the evidence for any effect on clinical outcomes. Search methods We identified studies by searching CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 2), MEDLINE (1950 to June 2009), EMBASE (1980 to June 2009), the internet (to August 2009) and bibliographies of published articles. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials with a concurrent control group in which adult patients, scheduled for non-urgent surgery, were randomised to cell salvage (autotransfusion) or to a control group who did not receive the intervention. Data collection and analysis Data were independently extracted and the risk of bias assessed. Relative risks (RR) and weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Data were pooled using a random-effects model. The primary outcomes were the number of patients exposed to allogeneic red cell transfusion and the amount of blood transfused. Other clinical outcomes are detailed in the review. Main results A total of 75 trials were included. Overall, the use of cell salvage reduced the rate of exposure to allogeneic RBC transfusion by a relative 38% (RR 0.62; 95% CI 0.55 to 0.70). The absolute reduction in risk (ARR) of receiving an allogeneic RBC transfusion was 21% (95% CI 15% to 26%). In orthopaedic procedures the RR of exposure to RBC transfusion was 0.46 (95% CI 0.37 to 0.57) compared to 0.77 (95% CI 0.69 to 0.86) for cardiac procedures. The use of cell salvage resulted in an average saving of 0.68 units of allogeneic RBC per patient (WMD −0.68; 95% CI −0.88 to −0.49). Cell salvage did not appear to impact adversely on clinical outcomes. Authors’ conclusions

  18. Association between transfusion of whole blood and recurrence of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Blumberg, N; Heal, J M; Murphy, P; Agarwal, M M; Chuang, C

    1986-01-01

    Transfusion affects the immune response to renal transplantation and may be associated with recurrence of various human neoplasms. Data from patients with colonic, rectal, cervical, and prostate tumours showed an association between transfusion of any amount of whole blood or larger amounts of red blood cells at the time of surgery and later recurrence of cancer. Recipients of one unit of whole blood had a significantly higher incidence of recurrence (45%) than recipients of a single unit of red cells (12%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of two units of whole blood also had a higher rate of recurrence (52%) than those receiving two units of red cells (23%) (p = 0.03). Recipients of any amount of whole blood had similar recurrence rates (38-52%). Recipients of four or more units of red blood cells had a higher rate of recurrence (55%) than those receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (20%) (p = 0.005). Mortality due to cancer in patients receiving three or fewer units of red blood cells (2%) was similar to that in patients who did not have transfusions (7%) and significantly lower than that observed in patients receiving three or fewer units of whole blood (20%) (p = 0.003). A proportional hazards risk analysis showed that transfusion of any whole blood or more than three units of red blood cells was significantly associated with earlier recurrence and death due to cancer. These data support an association between transfusion and recurrence of cancer. They also suggest that some factor present in greater amounts in whole blood, such as plasma, may contribute to the increased risk of recurrence in patients who have undergone transfusion. Until the questions raised by retrospective studies of cancer recurrence and transfusion can be answered by prospective interventional trials with washed red blood cells, red blood cells should be transfused to patients with cancer in preference to whole blood when clinically feasible. PMID:3092902

  19. Jehovah's Witnesses and autonomy: honouring the refusal of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bock, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores the scriptural and theological reasons given by Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) to refuse blood transfusions. Julian Savulescu and Richard W Momeyer argue that informed consent should be based on rational beliefs and that the refusal of blood transfusions by JWs is irrational, but after examining the reasons given by JWs, I challenge the claim that JW beliefs are irrational. I also question whether we should give up the traditional notion of informed consent. PMID:22790086

  20. Characterizing the Epidemiology of Perioperative Transfusion-associated Circulatory Overload

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Leanne; Jia, Qing; Yadav, Hemang; Subramanian, Arun; Wilson, Gregory A.; Murphy, Sean P.; Pathak, Jyotishman; Schroeder, Darrell R.; Ereth, Mark H.; Kor, Daryl J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a leading cause of transfusion-related fatalities, but its incidence and associated patient and transfusion characteristics are poorly understood. To inform surgical transfusion practice and to begin mitigating perioperative TACO, the authors aimed to define its epidemiology. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, the medical records of adult patients undergoing noncardiac surgery with general anesthesia during 2004 or 2011 and receiving intraoperative transfusions were screened using an electronic algorithm for identification of TACO. Those patients who were screened as high probability for TACO underwent rigorous manual review. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluated associations between patient and transfusion characteristics with TACO rates in a before-and-after study design. Results A total of 2,162 and 1,908 patients met study criteria for 2004 and 2011, respectively. The incidence of TACO was 5.5% (119 of 2,162) in 2004 versus 3.0% (57 of 1,908) in 2011 (P < 0.001), with comparable rates for men (4.8% [98 of 2,023]) and women (3.8% [78 of 2,047]) (P = 0.09). Overall, vascular (12.1% [60 of 497]), transplant (8.8% [17 of 193]), and thoracic surgeries (7.2% [10 of 138]) carried the highest TACO rates. Obstetric and gynecologic patients had the lowest rate (1.4% [4 of 295]). The incidence of TACO increased with volume transfused, advancing age, and total intraoperative fluid balance (all P < 0.001). Conclusions The incidence of perioperative TACO is similar to previous estimates in nonsurgical populations. There was a reduction in TACO rate between 2004 and 2011, with incidence patterns remaining comparable in subgroup analyses. Future efforts exploring risk factors for TACO may guide preventive or therapeutic interventions, helping to further mitigate this transfusion complication. PMID:25611653

  1. The annual cost of blood transfusions in the UK.

    PubMed

    Varney, S J; Guest, J F

    2003-08-01

    This study estimated the annual UK cost of blood transfusions in 2000/2001, updating a study we performed in 1994/1995. The analysis was based on published data, information from interviews with National Health Service (NHS) personnel and a structured questionnaire for blood donors. The annual cost of provision and transfusion of blood products increased by 256% in real terms, to pounds 898 million in 2000/2001, whereas the number of whole-blood donations increased by 2% to 2.8 million. The number of apheresis donations decreased by 52% to 70 000. Total blood product units issued to hospitals in 2000/2001 increased by 17% and were used in an estimated 1.7 million transfusions. The estimated NHS cost for an adult transfusion was pounds 635 for red blood cells, pounds 378 for fresh frozen plasma, pounds 347 for platelets and pounds 834 for cryoprecipitate. Blood donors incurred an annual direct cost of pounds 8.1 million and 3.1 million hours of used leisure time. There was also an indirect cost of pounds 7.2 million arising from lost productivity. The large increases since 1994/1995 reflect a real increase in expenditure by the blood transfusion services, partly due to the introduction of leucodepletion, greater hospital resource use due to more transfusions being undertaken and under-recording of hospital activity in 1994/1995. PMID:12880391

  2. Improved survival of newborns receiving leukocyte transfusions for sepsis

    SciTech Connect

    Cairo, M.S.; Rucker, R.; Bennetts, G.A.; Hicks, D.; Worcester, C.; Amlie, R.; Johnson, S.; Katz, J.

    1984-11-01

    To determine the role of polymorphonuclear (PMN) leukocyte transfusions in neonates with sepsis, 23 consecutive newborns were prospectively randomly selected during an 18-month period in a treatment plan to receive polymorphonuclear leukocyte transfusions with supportive care or supportive care alone. Thirteen neonates received transfusions every 12 hours for a total of five transfusions. Each transfusion consisting of 15 mL/kg of polymorphonuclear leukocytes was subjected to 1,500 rads of radiation. The polymorphonuclear leukocytes were obtained by continuous-flow centrifugation leukapheresis and contained 0.5 to 1.0 X 10(9) granulocytes per 15 mL with less than 10% lymphocytes. Positive findings on blood cultures were obtained in 14/23 patients and seven were randomly selected for each treatment group. Absolute granulocyte counts were less than 1,500/microL in 13 patients but tibial bone marrow examinations revealed that the neutrophil supply pool was depleted in only three patients. The survival was significantly greater in the treatment group compared with the group that did not receive transfusions.

  3. Blood transfusion risks and alternative strategies in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Josée

    2011-01-01

    Although the safety of the blood supply has been greatly improved, there still remain both infectious and noninfectious risks to the patient. The incidence of noninfectious transfusion reactions is greater than that of infectious complications. Furthermore, the mortality associated with noninfectious risks is significantly higher. In fact, noninfectious risks account for 87-100% of fatal complications of transfusions. It is concerning to note that the majority of pediatric reports relate to human error such as overtransfusion and lack of knowledge of special requirements in the neonatal age group. The second most frequent category is acute transfusion reactions, majority of which are allergic in nature. It is estimated that the incidence of adverse outcome is 18:100,000 red blood cells issued for children aged less than 18 years and 37:100,000 for infants. The comparable adult incidence is 13:100,000. In order to decrease the risks associated with transfusion of blood products, various blood-conservation strategies can be utilized. Modalities such as acute normovolemic hemodilution, hypervolemic hemodilution, deliberate hypotension, antifibrinolytics, intraoperative blood salvage, and autologous blood donation are discussed and the pediatric literature is reviewed. A discussion of transfusion triggers, and algorithms as well as current research into alternatives to blood transfusions concludes this review. PMID:21155923

  4. Emerging risks and outcomes of blood transfusion in surgery.

    PubMed

    Shander, Aryeh

    2004-01-01

    Prior to 1900, blood transfusions were fraught with danger and often caused more complications than the underlying disease. Discovery of the ABO compatibility system in the early twentieth century opened the modern era of blood transfusion, yet ABO incompatibility-as a result of clerical error-remains a significant threat to the recipient today. The risk of disease transmission now includes new and emerging agents, such as Trepanosoma cruzii and West Nile Virus (WNV), as well as other existing pathogens. Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) presents a further risk to recipient patients. Confounding these problems are shortages of safe blood and the accelerated rise in the cost of blood due to increased testing. Outcome data on transfusion therapy have not always been favorable, particularly in the areas of postoperative infection, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), multiple organ failure (MOF), and mortality. Such data have generated extensive efforts to determine association versus underlying cause of post-transfusion complications. In addition, unprecedented global initiatives to minimize the use of allogeneic blood are on the way. Options may include, but are not limited to, the use of "blood substitutes," although validation of such products is still required. In the meantime, blood product conservation techniques should become part of routine transfusion medicine. PMID:14872432

  5. Successful transfusion-free pancreatectomy in Jehovah's Witness patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Oh; Kim, Dong Won; Jeong, Mi Ae; Lee, Hee Jong; Kim, Kyu Nam

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Although perioperative therapies have improved greatly, pancreatectomies still often need blood transfusions. However, the morbidity from blood transfusions, the poor prognosis of blood transfused patients, high cost, and decreasing supply of blood products is accelerating transfusion-free (TF) surgery in the patients who have pacreatectomies. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of TF pancreatectomies for patients who are Jehovah's Witness. Methods We investigated the possibility of TF pancreatectomies for the Jehovah's Witness patients undergoing pancreatectomies between January 2007 and Februay 2014. There were 4 cases of Whipple's operation, 4 of pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, 2 of radical antegrade modular pancreatosplenectomy and 1 of laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy. All were performed by one surgeon. Results Most of the TF pancreatecomies patients received perioperative blood augmentation and intraoperative acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH). They received no blood transfusions at any time during their hospitalization, and pre- and intra-operative data and outcomes were acceptably favorable. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first successful consecutive pancreatectomy program for Jehovah's Witness not involving blood transfusion. TF pancreatectomy can be performed successfully in selected Jehovah's Witness. Postoperative prognosis and outcomes should be confirmed in follow up studies. PMID:27621749

  6. Platelet Transfusion – the Art and Science of Compromise

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Harm, Sarah K.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Many modern therapies depend on platelet (PLT) transfusion support. PLTs have a 4- to 7-day shelf life and are frequently in short supply. In order to optimize the inventory PLTs are often transfused to adults without regard for ABO compatibility. Hemolytic reactions are infrequent despite the presence of ‘high titer’ anti-A and anti-B antibodies in some of the units. Despite the low risk for hemolysis, some centers provide only ABO identical PLTs to their recipients; this practice might have other beneficial outcomes that remain to be proven. Strategies to mitigate the risk of hemolysis and the clinical and laboratory outcomes following ABO-matched and mismatched transfusions will be discussed. Although the PLTs themselves do not carry the D antigen, a small number of RBCs are also transfused with every PLT dose. The quantity of RBCs varies by the type of PLT preparation, and even a small quantity of D+ RBCs can alloimmunize a susceptible D− host. Thus PLT units are labeled as D+/–, and most transfusion services try to prevent the transfusion of D+ PLTs to D– females of childbearing age. A similar policy for patients with hematological diseases is controversial, and the elements and mechanisms of anti-D alloimmunization will be discussed. PMID:23922541

  7. Perioperative Red Blood Cell Transfusion: What We Do Not Know

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Chong; Xiong, Li-Ze

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Blood transfusion saves lives but may also increase the risk of injury. The objective of this review was to evaluate the possible adverse effects related to transfusion of red blood cell (RBC) concentrates stored for prolonged periods. Data Sources: The data used in this review were mainly from PubMed articles published in English up to February 2015. Study Selection: Clinical and basic research articles were selected according to their relevance to this topic. Results: The ex vivo changes to RBC that occur during storage are collectively called storage lesion. It is still inconclusive if transfusion of RBC with storage lesion has clinical relevance. Multiple ongoing prospective randomized controlled trials are aimed to clarify this clinical issue. It was observed that the adverse events related to stored RBC transfusion were prominent in certain patient populations, including trauma, critical care, pediatric, and cardiac surgery patients, which leads to the investigation of underlying mechanisms. It is demonstrated that free hemoglobin toxicity, decreasing of nitric oxide bioavailability, and free iron-induced increasing of inflammation may play an important role in this process. Conclusion: It is still unclear whether transfusion of older RBC has adverse effects, and if so, which factors determine such clinical effects. However, considering the magnitude of transfusion and the widespread medical significance, potential preventive strategies should be considered, especially for the susceptible recipients. PMID:26315088

  8. [New viral risks in blood transfusion by 2016].

    PubMed

    Pozzetto, B; Garraud, O

    2016-02-01

    Viral safety remains a major concern in transfusion of blood products. Over years, the control measures applied to blood products were made more and more sophisticated; however, the number of infectious agents, and notably of viruses, that can be transmitted by transfusion is increasing continuously. The aim of this review paper is to actualize that published in the same journal by the same authors in 2011 with more details on some of actual vs virtual viral threats that were identified recently in the field of blood transfusion. The main subjects that are covered successively concern the transmission via transfusion of hepatitis E virus, the frequency of transfusion transmitted arboviruses, transfusion at the time of the Ebola epidemics in West Africa, the debated role of Marseillevirus (giant viruses infecting amoebae and suspected to infect human blood latently), and, finally, the recent report of the identification in blood donors of a new member of the Flaviviridae family. The addition of these new viral risks to those already identified-partially controlled or not-pleads for the urgent need to move forward to considering inactivation of infectious agents in blood products. PMID:26781857

  9. Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... multiples that share a single placenta containing blood vessels going from one baby to the other. Blood ... transferred to the larger "recipient" twin through interconnecting vessels causing an unequal exchange of blood. The recipient ...

  10. LRS2: A New Integral Field Spectrograph for the HET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuttle, Sarah E.; Hill, Gary J.; Chonis, Taylor S.; Tonnesen, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    Here we present LRS2 (Low Resolution Spectrograph) and highlight early science opportunities with the newly upgraded Hobby Eberly telescope (HET). LRS2 is a four-channel optical wavelength (370nm - 1micron) spectrograph based on two VIRUS unit spectrographs. This fiber-fed integral field spectrograph covers a 12" x 6" field of view, switched between the two units (one blue, and one red) at R~2000. We highlight design elements, including the fundamental modification to grisms (from VPH gratings in VIRUS) to access the higher resolution. We discuss early science opportunities, including investigating nearby "blue-bulge" spiral galaxies and their anomalous star formation distribution.

  11. Fiber Diffraction of the Prion-Forming Domain HET-s(218-289) Shows Dehydration-Induced Deformation of a Complex Amyloid Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, William; Stubbs, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    Amyloids are filamentous protein aggregates that can be formed by many different proteins and are associated with both disease and biological functions. The pathogenicities or biological functions of amyloids are determined by their particular molecular structures, making accurate structural models a requirement for understanding their biological effects. One potential factor that can affect amyloid structures is hydration. Previous studies of simple stacked β-sheet amyloids have suggested that dehydration does not impact structure, but other studies indicated dehydration-related structural changes of a putative water-filled nanotube. Our results show that dehydration significantly affects the molecular structure of the fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289), which forms a β-solenoid with no internal solvent-accessible regions. The dehydration-related structural deformation of HET-s(218–289) indicates that water can play a significant role in complex amyloid structures, even when no obvious water-accessible cavities are present.

  12. [Screening for viral genomes in blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Coste, J

    2000-06-01

    Despite sustained improvement of donor selection and serologic screening assays, there still remains a small but significant transfusion risk for each of the major viral agents (hepatitis B virus [HBV], hepatitis C virus [HCV], human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] and human T-cell leukemia virus [HTLV]). The risk is due to the failure of the screening tests to detect all the infected blood donations and in particular those which are recently infected in the pre-seroconversion window phase of infection, and the asymptomatic immunosilent chronic carriers who never develop antibodies. Another source of risk relates to variant strains of known viruses that are not detected by the current assays. The last potential risk involves the failure to detect infected blood samples because of inaccurate performances of the test process. In order to reduce this residual risk, the French health authorities requested the progressive introduction of nucleic acid technology (NAT) in blood screening so as to be generalised to all blood centres in the course of year 2000. Multicentric studies are underway to identify the most suitable techniques for the French network. PMID:10919218

  13. Impact of antigenic exposures and role of molecular blood grouping in enhancing transfusion safety in chronically transfused thalassemics

    PubMed Central

    Makroo, Raj Nath; Agrawal, Soma; Bhatia, Aakanksha; Chowdhry, Mohit; Thakur, Uday Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Red cell alloimmunization is an acknowledged complication of blood transfusion. Current transfusion practices for thalassemia do not cater to this risk. Serological phenotyping is usually not reliable in these cases unless performed before the first transfusion. Under such circumstances, molecular blood grouping is an effective alternative. Aim: To perform molecular blood group genotyping in chronically transfused thalassemia patients and assess the risk of antigenic exposure and incidence of alloimmunization with current transfusion protocols. Materials and Methods: Molecular blood group genotyping was performed for 47 chronically transfused thalassemia patients. Their 1-year transfusion records were retrieved to assess the antigenic exposure and the frequency thereof. Results: Of 47 patients, 6 were already alloimmunized (3 with anti-E and 3 with anti-K) and were receiving the corresponding antigen negative units. We observed that random selection of ABO and Rh D matched units resulted in 57.7% ±8.26% chance of Rh and Kell phenotype matching also. Forty-four patients had received one or more antigenic exposures at least once. The 6 already alloimmunized patients were further exposed to antigens other than the ones they were immunized to. During the study period, only one patient developed an alloantibody, anti-E with exposure to antigens C (92%) and/or E (32%) at each transfusion. Conclusion: Several factors apart from mere antigen exposure may influence the development of alloimmunization as most of our patients received antigenic exposures but not alloimmunized. Our data provide an impetus for future large-scale studies to understand the development of alloimmunization in such patients. PMID:27605852

  14. Lichenoid Variant of Chronic Cutaneous Graft Versus Host Reaction Post Blood Transfusion: A Rare Event Post Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnaiah, Pushpa Kodipalya; Lakshman, Archana; Aradhya, Sacchidanand Sarvajnamurthy; Veerabhadrappa, Nataraja Holavanahally

    2015-01-01

    Chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a less frequently seen disease that occurs post solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. Chronic GVHD occurring post blood transfusion is an even more uncommon disease. It can present either as a lichenoid disease or as a sclerodermatous disease involving multiple systems. In this article, we report a case of chronic graft versus host reaction occurring in skin secondary to blood transfusion. PMID:26538747

  15. Identification of the het-r vegetative incompatibility gene of Podospora anserina as a member of the fast evolving HNWD gene family.

    PubMed

    Chevanne, Damien; Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons; Saupe, Sven J; Clavé, Corinne; Paoletti, Mathieu

    2009-02-01

    In fungi, vegetative incompatibility is a conspecific non-self recognition mechanism that restricts formation of viable heterokaryons when incompatible alleles of specific het loci interact. In Podospora anserina, three non-allelic incompatibility systems have been genetically defined involving interactions between het-c and het-d, het-c and het-e, het-r and het-v. het-d and het-e are paralogues belonging to the HNWD gene family that encode proteins of the STAND class. HET-D and HET-E proteins comprise an N-terminal HET effector domain, a central GTP binding site and a C-terminal WD repeat domain constituted of tandem repeats of highly conserved WD40 repeat units that define the specificity of alleles during incompatibility. The WD40 repeat units of the members of this HNWD family are undergoing concerted evolution. By combining genetic analysis and gain of function experiments, we demonstrate that an additional member of this family, HNWD2, corresponds to the het-r non-allelic incompatibility gene. As for het-d and het-e, allele specificity at the het-r locus is determined by the WD repeat domain. Natural isolates show allelic variation for het-r. PMID:19137300

  16. Structure of transcription factor HetR required for heterocyst differentiation in cyanobacteria.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Joachimiak, G.; Ye, Z.; Binkowski, T; Zhang, R.; Gornicki, P.; Callahan, S.; Hess, W.; Haselkorn, R.; Joachimiak, A.

    2011-06-21

    HetR is an essential regulator of heterocyst development in cyanobacteria. HetR binds to a DNA palindrome upstream of the hetP gene. We report the crystal structure of HetR from Fischerella at 3.0 {angstrom}. The protein is a dimer comprised of a central DNA-binding unit containing the N-terminal regions of the two subunits organized with two helix-turn-helix motifs; two globular flaps extending in opposite directions; and a hood over the central core formed from the C-terminal subdomains. The flaps and hood have no structural precedent in the protein database, therefore representing new folds. The structural assignments are supported by site-directed mutagenesis and DNA-binding studies. We suggest that HetR serves as a scaffold for assembly of transcription components critical for heterocyst development.

  17. A retrospective review of patient factors, transfusion practices, and outcomes in patients with transfusion-associated circulatory overload.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Lani; Maskens, Carolyn; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine; Hansen, Mark; Lin, Yulia; Pendergrast, Jacob; Yi, Qi Long; Callum, Jeannie

    2013-10-01

    Transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO) is a common yet underrecognized and underreported complication of transfusion associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The objective of this study was to examine patient and transfusion characteristics in a cohort of TACO cases. A retrospective medical record review of 100 consecutive TACO episodes reported at 2 academic centers was performed. Information related to demographics, medical history, radiologic and echocardiographic investigations, infusion practices, reaction features, management, and outcome were collected. Ninety-eight cases were accessible for review. A history of congestive heart failure (41%), renal dysfunction (44%), and age more than 70 years (56%) were common in TACO patients. Suboptimal fluid status management and inappropriate infusion practices were often seen (eg, verbal orders, double red cell transfusions, rapid infusion rates, lack or improper timing of preemptive diuretics). The median volume of blood ordered was 500 mL, and the median volume of crystalloid or colloid (preceding 24 hours) was 2200 mL. A physician order specifying the infusion rate was documented in 50% of transfusion orders. Preemptive diuretics were ordered in only 29% of cases, most commonly introduced midway or after the transfusion at a dose of furosemide 20 mg intravenously. After TACO, 18% of patients required transfer to the intensive care unit, 8% suffered a major complication, and 2% died. Suboptimal ordering and infusion practices may be contributing to the high incidence and severity of TACO. Research in TACO prevention strategies, such as slow rates of infusion and preemptive diuretics, is warranted. PMID:24075097

  18. Heterogeneous Seeding of a Prion Structure by a Generic Amyloid Form of the Fungal Prion-forming Domain HET-s(218-289)

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, William; Bian, Wen; McDonald, Michele; Kijac, Aleksandra; Wemmer, David E.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-11-13

    The fungal prion-forming domain HET-s(218–289) forms infectious amyloid fibrils at physiological pH that were shown by solid-state NMR to be assemblies of a two-rung β-solenoid structure. Under acidic conditions, HET-s(218–289) has been shown to form amyloid fibrils that have very low infectivity in vivo, but structural information about these fibrils has been very limited. We show by x-ray fiber diffraction that the HET-s(218–289) fibrils formed under acidic conditions have a stacked β-sheet architecture commonly found in short amyloidogenic peptides and denatured protein aggregates. At physiological pH, stacked β-sheet fibrils nucleate the formation of the infectious β-solenoid prions in a process of heterogeneous seeding, but do so with kinetic profiles distinct from those of spontaneous or homogeneous (seeded with infectious β-solenoid fibrils) fibrillization. Several serial passages of stacked β-sheet-seeded solutions lead to fibrillization kinetics similar to homogeneously seeded solutions. Our results directly show that structural mutation can occur between substantially different amyloid architectures, lending credence to the suggestion that the processes of strain adaptation and crossing species barriers are facilitated by structural mutation.

  19. [Responsibility for prescribing and monitoring an act transfusion and safety blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Piercecchi-Marti, M D; Tuchtan-Torrents, L; Lassale, B; Leonetti, G; Bartoli, C

    2014-11-01

    The act to transfuse is a prescription following basic rules similar to drug prescriptions. If harm happens, potentially linked with this prescription, the harm's responsibility is borne by the physician, the paramedics, the care organization but by the supplier laboratory too. The setting of good practice rules consistent with science data at the time when the act is performed, the respect of the patient's rights and the quality of supplied products will be assessed during the expertise. Under restorative responsibility, it is necessary to previously establish a direct and certain causation between the litigious act and the harm to enforce the vicarious liability. Nowadays, legal precedents grant a larger protection to more and more numerous victims, enhancing the field of the fault with the appeal to assumption of fault. At the same time, the lawmaker himself promulgated objective conditions of compensation for many categories of victims of medical risk from which transfused people are part. The law of March the 4th of 2002 went one step closer devoting a new foundation of compensation: national solidarity. PMID:25282487

  20. Transfusion transmitted infections – A retrospective analysis from the National Blood Transfusion Service in Eritrea

    PubMed Central

    Fessehaye, Nahom; Naik, Durgadas; Fessehaye, Tesfay

    2011-01-01

    Background The emergence of transfusion transmitted infection (TTI) especially HIV/AIDS has created a huge obstacle in ensuring blood safety. To assess the situation in Eritrea, we carried out a retrospective study of 29,501 blood donors for the prevalence of TTI's i.e. HIV, HBV, HCV and Syphilis. Methods The study population included all donors who donated blood from January 2006 to November 2009. The data was collected from the National Blood Transfusion Services (NTBS) of Eritrea and includes category of donor and result for TTI markers. Results A total of 29,501 units of blood were collected from 23,385(79%) voluntary blood donors and the rest 6,116(21%) units were collected from family replacement donors. The over all prevalence of TTI's were 3.8% with 3.5% in voluntary blood donors and 5.1% in family replacement donors. The sero-prevalence for TTI markers were 0.18% HIV, 2.58% HBV, 0.57% HCV and 0.49% Syphilis. Conclusion In conclusion, even if the TTI prevalence rate among Eritrean blood donors is low, ensuring blood safety has a long way to go. PMID:22145069

  1. Platelet transfusion in the neonatal intensive care unit: benefits, risks, alternatives.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Robert D

    2011-01-01

    Platelet transfusions were introduced into clinical medicine about 60 years ago when they were shown to reduce the mortality rate of patients with leukemia who were bleeding secondary to hyporegenerative thrombocytopenia. In modern neonatology units, platelet transfusions are integral and indeed lifesaving for some neonates. However, the great majority of platelet transfusions currently administered in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are not given in the original paradigm to treat thrombocytopenic hemorrhage, but instead are administered prophylactically with the hope that they will reduce the risk of spontaneous bleeding. Weighing the risks and benefits of platelet transfusion, although imprecise, should be attempted each time a platelet transfusion is ordered. Adopting guidelines specific for platelet transfusion will improve consistency of care and will also generally reduce transfusion usage, thereby reducing costs and conserving valuable blood bank resources. Initiating specific programs to improve compliance with transfusion guidelines can further improve NICU transfusion practice. PMID:21986337

  2. Platelet transfusion in chemotherapy patients: comparison of the effect of intravenous infusion pumps versus gravity transfusion.

    PubMed

    Meess, A

    2015-01-01

    Platelet concentrates are given to patients suffering with severe thrombocytopenia usually by a gravity transfusion procedure. Increasing patient numbers that are in need of this treatment increase the pressure on hospital staff and space. In order to combat time issues, the use of medical devices such as intravenous infusion pumps are thought to be beneficial for time and simultaneously for safety in transfusion practices. By using infusion pumps, platelet concentrates can be transfused in less time and provide accurate volume measurements. Manufacturers of infusion pumps claim that these devices are safe to be used for blood products including platelet concentrates. However, published studies were performed on older models and newer devices are on the market now. The purpose of this study is to evaluate infusion pumps, which are claimed to be suitable for blood products and to investigate the impact the pumps had on platelets. Furthermore, the study revealed if the intravenous infusion pumps are safe to be used for platelet transfusion as claimed by manufacturers. A simulated transfusion was performed using the Carefusion Alaris GP Plus volumetric pump and Fresenius Kabi Volumat Agilia infusion pump. Samples were taken from expired platelet concentrates before and after passage through the pump. All samples were investigated for full blood count that included platelet count, mean platelet volume (MPV), platelet distribution width (PDW) and a plateletcrit (PCT). The samples were then centrifuged to achieve platelet-poor plasma and then tested for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). A power calculation performed on the statistical power analysis program G*power indicated a requirement of 82 samples for a power of 80%. Statistical analysis was performed with the IBM SPSS statistic software. A paired sample t-test was used to calculate mean, standard deviation and P values for the infusion pumps used. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test was used to evaluate results that had a non

  3. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in neurocritical care

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Andreas H; Zygun, David A

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Anemia is one of the most common medical complications to be encountered in critically ill patients. Based on the results of clinical trials, transfusion practices across the world have generally become more restrictive. However, because reduced oxygen delivery contributes to 'secondary' cerebral injury, anemia may not be as well tolerated among neurocritical care patients. Methods The first portion of this paper is a narrative review of the physiologic implications of anemia, hemodilution, and transfusion in the setting of brain-injury and stroke. The second portion is a systematic review to identify studies assessing the association between anemia or the use of red blood cell transfusions and relevant clinical outcomes in various neurocritical care populations. Results There have been no randomized controlled trials that have adequately assessed optimal transfusion thresholds specifically among brain-injured patients. The importance of ischemia and the implications of anemia are not necessarily the same for all neurocritical care conditions. Nevertheless, there exists an extensive body of experimental work, as well as human observational and physiologic studies, which have advanced knowledge in this area and provide some guidance to clinicians. Lower hemoglobin concentrations are consistently associated with worse physiologic parameters and clinical outcomes; however, this relationship may not be altered by more aggressive use of red blood cell transfusions. Conclusions Although hemoglobin concentrations as low as 7 g/dl are well tolerated in most critical care patients, such a severe degree of anemia could be harmful in brain-injured patients. Randomized controlled trials of different transfusion thresholds, specifically in neurocritical care settings, are required. The impact of the duration of blood storage on the neurologic implications of transfusion also requires further investigation. PMID:19519893

  4. Blood transfusion therapy for traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest

    PubMed Central

    Moriwaki, Yoshihiro; Sugiyama, Mitsugi; Tahara, Yoshio; Iwashita, Masayuki; Kosuge, Takayuki; Toyoda, Hiroshi; Arata, Shinju; Suzuki, Noriyuki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion therapy (BTT), which represents transplantation of living cells, poses several risks. Although BTT is necessary for trauma victims with hemorrhagic shock, it may be futile for patients with blunt traumatic cardiopulmonary arrest (BT-CPA). Materials and Methods: We retrospectively examined the medical records of consecutive patients with T-CPA. The study period was divided into two periods: The first from 1995-1998, when we used packed red cells (PRC) regardless of the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC), and the second from 1999-2004, when we did not use PRC before ROSC. The rates of ROSC, admission to the ICU, and survival-to-discharge were compared between these two periods. Results: We studied the records of 464 patients with BT-CPA (175 in the first period and 289 in the second period). Although the rates of ROSC and admission to the ICU were statistically higher in the first period, there was no statistical difference in the rate of survival-to-discharge between these two periods. In the first period, the rate of ROSC was statistically higher in the non-BTT group than the BTT group. However, for cases in which ROSC was performed and was successful, there were no statistical differences in the rate of admission and survival-to-discharge between the first and second group, and between the BTT and non-BTT group. Conclusion: Our retrospective consecutive study shows the possibility that BTT before ROSC for BT-CPA and a treatment strategy that includes this treatment improves the success rate of ROSC, but not the survival rate. BTT is thought to be futile as a treatment for BT-CPA before ROSC. PMID:23493056

  5. Transfusion-transmitted infections in haemophilia patients.

    PubMed

    Zhubi, Bukurije; Mekaj, Ymer; Baruti, Zana; Bunjaku, Ilirijane; Belegu, Mazllum

    2009-11-01

    One of the largest therapeutic problem during the continuous treatment of the patients with Hemophilia A and B, are viral infections as Hepatitis B and C, and HIV, and the other infective diseases, which can be transmitted by the transfusion of blood products. The aim of this study is to analyze the complications of the hemophiliacs in Kosovo which have been treated with fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate and concentrated products of FVIII and FIX. We have tested 75 patients with hemophilia A or B and there were used enzyme immunoassay test-Elisa method for the following: anti-HCV, HBsAg, HIV and TPHA.The serological data showed that HCV infection was positive in 29 cases or 38,7%, whereas infection with HBV and HIV were present in a smaller percentage of the patients (2,7% HBV and 1,4% for HIV). HCV infection was present only in 9,5% of the cases of the age group under 18 years. Infected hemophiliacs with one or two infective agents were found in 34,7%, respectively 4%. Infection with T. pallidum was present at none of the examined patients with hemophilia. HCV infection was higher in severe forms of hemophilia B (44,4%), compared with severe form of hemophilia A (30%).Based on our results, despite the infrequent application of FVIII and FIX concentrates, and other anti hemophilic preparations used in treating hemophilia patients, the number of infected hemophiliacs with blood-transmittable infectious agents was substantially high, especially with hepatitis C virus. PMID:20001991

  6. Retroviral infections transmitted by blood transfusion.

    PubMed Central

    Sandler, S. G.; Fang, C.; Williams, A.

    1990-01-01

    Modifications in donor screening and the introduction of laboratory testing of donated blood for anti-HIV-1 and anti-HTLV-I have resulted in a significant reduction in the risks of retroviral infections from blood transfusion. Presently, the American Red Cross detects an average of eight carriers of human immunodeficiency virus, type 1 (HIV-1) per 100,000 otherwise acceptable blood donors (0.008 percent), compared with an average of 35 per 100,000 (0.035 percent) when testing for HIV-1 antibodies began in 1985. Surveillance studies in the United States indicate a small likelihood that HIV-2 carriers will pass current screening procedures and be accepted as blood donors. Even if an HIV-2-infected person were to be accepted as a blood donor, there is a 42-92 percent likelihood that this person's blood would be detected as infective for HIV-2 and excluded because of serological cross-reactions that occur in the EIA for HIV-1 antibodies. During 1989, which was the first year that donated blood was routinely tested for antibodies to human T-lymphotropic virus, type I (HTLV-I) in the United States, approximately nine in 100,000 donors (0.009 percent) were confirmed positive for antibodies to HTLV-I, and their donated blood was excluded. Subsequent testing has revealed that a significant number of these persons whose sera was reactive by the HTLV-I EIA were, in fact, infected by HTLV-II. Epidemiological studies of human retroviral infections (HIV-1, HIV-2, HTLV-I, and HTLV-II) continue to provide important data and direction for improving criteria for qualifying blood donors. PMID:1981409

  7. Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahieu-Caputo, Dominique; Dommergues, Marc; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Lacoste, Mireille; Cai, Yi; Narcy, Françoise; Jolly, Dominique; Gonzales, Marie; Dumez, Yves; Gubler, Marie-Claire

    2000-01-01

    The twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTS) results from an unbalanced blood supply through placental anastomoses in monochorionic twins. It induces growth restriction, renal tubular dysgenesis, and oliguria in the donor and visceromegaly and polyuria in the recipient. A better understanding of its pathophysiology could contribute to improving the management of TTS, which still carries a high perinatal mortality in both twins. As well as several other candidates, the renin-angiotensin system might be involved in TTS. To evaluate its role in the pathogenesis of the syndrome, we studied the kidneys of 21 twin pairs who died from TTS at 19 to 30 weeks, compared with 39 individuals in a control group, using light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and in situ hybridization. The overexpression of the renin protein and transcript with frequent evidence of renin synthesis by mesangial cells was observed in the donor kidneys, presumably as a consequence of chronic renal hypoperfusion. This upregulation of renin synthesis might be beneficial to restore euvolemia. In severe cases of TTS, however, angiotensin-II-induced vasoconstriction acts as an additional deleterious factor by further reducing the renal blood flow in donors. In recipients, renin expression was virtually absent, possibly because it was down-regulated by hypervolemia. However, in addition to congestion and hemorrhagic infarction, there were severe glomerular and arterial lesions resembling those observed in polycythemia- or hypertension-induced microangiopathy. We speculate that fetal hypertension in the recipient might be partly mediated by the transfer of circulating renin produced by the donor, through the placental vascular shunts. PMID:10666392

  8. [Post-transfusion pulmonary oedema: the French hemovigilance network classification method].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Renaudier, P; Caldani, C; Aguilon, P; Canivet, N; Fabrigli, P; Mertes, P-M; Muller, J-Y; Rebibo, D; Tazerout, M; Trophilme, C; Willaert, B; Carlier, M

    2010-12-01

    Pulmonary oedema after transfusion of blood products may be hydrostatic (transfusion-associated circulatory overload [taco]) or exsudative (transfusion-related acute lung injury [trali]). Both conditions have been recognized as major hazards to transfusion recipients. Risk characterization is necessary to improve safety and to monitor trends in the national blood transfusion system. A collaborative multidisciplinary working group of the French National Hemovigilance Committee has proposed an analysis framework for case definitions and classification. The method relies on internationally used definitions and is adapted to the codification procedures used in the french transfusion incident reports electronic data management. PMID:21051260

  9. Dose of Prophylactic Platelet Transfusions and Prevention of Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Slichter, Sherrill J.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Assmann, Susan F.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Triulzi, Darrell J.; Strauss, Ronald G.; Gernsheimer, Terry B.; Ness, Paul M.; Brecher, Mark E.; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Woodson, Robert D.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Hillyer, Christopher D.; Skerrett, Donna L.; McCrae, Keith R.; Sloan, Steven R.; Uhl, Lynne; George, James N.; Aquino, Victor M.; Manno, Catherine S.; McFarland, Janice G.; Hess, John R.; Leissinger, Cindy; Granger, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND We conducted a trial of prophylactic platelet transfusions to evaluate the effect of platelet dose on bleeding in patients with hypoproliferative thrombocytopenia. METHODS We randomly assigned hospitalized patients undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation or chemotherapy for hematologic cancers or solid tumors to receive prophylactic platelet transfusions at a low dose, a medium dose, or a high dose (1.1×1011, 2.2×1011, or 4.4×1011 platelets per square meter of body-surface area, respectively), when morning platelet counts were 10,000 per cubic millimeter or lower. Clinical signs of bleeding were assessed daily. The primary end point was bleeding of grade 2 or higher (as defined on the basis of World Health Organization criteria). RESULTS In the 1272 patients who received at least one platelet transfusion, the primary end point was observed in 71%, 69%, and 70% of the patients in the low-dose group, the medium-dose group, and the high-dose group, respectively (differences were not significant). The incidences of higher grades of bleeding, and other adverse events, were similar among the three groups. The median number of platelets transfused was significantly lower in the low-dose group (9.25×1011) than in the medium-dose group (11.25×1011) or the high-dose group (19.63×1011) (P = 0.002 for low vs. medium, P<0.001 for high vs. low and high vs. medium), but the median number of platelet transfusions given was significantly higher in the low-dose group (five, vs. three in the medium-dose and three in the high-dose group; P<0.001 for low vs. medium and low vs. high). Bleeding occurred on 25% of the study days on which morning platelet counts were 5000 per cubic millimeter or lower, as compared with 17% of study days on which platelet counts were 6000 to 80,000 per cubic millimeter (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Low doses of platelets administered as a prophylactic transfusion led to a decreased number of platelets transfused per patient but an

  10. [Acute lung injury as a consequence of blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Moyado, Héctor

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) has been recognized as a consequence of blood transfusion (BT) since 1978; the Food and Drug Administration, has classified it as the third BT mortality issue, in 2004, and in first place related with ALI. It can be mainly detected as: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), transfusion associated circulatory overload (TACO) and transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI). The clinical onset is: severe dyspnea, bilateral lung infiltration and low oxygen saturation. In USA, ARDS has an incidence of three to 22.4 cases/100 000 inhabitants, with 58.3 % mortality. TACO and TRALI are less frequent; they have been reported according to the number of transfusions: one in 1275 to 6000 for TRALI and one in 356 transfusions for TACO. Mortality is reported from two to 20 % in TRALI and 20 % in TACO. Antileukocyte antibodies in blood donors plasma, caused TRALI in 89 % of cases; also it has been found antigen specificity against leukocyte blood receptor in 59 %. The UCI patients who received a BT have ALI as a complication in 40 % of cases. The capillary pulmonary endothelia is the target of leukocyte antibodies and also plasma biologic modifiers of the stored plasma, most probable like a Sanarelli-Shwar-tzman phenomenon. PMID:21838994

  11. [Blood transfusion in emergency settings: French military health service experience].

    PubMed

    Sailliol, A; Ausset, S; Peytel, E

    2010-12-01

    Blood transfusion is required in a number of emergency settings and the French military health service (FMHS) has issued specific guidelines for the treatment of war casualties. These guidelines take into account European standards and laws, NATO standards, and also public sentiment regarding transfusion. These guidelines reflect a determination to control the process and to avoid the improvisation frequently associated with wartime transfusion. The evolution in warfare (terrorism and bombing more frequent than gunshot) and the wide use of body armor have deeply changed the clinical presentation of war injuries. These now involve the extremities in 80% of cases, with extensive tissue damage and heavy blood loss. The FMHS recommends that war casualties with hemorrhagic shock be brought quickly to a medical treatment facility (MTF) after first-line treatment applied through buddy aid or by medics. In the MTF, before an early Medevac, a damage control surgery will be performed, with resuscitation using freeze-dried plasma, red blood cells and fresh whole blood. The French military blood bank is responsible for blood product supply, training and medical advice regarding transfusion therapy during wartime, as well as hemovigilance. All transfusion therapy practices are periodically assessed but research on whole blood pathogen reduction is being conducted in order to reduce the residual infectious risk associated with this product. PMID:21051268

  12. Resveratrol preserves the function of human platelets stored for transfusion.

    PubMed

    Lannan, Katie L; Refaai, Majed A; Ture, Sara K; Morrell, Craig N; Blumberg, Neil; Phipps, Richard P; Spinelli, Sherry L

    2016-03-01

    Stored platelets undergo biochemical, structural and functional changes that lead to decreased efficacy and safety of platelet transfusions. Not only do platelets acquire markers of activation during storage, but they also fail to respond normally to agonists post-storage. We hypothesized that resveratrol, a cardioprotective antioxidant, could act as a novel platelet storage additive to safely prevent unwanted platelet activation during storage, while simultaneously preserving normal haemostatic function. Human platelets treated with resveratrol and stored for 5 d released less thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin E2 compared to control platelets. Resveratrol preserved the ability of platelets to aggregate, spread and respond to thrombin, suggesting an improved ability to activate post-storage. Utilizing an in vitro model of transfusion and thromboelastography, clot strength was improved with resveratrol treatment compared to conventionally stored platelets. The mechanism of resveratrol's beneficial actions on stored platelets was partly mediated through decreased platelet apoptosis in storage, resulting in a longer half-life following transfusion. Lastly, an in vivo mouse model of transfusion demonstrated that stored platelets are prothrombotic and that resveratrol delayed vessel occlusion time to a level similar to transfusion with fresh platelets. We show resveratrol has a dual ability to reduce unwanted platelet activation during storage, while preserving critical haemostatic function. PMID:26683619

  13. Plasma in the PICU: why and when should we transfuse?

    PubMed

    Labarinas, Sonia; Arni, Delphine; Karam, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Whereas red blood cell transfusions have been used since the 19th century, plasma has only been available since 1941. It was originally mainly used as volume replacement, mostly during World War II and the Korean War. Over the years, its indication has shifted to correct coagulation factors deficiencies or to prevent bleeding. Currently, it remains a frequent treatment in the intensive care unit, both for critically ill adults and children. However, observational studies have shown that plasma transfusion fail to correct mildly abnormal coagulation tests. Furthermore, recent epidemiological studies have shown that plasma transfusions are associated with an increased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Therefore, plasma, as any other treatment, has to be used when the benefits outweigh the risks. Based on observational data, most experts suggest limiting its use either to massively bleeding patients or bleeding patients who have documented abnormal coagulation tests, and refraining for transfusing plasma to nonbleeding patients whatever their coagulation tests. In this paper, we will review current evidence on plasma transfusions and discuss its indications. PMID:23725411

  14. Vestibular responses to linear acceleration are absent in otoconia-deficient C57BL/6JEi-het mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Erway, L. C.; Bergstrom, R. A.; Schimenti, J. C.; Jones, T. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were measured in normal mice and in mice homozygous for the head tilt mutation (het/het, abbr. het). The het mice lack otoconia, the inertial mass critical for natural stimulation of inner ear gravity receptors. Our findings demonstrate that vestibular neural responses to pulsed linear acceleration are absent in het mice. The results: (1) confirm that adequate sensory stimuli fail to activate gravity receptors in the het model; and (2) serve as definitive evidence that far-field vestibular responses to pulsed linear acceleration depend critically on otolith end organs. The C57BL/6JEi-het mouse may be an excellent model of gravity receptor sensory deprivation.

  15. Expanding the Direct HetR Regulon in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Videau, Patrick; Ni, Shuisong; Rivers, Orion S.; Ushijima, Blake; Feldmann, Erik A.; Cozy, Loralyn M.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    In response to a lack of environmental combined nitrogen, the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 differentiates nitrogen-fixing heterocyst cells in a periodic pattern. HetR is a transcription factor that coordinates the regulation of this developmental program. An inverted repeat-containing sequence in the hepA promoter required for proheterocyst-specific transcription was identified based on sequence similarity to a previously characterized binding site for HetR in the promoter of hetP. The binding affinity of HetR for the hepA site is roughly an order of magnitude lower than that for the hetP binding site. A BLAST search of the Anabaena genome identified 166 hepA-like sites that occur as single or tandem sites (two binding sites separated by 13 bp). The vast majority of these sites are present in predicted intergenic regions. HetR bound five representative single binding sites in vitro, and binding was abrogated by transversions in the binding sites that conserved the inverted repeat nature of the sites. Binding to four representative tandem sites was not observed. Transcriptional fusions of the green fluorescent protein gene gfp with putative promoter regions associated with the representative binding sites indicated that HetR could function as either an activator or repressor and that activation was cell-type specific. Taken together, we have expanded the direct HetR regulon and propose a model in which three categories of HetR binding sites, based on binding affinity and nucleotide sequence, contribute to three of the four phases of differentiation. PMID:24375104

  16. Practical aspects of out-of-hospital transfusion.

    PubMed

    Fridey, J L

    1997-04-01

    Out-of-hospital transfusion (OOHT) occurs in nontraditional settings, such as a patient's home, a physician's office, or a convalescent facility. Requests to issue components for OOHT present new challenges to some blood centers and transfusion services that are accustomed to issuing blood for use only in the hospital setting. Concerns about patient safety, a paucity of practical information on establishing programs, and a lack of specific practice guidelines may discourage some organizations from offering these services. Participation in OOHT programs, however, may present new patient care and customer service opportunities to blood centers and transfusion services. The purpose of this article is to familiarize readers with the essential elements for establishing a safe program. Relevant regulatory, legal, and financial issues are also addressed. PMID:9124232

  17. Granulocyte transfusions in children using filter-collected cells.

    PubMed

    Higby, D J; Freeman, A; Henderson, E S; Sinks, L; Cohen, E

    1976-09-01

    Twenty-three children with various stages and morphologic types of leukemia were treated with multiple granulocyte transfusions obtained by filtration leukapheresis when neutropenia-associated infection appeared unresponsive to antibiotics. All children meeting the above qualifications were given granulocyte transfusions during this time period. Twenty-one of 23 became afebrile during or shortly after the transfusions; one died with disseminated Herpes simplex; and one became well enough to be discharged, although he was never free of fever. Frequent mild to moderate fever and chills were noted. One child developed a severe pulmonary reaction followed by resolution of pneumonia. Filtration leukapheresis is a useful adjunct in controlling severe infections in neutropenic children. PMID:821603

  18. Filtration characteristics of the polyester fiber micropore blood transfusion filter.

    PubMed

    Risberg, B I; Hurley, M J; Miller, E; deJongh, D S; Litwin, M S

    1979-06-01

    The filtration characteristics of a new polyester fiber (Fenwal II) micropore blood transfusion filter were investigated. Filtration of stored human whole blood and packed cells resulted in return of screen filtration pressure (SFP) of the blood to normal. Increased filter weights verified removal of large amounts of debris and microaggregates from the blood. Filtration of large quantities of blood accomplished at very high flow rates did not adversely affect the composition of the filtered blood. We conclude that the polyester fiber (Fenwal II) micropore blood transfusion filter is effective in removing microaggregates from stored whole blood and packed cells. It has a high volume capacity, allows rapid flow, and is reliable during pressure transfusion. PMID:451646

  19. Pulmonary insults due to transfusions, radiation, and hyperoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Duane, P.

    1988-09-01

    Pulmonary insults caused by transfusion, radiation, and hyperoxia share many clinical features with insults caused by serious pulmonary infections. The major objective in evaluating these patients is to establish the diagnosis with as much certainty as possible. Unfortunately, there are no clinical aspects or laboratory tests that are pathognomonic for these diseases; therefore, it is often necessary to rely on a knowledge of those features which help to distinguish these disorders from infectious etiologies. For example, patients suffering from transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) experience onset of insult within 6 hours of a transfusion and have the presence of leukoagglutinins in their serum. Patients with radiation injuries frequently have roentgenographic infiltrates that conform to the ports of radiation. Despite extensive animal and human studies, factors distinguishing hyperoxic injury from infectious disorders remain poorly defined. These clinical features and others are reviewed to identify the essential components in the diagnosis of TRALI, acute radiation pneumonitis, and hyperoxic pneumonitis. 84 references.

  20. Applying molecular immunohaematology to regularly transfused thalassaemic patients in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Rujirojindakul, Pairaya; Flegel, Willy A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Red blood cell transfusion is the principal therapy in patients with severe thalassaemias and haemoglobinopathies, which are prevalent in Thailand. Serological red blood cell typing is confounded by chronic transfusion, because of circulating donor red blood cells. We evaluated the concordance of serological phenotypes between a routine and a reference laboratory and with red cell genotyping. Materials and methods Ten consecutive Thai patients with β-thalassemia major who received regular transfusions were enrolled in Thailand. Phenotypes were tested serologically at Songklanagarind Hospital and at the National Institutes of Health. Red blood cell genotyping was performed with commercially available kits and a platform. Results In only three patients was the red cell genotyping concordant with the serological phenotypes for five antithetical antigen pairs in four blood group systems at the two institutions. At the National Institutes of Health, 32 of the 100 serological tests yielded invalid or discrepant results. The positive predictive value of serology did not reach 1 for any blood group system at either of the two institutions in this set of ten patients. Discussion Within this small study, numerous discrepancies were observed between serological phenotypes at the two institutes; red cell genotyping enabled determination of the blood group when serology failed due to transfused red blood cells. We question the utility of serological tests in regularly transfused paediatric patients and propose relying solely on red cell genotyping, which requires training for laboratory personnel and physicians. Red cell genotyping outperformed red cell serology by an order of magnitude in regularly transfused patients. PMID:24120606

  1. [Transfusion medicine in the 2000s, on a reform].

    PubMed

    Hervé, Patrick

    2002-01-01

    The creation of the Etablissement Français du Sang (EFS) was mentioned in the Law of July 1, 1998, pertaining to sanitary safety. The EFS is the sole operator of blood transfusion. With a unique legal status, supervised by the Ministry in charge of Health, the EFS organizes the activities involved in the transfusion chain over the whole territory, it promotes research activities and take part in international scientific cooperation. Its activities include medical biology as well as cell and gene therapy. As part of the new 2000-2004 territorial transfusion scheme, the EFS network comprises 18 centers (versus 43 in the previous plan), 14 of which are located in the French territory and the other 4 overseas. The network includes 18 technical platforms for the biological qualification of blood products, while 27 are dedicated to their preparation, transformation and storage. The activities of collection and distribution, which comply with the principle of proximity to both donors and patients, are ensured by 220 sites spread over the whole territory. For the future, the EFS wants to focus its efforts on reducing residual infectious risks (using molecular biology tools), preventing immunological risks, drawing up an education program aiming at teaching transfusion medicine differently. Despite the advances achieved in biotechnologies, the development of substitution products to replace blood transfusion will still require a lot of time. The EFS wishes to focus its action following three different axes: transfusion medicine, medical biology and cell engineering. With its 18 centers and its 8,200 persons, the EFS must face the challengers of the 2000s, relying on the advances in biotechnologies. PMID:12145845

  2. Limiting excessive postoperative blood transfusion after cardiac procedures. A review.

    PubMed Central

    Ferraris, V A; Ferraris, S P

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of blood product use after cardiac operations reveals that a few patients (< or = 20%) consume the majority of blood products (> 80%). The risk factors that predispose a minority of patients to excessive blood use include patient-related factors, transfusion practices, drug-related causes, and procedure-related factors. Multivariate studies suggest that patient age and red blood cell volume are independent patient-related variables that predict excessive blood product transfusion after cardiac procedures. Other factors include preoperative aspirin ingestion, type of operation, over- or underutilization of heparin during cardiopulmonary bypass, failure to correct hypothermia after cardiopulmonary bypass, and physician overtransfusion. A survey of the currently available blood conservation techniques reveals 5 that stand out as reliable methods: 1) high-dose aprotinin therapy, 2) preoperative erythropoietin therapy when time permits adequate dosage before operation, 3) hemodilution by harvest of whole blood immediately before cardiopulmonary bypass, 4) autologous predonation of blood, and 5) salvage of oxygenator blood after cardiopulmonary bypass. Other methods, such as the use of epsilon-aminocaproic acid or desmopressin, cell saving devices, reinfusion of shed mediastinal blood, and hemofiltration have been reported to be less reliable and may even be harmful in some high-risk patients. Consideration of the available data allows formulation of a 4-pronged plan for limiting excessive blood transfusion after surgery: 1) recognize the causes of excessive transfusion, including the importance of red blood cell volume, type of procedure being performed, preoperative aspirin ingestion, etc.; 2) establish a quality management program, including a survey of transfusion practices that emphasizes physician education and availability of real-time laboratory testing to guide transfusion therapy; 3) adopt a multimodal approach using institution-proven techniques; and

  3. Haemovigilance: an effective tool for improving transfusion practice.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R R P; Faber, J-C; Strengers, P F W

    2011-01-01

    Haemovigilance is a tool to improve the quality of the blood transfusion chain, primarily focusing on safety. In this review we discuss the history and present state of this relatively new branch of transfusion medicine as well as some developments that we foresee in the near future. The top 10 results and conclusions are: (1) Haemovigilance systems have shown that blood transfusion is relatively safe compared with the use of medicinal drugs and that at least in Europe blood components have reached a high safety standard. (2) The majority of the serious adverse reactions and events occur in the hospital. (3) The majority of preventable adverse reactions are due to clerical errors. (4) Some adverse reactions such as anaphylactic reactions often are not avoidable and therefore have to be considered as an inherent risk of blood transfusion. (5) Well-functioning haemovigilance systems have not only indicated how safety should be improved, but also documented the success of various measures. (6) The type of organisation of a haemovigilance system is of relative value, and different systems may have the same outcome. (7) International collaboration has been extremely useful. (8) Haemovigilance systems may be used for the vigilance and surveillance of alternatives for allogeneic blood transfusion such as cell savers. (9) Haemovigilance systems and officers may be used to improve the quality of aspects of blood transfusion other than safety, such as appropriate use. (10) Haemovigilance systems will be of benefit also for vigilance and surveillance of the treatment with other human products such as cells, tissues and organs. PMID:21175656

  4. SALT/HET cooperation in education and public outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Preston, Sandra

    The "Science with SALT" meeting in March 1998 opened avenues of cooperation between SAAO and the University of Texas at Austin in education and public outreach. This paper will review past interactions and future plans. SAAO personnel have visited the HET and McDonald Observatory and have taken part in planning meetings for the Texas Astronomy Education Center museum area and educational programming. Discussions concerning the extension of the daily radio show StarDate (English), Universo (Spanish) and Sternzeit (German) versions to a southern hemisphere version are underway. In addition, we are cooperatively planning a workshop to discuss an international collaborative for educational outreach for state-of-the-art telescopes for which a regional collaborative in southwestern U.S. (SCOPE) serves as a model. The towns of Sutherland and Fort Davis are discussing forming a "twin-town" relationship. Projects and plans that link cutting-edge astronomical research to classrooms and the public will be reviewed.

  5. Blood Transfusion Strategies for Hemostatic Resuscitation in Massive Trauma.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Caroline

    2016-03-01

    Massive transfusion practices were transformed during the 1970s without solid evidence supporting the use of component therapy. A manual literature search was performed for all references to the lethal triad, acute or early coagulopathy of trauma, fresh whole blood, and component transfusion therapy in massive trauma, and damage control resuscitation. Data from recent wars suggest traditional component therapy causes a nonhemostatic resuscitation worsening the propagation of the lethal triad hastening death. These same studies also indicate the advantage of fresh whole blood over component therapy even when administered in a 1:1:1 replacement ratio. PMID:26897426

  6. Direct antiglobulin test positivity in multi-transfused thalassemics

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish; Agnihotri, Ajju; Marwaha, Neelam; Sharma, Ratti Ram

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Red cell allo- and auto-immunization is a well recognized problem in multi-transfused thalassemic patients. We conducted this study on 301 multi-transfused thalassemic patients under the Thalassemia Transfusion Programme of Advanced Pediatric Centre of PGIMER. Aims and Objectives: The study was designed to determine the frequency of alloimmunization and autoimmunization in multi-transfused thalassemic patients and to establish the specificity of alloantibody to red cell antigens, if alloimmunization is detected. Materials and Methods: The antibody screening was performed by the conventional tube technique using commercially available three cell screening panel (Diamed Switzerland) by saline, low ionic strength solution (LISS) and albumin indirect antiglobulin test (IAT). Samples with alloantibodies were then tested with red cell identification panel to determine the alloantibody specificity. Autoantibody screening was performed by direct antiglobulin test (DAT) during pre-transfusion testing. Results: Of the 301 patients, 52 (17.28%) were found to have antibodies (-allo and –autoantibodies). A total of 11 red cell alloantibodies were detected in 10 patients and the specificities were anti-Kell in 6(54.5%), anti-D in 2(18.2%), anti-c in 1(9.1%) and a combination of anti-E (9.1%) and anti-Jkb in 1 (9.1%) patients. DAT was positive in 48 (15.9%) patients. The frequency of autoantibody was significantly higher in alloimmunized group as compared to non-alloimmunized group (60% V/s 14.4%). Also, the pre-transfusion hemoglobin was significantly lower in the immunized group (8.5 gm/dl V/s 9.0 gm/dl; p=0.03) than the non-immunized group. Conclusion: Based on these observations, we suggest antigen typing of all thalassemia major patients for ABO, Rh and Kell antigens before initiating transfusion therapy. Also, screening for allo- and auto-antibodies at regular intervals should be done prior to each transfusion. PMID:27605858

  7. Ethical Questions about Platelet Transfusions at the End of Life.

    PubMed

    Sherbeck, John P; Boss, Renee D

    2016-01-01

    This case of platelet transfusion in palliative care illustrates a common dilemma in transfusion medicine: approval of the use of a scarce, yet potentially life-saving, resource. As in this case, these decisions often involve seriously ill patients with acute needs and evolving goals of care. The use of resources to treat the patient at hand must be balanced against maintaining adequate resources to treat future patients. In this setting, the ethical principles of beneficence and social justice are in conflict. PMID:27550559

  8. Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets.

    PubMed

    Tang, David H; Olesnicky, Bohdan T; Eby, Michael W; Heiskell, Lawrence E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear(®), a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear(®) as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings. PMID:27147871

  9. Auto-transfusion tourniquets: the next evolution of tourniquets

    PubMed Central

    Tang, David H; Olesnicky, Bohdan T; Eby, Michael W; Heiskell, Lawrence E

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the relationship between hemorrhagic shock and the pathophysiology of shock using conventional tourniquets. We will focus on corollary benefits with the use of HemaClear®, a self-contained, sterile, exsanguinating auto-transfusion tourniquet. This discussion will demonstrate that the use of auto-transfusion tourniquets is a practical evidence-based approach in fluid resuscitation: it shortens the duration of shock after hemorrhage and trauma compared with conventional tourniquets. Emphasis is placed on the use of the HemaClear® as an alternative fluid resuscitation tool which is more efficient in the battlefield, pre-hospital and in-hospital settings. PMID:27147871

  10. Hypothesis: Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions Represent an Alternative Type of Anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Hod, Eldad A.; Sokol, Set A.; Zimring, James C.; Spitalnik, Steven L.

    2009-01-01

    Classical anaphylaxis is the most severe, and potentially fatal, type of allergic reaction, manifested by hypotension, bronchoconstriction, and vascular permeability. Similarly, a hemolytic transfusion reaction (HTR) is the most feared consequence of blood transfusion. Evidence for the existence of an alternative, IgG-mediated pathway of anaphylaxis may be relevant for explaining the pathophysiology of IgG-mediated-HTRs. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence for this alternative pathway of anaphylaxis and to present the hypothesis that an IgG-mediated HTR is one example of this type of anaphylaxis. PMID:18830382

  11. Platelet transfusion prophylaxis for patients with haematological malignancies: where to now?

    PubMed

    Stanworth, S J; Hyde, C; Brunskill, S; Murphy, M F

    2005-12-01

    National guidelines for platelet transfusion in many countries recommend that the general platelet transfusion trigger for prophylaxis is 10x10(9)/l. This annotation reviews the evidence for this threshold level and discusses other current unresolved issues relevant to platelet transfusion practice such as the optimal dose and the clinical benefit of a strategy for the prophylactic use of platelet transfusions when the platelet count falls below a given threshold. PMID:16351634

  12. Effects of Storage-Aged RBC Transfusions on Endothelial Function in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Robert; Hayek, Salim; Rahman, Ayaz; Poole, Joseph C.; Menon, Vivek; Sher, Salman; Newman, James L.; Karatela, Sulaiman; Polhemus, David; Lefer, David J.; De Staercke, Christine; Hooper, Craig; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Roback, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical and animal studies indicate that transfusions of older stored RBCs impair clinical outcomes as compared to fresh RBC transfusions. It has been suggested that this effect is due to inhibition of NO-mediated vasodilation following transfusion of older RBC units. However, to date this effect has not been identified in human transfusion recipients. Study Design and Methods Forty-three hospitalized patients with transfusion orders were randomized to receive either fresh (< 14 days) or older stored (> 21 days) RBC units. Prior to transfusion, and at selected time points after the start of transfusion, endothelial function was assessed using non-invasive flow-mediated dilation assays. Results Following transfusion of older RBC units, there was a significant reduction in NO-mediated vasodilation at 24 hours after transfusion (p=0.045), while fresh RBC transfusions had no effect (p=0.231). Conclusions The present study suggests for the first time a significant inhibitory effect of transfused RBC units stored > 21 days on NO-mediated vasodilation in anemic hospitalized patients. This finding lends further support to the hypothesis that deranged NO signaling mediates adverse clinical effects of older RBC transfusions. Future investigations will be necessary to address possible confounding factors and confirm these results. PMID:25393772

  13. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  14. [Manic episode in a patient with Beçhet's disease].

    PubMed

    Bozikas, V; Ramnalis, A; Dittopoulos, J; Iakovou, J; Garyfallos, G; Fokas, K

    2015-01-01

    Beçhet's disease (BD) is a chronic, heterogeneous, multisystem disease that affects young males and females around the Mediterranean region, as well as from Far and Middle East. Its etiology is vague with vasculitis being its main pathological feature. International diagnostic criteria have been established and they require the presence of recurrent oral ulcerations plus two of the following: Recurrent genital ulceration, eye lesions, skin lesions and positive pathergy test. A significant number of patients with Beçhet's disease suffers from symptoms from the central nervous system (CNS), while the most common clinical symptoms are pyramidal signs, mental-behavioral changes, hemiparesis and brain stem syndrome. The existence of mental-behavioral changes seems to be one of the most common findings in patients with Neuro-Beçhet (N-BD). These changes seem to be related with memory and attention deficits, and the process of deterioration continues even in attack-free periods, suggesting a continuously active disease process in the CNS. The prevalence of anxiety, depression and general psychiatric symptoms is higher among patients with BD compared to healthy individuals. However, the association between psychiatric symptoms and BD is not clearly understood. On the other hand, syndromes like psychosis or bipolar disorder appear to be less frequent, especially in attack-free periods. We describe the case of a 52-year old woman with Beçhet's disease who developed a single manic episode 13 years after the onset of Beçhet's disease. A 52-year old woman, suffering from Beçhet's disease since the age of 39, developed manic symptoms, namely elevated mood, pressured speech, flight of ideas, distractibility and decreased need for sleep. The above symptoms developed during a period that no other symptoms of Beçhet's disease were present. Moreover there was no other manifestation from the nervous system. A brain MRI was unremarkable, while a brain SPECT study revealed severe

  15. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Goubran, Hadi A.; Elemary, Mohamed; Radosevich, Miryana; Seghatchian, Jerard; El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient’s immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure. PMID:27006592

  16. Impact of Transfusion on Cancer Growth and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Goubran, Hadi A; Elemary, Mohamed; Radosevich, Miryana; Seghatchian, Jerard; El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    For many years, transfusion of allogeneic red blood cells, platelet concentrates, and plasma units has been part of the standard therapeutic arsenal used along the surgical and nonsurgical treatment of patients with malignancies. Although the benefits of these blood products are not a matter of debate in specific pathological conditions associated with life-threatening low blood cell counts or bleeding, increasing clinical evidence is nevertheless suggesting that deliberate transfusion of these blood components may actually lead to negative clinical outcomes by affecting patient's immune defense, stimulating tumor growth, tethering, and dissemination. Rigorous preclinical and clinical studies are needed to dimension the clinical relevance, benefits, and risks of transfusion of blood components in cancer patients and understand the amplitude of problems. There is also a need to consider validating preparation methods of blood components for so far ignored biological markers, such as microparticles and biological response modifiers. Meanwhile, blood component transfusions should be regarded as a personalized medicine, taking into careful consideration the status and specificities of the patient, rather than as a routine hospital procedure. PMID:27006592

  17. Blood banking and transfusion medicine for the nephrologist.

    PubMed

    Wehrli, Gay

    2012-01-01

    Therapeutic Apheresis Medicine Services work closely with Blood Banking and Transfusion Medicine Services (BBTMS). The BBTMS performs patient testing and provides blood components for patients undergoing therapeutic apheresis procedures. This article will provide an overview of blood component descriptions, patient testing, and blood component options and preparations for therapeutic apheresis procedures. PMID:22276991

  18. The role of hematopoietic growth factors in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, C F

    1995-02-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors have already had an enormous impact on transfusion practice by eliminating or reducing the need for red blood cell transfusions in a variety of anemic states characterized by an absolute or relative decrease in erythropoietin. In addition, GM-CSF and G-CSF have stimulated the production of autologous neutrophils in febrile neutropenic patients in whom granulocyte transfusions had been considered ineffective. With the discovery of c-Mpl ligand and the promising results obtained with IL-11 and IL-3, a combination of growth factors that successfully stimulate platelet production may soon be identified. This first era in the clinical application of hematopoietic growth factors has been characterized largely by treatment of the patient to stimulate production of autologous cells or to enhance the ability of transplanted hematopoietic progenitor cells to repopulate the patient. The use of G-CSF to increase the yield of granulocytes harvested by apheresis procedures and to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells in allogeneic donors has initiated a new era in which the cell donor is treated to enhance cell production and enhance the repopulating ability of hematopoietic progenitor cells. As our understanding of hematopoiesis grows, scientists will be able to identify growth factors to overcome or correct deficient hematopoiesis. Increasingly, component transfusions will be reserved for life-threatening situations in which endogenous cell production cannot be stimulated or cell production will be too slow to prevent life-threatening events. PMID:7737944

  19. 42 CFR 493.1103 - Standard: Requirements for transfusion services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standard: Requirements for transfusion services. 493.1103 Section 493.1103 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION LABORATORY REQUIREMENTS...

  20. Toward a patient-based paradigm for blood transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Albert; Vamvakas, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    The current “manufacturing paradigm” of transfusion practice has detached transfusion from the clinical environment. As an example, fresh whole blood in large-volume hemorrhage may be superior to whole blood reconstituted from multiple components. Multicomponent apheresis can overcome logistical difficulties in matching patient needs with fresh component availability and can deliver the benefits of fresh whole blood. Because of the different transfusion needs of patients in emerging economies and the vulnerability of these blood systems to emerging infections, fresh whole blood and multicomponent apheresis can better meet patient needs when compared with transplants of the “manufacturing paradigm”. We propose that patient blood management, along with panels of repeat, paid, accredited apheresis and fresh whole-blood donors can be used in emerging economies to support decentralized blood services. This alternative transfusion–medicine paradigm could eventually also be adopted by established economies to focus transfusion medicine on local patient needs and to alleviate the problem of the aging volunteer donor base. PMID:24520208

  1. Effects of a CME Program on Physicians' Transfusion Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Alan L.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The hospital charts of 44 patients who were autologous blood donors undergoing elective orthopedic surgery and a matched group of 44 patients who were not autologous blood donors were analyzed to determine their physicians' transfusion practices. A continuing medical education program was developed. (Author/MLW)

  2. Transfusion and coagulation management in major obstetric hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Butwick, A.J.; Goodnough, L.T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Major obstetric hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. We will review transfusion strategies and the value of monitoring the maternal coagulation profile during severe obstetric hemorrhage. Recent Findings Epidemiologic studies indicate that rates of severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) in well-resourced countries are increasing. Despite these increases, rates of transfusion in obstetrics are low (0.9% - 2.3%), and investigators have questioned whether a pre-delivery ‘type and screen’ is cost-effective for all obstetric patients. Instead, blood ordering protocols specific to obstetric patients can reduce unnecessary antibody testing. When severe PPH occurs, a massive transfusion protocol (MTP) has attracted interest as a key therapeutic resource by ensuring sustained availability of blood products to the labor and delivery unit. During early postpartum bleeding, recent studies have shown that hypofibrinogenemia is an important predictor for the later development of severe PPH. Point-of-care technologies, such as thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry, can identify decreased fibrin-clot quality during PPH, which correlate with low fibrinogen levels. Summary A MTP provides a key resource in the management of severe PPH. However, future studies are needed to assess whether formula driven vs. goal-directed transfusion therapy improves maternal outcomes in women with severe PPH. PMID:25812005

  3. The use of big data in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Pendry, K

    2015-06-01

    'Big data' refers to the huge quantities of digital information now available that describe much of human activity. The science of data management and analysis is rapidly developing to enable organisations to convert data into useful information and knowledge. Electronic health records and new developments in Pathology Informatics now support the collection of 'big laboratory and clinical data', and these digital innovations are now being applied to transfusion medicine. To use big data effectively, we must address concerns about confidentiality and the need for a change in culture and practice, remove barriers to adopting common operating systems and data standards and ensure the safe and secure storage of sensitive personal information. In the UK, the aim is to formulate a single set of data and standards for communicating test results and so enable pathology data to contribute to national datasets. In transfusion, big data has been used for benchmarking, detection of transfusion-related complications, determining patterns of blood use and definition of blood order schedules for surgery. More generally, rapidly available information can monitor compliance with key performance indicators for patient blood management and inventory management leading to better patient care and reduced use of blood. The challenges of enabling reliable systems and analysis of big data and securing funding in the restrictive financial climate are formidable, but not insurmountable. The promise is that digital information will soon improve the implementation of best practice in transfusion medicine and patient blood management globally. PMID:26178303

  4. Alternatives to standard blood transfusion: availability and promise.

    PubMed

    Prowse, C V

    1999-12-01

    Largely due to concerns over safety, a wide variety of alternatives to the conventional blood bank products of red cells, platelet concentrates, plasma and fractionated plasma products are under development. This review attempts to survey the alternative therapies that are being developed, whether they provide viable solutions and what impact they might have on transfusion practice. PMID:10583882

  5. Structural insights into HetR−PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  6. Efficiency and Cost Analysis of Cell Saver Auto Transfusion System in Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bilgili, Mustafa Gökhan; Erçin, Ersin; Peker, Gökhan; Kural, Cemal; Başaran, Serdar Hakan; Duramaz, Altuğ; Avkan, Cevdet

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood loss and replacement is still a controversial issue in major orthopaedic surgery. Allogenic blood transfusion may cause legal problems and concerns regarding the transmission of transfusion-related diseases. Cellsaver Systems (CSS) were developed as an alternative to allogenic transfusion but CSS transfusion may cause coagulation, infection and haemodynamic instability. Aims: Our aim was to analyse the efficiency and cost analysis of a cell saver auto-transfusion system in the total knee arthroplasty procedure. Study Design: Retrospective comparative study. Methods: Those patients who were operated on by unilateral, cemented total knee arthroplasty (TKA) were retrospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 37 patients who were treated using the cell saver system, and Group 2 involved 39 patients who were treated by allogenic blood transfusion. The groups were compared in terms of preoperative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels, blood loss and transfusion amount, whether allogenic transfusion was made, degree of deformity, body mass index and cost. Results: No significant results could be obtained in the statistical comparisons made in terms of the demographic properties, deformity properties, preoperative laboratory values, transfusion amount and length of hospital stay of the groups. Average blood loss was calculated to be less in Group 1 (p<0.05) and cost was higher in Group 1 (p<0.05). Conclusion: Cell saver systems do not decrease the amount of allogenic blood transfusion and costs more. Therefore, the routine usage of the auto-transfusion systems is a controversial issue. Cell saver system usage does not affect allogenic blood transfusion incidence or allogenic blood transfusion volume. It was found that preoperative haemoglobin and body mass index rates may affect allogenic blood transfusion. Therefore, it is foreseen that auto-transfusion systems could be useful in patients with low haemoglobin level and body mass index. PMID:25207187

  7. Intravenous Tranexamic Acid Decreases Allogeneic Transfusion Requirements in Periacetabular Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Andrew J; Sanders, Thomas L; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2016-01-01

    Bernese (Ganz) periacetabular osteotomy is associated with significant blood loss and the need for perioperative transfusion. Tranexamic acid decreases blood loss and minimizes transfusion rates in total joint arthroplasty. However, no reports have described its use in patients undergoing Bernese periacetabular osteotomy. This study reports the use of intravenous tranexamic acid in these patients. The study included 137 patients (150 hips) who underwent isolated periacetabular osteotomy at a single institution between 2003 and 2014. Of these, 68 patients (75 hips) received intravenous tranexamic acid 1 g at the time of incision and 1 g at the time of closure. A group of 69 patients (75 hips) served as control subjects who underwent periacetabular osteotomy without administration of intravenous tranexamic acid. Thromboembolic disease was defined as deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism occurring within 6 weeks of surgery. Outcomes measured included transfusion requirements, pre- and postoperative hemoglobin values, operative times, and thromboembolic disease rates. Aspirin was used as the thromboembolic prophylactic regimen in 95% of patients. The rate of allogeneic transfusion was 0 in the tranexamic acid group compared with 21% in the control group (P=.0001). No significant difference was found in the autologous cell salvage requirement (.96 vs 1.01; P=.43) or the thromboembolic disease rate between the tranexamic acid group and the control group (2.67% vs 1.33%; P=.31). The use of intravenous tranexamic acid led to a decreased transfusion requirement with no increased risk of thromboembolic disease in this contemporary cohort of patients undergoing periacetabular osteotomy. PMID:26726988

  8. Effect of perioperative blood transfusion on clinical outcomes in hepatic surgery for cancer.

    PubMed

    Dionigi, Gianlorenzo; Boni, Luigi; Rovera, Francesca; Rausei, Stefano; Cuffari, Salvatore; Cantone, Giovanni; Bacuzzi, Alessandro; Dionigi, Renzo

    2009-08-28

    Allogeneic blood transfusion during liver resection for malignancies has been associated with an increased incidence of different types of complications: infectious complications, tumor recurrence, decreased survival. Even if there is clear evidence of transfusion-induced immunosuppression, it is difficult to demonstrate that transfusion is the only determinant factor that decisively affects the outcome. In any case there are several motivations to reduce the practice of blood transfusion. The advantages and drawbacks of different transfusion alternatives are reviewed here, emphasizing that surgeons and anesthetists who practice in centers with a high volume of liver resections, should be familiar with all the possible alternatives. PMID:19705491

  9. Fulminant transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease in a premature infant

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, R.S.; Dixon, S.L.

    1989-05-01

    A fatal case of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease developed in a premature infant after receiving several blood products, including nonirradiated white blood cells. Transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease can be prevented. Irradiation of blood products is the least controversial and most effective method. Treatment was unsuccessful in most reported cases of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Therefore irradiation of blood products before transfusing to patients susceptible to transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease is strongly recommended.

  10. Red Blood Cell Transfusion Strategies in Adult and Pediatric Patients with Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Roubinian, Nareg; Carson, Jeffrey L

    2016-06-01

    Anemia in patients with malignancy is common as a consequence of their disease and treatment. Substantial progress has been made in the management of anemia with red blood cell transfusion in acute conditions, such as bleeding and infection, through the performance of large clinical trials. These trials suggest that transfusion at lower hemoglobin thresholds (restrictive transfusion ∼7-8 g/dL) is safe and in some cases superior to higher transfusion thresholds (liberal transfusion ∼9-10 g/dL). However, additional studies are needed in patients with malignancy to understand best practice in relation to quality of life as well as clinical outcomes. PMID:27112994

  11. Red blood cell transfusion in pediatric patients with severe chronic anemia: how slow is necessary?

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anurag K; Hsu, Edmund; Quirolo, Keith; Neumayr, Lynne D; Flori, Heidi R

    2012-03-01

    Historic practice recommends slow transfusion for children with chronic anemia and hemoglobin less than 5.0 g/dl due to the theoretical risk of transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO). In our pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), we have been utilizing a more liberal transfusion practice in patients without underlying cardiopulmonary disease, and a faster transfusion rate appears safe in this population. Rate of transfusion must be based on multiple factors including convenience, timeliness of procedures and transport to an appropriate care facility, risk of alloimmunization and wastage of blood, stress for the family, and need for PICU monitoring. PMID:21793178

  12. Blood transfusion requirement for gastric cancer surgery: reasonable preparation for transfusion in the comprehensive health insurance system.

    PubMed

    Hoya, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Tomoko; Saitoh, Ryouta; Anan, Tadashi; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Inagaki, Takuya; Yamazaki, Satoshi; Yamashita, Makoto; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the necessity of preparation for blood transfusion in gastric cancer surgery to save costs for blood typing, antibody screening, cross-matching, and disposal of the blood product. The subjects of the study were 52 patients who underwent gastric cancer surgery at our department between 2000 and 2004. The requirement for blood transfusion during surgery was investigated in terms of patient characteristics, hemoglobin before surgery, and performance status as well as treatment regimen. Furthermore, economic effects were investigated when typing and screening (T&S) were performed instead of typing and cross-matching (T&X). Of 9 patients who received blood transfusion, 8 had gastric cancer of stage IIIB or higher, or underwent combined resection. Blood transfusion was not used in surgery for patients with early gastric cancer. The volumes of blood prepared, lost, and disposed of in 28 patients who underwent T&X were 831.3+/-249.4, 219.3+/-228.5 and 600+/-333.1 ml, respectively, whereas the blood loss in 24 patients who underwent T&S was 161.1+/-95.6 ml; this difference had a major economic effect. The practice of T&S for patients undergoing gastric surgery in the absence of combined resection for early gastric cancer seems to be a safe and cost-effective practice that abrogates disposal of blood in hospital management. PMID:18555758

  13. Low shear red cell oxygen transport effectiveness is adversely affected by transfusion and further worsened by deoxygenation in sickle cell disease patients on chronic transfusion therapy

    PubMed Central

    Detterich, Jon; Alexy, Tamas; Rabai, Miklos; Dongelyan, Ani; Coates, Thomas; Wood, John; Meiselman, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Simple chronic transfusion therapy (CTT) is a mainstay for stroke prophylaxis in sickle cell anemia, but its effects on hemodynamics are poorly characterized. Transfusion improves oxygen carrying capacity, reducing demands for high cardiac output. While transfusion decreases factors associated with vaso-occlusion, including percent HbS, reticulocyte count and circulating cell-free hemoglobin, it increases blood viscosity, which reduces microvascular flow. The hematocrit to viscosity ratio (HVR) is an index of red cell oxygen transport effectiveness that varies with shear stress and balances the benefits of improved oxygen capacity to viscosity-mediated impairment of microvascular flow. We hypothesized that transfusion would improve HVR at high shear despite increased blood viscosity, but would decrease HVR at low shear. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS To test this hypothesis, we examined oxygenated and deoxygenated blood samples from 15 sickle cell patients on CTT immediately pre-transfusion and again 12–120 hours post-transfusion. RESULTS Comparable changes in hemoglobin, hematocrit, reticulocyte count and hemoglobin S with transfusion were observed in all subjects. Viscosity, hematocrit and high-shear HVR increased with transfusion while low shear HVR decreased significantly. CONCLUSION Decreased low-shear HVR suggests impaired oxygen transport to low-flow regions and may explain why some complications of sickle cell anemia are ameliorated by chronic transfusion therapy and others may be made worse. PMID:22882132

  14. Analyzing the birth and propagation of two distinct prions, [PSI+] and [Het-s](y), in yeast.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Vidhu; Taneja, Vibha; Sun, Yidi; Liebman, Susan W

    2010-05-01

    Various proteins, like the infectious yeast prions and the noninfectious human Huntingtin protein (with expanded polyQ), depend on a Gln or Asn (QN)-rich region for amyloid formation. Other prions, e.g., mammalian PrP and the [Het-s] prion of Podospora anserina, although still able to form infectious amyloid aggregates, do not have QN-rich regions. Furthermore, [Het-s] and yeast prions appear to differ dramatically in their amyloid conformation. Despite these differences, a fusion of the Het-s prion domain to GFP (Het-sPrD-GFP) can propagate in yeast as a prion called [Het-s](y). We analyzed the properties of two divergent prions in yeast: [Het-s](y) and the native yeast prion [PSI(+)] (prion form of translational termination factor Sup35). Curiously, the induced appearance and transmission of [PSI(+)] and [Het-s](y) aggregates is remarkably similar. Overexpression of tagged prion protein (Sup35-GFP or Het-sPrD-GFP) in nonprion cells gives rise to peripheral, and later internal, ring/mesh-like aggregates. The cells with these ring-like aggregates give rise to daughters with one (perivacuolar) or two (perivacuolar and juxtanuclear) dot-like aggregates per cell. These line, ring, mesh, and dot aggregates are not really the transmissible prion species and should only be regarded as phenotypic markers of the presence of the prions. Both [PSI(+)] and [Het-s](y) first appear in daughters as numerous tiny dot-like aggregates, and both require the endocytic protein, Sla2, for ring formation, but not propagation. PMID:20219972

  15. Prospective Study on the Clinical Course and Outcomes in Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Looney, Mark R.; Roubinian, Nareg; Gajic, Ognjen; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Bacchetti, Peter; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C.; Wu, Ping; Grimes, Barbara; Norris, Philip J.; Murphy, Edward L.; Gandhi, Manish J.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Mair, David C.; Schuller, Randy M.; Hirschler, Nora V.; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Matthay, Michael A.; Toy, Pearl

    2014-01-01

    Objective Transfusion-related acute lung injury is the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. A prospective study using electronic surveillance was conducted at two academic medical centers in the United States with the objective to define the clinical course and outcomes in transfusion-related acute lung injury cases. Design Prospective case study with controls. Setting University of California, San Francisco and Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Patients We prospectively enrolled 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 164 transfused controls, and 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had fever, tachycardia, tachypnea, hypotension, and prolonged hypoxemia compared with controls. Of the patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury, 29 of 37 patients (78%) required initiation of mechanical ventilation and 13 of 53 (25%) required initiation of vasopressors. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury had an increased duration of mechanical ventilation and increased days in the ICU and hospital compared with controls. There were 15 of 89 patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury (17%) who died, whereas 61 of 145 patients with possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (42%) died and 7 of 164 of controls (4%) died. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury had evidence of more systemic inflammation with increases in circulating neutrophils and a decrease in platelets compared with controls. Patients with transfusion-related acute lung injury and possible transfusion-related acute lung injury also had a statistically significant increase in plasma interleukin-8, interleukin-10, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist posttransfusion compared with controls. Conclusions In conclusion, transfusion-related acute lung injury produced a condition

  16. Transfusion Efficacy of Apheresis Platelet Concentrates Irradiated at the Day of Transfusion Is Significantly Superior Compared to Platelets Irradiated in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Julmy, Friedgard; Ammann, Roland A.; Fontana, Stefano; Taleghani, Behrouz Mansouri; Hirt, Andreas; Leibundgut, Kurt

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Gamma irradiation is currently the standard care to avoid transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. Guidelines on gamma irradiation of blood components state that platelets (PLTs) can be irradiated at any stage in their 5-day storage and can thereafter be stored up to their normal shelf life of 5 days after collection. In this study, we explored whether the timing of irradiation has an effect on transfusion efficacy of apheresis PLT concentrates (APCs). Methods Based on the 1-hour percent PLT recovery (PPR1h), transfusion efficacy of 1,000 eligible APCs transfused to 144 children were evaluated retrospectively. PPR1h was compared in transfused APCs irradiated at the day of transfusion and APCs irradiated in advance. Results In univariate analysis, transfusion efficacy of APCs irradiated in advance was significantly lower than that of APCs irradiated at the day of transfusion (mean PPR1h 27.7 vs. 35.0%; p = 0.007). This was confirmed in multivariate analysis (p = 0.030). Compared to non-irradiated APCs, transfusion efficacy of APCs irradiated at the day of transfusion was not significantly inferior (mean difference −2.8%; 95% CI −6.1 to 0.5%; p = 0.092), but APCs irradiated in advance were clearly less efficient (mean difference −8.1%; 95% CI −12.2 to −4.0%; p < 0.001). Conclusion Our data strongly support that APCs should not be irradiated in advance, 1.e., ≥24 h before transfusion. PMID:25053930

  17. Relationships between the ABC-Exporter HetC and Peptides that Regulate the Spatiotemporal Pattern of Heterocyst Distribution in Anabaena

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    In the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, cells called heterocysts that are specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen differentiate from vegetative cells of the filament in the absence of combined nitrogen. Heterocysts follow a specific distribution pattern along the filament, and a number of regulators have been identified that influence the heterocyst pattern. PatS and HetN, expressed in the differentiating cells, inhibit the differentiation of neighboring cells. At least PatS appears to be processed and transferred from cell to cell. HetC is similar to ABC exporters and is required for differentiation. We present an epistasis analysis of these regulatory genes and of genes, hetP and asr2819, successively downstream from hetC, and we have studied the localization of HetC and HetP by use of GFP fusions. Inactivation of patS, but not of hetN, allowed differentiation to proceed in a hetC background, whereas inactivation of hetC in patS or patS hetN backgrounds decreased the frequency of contiguous proheterocysts. A HetC-GFP protein is localized to the heterocysts and especially near their cell poles, and a putative HetC peptidase domain was required for heterocyst differentiation but not for HetC-GFP localization. hetP is also required for heterocyst differentiation. A HetP-GFP protein localized mostly near the heterocyst poles. ORF asr2819, which we denote patC, encodes an 84-residue peptide and is induced upon nitrogen step-down. Inactivation of patC led to a late spreading of the heterocyst pattern. Whereas HetC and HetP appear to have linked functions that allow heterocyst differentiation to progress, PatC may have a role in selecting sites of differentiation, suggesting that these closely positioned genes may be functionally related. PMID:25121608

  18. Relationships between the ABC-exporter HetC and peptides that regulate the spatiotemporal pattern of heterocyst distribution in Anabaena.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-01-01

    In the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, cells called heterocysts that are specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen differentiate from vegetative cells of the filament in the absence of combined nitrogen. Heterocysts follow a specific distribution pattern along the filament, and a number of regulators have been identified that influence the heterocyst pattern. PatS and HetN, expressed in the differentiating cells, inhibit the differentiation of neighboring cells. At least PatS appears to be processed and transferred from cell to cell. HetC is similar to ABC exporters and is required for differentiation. We present an epistasis analysis of these regulatory genes and of genes, hetP and asr2819, successively downstream from hetC, and we have studied the localization of HetC and HetP by use of GFP fusions. Inactivation of patS, but not of hetN, allowed differentiation to proceed in a hetC background, whereas inactivation of hetC in patS or patS hetN backgrounds decreased the frequency of contiguous proheterocysts. A HetC-GFP protein is localized to the heterocysts and especially near their cell poles, and a putative HetC peptidase domain was required for heterocyst differentiation but not for HetC-GFP localization. hetP is also required for heterocyst differentiation. A HetP-GFP protein localized mostly near the heterocyst poles. ORF asr2819, which we denote patC, encodes an 84-residue peptide and is induced upon nitrogen step-down. Inactivation of patC led to a late spreading of the heterocyst pattern. Whereas HetC and HetP appear to have linked functions that allow heterocyst differentiation to progress, PatC may have a role in selecting sites of differentiation, suggesting that these closely positioned genes may be functionally related. PMID:25121608

  19. The definition and epidemiology of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, David J

    2012-04-01

    Inherited hemoglobin-related disorders, which include the structural variants (hemoglobin S, C, and E) and the alpha (α)- and beta (β)-thalassemias, affect more than 300,000 children annually, particularly in malaria-endemic regions stretching from sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean to Southeast Asia. Screening for carriers of these traits is important to provide prenatal genetic counseling and to accurately estimate the true prevalence and public health burden of these disorders. The clinical course of thalassemias, which affect nearly 70,000 children annually, is highly variable depending on the mixture of inherited alleles. The primary forms of non-transfusion-dependent thalassemia include β-thalassemia intermedia, hemoglobin E β-thalassemia, and hemoglobin H disease. Early clinical recognition of these disorders is essential to prevent affected children from being mistakenly placed on life-long transfusion therapy. PMID:22631040

  20. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome associated with blood-product transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Jett, J.R.; Kuritsky, J.N.; Katzmann, J.A.; Homburger, H.A.

    1983-11-01

    A 53-year-old white man had fever, malaise, and dyspnea on exertion. His chest roentgenogram was normal, but pulmonary function tests showed impaired diffusion capacity and a gallium scan showed marked uptake in the lungs. Results of an open-lung biopsy documented Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia. Immunologic test results were consistent with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. The patient denied having homosexual contact or using intravenous drugs. Twenty-nine months before the diagnosis of pneumocystis pneumonia was made, the patient had had 16 transfusions of whole blood, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma during coronary artery bypass surgery at another medical center. This patient is not a member of any currently recognized high-risk group and is believed to have contracted the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome from blood and blood-product transfusions.

  1. Spatial fluctuations in expression of the heterocyst differentiation regulatory gene hetR in Anabaena filaments.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-04-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  2. Spatial Fluctuations in Expression of the Heterocyst Differentiation Regulatory Gene hetR in Anabaena Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Mariscal, Vicente; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia; Stavans, Joel

    2015-01-01

    Under nitrogen deprivation, filaments of the cyanobacterium Anabaena undergo a process of development, resulting in a one-dimensional pattern of nitrogen-fixing heterocysts separated by about ten photosynthetic vegetative cells. Many aspects of gene expression before nitrogen deprivation and during the developmental process remain to be elucidated. Furthermore, the coupling of gene expression fluctuations between cells along a multicellular filament is unknown. We studied the statistics of fluctuations of gene expression of HetR, a transcription factor essential for heterocyst differentiation, both under steady-state growth in nitrogen-rich conditions and at different times following nitrogen deprivation, using a chromosomally-encoded translational hetR-gfp fusion. Statistical analysis of fluorescence at the individual cell level in wild-type and mutant filaments demonstrates that expression fluctuations of hetR in nearby cells are coupled, with a characteristic spatial range of circa two to three cells, setting the scale for cellular interactions along a filament. Correlations between cells predominantly arise from intercellular molecular transfer and less from cell division. Fluctuations after nitrogen step-down can build up on those under nitrogen-replete conditions. We found that under nitrogen-rich conditions, basal, steady-state expression of the HetR inhibitor PatS, cell-cell communication influenced by the septal protein SepJ and positive HetR auto-regulation are essential determinants of fluctuations in hetR expression and its distribution along filaments. A comparison between the expression of hetR-gfp under nitrogen-rich and nitrogen-poor conditions highlights the differences between the two HetR inhibitors PatS and HetN, as well as the differences in specificity between the septal proteins SepJ and FraC/FraD. Activation, inhibition and cell-cell communication lie at the heart of developmental processes. Our results show that proteins involved in these

  3. Effect of Hemoglobin Transfusion Threshold on Cerebral Hemodynamics and Oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Yamal, Jose-Miguel; Rubin, M Laura; Benoit, Julia S; Tilley, Barbara C; Gopinath, Shankar; Hannay, H Julia; Doshi, Pratik; Aisiku, Imoigele P; Robertson, Claudia S

    2015-08-15

    Cerebral dysfunction caused by traumatic brain injury may adversely affect cerebral hemodynamics and oxygenation leading to worse outcomes if oxygen capacity is decreased due to anemia. In a randomized clinical trial of 200 patients comparing transfusion thresholds <7 g/dl versus 10 g/dl, where transfusion of leukoreduced packed red blood cells was used to maintain the assigned hemoglobin threshold, no long-term neurological difference was detected. The current study examines secondary outcome measures of intracranial pressure (ICP), cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), and brain tissue oxygenation (PbtO2) in patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. We observed a lower hazard for death (hazard ratio [HR]=0.12, 95% confidence interval [CI]=0.02-0.99) during the first 3 days post-injury, and a higher hazard for death after three days (HR=2.55, 95% CI=1.00-6.53) in the 10 g/dl threshold group as compared to the 7 g/dL threshold group. No significant differences were observed for ICP and CPP but MAP was slightly lower in the 7 g/dL group, although the decreased MAP did not result in increased hypotension. Overall brain tissue hypoxia events were not significantly different in the two transfusion threshold groups. When the PbtO2 catheter was placed in normal brain, however, tissue hypoxia occurred in 25% of patients in the 7 g/dL threshold group, compared to 10.2% of patients in the 10 g/dL threshold group (p=0.04). Although we observed a few differences in hemodynamic outcomes between the transfusion threshold groups, none were of major clinical significance and did not affect long-term neurological outcome and mortality. PMID:25566694

  4. Intravenous immunoglobulin transfusion in colostrum-deprived dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Boccardo, A; Belloli, A; Biffani, S; Locatelli, V; Dall'Ara, P; Filipe, J; Restelli, I; Proverbio, D; Pravettoni, D

    2016-03-01

    Immunoglobulin transfusion is employed in the management of the failure of passive transfer (FPT). The aim of this study was to investigate the dose of immunoglobulin G (IgG) needed to reach a protective concentration (>10 g/L) in colostrum-deprived dairy calves. Twenty-eight Holstein Friesian newborn male calves were randomly assigned to either a control group (CG) or a treatment group (PG). Calves in the CG received 4 L of high quality colostrum within 12 h of birth. Calves in the PG received 62.7 ± 3.1 g of IgG IV in 2.6 ± 0.3 L of plasma within 6 h after birth. Serum immunoglobulin G (sIgG) and serum total protein (sTP) concentrations were assayed before and after (24 h, 72 h and 1 week after birth) plasma transfusion or colostrum ingestion. Serum (s) IgG and sTP concentrations increased in both groups throughout the period of observation. Mean sIgG and sTP concentrations after colostrum ingestion or plasma transfusion were higher in the CG than in the PG (P <0.01). Nine treated calves developed diarrhoea during the study and four were humanely euthanased due to progressive clinical deterioration. None of the calves in the CG showed signs of disease or died during the study. The dose of IgG used in this trial effectively provided an adequate sIgG concentration in colostrum-deprived calves (>10 g/L). Calves in the CG had significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates compared to those in the PG, suggesting that plasma transfusion alone is ineffective in providing complete protection against neonatal disease. PMID:26831168

  5. Diagnosis and Management of Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anthony

    2015-09-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) affects 10% to 15% of monochorionic pregnancies. In the absences of timely diagnosis and intervention perinatal loss or long term developmental delay can be expected in over 90% of cases. Establishing chorionicity in the first trimester followed by serial ultrasounds beginning at 16 weeks of gestation and intervention with placental laser ablation before the development of advance disease overall survival rates can be expected in 70% to 80% of cases. PMID:26165181

  6. Teaching transfusion medicine: current situation and proposals for proper medical training

    PubMed Central

    Flausino, Gustavo de Freitas; Nunes, Flávio Ferreira; Cioffi, Júnia Guimarães Mourão; Proietti, Anna Bárbara de Freitas Carneiro

    2014-01-01

    The current curricula in medical schools and hospital residence worldwide lack exposure to blood transfusion medicine, and require the reformulation of academic programs. In many countries, training in blood transfusion is not currently offered to medical students or during residency. Clinical evidence indicates that blood transfusions occur more frequently than recommended, contributing to increased risk due to this procedure. Therefore, the rational use of blood and its components is essential, due to the frequent undesirable reactions, to the increasing demand of blood products and the cost of the process. Significant improvements in knowledge of and skills in transfusion medicine are needed by both students and residents. Improvements are needed in both background knowledge and the practical application of this knowledge to improve safety. Studies prove that hemovigilance has an impact on transfusion safety and helps to prevent the occurrence of transfusion-related adverse effects. To ensure that all these aspects of blood transfusion are being properly addressed, many countries have instituted hospital transfusion committees. From this perspective, the interventions performed during the formation of medical students and residents, even the simplest, have proven effective in the acquisition of knowledge and medical training, thereby leading to a reduction in inappropriate use of blood. Therefore, we would like to emphasize the importance of the exposure of medical students and residents to blood services and transfusion medicine in order for them to acquire adequate medical training, as well as to discuss some changes in the current medical curricula regarding transfusion medicine that we judge critical. PMID:25638770

  7. Neonatal Transfusion Practice: When do Neonates Need Red Blood Cells or Platelets?

    PubMed

    Del Vecchio, Antonio; Franco, Caterina; Petrillo, Flavia; D'Amato, Gabriele

    2016-09-01

    Based on small studies and not on statistically valid clinical trials, guidelines for neonatal transfusions remain controversial and practices vary greatly. Premature infants and critically ill neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) often require blood transfusions and extremely preterm neonates receive at least one red blood cell transfusion during their hospital stay. Transfusions to neonates convey both benefits and risks and consequently it is imperative to establish specific guidelines to improve practice and avoid unnecessary transfusions. Appropriate and lifesaving platelet transfusion in thrombocytopenic bleeding neonates pertains to 2% of all neonates in NICUs. Inversely, 98% of platelet transfusions are given prophylactically, in the absence of bleeding, with the assumption that this reduces the risk of a serious hemorrhage. To date, no evidence base is available for assigning a platelet transfusion trigger to NICU patients. Each NICU should approve specific guidelines that best suit its local clinical practice. Therefore, whatever guidelines are chosen in deciding when to transfuse, what is most important is to adhere strictly to the guidelines adopted, thus limiting unnecessary transfusions that convey no benefits and carry both known and unknown risks. PMID:27603540

  8. Current understanding of allergic transfusion reactions: incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Fumiya

    2013-02-01

    Non-haemolytic transfusion reactions are the most common type of transfusion reaction and include transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, allergic reactions, febrile reactions, post-transfusion purpura and graft-versus- host disease. Although life-threatening anaphylaxis occurs rarely, allergic reactions occur most frequently. If possible, even mild transfusion reactions should be avoided because they add to patients' existing suffering. During the last decade, several new discoveries have been made in the field of allergic diseases and transfusion medicine. First, mast cells are not the only cells that are key players in allergic diseases, particularly in the murine immune system. Second, it has been suggested that immunologically active undigested or digested food allergens in a donor's blood may be transferred to a recipient who is allergic to these antigens, causing anaphylaxis. Third, washed platelets have been shown to be effective for preventing allergic transfusion reactions, although substantial numbers of platelets are lost during washing procedures, and platelet recovery after transfusion may not be equivalent to that with unwashed platelets. This review describes allergic transfusion reactions, including the above-mentioned points, and focusses on their incidence, pathogenesis, laboratory tests, prevention and treatment. PMID:23215650

  9. [Acute adverse effects in transfusion. Proposals for the hemosurveillance system].

    PubMed

    Baptista González, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    The management model based on risk prevention has become a major influence in shaping policies for transfusion safety. There are approximately sixty interactions between the health worker and the patient during the transfusion process,representing the number of times where you have the opportunity to make a mistake.We present an analysis of the weaknesses of the National Blood System, with particular attention to the haemovigilance donor and patient. The proposals include the implementation of the National Blood containing the need to establish from the National Blood Safety, significant changes in the regulatory framework and the internal regulations of the Ministry of Health, the CNTS and COFEPRIS. Is required to promote and coordinate the collection of accurate information from the committees of transfusion medicine, which will be accompanied by an initial diagnosis from the National Survey of Blood. Requires notice to other forms of funding to ensure the viability of the projects operating blood bank. Finally, as a strategic resource, the blood is of public, so access should not be restricted. PMID:23435081

  10. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-03-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the "material" itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing--after years of exhaustive haemovigilance--that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  11. Hepcidin as a new biomarker for detecting autologous blood transfusion.

    PubMed

    Leuenberger, Nicolas; Barras, Laura; Nicoli, Raul; Robinson, Neil; Baume, Norbert; Lion, Niels; Barelli, Stefano; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Saugy, Martial

    2016-05-01

    Autologous blood transfusion (ABT) is an efficient way to increase sport performance. It is also the most challenging doping method to detect. At present, individual follow-up of haematological variables via the athlete biological passport (ABP) is used to detect it. Quantification of a novel hepatic peptide called hepcidin may be a new alternative to detect ABT. In this prospective clinical trial, healthy subjects received a saline injection for the control phase, after which they donated blood that was stored and then transfused 36 days later. The impact of ABT on hepcidin as well as haematological parameters, iron metabolism, and inflammation markers was investigated. Blood transfusion had a particularly marked effect on hepcidin concentrations compared to the other biomarkers, which included haematological variables. Hepcidin concentrations increased significantly: 12 hr and 1 day after blood reinfusion, these concentrations rose by seven- and fourfold, respectively. No significant change was observed in the control phase. Hepcidin quantification is a cost-effective strategy that could be used in an "ironomics" strategy to improve the detection of ABT. Am. J. Hematol. 91:467-472, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26822428

  12. Bilaterally Symmetrical Lower Extremity Compartment Syndrome following Massive Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Karaoren, Gulsah; Bakan, Nurten; Tomruk, Senay Goksu; Topaç, Zelin; Kurtulmuş, Tuhan; Irkören, Saime

    2016-01-01

    Compartment syndrome is a serious condition characterized by raised intracompartmental pressure, which develops following trauma. Well leg compartment syndrome (WLCS) is a term reserved for compartment syndrome in a nontraumatic setting, usually resulting from prolonged lithotomy position during surgery. In literature, 8 cases have been reported regarding well leg compartment syndrome in a supine position and bilateral symmetrical involvement was observed in only 2 cases. In WLCS etiology, lengthy surgery, lengthy hypotension, and extremity malpositioning have been held responsible but one of the factors with a role in the etiology may have been the tissue oedema and impaired microcirculation formed from the effect of vasoactive mediators expressed into the circulation associated with the massive blood transfusion. The case is presented here regarding symmetrical lower extremity compartment syndrome after surgery in which massive transfusion was made for gross haemorrhage from an abdominal injury. In conclusion, blood transfusion applied at the required time is life-saving but potential risks must always be considered. PMID:26885421

  13. Bioethics and religious bodies: refusal of blood transfusions in Germany.

    PubMed

    Rajtar, Małgorzata

    2013-12-01

    The refusal of medical treatment is a recurrent topic in bioethical debates and Jehovah's Witnesses often constitute an exemplary case in this regard. The refusal of a potentially life-saving blood transfusion is a controversial choice that challenges the basic medical principle of acting in patients' best interests and often leads physicians to adopt paternalistic attitudes toward patients who refuse transfusion. However, neither existing bioethical nor historical and social sciences scholarship sufficiently addresses experiences of rank-and-file Witnesses in their dealings with the health care system. This article draws on results of a nine-month (2010, 2011-2012) ethnographic research on the relationship between religious, legal, ethical, and emotional issues emerging from the refusal of blood transfusions by Jehovah's Witnesses in Germany (mainly in Berlin). It shows how bioethical challenges are solved in practice by some German physicians and what they perceive to be the main goal of biomedicine: promoting the health or broadly understood well-being of patients. I argue that two different understandings of the concept of autonomy are at work here: autonomy based on reason and autonomy based on choice. The first is privileged by German physicians in line with a Kantian philosophical tradition and constitutional law; the second, paradoxically, is utilized by Jehovah's Witnesses in their version of the Anglo-Saxon Millian approach. PMID:23538204

  14. Improving platelet transfusion safety: biomedical and technical considerations

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, Olivier; Cognasse, Fabrice; Tissot, Jean-Daniel; Chavarin, Patricia; Laperche, Syria; Morel, Pascal; Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lozano, Miguel; Blumberg, Neil; Osselaer, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Platelet concentrates account for near 10% of all labile blood components but are responsible for more than 25% of the reported adverse events. Besides factors related to patients themselves, who may be particularly at risk of side effects because of their underlying illness, there are aspects of platelet collection and storage that predispose to adverse events. Platelets for transfusion are strongly activated by collection through disposal equipment, which can stress the cells, and by preservation at 22 °C with rotation or rocking, which likewise leads to platelet activation, perhaps more so than storage at 4 °C. Lastly, platelets constitutively possess a very large number of bioactive components that may elicit pro-inflammatory reactions when infused into a patient. This review aims to describe approaches that may be crucial to minimising side effects while optimising safety and quality. We suggest that platelet transfusion is complex, in part because of the complexity of the “material” itself: platelets are highly versatile cells and the transfusion process adds a myriad of variables that present many challenges for preserving basal platelet function and preventing dysfunctional activation of the platelets. The review also presents information showing - after years of exhaustive haemovigilance - that whole blood buffy coat pooled platelet components are extremely safe compared to the gold standard (i.e. apheresis platelet components), both in terms of acquired infections and of immunological/inflammatory hazards. PMID:26674828

  15. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injured (TRALI): Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez, P; Carrasco, R; Romero-Dapueto, C; Castillo, R.L

    2015-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a life-threatening intervention that develops within 6 hours of transfusion of one or more units of blood, and is an important cause of morbidity and mortality resulting from transfusion. It is necessary to dismiss other causes of acute lung injury (ALI), like sepsis, acute cardiogenic edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) or bacterial infection. There are two mechanisms that lead to the development of this syndrome: immune-mediated and no immune- mediated TRALI. A common theme among the experimental TRALI models is the central importance of neutrophils in mediating the early immune response, and lung vascular injury. Central clinical symptoms are dyspnea, tachypnea, tachycardia, cyanosis and pulmonary secretions, altogether with other hemodynamic alterations, such as hypotension and fever. Complementary to these clinical findings, long-term validated animal models for TRALI should allow the determination of the cellular targets for TRALI-inducing alloantibodies as well as delineation of the underlying pathogenic molecular mechanisms, and key molecular mediators of the pathology. Diagnostic criteria have been established and preventive measures have been implemented. These actions have contributed to the reduction in the overallnumber of fatalities. However, TRALI still remains a clinical problem. Any complication suspected of TRALI should immediately be reported. PMID:26312100

  16. DRGs in Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy in Germany.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthäus; Ostermann, Helmut

    2012-04-01

    Patients requiring transfusion medicine and hemotherapy in an inpatient setting are incorporated into the German Diagnosis Related Groups (G-DRG) system in multiple ways. Different DRGs exist in Major Diagnostic Category 16 for patients that have been admitted for the treatment of a condition from the field of transfusion medicine. However, the reimbursement might be not cost covering for many cases, and efforts have to be intensified to find adequate definitions and prices. We believe that this can only be successful if health service research is intensified in this field. For patients requiring hemotherapy and transfusion medicine concomitant to the treatment of an underlying disease such as cancer, multiple systems exist to increase remuneration, among them the Patient Clinical Complexity Level (PCCL) and complex constellations to induce DRG splits. For direct reimbursement of high cost products, additional remuneration fees (Zusatzentgelte, ZE) are the most important. In addition, expensive innovations not reflected within the DRGs can be reimbursed after application and negotiation of the New Diagnostic and Treatment Methods (Neue Untersuchungs-und Behandlungsmethoden, NUB) system. The NUB system guarantees that medical progress is put rapidly into clinical practice and prevents financial issues from becoming a stumbling block for the use of innovative drugs and methods. PMID:22670123

  17. Revisiting blood transfusion preparedness: experience from the Bam earthquake response.

    PubMed

    Abolghasemi, Hassan; Radfar, Mohammad H; Tabatabaee, Morteza; Hosseini-Divkolayee, Nasim S; Burkle, Frederick M

    2008-01-01

    Blood transfusion plays a critical role in the provision of medical care for disasters due to man-made and natural hazards. Although the short-term increase in blood donations following national disasters is well-documented, some aspects of blood transfusion during disasters remain under study. The 2003 earthquake in Bam, Iran resulted in the death of >29,000 people and injured 23,000. In total, 108,985 blood units were donated, but only 21,347 units (23%) actually were distributed to hospitals around the country. Kerman Province, the site of the disaster, received 1,231 (1.3%) of the donated units in the first four days after the disaster. The Bam experience revealed crucial missteps in the development of a post-event strategy for blood product management, and led to the development of a detailed disaster preparedness and response plan that addresses issues of donation, distribution, communication, transportation, and coordination. The current plan requires the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization to convene a disaster task force immediately as the main coordinator of all disaster preparedness and response activities. PMID:19189607

  18. [Case of Rh (-) patient's right lobectomy of the liver with massive hemorrhage evading allogeneic blood transfusion by hemodilutional autologous blood transfusion].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Masayuki; Takada, Norikazu; Hashiba, Eiji; Kimura, Futoshi; Kitayama, Masatou; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old man (ASA-PS 1) underwent right lobectomy of the liver under total intravenous anesthesia with propofol, remifentanil, ketamine and rocuronium. In order to evade allogeneic blood transfusion, 1,200 g of the patient's blood was taken and hemodilution was induced for autologous blood transfusion (HAT) after the induction of anesthesia. As intraoperative blood loss amounted to about 4,000 g, Hb level decreased from 13.6 to 6.2 g x dl(-1). However, as intraoperative hemodynamics was relatively stable with crystalloidal and colloidal transfusion with no ischemic change on ECG and no metabolic acidosis, autologous blood transfusion was withheld. After returning the autologous blood, Hb increased to 9.8 g x dl(-1). Any postoperative complications related to the low Hb level were not recognized. HAT is a useful method to evade or at least decrease the amount of allogeneic blood transfusion by anesthesiologists. PMID:24558939

  19. [Severe sickle cell disease and pregnancy. Systematic prophylactic transfusions in 16 cases].

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, D R; Chouhou, L; Guelzim, K; Kouach, J; Dehayni, M; Fehri, H S

    2002-01-01

    Sickle cell disease is a major cause of maternal and neonatal mortality in tropical regions. Treatment consists of regular blood transfusion during pregnancy and delivery. Transfusion may be performed selectively (in function of the clinical status of the mother, fetus, and pregnancy) or prophylactically. Both management strategies result in a significant improvement in the obstetric outcome. However systematic prophylactic transfusion has been shunned due to the risk of transmitting infections and allo-immunization. The16-case series reported here demonstrates a real benefit for prophylactic blood transfusion during pregnancy complicated by sickle cell disease in tropical zones. Improvements in our transfusion curves resulting from better donor selection, follow-up, and phenotyping support arguments previously made over one decade ago in favor of the prophylactic approach especially in countries with high transfusional risks. In our experience the risks associated with more transfusions was offset by the greater safety margin and better efficacy of the prophylactic approach. PMID:12731306

  20. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury after Cesarean Section in a Patient with HELLP Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Kim, So Ri; Shin, Sang Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Lee, Jun Ho; Kim, Jihye; Kim, Sang Il

    2016-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious adverse reaction of transfusion, and presents as hypoxemia and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema within 6 hours of transfusion. A 14-year-old primigravida woman at 34 weeks of gestation presented with upper abdominal pain without dyspnea. Because she showed the syndrome of HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count), an emergency cesarean section delivery was performed, and blood was transfused. In the case of such patients, clinicians should closely observe the patient's condition at least during the 6 hours while the patient receives blood transfusion, and should suspect TRALI if the patient complains of respiratory symptoms such as dyspnea. Furthermore, echocardiography should be performed to distinguish between the different types of transfusion-related adverse reactions. PMID:26885326

  1. Acute lung injury after platelet transfusion in a patient with dengue fever

    PubMed Central

    Karoli, Ritu; Bhat, Sanjay; Fatima, Jalees; Verma, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a serious clinical syndrome associated with the transfusion of plasmacontaining blood components. Recently, TRALI has come to be recognized as the leading cause of transfusion-related mortality. This complication typically presents as shortness of breath, hypoxemia, hypotension, fever, and non cardiogenic pulmonary edema, occurring within 6 h after transfusion. Although the mechanism of TRALI has not been exactly known, it has been associated with human leukocyte antigen antibodies and with biologically active mediators in stored cellular blood components. We, hereby, present a case of a patient with dengue fever who developed acute lung injury (ALI), presumably TRALI, after transfusion of platelet concentrates. He was treated with supportive measures and mechanical ventilation. Greater knowledge and increased awareness especially amongst the clinicians regarding TRALI is needed for prevention and treatment of this potentially severe complication of blood/component transfusion. PMID:25161356

  2. Septic shock during platelet transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Haesebaert, Julie; Bénet, Thomas; Michallet, Mauricette; Vanhems, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Although rare, transfusion-associated bacterial contamination (TABC) is nowadays the main risk associated with platelet concentrate (PC) transfusion. Consequences vary from spontaneously resolving symptoms to severe sepsis and death. In this report we have summarised a case of bacterial contamination and sepsis during PC transfusion in a patient with acute myeloid leukaemia. Fifteen minutes after the PC transfusion began, she developed chills and rapidly worsened to septic shock. The episode was managed appropriately. The patient's blood cultures and PC unit cultures grew Escherichia coli. The microbiological susceptibilities of isolates from the patient and platelet bag were identical. No other source of E coli was found. Donor and blood products issued from the same donation investigations were negative. The causality between sepsis and PC transfusion might be difficult to confirm. As no method is available in daily practice to eliminate TABC risk, physicians should always consider TABC by immediately stopping the transfusion and conducting appropriate investigations. PMID:24172770

  3. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion: systematic review of randomised trials with meta-analysis and trial sequential analysis

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. Design Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. Data sources Cochrane central register of controlled trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials. Trial selection Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. Data extraction Two authors independently screened titles and abstracts of trials identified, and relevant trials were evaluated in full text for eligibility. Two reviewers then independently extracted data on methods, interventions, outcomes, and risk of bias from included trials. random effects models were used to estimate risk ratios and mean differences with 95% confidence intervals. Results 31 trials totalling 9813 randomised patients were included. The proportion of patients receiving red blood cells (relative risk 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.47 to 0.63, 8923 patients, 24 trials) and the number of red blood cell units transfused (mean difference −1.43, 95% confidence interval −2.01 to −0.86) were lower with the restrictive compared with liberal transfusion strategies. Restrictive compared with liberal transfusion strategies were not associated with risk of death (0.86, 0.74 to 1.01, 5707 patients, nine lower risk of bias trials), overall morbidity (0.98, 0.85 to 1.12, 4517 patients, six lower risk of bias trials), or fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction (1.28, 0.66 to 2.49, 4730 patients, seven lower risk of bias

  4. Blood Transfusion Requirements for Patients With Sarcomas Undergoing Combined Radio- and Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Earl, Helena M.; Whitehead, Lynne; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Burnet, Neil G.

    2005-01-01

    Patients with bony and soft tissue sarcomas may require intensive treatment with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, which often leads to a fall in haemoglobin levels, requiring blood transfusion. There may be advantages in predicting which patients will require transfusion, partly because anaemia and hypoxia may worsen the response of tumours to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Between 1997 and 2003, a total of 26 patients who received intensive treatment with curative intent were identified. Transfusions were given to maintain the haemoglobin at 10g/dl or above during chemotherapy, and at 12 g/dl or above during radiotherapy. Eighteen (69%) required a transfusion, the majority as a result of both the chemotherapy and RT criteria. There were 78 transfusion episodes, and 181 units of blood given. In the 18 patients who required transfusion, the average number of units was 10.1, but seven patients required more blood than this. The most significant factor influencing blood transfusion was choice of intensive chemotherapy. Intensive chemotherapy and presenting Hb less than 11.6 g/dl identified 13 out of 18 patients who needed transfusion. Adding a drop in haemoglobin of greater than 1.7 g/dl after one cycle of chemotherapy identified 16 out of 18 patients who required transfusion. The seven patients who had heavy transfusion requirements were identified by age 32 or less, intensive chemotherapy and a presenting Hb of 12 g/dl or less. Erythropoietin might be a useful alternative to transfusion in selected patient groups, especially those with heavy transfusion requirements. PMID:18521418

  5. Predicting red blood cell transfusion in hospitalized patients: role of hemoglobin level, comorbidities, and illness severity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trial evidence supports a restrictive strategy of red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, but significant variation in clinical transfusion practice persists. Patient characteristics other than hemoglobin levels may influence the decision to transfuse RBCs and explain some of this variation. Our objective was to evaluate the role of patient comorbidities and severity of illness in predicting inpatient red blood cell transfusion events. Methods We developed a predictive model of inpatient RBC transfusion using comprehensive electronic medical record (EMR) data from 21 hospitals over a four year period (2008-2011). Using a retrospective cohort study design, we modeled predictors of transfusion events within 24 hours of hospital admission and throughout the entire hospitalization. Model predictors included administrative data (age, sex, comorbid conditions, admission type, and admission diagnosis), admission hemoglobin, severity of illness, prior inpatient RBC transfusion, admission ward, and hospital. Results The study cohort included 275,874 patients who experienced 444,969 hospitalizations. The 24 hour and overall inpatient RBC transfusion rates were 7.2% and 13.9%, respectively. A predictive model for transfusion within 24 hours of hospital admission had a C-statistic of 0.928 and pseudo-R2 of 0.542; corresponding values for the model examining transfusion through the entire hospitalization were 0.872 and 0.437. Inclusion of the admission hemoglobin resulted in the greatest improvement in model performance relative to patient comorbidities and severity of illness. Conclusions Data from electronic medical records at the time of admission predicts with very high likelihood the incidence of red blood transfusion events in the first 24 hours and throughout hospitalization. Patient comorbidities and severity of illness on admission play a small role in predicting the likelihood of RBC transfusion relative to the admission hemoglobin. PMID

  6. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  7. A case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease patient.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Ashu; Sidhu, Meena

    2016-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is autosomal recessive, genetically transmitted hemoglobinopathy responsible for considerable morbidity and mortality. It is prevalent in many parts of India including Central India, where the prevalence in different communities has ranged from 9.4% to 22%. Perioperative management may include transfusion of red blood cells. Hemolytic transfusion reactions can occur, and these can be either acute or delayed. We present a case of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in a patient with SCD. PMID:27605854

  8. [Antibodies, human leukocyte antigens, and biomodulators in transfusion-related acute adverse effects].

    PubMed

    Martínez Álvarez, Julio César

    2013-01-01

    With the onset of the AIDS epidemic, major changes occurred in blood banking and transfusion medicine. These changes occurred mainly in donor selection and screening tests for infectious diseases, blood centers modified their organizational philosophy regarding quality. Transfusion of blood products are procedures that allow us to correct the haematology deficiencies for which was indicated. But today, despite the strict controls that precede transfusion,recipients may have undesirable effects, which are known as adverse effects or adverse reactions to transfusion. Antibodies and antigens of the HLA system plays a role in a series of events related to transfusion, such as immunological platelet refractoriness, febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease. The determination of anti-HLA antibodies is evidence that in most developed countries is used on a daily basis in the regular assessment of patients multitransfused or waiting lists for organs from deceased donors. The biomodulators are able to modify biological responses which act in sequence to lead to the differentiation of T lymphocytes. These agents may subcategorizes those which facilitate a normal immune response, those stimulates the immune response, those are capable of inducing immunosuppression not cytotoxic, and those enhancing the ability of the host to tolerate damage by cytotoxic treatment (transfusion or transplant). PMID:23435079

  9. Transfusion Medicine Problems and Solutions for the Pediatric Hematologist/Oncologist

    PubMed Central

    Luban, Naomi L.C.; McBride, Eileen; Ford, Jason C.; Gupta, Sumit

    2012-01-01

    Blood component transfusion is an integral part of the care of children with oncologic and hematologic conditions. The complexity of transfusion medicine may however lead to challenges for pediatric hematologists/oncologists. In this review, three commonly encountered areas of transfusion medicine are explored. The approach to the investigation and management of suspected platelet refractoriness is reviewed. The unique transfusion related challenges encountered by children undergoing stem cell transplantation are also discussed. Finally, issues arising out of the care of children with hemoglobinopathies are explored, with an emphasis on the incidence of allo- and autoimmunization. PMID:22238206

  10. Platelet count and transfusion requirements during moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Jones, R M; de Lloyd, L; Kealaher, E J; Lilley, G J; Precious, E; Burckett St Laurent, D; Hamlyn, V; Collis, R E; Collins, P W

    2016-06-01

    Limited data exist on platelet transfusion during postpartum haemorrhage. We retrospectively analysed a consecutive cohort from a single centre of 347 women with moderate or severe postpartum haemorrhage, transfused according to national guidelines. Twelve (3%) women required a platelet transfusion. There were no differences between women who did and did not receive platelets with respect to age, mode of initiation of labour or mode of delivery. Women receiving a platelet transfusion had a lower median (IQR [range]) platelet count at study entry than women who did not receive platelets before haemorrhage (135 (97-175 [26-259])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 224 (186-274 [91-1006])×10(9) .l(-1) ), respectively), and at diagnosis of postpartum haemorrhage (median 114 (78-153 [58-238])×10(9) .l(-1) vs 193 (155-243 [78-762])×10(9) .l(-1) respectively). Six women were thrombocytopenic pre-delivery. The cause of haemorrhage that was associated with the highest rate of platelet transfusion was placental abruption, with three of 14 women being transfused. If antenatal thrombocytopenia or consumptive coagulopathy were not present, platelets were only required for haemorrhage > 5000 ml. Early formulaic platelet transfusion would have resulted in many women receiving platelets unnecessarily. Using current guidelines, the need for platelet transfusion is uncommon without antenatal thrombocytopenia, consumptive coagulopathy or haemorrhage > 5000 ml. We found no evidence to support early fixed-ratio platelet transfusion. PMID:27062151

  11. Transfusion reaction in a case with the rare Bombay blood group.

    PubMed

    Shahshahani, Hayedeh Javadzadeh; Vahidfar, Mohamad Reza; Khodaie, Seyed Ali

    2013-01-01

    Bombay phenotype is extremely rare in Caucasian with an incidence of 1 in 250,000. When individuals with the Bombay phenotype need blood transfusion, they can receive only autologous blood or blood from another Bombay blood group. Transfusing blood group O red cells to them can cause a fatal hemolytic transfusion reaction. In this study, we report a case with the rare Bombay blood group that was misdiagnosed as the O blood group and developed a hemolytic transfusion reaction. This highlights the importance of both forward and reverse typing in ABO blood grouping and standard cross-matching and performing standard pretransfusion laboratory tests in hospital blood banks. PMID:23559776

  12. Anemia and red blood cell transfusion in critically ill cardiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anemia and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion occur frequently in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. In this narrative review, we report the epidemiology of anemia and RBC transfusion in hospitalized adults and children (excluding premature neonates) with cardiac disease, and on the outcome of anemic and transfused cardiac patients. Both anemia and RBC transfusion are common in cardiac patients, and both are associated with mortality. RBC transfusion is the only way to rapidly treat severe anemia, but is not completely safe. In addition to hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, the determinant(s) that should drive a practitioner to prescribe a RBC transfusion to cardiac patients are currently unclear. In stable acyanotic cardiac patients, Hb level above 70 g/L in children and above 70 to 80 g/L in adults appears safe. In cyanotic children, Hb level above 90 g/L appears safe. The appropriate threshold Hb level for unstable cardiac patients and for children younger than 28 days is unknown. The optimal transfusion strategy in cardiac patients is not well characterized. The threshold at which the risk of anemia outweighs the risk of transfusion is not known. More studies are needed to determine when RBC transfusion is indicated in hospitalized patients with cardiac disease. PMID:25024880

  13. Evaluation of Blood Transfusions in Anemic Children in Effia Nkwanta Regional Hospital, Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Orish, Verner N; Ilechie, Alex; Combey, Theophilus; Onyeabor, Onyekachi S; Okorie, Chuku; Sanyaolu, Adekunle O

    2016-03-01

    Blood transfusion is a common practice in sub-Saharan Africa as a way of correcting anemia in children with mild and severe sicknesses. This study evaluated this practice in a secondary health-care institution in Ghana. A retrospective study was done over a 3-year period from January 2010 to December 2012. Medical records of children admitted, successfully treated, and discharged from the hospital were collected and analyzed. Data were analyzed using Epi Info version 7. Transfusions were more among male children (89, 63.1%) than female children (52, 36.9%). The highest number of blood transfusions were carried out on children in the age range 0-1 year (66, 46.8%). The majority of the blood transfusions were done on children with hemoglobin concentration level of 5 g/dL and below. Children with malaria parasitemia (83, 58.9%) had more transfusions than children without malaria parasitemia (58, 41.1%). Fever alone (43, 30.5%) and fever with gastrointestinal symptoms (33, 23.4%) were the predominant symptoms among children who had blood transfusions. In conclusion, younger children received more transfusions than older children. Also, male children received more blood transfusions than female children. Malaria was observed as a major contributory factor to the requirement for blood transfusions among the children. PMID:26787159

  14. Malaysian child infected with Plasmodium vivax via blood transfusion: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria may be a serious complication of blood transfusion due to the asymptomatic persistence of parasites in some donors. This case report highlights the transfusion-transmitted malaria of Plasmodium vivax in a child diagnosed with germ cell tumour. This child had received blood transfusion from three donors and a week later started developing malaria like symptoms. Nested PCR and sequencing confirmed that one of the three donors was infected with P. vivax and this was transmitted to the 12-year-old child. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported transfusion-transmitted malaria case in Malaysia. PMID:24007496

  15. Evaluation of Transfusion Pyrexia: A Review of Differential Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Arewa, Oladimeji P.

    2012-01-01

    Background/purpose. Transfusion pyrexia (fever) is an important clinical sign/symptom occurring either as an isolated event or as part of a constellation of signs and symptoms in relation to blood transfusion. It is an important cause of morbidity and may be an important sign of life-threatening complications of blood transfusion. Pyrexia is often a reason for the discontinuation of a blood transfusion episode, and adequate evaluation remains a challenge for clinicians. The decision to stop a blood transfusion episode on account of fever is often a difficult one. This paper reviews the differential diagnosis of transfusion pyrexia (TP), the pathogenesis as well as current management measures. Study selection and data source. Literature sources include medical texts, journals, dissertations, and internet-based electronic materials Results and conclusion. Adequate evaluation of pyrexia accompanying blood transfusion remains a challenge for clinicians. An algorithm to assist the clinician in the evaluation of fever occurring in a blood transfusion recipient is developed and presented. Continuous medical education is necessary for clinicians towards improved patient care in transfusion medicine. PMID:23119174

  16. Transfusion Consent in Oman: Physicians’ Perception at a Tertiary Care University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Al-Riyami, Arwa Z.; Al-Marshoodi, Ibrahim; Zia, Fehmida; Al-Huneini, Mohammed; Al-Rawas, Abdul Hakim; Jose, Sachin; Daar, Shahina; Al-Khabori, Murtadha; Al-Sabti, Hilal

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Transfusion is a common intervention that mandates the discussion of benefits, risks, and alternatives to planned transfusions. In Oman, transfusion consent was first introduced at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in March 2014. We sought to evaluate our physicians’ opinions, attitudes, and perception of the transfusion consent process. Methods Attending physicians of different specialties were invited to complete an anonymous survey on transfusion consent. Results A total of 114 physicians responded to the survey. Transfusion benefits and risks were explained regularly by 91% and 87% of the surveyed physicians, respectively. On the other hand, alternatives were declared by only 38%. Discomfort with the consent process was admitted by 10% of the physicians. There was no statistically significant association between discomfort in obtaining the consent and the physician seniority (p = 0.801), nor their specialties (p = 0.623). The importance of the consent process was acknowledged by 80% of surveyed physicians, who supported its implementation in other hospitals. Conclusion This survey reflects positive attitudes of the surveyed physicians on the importance of transfusion consent. However, actions are required to achieve physicians’ full ease with the process and to ensure that transfusion alternatives are discussed. We advocate implementation of transfusion consent in other hospitals in Oman. PMID:27403236

  17. [A structured ePortfolio to handle a programme of professional competences assessment in the area of transfusion medicine].

    PubMed

    Staccini, P; Hergon, E; Bordonado, C; Jullien, S; Quaranta, J-F

    2007-08-01

    In order to organize a nationwide program for the evaluation of professional practices in the area of blood transfusion, the French National Blood Transfusion Institute and the Nice-Sophia Antipolis University designed and implemented a web based service aimed at following-up and guiding the physicians involved in such an assessment program. The core component is a structured electronic portfolio (ePortfolio), the implementation of which was based on an object-oriented environment combined with a content management system. The modelling of the global evaluation system makes it possible to describe this type of portfolio according to six axes: an axis "objectives" (competencies accreditation); an axis "target" (heath care professionals); an axis "content" (numerical documents); an axis "structure" (matrix of answer defined in space and time); an axis "source" (single source peer-reviewed); an axis "level of evidence" (validation of the proof after its deposit by an identified and authenticated peer user, whole tracking of the exchanges and interactions between users and device). PMID:17466558

  18. The evolution of perioperative transfusion testing and blood ordering.

    PubMed

    White, Marissa J; Hazard, Sprague W; Frank, Steven M; Boyd, Joan S; Wick, Elizabeth C; Ness, Paul M; Tobian, Aaron A R

    2015-06-01

    The evolution of modern anesthesia and surgical practices has been accompanied by enhanced supportive procedures in blood banking and transfusion medicine. There is increased focus on the preparation and the use of blood components including, but not limited to, preventing unnecessary type and screen/crossmatch orders, decreasing the time required to provide compatible red blood cells (RBCs), and reducing the waste of limited blood and personnel resources. The aim of this review is to help the anesthesiologist and surgical staff identify patients at highest risk for surgical bleeding. In addition, this review examines how anesthesia and transfusion medicine can efficiently and safely allocate blood components for surgical patients who require transfusions. The following databases were searched: PubMed, EMBASE, Google Scholar, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 through March 2014. Subsequent reference searches of retrieved articles were also assessed. Several innovations have drastically changed the procedures by which blood is ordered, inventoried, and the speed in which blood is delivered for patient care. Before entering an operating room, patient blood management provides guidance to clinicians about when and how to treat preoperative anemia and intra- and postoperative strategies to limit the patient's exposure to blood components. Timely updates of the recommendations for blood orders (maximum surgical blood ordering schedule) have enhanced preoperative decision making regarding the appropriateness of the type and screen versus the type and crossmatch order. The updated maximum surgical blood ordering schedule reflects modern practices, such as laparoscopy, improved surgical techniques, and use of hemostatic agents resulting in a more streamlined process for ordering and obtaining RBCs. The electronic (computer) crossmatch and electronic remote blood issue have also dramatically reduced the amount of time required to obtain crossmatch-compatible RBCs

  19. AABB Committee Report: reducing transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus infections.

    PubMed

    Heddle, Nancy M; Boeckh, Michael; Grossman, Brenda; Jacobson, Jessica; Kleinman, Steven; Tobian, Aaron A R; Webert, Kathryn; Wong, Edward C C; Roback, John D

    2016-06-01

    Transfusion-transmitted cytomegalovirus (TT-CMV) is often asymptomatic, but certain patient populations, such as very low birth weight neonates, fetuses requiring intrauterine transfusion, pregnant women, patients with primary immunodeficiencies, transplant recipients, and patients receiving chemotherapy or transplantation for malignant disease, may be at risk of life-threatening CMV infection. It is unclear whether leukoreduction of cellular blood components is sufficient to reduce TT-CMV or whether CMV serological testing adds additional benefit to leukoreduction. The AABB CMV Prevention Work Group commissioned a systematic review to address these issues and subsequently develop clinical practice guidelines. However, the data were of poor quality, and no studies of significant size have been performed for over a decade. Rather than creating guidelines of questionable utility, the Work Group (with approval of the AABB Board of Directors) voted to prepare this Committee Report. There is wide variation in practices of using leukoreduced components alone or combining CMV-serology and leukoreduction to prevent TT-CMV for at-risk patients. Other approaches may also be feasible to prevent TT-CMV, including plasma nucleic acid testing, pathogen inactivation, and patient blood management programs to reduce the frequency of inappropriate transfusions. It is unlikely that future large-scale clinical trials will be performed to determine whether leukoreduction, CMV-serology, or a combination of both is superior. Consequently, alternative strategies including pragmatic randomized controlled trials, registries, and collaborations for electronic data merging, nontraditional approaches to inform evidence, or development of a systematic approach to inform expert opinion may help to address the issue of CMV-safe blood components. PMID:26968400

  20. Establishment of reference intervals and transfusion criterion for Sonoclot analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen-Lu; Chen, You-Ping; Tao, Cui-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Hui; Li, Meng-Ya; Zhou, Xin

    2016-08-01

    Sonoclot analyzer has been widely used in many countries. But the reference intervals provided by the manufacturer were derived from only 45 participants, and there was no cut-off value for transfusion for Sonoclot analysis. This study aimed to establish reference intervals and transfusion criterion for Sonoclot analysis. Volunteers were recruited from healthy Chinese adults and patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Blood samples were withdrawn from forearm vein and measured for activated clotting time (ACT), clot rate (CR), platelet function (PF), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen concentration (FIB), and platelet count (PLT). The reference intervals were determined by the nonparametric method. Cut-off values were determined by the receiver operating characteristics curve. A total of 135 healthy volunteers and 281 patients were enrolled. The 95% reference intervals were 96-195 s, 22-51 signal U/min, >1.6 for ACT, CR, PF respectively. In the 281 patients, the results of APTT, FIB, PLT, ACT, CR, and PF ranged from 20.5-300.0 s, 0.28-4.11 g/L, (19.0-387.3)×109/L, 80-514 s, 2.9-74 signal U/min, and 0.1-5.1 respectively. The cut-off values for transfusion were >208, ≤14, and ≤1.3 for ACT, CR, PF respectively. The cut-off values of Sonoclot analysis were within the manufacturer's reference intervals, while they were outside the reference intervals established in this study. The results suggested that the manufacturer's reference intervals were not suitable for Chinese. The reference intervals and cut-off values established in this study will be helpful to Chinese patients. PMID:27465342

  1. Ocular abnormalities in multi-transfused beta-thalassemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Jafari, Reza; Heydarian, Samira; Karami, Hosein; Shektaei, Mohammad Momeni; Dailami, Kiumars Noruzpour; Amiri, Ahmad Ahmadzadeh; Rezaee, Majid Reza Sheikh; Far, Asad Allah Farrokh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to assess ocular changes in thalassemia patients who have received multiple transfusions and chelate binding therapy in order to avoid iron accumulation. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study. Subjects and Methods: A total of 54 thalassemia major patients were selected as case group, and 54 age- and sex-matched healthy subjects were regarded as a control group. Ocular examination included visual acuity, refraction testing, slit lamp examination, funduscopy, tonometry, perimetry, tear break-up time test, and color vision testing were performed for all the participants. We computed the frequency and duration of blood transfusion, the mean serum ferritin level, pretransfusion hemoglobin concentration, and type, duration, and daily dose of chelation therapy for thalassemia patients based on their records. Statistical Analysis Used: All data analysis was performed using SPSS, version 19. Results: All the thalassemic patients were asymptomatic, but abnormal ocular findings (dry eye (33.3%), cataract (10.2%), retinal pigment epithelium degeneration (16.7%), color vision deficiency (3.7%), and visual field defects (33.7%)) were seen in 68.5% of thalassemic group. The prevalence of ocular abnormalities in normal group was 19.4%, which was significantly lower than that in thalassemia patients (P = 0.000). No significant correlation was found between ocular abnormalities and mean serum ferritin level (P = 0.627) and mean hemoglobin concentration (P = 0.143). Correlation of number of blood transfusion with the presence of ocular abnormalities was found to be statistically significant (P = 0.005). Conclusions: As life expectancy for beta-thalassemia patients extends, regular ophthalmological evaluation to detect early changes in their ocular system is recommended. PMID:26632126

  2. Clinical Gestalt and the Prediction of Massive Transfusion after Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Pommerening, Matthew J.; Goodman, Michael D.; Holcomb, John B.; Wade, Charles E.; Fox, Erin E.; del Junco, Deborah J.; Brasel, Karen J.; Bulger, Eileen M.; Cohen, Mitch J.; Alarcon, Louis H.; Schreiber, Martin A.; Myers, John G.; Phelan, Herb A.; Muskat, Peter; Rahbar, Mohammad; Cotton, Bryan A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Early recognition and treatment of trauma patients requiring massive transfusion (MT) has been shown to reduce mortality. While many risk factors predicting MT have been demonstrated, there is no universally accepted method or algorithm to identify these patients. We hypothesized that even among experienced trauma surgeons, the clinical gestalt of identifying patients who will require MT is unreliable. Methods Transfusion and mortality outcomes after trauma were observed at 10 U.S. Level-1 trauma centers in patients who survived ≥30 minutes after admission and received ≥1 unit of RBC within 6 hours of arrival. Subjects who received ≥ 10 units within 24 hours of admission were classified as MT patients. Trauma surgeons were asked the clinical gestalt question “Is the patient likely to be massively transfused?” ten minutes after the patients arrival. The performance of clinical gestalt to predict MT was assessed using chi-square tests and ROC analysis to compare gestalt to previously described scoring systems. Results Of the 1,245 patients enrolled, 966 met inclusion criteria and 221 (23%) patients received MT. 415 (43%) were predicted to have a MT and 551(57%) were predicted to not have MT. Patients predicted to have MT were younger, more often sustained penetrating trauma, had higher ISS scores, higher heart rates, and lower systolic blood pressures (all p < 0.05). Gestalt sensitivity was 65.6% and specificity was 63.8%. PPV and NPV were 34.9% and 86.2% respectively. Conclusion Data from this large multicenter trial demonstrates that predicting the need for MT continues to be a challenge. Because of the increased mortality associated with delayed therapy, a more reliable algorithm is needed to identify and treat these severely injured patients earlier. Level of Evidence II; Diagnostic study - Development of diagnostic criteria on basis of consecutive patients (with universally applied reference standard) PMID:25682314

  3. Congenital bowel perforation in twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Philip, I; Ford, A; Haslam, R

    2002-12-01

    Two unrelated survivors of twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) presented with intestinal perforation at birth. Both were localised perforations without any suggestion of widespread ischaemic disease to the splanchnic bed. Histopathology from the perforation site showed evidence of focal ischaemic necrosis, presumably from a vascular accident. One infant later died of multiple organ failure with major brain damage, but the other survived without long-term sequelae. These two cases appear to represent an unreported variation of the ischaemic intestinal complications of TTTS. PMID:12598976

  4. Blood product transfusion: does location make a difference?

    PubMed

    Palmieri, Tina L; Sen, Soman; Falwell, Katrina; Greenhalgh, David G

    2011-01-01

    Early blood product administration during acute blood loss may improve outcomes, yet blood product transfusion for anemia of critical illness has been associated with increased mortality. After major burn injury, patients have two sources of anemia: massive acute blood loss during excision and insidious losses in the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between the administration of fresh frozen plasma (FFP), platelets, and cryoprecipitate and outcomes in children with major burn injury. This was a retrospective review of children admitted with >20% TBSA burn from 2006 to 2009. Parameters measured included demographics, injury characteristics, operations, blood product transfusions, and outcomes. A total of 143 children received a mean of 3342 ± 283 ml blood. Nonsurvivors had larger burns (62.1 ± 4.6% vs 41.0 ± 1.5% TBSA, P < .001) and received similar amounts of packed red blood cells (PRBCs) during hospitalization (12.8 ± 2.4 units vs 10.9 ± 1.0 units, P = .5) than survivors. Nonsurvivors received more total units of FFP during hospitalization than survivors (8.0 ± 1.7 units vs 3.1 ± 0.4 units, P < .0001) because of the FFP units transfused in the ICU (5.5 ± 1.2 units vs 1.1 ± 0.2 units, P < .0001). The overall FFP:PRBC transfusion ratio in survivors was 1:4, whereas mean FFP:PRBC volume ratio in nonsurvivors was 3:4 (P < .0001). Nonsurvivors received more platelets (3.4 ± 1.0 units vs 0.50 ± 0.1 units, P < .001) and cryoprecipitate (1.9 ± 0.9 units vs 0.3 ± 0.1 units, P < .001) than survivors, both in the operating room and in the ICU. Blood product use in children with severe burns is associated with increased mortality. Appropriate use of blood products may need to be different in the operating room (massive acute hemorrhage) vs the ICU (ongoing red cell senescence). PMID:21107270

  5. Cardiac Manifestations of Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Manning, Nicky; Archer, Nick

    2016-06-01

    This review addresses the physiology of monochorionic diamniotic (MC/DA) twins and the potential for twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS). It focuses on the underlying cardiovascular pathophysiology of TTTS and the cardiovascular impact of TTTS for both the recipient and the donor twin. It explains the principles for assessment and monitoring of these cardiovascular changes and how these may be used to guide pregnancy management. Finally, it describes the effect of treatment on the altered hemodynamics and how this can influence pregnancy and perinatal management, as well as longer-term follow-up. PMID:27087122

  6. [Current trends in plasma transfusion for patients with severe hemorrhage].

    PubMed

    Ozier, Y; Querellou, E; Grimault, O; L'Her, E

    2012-11-01

    Recent changes in plasma transfusion practices for severe hemorrhage are largely related to the recognition of an early endogenous coagulopathy associated with traumatic injury. Observational and mostly retrospective data suggest improved survival rates with high-dose plasma therapy, up to a 1:1 ratio of fresh frozen plasma to packed red blood cells, but the quality of evidence is limited. Putting it into practice raises many issues (early identification of patients at risk of massive bleeding, extrapolation to non-trauma settings, alternative or adjunctive treatments, among others) that are discussed in this brief review. PMID:23039954

  7. Inactivation of the Podospora anserina vegetative incompatibility locus het-c, whose product resembles a glycolipid transfer protein, drastically impairs ascospore production.

    PubMed Central

    Saupe, S; Descamps, C; Turcq, B; Bégueret, J

    1994-01-01

    The het-c locus contains different alleles that elicit nonallelic vegetative incompatibility through specific interactions with alleles of the unlinked loci het-e and het-d. The het-c2 allele has been cloned. It encodes a 208-amino acid polypeptide that is similar to a glycolipid transfer protein purified from pig brain. Disruption of this gene drastically impairs ascospore production in homozygous crosses, and some mutants exhibit abnormal branching of apical hyphae. The protein encoded by het-c2 is essential in the biology of the fungus and may be involved in cell-wall biosynthesis. Images PMID:8016091

  8. Transfusion-related adverse reactions: From institutional hemovigilance effort to National Hemovigilance program

    PubMed Central

    Vasudev, Rahul; Sawhney, Vijay; Dogra, Mitu; Raina, Tilak Raj

    2016-01-01

    Aims: In this study we have evaluated the various adverse reactions related to transfusion occurring in our institution as a pilot institutional effort toward a hemovigilance program. This study will also help in understanding the problems faced by blood banks/Transfusion Medicine departments in implementing an effective hemovigilance program. Materials and Methods: All the adverse reactions related to transfusion of whole blood and its components in various clinical specialties were studied for a period of 1 year. Any transfusion-related adverse event was worked up in accordance with guidelines laid down by the Directorate General of Health Services (DGHS) and departmental standard operating procedures. Results: During the study period from November 1, 2011 to October 31, 2012, 45812 components were issued [30939 WB/PRBC; 12704 fresh frozen plasma (FFP); 2169 platelets]. Risk estimation per 1000 units of red cells (WB/PRBC) transfused was estimated to be: 0.8 for febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reaction (FNHTR), 0.7 for allergic reaction, 0.19 for acute hemolytic transfusion reaction (AcHTR), 0.002 for anaphylactoid reactions, 0.1 for bacterial sepsis, and 0.06 for hypervolemia and hypocalcemia. 0.09 is the risk for delayed transfusion reaction and 0.03 is the risk for transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Risk estimate per 1,000 units of platelets transfused was estimated to be 1.38 for FNHTR, 1.18 for allergic reaction, and 1 in case of bacterial sepsis. Risk estimation per 1,000 units of FFP was estimated to be 0.15 for FNHTR and 0.2 for allergic reactions. Conclusions: Factors such as clerical checks at various levels, improvement in blood storage conditions outside blood banks, leukodepletion, better inventory management, careful donor screening, bedside monitoring of transfusion, and documentation of adverse events may decrease transfusion-related adverse events. Better coordination between transfusion specialists and various clinical specialties

  9. Characterization of flow in the HET enclosure following ventilation and application of low-emissive coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, John M.

    2004-10-01

    In 2002 the method of thermal control within the HET enclosure was dramatically changed by the installation of 300 square meters of ventilated area to the stationary walls below the rotating dome. During the month of July 2003 a nightly study of the airflow was undertaken at the HET. While dome seeing has shown substantial improvement, this study revealed a number of counter intuitive flow modes which indicate that additional seeing improvements can be achieved by selective ventilation of the HET dome above the ring-wall. Additional study of dome seeing revealed substantial sub-cooling of the dome skin. Measurements of the skin temperature of the un-insulated dome revealed night-time cooling of local ambient air by as much as 3.6° C. An investigation of coating alternatives resulted in the application of aluminum foil tape, which reduced the temperature drop to 0.3° C. Presently, the performance of the HET (as low as EE50=0.8 arc-seconds) is not thought to be limited by dome seeing.

  10. The heterocyst differentiation transcriptional regulator HetR of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena forms tetramers and can be regulated by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Valladares, Ana; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2016-02-01

    Many filamentous cyanobacteria respond to the external cue of nitrogen scarcity by the differentiation of heterocysts, cells specialized in the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen in oxic environments. Heterocysts follow a spatial pattern along the filament of two heterocysts separated by ca. 10-15 vegetative cells performing oxygenic photosynthesis. HetR is a transcriptional regulator that directs heterocyst differentiation. In the model strain Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, the HetR protein was observed in various oligomeric forms in vivo, including a tetramer that peaked with maximal hetR expression during differentiation. Tetramers were not detected in a hetR point mutant incapable of differentiation, but were conspicuous in an over-differentiating strain lacking the PatS inhibitor. In differentiated filaments the HetR tetramer was restricted to heterocysts, being undetectable in vegetative cells. HetR co-purified with RNA polymerase from Anabaena mainly as a tetramer. In vitro, purified recombinant HetR was distributed between monomers, dimers, trimers and tetramers, and it was phosphorylated when incubated with (γ-(32)P)ATP. Phosphorylation and PatS hampered the accumulation of HetR tetramers and impaired HetR binding to DNA. In summary, tetrameric HetR appears to represent a functionally relevant form of HetR, whose abundance in the Anabaena filament could be negatively regulated by phosphorylation and by PatS. PMID:26552991

  11. A life-threatening case of autoimmune hemolytic anemia successfully treated by plasma-exchange.

    PubMed

    Cerdas-Quesada, César

    2010-06-01

    A case of severe AIHA caused by pan-agglutinant IgG-class antibodies was resolved with therapeutic plasma exchange, transfusions and steroids to maintain acceptable hemoglobin levels, remove free hemoglobin, reduce the title of autoantibodies and sustain cardiopulmonary functions. PMID:20371214

  12. Dual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection and recombination in a dually exposed transfusion recipient. The Transfusion Safety Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, R S; Sabino, E C; Mayer, A; Mosley, J W; Busch, M P

    1995-01-01

    We studied a case in which a 2-month-old premature infant was concurrently transfused with packed erythrocytes from two different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive donors in late 1984. The two donors also each singly infected a second infant. Inspection of sequences from portions of the HIV-1 genomes in each of the two donors showed a close relationship to the strain in their respective singly exposed recipients. Inspection of sequences from the dually exposed recipient provided evidence of an individual simultaneously infected with two distinct HIV-1 strains, as well as recombination of the two strains in vivo. PMID:7745674

  13. A radiolabeled antiglobulin test for crossmatching platelet transfusions

    SciTech Connect

    Kickler, T.S.; Braine, H.G.; Ness, P.M.; Koester, A.; Bias, W.

    1983-02-01

    Despite the use of HLA-matched platelets for alloimmunized recipients, transfusion failures occur. In order to reduce these failures, researchers investigated the use of a radiolabeled antiglobulin technique for platelet crossmatching. The principle of the test is that of an indirect Coombs test using /sup 125/I labeled goat anti-human IgG. Incompatibility is determined by calculating a radioactivity antiglobulin test (RAGT) index. Using this technique, researchers performed 89 crossmatches on 19 leukemic or aplastic patients who were refractory to random donor platelets and receiving varying degrees of HLA-matched platelets. Effectiveness of the transfusion was assessed from the posttransfusion corrected platelet count increment (CCI) determined at 1 and 20 hr. When the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI at 1 lhr was 17,570 +/- 7003/cu mm, n . 55. When the RAGT index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 4237 +/- 4100/cu mm, n . 34. At 20 hr when the RAGT index was 1.9 or less, the mean CCI was 8722 +/- 3143/cu mm, n . 33, and when the index was 2.0 or greater, the mean CCI was 571 +/- 1286/cu mm, n . 23. Using this technique, one false negative resulted. Nine positive crossmatches with good increments at 1 hr were found; at 20 hr, however, the survival of these units was zero. These data suggest that this method is a useful adjunct in the selection of platelets in the refractory patient.

  14. Applying radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Hohberger, Clive; Davis, Rodeina; Briggs, Lynne; Gutierrez, Alfonso; Veeramani, Dhamaraj

    2012-05-01

    ISO/IEC 18000-3 mode 1 standard 13.56 MHz RFID tags have been accepted by the International Society for Blood Transfusion (ISBT) and the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as data carriers to integrate with and augment ISBT 128 barcode data carried on blood products. The use of 13.56 MHz RFID carrying ISBT 128 data structures allows the global deployment and use of RFID, supporting both international transfer of blood and international disaster relief. The deployment in process at the BloodCenter of Wisconsin and testing at the University of Iowa Health Center is the first FDA-permitted implementation of RFID throughout in all phases of blood banking, donation through transfusion. RFID technology and equipment selection will be discussed along with FDA-required RF safety testing; integration with the blood enterprise computing system and required RFID tag performance. Tag design and survivability is an issue due to blood bag centrifugation and irradiation. Deployment issues will be discussed. Use of RFID results in significant return on investment over the use of barcodes in the blood center operations through labor savings and error reduction. PMID:22079476

  15. [Liability for hepatitis after blood transfusion (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Fiedler, H; Hackethal, B

    1980-01-01

    1) Only a very limited amount of all cases of so-called "post-transfusion-hepatitis" (pth) is really due to infectivity of the transfused blood. Regardless of the mostly unknown true source of the infection, the occurrence of "pth" for itself does not qualify the recipient and/or his illness-insurance company for a legitimate action for damages against the blood bank under current West Germany Federal Law. 2) All West German blood banks are obliged by Federal Law to insure themselves against strictly defined damage claims. Their damage-insurance companies are not entitled to pay compensations to the illness-insurance companies of any victim of "pth" without meticulous investigation of the exact circumstances if expenses exceeding the legally defined limitations are included in the premium of damage-insurance charged to the blood banks. 3)Since nearly all inhabitants of West Germany are legally or voluntarily insured against illness, compensations paid by damage-insurance companies to illness-insurance companies are no appropriate means for any cost containment of the latter: The blood banks have no other choice than to calculate the additional premium costs into the costs of the blood units to be debitted to the illness-insurance companies. PMID:7467874

  16. Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury: The Work of DAMPs*

    PubMed Central

    Land, Walter G.

    2013-01-01

    Current notions in immunology hold that not only pathogen-mediated tissue injury but any injury activates the innate immune system. In principle, this evolutionarily highly conserved, rapid first-line defense system responds to pathogen-induced injury with the creation of infectious inflammation, and non-pathogen-induced tissue injury with ‘sterile’ tissue inflammation. In this review, evidence has been collected in support of the notion that the transfusion-related acute lung injury induces a ‘sterile’ inflammation in the lung of transfused patients in terms of an acute innate inflammatory disease. The inflammatory response is mediated by the patient's innate immune cells including lung-passing neutrophils and pulmonary endothelial cells, which are equipped with pattern recognition receptors. These receptors are able to sense injury-induced, damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) generated during collection, processing, and storage of blood/blood components. The recognition process leads to activation of these innate cells. A critical role for a protein complex known as the NLRP3 inflammasome has been suggested to be at the center of such a scenario. This complex undergoes an initial ‘priming’ step mediated by 1 class of DAMPs and then an ‘activating’ step mediated by another class of DAMPs to activate interleukin-1beta and interleukin-18. These 2 cytokines then promote, via transactivation, the formation of lung inflammation. PMID:23637644

  17. Variability in splanchnic tissue oxygenation during preterm red blood cell transfusion given for symptomatic anaemia may reveal a potential mechanism of transfusion-related acute gut injury

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Sean M.; Hendricks-Muñoz, Karen D.; Mally, Pradeep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is increasing evidence indicating an association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and necrotising enterocolitis (NEC) in preterm infants, especially late-onset NEC. This phenomenon is referred to as transfusion-related acute gut injury (TRAGI). One theory as to a pathophysiological mechanism is that transfusion may result in an ischemia-reperfusion injury to intestinal tissue. We tested the hypothesis that there is significantly greater variability during transfusion in splanchnic tissue oxygen saturation (SrSO2) than in cerebral tissue oxygen saturation (CrSO2). Materials and methods This was a prospective, observational study using near-infrared spectroscopy to monitor SrSO2 and CrSO2 in preterm neonates undergoing RBC transfusion for symptomatic anaemia. Mean, standard deviation, highest and lowest SrSO2 and CrSO2 values during each transfusion were determined. The greatest difference in SrSO2 and CrSO2 during each transfusion was calculated, along with the coefficient of variation. Results We studied 37 subjects. Throughout all transfusions, the mean SrSO2 was 45.6% ±13.8 and the mean CrSO2 was 65.4% ±6.9 (p<0.001). The variability of SrSO2 was significantly greater than that of CrSO2. Averaging data from all subjects, the greatest difference in SrSO2 was 43.8% ±13.4 compared with 23.3% ±7.6 for CrSO2 (p<0.001). The mean coefficient of variation in all transfusions was 20.5% for SrSO2 and 6.0% for CrSO2 (p<0.001). Increasing post-conceptional age did not affect SrSO2 variability (R2 =0.022; p=0.379), whereas CrSO2 variability during transfusion decreased with increasing post-conceptional age (R2=0.209; p=0.004). Discussion In preterm infants, there is a large degree of tissue oxygenation variability in splanchnic tissue during RBC transfusion and this does not change with increasing maturity. We speculate that these findings, combined with lower average tissue oxygenation, may demonstrate susceptibility of the preterm gut to TRAGI

  18. Improvement in fresh frozen plasma transfusion practice: results of an outcome audit.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, N; Kaur, R; Dhanoa, J

    2004-06-01

    Blood components have been in use in clinical practice for many decades now. In spite of fairly clear guidelines regarding their use, inappropriate prescriptions for components are still rampant. We undertook this work to assess the appropriateness of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) transfusions in our hospital. A prospective audit of 504 transfusion orders for 1761 FFP units was conducted over a 6-month period which was followed by a re-audit of 294 FFP prescriptions for 961 units. In the initial audit, we identified 304 (60.3%) prescriptions which were inappropriate according to the British Committee for Standardization in Hematology (BCSH) guidelines. The re-audit performed after an educational campaign among clinicians showed a reduction in inappropriate requests by 26.6%. The specific areas of misuse were FFP transfusions in patients with hypoproteinaemic states (40.5%), anaemia (36.5%), bleeding without coagulation factor deficiency (10.2%) and volume depletion (9.2%). A significant 50.3% of requests in the initial audit and 38.4% in the re-audit were for single- or two-unit transfusions, which were subtherapeutic. FFP transfusions carry the same risks to the patients as any other blood component. Prescribers of these transfusions need to be aware of the clinical setting where their use is appropriate. Local hospital transfusion committees can play a vital role in overseeing transfusion practices to ensure optimal use of blood/component therapy. PMID:15180815

  19. Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabro, Samuele; Gallman, Antonia; Gowthaman, Uthaman; Liu, Dong; Chen, Pei; Liu, Jingchun; Krishnaswamy, Jayendra Kumar; Nascimento, Manuela Sales L; Xu, Lan; Patel, Seema R; Williams, Adam; Tormey, Christopher A; Hod, Eldad A; Spitalnik, Steven L; Zimring, James C; Hendrickson, Jeanne E; Stowell, Sean R; Eisenbarth, Stephanie C

    2016-05-30

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is a life-saving therapeutic tool. However, a major complication in transfusion recipients is the generation of antibodies against non-ABO alloantigens on donor RBCs, potentially resulting in hemolysis and renal failure. Long-lived antibody responses typically require CD4(+) T cell help and, in murine transfusion models, alloimmunization requires a spleen. Yet, it is not known how RBC-derived antigens are presented to naive T cells in the spleen. We sought to answer whether splenic dendritic cells (DCs) were essential for T cell priming to RBC alloantigens. Transient deletion of conventional DCs at the time of transfusion or splenic DC preactivation before RBC transfusion abrogated T and B cell responses to allogeneic RBCs, even though transfused RBCs persisted in the circulation for weeks. Although all splenic DCs phagocytosed RBCs and activated RBC-specific CD4(+) T cells in vitro, only bridging channel 33D1(+) DCs were required for alloimmunization in vivo. In contrast, deletion of XCR1(+)CD8(+) DCs did not alter the immune response to RBCs. Our work suggests that blocking the function of one DC subset during a narrow window of time during RBC transfusion could potentially prevent the detrimental immune response that occurs in patients who require lifelong RBC transfusion support. PMID:27185856

  20. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  1. Targeting Continuing Medical Education on Decision Makers: Who Decides to Transfuse Blood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodnough, Lawrence T.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Staff communication patterns were observed during 13 open-heart surgeries to identify the transfusion decision makers. It was determined that targeting decision makers for continuing medical education would improve the quality of transfusion practice and increase the efficiency of continuing education. (SK)

  2. NOTE: Arterio-venous flow between monochorionic twins determined during intra-uterine transfusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van den Wijngaard, Jeroen P. H. M.; Lopriore, Enrico; Pasman, Suzanne A.; Vandenbussche, Frank P. H. A.

    2008-04-01

    Twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) is a severe complication of monozygotic (identical) twin fetuses sharing one single (monochorionic) placenta. TTTS is caused by a net inter-twin transfusion of blood through placental anastomoses, from one twin (the donor) to the other (the recipient), which link the two feto-placental circulations. Currently, the only reliable method to measure the net inter-twin transfusion clinically is when incomplete laser therapy of TTTS occurs and one of the twins becomes anemic and requires an intra-uterine transfusion of adult red blood cells. Then, differences between adult hemoglobin concentrations measured during the transfusion and at birth relate not only to the net inter-twin transfusion but also to the finite lifetime of the adult red blood cells. We have analyzed this situation, derived the differential equations of adult hemoglobin in the donor and recipient twins, given the solutions and given expressions relating the net inter-twin flow with clinically measured parameters. We have included single and multiple intra-uterine transfusions. In conclusion, because incomplete laser therapy occurs frequently, and some cases require an intra-uterine transfusion, this method may allow collecting a wealth of net inter-twin flow data from clinicians involved in laser therapy of TTTS. To aid to the widespread use of this method, we have presented the equations as clearly as possible in tables for easy use by others.

  3. Evaluating Large-scale Blood Transfusion Therapy for the Current Ebola Epidemic in Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Meyers, Lauren Ancel

    2015-01-01

    Background. To combat the 2014–2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa, the World Health Organization urged the rapid evaluation of convalescent whole blood (CWB) and plasma (CP) transfusion therapy. However, the feasibility and likely impacts of broad implementation of transfusions are yet unknown. Methods. We extended an Ebola virus transmission model published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to include hospital-based convalescent donations and transfusions. Using recent epidemiological estimates for EVD in Liberia and assuming that convalescent transfusions reduce the case-fatality rate to 12.5% (range, 7.5%–17.5%), we projected the impacts of a countrywide ramp-up of transfusion therapy. Results. Under the 10% case-hospitalization rate estimated for Liberia in September 2014, large-scale CP therapy is expected to save 3586 lives by October 2015 (3.1% mortality reduction; 95% confidence interval [CI], .52%–4.5%). Under a higher 30% hospitalization rate, CP transfusions are expected to save 151 lives (0.9% of the total; 95% CI, .21%–11%). Conclusions. Transfusion therapy for EVD is a low-cost measure that can potentially save many lives in West Africa but will not measurably influence the prevalence. Under all scenarios considered, CP transfusions are predicted to achieve greater reductions in mortality than CWB. PMID:25635118

  4. Clinical factors affecting engraftment and transfusion needs in SCT: a single-center retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Liesveld, J; Pawlowski, J; Chen, R; Hyrien, O; Debolt, J; Becker, M; Phillips, G; Chen, Y

    2013-05-01

    Successful utilization of SCT modalities often requires utilization of both red cell and platelet transfusions. In this retrospective evaluation of clinical factors affecting transplant engraftment and transfusion utilization at a single transplant center in 505 patients from 2005 through 2009, we found that graft type, donor type and the conditioning regimen intensity significantly affected both the neutrophil engraftment time (P<0.001) and the platelet engraftment time (P<0.001). SCT patients required an average of 6.2 red cell units, and 7.9 platelet transfusions in the first 100 days with a wide s.d. Among auto-SCT patients, 5% required neither RBC nor platelet transfusions. Some reduced-intensity transplants were also associated with no transfusion need, and in allogeneic transplants, conditioning regimen intensity was positively correlated with platelet transfusion events as assessed by multivariate analysis. Other patient characteristics such as gender, graft type, donor type, underlying disease and use of TBI were all independently associated with transfusion needs in SCT patients. Further studies are required to understand the means to minimize transfusions and potential related complications in SCT patients. PMID:23085827

  5. A successful transfusion in a tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) using both whole blood and blood replacement products.

    PubMed

    Raines, Janis A; Storms, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    A 10-yr-old tamandua (Tamandua tetradactyla) presented with severe lethargy and ataxia. Severe anemia (9% hematocrit) was diagnosed and ultimately resolved with the administration of a whole blood transfusion from conspecific and additional blood replacement products (Oxyglobin). This is the first described use of a whole blood transfusion in an edentate. PMID:25831593

  6. Anaphylactic reaction after autologous blood transfusion: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Shailendra; Goyal, Keshav; Dubey, Surya; Bindra, Ashish; Kedia, Shweta

    2015-01-01

    Autologous blood transfusion as a cause of intraoperative anaphylaxis is very rare. We encountered one such life-threatening event in a 72-year-old patient undergoing laminectomy and pedicle screw fixation. The probable cause identified was the floseal mixed autologous blood transfusion. Review of literature has been done, and measures to avoid such an event in the future are discussed. PMID:25972952

  7. Early Identification of Acute Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions: Realistic Implications for Best Practice in Patient Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Juliet Battard; Edwards, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Acute hemolytic transfusion reactions can result in severe complications and death. Through early identification and prompt intervention, nurses can reduce the risks associated with these serious reactions. Realistic evidence-based patient monitoring protocols can help guide identification of acute hemolytic transfusion reactions and facilitate lifesaving interventions to avert critical patient situations. PMID:27323466

  8. ‘Chameleonic’ Serological Findings Leading to Life-Threatening Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Sümnig, Ariane; Mayer, Beate; Kiefel, Volker; Greinacher, Andreas; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The phenomena of co-incidence of transfusion-induced allo- and autoantibodies, blockage and/or loss of red blood cell (RBC) antigens are conspicuous and may result in confusion and misdiagnosis. Case Report A 67-year-old female was transferred to the intensive care unit due to hemolysis which developed 2 days following transfusion of three Rh(D)-negative RBC units in the presence of strongly reactive autoantibodies. Standard serological testing and genotyping were performed. Upon arrival, the patient was typed as Ccddee. Her hemolysis was decompensated, and an immediate blood transfusion was required. In addition, direct and indirect antiglobulin tests (DAT and IAT) as well as the eluate were strongly positive. Emergency transfusion of Rh(D)-negative RBCs resulted in increased hemolysis and renal failure. An exhaustive testing revealed anti-D, anti-c, CCddee phenotype and CCD.ee genotype. Three units of cryopreserved CCddee RBCs were transfused, and the patient's condition immediately improved. The discrepancy between Rh-D phenotyping and genotyping was likely caused by masking of the D-epitopes by the autoantibodies. In fact, further enquiry revealed that the patient had been phenotyped as Rh(D)-positive 6 months ago and had been transfused at that time following hip surgery. Conclusion The phenomena of transfusion-induced autoantibodies, masked alloantibodies, antigen blockage and/or loss are rare but important features which should be considered in patients presenting with autoimmune hemolytic anemia and/or hemolytic transfusion reactions. PMID:26696804

  9. Transfusion of stored blood impairs host defenses against Gram-negative pathogens in mice

    PubMed Central

    Prestia, Kevin; Bandyopadhyay, Sheila; Slate, Andrea; Francis, Richard O.; Francis, Kevin P.; Spitalnik, Steven L.; Fidock, David A.; Brittenham, Gary M.; Hod, Eldad A.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although human red blood cell (RBC) units may be refrigerator stored for up to 42 days, transfusion of older RBCs acutely delivers a large bolus of iron to mononuclear phagocytes. Similarly, iron dextran circulates in plasma for hours to days and is progressively cleared by mononuclear phagocytes, which return iron to plasma. Finally, malaria infection continuously delivers iron to macrophages by intra- and extravascular hemolysis. Studies suggest that iron administration increases infectious risk. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS To assess the effects of increased iron availability on susceptibility to infection, we infected mice with model Gram-negative intracellular or extracellular pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium or Escherichia coli, respectively), accompanied by RBC transfusion, iron dextran administration, or malarial coinfection. RESULTS In our mouse models, transfusion of older RBCs exacerbates infection with both Gram-negative pathogens. Although iron dextran exacerbates E. coli infection to a similar extent as transfusion of corresponding amounts of iron, higher iron doses are required to produce comparable effects with S. typhimurium. Coinfection of mice with Plasmodium yoelii and S. typhimurium produces overwhelming Salmonella sepsis. Finally, treating mice with antibiotics abrogates the enhancing effect on E. coli infection of both older RBC transfusion and iron dextran administration. CONCLUSIONS Transfusion of older RBCs exacerbates Gram-negative infection to a similar extent as malaria coinfection or iron dextran administration. Appropriate antibiotic therapy abrogates the effect of older RBC transfusions on infection with E. coli. Iron delivery to macrophages may be an underappreciated mechanism mediating, at least some, adverse effects of RBC transfusions. PMID:24840185

  10. Endothelial cell transfusion ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in 5/6 nephrectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, Maricica; Xing, Dongqi; Hilgers, Rob H. P.; Guo, Yuan Yuan; Yang, Zhengqin

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial dysfunction is prevalent in chronic kidney disease. This study tested the hypothesis that transfusion of rat aortic endothelial cells (ECs) ameliorates endothelial dysfunction in a rat model of chronic kidney disease. Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent sham surgery or 5/6 nephrectomy (Nx). Five weeks after Nx, EC (1.5 × 106 cells/rat) or vehicle were transfused intravenously. One week later, vascular reactivity of mesenteric artery was assessed on a wire myograph. Sensitivity of endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine and maximum vasodilation were impaired by Nx and improved by EC transfusion. Using selective pharmacological nitric oxide synthase isoform inhibitors, we demonstrated that the negative effect of Nx on endothelial function and rescue by EC transfusion are, at least in part, endothelial nitric oxide synthase mediated. Plasma asymmetric dimethylarginine was increased by Nx and decreased by EC transfusion, whereas mRNA expression of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases 1 (DDAH1) was decreased by Nx and restored by EC transfusion. Immunohistochemical staining confirmed that local expression of DDAH1 is decreased by Nx and increased by EC transfusion. In conclusion, EC transfusion attenuates Nx-induced endothelium-dependent vascular dysfunction by regulating DDAH1 expression and enhancing endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. These results suggest that EC-based therapy could provide a novel therapeutic strategy to improve vascular function in chronic kidney disease. PMID:23955716

  11. Protocol for a national blood transfusion data warehouse from donor to recipient

    PubMed Central

    van Hoeven, Loan R; Hooftman, Babette H; Janssen, Mart P; de Bruijne, Martine C; de Vooght, Karen M K; Kemper, Peter; Koopman, Maria M W

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Blood transfusion has health-related, economical and safety implications. In order to optimise the transfusion chain, comprehensive research data are needed. The Dutch Transfusion Data warehouse (DTD) project aims to establish a data warehouse where data from donors and transfusion recipients are linked. This paper describes the design of the data warehouse, challenges and illustrative applications. Study design and methods Quantitative data on blood donors (eg, age, blood group, antibodies) and products (type of product, processing, storage time) are obtained from the national blood bank. These are linked to data on the transfusion recipients (eg, transfusions administered, patient diagnosis, surgical procedures, laboratory parameters), which are extracted from hospital electronic health records. Applications Expected scientific contributions are illustrated for 4 applications: determine risk factors, predict blood use, benchmark blood use and optimise process efficiency. For each application, examples of research questions are given and analyses planned. Conclusions The DTD project aims to build a national, continuously updated transfusion data warehouse. These data have a wide range of applications, on the donor/production side, recipient studies on blood usage and benchmarking and donor–recipient studies, which ultimately can contribute to the efficiency and safety of blood transfusion. PMID:27491665

  12. The first direct human blood transfusion: the forgotten legacy of George W. Crile.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Narendra; Lautzenheiser, Frederick K; Barnett, Gene H

    2009-03-01

    GEORGE W. CRILE is best known as the father of physiological surgery in the United States, a pioneer surgeon, an innovator and inventor, a founding member of the American College of Surgeons, and the principal founder of the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. However, Crile's legacy of performing the first direct blood transfusion in humans has been all but forgotten, even though the results were published in the leading scientific journals of the day. Crile's lifelong interest in the treatment of surgical shock led to his interest in blood transfusion. A chance visit to the laboratory of Alexis Carrel in 1902 resulted in Crile perfecting his technique for direct blood transfusion. He subsequently modified Carrel's anastomosis technique to administer a faster transfusion, investigated the use of blood transfusions in various clinical settings, and went on to introduce the concept and technique of blood transfusion to soldiers during World War I. In this report, we trace his long-time interest in blood transfusion and document the events that led to the first successful blood transfusion performed between 2 brothers on August 6, 1906, at St. Alexis Hospital, Cleveland, OH. PMID:19240569

  13. Does tranexamic acid reduce blood transfusion cost for primary total hip arthroplasty? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Ryan N; Moskal, Joseph T; Capps, Susan G

    2015-02-01

    Peri-operative tranexamic acid (TXA) significantly reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and thus hospital costs are reduced. Before employing TXA in primary THA at our institution, facility costs were $286.90/THA for blood transfusion and required 0.45 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 19.87%). After incorporating TXA, the cost for intravenous application was $123.38/THA for blood transfusion and TXA medication and 0.07 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 4.39%) and the cost for topical application was $132.41/THA for blood transfusion and TXA and 0.14 man-hours/THA (transfusion rate 12.86%). TXA has the potential to reduce the facility cost per THA and the man-hours/THA from blood transfusions. PMID:25534861

  14. Transfusions and patient burden in chemotherapy-induced anaemia in France

    PubMed Central

    Desrosiers, Marie-Pierre; Collins, Helen; De La Orden, Margarita; Payne, Krista A.; Levaché, Charles Briac; Dumont, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the patient burden in terms of the time spent on outpatient red blood cell (RBC) transfusions indicated for chemotherapy induced-anaemia (CIA) in patients with cancer in France. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with cancer receiving an outpatient RBC transfusion was conducted at seven treatment centres in France. Total treatment time for one transfusion visit per patient was measured as the elapsed time between pre- and post-transfusion vital sign assessment, including time from transfusion start to stop. Elapsed time from haemoglobin (Hb) level testing to transfusion start and from blood draw for compatibility testing to transfusion start were recorded. In addition, estimated travel time and distance to the transfusion centre, and clinical and demographic information were collected. Results: A total of 103 patients [63.1% men; mean age 66.2 years, standard deviation (SD) 11.9] were enrolled in the study (1 August 2010–31 October 2010). The four most frequent diagnoses were lung cancer (31.1%), urological cancer (15.5%), gynecological cancer (14.6%) and gastrointestinal/colorectal cancer (14.6%). Mean elapsed time between prevital and postvital sign assessment was 4.0 h [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.9–6.1], including a mean of 3.4 h (95% CI 2.5–4.2) for the transfusion itself. Hb level testing (mean pre-transfusion Hb level 8.0 g/dl, SD 0.8) and blood draw for compatibility testing were completed in a mean of 28.8 h (95% CI 1.3–56.2) and 9.4 h (95% CI 0–21.4) prior to transfusion respectively. Patients’ one-way mean travel time to the transfusion centre was 32.9 min (95% CI 28.5–37.4) and mean distance travelled was 25.4 km (95% CI 11.6–39.3). Conclusion: In France, CIA treatment with RBC transfusion is a time-consuming activity for patients that includes multiple trips to a medical facility, blood testing and the transfusion procedure itself. This burden is important to consider in the context of

  15. Continuous and noninvasive hemoglobin monitoring reduces red blood cell transfusion during neurosurgery: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Awada, Wael N; Mohmoued, Maher F; Radwan, Tarek M; Hussien, Gomaa Z; Elkady, Hany W

    2015-12-01

    Continuous, noninvasive hemoglobin (SpHb) monitoring provides clinicians with the trending of changes in hemoglobin, which has the potential to alter red blood cell transfusion decision making. The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of SpHb monitoring on blood transfusions in high blood loss surgery. In this prospective cohort study, eligible patients scheduled for neurosurgery were enrolled into either a Control Group or an intervention group (SpHb Group). The Control Group received intraoperative hemoglobin monitoring by intermittent blood sampling when there was an estimated 15% blood loss. If the laboratory value indicated a hemoglobin level of ≤10 g/dL, a red blood cell transfusion was started and continued until the estimated blood loss was replaced and a laboratory hemoglobin value was >l0 g/dL. In the SpHb Group patients were monitored with a Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter for continuous noninvasive hemoglobin values. Transfusion was started when the SpHb value fell to ≤l0 g/dL and was continued until the SpHb was ≥l0 g/dL. Blood samples were taken pre and post transfusion. Percent of patients transfused, average amount of blood transfused in those who received transfusions and the delay time from the hemoglobin reading of <10 g/dL to the start of transfusion (transfusion delay) were compared between groups. The trending ability of SpHb, and the bias and precision of SpHb compared to the laboratory hemoglobin were calculated. Compared to the Control Group, the SpHb Group had fewer units of blood transfused (1.0 vs 1.9 units for all patients; p ≤ 0.001, and 2.3 vs 3.9 units in patients receiving transfusions; p ≤ 0.0 l), fewer patients receiving >3 units (32 vs 73%; p ≤ 0.01) and a shorter time to transfusion after the need was established (9.2 ± 1.7 vs 50.2 ± 7.9 min; p ≤ 0.00 l). The absolute accuracy of SpHb was 0.0 ± 0.8 g/dL and trend accuracy yielded a coefficient of determination of 0.93. Adding SpHb monitoring to

  16. Feline transfusion practice in South Africa: current status and practical solutions.

    PubMed

    Dippenaar, T

    1999-09-01

    Blood transfusion therapy is often under-utilised in feline practice in South Africa. However, it is a technique that can be safely and effectively introduced in practice. Cats have naturally occurring allo-antibodies against the blood type that they lack, which makes blood typing, or alternatively cross-matching, essential before transfusions. Feline blood donors must be carefully selected, be disease free and should be sedated before blood collection. The preferred anticoagulant for feline blood collection is citrate-phosphate-dextrose-adenine. Blood can either be administered intravenously or into the medullary cavity, with the transfusion rate depending on the cat's hydration status and cardiac function. Transfusion reactions can be immediate or delayed and they are classified as immunological or non-immunological. Indications, methods and techniques to do feline blood transfusions in a safe and economical way are highlighted. PMID:10852686

  17. Perioperative management of anemia: limits of blood transfusion and alternatives to it.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ajay

    2009-11-01

    Perioperative anemia is associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Transfusion of allogeneic blood has been a longstanding strategy for managing perioperative anemia, but the blood supply is insufficient to meet transfusion needs, and complications such as infection, renal injury, and acute lung injury are fairly common. Further, data suggest that mortality and length of stay are worsened with liberal use of transfusion. Medical alternatives to transfusion include iron supplementation and erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs). Though ESAs reduce the need for perioperative blood transfusion compared with placebo, they are associated with an increased risk of thrombotic events in surgical patients. Cleveland Clinic has been developing a blood management program aimed at reducing allogeneic blood exposure for greater patient safety; the program has achieved some reduction in blood utilization in its first 7 months. PMID:19880828

  18. Severe Childhood Anaemia and Blood Transfusion in a Nigerian Secondary Level Facility.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, Tinuade; Fetuga, Bolanle; Olowonyo, Michael; Adekoya, Adesola; Adetola, Oluseyi; Ajetunmobi, Adebimpe

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to describe the pattern and immediate outcome of severe childhood anaemia requiring blood transfusion at a secondary level of care in Nigeria. A cross-sectional survey of children hospitalized in a secondary health facility in Ogun State, Nigeria, with packed cell volume <20% and who received blood transfusion was done. Of the 253 children admitted between March 2013 and June 2014, 79 (31.2%) had severe anaemia and were transfused with blood. Two-thirds had multiple transfusions. Higher rates of blood transfusion were obtained among underweight children. Fever (98.7%), hypoglycaemia (65.8%) and tender liver (54.4%) were the leading co-morbidities. The case fatality rate was 21.5%. Respiratory distress, convulsions and altered sensorium were significantly associated with mortality. In conclusion, severe anaemia was associated with major morbidities and mortality at the secondary level of paediatric care in Nigeria. PMID:26637271

  19. Red blood cell transfusion strategies and Maximum surgical blood ordering schedule

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Shivakumar S; Shah, Jignesh

    2014-01-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the practices that is in vogue because it expands blood volume and purportedly improves the oxygen carrying capacity. Despite this supposed physiological benefit, paradoxically, both anaemia and transfusion are independently associated with organ injury and increased morbidity. Historically, transfusion was used to maintain blood haemoglobin concentration above 10 g/dL and a haematocrit above 30%. There is now a greater emphasis on interventions to reduce the use of transfusion as it is a scarce and expensive resource with many serious adverse effects. Institutional maximum surgical blood ordering schedule algorithm developed with data analysis and consensus of surgeons, anaesthesiologists and blood banks can reduce the overuse of blood. A PubMed search was performed with search words/combination of words ‘erythrocyte transfusion, adverse effects, economics, mortality, therapy, therapeutic use and utilisation’. Search yielded a total of 1541 articles that were screened for clinical relevance for the purpose of this review. PMID:25535420

  20. Low incidence of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: The Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study

    PubMed Central

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A.; O'Brien, Kerry L.; Murphy, Michael F.; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A.; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A.; Yazer, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5%±2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥28 days following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010-2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1.44%; 95%CI 0.58-2.97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 days (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  1. Low frequency of anti-D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion: the Anti-D Alloimmunization after D-incompatible Platelet Transfusions (ADAPT) study.

    PubMed

    Cid, Joan; Lozano, Miguel; Ziman, Alyssa; West, Kamille A; O'Brien, Kerry L; Murphy, Michael F; Wendel, Silvano; Vázquez, Alejandro; Ortín, Xavier; Hervig, Tor A; Delaney, Meghan; Flegel, Willy A; Yazer, Mark H

    2015-02-01

    The reported frequency of D alloimmunization in D- recipients after transfusion of D+ platelets varies. This study was designed to determine the frequency of D alloimmunization, previously reported to be an average of 5 ± 2%. A primary anti-D immune response was defined as the detection of anti-D ≥ 28 d following the first D+ platelet transfusion. Data were collected on 485 D- recipients of D+ platelets in 11 centres between 2010 and 2012. Their median age was 60 (range 2-100) years. Diagnoses included: haematological (203/485, 42%), oncological (64/485, 13%) and other diseases (218/485, 45%). Only 7/485 (1·44%; 95% CI 0·58-2·97%) recipients had a primary anti-D response after a median serological follow-up of 77 d (range: 28-2111). There were no statistically significant differences between the primary anti-D formers and the other patients, in terms of gender, age, receipt of immunosuppressive therapy, proportion of patients with haematological/oncological diseases, transfusion of whole blood-derived or apheresis platelets or both, and total number of transfused platelet products. This is the largest study with the longest follow-up of D alloimmunization following D+ platelet transfusion. The low frequency of D alloimmunization should be considered when deciding whether to administer Rh Immune Globulin to D- males and D- females without childbearing potential after transfusion of D+ platelets. PMID:25283094

  2. Risk Factors for Alloimmunisation after red blood Cell Transfusions (R-FACT): a case cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Zwaginga, Jaap Jan; van der Bom, J G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Individuals exposed to red blood cell alloantigens through transfusion, pregnancy or transplantation may produce antibodies against the alloantigens. Alloantibodies can pose serious clinical problems such as delayed haemolytic reactions and logistic problems, for example, to obtain timely and properly matched transfusion blood for patients in which new alloantibodies are detected. Objective The authors hypothesise that the particular clinical conditions (eg, used medication, concomitant infection, cellular immunity) during which transfusions are given may contribute to the risk of immunisation. The aim of this research was to examine the association between clinical, environmental and genetic characteristics of the recipient of erythrocyte transfusions and the risk against erythrocyte alloimmunisation during that transfusion episode. Methods and analysis Study design Incident case–cohort study. Setting Secondary care, nationwide study (within the Netherlands) including seven hospitals, from January 2005 to December 2011. Study population Consecutive red cell transfused patients at the study centres. Inclusion The study cohort comprises of consecutive red blood cell transfused patients at the study centre. Exclusion Patients with transfusions before the study period and/or pre-existing alloantibodies.Cases defined as first time alloantibody formers; Controls defined as transfused individuals matched (on number of transfusions) to cases and have not formed an alloantibody. Statistical analysis Logistic regression models will be used to assess the association between the risk to develop antibodies and potential risk factors, adjusted for other risk factors. Ethics and dissemination Approval at each local ethics regulatory committee will be obtained. Data will be coded for privacy reasons. Patients will be sent a letter and an information brochure explaining the purpose of the study. A consent form in presence of the study coordinator will be signed

  3. Transfusion of murine RBCs expressing the human KEL glycoprotein induces clinically significant alloantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Stowell, Sean R.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Smith, Nicole H.; Henry, Kate L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Red blood cell (RBC) alloantibodies to non-self antigens may develop following transfusion or pregnancy, leading to morbidity and mortality in the form of hemolytic transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn. A better understanding of the mechanisms of RBC alloantibody induction, or strategies to mitigate the consequences of such antibodies, may ultimately improve transfusion safety. However, such studies are inherently difficult in humans. Study Design and Methods We recently generated transgenic mice with RBC specific expression of the human KEL glycoprotein, with the KEL2 or KEL1 antigens. Herein, we investigate recipient alloimmune responses to transfused RBCs in this system. Results Transfusion of RBCs from KEL2 donors into wild type recipients (lacking the human KEL protein but expressing the murine KEL orthologue) resulted in dose dependent anti-KEL glycoprotein IgM and IgG antibody responses, enhanced by recipient inflammation with poly (I:C). Boostable responses were evident upon repeat transfusion, with morbid appearing alloimmunized recipients experiencing rapid clearance of transfused KEL2 but not control RBCs. Although KEL1 RBCs were also immunogenic following transfusion into wild type recipients, transfusion of KEL1 RBCs into KEL2 recipients or vice versa failed to lead to detectable anti-KEL1 or anti-KEL2 responses. Conclusions This murine model, with reproducible and clinically significant KEL glycoprotein alloantibody responses, provides a platform for future mechanistic studies of RBC alloantibody induction and consequences. Long term translational goals of these studies include improving transfusion safety for at risk patients. PMID:23621760

  4. Trends in transfusion of trauma victims - evaluation of changes in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The present study was performed to compare blood product consumption and clinical results in consecutive, unselected trauma patients during the first 6 months of year 2002, 2004 and 2007. Methods Clinical data, blood product consumption, lowest haemoglobin values on day 1-10 after admission, and 30-day mortality were extracted from in-hospital trauma registry and the blood bank data base. The subpopulation of massively transfused patients was identified and analysed separately. Results The total number of admitted trauma patients increased by 48% from 2002 to 2007, but the clinical data remained essentially unchanged. The mean number of erythrocyte units given day 1-10 decreased insignificantly from 9.4 in 2002 to 6.8 in 2007. New Injury Severity Score (NISS) increased in transfused and massively transfused patients, but not significantly. The number of patients transfused with plasma increased and the mean ratio of erythrocyte to plasma units transfused decreased by about 50%. The mean haemoglobin value in transfused patients on day 2 after admittance was significantly lower in 2007 than in 2002, while that on day 10 was significantly higher in 2007 than in 2002 and 2004. There was no change of 30-day survival from 2002 to 2007. Conclusions Significant changes of transfusion practice occurred during the past decade, probably as a result of increased focus on haemostasis and more precise criteria for transfusion. Despite a lower consumption of erythrocytes in 2007 than in 2002 and 2004, the mean haemoglobin level of transfused patients was higher on day 10 in 2007. The low number of transfused patients in this material makes evaluation of effect on survival difficult. Larger studies with strict control of all influencing factors are needed. PMID:21481228

  5. Impact of red blood cell transfusion on global and regional measures of oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Russell S; Bennett-Guerrero, Elliott

    2012-01-01

    Anemia is common in critically ill patients. Although the goal of transfusion of red blood cells is to increase oxygen-carrying capacity, there are contradictory results about whether red blood cell transfusion to treat moderate anemia (e.g., hemoglobin 7-10 g/dL) improves tissue oxygenation or changes outcomes. Whereas increasing levels of anemia eventually lead to a level of critical oxygen delivery, increased cardiac output and oxygen extraction are homeostatic mechanisms the body uses to prevent a state of dysoxia in the setting of diminished oxygen delivery due to anemia. In order for cardiac output to increase in the face of anemia, normovolemia must be maintained. Transfusion of red blood cells increases blood viscosity, which may actually decrease cardiac output (barring a state of hypovolemia prior to transfusion). Studies have generally shown that transfusion of red blood cells fails to increase oxygen uptake unless oxygen uptake/oxygen delivery dependency exists (e.g., severe anemia or strenuous exercise). Recently, near-infrared spectroscopy, which approximates the hemoglobin saturation of venous blood, has been used to investigate whether transfusion of red blood cells increases tissue oxygenation in regional tissue beds (e.g., brain, peripheral skeletal muscle). These studies have generally shown increases in near-infrared spectroscopy derived measurements of tissue oxygenation following transfusion. Studies evaluating the effect of transfusion on the microcirculation have shown that transfusion increases the functional capillary density. This article will review fundamental aspects of oxygen delivery and extraction, and the effects of red blood cell transfusion on tissue oxygenation as well as the microcirculation. PMID:22238040

  6. Regional transfusion centre preoperative autologous blood donation programme: the first two years.

    PubMed Central

    Howard, M. R.; Chapman, C. E.; Dunstan, J. A.; Mitchell, C.; Lloyd, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the efficacy of a regional autologous blood donation programme. DESIGN--Clinical and laboratory data were collected and stored prospectively. Transfusion data were collected retrospectively from hospital blood bank records. SETTING--Northern Region Blood Transfusion Service and 14 hospitals within the Northern Regional Health Authority. SUBJECTS--505 patients referred for autologous blood donation before elective surgery. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patient eligibility, adverse events from donation, autologous blood units provided, and autologous and allogeneic blood units transfused within 10 days of operation. RESULTS--Of 505 patients referred, 354 donated at least one unit. 78 of 151 referred patients who did not donate were excluded at the autologous clinic, mostly because of anaemia or ischaemic heart disease. In 73 cases the patient, general practitioner, or hospital consultant decided against donation. 363 autologous procedures were undertaken. In 213 (59%) cases all requested units were provided. The most common reasons for incomplete provision were late referral or anaemia. Adverse events accompanied 24 of 928 donations (2.6%). Transfusion data were obtained for 357 of the 363 procedures. 281 donors were transfused; autologous blood only was given to 225, autologous and allogeneic blood was given to 52, and allogeneic blood only was given to four. 648 of 902 (72%) units of autologous blood were transfused. Complete provision of requested autologous units was followed by allogeneic transfusion in 12 of 208 procedures (5.8%). Incomplete provision was followed by allogeneic transfusion in 44 of 149 procedures (30%). CONCLUSIONS--This study shows the feasibility of a regional autologous transfusion programme. Autologous donors only infrequently received allogeneic transfusion. Patients should be appropriately selected and referred early. PMID:1493393

  7. Blood loss predictive factors and transfusion practice during percutaneous nephrolithotomy of kidney stones: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Syahputra, Firtantyo Adi; Birowo, Ponco; Rasyid, Nur; Matondang, Faisal Abdi; Noviandrini, Endrika; Huseini, Maruto Harjanggi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Bleeding is the most common complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Injudicious transfusion is frequently performed in current practice, even though it is not always needed. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors of blood loss in the PCNL procedure and evaluate the perioperative transfusion practice. Methods A prospective study of PCNL was randomly performed by two consultants of endo-urology at our institution. The inclusion criteria were adults with kidney pelvic stones >20 mm or stone in inferior calyx >10 mm or staghorn stone. Those with coagulopathy, under anti-coagulant treatment or open conversion were excluded. A full blood count was taken at baseline and during 12, 24, 36, 72-hours post-operatively. Factors such as stone burden, sex, body surface area, shifting of hematocrit level and amount of blood transfused were analyzed statistically using line regression to identify the predictive factors of total blood loss (TBL).   Results Eighty-five patients were enrolled in this study. Mean TBL was 560.92 ± 428.43 mL for both endo-urology surgeons. Stone burden was the most influential factor for TBL (p=0.037). Our results revealed that TBL (mL) = -153.379 + 0.229 × stone burden (mm2) + 0.203 x baseline serum hematocrit (%); thus considerably predicted the need for blood transfusion. A total of 87.1% patients did not receive perioperative transfusion, 3.5% received intra-operative transfusion, 7.1% received post-operative transfusion, 23% had both intra and post-operative transfusion, resulting in a cross-matched transfusion ratio of 7.72. Mean perioperative blood transfused was 356.00 ± 145.88 mL. PMID:27429745

  8. Incidence and pattern of 12 years of reported transfusion adverse events in Zimbabwe: a retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mafirakureva, Nyashadzaishe; Khoza, Star; Mvere, David A.; Chitiyo, McLeod E.; Postma, Maarten J.; van Hulst, Marinus

    2014-01-01

    Background Haemovigilance hinges on a systematically structured reporting system, which unfortunately does not always exist in resource-limited settings. We determined the incidence and pattern of transfusion-related adverse events reported to the National Blood Service Zimbabwe. Materials and methods A retrospective review of the transfusion-event records of the National Blood Service Zimbabwe was conducted covering the period from 1 January 1999 to 31 December 2011. All transfusion-related event reports received during the period were analysed. Results A total of 308 transfusion adverse events (0.046%) were reported for 670,625 blood components distributed. The majority (61.6%) of the patients who experienced an adverse event were female. The median age was 36 years (range, 1–89 years). The majority (68.8%) of the adverse events were acute transfusion reactions consisting of febrile non-haemolytic transfusion reactions (58.5%), minor allergies (31.6%), haemolytic reactions (5.2%), severe allergic reactions (2.4%), anaphylaxis (1.4%) and hypotension (0.9%). Two-thirds (66.6%) of the adverse events occurred following administration of whole blood, although only 10.6% of the blood was distributed as whole blood. Packed cells, which accounted for 75% of blood components distributed, were associated with 20.1% of the events. Discussion The incidence of suspected transfusion adverse events was generally lower than the incidences reported globally in countries with well-established haemovigilance systems. The administration of whole blood was disproportionately associated with transfusion adverse events. The pattern of the transfusion adverse events reported here highlights the probable differences in practice between different settings. Under-reporting of transfusion events is rife in passive reporting systems. PMID:24887217

  9. Transfusion medicine during the summer of 2006: lessons learned in northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Dann, Eldad J; Michaelson, Moshe; Barzelay, Mirit; Hoffman, Ron; Bonstein, Lilach

    2008-01-01

    In July 2006 a Hizballah attack erupted at the Lebanon-Israel border. Reported here is the experience of the Rambam Health Care Campus--a level I trauma center--during 33 days of warfare. Two hundred ninety-five soldiers and 209 civilians were admitted to the emergency department (ED). Forty-eight wounded soldiers (16%) and 12 civilians (6%) had transfusion. Twenty soldiers and 1 civilian had massive transfusions. The ratio between packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma (FFP) used for patients who had massive transfusion was 3:2. In these patients, the median prothrombin time international normalized ratio and partial thromboplastin time increased during the first 2 hours after admission from 1.29 to 1.51 and from 33.6 to 39 seconds, respectively. Twenty patients who had massive transfusion survived. Patients with an injury severity score of at least 16 had a higher need for blood products than others, with a lower severity score, with a mean packed red blood cells unit transfusion of 7 vs 4 (P = .03) and FFP transfusion of 13 vs 1.5 (P = .002), respectively. In conclusion, we observed that early transfusion of FFP to casualties with penetrating wounds requiring massive transfusion is needed to overcome the coagulopathy present. The presence of a transfusion service representative on-site in the ED is recommended to ensure proper identification and labeling of blood samples. Real-time consultations provided by a transfusion medicine physician in the operation theater was also found to be essential. PMID:18063193

  10. A prophylactic fresh frozen plasma transfusion leads to a possible case of transfusion-related acute lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Debasree; Hussain, Rashid; Mazer, Jeffrey; Carino, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    A 39-year-old man with cholangiocarcinoma presented with fever and abdominal pain. He was hypotensive, jaundiced and had right upper quadrant tenderness. Laboratory testing showed a leucocytosis, elevated liver function tests, total bilirubin and International Normalised Ratio (INR). Given the concern for cholangitis, the patient was given antibiotics and three units of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) before biliary drain placement. After drain placement, and within 3 h of receiving blood products, the patient became tachypnoeic and hypoxic with a chest X-ray revealing new bilateral airspace disease. The rapid development of respiratory distress was determined to most likely be transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). He rapidly progressed to intubation and required 100% FiO2, high positive-end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and intermittent-prone ventilation for 48 h but eventually recovered and was extubated. TRALI is an under-recognised aetiology for respiratory distress in the critically ill. Adopting a conservative transfusion strategy may prevent TRALI. PMID:25053669

  11. Prophylactic plasma and platelet transfusion in the critically Ill patient: just useless and expensive or even harmful?

    PubMed

    Görlinger, Klaus; Saner, Fuat H

    2015-01-01

    It is still common practice to correct abnormal standard laboratory test results, such as increased INR or low platelet count, prior to invasive interventions, such as tracheostomy, central venous catheter insertion or liver biopsy, in critically ill patients. Data suggest that 30-90 % of plasma transfused for these indications is unnecessary and puts the patient at risk. Plasma transfusion is associated with a high risk of transfusion-associated adverse events such as transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), transfusion-related lung injury (TRALI), transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM), and anaphylaxis/allergic reactions. Therefore, the avoidance of inappropriate plasma transfusion bears a high potential of improving patient outcomes. The prospective study by Durila et al., published recently in BMC Anesthesiology, provides evidence that tracheostomies can be performed without prophylactic plasma transfusion and bleeding complications in critically ill patients despite increased INR in case of normal thromboelastometry (ROTEM) results. Thromboelastometry-based restrictive transfusion management helped avoid unnecessary plasma and platelet transfusion, and should reduce the incidence of transfusion-related adverse events and transfusion-associated hospital costs. Therefore, the authors believe that thromboelastometry-based strategies should be implemented to optimize patient blood management in perioperative medicine. PMID:26054337

  12. A Prospective Study on Red Blood Cell Transfusion Related Hyperkalemia in Critically Ill Patients

    PubMed Central

    Raza, Shahzad; Ali Baig, Mahadi; Chang, Christopher; Dabas, Ridhima; Akhtar, Mallika; Khan, Areej; Nemani, Krishna; Alani, Rahima; Majumder, Omran; Gazizova, Natalya; Biswas, Shaluk; Patel, Priyeshkumar; Al-Hilli, Jaffar A.; Shad, Yasar; Berger, Barbara J.; Zaman, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background Transfusion-associated hyperkalemic cardiac arrest is a serious complication in patients receiving packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions. Mortality from hyperkalemia increases with large volumes of PRBC transfusion, increased rate of transfusion, and the use of stored PRBCs. Theoretically, hyperkalemia may be complicated by low cardiac output, acidosis, hyperglycemia, hypocalcemia, and hypothermia. In this study, we focus on transfusion-related hyperkalemia involving only medical intensive care unit (MICU) patients. Method This prospective observational study focuses on PRBC transfusions among MICU patients greater than 18 years of age. Factors considered during each transfusion included patient’s diagnosis, indication for transfusion, medical co-morbidities, acid-base disorders, K+ levels before and after each PRBC transfusion, age of stored blood, volume and rate of transfusion, and other adverse events. We used Pearson correlation and multivariate analysis for each factor listed above and performed a logistic regression analysis. Results Between June 2011 and December 2011, 125 patients received a total of 160 units of PRBCs. Median age was 63 years (22 - 92 years). Seventy-one (57%) were females. Sixty-three patients (50%) had metabolic acidosis, 75 (60%) had acute renal failure (ARF), and 12 (10%) had end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Indications for transfusion included septic shock (n = 65, 52%), acute blood loss (n = 25, 20%), non-ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) (n = 25, 20%) and preparation for procedures (n = 14, 11%). Baseline K+ value was 3.9 ± 1.1 mEq/L compared to 4.3 ± 1.2 mEq/L post-transfusion respectively (P = 0.9). During this study period, 4% of patients developed hyperkalemia (K+ 5.5 mEq/L or above). The mean change of serum potassium in patients receiving transfusion ≥ 12 days old blood was 4.1 ± 0.4 mEq/L compared to 4.8 ± 0.3 mEq/L (mean ± SD) in patients receiving blood 12 days or less old. Sixty

  13. Vascular access, fluid resuscitation, and blood transfusion in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel; Bhananker, Sanjay; Ramaiah, Ramesh

    2012-09-01

    Trauma care in the general population has largely become protocol-driven, with an emphasis on fast and efficient treatment, good team communication at all levels of care including prehospital care, initial resuscitation, intensive care, and rehabilitation. Most available literature on trauma care has focused on adults, allowing the potential to apply concepts from adult care to pediatric care. But there remain issues that will always be specific to pediatric patients that may not translate from adults. Several new devices such as intraosseous (IO) needle systems and techniques such as ultrasonography to cannulate central and peripheral veins have become available for integration into our pre-existing trauma care system for children. This review will focus specifically on the latest techniques and evidence available for establishing intravenous access, rational approaches to fluid resuscitation, and blood product transfusion in the pediatric trauma patient. PMID:23181207

  14. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy. PMID:27067907

  15. Increased leucocyte apoptosis in transfused β-thalassaemia patients.

    PubMed

    Walter, Patrick B; Porter, John; Evans, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Janet L; Neufeld, Ellis J; Coates, Thomas; Giardina, Patricia J; Grady, Robert W; Vichinsky, Elliott; Olivieri, Nancy; Trachtenberg, Felicia; Alberti, Daniele; Fung, Ellen; Ames, Bruce; Higa, Annie; Harmatz, Paul

    2013-02-01

    This exploratory study assessed apoptosis in peripheral blood leucocytes (PBL) from β-thalassaemia patients receiving chronic transfusions and chelation therapy (deferasirox or deferoxamine) at baseline, 1, 6, and 12 months. At baseline, thalassaemic PBLs presented 50% greater levels of Bax (BAX), 75% higher caspase-3/7, 48% higher caspase-8 and 88% higher caspase-9 activities and 428% more nucleosomal DNA fragmentation than control subjects. Only neutrophils correlated significantly with apoptotic markers. Previously, we showed that over the treatment year, hepatic iron declined; we now show that the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 (BCL2), (-27·3%/year), and caspase-9 activity (-13·3%/year) declined in both treatment groups, suggesting that chelation decreases body iron and indicators of PBL apoptosis. PMID:23216540

  16. [Transfusion policy in trauma involving massive blood loss].

    PubMed

    Saltzherr, Teun Peter; Christiaans, Sarah C; Henny, C Pieter; Levi, Marcel M; Goslings, J Carel

    2011-01-01

    Severe haemorrhage is a significant cause of death in trauma patients. In the case of massive blood loss a combination of coagulation defects, acidosis and hypothermia arise, which are accompanied by high morbidity and mortality rates unless properly corrected. Research in wounded military showed that a high ratio of fresh frozen plasma to packed red blood cells (FFP:PRBC) seemed to have a positive effect on survival. These studies do not provide a definition of the ideal ratio FFP:PRBC; the ratio in which a positive effect is seen varies from 1:1 to 1:3. Unnecessary FFP transfusions in trauma patients without imminent severe haemorrhage increase the risk of complications such as multi-organ failure and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Additional research is required into the accuracy of diagnosis of acute coagulation disorders. PMID:21291576

  17. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Waseem; El Assal, Rami; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-07-01

    Cell cryopreservation maintains cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation. PMID:24995723

  18. Preserving human cells for regenerative, reproductive, and transfusion medicine

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Assal, Rami El; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Cell cryopreservation enables maintaining cellular life at sub-zero temperatures by slowing down biochemical processes. Various cell types are routinely cryopreserved in modern reproductive, regenerative, and transfusion medicine. Current cell cryopreservation methods involve freezing (slow/rapid) or vitrifying cells in the presence of a cryoprotective agent (CPA). Although these methods are clinically utilized, cryo-injury due to ice crystals, osmotic shock, and CPA toxicity cause loss of cell viability and function. Recent approaches using minimum volume vitrification provide alternatives to the conventional cryopreservation methods. Minimum volume vitrification provides ultra-high cooling and rewarming rates that enable preserving cells without ice crystal formation. Herein, we review recent advances in cell cryopreservation technology and provide examples of techniques that are utilized in oocyte, stem cell, and red blood cell cryopreservation. PMID:24995723

  19. Spontaneous Posterior Uterine Rupture in Twin-Twin Transfusion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Marcela C.; Waltner-Toews, Rebecca; Goodnight, William

    2015-01-01

    Background The maternal and fetal risks of uterine distension in rapidly progressive twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) in the setting of prior uterine scar are poorly characterized. Case We present the case of a 42-year-old woman, G4P1201, at 21 weeks gestation with stage-1 TTTS who developed a spontaneous posterior uterine rupture necessitating emergent laparotomy and delivery of previable fetuses, possibly due to prior uterine scar from a displaced intrauterine device. Conclusion TTTS may be a risk factor for uterine rupture, including uterine rupture in atypical anatomic locations. Prior unrecognized uterine scars, including perforations, may magnify the risk for atypical uterine rupture in the setting of excessive uterine distension. PMID:26929874

  20. Alternative Blood Products and Clinical Needs in Transfusion Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Whitsett, Carolyn; Vaglio, Stefania; Grazzini, Giuliano

    2012-01-01

    The primary focus of national blood programs is the provision of a safe and adequate blood supply. This goal is dependent on regular voluntary donations and a regulatory infrastructure that establishes and enforces standards for blood safety. Progress in ex vivo expansion of blood cells from cell sources including peripheral blood, cord blood, induced pluripotent stem cells, and human embryonic stem cell lines will likely make alternative transfusion products available for clinical use in the near future. Initially, alloimmunized patients and individuals with rare blood types are most likely to benefit from alternative products. However, in developed nations voluntary blood donations are projected to be inadequate in the future as blood usage by individuals 60 years and older increases. In developing nations economic and political challenges may impede progress in attaining self-sufficiency. Under these circumstances, ex vivo generated red cells may be needed to supplement the general blood supply. PMID:22567025

  1. Irradiation of hemoderivatives for transfusion in immunodepressed patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, J. Fernandez; Castillo, Elsa Lidia

    In this paper we describe a methodology for irradiating hemotherapeutic products that allows the use of radiator GAMMA-CELL-500-001. Irradiation conditions for PVC 300 mL bags were characterized in which blood plasma, erythrocyte and thrombocyte concentrates, and leukocyte mass were packed. Lacking suitable systems in a 10-40 Gy dose range, we modified the Fricke dosimeter system and verified it according to international standards. This modified system showed good repeatibility and homogeinity of results and linearity in the 10-40 Gy range. The linear correlation coefficient was 0.9966, and the reproductibility was ± 2%. More than 300 bags were processed by this established methodology. Hemoderivatives were transfused to patients with malignant hemopathic disorders, subjected to treatment with cytostatics and immunosuppressors, and in general immunodepressed. At present, results are promising from dosimetric and clinical points of view.

  2. [Establishment of a blood transfusion center at Kabul (Afghanistan)].

    PubMed

    Dupire, B; Abawi, A K; Ganteaume, C; Lam, T; Truze, P; Martet, G

    1999-01-01

    Recent events concerning blood transfusion (BT) have led to the number of BT being drastically reduced and to more rigorous checking of blood donations before their use for transfusion. Very few developing countries have been able to set up BT organizations that are both self-sufficient and capable of ensuring a high quality of blood testing. A central blood bank (CBB) was set up in Kabul (Afghanistan) during the 1980s. From 1992 onwards, its activities were curtailed due to the political turmoil, lack of funds and the fact that no blood collection policy was being implemented. A partnership between a development aid agency (Avicen), French public institutions and the local authorities has resulted in the rebirth of this CBB by the injection of financial resources and technical and scientific expertise. An independent committee of BT specialists was responsible for assessing the scientific validity and ethical acceptability of the project. In 1996, the objectives of the project, which had been in operation for one year, were achieved as far as the renovation of the laboratories was concerned. Work has focused mostly on setting up a proper cold chain and on training laboratory technicians in standard biological methods for testing blood from donors (blood group, HIV screening, Ag Hbs, HCV and syphilis). However, due to the shortage of blood donors, it has been difficult to set up a minimum blood bank stock. The results of the first biological tests carried out on the blood of the first 1,281 donors have made it possible to define an appropriate, detailed policy for preventing and controlling the main risks of infection from BT, involving routine testing for HIV, Ag HBs and HCV (0.3% prevalence). BT is a major component of any health care system and it must be reconstructed. The measures proposed here are long-term and require the ongoing participation of all those involved in this project including the local authorities and sources of financial support. PMID

  3. Epidemiology of Transfusion Transmitted Infection among Patients with β-Thalassaemia Major in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed Kiani, Rizwan; Anwar, Muhammad; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Abbasi, Saleem; Abbas Zaheer, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Transfusion Transmitted Infections (TTIs) continue to be a major risk in transfusions in many parts of the world. The transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients are particularly at risk of acquiring TTIs. The current study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study of 1253 multitransfused thalassaemia major patients was conducted in five different centres of Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and Karachi. The study subjects were screened for HIV, HCV, and HBV. The screening was performed at two centres: Department of Pathology, Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (SZAB) Medical University, and Blood Transfusion Services, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, from July to December 2015. The confirmatory screening was performed by Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CLIA). Results. Out of the 1253 multiple transfused patients, 317 (25.3%) were infected with TTIs. HCV was positive in 273 cases (21.7%), HBV in 38 cases (3.0%), and HIV in 6 cases (0.5%). Conclusion. HCV was the leading TTI in multitransfused thalassaemia major patients in the study. Presence of HIV in thalassaemia patients is a recent disturbing development in Pakistan. Improved regulation of blood banks including use of internationally or nationally evaluated kits will bring down the incidence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. More stringent behavioral and serological pretransfusion screening of blood for TTIs must be implemented in blood banks. PMID:27559490

  4. Effect of Tranexamic Acid on Blood Loss and Blood Transfusion Reduction after Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Seol, Young-Jun; Seon, Jong-Keun; Lee, Seung-Hun; Jin, Cheng; Prakash, Jatin; Park, Yong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) accompanies the risk of bleeding and need for transfusion. There are several methods to reduce postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion. One such method is using tranexamic acid during TKA. The purpose of this study was to confirm whether tranexamic acid reduces postoperative blood loss and blood transfusion after TKA. Materials and Methods A total of 100 TKA patients were included in the study. The tranexamic acid group consisted of 50 patients who received an intravenous injection of tranexamic acid. The control included 50 patients who received a placebo injection. The amounts of drainage, postoperative hemoglobin, and transfusion were compared between the groups. Results The mean amount of drainage was lower in the tranexamic acid group (580.6±355.0 mL) than the control group (886.0±375.5 mL). There was a reduction in the transfusion rate in the tranexamic acid group (48%) compared with the control group (64%). The hemoglobin level was higher in the tranexamic acid group than in the control group at 24 hours postoperatively. The mean units of transfusion were smaller in the tranexamic acid group (0.76 units) than in the control group (1.28 units). Conclusions Our data suggest that intravenous injection of tranexamic acid decreases the total blood loss and transfusion after TKA. PMID:27595071

  5. The quest for an Indian blood law as of blood transfusion services regulatory framework

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Ranabir; Kar, Sumit; Zaman, Forhad Akhtar; Pal, Shrayan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion services are a vital part of the national health delivery system. The responsibility for ensuring a continuous supply of blood rests with health administrators, who need to galvanize entire communities towards regular and non-remunerated blood donation. Objective: The present study aimed to examine the prevailing global regulations and practices related to blood transfusion and press the case for a dedicated blood law in India. Materials and Methods: We attempted a comprehensive, annotated assembly of published studies on blood transfusion services in India. Data Abstraction and Synthesis: Laws related to blood transfusion services exist in India as a part of the Drugs and Cosmetics Law. In the developed world, most blood donors are unpaid volunteers who give blood for a community supply. In order to augment safe blood transfusion services in India, we have to develop operational legal guidelines on recruitment and retention of voluntary blood donors to direct related organizations for this imperative activity. Conclusion: Several factors, such as political will and a professional and ethical approach can help in formulating a common vision, building trust, by providing optimum information towards a social movement for the rational blood transfusion services. We have to come together for a dedicated blood law in order to improve the quality of blood transfusion services in India. PMID:21897599

  6. Epidemiology of Transfusion Transmitted Infection among Patients with β-Thalassaemia Major in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Ahmed Kiani, Rizwan; Anwar, Muhammad; Waheed, Usman; Asad, Muhammad Javaid; Abbasi, Saleem; Abbas Zaheer, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Transfusion Transmitted Infections (TTIs) continue to be a major risk in transfusions in many parts of the world. The transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients are particularly at risk of acquiring TTIs. The current study was undertaken to estimate the prevalence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional study of 1253 multitransfused thalassaemia major patients was conducted in five different centres of Islamabad, Rawalpindi, and Karachi. The study subjects were screened for HIV, HCV, and HBV. The screening was performed at two centres: Department of Pathology, Shaheed Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto (SZAB) Medical University, and Blood Transfusion Services, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, from July to December 2015. The confirmatory screening was performed by Chemiluminescent Immunoassay (CLIA). Results. Out of the 1253 multiple transfused patients, 317 (25.3%) were infected with TTIs. HCV was positive in 273 cases (21.7%), HBV in 38 cases (3.0%), and HIV in 6 cases (0.5%). Conclusion. HCV was the leading TTI in multitransfused thalassaemia major patients in the study. Presence of HIV in thalassaemia patients is a recent disturbing development in Pakistan. Improved regulation of blood banks including use of internationally or nationally evaluated kits will bring down the incidence of TTIs in transfusion-dependent β-thalassaemia patients. More stringent behavioral and serological pretransfusion screening of blood for TTIs must be implemented in blood banks. PMID:27559490

  7. Prolongation of rat heart allografts by donor-specific blood transfusion treated with ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oluwole, S.F.; Iga, C.; Lau, H.; Hardy, M.A.

    1985-07-01

    The effect of donor-specific blood transfusion was compared to that of UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion on heart allograft survival in inbred rats with major histocompatibility differences. In one series ACI rats received heterotopic heart grafts from Lewis rats and 1 mL transfusion of donor-type blood at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to the transplantation. Fifty percent of the grafts were permanently accepted (survival greater than 200 days). Following UVB-irradiated donor-specific blood transfusion, 55% of the grafts survived indefinitely. In a mixed lymphocyte reaction ACI lymphocytes are weak responders to Lewis lymphocytes. In another series, Lewis rats received ACI hearts. Donor-specific transfusions at 1, 2, and 3 weeks prior to transplantation did not significantly alter the survival of heart allografts. Lewis lymphocytes react strongly to ACI stimulator cells in a mixed lymphocyte reaction. However, when the donor blood was UVB-irradiated prior to transfusion, the ACI allograft survival was significantly prolonged in this ACI-to-Lewis strain combination. When Lewis rats received W/F hearts following either donor-specific or UVB-irradiated donor-specific transfusions, the hearts' survival was similarly and significantly prolonged, but did not become permanent. Mixed lymphocyte reaction reveals that the stimulation index of Lewis lymphocytes against W/F lymphocytes is greater than that of ACI versus Lewis, but is less than that between Lewis responder cells against ACI stimulators.

  8. Evaluation of a new restricted transfusion protocol in neonates admitted to the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Fatemeh; Nili, Firozeh; Ebrahim, Bita; Olomie Yazdi, Zohreh; Maliki, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although transfusion is a common procedure for treating anemia of prematurity, there is no specific protocol for blood transfusion in premature newborns. So in this study we investigate whether application of a strict protocol has any statistically significant effect on reduction of blood transfusion. Methods: In this study, first group admitted in NICU during 2005 - 2006 and the second group admitted during 2006 - 2007. Whereas in the first group the blood transfusion performed based on neonatologists' opinion following consultations with a pediatric hematologist, blood transfusion in the second group was based on the Shannon's protocol. Results: During 2005-2006, out of 206 cases, 71 cases (%34.5) underwent blood infusion. During 2006-2007, out of 211 cases, 56 (%26.5) received blood transfusion based on the Shannon's strict protocol. Although the number of cases decreased, no significant difference was found betweenthe two groups (p= 0.07). Conculsion: Applying strict criteria alone is not effective in reducing the frequency of transfusion in infants. PMID:25678998

  9. Blood Transfusion Reactions in Elderly Patients Hospitalized in a Multilevel Geriatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lubart, E.; Segal, R.; Tryhub, N.; Sigler, E.; Leibovitz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives. Blood transfusion is a critical issue for patients with chronic diseases such as heart failure, chronic kidney disease, and malignancy. However, side effects are not rare. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the frequency of adverse blood transfusion reactions in hospitalized elderly patients during a one-year period. Design/Setting/Participants. Blood transfusion reactions such as fever, chills, dyspnea, and others following blood transfusions in hospitalized geriatric patients during one-year period were examined. Results. 382 blood units (242 patients) were administered during the study period. In 40 (11%) cases, blood transfusion reactions occurred. Fever was the most common reaction in 29 cases (72%), four (10%) had shortness of breath, and 3 (8%) had vomiting and chills each. There were no lethal cases in the 24-hour period following blood transfusions. Conclusion. A relatively low rate of adverse blood transfusion reactions occurred in our geriatric patients. We may speculate that this is related to underreporting of minor symptoms due to the high percentage of demented patients in this population. PMID:24804100

  10. Predictive factors for perioperative blood transfusion in surgeries for correction of idiopathic, neuromuscular or congenital scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Borges, Paulo Alvim; Barbosa, Angelo Roberto; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros-Filho, Tarcisio Eloy Pessoa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the association of clinical and demographic variables in patients requiring blood transfusion during elective surgery to treat scoliosis with the aim of identifying markers predictive of the need for blood transfusion. METHODS: Based on the review of medical charts at a public university hospital, this retrospective study evaluated whether the following variables were associated with the need for red blood cell transfusion (measured by the number of packs used) during scoliosis surgery: scoliotic angle, extent of arthrodesis (number of fused levels), sex of the patient, surgery duration and type of scoliosis (neuromuscular, congenital or idiopathic). RESULTS: Of the 94 patients evaluated in a 55-month period, none required a massive blood transfusion (most patients needed less than two red blood cell packs). The number of packs was not significantly associated with sex or type of scoliosis. The extent of arthrodesis (r = 0.103), surgery duration (r = 0.144) and scoliotic angle (r = 0.004) were weakly correlated with the need for blood transfusion. Linear regression analysis showed an association between the number of spine levels submitted to arthrodesis and the volume of blood used in transfusions (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: This study did not reveal any evidence of a significant association between the need for red blood cell transfusion and scoliotic angle, sex or surgery duration in scoliosis correction surgery. Submission of more spinal levels to arthrodesis was associated with the use of a greater number of blood packs. PMID:25518018

  11. A joint latent class analysis for adjusting survival bias with application to a trauma transfusion study.

    PubMed

    Ning, Jing; Rahbar, Mohammad H; Choi, Sangbum; Hong, Chuan; Piao, Jin; del Junco, Deborah J; Fox, Erin E; Rahbar, Elaheh; Holcomb, John B

    2016-01-15

    There is no clear classification rule to rapidly identify trauma patients who are severely hemorrhaging and may need substantial blood transfusions. Massive transfusion (MT), defined as the transfusion of at least 10 units of red blood cells within 24 h of hospital admission, has served as a conventional surrogate that has been used to develop early predictive algorithms and establish criteria for ordering an MT protocol from the blood bank. However, the conventional MT rule is a poor proxy, because it is likely to misclassify many severely hemorrhaging trauma patients as they could die before receiving the 10th red blood cells transfusion. In this article, we propose to use a latent class model to obtain a more accurate and complete metric in the presence of early death. Our new approach incorporates baseline patient information from the time of hospital admission, by combining respective models for survival time and usage of blood products transfused within the framework of latent class analysis. To account for statistical challenges, caused by induced dependent censoring inherent in 24-h sums of transfusions, we propose to estimate an improved standard via a pseudo-likelihood function using an expectation-maximization algorithm with the inverse weighting principle. We evaluated the performance of our new standard in simulation studies and compared with the conventional MT definition using actual patient data from the Prospective Observational Multicenter Major Trauma Transfusion study. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26256455

  12. Transfusion treatment at Sestre Milosrdnice University Hospital Center during a twelve-year period.

    PubMed

    Sović, Dragica; Dodig, Javorka; Banović, Miroslav; Jularić, Anamarija

    2014-09-01

    Transfusion treatment is administered according to clinical and laboratory results, with ongoing patient assessments. Decisions on necessary measures to prevent any adverse and unexpected events and reactions are made on the basis ofhemovigilance and ongoing gathering and analysis of relevant data. Information about transfusion treatment at the Sestre milosrdnice University Hospital Center, Vinogradska site, was retrospectively collected for a period of twelve years (2001-2012). In that period, 14137.25 ± 1693.07 units of all blood products were used, where red blood cells (RBC) accounted for 67.34%, fresh frozen plasma (FFP) for 17.55%, and platelet concentrates (PC) for 14.32%. During the study period, the consumption of RBC was even, of FFP decreased by 45% and of PC increased by 58%. RBC transfusions were received by 10.43% of hospitalized patients, 1.46% of them during surgical procedures. Transfusions of all blood products were received by 14.63% of patients. We found 247 adverse reactions to all blood products. Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions were quite equally represented, 49.5% each. As for other reactions (1%), one transfusion associated circulatory overload and one transfusion related acute lung injury were recorded. There were no fatal post-transfusion reactions. PMID:25509245

  13. A Derivation and Validation Study of an Early Blood Transfusion Needs Score for Severe Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Umejiego, Johnbosco; Robinson, Richard D.; Schrader, Chet D.; Leuck, JoAnna; Barra, Michael; Buca, Stefan; Shedd, Andrew; Bui, Andrew; Zenarosa, Nestor R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is no existing adequate blood transfusion needs determination tool that Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel can use for prehospital blood transfusion initiation. In this study, a simple and pragmatic prehospital blood transfusion needs scoring system was derived and validated. Methods Local trauma registry data were reviewed retrospectively from 2004 through 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to derivation and validation cohorts. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the independent approachable risks associated with early blood transfusion needs in the derivation cohort in which a scoring system was derived. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the receiver operational characteristic (AUC) were calculated and compared using both the derivation and validation data. Results A total of 24,303 patients were included with 12,151 patients in the derivation and 12,152 patients in the validation cohorts. Age, penetrating injury, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and Glasgow coma scale (GCS) were risks predictive of early blood transfusion needs. An early blood transfusion needs score was derived. A score > 5 indicated risk of early blood transfusion need with a sensitivity of 83% and a specificity of 80%. A sensitivity of 82% and a specificity of 80% were also found in the validation study and their AUC showed no statistically significant difference (AUC of the derivation = 0.87 versus AUC of the validation = 0.86, P > 0.05). Conclusions An early blood transfusion scoring system was derived and internally validated to predict severe trauma patients requiring blood transfusion during prehospital or initial emergency department resuscitation. PMID:27429680

  14. [The European network of transfusion medicine societies (EuroNet-TMS): The White Book 2005].

    PubMed

    Rouger, P

    2005-06-01

    Europe is building up. It develops in a quite complex environment, in which health care represents an important field of activities. As for blood transfusion, it plays a major role especially in the development of medical activities as well as for the patients treatments. Today, blood components are still of human origin and there are no substitutes for them. As a medical discipline, Blood Transfusion represents a broad field in medicine which requests the involvement of numerous actors. It is up to professional medical/scientific societies to promote the discipline. This is why it has been considered necessary and relevant to build up a federation of transfusion medicine societies throughout the European Union (EU) ; it is called EuroNet-TMS, the European Network of Transfusion Medicine Societies. This network groups more than 7500 professionals of involved in blood transfusion activities. It has six major objectives: 1) To find coherent responses to issues at stake in transfusion; 2) To promote medical and scientific developments of blood transfusion in Europe; 3) To ensure the highest and most up-to-date scientific level to meet safety and quality standards; 4) To offer similar services to all EU citizens in the field of blood transfusion; 5) To share knowledge and date within Europe; 6) To develop interfaces with decision-makers among the diverse European countries. The first step is the writing of the "White Book 2005" which reports the state of the art of blood transfusion in Europe; a prospective plan is proposed to be discussed. PMID:15896994

  15. Alloimmunization screening after transfusion of red blood cells in a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vitor Mendonça; Martins, Paulo Roberto Juliano; Soares, Sheila; Araújo, Gislene; Schmidt, Luciana Cayres; Costa, Sidneia Sanches de Menezes; Langhi, Dante Mário; Moraes-Souza, Helio

    2012-01-01

    Background Several irregular red blood cell alloantibodies, produced by alloimmunization of antigens in transfusions or pregnancies, have clinical importance because they cause hemolysis in the fetus and newborn and in transfused patients. Objective a prospective analysis of patients treated by the surgical and clinical emergency services of Hospital de Clínicas of the Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro (HC/UFTM), Brazil was performed to correlate alloimmunization to clinical and epidemiological data. Methods Blood samples of 143 patients with initial negative antibody screening were collected at intervals for up to 15 months after the transfusion of packed red blood cells. Samples were submitted to irregular antibody testing and, when positive, to the identification and serial titration of alloantibodies. The Fisher Exact test and Odds Ratio were employed to compare proportions. Results Fifteen (10.49%) patients produced antibodies within six months of transfusion. However, for 60% of these individuals, the titers decreased and disappeared by 15 months after transfusion. Anti-K antibodies and alloantibodies against antigens of the Rh system were the most common; the highest titer was 1:32 (anti-K). There was an evident correlation with the number of transfusions. Conclusions Given the high incidence of clinically important red blood cell alloantibodies in patients transfused in surgical and clinical emergency services, we suggest that phenotyping and pre-transfusion compatibilization for C, c, E, e (Rh system) and K (Kell system) antigens should be extended to all patients with programmed surgeries or acute clinical events that do not need emergency transfusions. PMID:23049421

  16. Greater Volume of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution May Aid in Reducing Blood Transfusions After Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Joshua; Paugh, Paugh; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fuller, John; Paone, Gaetano; Theurer, Patty F.; Shann, Kenneth G.; Sundt, Thoralf M.; Prager, Richard L.; Likosky, Donald S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Perioperative red blood cell transfusions (RBC) are associated with increased morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is recommended to reduce perioperative transfusions; however, supporting data are limited and conflicting. We describe the relationship between ANH and RBC transfusions after cardiac surgery using a multi-center registry. Methods We analyzed 13,534 patients undergoing cardiac surgery between 2010 and 2014 at any of the 26 hospitals participating in a prospective cardiovascular perfusion database. The volume of ANH (no ANH, <400mL, 400–799mL, ≥800mL) was recorded and linked to each center’s surgical data. We report adjusted relative risks reflecting the association between the use and amount of ANH and the risk of perioperative RBC transfusion. Results were adjusted for preoperative risk factors, procedure, BSA, preoperative HCT, and center. Results ANH was used in 17% of the patients. ANH was associated with a reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.74, p <0.001). Patients having ≥800mL of ANH had the most profound reduction in RBC transfusions (RRadj 0.57, p<0.001). Platelet and plasma transfusions were also significantly lower with ANH. The ANH population had superior postoperative morbidity and mortality compared to the no ANH population. Conclusions There is a significant association between ANH and reduced perioperative RBC transfusion in cardiac surgery. Transfusion reduction is most profound with larger volumes of ANH. Our findings suggest the volume of ANH, rather than just its use, may be an important feature of a center’s blood conservation strategy. PMID:26206721

  17. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases

    PubMed Central

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient’s tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a “one-by-one” administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  18. Plasma and Plasma Protein Product Transfusion: A Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation Symposium.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Michelle P; Al-Habsi, Khalid S; Golder, Mia; Walsh, Geraldine M; Sheffield, William P

    2015-07-01

    Plasma obtained via whole blood donation processing or via apheresis technology can either be transfused directly to patients or pooled and fractionated into plasma protein products that are concentrates of 1 or more purified plasma protein. The evidence base supporting clinical efficacy in most of the indications for which plasma is transfused is weak, whereas high-quality evidence supports the efficacy of plasma protein products in at least some of the clinical settings in which they are used. Transfusable plasma utilization remains composed in part of applications that fall outside of clinical practice guidelines. Plasma contains all of the soluble coagulation factors and is frequently transfused in efforts to restore or reinforce patient hemostasis. The biochemical complexities of coagulation have in recent years been rationalized in newer cell-based models that supplement the cascade hypothesis. Efforts to normalize widely used clinical hemostasis screening test values by plasma transfusion are thought to be misplaced, but superior rapid tests have been slow to emerge. The advent of non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants has brought new challenges to clinical laboratories in plasma testing and to clinicians needing to reverse non-vitamin K-dependent oral anticoagulants urgently. Current plasma-related controversies include prophylactic plasma transfusion before invasive procedures, plasma vs prothrombin complex concentrates for urgent warfarin reversal, and the utility of increased ratios of plasma to red blood cell units transfused in massive transfusion protocols. The first recombinant plasma protein products to reach the clinic were recombinant hemophilia treatment products, and these donor-free equivalents to factors VIII and IX are now being supplemented with novel products whose circulatory half-lives have been increased by chemical modification or genetic fusion. Achieving optimal plasma utilization is an ongoing challenge in the interconnected

  19. Blood transfusion after total shoulder arthroplasty: Which patients are at high risk?

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, Abdurrahman; Griffin, Justin W.; Novicoff, Wendy M.; Brockmeier, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple reported risk factors and a wide range of reported blood transfusion rates for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). There are no evidence-based guidelines for blood transfusions in TSA patients. Materials and Methods: We utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to analyze 51,191 patients undergoing TSA between 1998 and 2011. The purpose was to describe the incidence and identify the preoperative factors that are independently associated with blood transfusion after TSA. In addition, we studied the association of blood transfusions with certain variables such as length of stay (LOS), total charges, and payer status. Results: The blood transfusion rate in our study was 6.1%. There was no difference in the rate of blood transfusions over the study period (P < 0.001). In our logistic regression model, significant associations were found with increased age (odds ratio [OR] =1.03), white race (OR = 1.05), higher Charlson-Deyo score (OR = 1.12), presence of ischemic heart disease (OR = 1.24), blood loss anemia (OR = 1.65), female gender (OR = 1.94), presence of coagulation disorders (OR = 2.25), and presence of deficiency anemia (OR = 3.5). Patients receiving a blood transfusion had higher total charges, a longer hospital LOS, and were more likely to be Medicare payers (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Our study found five clinically significant risk factors for blood transfusions for TSA: female gender, ischemic heart disease, deficiency anemia, coagulation disorder, and blood loss anemia. Patients with these risk factors should be considered higher risk for requiring a blood transfusion after TSA and counseled appropriately. Level of Evidence: Level II, retrospective cohort study, prognostic study. PMID:27186059

  20. Respiratory Impairment after Early Red Cell Transfusion in Pediatric Patients with ALI/ARDS

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Surender; Sanfilippo, Dominic; Shoemaker, Allen; Curtis, Scott; Zuiderveen, Sandra; Ndika, Akunne; Stoiko, Michael; Hassan, Nabil

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. In the first 48 hours of ventilating patients with acute lung injury (ALI)/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a multipronged approach including packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion is undertaken to maintain oxygen delivery. Hypothesis. We hypothesized children with ALI/ARDS transfused within 48 hours of initiating mechanical ventilation would have worse outcome. The course of 34 transfused patients was retrospectively compared to 45 nontransfused control patients admitted to the PICU at Helen DeVos Children's Hospital between January 1st 2008 and December 31st 2009. Results. Mean hemoglobin (Hb) prior to transfusion was 8.2 g/dl compared to 10.1 g/dl in control. P/F ratio decreased from 135.4 ± 7.5 to 116.5 ± 8.8 in transfused but increased from 148.0 ± 8.0 to 190.4 ± 17.8 (P < 0.001) in control. OI increased in the transfused from 11.7 ± 0.9 to 18.7 ± 1.6 but not in control. Ventilator days in the transfused were 15.6 ± 1.7 versus 9.5 ± 0.6 days in control (P < 0.001). There was a trend towards higher rates of MODS in transfused patients; 29.4% versus 17.7%, odds ratio 1.92, 95% CI; 0.6–5.6 Fisher exact P < 0.282. Conclusion. This study suggests that early transfusions of patients with ALI/ARDS were associated with increased ventilatory needs. PMID:22957223

  1. Decreasing the critical value of hemoglobin required for physician notification reduces the rate of blood transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Eric A; Thompson, Paul A; Anderson, Zachary K; Anderson, Keith A; Lupu, Roxana A; Tigner, Vicki; Hoffman, Wendell W

    2016-01-01

    Red blood cell transfusions have been cited as one of the most overused therapeutic interventions in the USA. Excessively aggressive transfusion practices may be driven by mandatory physician notification of critical hemoglobin values that do not generally require transfusion. We examined the effect of decreasing the critical value of hemoglobin from 8 to 7 g/dL at our institution. Along with this change, mandatory provider notification for readings between 7 and 8 g/dL was rescinded. Transfusion rates were compared retrospectively during paired 5-month periods for patients presenting in three key hemoglobin ranges (6.00–6.99, 7.00–7.99, and 8.00–8.99 g/dL). A change in transfusion practices was hypothesized in the 7–8 g/dL range, which was no longer labeled critical and for which mandated physician calls were rescinded. Transfusion rates showed a statistically significant 8% decrease (P≤0.0001) during the 5-month period post change in our transfusion practices. This decrease in the 7.00–7.99 g/dL range was significantly greater than the 2% decrease observed in either the 6–6.99 g/dL (P=0.0017) or 8–8.99 g/dL (P≤0.0001) range. Cost savings of up to $700,000/year were extrapolated from our results showing 491 fewer units of red blood cells transfused during the 5-month post change. These cost savings do not take into account the additional impact of complications associated with blood transfusions. PMID:27350757

  2. [Clinical effects of the transfusion of leukocytes isolated by filtration from continuous flux].

    PubMed

    Malinvaud, G; Gailiard, S; Gualde, N

    1977-09-01

    The present work studies clinical effects of leukocyte transfusions to patients with medular aplasis. Leukocytes were collected by filtration on a continuous flow, according to the technique earlier described in this review [9]. Two major points are stressed on tolerance by the patients of the injected products and clinical efficiency. Seventy eight suspensions were prepared and transfused to 30 patients in the course of 36 incidents of myeloid insufficiency. All patients but two evidenced by the time of transfusion a number of polynuclears inferior to 500 per cubic millimeter. The infection was quite serious with increased gravity despite the antibiotherapy. Intolerance was noticeable in about one third of the cases, half of which consisted only in chillis by the end or after transfusion. Only one accident consisting in acute respiration troubles and shock was observed. This however does not occur by chance. It involves sensitization which may be related to HLA system but may also be of different nature, although not clearly identified. Nevertheless is efficiency of the injected products demonstrated by recirculation of the transfused leukocytes. This was noticed within an hour following transfusion for more than 50 percent of the cases. Furthermore it lasted for 16 hours in more than one fourth of the patients. In addition following results are in favour of real clinical efficiency. Certainly in the course of 16 aplasic incidents, no improvement was observed. For most patients however transfusions were late and not renewed or the patients were highly immunized. Conversely the infection state did improve in 8 patients, the disease responsible for aplasia running its course on its own. Lastly in the course of 12 aplasic incidents, infection and acute aplasia did cure. All these observations should lead one to study with great care the immunological state of the recipient. Instructions being known, the number of transfused leukocytes should be sufficient and

  3. Frequency and Pattern of Noninfectious Adverse Transfusion Reactions at a Tertiary Care Hospital in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jooyoung; Choi, Seung Jun; Kim, Sinyoung; Alghamdi, Essam

    2016-01-01

    Background Although transfusion is a paramount life-saving therapy, there are multiple potential significant risks. Therefore, all adverse transfusion reaction (ATR) episodes require close monitoring. Using the computerized reporting system, we assessed the frequency and pattern of non-infectious ATRs. Methods We analyzed two-year transfusion data from electronic medical records retrospectively. From March 2013 to February 2015, 364,569 units of blood were transfused. Of them, 334,582 (91.8%) records were identified from electronic nursing records. For the confirmation of ATRs by blood bank physicians, patients' electronic medical records were further evaluated. Results According to the nursing records, the frequency of all possible transfusion-related events was 3.1%. After the blood bank physicians' review, the frequency was found to be 1.2%. The overall frequency of febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions (FNHTRs) to red blood cells (RBCs), platelet (PLT) components, and fresh frozen plasmas (FFPs) were 0.9%, 0.3%, and 0.2%, respectively, and allergic reactions represented 0.3% (RBCs), 0.9% (PLTs), and 0.9% (FFPs), respectively. The pre-storage leukocyte reduction significantly decreased the frequency of FNHTRs during the transfusion of RBCs (P<0.01) or PLTs (P≒0.01). Conclusions The frequency of FNHTRs, allergic reactions, and "no reactions" were 22.0%, 17.0%, and 60.7%, respectively. Leukocyte-reduction was associated with a lower rate of FNHTRs, but not with that of allergic reactions. The development of an effective electronic reporting system of ATRs is important in quantifying transfusion-related adverse events. This type of reporting system can also accurately identify the underlying problems and risk factors to further the quality of transfusion care for patients. PMID:26522757

  4. Recipient Clinical Risk Factors Predominate in Possible Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Toy, Pearl; Bacchetti, Peter; Grimes, Barbara; Gajic, Ognjen; Murphy, Edward L.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Gropper, Michael A.; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Matthay, Michael A.; Wilson, Gregory; Koenigsberg, Monique; Lee, Deanna C.; Hirschler, Nora V.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Schuller, Randy M.; Gandhi, Manish J.; Norris, Philip J.; Mair, David C.; Rosen, Rosa Sanchez; Looney, Mark R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Possible transfusion-related acute lung injury (pTRALI) cases by definition have a clear temporal relationship to an alternative recipient risk factor for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We questioned whether transfusion factors are important for the development of pTRALI. Study Design and Methods In this nested case-control study, we prospectively identified 145 consecutive patients with pTRALI and randomly selected 163 transfused controls over a 4-year period at the University of California, San Francisco and the Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Results For pTRALI, we found evidence against transfusion being important: receipt of plasma from female donors (OR 0.82, 95% CI 0.29 – 2.3, p=0.70), total number of units transfused (OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.89 – 1.10, p=0.86), and number of red blood cell and whole blood units transfused (OR 0.78, 95% CI 0.59 –1.03, p=0.079). In contrast, we found that risk for pTRALI was associated with additional recipient factors: chronic alcohol abuse (OR 12.5, 95% CI 2.8 – 55, p<0.001), current smoker (OR 4.2, 95% CI 1.67 – 10.8, p=0.0024), shock before transfusion (OR 4.6, 95% CI 2.0 – 10.7, p<0.001), and positive fluid balance before transfusion (OR 1.32 per liter, 95% CI 1.20 – 1.44, p<0.001). Conclusion Recipient risk factors for ARDS rather than transfusion risk factors predominate in pTRALI. PMID:25488517

  5. Blood transfusion for the treatment of acute anaemia in inflammatory bowel disease and other digestive diseases.

    PubMed

    García-Erce, José Antonio; Gomollón, Fernando; Muñoz, Manuel

    2009-10-01

    Allogeneic blood transfusion (ABT) is frequently used as the first therapeutic option for the treatment of acute anaemia in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), especially when it developed due to gastrointestinal or perioperative blood loss, but is not risk-free. Adverse effects of ABT include, but are not limited to, acute hemolytic reaction (wrong blood or wrong patient), febrile non-hemolytic transfusional reaction, bacterial contamination, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion associated circulatory overload, transfusion-related immuno-modulation, and transmission of almost all infectious diseases (bacteria, virus, protozoa and prion), which might result in increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Unfortunately, the main physiological goal of ABT, i.e. to increase oxygen consumption by the hypoxic tissues, has not been well documented. In contrast, the ABT is usually misused only to increase the haemoglobin level within a fixed protocol [mostly two by two packed red blood cell (PRC) units] independently of the patient's tolerance to normovolemic anaemia or his clinical response to the transfusion of PRC units according to a "one-by-one" administration schedule. Evidence-based clinical guidelines may promote best transfusion practices by implementing restrictive transfusion protocols, thus reducing variability and minimizing the avoidable risks of transfusion, and the use of autologous blood and pharmacologic alternatives. In this regard, preoperative autologous blood donation (PABD) consistently diminished the frequency of ABT, although its contribution to ABT avoidance is reduced when performed under a transfusion protocol. In addition, interpretation of utility of PABD in surgical IBD patients is hampered by scarcity of published data. However, the role of autologous red blood cells as drug carriers is promising. Finally, it must be stressed that a combination of methods used within well-constructed protocols will offer better

  6. Effect of total lymphoid irradiation and pretransplant blood transfusion on pancreatic islet allograft survival

    SciTech Connect

    Mendez-Picon, G.; McGeorge, M.

    1983-05-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) has been shown to have a strong immunosuppressive effect both experimentally and clinically. Pretransplant blood transfusions have also been shown to have a strong beneficial effect in the outcome of organ transplantation. A study was made of the effect of TLI and pretransplant blood transfusions, alone and in combination, as an immunosuppressive modality in the isolated pancreatic islet transplant in the rat model. Donor rats (Fischer RT1v1) were kept on a 50% DL-ethionine supplemented diet for 4-6 weeks prior to pancreas removal. Recipient rats (Lewis RT1) were made diabetics prior to transplantation by iv injection of streptozotocin (45 mg/kg). Transfusion protocol consisted of a biweekly transfusion of 2 ml of either donor specific or third party transfusions. Total lymphoid irradiation was carried out by daily administration of 200 rads during one week prior to transplantation. Transplantation of the isolated islets was performed by intraportal injection. Syngeneic transplant of one and a half donor pancreata in each recipient reverted the diabetic condition indefinitely (greater than 100 days). Untreated allogenic grafts had a mean survival time (MST) of 5.2 days. Total lymphoid irradiation in dosages of 800, 1000, and 1200 rads, as the only immunosuppressive regimen, prolonged the MST of allografts to 15.3, 16.5, and 21.8 days, respectively (P less than .05). Pretransplant third party blood transfusion had no effect on allograft survival (MST 6.0). When donor specific blood transfusions were given, the MST was prolonged to 25.3 days (P less than .05). When TLI was administered to recipients of donor specific transfusions, the MST of the allografts did not show any statistical significant difference when compared with untreated animals. This abrogation of the beneficial effect of specific blood transfusion was observed in all dosages of TLI employed: 800 rad (MST 3.0), 1000 rad (MST 8.0), 1200 rad (MST 5.18).

  7. Impact of Perioperative Blood Transfusion on Postoperative Complications and Prognosis of Gastric Adenocarcinoma Patients with Different Preoperative Hemoglobin Value

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Lian; Wei-Han, Zhang; Yang, Kun; Chen, Xin-Zu; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of perioperative blood transfusion on the prognosis of gastric adenocarcinoma patients is still controversial. The aim of this study was to elucidate the impact of perioperative blood transfusion on postoperative complications and prognosis of patients who underwent gastrectomy for gastric adenocarcinoma with different levels of preoperative hemoglobin value (POHb). Method. From 2003 to 2011, 1199 patients who underwent curative gastrectomy were retrospectively enrolled and followed up to December 2014. Clinicopathological features and survival outcomes were compared between transfused and nontransfused patients. Results. In this study, transfused patients had more postoperative complications than nontransfused ones (P = 0.002). In survival analysis, the difference was not significant between transfused and nontransfused patients with POHb between 70 and 100 g/L (P = 0.191). However, in patients with POHb >100 g/L, transfused patients had significantly worse prognosis (P < 0.001), especially in TNM III stage patients (P = 0.002). And intraoperative blood transfusion predicted poor prognosis (P = 0.001). Conclusion. Perioperative blood transfusion might lead to poor survival in gastric adenocarcinoma patients with POHb >100 g/L and transfused patients had more postoperative complications; thus it is better to refrain from unnecessary perioperative blood transfusion especially intraoperative transfusion. PMID:26819609

  8. Assessing the Rationale and Effectiveness of Frozen Plasma Transfusions: An Evidence-based Review.

    PubMed

    Tinmouth, Alan

    2016-06-01

    Frozen plasma is a commonly used blood product. The primary indications for frozen plasma are the treatment and prevention of bleeding in patients with prolonged coagulation tests. However, there is a lack of well-conducted clinical trials to determine the appropriate indications for frozen plasma. The rationale and evidence for frozen plasma transfusions are reviewed, including the evidence or lack of evidence supporting common indications. Targeting indications in which frozen plasma transfusions are clearly not beneficial as supported by the current evidence provides an opportunity to improve the current use of frozen plasma and reduce adverse transfusion events. PMID:27112996

  9. MRI Measurements of Iron Load in Transfusion-Dependent Patients: Implementation, Challenges, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Charles T; St Pierre, Tim G

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has played a key role in studies of iron overload in transfusion-dependent patients, providing insights into the relations among liver and cardiac iron loading, iron chelator dose, and morbidity. Currently, there is rapid uptake of these methods into routine clinical practice as part of the management strategy for iron overload in regularly transfused patients. Given the manifold methods of data acquisition and analysis, there are several potential pitfalls that may result in inappropriate decision making. Herein, we review the challenges of establishing suitable MRI techniques for tissue iron measurement in regularly transfused patients. PMID:26713769

  10. RBC AGE AND POTENTIATION OF TRANSFUSION RELATED PATHOLOGY IN TRAUMA PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Jordan A.; Barnum, Scott R.; Patel, Rakesh P.

    2011-01-01

    The specific negative clinical manifestations associated with the transfusion of stored red blood cells (RBCs) and the corresponding mechanisms responsible for such phenomena remain poorly defined. Our recent studies document that leukodepleted older RBC units potentiate transfusion-related toxicity in trauma patients. It is our hypothesis that the transfusion of relatively older blood impedes microvascular perfusion. The central mechanisms proposed to mediate this microcirculatory alteration include: i) the loss of RBC-dependent control of nitric oxide mediated homeostasis concerning vasodilation, and ii) immune cell and complement activation. In this review, we outline the background for our hypothesis and detail our current investigations toward the understanding of this pathophysiology. PMID:21496048

  11. Effectiveness of Pooled Platelet Transfusion in Concordant and Discordant Groups among Dengue Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chowdappa, Vijaya; Masamatti, Smita Surendra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dengue affects more than 50 million people per year and is one of the most common causes of severe thrombocytopaenia. Thrombocytopaenia is a common complication of dengue and other viral fevers apart from malaria, typhoid, leptospirosis, leukaemia and megaloblastic anaemia. A platelet count of <20,000/μl is characteristically seen in dengue haemorrhagic fever and dengue fever. It results from immune complex mediated platelet destruction or bone marrow suppression. Severe thrombocytopaenia <10,000/μl is one of the indications for prophylactic platelet transfusion therapy to prevent haemorrhage. Aim To evaluate the effectiveness of transfusion of ABO compatible and ABO incompatible pooled platelet units in severe thrombocytopaenia cases. Materials and Methods In this study ABO compatible and incompatible pooled platelet units were transfused to serologically confirmed dengue cases having thrombocytopaenia with or without bleeding manifestations. Each of the adult patients received 4-6 units of pooled platelet concentrates prepared from random donor whole blood suspended in plasma for severe thrombocytopaenia. Pre and post transfusion platelet counts were compared. Children aged less than 12 years, pregnant women and patients with splenomegaly those on ayurvedic and homeopathic therapy, recipients of packed red cells on the same day of platelet transfusion and recipients of multiple platelet transfusions within 24 hours were excluded from the study. Results The median post transfusion platelet increments (PPI) and corrected count increments (CCI) at 4hour post transfusion were 25,000/μL (5,000-80,000/μL) and 18,000/μL (range 8,000/μL- 47,500/μL) respectively among the responders. Median PPI and CCI at 24 hours were 45,000/μL and 28,863/μL among the responders. The median CCI at 4 hour post transfusion among the non-responders was 850/μL and at 24hours was 1,425/μL. At 24 hours responders showed significantly higher PPI as compared to non

  12. When less is more: can we abandon prophylactic platelet transfusion in Dengue fever?

    PubMed

    Kurukularatne, Changa; Dimatatac, Frederico; Teo, Diana Lt; Lye, David C; Leo, Yee Sin

    2011-12-01

    Dengue fever (DF) has several hematological manifestations including thrombocytopenia and increased bleeding risk. Prophylactic platelet transfusion-in the absence of major bleeding-is utilized in DF with thrombocytopenia with the intention of preventing hemorrhagic complications. However, prophylactic platelet transfusion in DF is neither standardized nor supported by clinical evidence. We conclude that risks, costs and poor resource utilization associated with prophylactic platelet transfusion in DF far outweigh any potential hematological benefit, and as such, should not constitute routine clinical practice. PMID:22294065

  13. Association of postoperative furosemide use with a reduced blood transfusion rate in sagittal craniosynostosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Harroud, Adil; Weil, Alexander G; Turgeon, Jean; Mercier, Claude; Crevier, Louis

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT A major challenge in sagittal craniosynostosis surgery is the high transfusion rate (50%-100%) related to blood loss in small pediatric patients. Several approaches have been proposed to prevent packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion, including endoscopic surgery, erythropoietin ortranexamic acid administration, and preoperative hemodilution. The authors hypothesized that a significant proportion of postoperative anemia observed in pediatric patients is actually dilutional. Consequently, since 2005, at CHU Sainte-Justine, furosemide has been administered to correct the volemic status and prevent PRBC transfusion. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of postoperative furosemide administration on PRBC transfusion rates. METHODS This was a retrospective study of 96 consecutive patients with sagittal synostosis who underwent surgery at CHU Sainte-Justine between January 2000 and May 2012. The mean age at surgery was 4.9 ± 1.5 months (range 2.8-8.7 months). Patients who had surgery before 2005 constituted the control group. Those who had surgery in 2005 or 2006 were considered part of an implementation phase because furosemide administration was not routine. Patients who had surgery after 2006 were part of the experimental (or furosemide) group. Transfusion rates among the 3 groups were compared. The impact of furosemide administration on transfusion requirement was also measured while accounting for other variables of interest in a multiple logistic regression model. RESULTS The total transfusion rate was significantly reduced in the furosemide group compared with the control group (31.3% vs 62.5%, respectively; p = 0.009), mirroring the decrease in the postoperative transfusion rate between the groups (18.3% vs 50.0%, respectively; p = 0.003). The postoperative transfusion threshold remained similar throughout the study (mean hemoglobin 56.0 g/dl vs 60.9 g/dl for control and furosemide groups, respectively; p = 0.085). The proportion of

  14. Comparison of different platelet count thresholds to guide administration of prophylactic platelet transfusion for preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Estcourt, Lise J; Stanworth, Simon; Doree, Carolyn; Trivella, Marialena; Hopewell, Sally; Murphy, Michael F; Tinmouth, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine whether different platelet transfusion thresholds for administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions (platelet transfusions given to prevent bleeding) affect the efficacy and safety of prophylactic platelet transfusions in preventing bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy with or without stem cell transplantation. PMID:25722651

  15. HEAT EXCHANGER

    DOEpatents

    Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

    1962-10-23

    A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

  16. Neonatal transfusion models to determine the impact of using fresh red blood cells on inventory and exposure

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kerry; Quinn, Maureen; Moreno, Christina; Soundar, Esther; Teruya, Jun; Hui, Shiu-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on age of blood and its impact on donor exposure and inventory in the paediatric setting are lacking. The standard of practice of reserving a specific red blood cell (RBC) unit for neonates who may require repeat transfusions is unique to the paediatric setting. Requiring transfusion of fresher RBC units may increase the exposure of neonates to multiple units and negatively affect the supply of fresh RBC. We constructed a transfusion model based on a 6 months of retrospective neonatal transfusion data at our institution. Materials and methods All neonates (≤4 months old) at Texas Children’s Hospital who received a RBC transfusion from June to November 2011 were included and RBC transfusion data were compiled. The age of blood at the time of each RBC transfusion was recorded. These data were reviewed to calculate exposure and inventory impact if each transfusion had been restricted to RBC either ≤7 or ≤14 days old at transfusion. Results A total of 216 neonates received 938 RBC transfusions. Of these, 393 (42%) were fresh RBC (≤14 days old), even without a required age guideline. Requiring fresh (≤14 days) RBC for all transfusions in this period would have resulted in 70 additional fresh units and one or more additional exposures in 44 patients. Requiring fresher (≤7 days old) RBC would have resulted in an additional 147 units and. one or more additional exposures in 54 patients. Discussion The more conservative model of fresh (≤7 days old) RBC would greatly increase fresh RBC inventory requirements, and 25% of transfused neonates would require additional RBC exposure. Based on retrospective data and the two transfusion models, it can be concluded that requiring RBC ≤14 days old for neonatal transfusion would best balance the use of fresher RBC with the smallest increase in patient exposure (20%) and minimum impact on the RBC inventory. PMID:26192783

  17. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood: Subsequent Normal Pregnancy Without Anti D production.

    PubMed

    Maya, E T; Buntugu, K A; Pobee, F; Srofenyoh, E K

    2015-03-01

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction if they receive another Rh D positive blood in future. We present a 32-year-old Rh D negative woman, who had postpartum haemorrhage in her first pregnancy and was transfused with Rh D positive blood because of unavailability of Rh D negative blood. She did not receive anti D immunoglobin but subsequently had a normal term pregnancy of an Rh positive fetus without any detectable anti D antibodies throughout the pregnancy. In life threatening situations from obstetric haemorrhage, transfusion of Rh D negative women with Rh D positive blood should be considered as the last resort. PMID:26339087

  18. [Transfusion risk related to female/male plasma use. Analysis and debate].

    PubMed

    Mejía Domínguez, Ana María

    2013-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is a syndrome characterized by acute respiratory distress following the transfusion of blood components. The pathophysiological hallmark of TRALI is increased pulmonary microvascular permeability. Several reports demonstrate that the majority of TRALI cases are precipitated by transfusion of donor antibodies directed against HLA (human leukocyte antigens) or HNA (human neutrophil antigens) expressed on the neutrophils’ surface of the recipient. This antibody-antigen interaction is thought to directly cause neutrophils activation and release of cytotoxic agents, with subsequent endothelial damage and capillary leak. Following plasma transfusion is an important and underreported adverse event. Some blood centers have limited the collection of plasma from female donors due to their propensity for developing anti HLA antibodies after pregnancy. PMID:23435080

  19. Awareness and performance of blood transfusion standards in operating rooms of Shiraz hospitals in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Robati, R; Mirahmadi Nejad, E

    2015-01-01

    Background Assuring safety and survival of blood in vitro depends on anti-coagulation substances, blood bag characteristics, storage conditions, and transport of blood. Besides, careful selection and screening of donors as well as blood tests can minimize the transmission risk of blood-transmissible pathogens and optimize blood health. The aim of this study was to assay the level of knowledge and practices among anesthesia technicians on blood transfusion standards. Materials and Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed among 85 anesthesia technicians Shiraz, Iran throughout 2012 who were examined by census using blood transfusion questionnaires and checklists. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16 software. Results The obtained findings indicated that 32.44% of the technicians have corrected knowledge of blood transfusion standards; nevertheless, 73.84% have corrected performance. Conclusions The technicians mostly performed based on their habit and experience. However, their knowledge about blood transfusion and blood bag storage was low. PMID:26131349

  20. 75 FR 22817 - Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Emerging Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation... Infectious Diseases: Evaluation to Implementation for Transfusion and Transplantation Safety'' (EID public... of risk from, and prioritization of response to, emerging infectious diseases relevant to...

  1. Brazilian Thalassemia Association protocol for iron chelation therapy in patients under regular transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Veríssimo, Monica Pinheiro de Almeida; Loggetto, Sandra Regina; Fabron Junior, Antonio; Baldanzi, Giorgio Roberto; Hamerschlak, Nelson; Fernandes, Juliano Lara; Araujo, Aderson da Silva; Lobo, Clarisse Lopes de Castro; Fertrin, Kleber Yotsumoto; Berdoukas, Vasilios Antonios; Galanello, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    In the absence of an iron chelating agent, patients with beta-thalassemia on regular transfusions present complications of transfusion-related iron overload. Without iron chelation therapy, heart disease is the major cause of death; however, hepatic and endocrine complications also occur. Currently there are three iron chelating agents available for continuous use in patients with thalassemia on regular transfusions (desferrioxamine, deferiprone, and deferasirox) providing good results in reducing cardiac, hepatic and endocrine toxicity. These practice guidelines, prepared by the Scientific Committee of Associação Brasileira de Thalassemia (ABRASTA), presents a review of the literature regarding iron overload assessment (by imaging and laboratory exams) and the role of T2* magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to control iron overload and iron chelation therapy, with evidence-based recommendations for each clinical situation. Based on this review, the authors propose an iron chelation protocol for patients with thalassemia under regular transfusions. PMID:24478610

  2. Study of blood-transfusion services in Maharashtra and Gujarat States, India.

    PubMed

    Ramani, K V; Mavalankar, Dileep V; Govil, Dipti

    2009-04-01

    Blood-transfusion services are vital to maternal health because haemorrhage and anaemia are major causes of maternal death in South Asia. Unfortunately, due to continued governmental negligence, blood-transfusion services in India are a highly-fragmented mix of competing independent and hospital-based blood-banks, serving the needs of urban populations. This paper aims to understand the existing systems of blood-transfusion services in India focusing on Maharashtra and Gujarat states. A mix of methodologies, including literature review (including government documents), analysis of management information system data, and interviews with key officials was used. Results of analysis showed that there are many managerial challenges in blood-transfusion services, which calls for strengthening the planning and monitoring of these services. Maharashtra provides a good model for improvement. Unless this is done, access to blood in rural areas may remain poor. PMID:19489420

  3. Plasma transfusions prior to insertion of central lines for patients with abnormal coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Hall, David P; Estcourt, Lise J; Doree, Carolyn; Hopewell, Sally; Trivella, Marialena; Walsh, Timothy S

    2015-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effect of different prophylactic plasma transfusion regimens prior to central line insertion in patients with abnormal coagulation. PMID:27057149

  4. Pharmacologic Strategies to Prevent Blood Loss and Transfusion in Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tischer, Sarah; Miller, James T

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation are at risk of both life-threatening blood loss and thrombosis due to preexisting liver dysfunction and major intra- and postoperative coagulopathy. Traditional laboratory markers of hemostasis and coagulopathy are often inadequate to describe the alterations. Whole blood global viscoelastic tests, thromboelastography, and thromboelastometry may provide more complete pictures of the hematologic derangements and allow for more targeted therapy to prevent blood loss and massive transfusion. Antifibrinolytic medications such as aprotinin, tranexamic acid, and [Latin Small Letter Open E]-aminocaproic acid have been used successfully to reduce blood loss and the need for transfusion, although most published data are from small prospective trials or larger retrospective cohorts. Recombinant factor VIIa has not been shown to improve outcomes. Although transfusion needs have been associated with adverse outcomes, no studied medications for prevention of blood loss and transfusion have been associated with improved mortality or graft survival post-liver transplant. PMID:27254642

  5. Improving the evidence base for transfusion medicine: the work of the UK systematic review initiative.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, S J; Hyde, C J; Stanworth, S J; Dorée, C J; Roberts, D J; Murphy, M F

    2009-04-01

    Clarifying the existing evidence base is crucial to improve the effectiveness of transfusion practice. The UK Systematic Review Initiative has been pursuing this objective primarily through writing systematic reviews on important topics in transfusion medicine. Here, we describe our progress for the past 5 years. We are the only research group that identifies transfusion medicine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and to date, we have contributed 3002 RCT citations. The article considers future challenges including the need for wider involvement from the transfusion medicine community in the process of maintaining and updating systematic reviews and the identification and prioritization of topics for further clinical research including clinical trials. Collaboration between international and local research groups is important if these challenges are to be met. PMID:19320853

  6. Study of Blood-transfusion Services in Maharashtra and Gujarat States, India

    PubMed Central

    Ramani, K.V.; Govil, Dipti

    2009-01-01

    Blood-transfusion services are vital to maternal health because haemorrhage and anaemia are major causes of maternal death in South Asia. Unfortunately, due to continued governmental negligence, blood-transfusion services in India are a highly-fragmented mix of competing independent and hospital-based blood-banks, serving the needs of urban populations. This paper aims to understand the existing systems of blood-transfusion services in India focusing on Maharashtra and Gujarat states. A mix of methodologies, including literature review (including government documents), analysis of management information system data, and interviews with key officials was used. Results of analysis showed that there are many managerial challenges in blood-transfusion services, which calls for strengthening the planning and monitoring of these services. Maharashtra provides a good model for improvement. Unless this is done, access to blood in rural areas may remain poor. PMID:19489420

  7. [The beneficial role of blood transfusion and preganancy in the survival of renal allografts].

    PubMed

    Buy-Quang, D; Soulillou, J P; Fontenaille, C; Guimbretière, J; Guenel, J

    1977-11-12

    This analysis involves 93 cases of transplants of non-related cadaver kidneys. The result was better (p = 0.02 at 1 year) in recipients transfused before the graft (73 cases) than in those who had not been trasfused (20 cases). However, this latter group had a shorter average period of haemodialysis (p = 0.05 than the first. The benefits of pre-immunisation appear from 1 to 2 transfusions or 1 pregnancy onwards (p = 0.02 at 1 year). Subjects transfused during the 6 months prior to the transplant had a graft which was functional more often than those who had been more than 6 months before the operation (p = 0.01 at 6 months). These results would be in favour of routine small quantity transfusions, approximately every six months in patients undergoing haemodialysis and on a waiting list for transplantation. PMID:341078

  8. Effect of Blood Donor Characteristics on Transfusion Outcomes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chassé, Michaël; McIntyre, Lauralyn; English, Shane W; Tinmouth, Alan; Knoll, Greg; Wolfe, Dianna; Wilson, Kumanan; Shehata, Nadine; Forster, Alan; van Walraven, Carl; Fergusson, Dean A

    2016-04-01

    Optimal selection of blood donors is critical for ensuring the safety of blood products. The current selection process is concerned principally with the safety of the blood donor at the time of donation and of the recipient at the time of transfusion. Recent evidence suggests that the characteristics of the donor may affect short- and long-term transfusion outcomes for the transfused recipient. We conducted a systematic review with the primary objective of assessing the association between blood donor characteristics and red blood cell (RBC) transfusion outcomes. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Central databases and performed manual searches of top transfusion journals for all available prospective and retrospective studies. We described study characteristics, methodological quality, and risk of bias and provided study-level effect estimates and, when appropriate, pooled estimates with 95% confidence intervals using the Mantel-Haenszel or inverse variance approach. The overall quality of the evidence was graded using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology. From 6121 citations identified by our literature search, 59 studies met our eligibility criteria (50 observational, 9 interventional). We identified the evaluation of association of 17 donor characteristics on RBC transfusion outcome. The risk of bias and confounding of the included studies was high. The quality of evidence was graded as very low to low for all 17 donor characteristics. Potential associations were observed for donor sex with reduced survival at 90 days and 6 months in male recipients that receive donated blood from females (hazard ratio 2.60 [1.09, 6.20] and hazard ratio 2.40 [1.10, 5.24], respectively; n = 1), Human Leukocyte Antigen - antigen D Related (HLA-DR) selected transfusions (odds ratio [OR] 0.39 [0.15, 0.99] for the risk of transplant alloimmunization, n = 9), presence of antileukocyte antibodies (OR 5.84 [1.66, 20.59] for risk

  9. Where does blood go? Prospective observational study of red cell transfusion in north England

    PubMed Central

    Wells, A W; Mounter, P J; Chapman, C E; Stainsby, D; Wallis, J P

    2002-01-01

    Objective To collect population based information on transfusion of red blood cells. Design Prospective observational study over 28 days. Setting Hospital blood banks in the north of England (population 2.9 million). Main outcome measures Indications for transfusion, number of units given, and the age and sex of transfusion recipients. Participants All patients who received a red cell transfusion during the study period. Data completed by hospital blood bank staff. Results The destination of 9848 units was recorded (97% of expected blood use). In total 9774 units were transfused: 5047 (51.6%) units were given to medical patients, 3982 (40.7%) to surgical patients, and 612 (6.3%) to obstetric and gynaecology patients. Nearly half (49.3%) of all blood is given to female recipients, and the mean age of recipients of individual units was 62.7 years. The most common surgical indications for transfusion were total hip replacement (4.6% of all blood transfused) and coronary artery bypass grafting (4.1%). Haematological disorders accounted for 15.5% of use. Overall use was 4274 units per 100 000 population per year. Conclusion In the north east of England more than half of red cell units are transfused for medical indications. Demand for red cell transfusion increases with age. With anticipated changes in the age structure of the population the demand for blood will increase by 4.9% by 2008. What is already known on this topicThere have been no systematic population based surveys on use of red cells in the United KingdomStudies in France and the United States have shown that more than half of transfused red cells go to surgical patientsWhat this study addsIn the north of England over half of red cells are given for medical indicationsRates of red cell transfusion rise steeply with advancing ageSmall increases in the number of elderly people will have large effects on demand PMID:12376439

  10. Reversal of hemochromatosis by apotransferrin in non-transfused and transfused Hbbth3/+ (heterozygous B1/B2 globin gene deletion) mice.

    PubMed

    Gelderman, Monique P; Baek, Jin Hyen; Yalamanoglu, Ayla; Puglia, Michele; Vallelian, Florence; Burla, Bo; Vostal, Jaroslav; Schaer, Dominik J; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Intermediate beta-thalassemia has a broad spectrum of sequelae and affected subjects may require occasional blood transfusions over their lifetime to correct anemia. Iron overload in intermediate beta-thalassemia results from a paradoxical intestinal absorption, iron release from macrophages and hepatocytes, and sporadic transfusions. Pathological iron accumulation in parenchyma is caused by chronic exposure to non-transferrin bound iron in plasma. The iron scavenger and transport protein transferrin is a potential treatment being studied for correction of anemia. However, transferrin may also function to prevent or reduce iron loading of tissues when exposure to non-transferrin bound iron increases. Here we evaluate the effects of apotransferrin administration on tissue iron loading and early tissue pathology in non-transfused and transfused Hbb(th3/+) mice. Mice with the Hbb(th3/+) phenotype have mild to moderate anemia and consistent tissue iron accumulation in the spleen, liver, kidneys and myocardium. Chronic apotransferrin administration resulted in normalization of the anemia. Furthermore, it normalized tissue iron content in the liver, kidney and heart and attenuated early tissue changes in non-transfused Hbb(th3/+) mice. Apotransferrin treatment was also found to attenuate transfusion-mediated increases in plasma non-transferrin bound iron and associated excess tissue iron loading. These therapeutic effects were associated with normalization of transferrin saturation and suppressed plasma non-transferrin bound iron. Apotransferrin treatment modulated a fundamental iron regulatory pathway, as evidenced by decreased erythroid Fam132b gene (erythroferrone) expression, increased liver hepcidin gene expression and plasma hepcidin-25 levels and consequently reduced intestinal ferroportin-1 in apotransferrin-treated thalassemic mice. PMID:25616571

  11. Coagulopathy and transfusion therapy in pediatric liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nacoti, Mirco; Corbella, Davide; Fazzi, Francesco; Rapido, Francesca; Bonanomi, Ezio

    2016-01-01

    Bleeding and coagulopathy are critical issues complicating pediatric liver transplantation and contributing to morbidity and mortality in the cirrhotic child. The complexity of coagulopathy in the pediatric patient is illustrated by the interaction between three basic models. The first model, “developmental hemostasis”, demonstrates how a different balance between pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal hemostatic capacity in the pediatric patient at various ages. The second, the “cell based model of coagulation”, takes into account the interaction between plasma proteins and cells. In the last, the concept of “rebalanced coagulation” highlights how the reduction of both pro- and anticoagulation factors leads to a normal, although unstable, coagulation profile. This new concept has led to the development of novel techniques used to analyze the coagulation capacity of whole blood for all patients. For example, viscoelastic methodologies are increasingly used on adult patients to test hemostatic capacity and to guide transfusion protocols. However, results are often confounding or have limited impact on morbidity and mortality. Moreover, data from pediatric patients remain inadequate. In addition, several interventions have been proposed to limit blood loss during transplantation, including the use of antifibrinolytic drugs and surgical techniques, such as the piggyback and lowering the central venous pressure during the hepatic dissection phase. The rationale for the use of these interventions is quite solid and has led to their incorporation into clinical practice; yet few of them have been rigorously tested in adults, let alone in children. Finally, the postoperative period in pediatric cohorts of patients has been characterized by an enhanced risk of hepatic vessel thrombosis. Thrombosis in fact remains the primary cause of early graft failure and re-transplantation within the first 30 d following surgery, and it occurs despite prolongation

  12. Granulocyte transfusions in recovery of neutropenic rats from induced E. coli toxicemia.

    PubMed

    Popovic, V; Schaffer, R; Popovic, P

    1977-05-01

    Rats made transiently neutropenic by intra-arterial administration of vinblastine (3 mg/kg) and infected with E. coli (6.02+/-0.45 X 10(8), per animal) have a mortality rate of 90% within 48 h post infection. Multiple transfusions of large numbers of granulocytes (harvested from Deca-Durabolin treated donor rats) protected the neutropenic animals from sepsis. Out of a group of 11 rats, 10 recovered completely after repeated granulocyte transfusions. PMID:326570

  13. Coagulation defects associated with massive blood transfusion: A large multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    YANG, JIANG-CUN; SUN, YANG; XU, CUI-XIANG; DANG, QIAN-LI; LI, LING; XU, YONG-GANG; SONG, YAO-JUN; YAN, HONG

    2015-01-01

    The variations in the coagulation indices of patients receiving massive blood transfusion were investigated across 20 large-scale general hospitals in China. The data of 1,601 surgical inpatients receiving massive transfusion were retrospectively collected and the trends in the platelet counts and coagulation indices prior to and at 16 different time points during packed red blood cell (pRBC; after 2–40 units of pRBC) transfusion were evaluated by linear regression analysis. Temporal variations in the means of prothrombin time (PT), international normalized ratio (INR), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and fibrinogen (FIB) concentration were also assessed and the theoretical estimates and actual measurements of the platelet count were compared. The results demonstrated that the platelet count decreased linearly with an increase in the number of pRBC units transfused (Y=150.460−3.041X; R2 linear=0.775). Following transfusion of 18 units of pRBC (0.3 units of pRBC transfused per kilogram of body weight), the average platelet count decreased to 71×109/l (<75×109/l). Furthermore, variations in the means of PT, INR, APTT and FIB did not demonstrate any pronounced trends and actual platelet counts were markedly higher than the theoretical estimates. In conclusion, no variations in the means of traditional coagulation indices were identified, however, the platelet count demonstrated a significant linear decrease with an increase in the number of pRBC units transfused. Furthermore, actual platelet counts were higher than theoretical estimates, indicating the requirement for close monitoring of actual platelet counts during massive pRBC transfusion. PMID:26095897

  14. The Placenta in Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome and Twin Anemia Polycythemia Sequence.

    PubMed

    Couck, Isabel; Lewi, Liesbeth

    2016-06-01

    Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS) and twin anemia polycythemia sequence (TAPS) are complications unique to monochorionic twin pregnancies and their shared circulation. Both are the result of the transfusion imbalance in the intertwin circulation. TTTS is characterized by an amniotic fluid discordance, whereas in TAPS, there is a severe discordance in hemoglobin levels. The article gives an overview of the typical features of TTTS and TAPS placentas. PMID:27098457

  15. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-primed leukocyte transfusions in candida tropicalis fungemia in neutropenic patients.

    PubMed

    Di Mario, A; Sica, S; Salutari, P; Ortu La Barbera, E; Marra, R; Leone, G

    1997-01-01

    Optimal management of fungemia in neutropenic patients is still controversial. Several reports have already stressed the poor prognosis in invasive candidiasis (80% mortality in several reports). Therefore granulocyte transfusions would appear to be useful in the management of these infections. We report the use of rhG-CSF-primed granulocyte transfusions plus amphotericin B in two neutropenic patients who developed life-threatening systemic fungal infections. This approach was successful and both patients fully recovered from the infection. PMID:9234594

  16. [Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety].

    PubMed

    Cazenave, Jean-Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Transfusion of labile blood products (red cell concentrates, platelet concentrates and plasma) is vital in the absence of alternatives. Patients and doctors have always feared infections transmitted by blood, blood components and blood-derived drugs. It is potentially dangerous to delay implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products pending a perfect process. Universal implementation of pathogen inactivation in labile blood products is a major step towards transfusion safety. PMID:22043595

  17. Improving Decision Making for Massive Transfusions in a Resource Poor Setting: A Preliminary Study in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Riviello, Elisabeth D.; Letchford, Stephen; Cook, Earl Francis; Waxman, Aaron B.; Gaziano, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background The reality of finite resources has a real-world impact on a patient’s ability to receive life-saving care in resource-poor settings. Blood for transfusion is an example of a scarce resource. Very few studies have looked at predictors of survival in patients requiring massive transfusion. We used data from a rural hospital in Kenya to develop a prediction model of survival among patients receiving massive transfusion. Methods Patients who received five or more units of whole blood within 48 hours between 2004 and 2010 were identified from a blood registry in a rural hospital in Kenya. Presenting characteristics and in-hospital survival were collected from charts. Using stepwise selection, a logistic model was developed to predict who would survive with massive transfusion versus those who would die despite transfusion. An ROC curve was created from this model to quantify its predictive power. Results Ninety-five patients with data available met inclusion criteria, and 74% survived to discharge. The number of units transfused was not a predictor of mortality, and no threshold for futility could be identified. Preliminary results suggest that initial blood pressure, lack of comorbidities, and indication for transfusion are the most important predictors of survival. The ROC curve derived from our model demonstrates an area under the curve (AUC) equal to 0.757, with optimism of 0.023 based on a bootstrap validation. Conclusions This study provides a framework for making prioritization decisions for the use of whole blood in the setting of massive bleeding. Our analysis demonstrated an overall survival rate for patients receiving massive transfusion that was higher than clinical perception. Our analysis also produced a preliminary model to predict survival in patients with massive bleeding. Prediction analyses can contribute to more efficient prioritization decisions; these decisions must also include other considerations such as equity, acceptability

  18. Adverse effects of small-volume red blood cell transfusions in the neonatal population

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Adverse transfusion reactions in the neonatal population are poorly understood and defined. The incidence and pattern of adverse effects due to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion are not well known, and there has been no systematic review of published adverse events. RBC transfusions continue to be linked to the development of morbidities unique to neonates, including chronic lung disease, retinopathy of prematurity, intraventricular haemorrhage and necrotising enterocolitis. Uncertainties about the exact nature of risks alongside benefits of RBC transfusion may contribute to evidence of widespread variation in neonatal RBC transfusion practice. Our review aims to describe clinical adverse effects attributed to small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions and, where possible, their incidence rates in the neonatal population through the systematic identification of all relevant studies. Methods A comprehensive search of the following bibliographic databases will be performed: MEDLINE (PubMed/OVID which includes the Cochrane Library) and EMBASE (OVID). The intervention of interest is small-volume (10–20 mL/kg) RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We will undertake a narrative synthesis of the evidence. If clinical similarity and data quantity and quality permit, we will also carry out meta-analyses on the listed outcomes. Discussion This systematic review will identify and synthesise the reported adverse effects and associations of RBC transfusions in the neonatal population. We believe that this systematic review is timely and will make a valuable contribution to highlight an existing research gap. Trial Registration PROSPERO, CRD42013005107 http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42013005107 PMID:25143009

  19. Investigation of the current situation of massive blood transfusion in different surgical departments: a large multicenter study in China

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yang; Jin, Zhan-Kui; Xu, Cui-Xiang; Dang, Qian-Li; Zhang, Li-Jie; Chen, Hong-Nan; Song, Yao-Jun; Yang, Jiang-Cun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to learn about the current situation of surgical massive blood transfusion of different surgical departments in China’s Tertiary hospitals, which could provide the basis for the formulation of guidelines on massive blood transfusion. Method: A multicenter retrospective research on the application status of blood constituents during massive blood transfusion was conducted and a comparative analyses of survival and length of hospitalization in patients from different departments (trauma, cardiac surgery, obstetric conditions, or other common surgeries), were performed. Result: In China, during massive blood transfusion the ratio of the dosage of fresh frozen plasma to the dosage of red blood cell suspension reached 1:1-2, while the dosage of platelet and cryoprecipitate appeared to be very small. The risk of in-hospital death were associated with the primary disease in patients receiving massive blood transfusion (Log-Rank P = 0.000), cardiac surgery and trauma patients who received massive blood transfusion have a higher risk of death rate. Conclusions: Patients undergoing massive blood transfusion among different surgical departments have a certain difference in use of blood transfusion, mortality rate and the time of death. Our findings suggested that we should set up an independent transfusion program in cardiac surgery and trauma patients of massive blood transfusion. PMID:26309583

  20. Characterization of the cation-binding capacity of a potassium-adsorption filter used in red blood cell transfusion.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takao; Muto, Shigeaki; Miyata, Yukio; Maeda, Takao; Odate, Takayuki; Shimanaka, Kimio; Kusano, Eiji

    2015-06-01

    A K(+) -adsorption filter was developed to exchange K(+) in the supernatant of stored irradiated red blood cells with Na(+) . To date, however, the filter's adsorption capacity for K(+) has not been fully evaluated. Therefore, we characterized the cation-binding capacity of this filter. Artificial solutions containing various cations were continuously passed through the filter in 30 mL of sodium polystyrene sulfonate at 10 mL/min using an infusion pump at room temperature. The cation concentrations were measured before and during filtration. When a single solution containing K(+) , Li(+) , H(+) , Mg(2+) , Ca(2+) , or Al(3+) was continuously passed through the filter, the filter adsorbed K(+) and the other cations in exchange for Na(+) in direct proportion to the valence number. The order of affinity for cation adsorption to the filter was Ca(2+) >Mg(2+) >K(+) >H(+) >Li(+) . In K(+) -saturated conditions, the filter also adsorbed Na(+) . After complete adsorption of these cations on the filter, their concentration in the effluent increased in a sigmoidal manner over time. Cations that were bound to the filter were released if a second cation was passed through the filter, despite the different affinities of the two cations. The ability of the filter to bind cations, especially K(+) , should be helpful when it is used for red blood cell transfusion at the bedside. The filter may also be useful to gain a better understanding of the pharmacological properties of sodium polystyrene sulfonate. PMID:25656422

  1. Anemia and Blood Transfusion in Patients with Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Al-Humaid, Waleed; Tamim, Hani M.; Haddad, Samir; Aljabbary, Ahmad; Arifi, Abdulaziz; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale. By reducing cerebral oxygen delivery, anemia may aggravate traumatic brain injury (TBI) secondary insult. This study evaluated the impact of anemia and blood transfusion on TBI outcomes. Methods. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with isolated TBI at a tertiary-care intensive care unit from 1/1/2000 to 31/12/2011. Daily hemoglobin level and packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusion were recorded. Patients with hemoglobin < 10 g/dL during ICU stay (anemic group) were compared with other patients. Results. Anemia was present on admission in two (2%) patients and developed in 48% during the first week with hemoglobin < 7 g/dL occurring in 3.0%. Anemic patients had higher admission Injury Severity Score and underwent more craniotomy (50% versus 13%, p < 0.001). Forty percent of them received PRBC transfusion (2.8 ± 1.5 units per patient, median pretransfusion hemoglobin = 8.8 g/dL). Higher hospital mortality was associated with anemia (25% versus 6% for nonanemic patients, p = 0.01) and PRBC transfusion (38% versus 9% for nontransfused patients, p = 0.003). On multivariate analysis, only PRBC transfusion independently predicted hospital mortality (odds ratio: 6.8; 95% confidence interval: 1.1–42.3). Conclusions. Anemia occurred frequently after isolated TBI, but only PRBC transfusion independently predicted mortality. PMID:26605080

  2. Active Hemovigilance Significantly Improves Reporting of Acute Non-infectious Adverse Reactions to Blood Transfusion.

    PubMed

    Agnihotri, Naveen; Agnihotri, Ajju

    2016-09-01

    One of the key purposes of a hemovigilance program is to improve reporting of transfusion related adverse events and subsequent data-driven improvement in blood transfusion (BT) practices. We conducted a study over 3 years to assess the impact of healthcare worker training and an active feedback programme on reporting of adverse reactions to BTs. All hospitalized patients who required a BT were included in the study. Healthcare workers involved in BT to patients were sensitized and trained in adverse reaction reporting by conducting training sessions and meetings. All the transfused patients were 'actively' monitored for any acute adverse reaction by using a uniquely coded blood issue form. A total of 18,914 blood components transfused to 5785 different patients resulted in 61 adverse reaction episodes. This incidence of 0.32 % in our study was found to be significantly higher (p < 0.005) than that reported from the same region in the past. Red blood cell units were the most frequently transfused component and thus most commonly involved in an adverse reaction (42.6 %), however apheresis platelets had the highest chance of reaction per unit transfused (0.66 %). There was no mortality associated with the BT during the study period. An active surveillance program significantly improves reporting and management of adverse reactions to BTs. PMID:27429527

  3. A controlled study of the efficacy of granulocyte transfusions in patients with neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Vogler, W R; Winton, E F

    1977-10-01

    A randomized clinical trial to determine the efficacy of granulocyte transfusions in neutropenic patients with infection was conducted. Criteria for patient selection included a proved infection, a granulocyte count of less than 300/mm3, availability of a suitable donor and failure to respond to at least 72 horus of appropriate antibiotic therapy. Thirty patients were assigned at random to receive either granulocyte transfusions or to serve as a control group. Antibiotic therapy was continued in both groups. Responses were judged by the degree of diminution of infectious episodes and survival. The results showed that 11 of 13 control patients failed to respond during the period of observation, whereas 10 of 17 patients given transfusions responded. The results were statistically significantly different (p less than 0.05). The median survival was 22.5 days in the group given transfusions (group 2) and 7.7 in the control group (group 1) (p less than 0.01). The granulocyte transfusions were most effective in patients with hypocellular marrows who failed to recover during the period of observation. These results indicate that granulocyte transfusions are effective in the short-term control of infections in neutropenic patients. PMID:910806

  4. How we treat delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions in patients with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Kate; Hoppe, Carolyn; Mijovic, Aleksandar; Thein, Swee L

    2015-09-01

    Transfusion therapy is effective in the prevention and treatment of many complications of sickle cell disease (SCD). However, its benefits must be balanced against its risks, including delayed haemolytic transfusion reactions (DHTR). Not only is the relative rate of alloimmunization higher in patients with SCD than in other patient populations, but attendant risks associated with DHTR are even greater in SCD. Clinicians' awareness of DHTR events is poor because symptoms of DHTR mimic acute vaso-occlusive pain and immunohaematology findings are often negative. Transfusions delivered in the acute rather than elective setting appear to confer a higher risk of DHTR. Management of DHTR in SCD depends on the clinical severity, ranging from supportive care to immunosuppression, and optimization of erythropoiesis. DHTR must be considered in any recently transfused patient presenting with acute sickle cell pain. Meticulous documentation of transfusion and immunohaematology history is key. We anticipate an increase in DHTR events in SCD patients with the increasing use of red blood cell transfusion therapy. PMID:25967919

  5. Association of Hematocrit and Red Blood Cell Transfusion with Outcomes in Infants Undergoing Norwood Operation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Punkaj; King, Caitlin; Benjamin, Lisle; Goodhart, Timothy; Robertson, Michael J; Gossett, Jeffrey M; Pesek, Gina A; DasGupta, Rahul

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the association between red blood cell (RBC) transfusion and hematocrit values with outcomes in infants undergoing Norwood operation. This study included infants ≤2 months of age who underwent Norwood operation with either a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt or a right ventricle-pulmonary artery shunt. Demographics, preoperative, operative, daily laboratory data, and postoperative variables were collected. The primary outcome measures evaluated included mortality, ICU length of stay, length of mechanical ventilation, and days to chest closure. The secondary outcome measures evaluated included lactate levels, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and inotrope score in the first 14 days after heart operation. Cox proportional hazard models were fitted to study the probability of study outcomes as a function of hematocrit values and RBC transfusions after operation. Eighty-nine patients qualified for inclusion. With a median hematocrit of 46 (IQR 44, 49), and a median RBC transfusion of 92 ml/kg (IQR 31, 384) in the first 14 days after operation, 81 (91 %) patients received RBC transfusions. A multivariable analysis adjusted for risk factors, including the age, weight, prematurity, cardiopulmonary bypass and cross-clamp time, and postoperative need for nitric oxide and dialysis, demonstrated no association between hematocrit and RBC transfusion with majority of study outcomes. This single-center study found that higher hematocrit values and increasing RBC transfusions are not associated with improved outcomes in infants undergoing Norwood operation. PMID:25773580

  6. Transfusion Management and Immunohematologic Complications in Liver Transplantation: Experience of a Single Institution

    PubMed Central

    Solves, Pilar; Carpio, Nelly; Moscardo, Federico; Lancharro, Aima; Cano, Isabel; Moya, Angel; López-Andujar, Rafael; Sanz, Miguel Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective Liver transplantation (LT) has traditionally been associated with major blood loss and consequently high blood transfusion requirements. Our objective was to analyze transfusion management and incidence of immunohematologic complications in patients undergoing LT at our institution. Methods A retrospective analysis of immunohematologic events and transfusion outcomes was carried out at La Fe University Hospital in Valencia. Data from 654 patients were reviewed: 654 underwent only one LT while 36 underwent second LT. Results Patients received a median of 3 red blood cell (RBC) concentrates, 2 platelets concentrates (PCs) and 2 fresh frozen plasma units (FFPs). Variables significantly influencing RBC transfusions were: the MELD score, hemoglobin levels, and the platelet counts before LT. 27 patients (4.1%) had a positive antibody screening before transplant. Immunohematologic events occurred in 8% of the patients, mostly in the first month after LT, and involved hemolysis in 13 cases. Mortality was significantly higher in patients developing immunohematologic disorders (42.8 vs. 18.3%; p < 0.001). In the multivariable analysis, only ABO minor incompatibility between donor and recipient significantly increased the appearance of immunohematologic incidences (OR 4.92, 95% CI 2.31–10.50; p < 0.001). Conclusion Transfusion management of patients that underwent LT can be complicated by immunohematologic problems. Blood banks should implement the DAT test in each transfusion to detect them. PMID:25960710

  7. A review of transfusion practice before, during, and after hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Viviana V.; Sandler, S. Gerald; Sayegh, Antoine; Klumpp, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    The increased use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has implications and consequences for transfusion services: not only in hospitals where HPC transplantations are performed, but also in hospitals that do not perform HPC transplantations but manage patients before or after transplantation. Candidates for HPC transplantation have specific and specialized transfusion requirements before, during, and after transplantation that are necessary to avert the adverse consequences of alloimmunization to human leukocyte antigens, immunohematologic consequences of ABO-mismatched transplantations, or immunosuppression. Decisions concerning blood transfusions during any of these times may compromise the outcome of an otherwise successful transplantation. Years after an HPC transplantation, and even during clinical remission, recipients may continue to be immunosuppressed and may have critically important, special transfusion requirements. Without a thorough understanding of these special requirements, provision of compatible blood components may be delayed and often urgent transfusion needs prohibit appropriate consultation with the patient's transplantation specialist. To optimize the relevance of issues and communication between clinical hematologists, transplantation physicians, and transfusion medicine physicians, the data and opinions presented in this review are organized by sequence of patient presentation, namely, before, during, and after transplantation. PMID:18583566

  8. Assessment of five formulae to predict post-transfusion packed cell volume in cats.

    PubMed

    Reed, Nicki; Espadas, Irene; Lalor, Stephanie M; Kisielewicz, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    This retrospective study aimed to identify the most accurate formula for estimating the increase in packed cell volume (PCV) after whole blood transfusion of cats, as several formulae have been reported but not validated. Forty cats, of varying breeds and gender, were included from two referral institutions after database searches over a 13 year period. Five formulae were used to calculate an estimated post-transfusion PCV based on the re-working of formulae for determining the volume of donor blood to be transfused; three formulae were derived from those previously reported in the feline literature and two from human paediatric medicine, where a similar mean blood volume has been described. Cats were subdivided into two groups, the first consisting of 17 cats with non-regenerative anaemia and the second consisting of 23 cats with ongoing losses such as haemolysis and haemorrhage; it was hypothesised that formulae could be more accurate for group 1 cats, whereas formulae applied to group 2 cats could have overestimated the post-transfusion PCV. Bland-Altman analysis was performed for all cats to compare the actual increase in PCV with the calculated increase for the five formulae. Formula 1 (PCV % increase = volume of blood transfused in ml/2 × bodyweight in kg) performed best overall and is easy to calculate; however, no single formula was highly accurate at predicting the PCV increase after whole blood transfusion in cats and, owing to the wide confidence intervals, these formulae should be applied judiciously in the clinical setting. PMID:24393778

  9. Factors associated with knowledge of the nursing staff at a teaching hospital on blood transfusion 1

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Jordânia Lumênia; Barichello, Elizabeth; Mattia, Ana Lúcia De; Barbosa, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine whether there is an association between knowledge of the nursing professionals about blood transfusion and the variables related to the professional aspects. Method: this is an observational, cross-sectional and quantitative study, carried out at a large general teaching hospital. The sample consisted of 209 nursing professionals, obtained by simple random sampling. For data collection, a checklist was used. In the univariate analysis, descriptive statistics and central trend and dispersion measures were used. In the bivariate analysis, Student's t-Test, analysis of variance and Pearson's correlation were used. To determine the predictors, multiple linear regression was applied. The Institutional Review Board (Opinion number 2434) approved the study. Results: the overall average knowledge score was 52.66%; in the Pre-transfusion Step, it corresponded to 53.38%; in the Transfusion Step 51.25% and, in the Post-transfusion Step, 62.68%. The factors related to knowledge were professional category and received training and/or guidance to accomplish the transfusion process (p<0.01). Conclusion: this study showed the influence of training and guidance on the knowledge and provided a diagnosis to identify the professionals' difficulties regarding the transfusion process. PMID:26444160

  10. Transfusion Induced Bone Marrow Transplant Rejection Due to Minor Histocompatibility Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Seema R; Zimring, James C

    2014-01-01

    Traditionally, alloimmunization to transfused blood products has focused exclusively upon recipient antibodies recognizing donor alloantigens present on the cell surface. Accordingly, the immunological sequelae of alloimmunization have been antibody mediated effects (i.e. hemolytic transfusion reactions, platelet refractoriness, anti-HLA and anti-HNA effects, etc.). However, in addition to the above sequelae, there is also a correlation between the number of antecedent transfusions in humans and the rate of bone marrow transplant (BMT) rejection - under reduced intensity conditioning with HLA matched or HLA identical marrow. BMT of this nature is the only existing cure for a series of non-malignant hematological diseases (e.g. sickle cell disease, thalassemias, etc.); however, rejection remains a clinical problem. It has been hypothesized that transfusion induces subsequent BMT rejection through immunization. Studies in animal models have observed the same effect and have demonstrated that transfusion induced BMT rejection can occur in response to alloimmunization. However, unlike traditional antibody responses, sensitization in this case results in cellular immune effects, involving populations such as T cell or NK cells. In this case, rejection occurs in the absence of alloantibodies, and would not be detected by existing immune-hematological methods. We review human and animal studies in light of the hypothesis that, for distinct clinical populations, enhanced rejection of BMT may be an unappreciated adverse consequence of transfusion which current blood bank methodologies are unable to detect. PMID:24090731

  11. Science exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Dwindling scientific and technical exchange between the United States and the Soviet Union and prospects for enhancing such exchanges were discussed at an August 2 hearing by the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The committee also heard overviews on the United States' approach to international exchange of science and technology. The hearing was the first in a series on current and future international science and technology programs.Four of eight science and technology agreements with the USSR that have expired in the last 15 months, including one on space, have not been renewed. The remaining four agreements have been extended into 1987 and 1988. Two others, including one on oceanography, are scheduled to run out in 1984.

  12. Heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, C.R.

    1988-02-02

    A heat exchanger having primary and secondary conduits in heat-exchanging relationship is described comprising: at least one serpentine tube having parallel sections connected by reverse bends, the serpentine tube constituting one of the conduits; a group of open-ended tubes disposed adjacent to the parallel sections, the open-ended tubes constituting the other of the conduits, and forming a continuous mass of contacting tubes extending between and surrounding the serpentine tube sections; and means securing the mass of tubes together to form a predetermined cross-section of the entirety of the mass of open-ended tubes and tube sections.

  13. [Prions and risks for blood transfusion: the situation in 2003].

    PubMed

    Deslys, J P

    2003-06-01

    In 2003, Prions still constitute a biological enigma and a public health concern. The risks of transmission of the so called "mad cow disease" are now under control but concerns still persist about potential secondary transmissions, notably via blood transfusion. Information obtained from diseases previously observed in animals (scrapie of sheep and goat) and in man (Kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease) demonstrate the complexity of the relations between these transmissible agents and their host. The difficulty in decontamination, the very long silent incubation period during which diagnosis is not possible and the lack of treatment are alarming elements which explain the increased perception of risk for these diseases. The development of rapid screening tests used on bovine at slaughterhouse has represented an important improvement in the development of a targeted protection against these agents. Today, technical evolutions in diagnosis let us imagine the possibility of blood detection for prions: on one hand new garanties for security may arise but on the other hand it points out the potential infectivity of blood with these agents responsible for constant fatal diseases. Precautionary security measures have to ensure an optimal ratio benefit/risk for the patient and thus, in this field, to balance the risk linked to prions with those clearly identified elsewhere. PMID:12798843

  14. Diagnostic features of transfusion associated graft versus host disease.

    PubMed Central

    Appleton, A L; Sviland, L; Pearson, A D; Wilkes, J; Green, M A; Malcolm, A J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To define the immunopathological profile of transfusion associated graft versus host disease (TA-GvHD) to elucidate its pathophysiology and to determine if any features are of diagnostic value. METHODS--Nine patients (age range 14-61 years) who developed histologically confirmed TA-GvHD between 1989 and 1992 were studied. Immunohistochemical analysis of frozen and formalin fixed skin biopsy tissue was performed. Sections were stained with antibodies to CD3, CD8, CD4 and HLA-DR, using a routine streptavidin-biotin technique with standard diaminobenzidine development. RESULTS--All biopsy specimens showed aberrant positive expression of HLA-DR by epidermal keratinocytes. In four patients, all of whom died, HLA-DR was diffusely expressed throughout the epidermis; in the other five cases keratinocyte expression of HLA-DR was more focal. In all biopsy specimens T cells had infiltrated the dermis and epidermis. In all nine cases CD4+ T helper/inducer cells were the predominant T cells. DISCUSSION--Immunohistochemical studies are of value in the diagnosis of TA-GvHD. Aberrant keratinocyte expression of HLA-DR and dermal and epidermal infiltration of CD4+ T cells are immunopathological features of TA-GvHD. Immunohistochemical analysis of skin biopsy tissue using antibodies to these markers is thus a useful investigation in pancytopenic patients presenting with unexplained rashes. Images PMID:8063938

  15. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    SciTech Connect

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  16. Prevention of recurrent spontaneous abortions by leukocyte transfusions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, C G; Faulk, W P; McIntyre, J A

    1985-08-01

    One hundred and thirty-nine couples referred because of recurrent abortions with no obvious cause were assessed for genetic similarity using the HLA major histocompatibility system. Comparison with 103 fertile control couples demonstrated that a much higher proportion of couples in the abortion group shared two or more HLA antigens. Using this criterion, 44 wives out of the 139 couples referred, when compared with a child-bearing group, appeared to share a greater than expected number of histocompatibility antigens and were therefore considered suitable for treatment. Twenty-eight wives have received treatment with white cell infusions from erythrocyte-compatible donors and so far they have delivered 17 babies plus 2 second babies. Another 3 wives are pregnant beyond their previous dates for abortions (1 first and 2 second pregnancies). There have been 5 failures (4 first pregnancy and 1 second pregnancy); one of these was treated a second time and has now successfully delivered. Seven couples are awaiting conception. Of the patients who have become pregnant, 81.5% have had successful deliveries. No adverse transfusion reactions have been observed. PMID:4020795

  17. Drugs and blood transfusions: dogma- or evidence-based practice?

    PubMed

    Murdock, J; Watson, D; Dorée, C J; Blest, A; Roberts, M M; Brunskill, S J

    2009-02-01

    There is a lack of consensus on the safety of the coadministration of drugs and red blood cells (RBCs). A systematic review was undertaken to establish the evidence base for this question and assess how the evidence may be translated into present clinical day practice. Comprehensive searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library and hand searching of transfusion journals, guidelines and websites identified 12 relevant papers: 11 in-vitro experiments and 1 case report. Data on incidences of haemolysis and agglutination following coadministration were extracted and analysed. Overall findings suggest that iron chelators (two papers), antimicrobials (three papers) and lower doses of opioids (three papers) are safe to coadminister with RBCs. Haemolysis was observed with higher doses of opioids (three papers). Transposition of these findings to clinical practice is limited because of the lack of clinical applicability of in-vitro experiments and diversity in how, and what, clinical outcome measures were used. Further evidence from true clinical settings would be required to inform clinical practice on the efficacy and safety of the coadministration of drugs and RBCs. PMID:19302450

  18. Heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Daman, Ernest L.; McCallister, Robert A.

    1979-01-01

    A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

  19. The effects of perioperative blood transfusion on morbidity and mortality after esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Fields, Ryan C; Meyers, Bryan F

    2006-02-01

    The effect of blood transfusion on outcomes in esophageal surgery remains controversial. The contrasting conclusions drawn from a number of retrospective analyses with different methodologies create a landscape that is difficult to interpret. Because of the scope of esophageal resection, the need for blood transfusion cannot be eliminated. What recommendations then, if any, can be made for the practicing surgeon? First, surgeons and anesthesiologists need to reevaluate their transfusion thresholds. The age-old practice of keeping the hemoglobin above 10 g/dL has very little evidence-based support. A multicenter, randomized, controlled clinical trial in Canada demonstrated that a restrictive strategy of blood transfusion, in which patients were transfused only for a hemoglobin level of less than 7 g/dL, was at least as effective as and possibly was superior to a liberal transfusion strategy in critically ill patients. It has also been estimated that more than 25% of patients undergoing colorectal resections may receive at least one unit of unnecessary blood. Further, the immediate reduction in the hemoglobin concentration caused by the normovolemic hemodilution associated with surgery and crystalloid fluid replacement is not associated with any increased morbidity or mortality. If these data are examined in the context of the results of Langley and Tachibana indicating that a threshold amount of blood needs to be transfused to impact outcomes, it becomes even more important to limit transfusion to only the amount that is essential. Thus, surgeons and anesthesiologists should adopt a more stringent set of requirements for blood transfusion. Second, with the proven feasibility and reduction in infectious complications associated with autologous blood-donation programs, any patient who meets the criteria discussed here should be encouraged to participate in such a program. Although the effect of autologous blood on cancer outcomes remains unclear, the other advantages

  20. Allogenic Blood Transfusion Following Total Hip Arthroplasty: Results from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, 2000 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Saleh, Anas; Small, Travis; Chandran Pillai, Aiswarya Lekshmi Pillai; Schiltz, Nicholas K.; Klika, Alison K.; Barsoum, Wael K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The large-scale utilization of allogenic blood transfusion and its associated outcomes have been described in critically ill patients and those undergoing high-risk cardiac surgery but not in patients undergoing elective total hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to determine the trends in utilization and outcomes of allogenic blood transfusion in patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty in the United States from 2000 to 2009. Methods: An observational cohort of 2,087,423 patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty from 2000 to 2009 was identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedure codes 99.03 and 99.04 were used to identify patients who received allogenic blood products during their hospital stay. Risk factors for allogenic transfusions were identified with use of multivariable logistic regression models. We used propensity score matching to estimate the adjusted association between transfusion and surgical outcomes. Results: The rate of allogenic blood transfusion increased from 11.8% in 2000 to 19.0% in 2009. Patient-related risk factors for receiving an allogenic blood transfusion include an older age, female sex, black race, and Medicaid insurance. Hospital-related risk factors include rural location, smaller size, and non-academic status. After adjusting for confounders, allogenic blood transfusion was associated with a longer hospital stay (0.58 ± 0.02 day; p < 0.001), increased costs ($1731 ± $49 [in 2009 U.S. dollars]; p < 0.001), increased rate of discharge to an inpatient facility (odds ratio, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.31), and worse surgical and medical outcomes. In-hospital mortality was not affected by allogenic blood transfusion (odds ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.77 to 1.21). Conclusions: The increase in allogenic blood transfusion among total hip arthroplasty patients is concerning