Science.gov

Sample records for exercise therapy

  1. Exercise therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Palmer, S S; Mortimer, J A; Webster, D D; Bistevins, R; Dickinson, G L

    1986-10-01

    The outcomes of two different 12-week exercise programs were assessed by machine measurements of motor signs, tests of grip strength, motor coordination and speed, and neurophysiologic determinations of long-latency stretch responses in two groups of Parkinson patients matched for age, sex and stage of disease. The programs tested included an exercise program developed by the United Parkinson Foundation and a program of upper body karate training. Outcomes of these programs were similar. The majority of patients in both groups showed improvements in gait, tremor, grip strength and motor coordination on tasks requiring fine control. In one task involving whole body coordination there was a decline in function, while muscle rigidity was unchanged. The findings suggest that exercise is a useful adjunct to pharmacologic therapy. PMID:3767624

  2. Exercise therapy for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Heather R

    2015-05-01

    The benefit of exercise for pain control likely comes from the impact of exercise on the endogenous opioid system and on central pain modulatory systems. Patients with some chronic pain conditions seem to have a dysfunctional endogenous pain modulatory system, which should be considered when prescribing exercise. The prescription of exercise for chronic pain must address the biomechanical issues and the psychosocial factors that contribute to the patient's pain and disability. Patient education, coordination of care within the health care team, and selecting an exercise regimen that is meaningful to and achievable by the patient are all important components to promote a successful rehabilitation program. PMID:25952064

  3. Improved exercise myocardial perfusion during lidoflazine therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, W.; Narahara, K.A.; Park, J.

    1983-11-01

    Lidoflazine is a synthetic drug with calcium-channel blocking effects. In a study of 6 patients with severe classic angina pectoris, single-blind administration of lidoflazine was associated with improved myocardial perfusion during exercise as determined by thallium-201 stress scintigraphy. These studies demonstrate that lidoflazine therapy is associated with relief of angina, an increased physical work capacity, and improved regional myocardial perfusion during exercise.

  4. Chronic Pain and Exercise Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raithel, Kathryn Simmons

    1989-01-01

    Aerobic and resistance exercise are currently prescribed by physicians to treat chronic pain. However, patient fitness level must improve before he/she feels better. Pain management programs help patients become more active so they can function at work and home. (SM)

  5. Exercise in Treating Hypertension: Tailoring Therapies for Active Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chintanadilok, Jirayos

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can be definitive therapy for some, and adjunctive therapy for many, people with hypertension, though people with secondary hypertension may not derive as much benefit. Low-to- moderate-intensity aerobic exercise can help with mild hypertension and reduce drug dosages in more severe cases. For active patients requiring medication,…

  6. Exercise: An Alternative Therapy for Gestational Diabetes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artal, Raul

    1996-01-01

    Exercise is encouraged in the management of pregnant women with gestational diabetes or women with Type II diabetes who become pregnant. Although non-weight-bearing exercises may be best for sedentary women, moderate workouts appear to be safe for most women with gestational diabetes. The role of exercise, risk factors, warning signs, and examples…

  7. Working the Continuum between Therapy and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ruth

    Because of the relative weightlessness factor, water exercise is an excellent low-impact aerobic activity for people with physical difficulties. Participants should inform their physicians of intentions to begin aquatic exercise, and physicians should advise participants that water exercise is exertive. Program instructors must be prepared to…

  8. Physical Exercise as Therapy for Frailty

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Lina E.; Villareal, Dennis T.

    2015-01-01

    Longitudinal studies demonstrate that regular physical exercise extends longevity and reduces the risk of physical disability. Decline in physical activity with aging is associated with a decrease in exercise capacity that predisposes to frailty. Frailty syndrome includes lowered activity level, poor exercise tolerance, and loss of lean body and muscle mass. Poor exercise tolerance is related to aerobic endurance. Aerobic endurance training can significantly improve peak oxygen consumption by ~10–15%. Resistance training is the best way to increase muscle strength and mass. Although the increase in muscle mass in response to resistance training may be attenuated in frail older adults, resistance training can significantly improve muscle strength, particularly in institutionalized patients by ~110%. Because both aerobic and resistance training target specific components of frailty, studies combining aerobic and resistance training provide the most promising evidence with respect to successfully treating frailty. At the molecular level, exercise reduces frailty by decreasing muscle inflammation, increasing anabolism, and increasing muscle protein synthesis. More studies are needed to determine which exercises are best suited, most effective, and safe for this population. Based on the available studies, an individualized multicomponent exercise program that includes aerobic activity, strength exercises, and flexibility is recommended to treat frailty. PMID:26524568

  9. Exercise as an Adjuvant Therapy for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Emmons, Russell; Niemiro, Grace M.; De Lisio, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) using mobilized peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (HSPCs) is the only curative strategy for many patients suffering from hematological malignancies. HSPC collection protocols rely on pharmacological agents to mobilize HSPCs to peripheral blood. Limitations including variable donor responses and long dosing protocols merit further investigations into adjuvant therapies to enhance the efficiency of HSPCs collection. Exercise, a safe and feasible intervention in patients undergoing HSCT, has been previously shown to robustly stimulate HSPC mobilization from the bone marrow. Exercise-induced HSPC mobilization is transient limiting its current clinical potential. Thus, a deeper investigation of the mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization and the factors responsible for removal of HSPCs from circulation following exercise is warranted. The present review will describe current research on exercise and HSPC mobilization, outline the potential mechanisms responsible for exercise-induced HSPC mobilization, and highlight potential sites for HSPC homing following exercise. We also outline current barriers to the implementation of exercise as an adjuvant therapy for HSPC mobilization and suggest potential strategies to overcome these barriers. PMID:27123008

  10. Randomized trial comparing exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot therapy, and low intensity laser therapy for chronic lumbar muscle strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoguang; Li, Jie; Liu, Timon Chengyi; Yuan, Jianqin; Luo, Qingming

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of exercise therapy, alternating cold and hot (ACH) therapy and low intensity laser (LIL) therapy in patients with chronic lumbar muscle strain (CLMS). Thirty-two patients were randomly allocated to four groups: exercise group, ACH group, LIL group, and combination group of exercise, ACH and LIL, eight in each group. Sixteen treatments were given over the course of 4 weeks. Lumbar muscle endurance, flexion and lateral flexion measures, visual analogue scale (VAS) and lumbar disability questionnaire (LDQ) were used in the clinical and functional evaluations before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after treatment. It was found that the values of endurance, VAS and LDQ in all groups were significantly improved from before to after treatment (P < 0.01). The combination group showed significantly larger reduction on pain level and functional disability than the other groups immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.01). Pain level reduced significantly more in the ACH group than in the exercise group or the LIL group immediately and 4 weeks after treatment (P < 0.05). Lumbar muscle endurance and spinal ranges of motion in all groups were improved after treatment but there was no significant difference between any therapy groups. In conclusion, exercise therapy, ACH therapy and LIL therapy were effective in the treatment of CLMS. ACH therapy was more effective than exercise therapy or LIL therapy. The combination therapy of exercise, ACH and LIL had still better rehabilitative effects on CLMS.

  11. Statin therapy, myopathy and exercise--a case report.

    PubMed

    Semple, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    In a bid to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with coronary artery disease, statin therapy has become a cornerstone treatment for patients with dyslipideamia. Statins, or HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, are effective in blocking hepatic synthesis of cholesterol and are generally regarded as safe. Although rare, severe adverse side effects such as rhabdomyolysis have been reported, however, the more common complaint from patients is that related to myopathy. There is also mounting evidence that exercise may exacerbate these side effects, however the mechanisms are yet to be fully defined and there is controversy regarding the role that inflammation may play in the myopathy. This paper reports a patients experience during 6 months of simvastatin therapy and provides some insight into the white cell count (inflammation) following two bouts of moderate intensity exercise before and during statin therapy. It also highlights the need for rehabilitation practitioners to be aware of the adverse effects of statins in exercising patients. PMID:22420409

  12. [Cardiac reserve in Parkinson's disease and exercise therapy].

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Masaaki; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sobue, Gen

    2013-01-01

    The clinical feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) is not based on the identification of the extrapyramidal symptom such as bradykinesia, restinbg tremor, rigidity, but also other non-motor symptom (REM sleep disorder, autonomic dysfunction, hyposmia etc). According to the cardio-sympathetic dysfunction, it is well known abnormal MIBG and orthostatic hypotension finding was seen in early disease stage. Furthermore denervation supersensitivity using β1 stimulant correlates the severity of MIBG image, so that this abnormal cardiac function induces inadequate cardiac capacity for exercise. Inadequate cardiac capacity makes easy fatigability, which correlates the abnormal MIBG image and cardio-sympathetic damage. So it is difficult to prescribe a specific exercise program to meet individual PD patients needs. Music therapy and trunk exercise (for example Tai-Chi exercise) are better suited for PD patients. PMID:24291996

  13. Cervicothoracic Manual Therapy Plus Exercise Therapy Versus Exercise Therapy Alone in the Management of Individuals With Shoulder Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mintken, Paul E; McDevitt, Amy W; Cleland, Joshua A; Boyles, Robert E; Beardslee, Amber R; Burns, Scott A; Haberl, Matthew D; Hinrichs, Lauren A; Michener, Lori A

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Background Cervicothoracic manual therapy has been shown to improve pain and disability in individuals with shoulder pain, but the incremental effects of manual therapy in addition to exercise therapy have not been investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Objectives To compare the effects of cervicothoracic manual therapy and exercise therapy to those of exercise therapy alone in individuals with shoulder pain. Methods Individuals (n = 140) with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to receive 2 sessions of cervicothoracic range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy, or 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy and range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy (manual therapy plus exercise). Pain and disability were assessed at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 6 months. The primary aim (treatment group by time) was examined using linear mixed-model analyses and the repeated measure of time for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), the numeric pain-rating scale, and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH). Patient-perceived success was assessed and analyzed using the global rating of change (GROC) and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS), using chi-square tests of independence. Results There were no significant 2-way interactions of group by time or main effects by group for pain or disability. Both groups improved significantly on the SPADI, numeric pain-rating scale, and QuickDASH. Secondary outcomes of success on the GROC and PASS significantly favored the manual therapy-plus-exercise group at 4 weeks (P = .03 and P<.01, respectively) and on the GROC at 6 months (P = .04). Conclusion Adding 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy to an exercise program did not improve pain or disability in patients with shoulder pain, but did improve patient-perceived success at 4 weeks

  14. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    PubMed

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  15. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  16. Exercise therapy for patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    PubMed

    Al-Herz, Adeeba; Snip, Jan Paul; Clark, Bruce; Esdaile, John M

    2008-02-01

    We evaluated the effect of exercise therapy on back pain, spinal range of motion (ROM), and disability in persons with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). Persons with symptomatic DISH received a daily exercise program for 24 weeks consisting of mobility, stretching, and strengthening exercises for the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. It included 14 supervised sessions over 8 weeks. Outcomes included visual analogue scales (VAS) for pain, stiffness, and fatigue, 13 spinal measurements, the neck pain and disability scale, the Quebec back pain disability scale, the Bath Spondylitis Functional Index, and the MACTAR patient preference scale. Assessments were made at baseline, 8 weeks, and 24 weeks. Fifteen of 17 completed the study. Comparing week 24 with baseline, Schober's test improved significantly (p = 0.02), and VAS stiffness and left finger-to-floor test demonstrated a trend to improvement (p = 0.07 each). The physical measures, which were expected to improve with the exercise program, all moved in the direction expected, but had p values > 0.10. At 24 weeks, eight (53.3%) participants rated their status as improved, three (20%) as unchanged, and four (27%) were unsure about the benefit. The exercise program designed for DISH and tested in this study led to small improvements in physical measures which achieved significance only for lumbosacral flexion. PMID:17885726

  17. [DGRW-update: exercise therapy in medical rehabilitation--effects, quality, perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, K; Sudeck, G; Brüggemann, S; Huber, G

    2010-08-01

    Exercise therapy constitutes the better part of rehabilitative treatment. However, in rehabilitation research the scientific analysis of exercise therapy only plays a minor role. Taking the theoretical model of rehabilitation and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) into account, we propose a heuristic model of aims and effects of exercise therapy and define a system of methodological target setting. This system offers a background for an expanded scientific discussion about biopsychosocial determinants and effects of exercise therapy as well as quality development and the evaluation of exercise treatment concepts within and across indications in the context of multimodal medical rehabilitation. PMID:20677118

  18. [Exercise Therapy for Children with Cancer Related Fatigue].

    PubMed

    Jung, M; Zepf, N; Fuchs, B

    2016-05-01

    Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF) is known as one of the strongest and incriminating side effects of cancer for adults and children. By now there is a lack of valid assessments and sufficient therapy in pediatric oncology. For children it is a tough challenge to accept this overwhelming tiredness and lower activity level in their daily life routines. First positive effects in CFR therapy were found by adults, but this specific scientific field is very young and therefore mostly unexplored. 4 databases for medical and therapeutic journals were systematically searched for RCTs, CCTs and CTs. Systematic reviews were analyzed as well. All studies were carried out in pediatric oncology and deal with exercise therapy. The enclosed studies were valued by PEDro-Scale. Only a handful papers about a potential reduction of CRF in pediatrics could be found, one RCT, 2 CCTs and one CT. No additional results could be found. To summarize the 4 papers, it can be stated that the duration of intervention depends between 2 days and 12 weeks. Also there are differences between the option inpatient and outpatient programs, as well as with or without supervising. The exercise therapy mostly consists of strength and endurance training in combination with warm-up and cool-down programs. This review underlines the importance of developing new assessments. Especially bigger groups of participants should be analyzed with the scope on individualized, supervised program. So far, CRF is underestimated in pediatric oncology and it is very crucial to identify the symptoms. This could lead to an improvement in quality of life. PMID:27096304

  19. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  20. Mechanisms of non-pharmacologic adjunct therapies used during exercise in COPD.

    PubMed

    Moga, A M; de Marchie, M; Saey, D; Spahija, J

    2012-05-01

    Individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often limited in their ability to perform exercise due to a heightened sense of dyspnea and/or the occurrence of leg fatigue associated with a reduced ventilatory capacity and peripheral skeletal muscle dysfunction, respectively. Pulmonary rehabilitation programs have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and health related quality of life. Additional therapeutic approaches such as non-invasive ventilatory support (NIVS), heliox (He-O(2)) and supplemental oxygen have been used as non-pharmacologic adjuncts to exercise to enhance the ability of patients with COPD to exercise at a higher exercise-intensity and thus improve the physiological benefits of exercise. The purpose of the current review is to examine the pathophysiology of exercise limitation in COPD and to explore the physiological mechanisms underlying the effect of the adjunct therapies on exercise in patients with COPD. This review indicates that strategies that aim to unload the respiratory muscles and enhance oxygen saturation during exercise alleviate exercise limiting factors and improve exercise performance in patients with COPD. However, available data shows significant variability in the effectiveness across patients. Further research is needed to identify the most appropriate candidates for these forms of therapies. PMID:22341681

  1. Wii Fit™ exercise therapy for the rehabilitation of ankle sprains: Its effect compared with physical therapy or no functional exercises at all.

    PubMed

    Punt, I M; Ziltener, J-L; Monnin, D; Allet, L

    2016-07-01

    Lateral ankle sprains represent the most common sports-related injuries. The Nintendo Wii Fit™ could be useful in the treatment of ankle sprains. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of exercise training using the Wii Fit™ in ankle sprain patients: (a) with physical therapy; and (b) a control group not receiving any treatment. Ninety lateral ankle sprain patients were randomized to a Wii Fit™, physical therapy, or control group. We assessed the following outcome measures before, and 6 weeks after starting the allocated treatment: Foot and Ankle Ability Measure, pain during rest and walking, delay before return to sport, patient satisfaction, and effectiveness of the allocated treatment. Six weeks after the baseline measures, foot and ankle ability scores had improved in all groups, and pain had decreased during walking (P < 0.050). No between-group differences were detected between Wii Fit™ treatment, and both other groups (P > 0.050). In conclusion, the Wii Fit™ could be used as an exercise therapy to treat ankle sprain patients. However, Wii Fit™ was not more effective than only physical therapy, or no exercise therapy at all. Patients who did not receive treatment showed similar results as people who got any kind of exercise therapy. PMID:26076737

  2. Supervised Phase II Cardiac Exercise Therapy Shortens the Recovery of Exercise Capacity in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hung; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Zu; Chen, Tung-Wei; Huang, Chien-Hui

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of Phase II cardiac exercise therapy (CET) on exercise capacity and changes in coronary risk factors (CRFs) of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). [Subjects] Thirty male subjects with AMI were divided into an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). Another 30 age-matched subjects with patent coronary arteries served as a normal-control group (NCG). [Methods] Subjects in EG (n=20) trained using a stationary bicycle for 30 min at their target heart rate twice a week for 8 weeks. Exercise capacity was defined as the maximal metabolic equivalents (METs) that subjects reached during the symptom-limited maximal exercise test. HR, BP and RPP were recorded. Subjects in EG and CG received exercise tests and screening for CRFs at the beginning of, end of, and 3 months after Phase II CET, while subjects in NCG participated only in the 1st test. [Results] METs of CG did not improve until the 3rd test, while RPP at the 2nd test showed a significant increase. However, EG showed increased METs at the 2nd test without increase of RPP, and increased their high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) during the follow-up period between the 2nd and 3rd tests. [Conclusion] Phase II CET shortens the recovery time of exercise capacity, helps to maintain the gained exercise capacity and increases HDL-C in phase III. PMID:25276046

  3. Supervised Phase II Cardiac Exercise Therapy Shortens the Recovery of Exercise Capacity in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hung; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Wu, Yu-Zu; Chen, Tung-Wei; Huang, Chien-Hui

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of Phase II cardiac exercise therapy (CET) on exercise capacity and changes in coronary risk factors (CRFs) of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). [Subjects] Thirty male subjects with AMI were divided into an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG). Another 30 age-matched subjects with patent coronary arteries served as a normal-control group (NCG). [Methods] Subjects in EG (n=20) trained using a stationary bicycle for 30 min at their target heart rate twice a week for 8 weeks. Exercise capacity was defined as the maximal metabolic equivalents (METs) that subjects reached during the symptom-limited maximal exercise test. HR, BP and RPP were recorded. Subjects in EG and CG received exercise tests and screening for CRFs at the beginning of, end of, and 3 months after Phase II CET, while subjects in NCG participated only in the 1st test. [Results] METs of CG did not improve until the 3rd test, while RPP at the 2nd test showed a significant increase. However, EG showed increased METs at the 2nd test without increase of RPP, and increased their high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) during the follow-up period between the 2nd and 3rd tests. [Conclusion] Phase II CET shortens the recovery time of exercise capacity, helps to maintain the gained exercise capacity and increases HDL-C in phase III. PMID:25276046

  4. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  5. Effect of therapeutic exercise versus manual therapy on athletes with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Haley; Kujat, Christina; Brumitt, Jason

    2011-11-01

    Rehabilitation professionals treat individuals suffering from chronic low back pain (CLBP) using a variety of treatment approaches including manual therapy and the prescription of therapeutic exercises. The use of manual therapy, specifically joint mobilization of the lumbar spine, may significantly decrease a patient's pain and contribute to improvement in his or her functioning. Exercise may also improve pain and functioning, with some patients reporting gains up to 1 year after the last treatment session. PMID:21904004

  6. Effectiveness of a Home Exercise Program in Combination with Ultrasound Therapy for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, İrfan; Eroğlu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:25540479

  7. The effects of electrical stimulation and exercise therapy in patients with limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kılınç, Muhammed; Yıldırım, Sibel A.; Tan, Ersin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate and compare the effects of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation on muscle strength and functional activities in patients with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD). Methods: This controlled clinical trial included 24 subjects who were diagnosed with LGMD by the Neurology Department of the Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey and were referred to the Physical Therapy Department between May 2013 and December 2014. Subjects were enrolled into an electrical stimulation (11 patients) group, or an exercise therapy (13 patients) group. Results: The mean age of patients was 31.62 years in the electrical stimulation group, and 30.14 years in the exercise therapy group. The most important results in this controlled clinical study were that the muscle strength in both groups was significantly decreased and post-treatment evaluation results indicated that muscle strength of the Deltoideus was higher in the electrical stimulation group, and the difference between the groups was maintained in the follow-up period (p<0.05). However, the muscle strength of quadriceps was similar in both groups, according to the post-treatment and follow-up evaluation results (p>0.05). Additionally, the electrical stimulation group presented more obvious overall improvements than the exercise therapy group according to muscle strength, endurance, and timed performance tests. Conclusions: Since no definitive treatments currently exist for patients with LGMD, these results provide important information on the role of exercise therapy and electrical stimulation for clinicians working in rehabilitation. PMID:26166595

  8. Effects of eight weeks of exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal exercise capacity in obese females.

    PubMed

    Ozcelik, O; Dogan, H; Kelestimur, H

    2006-01-01

    A comparative assessment was made of the short-term effects of orlistat therapy and exercise training on body composition and aerobic fitness in obese females. A total of 24 obese patients were enrolled in to the study; 12 received orlistat therapy (DO) and 12 participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training programme (DE). All patients were on hypocaloric diets. Each patient performed three incremental ramp exercise tests (one at Week 0, one at the end of Week 4 and one at the end of Week 8) to exhaustion using an electromagnetically braked cycle ergometer to determine their anaerobic threshold and maximal exercise (Wmax) capacity. Patients in the DE group performed continuous exercise at a work rate that corresponded to the anaerobic threshold. Weight loss and loss of fat mass after 8 weeks were -6.4% (P=0.002) and -13.4% (DE) vs -5.8% (P=0.002) and -6.4% (P=0.008) (DO), respectively. Wmax capacity was 90.8+/-5 W (basal) vs 92.9+/-5 W (Week 4, P=0.1) and 100.4+/-6 W (Week 8, 10.5%, P=0.04) in the DO group, and 96.2+/-6 W (basal) vs 129.1+/-4 W (Week 4, 34.1%, P=0.002) and 137.5+/-5 W(Week 8, 42.9%, P=0.002) in the DE group. Despite similar decreases in body weight in both groups, patients in the DE group achieved a markedly higher level of Wmax, reflecting a better improvement in cardiopulmonary fitness, compared with patients in the DO group. Considering the improvement of aerobic fitness in the short term, an aerobic exercise-training programme should be considered for sedentary obese patients to improve their aerobic fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity. PMID:16198382

  9. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) COPD: Lifestyle Management Exercises Exercises Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... riding a stationary bike. Medication to Help You Exercise People with COPD often use a metered-dose ...

  10. A randomised controlled trial evaluating family mediated exercise (FAME) therapy following stroke

    PubMed Central

    Galvin, Rose; Cusack, Tara; Stokes, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Background Stroke is a leading cause of disability among adults worldwide. Evidence suggests that increased duration of exercise therapy following stroke has a positive impact on functional outcome following stroke. The main objective of this randomised controlled trial is to evaluate the impact of additional family assisted exercise therapy in people with acute stroke. Methods/Design A prospective multi-centre single blind randomised controlled trial will be conducted. Forty patients with acute stroke will be randomised into either an experimental or control group. The experimental group will receive routine therapy and additional lower limb exercise therapy in the form of family assisted exercises. The control group will receive routine therapy with no additional formal input from their family members. Participants will be assessed at baseline, post intervention and followed up at three months using a series of standardised outcome measures. A secondary aim of the project is to evaluate the impact of the family mediated exercise programme on the person with stroke and the individual(s) assisting in the delivery of exercises using a qualitative methodology. The study has gained ethical approval from the Research Ethics Committees of each of the clinical sites involved in the study. Discussion This study will evaluate a structured programme of exercises that can be delivered to people with stroke by their 'family members/friends'. Given that the progressive increase in the population of older people is likely to lead to an increased prevalence of stroke in the future, it is important to reduce the burden of this illness on the individual, the family and society. Family mediated exercises can maximise the carry over outside formal physiotherapy sessions, giving patients the opportunity for informal practice. Trial Registration The protocol for this study is registered with the US NIH Clinical trials registry (NCT00666744) PMID:18570643

  11. Merits of exercise therapy before and after major surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hoogeboom, Thomas J.; Dronkers, Jaap J.; Hulzebos, Erik H.J.; van Meeteren, Nico L.U.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Advances in medical care have led to an increasing elderly population. Elderly individuals should be able to participate in society as long as possible. However, with an increasing age their adaptive capacity gradually decreases, specially before and after major life events (like hospitalization and surgery) making them vulnerable to reduced functioning and societal participation. Therapeutic exercise before and after surgery might augment the postoperative outcomes by improving functional status and reducing the complication and mortality rate. Recent findings There is high quality evidence that preoperative exercise in patients scheduled for cardiovascular surgery is well tolerated and effective. Moreover, there is circumstantial evidence suggesting preoperative exercise for thoracic, abdominal and major joint replacement surgery is effective, provided that this is offered to the high-risk patients. Postoperative exercise should be initiated as soon as possible after surgery according to fast-track or enhanced recovery after surgery principles. Summary The perioperative exercise training protocol known under the name ‘Better in, Better out’ could be implemented in clinical care for the vulnerable group of patients scheduled for major elective surgery who are at risk for prolonged hospitalization, complications and/or death. Future research should aim to include this at-risk group, evaluate perioperative high-intensity exercise interventions and conduct adequately powered trials. PMID:24500337

  12. Exercise therapy after corticosteroid injection for moderate to severe shoulder pain: large pragmatic randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Crawshaw, Dickon P; Helliwell, Philip S; Hensor, Elizabeth M A; Hay, Elaine M; Aldous, Simon J

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the effectiveness of subacromial corticosteroid injection combined with timely exercise and manual therapy (injection plus exercise) or exercise and manual therapy alone (exercise only) in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. Design Pragmatic randomised clinical trial. Setting Primary care based musculoskeletal service. Patients Adults aged 40 or over with subacromial impingement syndrome with moderate or severe shoulder pain. Interventions Injection plus exercise or exercise only. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was the difference in improvement in the total shoulder pain and disability index at 12 weeks. Results 232 participants were randomised (115 to injection plus exercise, 117 to exercise only). The mean age was 56 (range 40-78), 127 were women, and all had had a median of 16 weeks of shoulder pain (interquartile range 12-28). At week 12 there was no significant difference between the groups in change in total pain and disability index (mean difference between change in groups 3.26 (95% confidence interval −0.81 to 7.34), P=0.116). Improvement was significantly greater in the injection plus exercise group at week 1 (6.56, 4.30 to 8.82) and week 6 (7.37, 4.34 to 10.39) for the total pain and disability index (P<0.001), with no differences at week 24 (−2.26, −6.77 to 2.25, P=0.324). Conclusions In the treatment of patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, injection plus exercise and exercise only are similarly effective at 12 weeks. Trial registration ISRCT 25817033; EudraCT No 2005-003628-20. PMID:20584793

  13. Exercise pathophysiology and the role of oxygen therapy in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Troy, Lauren K; Young, Iven H; Lau, Edmund M T; Corte, Tamera J

    2016-08-01

    Exercise limitation is a common feature in idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP). There are multiple contributing pathophysiological mechanisms, including ventilatory mechanical limitation, impaired gas exchange, pulmonary vascular insufficiency and peripheral muscle dysfunction. Progressive exertional dyspnoea and functional incapacity impact significantly on quality of life. Exercise-induced desaturation is frequently observed and is predictive of poorer outcomes. Tests to assess the cardiorespiratory system under stress (e.g. cardiopulmonary exercise testing and the 6-min walk test) can provide important physiologic and prognostic information as adjuncts to resting measurements of lung function. Despite many advances in understanding disease mechanisms, therapies to improve exercise capacity, symptom burden and quality of life are lacking. Exercise training and supplemental oxygen are two potential interventions that require closer evaluation in patients with IIP. PMID:26416262

  14. Effect of Different Types of Exercise in HIV + Mozambican Women Using Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mangona, Lucília; Daca, Timóteo; Tchonga, Francisco; Bule, Odete; Bhatt, Nilesh; Jani, Ilesh; Damasceno, Albertino; Prista, António

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two types of exercises interventions on the regularity and health-related physical fitness in HIV-infected individuals who use antiretroviral therapy (ART). A total of 53 HIV+ African women (mean age=39.5±8.4 years) on ART participated in the study. Subjects were randomly divided into 3 groups, namely, formal exercise (FEG), playful exercise (PEG) and control (CG). During 12 weeks, the exercise groups underwent a program of 1-hour duration with a frequency of 3 times a week. The FEG performed a protocol that included 20 minutes of exercise, cycling at 60 % of V̇O2peak, increasing to 75 % and 85 % in the 4th and 8th weeks, respectively, and a muscular endurance circuit consisted of 6 exercises at 15 repetitions per minute (RM). The PEG followed a program consisting of active games. Before and after the intervention the participants were submitted to a clinical evaluation including immunological parameters (CD4+), cardiovascular risk factors, physical fitness and anthropometry. Comparison of somatic variables before and after the program showed no exercise effect. Immunological and cardiovascular variables were also independent of the exercise group. The main effect was found in cardiorespiratory fitness: exercise groups increased significantly in V̇O2peak (FEG=14.7 %; PEG=11.1 %) with no significant differences in CG. The percentage of high attendance was identical between the two groups. It was concluded that there is no contraindication for exercise in this type of population and the beneficial effect was mainly in cardiorespiratory fitness, regardless of the type of exercise performed. PMID:26587077

  15. Role of manual therapy with exercise regime versus exercise regime alone in the management of non-specific chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Akhter, Saeed; Khan, Muhammad; Ali, Syed Shahzad; Soomro, Rabial Rani

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the role of manual therapy with exercise regime versus exercise regime alone in the management of non-specific chronic neck pain. In this 62 subjects randomized controlled trial 31 subjects in group A received manual therapy (manipulation) with supervised exercise regime whilst 31 subjects in group B performed only supervised exercise regime for the period of 3 weeks. Both groups had a home exercise program consisted of strengthening exercises for neck/scapuluar stability, stretching and general range of motion exercises for neck with advice regarding posture awareness and correction for 3 months. The results suggested significant reduction in pain intensity level in both groups; over 3 weeks and 12 weeks' time period in relation to baseline on visual analog scale (p=0.001). Similarly, statistically significant improvements noticed in Neck Disability Index (NDI) (p=0.0001) in both groups while looking at baseline data with reference to 12 weeks' time period. On closer inspection, the manual therapy (manipulation) with exercise regime appeared as a favorable treatment preference compared with exercise regime alone. PMID:25410083

  16. Enhancing the Efficacy of Behavior Therapy for Obesity: Effects of Aerobic Exercise and a Multicomponent Maintenance Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perri, Michael G.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Moderately obese volunteers were randomly assigned to two treatment conditions (behavior therapy or behavior therapy plus aerobic exercise) and two posttreatment conditions (no further contact or a multicomponent maintenance program). Clients in the aerobic exercise condition lost significantly more weight than those who received behavior therapy…

  17. Exercise as Gene Therapy: BDNF and DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is a common feature of neurodegenerative illnesses, and the ability to repair DNA strand breaks and lesions is crucial for neuronal survival, reported by Jeppesen et al (Prog Neurobiol. 2011;94:166-200) and Shiwaku et al (Curr Mol Med. 2015;15:119-128). Interventions aimed at repairing these lesions, therefore, could be useful for preventing or delaying the progression of disease. One potential strategy for promoting DNA damage repair (DDR) is exercise. Although the role of exercise in DDR is not understood, there is increasing evidence that simple physical activity may impact clinical outcomes for neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and how these mechanisms might influence the DDR process. PMID:27488073

  18. Exercise therapy normalizes BDNF upregulation and glial hyperactivity in a mouse model of neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cayo; DeMaman, Aline; Kusuda, Ricardo; Cadetti, Flaviane; Ravanelli, Maria Ida; Queiroz, André L; Sousa, Thais A; Zanon, Sonia; Silveira, Leonardo R; Lucas, Guilherme

    2015-03-01

    Treatment of neuropathic pain is a clinical challenge likely because of the time-dependent changes in many neurotransmitter systems, growth factors, ionic channels, membrane receptors, transcription factors, and recruitment of different cell types. Conversely, an increasing number of reports have shown the ability of extended and regular physical exercise in alleviating neuropathic pain throughout a wide range of mechanisms. In this study, we investigate the effect of swim exercise on molecules associated with initiation and maintenance of nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain. BALB/c mice were submitted to partial ligation of the sciatic nerve followed by a 5-week aerobic exercise program. Physical training reversed mechanical hypersensitivity, which lasted for an additional 4 weeks after exercise interruption. Swim exercise normalized nerve injury-induced nerve growth factor, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhanced expression in the dorsal root ganglion, but had no effect on the glial-derived neurotrophic factor. However, only BDNF remained at low levels after exercise interruption. In addition, exercise training significantly reduced the phosphorylation status of PLCγ-1, but not CREB, in the spinal cord dorsal horn in response to nerve injury. Finally, prolonged swim exercise reversed astrocyte and microglia hyperactivity in the dorsal horn after nerve lesion, which remained normalized after training cessation. Together, these results demonstrate that exercise therapy induces long-lasting analgesia through various mechanisms associated with the onset and advanced stages of neuropathy. Moreover, the data support further studies to clarify whether appropriate exercise intensity, volume, and duration can also cause long-lasting pain relief in patients with neuropathic pain. PMID:25687543

  19. Cognitive behavioral therapy and exercise minimally help Gulf War veterans' illnesses.

    PubMed

    Luttermoser, Gary

    2003-06-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy and aerobic exercise provide only modest relief from symptoms of Gulf War veterans' illnesses. Unfortunately, over 80% of the patients showed no improvement of symptoms after 1 year of either or both treatments. With the Iraqi war ending, the outcomes of veterans of this previous conflict may prove significant. PMID:12791222

  20. Bootstrapping Results of Exercise Therapy and Education for Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witta, E. Lea; Brubaker, Craig

    2003-01-01

    When studies are conducted over a period of time, the sample size typically decreases. In a study of the effects of exercise therapy and education with recovering congestive heart failure (CHF) patients (Brubaker, Witta, & Angelopoulus, 2003), the sample size decreased from over 40 to 9 participants after an 18-month time span. Although the…

  1. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  2. [Exercise therapy in the treatment of idiopathic adolescent scoliosis: Is it useful?].

    PubMed

    Porte, M; Patte, K; Dupeyron, A; Cottalorda, J

    2016-06-01

    Many practitioners, pediatricians, and general practitioners prescribe physical therapy when tracking scoliosis. However, has physical therapy alone proved its efficacy in the care of the scoliosis to slow down progression? Our purpose is to report the results of a literature review on the effectiveness of rehabilitation in idiopathic scoliosis. No current study presents sufficient scientific proof to validate the efficacy of isolated exercise therapy in scoliosis. Learned societies recognize, however, the efficacy of combining conservative therapy (brace+physiotherapy) in idiopathic scoliosis. Should we then still prescribe rehabilitation without brace treatment? Although physical therapy alone does not seem effective in treating scoliosis, it can limit potential painful phenomena and be beneficial for respiratory function. The physical therapist can also teach the teenager the classic principles of hygiene of the back. It may therefore be appropriate to prescribe physical therapy, but the principles and objectives must be explained to the patient and family in light of current evidence-based medicine. PMID:27117993

  3. Patients' mental models and adherence to outpatient physical therapy home exercise programs.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, Jon

    2015-05-01

    Within physical therapy, patient adherence usually relates to attending appointments, following advice, and/or undertaking prescribed exercise. Similar to findings for general medical adherence, patient adherence to physical therapy home exercise programs (HEP) is estimated between 35 and 72%. Adherence to HEPs is a multifactorial and poorly understood phenomenon, with no consensus regarding a common theoretical framework that best guides empirical or clinical efforts. Mental models, a construct used to explain behavior and decision-making in the social sciences, may serve as this framework. Mental models comprise an individual's tacit thoughts about how the world works. They include assumptions about new experiences and expectations for the future based on implicit comparisons between current and past experiences. Mental models play an important role in decision-making and guiding actions. This professional theoretical article discusses empirical research demonstrating relationships among mental models, prior experience, and adherence decisions in medical and physical therapy contexts. Specific issues related to mental models and physical therapy patient adherence are discussed, including the importance of articulation of patients' mental models, assessment of patients' mental models that relate to exercise program adherence, discrepancy between patient and provider mental models, and revision of patients' mental models in ways that enhance adherence. The article concludes with practical implications for physical therapists and recommendations for further research to better understand the role of mental models in physical therapy patient adherence behavior. PMID:25585516

  4. Exerciser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lem, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    The Mark I exerciser which was added for the second and third Skylab missions, was used for a number of arm and leg exercises. This unit is a modified version of a commercial device. This is an iso-kinetic, or constant velocity, exerciser which retards the speed at which the user is allowed to move. The user applies a maximum effort and the device automatically varies the opposing resistance to maintain speed of translation at a constant preselected value.

  5. [Repetitive facilitative exercise: recent evidence and development for combination therapy].

    PubMed

    Shimodozono, Megumi

    2013-01-01

    Repetitive facilitative exercise (RFE), a combination of high-dose (high frequency) of repetitions and neurofacilitation, is a recently developed approach to the rehabilitation of stroke-related limb impairment. We conducted a randomized controlled evaluation of RFE compared with a duration-matched conventional rehabilitation program in the treatment of subacute stroke-related upper extremity impairment (Shimodozono et al. 2013). RFE demonstrated both statistically and clinically significant benefits over conventional rehabilitation both on the Action Research Arm Test, which is designed to measure dexterity and function, and on the Fugl-Meyer Arm scores, which was chosen as measure of motor control. In the case-series study, the beneficial effect of RFE is also reported in the treatment of chronic phase of stroke. More research is needed, but RFE could conceivably be integrated with other approaches such as vibration, neuromuscular electrical stimulation, repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, botulinum toxin, and robotics to achieve further improvement in its capabilities. PMID:24291952

  6. Hormone therapy and maximal eccentric exercise alters myostatin-related gene expression in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Dieli-Conwright, Christina M; Spektor, Tanya M; Rice, Judd C; Sattler, Fred R; Schroeder, E Todd

    2012-05-01

    We sought to evaluate baseline mRNA values and changes in gene expression of myostatin-related factors in postmenopausal women taking hormone therapy (HT) and not taking HT after eccentric exercise. Fourteen postmenopausal women participated including 6 controls not using HT (59 ± 4 years, 63 ± 17 kg) and 8 women using HT (59 ± 4 years, 89 ± 24 kg). The participants performed 10 sets of 10 maximal eccentric repetitions of single-leg extension on a dynamometer. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained from the exercised leg at baseline and 4 hours after the exercise bout. Gene expression was determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for myostatin, activin receptor IIb (ActRIIb), follistatin, follistatin-related gene (FLRG), follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3), and GDF serum-associated protein-1 (GASP-1). In response to the exercise bout, myostatin and ActRIIb significantly decreased (p < 0.05), and follistatin, FLRG, FSTL3, and GASP-1 significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). Significantly greater changes in gene expression of all genes occurred in the HT group than in the control group after the acute eccentric exercise bout (p < 0.05). These data suggest that postmenopausal women using HT express greater myostatin-related gene expression, which may reflect a mechanism by which estrogen influences the preservation of muscle mass. Further, postmenopausal women using HT experienced a profoundly greater myostatin-related response to maximal eccentric exercise. PMID:22395277

  7. Stem cell therapy: an exercise in patience and prudence

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huan-Ting; Otsu, Makoto; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    In recent times, the epigenetic study of pluripotency based on cellular reprogramming techniques led to the creation of induced pluripotent stem cells. It has come to represent the forefront of a new wave of alternative therapeutic approaches in the field of stem cell therapy. Progress in drug development has saved countless lives, but there are numerous intractable diseases where curative treatment cannot be achieved through pharmacological intervention alone. Consequently, there has been an unfortunate rise in incidences of organ failures, degenerative disorders and cancers, hence novel therapeutic interventions are required. Stem cells have unique self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capabilities that could be harnessed for therapeutic purposes. Although a number of mature differentiated cells have been characterized in vitro, few have been demonstrated to function in a physiologically relevant context. Despite fervent levels of enthusiasm in the field, the reality is that other than the employment of haematopoietic stem cells, many other therapies have yet to be thoroughly proven for their therapeutic benefit and safety in application. This review shall focus on a discussion regarding the current status of stem cell therapy, the issues surrounding it and its future prospects with a general background on the regulatory networks underlying pluripotency. PMID:23166396

  8. Feasibility and Initial Effectiveness of Home Exercise During Maintenance Therapy for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Esbenshade, Adam J.; Friedman, Debra L.; Smith, Webb A.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at increased risk of obesity and deconditioning from cancer therapy. This pilot study assessed feasibility/initial efficacy of an exercise intervention for ALL patients undergoing maintenance therapy. Methods Participants were children with ALL, age 5-10 years, receiving maintenance therapy, in first remission. A 6-month home-based intervention, with written and video instruction, was supervised with weekly calls from an exercise coach. Pre- and post-study testing evaluated strength, flexibility, fitness and motor function. Results Seventeen patients enrolled (participation 63%). Twelve (71%) finished the intervention, completing 81.7±7.2% of prescribed sessions. Improvements ≥5% occurred in 67% for knee and 75% for grip strength, 58% for hamstring/low-back and 83% for ankle flexibility, 75% for the 6-minute-walk-test, and 33% for performance on the Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency Version 2. Conclusions This pilot study demonstrated that exercise intervention during ALL therapy is feasible and has promise for efficacy. PMID:24979081

  9. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Therapies for Skeletal Myopathy in Heart Failure: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    Bacurau, Aline V.; Cunha, Telma F.; Souza, Rodrigo W.; Voltarelli, Vanessa A.; Gabriel-Costa, Daniele; Brum, Patricia C.

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal myopathy has been identified as a major comorbidity of heart failure (HF) affecting up to 20% of ambulatory patients leading to shortness of breath, early fatigue, and exercise intolerance. Neurohumoral blockade, through the inhibition of renin angiotensin aldosterone system (RAS) and β-adrenergic receptor blockade (β-blockers), is a mandatory pharmacological therapy of HF since it reduces symptoms, mortality, and sudden death. However, the effect of these drugs on skeletal myopathy needs to be clarified, since exercise intolerance remains in HF patients optimized with β-blockers and inhibitors of RAS. Aerobic exercise training (AET) is efficient in counteracting skeletal myopathy and in improving functional capacity and quality of life. Indeed, AET has beneficial effects on failing heart itself despite being of less magnitude compared with neurohumoral blockade. In this way, AET should be implemented in the care standards, together with pharmacological therapies. Since both neurohumoral inhibition and AET have a direct and/or indirect impact on skeletal muscle, this review aims to provide an overview of the isolated effects of these therapeutic approaches in counteracting skeletal myopathy in HF. The similarities and dissimilarities of neurohumoral inhibition and AET therapies are also discussed to identify potential advantageous effects of these combined therapies for treating HF. PMID:26904163

  10. LED therapy or cryotherapy between exercise intervals in Wistar rats: anti-inflammatory and ergogenic effects.

    PubMed

    da Costa Santos, Vanessa Batista; de Paula Ramos, Solange; Milanez, Vinícius Flávio; Corrêa, Julio Cesar Molina; de Andrade Alves, Rubens Igor; Dias, Ivan Frederico Lupiano; Nakamura, Fábio Yuzo

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to test, between two bouts of exercise, the effects of light-emitting diode (LED) therapy and cryotherapy regarding muscle damage, inflammation, and performance. Male Wistar rats were allocated in four groups: control, passive recovery (PR), cryotherapy (Cryo), and LED therapy. The animals were submitted to 45 min of swimming exercise followed by 25 min of recovery and then a second bout of either 45 min of exercise (muscle damage analysis) or time to exhaustion (performance). During the rest intervals, the rats were kept in passive rest (PR), submitted to cold water immersion (10 min, 10 °C) or LED therapy (940 nm, 4 J/cm(2)) of the gastrocnemius muscle. Blood samples were collected to analyze creatine kinase activity (CK), C-reactive protein (CRP), and leukocyte counts. The soleus muscles were evaluated histologically. Time to exhaustion was recorded during the second bout of exercise. After a second bout of 45 min, the results demonstrated leukocytosis in the PR and Cryo groups. Neutrophil counts were increased in all test groups. CK levels were increased in the Cryo group. CRP was increased in PR animals. The PR group presented a high frequency of necrosis, but the LED group had fewer necrotic areas. Edema formation was prevented, and fewer areas of inflammatory cells were observed in the LED group. The time to exhaustion was greater in both the LED and Cryo groups, without differences in CK levels. CRP was decreased in LED animals. We conclude that LED therapy and cryotherapy can improve performance, although LED therapy is more efficient in preventing muscle damage and local and systemic inflammation. PMID:23780711

  11. Effect of aerobic exercise and raloxifene combination therapy on senile osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chengjin; Hou, Haibing; Chen, Yutao; Lv, Kai

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the effects of combined application of raloxifene and aerobic exercise on senile osteoporosis. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 70 elderly patients with osteoporosis, who treated at our hospital between April 2013 and August 2014, were divided into equal-sized observation and control groups. The control group was administered raloxifene, whereas the observation group received raloxifene treatment plus aerobic exercise. [Results] Outpatient outcomes were considered dependent variables. After treatment, the two groups differed significantly in terms of lumbar spine (L2–L4) and proximal femoral bone mineral density. The urine pyridine/creatinine ratio decreased significantly and serum calcitonin level increased significantly in the observation group. These differences were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Raloxifene combined with aerobic exercise therapy significantly improves bone density and promotes bone formation in patients with senile osteoporosis. PMID:27390417

  12. Effect of aerobic exercise and raloxifene combination therapy on senile osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Hou, Haibing; Chen, Yutao; Lv, Kai

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study assessed the effects of combined application of raloxifene and aerobic exercise on senile osteoporosis. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 70 elderly patients with osteoporosis, who treated at our hospital between April 2013 and August 2014, were divided into equal-sized observation and control groups. The control group was administered raloxifene, whereas the observation group received raloxifene treatment plus aerobic exercise. [Results] Outpatient outcomes were considered dependent variables. After treatment, the two groups differed significantly in terms of lumbar spine (L2-L4) and proximal femoral bone mineral density. The urine pyridine/creatinine ratio decreased significantly and serum calcitonin level increased significantly in the observation group. These differences were statistically significant. [Conclusion] Raloxifene combined with aerobic exercise therapy significantly improves bone density and promotes bone formation in patients with senile osteoporosis. PMID:27390417

  13. Effectiveness of Manual Therapy and Therapeutic Exercise for Temporomandibular Disorders: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pitance, Laurent; Singh, Vandana; Neto, Francisco; Thie, Norman; Michelotti, Ambra

    2016-01-01

    Background Manual therapy (MT) and exercise have been extensively used to treat people with musculoskeletal conditions such as temporomandibular disorders (TMD). The evidence regarding their effectiveness provided by early systematic reviews is outdated. Purpose The aim of this study was to summarize evidence from and evaluate the methodological quality of randomized controlled trials that examined the effectiveness of MT and therapeutic exercise interventions compared with other active interventions or standard care for treatment of TMD. Data Sources Electronic data searches of 6 databases were performed, in addition to a manual search. Study Selection Randomized controlled trials involving adults with TMD that compared any type of MT intervention (eg, mobilization, manipulation) or exercise therapy with a placebo intervention, controlled comparison intervention, or standard care were included. The main outcomes of this systematic review were pain, range of motion, and oral function. Forty-eight studies met the inclusion criteria and were analyzed. Data Extraction Data were extracted in duplicate on specific study characteristics. Data Synthesis The overall evidence for this systematic review was considered low. The trials included in this review had unclear or high risk of bias. Thus, the evidence was generally downgraded based on assessments of risk of bias. Most of the effect sizes were low to moderate, with no clear indication of superiority of exercises versus other conservative treatments for TMD. However, MT alone or in combination with exercises at the jaw or cervical level showed promising effects. Limitations Quality of the evidence and heterogeneity of the studies were limitations of the study. Conclusions No high-quality evidence was found, indicating that there is great uncertainty about the effectiveness of exercise and MT for treatment of TMD. PMID:26294683

  14. Integrating diet and exercise into care of prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Moyad, Mark A; Newton, Robert U; Tunn, Ulf W; Gruca, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment regimens have resulted in greater longevity for men with prostate cancer. This has led to an increase in both androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use and duration of exposure, and therefore to its associated adverse effects, such as sexual dysfunction, osteoporosis, reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the adverse effects of ADT are systemic, often debilitating, and difficult to treat, efforts continue in the development of new strategies for long-term management of prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to select trials, reviews, and meta-analyses in English using such search terms as "prostate cancer" and "androgen deprivation therapy", "cardiovascular risk", "lean body mass", "exercise", and "diet". The initial searches produced 379 articles with dates 2005 or more recent. Articles published after 2004 were favored. This review utilizes the latest data to provide a status update on the effects of exercise and diet on patients with prostate cancer, focusing on ADT-associated side effects, and it discusses the evidence for such interventions. Since the evidence of large-scale trials in patients with prostate cancer is missing, and an extrapolation of supporting data to all patient subgroups cannot be provided, individualized risk assessments remain necessary before the initiation of exercise and diet programs. Exercise, diet, and nutritional supplementation interventions have the potential to provide effective, accessible, and relatively inexpensive strategies for mitigating ADT-associated toxicities without introducing additional adverse effects. PMID:27574584

  15. Effect of Educational Program Based On Exercise Therapy on Burned Hand Function

    PubMed Central

    Mohaddes Ardebili, Fatemeh; Manzari, Zahra Sadat; Bozorgnejad, Mehri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hands burn was associated with significant functional disorders that severely affected patient’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of educational program based on exercise therapy on burned hand function. METHODS This experimental research was conducted in a period of ten months in 2010-2011 in Mottahari Hospital in Tehran in Iran. The sample included 60 patients, who were randomly assigned into experimental and control groups, half in intervention and half in control group. Educational program was implemented on experimental group. The data collection tools were two observational checklists about determining of hand function. RESULTS Both groups were matched in characteristic of demographic and burn injury. Subjects in experimental group demonstrated significant improvements in range of motion and hand function balance from admission to discharge. CONCLUSION In order to reduce the hand functional impairment caused by burns, it is recommended that special attention be paid to patient education about exercise therapy. PMID:25489523

  16. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Holmberg, Christine; Farahani, Zubin; Witt, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n = 20) consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59). Patients' experiences differed according to the therapies' philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy. PMID:27418938

  17. How Do Patients with Chronic Neck Pain Experience the Effects of Qigong and Exercise Therapy? A Qualitative Interview Study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Christine; Farahani, Zubin; Witt, Claudia M

    2016-01-01

    Background. The high prevalence of chronic neck pain in high income countries impacts quality of life and the social and work-related activities of those afflicted. We aimed to understand how mind-body therapies and exercise therapy may influence the experience of pain among patients with chronic neck pain. Methods. This qualitative interview study investigated how patients with chronic neck pain experienced the effects of exercise or qigong therapy at two time points: during an intervention at three months and after the intervention at six months. Interviews were analysed thematically across interviews and within person-cases. Based on other qualitative studies, a sample size of 20 participants was deemed appropriate. Results. The sample (n = 20) consisted of 16 women and four men (age range: 29 to 59). Patients' experiences differed according to the therapies' philosophies. Exercise therapy group interviewees described a focus on correct posture and muscle tension release. Qigong group interviewees discussed calming and relaxing effects. Maintaining regular exercise was easier to achieve with exercise therapy. Conclusions. The findings of this study may help health care providers when counselling chronic pain patients on self-help interventions by informing them of different bodily and emotional experiences of mind-body interventions compared to exercise therapy. PMID:27418938

  18. A pilot study of an exercise & cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for epithelial ovarian cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian cancer has the highest mortality rate of all gynaecologic cancers. Faced with poor prognoses, stressful treatment effects and a high likelihood of recurrence, survivors must confront significant physical and psychological morbidities that negatively impact health-related quality of life. Frequently reported side effects include cancer-related fatigue, peripheral neuropathy, and psychological distress. Exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy interventions have counteracted such adverse effects in other cancer populations. Objective To investigate the feasibility and benefits of a 24-week home-based exercise intervention, coordinated with 12 weeks of cognitive behavioral therapy (two sessions per month), developed for two types of patients diagnosed with epithelial ovarian cancer: 1) those undergoing primary treatment with adjuvant chemotherapy after primary surgery; 2) those on surveillance after completing treatment within the last 2 years. Methods Participants were recruited from the Gynaecologic Oncology Clinic. Eligible participants completed baseline assessments and were provided with home-based exercise equipment. Cognitive behavioral therapy was provided every other week for patients via telephone. Assessments were completed at baseline (T1), 3 months (T2) and 6 months (T3). Results 19 of the 46 eligible patients approached were enrolled, with 7 patients in the treatment group and 12 in the surveillance group. There was a significant within group increase in peak VO2 from baseline to 6 months: F(2,16) = 5.531, p = 0.015, partial η2 = 0.409. Conclusion The combined 6-month exercise-cognitive behavioral therapy intervention was associated with significant increases in aerobic fitness in epithelial ovarian cancer patients assessed. These improvements were similar regardless of whether the patient was receiving chemotherapy or under surveillance. PMID:23557323

  19. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis in a cardiopathic patient on chronic aspirin therapy.

    PubMed

    Micucci, C; Amico, D; Braconi, M; Pareo, C; Cimarelli, M E; Subiaco, S

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 73 year old man on chronic aspirin therapy who went in anaphylactic shock during his daily farm chores following a meal rich in wheat products. The serum specific IgE assay (ImmunoCAP) showed strong positive specific IgE responses to ω-5 gliadin. A two-year period avoiding wheat meals 3 hours prior to exercise, resulted in a lack of further anaphylaxis; this results aided us in making the diagnosis. PMID:24739129

  20. Automated evaluation of physical therapy exercises using multi-template dynamic time warping on wearable sensor signals.

    PubMed

    Yurtman, Aras; Barshan, Billur

    2014-11-01

    We develop an autonomous system to detect and evaluate physical therapy exercises using wearable motion sensors. We propose the multi-template multi-match dynamic time warping (MTMM-DTW) algorithm as a natural extension of DTW to detect multiple occurrences of more than one exercise type in the recording of a physical therapy session. While allowing some distortion (warping) in time, the algorithm provides a quantitative measure of similarity between an exercise execution and previously recorded templates, based on DTW distance. It can detect and classify the exercise types, and count and evaluate the exercises as correctly/incorrectly performed, identifying the error type, if any. To evaluate the algorithm's performance, we record a data set consisting of one reference template and 10 test executions of three execution types of eight exercises performed by five subjects. We thus record a total of 120 and 1200 exercise executions in the reference and test sets, respectively. The test sequences also contain idle time intervals. The accuracy of the proposed algorithm is 93.46% for exercise classification only and 88.65% for simultaneous exercise and execution type classification. The algorithm misses 8.58% of the exercise executions and demonstrates a false alarm rate of 4.91%, caused by some idle time intervals being incorrectly recognized as exercise executions. To test the robustness of the system to unknown exercises, we employ leave-one-exercise-out cross validation. This results in a false alarm rate lower than 1%, demonstrating the robustness of the system to unknown movements. The proposed system can be used for assessing the effectiveness of a physical therapy session and for providing feedback to the patient. PMID:25168775

  1. Exercise-Induced Release of Pharmacologically Active Substances and Their Relevance for Therapy of Hepatic Injury

    PubMed Central

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) features constant parenchymal injury and repair together with an increasing hepatic impairment, finally leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis and a heightened risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Closely related to the rise in obesity, the worldwide prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of CLD, has reached an epidemic dimension and is estimated to afflict up to 46% of the general population, including more than one out of three U.S. citizens. Up to now there is no effective drug treatment available, which is why recommendations encompass both exercise programs and changes in dietary habits. Exercise is well-known for unleashing potent anti-inflammatory effects, which can principally counteract liver inflammation and chronic low-grade inflammation. This review article summarizes the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory effects, illustrates the application in animal models as well as in humans, and highlights the therapeutic value when possible. Based on the available results there is no doubt that exercise can even be beneficial in an advanced stage of liver disease and it is the goal of this review article to provide evidence for the therapeutic impact on fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC and to assess whether exercise might be of value as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CLD. In principle, all exercise programs carried out in these high-risk patients should be guided and observed by qualified healthcare professionals to guarantee the patients’ safety. Nevertheless, it is also necessary to additionally determine the optimal amount and intensity of exercise to maximize its value, which is why further studies are essential. PMID:27625607

  2. Exercise-Induced Release of Pharmacologically Active Substances and Their Relevance for Therapy of Hepatic Injury.

    PubMed

    Schon, Hans-Theo; Weiskirchen, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Chronic liver disease (CLD) features constant parenchymal injury and repair together with an increasing hepatic impairment, finally leading to fibrosis and cirrhosis and a heightened risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Closely related to the rise in obesity, the worldwide prevalence of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the most common form of CLD, has reached an epidemic dimension and is estimated to afflict up to 46% of the general population, including more than one out of three U.S. citizens. Up to now there is no effective drug treatment available, which is why recommendations encompass both exercise programs and changes in dietary habits. Exercise is well-known for unleashing potent anti-inflammatory effects, which can principally counteract liver inflammation and chronic low-grade inflammation. This review article summarizes the underlying mechanisms responsible for the exercise-mediated anti-inflammatory effects, illustrates the application in animal models as well as in humans, and highlights the therapeutic value when possible. Based on the available results there is no doubt that exercise can even be beneficial in an advanced stage of liver disease and it is the goal of this review article to provide evidence for the therapeutic impact on fibrosis, cirrhosis, and HCC and to assess whether exercise might be of value as adjuvant therapy in the treatment of CLD. In principle, all exercise programs carried out in these high-risk patients should be guided and observed by qualified healthcare professionals to guarantee the patients' safety. Nevertheless, it is also necessary to additionally determine the optimal amount and intensity of exercise to maximize its value, which is why further studies are essential. PMID:27625607

  3. Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... article Exercise / physical activity with MS Judy Boone, physical therapist Lynn Williams, Dan Melfi and Dave Altman discuss ... adjusted as changes occur in MS symptoms. A physical therapist experienced with MS can be helpful in designing, ...

  4. Exercise Therapy for Total Tear of Rotator Cuff: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nejati, Parisa; Akbari, Faramarz

    2013-01-01

    Background Shoulder pain is one of the most common problems in ages older than 60 years of age. Rotator cuff pathology is the most common etiology of shoulder pain. Most of rotator cuff pathologies are treated conservatively in old ages and exercise therapy is not an accepted intervention for management of rotator cuff tear yet. Case presentation The case was a man of 53 years age with shoulder pain who had total tear of supraspinatus tendon and biceps tendinitis in the right shoulder. He had regularly gone swimming, mountain climbing and running in the last 10 years. The case was managed by exercise therapy for 3 months and physical modalities for 20 sessions. Shoulder pain and his function and right shoulder range of motion increased after 3 months. Para clinical findings did not change after treatment, though. The improvements continued 15 months after the beginning of the treatment. Conclusion Exercise therapy was very effective for improving pain and function in total tear of supraspinatus tendon and tendinitis of biceps. PMID:24868434

  5. Aerobic Exercise as an Adjunct Therapy for Improving Cognitive Function in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gary, Rebecca A.; Brunn, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Persons with heart failure (HF) are typically older and are at a much higher risk for developing cognitive impairment (CI) than persons without HF. Increasingly, CI is recognized as a significant, independent predictor of worse clinical outcomes, more frequent hospital readmissions, and higher mortality rates in persons with HF. CI can have devastating effects on ability to carry out HF effective self-care behaviors. If CI occurs, however, there are currently no evidence based guidelines on how to manage or improve cognitive function in this population. Improvement in cognition has been reported following some therapies in HF and is thought to be the consequence of enhanced cerebral perfusion and oxygenation, suggesting that CI may be amenable to intervention. Because there is substantial neuronal loss with dementia and no effective restorative therapies, interventions that slow, reverse, or prevent cognitive decline are essential. Aerobic exercise is documented to increase cerebral perfusion and oxygenation by promoting neuroplasticity and neurogenesis and, in turn, cognitive functioning. Few studies have examined exercise as a potential adjunct therapy for attenuating or alleviating cognitive decline in HF. In this review, the potential benefit of aerobic exercise on cognitive functioning in HF is presented along with future research directions. PMID:25105053

  6. A manual therapy and exercise approach to meralgia paresthetica in pregnancy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Skaggs, Clayton D.; Winchester, Brett A.; Vianin, Michael; Prather, Heidi

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Objective To present a case of a pregnant patient with meralgia paresthetica who improved using manual therapy and exercise procedures. Clinical Features A 22-year-old patient in the sixteenth week of pregnancy had low back pain, bilateral anterolateral thigh paresthesia and groin pain for a duration of 1 month. She had no motor deficits in either lower extremity and her reflexes were intact. As a standard clinic procedure, a battery of functional tests were performed including: active straight leg raise, long dorsal ligament test, and the pelvic pain provocation procedure. Based on her clinical history and physical responses to the aforementioned functional tests, the diagnosis of meralgia paresthetica was deduced. Intervention and Outcome Treatment was provided at 6 visits over a 6-week period where the patient underwent evaluation, manual intervention, and exercise prescription. Active Release Technique (ART) was performed to the restricted right sacroiliac (SIJ) complex and quadratus lumborum muscles. ART and post-isometric relaxation were applied to the illiopsoas muscles. The home exercise program consisted of pelvic/low back mobility, stabilization and relaxation exercises. After 6 treatments, the patient reported complete resolution of low back pain and left lower extremity symptoms and a 90% improvement in the right thigh symptoms. At her one-year follow-up, the patient reported no further complications and the absence of pain. Conclusions Manual therapy and exercises may serve as an effective treatment protocol for pregnant patients experiencing low back pain complicated by paresthesia. Because these conservative procedures offer a low-risk intervention, additional clinical studies are warranted to further study this treatment. PMID:19674679

  7. A 4-Week Home-Based Aerobic and Resistance Exercise Program During Radiation Therapy: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Mustian, Karen M.; Peppone, Luke; Darling, Tom V.; Palesh, Oxana; Heckler, Charles E.; Morrow, Gary R.

    2011-01-01

    During radiation therapy, cancer patients may report cancer-related fatigue (CRF), which impairs aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, and, ultimately, quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this pilot clinical trial was to examine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a home-based aerobic and progressive resistance exercise intervention for aerobic capacity, strength, muscle mass, CRF, and QOL. Daily steps walked (DSW), daily minutes of resistance exercise (MRE), and number of resistance exercise days (RED) were assessed to evaluate intervention adherence. Breast and prostate cancer patients (n = 38) beginning radiation therapy were randomized to undergo 4 weeks of exercise or no exercise. Participants in the exercise group demonstrated good adherence to the exercise intervention, with significantly more DSW, MRE, and RED at post intervention and 3 month follow-up than controls. Participants in the exercise intervention exhibited significantly higher QOL and significantly lower CRF post intervention and at 3-month follow-up than controls. Results of this pilot study provide positive preliminary evidence that exercise during radiation may be beneficial for cancer patients. PMID:19831159

  8. A Study of Using Massage Therapy Accompanied with Stretching Exercise for Rehabilitation of Mammary Gland Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lv, Pin; Chong, Yuping; Zou, Huagang; Chen, Xiangxian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To apply massage therapy accompanied with stretching exercises for treatment of mammary gland hyperplasia, evaluate the clinical outcome in patients, and estimate the therapy as a novel treatment method for mammary hyperplasia. Methods. 28 adult female patients were selected and treated with massage therapy and stretching exercises focusing on skeleton muscles of chest, abdomen, and axilla. The mammary gland oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) levels were detected before and after treatment after 15, 30, and 45 days. Results. In this cohort, pretreatment OxyHb (mean ± SD) is 1.32 ± 0.14 (medium-high), and DeoxyHb is 0.87 ± 0.13 (normal). All patients were clinically diagnosed with benign mammary gland hyperplasia and mastitis. The posttreatment OxyHb levels are 1.23 ± 0.09 (normal-medium, 15-day), 1.16 ± 0.08 (normal, 30-day), and 1.05 ± 0.04 (normal, 45-day), and DeoxyHb levels are 0.90 ± 0.11 (normal, 15-day), 0.94 ± 0.18 (normal, 30-day), and 0.98 ± 0.12 (normal, 45-day). Patients were diagnosed with decreased hyperplasia 15 and 30 days after treatment and with no symptom of hyperplasia in mammary gland 45 days after treatment. Conclusion. Mammary gland hyperplasia is closely correlated with pathological changes of skeletal muscles and could be significantly improved by massage therapy and stretching exercises targeting neighboring skeletal muscles. PMID:27022615

  9. A Study of Using Massage Therapy Accompanied with Stretching Exercise for Rehabilitation of Mammary Gland Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Pin; Chong, Yuping; Zou, Huagang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To apply massage therapy accompanied with stretching exercises for treatment of mammary gland hyperplasia, evaluate the clinical outcome in patients, and estimate the therapy as a novel treatment method for mammary hyperplasia. Methods. 28 adult female patients were selected and treated with massage therapy and stretching exercises focusing on skeleton muscles of chest, abdomen, and axilla. The mammary gland oxyhemoglobin (OxyHb) and deoxyhemoglobin (DeoxyHb) levels were detected before and after treatment after 15, 30, and 45 days. Results. In this cohort, pretreatment OxyHb (mean ± SD) is 1.32 ± 0.14 (medium-high), and DeoxyHb is 0.87 ± 0.13 (normal). All patients were clinically diagnosed with benign mammary gland hyperplasia and mastitis. The posttreatment OxyHb levels are 1.23 ± 0.09 (normal-medium, 15-day), 1.16 ± 0.08 (normal, 30-day), and 1.05 ± 0.04 (normal, 45-day), and DeoxyHb levels are 0.90 ± 0.11 (normal, 15-day), 0.94 ± 0.18 (normal, 30-day), and 0.98 ± 0.12 (normal, 45-day). Patients were diagnosed with decreased hyperplasia 15 and 30 days after treatment and with no symptom of hyperplasia in mammary gland 45 days after treatment. Conclusion. Mammary gland hyperplasia is closely correlated with pathological changes of skeletal muscles and could be significantly improved by massage therapy and stretching exercises targeting neighboring skeletal muscles. PMID:27022615

  10. Exercise Augmentation of Exposure Therapy for PTSD: Rationale and Pilot Efficacy Data.

    PubMed

    Powers, Mark B; Medina, Johnna L; Burns, Stephanie; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Monfils, Marie; Asmundson, Gordon J G; Diamond, Allison; McIntyre, Christa; Smits, Jasper A J

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with synaptic plasticity, which is crucial for long-term learning and memory. Some studies suggest that people suffering from anxiety disorders show reduced BDNF relative to healthy controls. Lower BDNF is associated with impaired learning, cognitive deficits, and poor exposure-based treatment outcomes. A series of studies with rats showed that exercise elevates BDNF and enhances fear extinction. However, this strategy has not been tested in humans. In this pilot study, we randomized participants (N = 9, 8 females, M(Age) = 34) with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to (a) prolonged exposure alone (PE) or (b) prolonged exposure+exercise (PE+E). Participants randomized to the PE+E condition completed a 30-minute bout of moderate-intensity treadmill exercise (70% of age-predicted HR(max)) prior to each PE session. Consistent with prediction, the PE+E group showed a greater improvement in PTSD symptoms (d = 2.65) and elevated BDNF (d = 1.08) relative to the PE only condition. This pilot study provides initial support for further investigation into exercise augmented exposure therapy. PMID:25706090

  11. Near-Infrared Light Therapy to Attenuate Strength Loss After Strenuous Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Larkin-Kaiser, Kelly A.; Christou, Evangelos; Tillman, Mark; George, Steven; Borsa, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Near-infrared (NIR) light therapy is purported to act as an ergogenic aid by enhancing the contractile function of skeletal muscle. Improving muscle function is a new avenue for research in the area of laser therapy; however, very few researchers have examined the ergogenic effects of NIR light therapy and the influence it may have on the recovery process during rehabilitation. Objective: To evaluate the ergogenic effect of NIR light therapy on skeletal muscle function. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Controlled laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-nine healthy men (n = 21) and women (n = 18; age = 20.0 ± 0.2 years, height = 169 ± 2 cm, mass = 68.4 ± 1.8 kg, body mass index = 23.8 ± 0.4 kg/m2). Intervention(s): Each participant received active and sham treatments on the biceps brachii muscle on 2 separate days. The order of treatment was randomized. A class 4 laser with a cumulative dose of 360 J was used for the active treatment. After receiving the treatment on each day, participants completed an elbow-flexion resistance-exercise protocol. Main Outcome Measure(s): The dependent variables were elbow range of motion, muscle point tenderness, and strength (peak torque). Analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to assess changes in these measures between treatments at baseline and at follow-up, 48 hours postexercise. Additionally, immediate strength loss postexercise was compared between treatments using a paired t test. Results: Preexercise to postexercise strength loss for the active laser treatment, although small, was less than with the sham treatment (P = .05). Conclusions: Applied to skeletal muscle before resistance exercise, NIR light therapy effectively attenuated strength loss. Therefore, NIR light therapy may be a beneficial, noninvasive modality for improving muscle function during rehabilitation after musculoskeletal injury. However, future studies using higher treatment doses are warranted. PMID:25397864

  12. Effect of a randomized controlled exercise trial on bone outcomes: influence of adjuvant endocrine therapy.

    PubMed

    Knobf, M Tish; Jeon, Sangchoon; Smith, Barbara; Harris, Lyndsay; Kerstetter, Jane; Thompson, A Siobhan; Insogna, Karl

    2016-02-01

    Bone loss is a significant clinical problem for female cancer survivors (FCS) and increases fracture risk. The aim of the Yale Fitness Intervention Trial (Yale FIT) was to determine the effects of a 12-month aerobic-resistance exercise intervention compared to a home-based physical activity group on bone outcomes [bone mineral density (BMD)] and biomarkers bone turnover). Early postmenopausal FCS (N = 154) were randomized to the exercise intervention (3 times/week) or to a home-based physical activity group. Calcium (1200 mg) and Vitamin D (400 IU) supplements were provided to both groups. BMD was measured at baseline and 12 months. No significant difference in BMD was observed for the exercise vs home-based group. However, subjects on Tamoxifen or no endocrine therapy did not significantly lose BMD, with the exception of the femoral neck (FN). In contrast subjects on aromatase inhibitors (AIs) had significant BMD loss at all sites. The majority of subjects had sufficient serum levels of Vitamin D (>20 ng/mL) but there was significantly less bone loss in subjects in the 20-29 ng/mL range at the LS (p = 0.01), hip (p = 0.03), and GT (p = 0.008) compared to lower or higher levels. Exercise stimulates bone remodeling but the intervention was not superior for BMD outcomes at one year. The dose of the osteogenic stimulus in the intervention has been effective in preserving BMD in healthy postmenopausal women but it may be inadequate for survivors with chemotherapy-induced menopause and for those on adjuvant AI therapy. PMID:26850265

  13. Effective therapy using voglibose for nonalcoholic steatohepatitis in a patient with insufficient dietary and exercise therapy: exploring other treatment possibilities.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Kazuki; Matsumaru, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Nakamura, Noriko

    2011-05-01

    A 56-year-old Japanese female with a 10-year history of thyroiditis presented to our institution. The laboratory data and clinical findings suggested that the patient had complicated nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) with autoimmune hepatitis according to the criteria by the application of the International Autoimmune Hepatitis score. The patient could not manage by herself so dietary- and exercise-based treatment was difficult. Accordingly, ursodeoxycholic acid and ezetimibe therapy was started and continued until the performance of a liver needle biopsy to define the diagnosis. However, no improvement in liver function was observed. In addition, pathological findings indicated that the patient had NASH. The patient was finally diagnosed as having NASH. Therefore, voglibose was added to the ursodeoxycholic acid and ezetimibe therapy, and this addition of voglibose actually took effect. The patient's serum aspartate transaminase and alanine aminotransferase levels decreased dramatically. This report is the first to document other treatment possibilities of NASH in a case when dietary therapy is difficult. PMID:21712950

  14. [Effects of an optimized exercise therapy on physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Rhodius, U; Posselt, S; Posselt, H G; Hofstetter, R; Leyk, D

    2002-09-01

    Regular exercise training can increase the physical performance of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, training is often hampered by negative factors such as infections, lack of time, etc. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a 3-week-training-program performed under favourable conditions on physical performance and lung function of CF-patients: 17 patients daily trained at least 2,5 h under suspicious conditions at a sport hotel in Israel (Eilat). During the entire 3 weeks a comprehensive care was applied to the patients including intensive physical therapy and nutrition adapted to the individual demands. Testings of lung function and cycle ergometry ramp tests were performed a week before and after the training program. Additional control measurements were taken 7 months post training. After the 3-week-training vital capacity and FEV1 were increased by 7 % and 6 % (p > 0.05). The results of the cycle ergometry showed bigger and significant improvements in the maximal values of power (12 % - 20 %), oxygen uptake and ventilation. This findings were also valid for the submaximal exercise range indicated by a slower heart rate slope and a lower aerobic-anaerobic threshold. The present results suggest, that relatively large increases in physical performance can be obtained by short, but intensive exercise training including a comprehensive care. PMID:12215912

  15. The use of exercise interventions to overcome adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy.

    PubMed

    Østergren, Peter Busch; Kistorp, Caroline; Bennedbæk, Finn Noe; Faber, Jens; Sønksen, Jens; Fode, Mikkel

    2016-06-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) induces severe hypogonadism and is associated with several adverse effects that negatively affect health and quality of life in patients with prostate cancer. ADT changes body composition characterized by an increase in fat mass and a reduction in muscle mass and strength. Insulin sensitivity is also diminished and population-based studies indicate an increased risk of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease in men receiving ADT. Particularly the first 6 months of treatment seem to hold an additional risk of new cardiovascular events for patients with already existing cardiovascular disease. In this initial phase of ADT, metabolic changes are also most prominent. In addition, ADT increases the rate of bone loss and fracture risk. Currently available evidence supports the use of exercise interventions to improve physical function and mitigate ADT-induced fatigue. Some studies also indicate that exercise might moderate ADT-related changes in body composition. However, beneficial effects of exercise interventions on other ADT-related conditions have not been conclusively proven. Trials investigating the effects of ADT on fracture risk and development of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease are still warranted. Furthermore, studies investigating safety and effects of physical activity in men with bone metastases are lacking. PMID:27112391

  16. A new diet-exercise therapy in our obese-child clinic.

    PubMed

    Yamagishi, M; Komatsu, K; Shirakawa, Y; Kawada, Y; Iwami, T; Miyakawa, T; Kajiwara, Y; Noda, M

    1987-06-01

    Because a large percentage of childhood obesity may persist into adulthood and cause a hotbed of so-called seijin-byoh (adult diseases), its treatment should also be considered from the viewpoint of seijin-byoh prophylaxis. Most obese children, however, are awkward in their movements, in spite of binge eating or bulimia, and unable to carry out any severe exercise-diet therapy. For such subjects, we have designed a new practicable procedure, and obtained excellent results for the last five years. The main principle of our procedure is that the control of caloric intake is relaxed as much as possible after due consideration of a child's growth in height: no restriction for mild, 10-15% of the requirement for moderate, and 20-25% for severe obese children, respectively. The ratio of protein/energy is established at a higher level than usual, while that of fat/energy at a lower level. For exercise, walking is the most easy and important exercise and the proper speeds for individuals are converted from the same amount of movement determined at the 1st increase point of serum lactate values, where the proportion of movement-energy originating from body fat reaches the highest percentage at about 75%. Our new procedure is supported also by the fact that the reduction in body weight combines with the improvement in measurement values of fatty metabolites without any change in values of proteins. PMID:3616265

  17. Exercise as a prescription therapy for breast and colon cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Galanti, Giorgio; Stefani, Laura; Gensini, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast and colon tumors are the most common types of cancer in the general population. As a result of improved diagnosis and treatment, more people are now surviving cancer. Lifestyle has been identified as one of the potential risk factors for cancer, and it has been demonstrated recently that physical activity reduces the physiological and psychological symptoms and side effects of chemotherapy. Muscular atrophy, weight changes, decreased aerobic capacity, fatigue, and depression are the most common symptoms in cancer patients. The exact amount of moderate to vigorous physical activity needed to overcome these effects has not yet been established, but an individualized and variable exercise program as prescription therapy could be considered a helpful tool for improving quality of life. This paper proposes a model of lifestyle analysis and dedicated individualized exercise programs for the treatment of cancer patients. The program starts with a preliminary evaluation of the patient’s lifestyle using a questionnaire and accelerometer, which provides information on the amount of daily physical activity and number of steps taken, as well as an assessment of aerobic capacity, cardiovascular response, muscle strength, and resistance. Two different levels of aerobic exercise, ie, low-to-moderate (40% of maximal heart rate) to moderate (60% of maximal heart rate) can be prescribed. This model of exercise prescription in patients with cancer offers a flexible program for assisting in the management of this complex disease. It is projected to ensure easier management of medical problems related to cancer, and to attract a greater number of participants over time. PMID:23620675

  18. Functional significance of predischarge exercise thallium-201 findings following intravenous streptokinase therapy during acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Touchstone, D.A.; Beller, G.A.; Nygaard, T.W.; Watson, D.D.; Tedesco, C.; Kaul, S.

    1988-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging pattern(s) best correlate with myocardial salvage following intravenous streptokinase therapy (IVSK). Myocardial salvage was defined as improvement in regional left ventricular function determined by two-dimensional echocardiography between the time of admission and time of discharge in 21 prospectively studied patients receiving IVSK within 4 hours of chest pain. All patients had coronary angiography 2 hours following IVSK. Whereas 16 of the 21 patients (76%) had patent infarct-related vessels, only seven (33%) showed significant improvement in regional function at hospital discharge. Eleven patients demonstrated persistent defects (PD), and five each showed delayed and reverse redistribution. Patients with both delayed and reverse redistribution demonstrated significant improvement in regional left ventricular function score, while those with PD did not (+3.9 +/- 3.3 versus -0.5 +/- 2.9, p = 0.004). All other clinical, exercise, electrocardiographic, scintigraphic, and angiographic variables were similar between all patients, with the exception of the interval between chest pain and the institution of IVSK, which was longer in patients with reverse compared to delayed redistribution (3.5 +/- 0.4 versus 2.2 +/- 0.4 hours, p = 0.001). It is concluded that both delayed and reverse redistribution seen on predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging are associated with myocardial salvage, defined as serial improvement in regional systolic function. Despite a high infarct vessel patency rate in patients with acute myocardial infarction receiving IVSK within 4 hours of onset of symptoms, only one third demonstrated improvement in regional function that was associated with either delayed or reverse redistribution seen on predischarge exercise thallium-201 imaging.

  19. A Pilot Prospective Randomized Control Trial Comparing Exercises Using Videogame Therapy to Standard Physical Therapy: 6 Months Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Parry, Ingrid; Painting, Lynda; Bagley, Anita; Kawada, Jason; Molitor, Fred; Sen, Soman; Greenhalgh, David G; Palmieri, Tina L

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available, interactive videogames that use body movements for interaction are used clinically in burn rehabilitation and have been shown to facilitate functional range of motion (ROM) but their efficacy with burn patients has not yet been proven. The purpose of this pilot randomized control study was to prospectively compare planar and functional ROM, compliance, pain, enjoyment, and exertion in pediatric burn patients receiving two types of rehabilitation therapy. Seventeen school-aged children with 31 affected limbs who demonstrated limited shoulder ROM from burn injury were randomized to receive exercises using either standard therapy ROM activities (ST) or interactive videogame therapy (VGT). Patients received 3 weeks of the designated therapy intervention twice daily. They were then given a corresponding home program of the same type of therapy to perform regularly for 6 months. Standard goniometry and three-dimensional motion analysis during functional tasks were used to assess ROM. Measures were taken at baseline, 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Pain was measured before and after each treatment session during the 3-week intervention. There was no difference in compliance, enjoyment, or exertion between the groups. Patients in both the ST and VGT groups showed significant improvement in shoulder flexion (P < .001), shoulder abduction (P <.001), shoulder external rotation (P = .01), and elbow flexion (P = .004) ROM from baseline to 6 months as measured with goniometry. Subjects also showed significant gains in elbow flexion (P = .04) during hand to head and shoulder flexion (P = .04) during high reach. There was no difference in ROM gains between the groups. Within group comparison showed that the VGT group had significantly more recovery of ROM during the first 3 weeks than any other timeframe in the study, whereas ST had most gains at 3 months. There was a significant difference between the groups in the subjects' pain response. ST subjects

  20. Functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy is more conducive to rehabilitation of menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yubin; Duan, Fugui; Xu, Rongmei; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Hongyu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Observe the effect of functional exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder. Method: Select 45 menopausal women patients with anxiety disorder and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a functional exercise group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in the functional exercise group do yoga exercise twice a day; those in the auricular plaster therapy group are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day; those in the combination group do yoga exercise and then they are provided with the auricular plaster therapy twice a day. Before the treatment and after 12 weeks’ treatment, respectively detect and compare the selected patients in the three groups in respect HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score; And the cured patients are followed up for 3 months to compare recurrence rate of each group. Results: After 12 weeks’ treatment, HAMA score, physical function score and mental function score of the combination group are obviously better than those of another two groups (P<0.05); Of the cure rate and the recurrence rate within 3 months, the cure rate of the combination group is higher and the recurrence rate is low. Conclusion: Through the functional rehabilitation exercise in combination with the auricular plaster, the combined curative effect is obviously better than that of single treatment and the clinical recurrence rate is significantly lower than that of single treatment. It shows that the combined treatment method presents obvious synergistic effect and the synergistic treatment is more beneficial to improve the curative effect. PMID:26885051

  1. Method to observe hemodynamic and metabolic changes during hemodiafiltration therapy with exercise.

    PubMed

    Cadena, Miguel; Pérez-Grovas, Héctor; Flores, Pedro; Azpiroz, Joaquín; Borja, Gisella; Medel, Humberto; Rodriguez, Fausto; Flores, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    Intradyalitic exercise programas are important to improve patient's hemodynamic stability. Blood pressure and metabolic changes are correlated when heat accumulation is due to increment of the body core temperature (+1.0 °C). However, increase in temperature could be controlled by lowering dialysate's temperature using two main modalities techniques (isothermic and thermoneural) with different patient's thermal balance consequences, not yet well studied. In this work, a new method to observe the main physiological parameters (hearth rate variability (HRV), blood pressure, BTM dialysate temperature control and substrate utilization by indirect calorimtery) which are involved in hemodiafitration (HDF), are displayd. An experiment was carried out in a group of 5 patients waiting kidney transplant. In each patient, EE was assessed as well as the HRV during isothermic and thermoneutral modalities as a manner of cross and prospective study (a) at before therapy, (b) during therapy and (c) at the end of the HDF therapy. Power extraction was also measured by a BTM (Blood Temperature Monitor from Fresenius Inc), in order to determine how the dialysate temperature was controlled. The results showed important method's advantages which place the BTM performance as unstable control system with the possibility to produce undesirable HRV changes as the vagotonical response. However more patient cases are needed in order to identify the real advantage of this new method. PMID:21095679

  2. A Pilot Study to Assess the Feasibility of Group Exercise and Animal-Assisted Therapy in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Grubbs, Brandon; Artese, Ashley; Schmitt, Karla; Cormier, Eileen; Panton, Lynn

    2016-04-01

    This pilot study assessed the feasibility of incorporating animal-assisted therapy teams (ATT) into a 6-week group exercise program for older adults (77 ± 6 years). Fifteen participants were randomly assigned to an exercise with ATT (E+ATT; n = 8) or exercise only (E; n = 7) group. Groups exercised 3x/week for 45 min. Feasibility was assessed by three objectives: (1) ATT will not need extensive preparation beyond their original therapy training; (2) the study will require minimal cost; and (3) ATT must not impair the effectiveness of the exercise program. By the study conclusion, all objectives were met. Time and cost were minimal for ATT, and adherence was 93% and 90% for E+ATT and E, respectively. There were significant improvements in both groups (p ≤ .05) for arm curls, get-up and go, and 6-min walk. The results of this pilot study suggest that it is feasible to incorporate ATT into group exercise programming for older adults. PMID:26439234

  3. Integrative Effect of Carvedilol and Aerobic Exercise Training Therapies on Improving Cardiac Contractility and Remodeling in Heart Failure Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vanzelli, Andréa S.; Medeiros, Alessandra; Rolim, Natale; Bartholomeu, Jan B.; Cunha, Telma F.; Bechara, Luiz G.; Gomes, Enéas R. M.; Mattos, Katt C.; Sirvente, Raquel; Salemi, Vera; Mady, Charles; Negrao, Carlos E.; Guatimosim, Silvia; Brum, Patricia C.

    2013-01-01

    The use of β-blockers is mandatory for counteracting heart failure (HF)-induced chronic sympathetic hyperactivity, cardiac dysfunction and remodeling. Importantly, aerobic exercise training, an efficient nonpharmacological therapy to HF, also counteracts sympathetic hyperactivity in HF and improves exercise tolerance and cardiac contractility; the latter associated with changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling. This study was undertaken to test whether combined β–blocker and aerobic exercise training would integrate the beneficial effects of isolated therapies on cardiac structure, contractility and cardiomyocyte Ca2+ handling in a genetic model of sympathetic hyperactivity-induced HF (α2A/α2C- adrenergic receptor knockout mice, KO). We used a cohort of 5–7 mo male wild-type (WT) and congenic mice (KO) with C57Bl6/J genetic background randomly assigned into 5 groups: control (WT), saline-treated KO (KOS), exercise trained KO (KOT), carvedilol-treated KO (KOC) and, combined carvedilol-treated and exercise-trained KO (KOCT). Isolated and combined therapies reduced mortality compared with KOS mice. Both KOT and KOCT groups had increased exercise tolerance, while groups receiving carvedilol had increased left ventricular fractional shortening and reduced cardiac collagen volume fraction compared with KOS group. Cellular data confirmed that cardiomyocytes from KOS mice displayed abnormal Ca2+ handling. KOT group had increased intracellular peak of Ca2+ transient and reduced diastolic Ca2+ decay compared with KOS group, while KOC had increased Ca2+ decay compared with KOS group. Notably, combined therapies re-established cardiomyocyte Ca2+ transient paralleled by increased SERCA2 expression and SERCA2:PLN ratio toward WT levels. Aerobic exercise trained increased the phosphorylation of PLN at Ser16 and Thr17 residues in both KOT and KOCT groups, but carvedilol treatment reduced lipid peroxidation in KOC and KOCT groups compared with KOS group. The present findings

  4. Integrating diet and exercise into care of prostate cancer patients on androgen deprivation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moyad, Mark A; Newton, Robert U; Tunn, Ulf W; Gruca, Damian

    2016-01-01

    Improved diagnosis and treatment regimens have resulted in greater longevity for men with prostate cancer. This has led to an increase in both androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) use and duration of exposure, and therefore to its associated adverse effects, such as sexual dysfunction, osteoporosis, reduced muscle mass, increased fat mass, and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Given that the adverse effects of ADT are systemic, often debilitating, and difficult to treat, efforts continue in the development of new strategies for long-term management of prostate cancer. The PubMed database was searched to select trials, reviews, and meta-analyses in English using such search terms as “prostate cancer” and “androgen deprivation therapy”, “cardiovascular risk”, “lean body mass”, “exercise”, and “diet”. The initial searches produced 379 articles with dates 2005 or more recent. Articles published after 2004 were favored. This review utilizes the latest data to provide a status update on the effects of exercise and diet on patients with prostate cancer, focusing on ADT-associated side effects, and it discusses the evidence for such interventions. Since the evidence of large-scale trials in patients with prostate cancer is missing, and an extrapolation of supporting data to all patient subgroups cannot be provided, individualized risk assessments remain necessary before the initiation of exercise and diet programs. Exercise, diet, and nutritional supplementation interventions have the potential to provide effective, accessible, and relatively inexpensive strategies for mitigating ADT-associated toxicities without introducing additional adverse effects. PMID:27574584

  5. INTEGRATING ACUPUNCTURE WITH EXERCISE-BASED PHYSICAL THERAPY FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: A RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, LX; Mao, JJ; Fernandes, S; Galantino, ML; Guo, W; LaRiccia, P; Teal, V; Bowman, MA; Schumacher, HR; Farrar, JT

    2013-01-01

    Background Knee OA is a chronic disease associated with significant morbidity and economic cost. The efficacy of acupuncture in addition to traditional physical therapy has received little study. Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of integrating a standardized true acupuncture protocol versus non-penetrating acupuncture into exercise-based physical therapy (EPT). Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, controlled trial at 3 physical therapy centers in Philadelphia, PA. We studied 214 patients (66% African-American) with at least 6 months of chronic knee pain and X-ray confirmed Kellgren scores of 2 or 3. Patients received 12 sessions of acupuncture directly following EPT over 6–12 weeks. Acupuncture was performed at the same 9 points dictated by the Traditional Chinese “Bi” syndrome approach to knee pain, using either standard needles or Streitberger non-skin puncturing needles. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with at least a 36% improvement in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) score at 12 weeks. Results Both treatment groups showed improvement from combined therapy with no difference between true (31.6%) and non-penetrating acupuncture (30.3%) in WOMAC response rate (p=0.5) or report of minor adverse events. A multivariable logistic regression prediction model identified an association between a positive expectation of relief from acupuncture and reported improvement. No differences were noted by race, sex, or age. Conclusion Puncturing acupuncture needles did not perform any better than non-puncturing needles integrated with EPT. Whether EPT, acupuncture, or other factors accounted for any improvement noted in both groups could not be determined in this study. Expectation for relief was a predictor of reported benefit. PMID:23965480

  6. Manual Therapy and Exercise to Improve Outcomes in Patients With Muscle Tension Dysphonia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Muscle tension dysphonia (MTD), a common voice disorder that is not commonly referred for physical therapy intervention, is characterized by excessive muscle recruitment, resulting in incorrect vibratory patterns of vocal folds and an alteration in voice production. This case series was conducted to determine whether physical therapy including manual therapy, exercise, and stress management education would be beneficial to this population by reducing excess muscle tension. Case Description Nine patients with MTD completed a minimum of 9 sessions of the intervention. Patient-reported outcomes of pain, function, and quality of life were assessed at baseline and the conclusion of treatment. The outcome measures were the numeric rating scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), and Voice Handicap Index (VHI). Cervical and jaw range of motion also were assessed at baseline and postintervention using standard goniometric measurements. Outcomes Eight of the patients had no pain after treatment. All 9 of the patients demonstrated an improvement in PSFS score, with 7 patients exceeding a clinically meaningful improvement at the conclusion of the intervention. Three of the patients also had a clinically meaningful change in VHI scores. All 9 of the patients demonstrated improvement in cervical flexion and lateral flexion and jaw opening, whereas 8 patients improved in cervical extension and rotation postintervention. Discussion The findings suggest that physical therapists can feasibly implement an intervention to improve outcomes in patients with MTD. However, a randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm the results of this case series and the efficacy of the intervention. A clinical implication is the expansion of physical therapy to include referrals from voice centers for the treatment of MTD. PMID:25256740

  7. Manual Therapy and Exercise for a Patient With Neck-Tongue Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Niethamer, Lisa; Myers, Robin

    2016-03-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is defined as neck and/or head pain accompanied by ipsilateral dysesthesia of the tongue with sudden rotation of the head. Proposed causes include compression or irritation of the C2 nerve root as it courses behind the atlantoaxial joint or hypertrophy of the inferior oblique muscle. The primary purpose of this case report was to describe the conservative physical therapy treatment of a patient with uncomplicated NTS. Case Description The patient was a 13-year-old girl who reported insidious onset of sharp pain in the neck, numbness/tingling of the ipsilateral tongue/face, and tinnitus with cervical rotation. Symptoms occurred several times a week for approximately 10 seconds. Examination revealed impaired function, increased forward head posture, decreased cervical range of motion, and positive neurodynamic assessment. The patient's treatment included manual therapy and exercise for postural stabilization. Outcomes Following 8 visits, pain of the neck and tongue numbness had resolved. Score on the Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), cervical range of motion, and posture had also improved. At the 22-month follow-up, infrequent, momentary symptoms in the neck and dysesthesia of the tongue were reported. The PSFS remained the same. Objective measures were normal. Discussion This case report describes the physical therapy management of an individual with NTS. The management strategy followed a protocol similar to that used for cervicogenic headaches, due to the involvement of the upper cervical spine with both NTS and cervicogenic headache and the lack of evidence for the treatment of NTS. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(3):217-224. Epub 11 Feb 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6195. PMID:26868897

  8. Effect of exercise therapy combining electrical therapy and balance training on functional instability resulting from ankle sprain—focus on stability of jump landing

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Takaki; Tanino, Yoshitsugu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Functional instability leads to a delay in the muscle reaction time and weakness of the peroneal muscles. The present study examined the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation during balance exercise on patients with functional instability of the ankles, including the ability to land after jumping at the center of foot pressure. [Subjects] The subjects were seven males with a history of ankle sprain. All had a sprained ankle score of ≤80 points on Karlson’s functional instability test. [Methods] They were asked to jump over a 20-cm-high platform sideways for 10 consecutive seconds on a force plate with one leg. The length of the center of pressure was measured for comparison of balance exercise and balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. [Results] The length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly greater than on the non-sprain side under both conditions. Under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition, the length of the center of foot pressure on the sprain side was significantly reduced, with the values being 627.0 ± 235.4 and 551.8 ± 171.1 mm before and after the challenge, respectively. [Conclusion] Ankle instability on the sprain side was significantly reduced under the balance exercise with simultaneous transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation therapy condition before and after the challenge. Peroneal muscles showed increased activity caused by common peroneal innervation. PMID:26644645

  9. Effects of antihyperlipidemic drugs and diet plus exercise therapy in the treatment of patients with moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Nomura, H; Kimura, Y; Okamoto, O; Shiraishi, G

    1996-01-01

    We compared the efficacy of two antihyperlipidemic drugs and the efficacy of diet plus exercise therapy in the treatment of patients with moderate hypercholesterolemia. The study included 48 patients with moderate hypercholesterolemia (serum total cholesterol [TC], 250 to 320 mg/dL). Patients were divided into three groups: group A--patients administered 10 mg/d of pravastatin; group B--patients administered 500 mg/d of probucol and 600 mg/d of pantethine; and group C--patients administered diet plus exercise therapy. The serum TC and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) values were determined via enzymatic methods before initiation of each therapy and after 4 and 8 weeks of therapy. An atherogenic index (AI) was also calculated. The results indicated that TC showed a statistically significant decrease in all three groups at 4 and 8 weeks (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively); the HDL-C value did not change significantly in groups A and C, but it had a statistically significant decrease in group B at 4 and 8 weeks. The AI showed a statistically significant decrease in group A at 4 and 8 weeks of treatment and group C at 8 weeks; there were no significant changes in AI in group B. It may be concluded that as an antihyperlipidemic agent, pravastatin is more useful than probucol and that appropriate exercise and strict dietary management for 8 weeks achieve an efficacy close to that achieved by drug therapy. PMID:8829023

  10. Effects of oral motor exercises and laser therapy on chronic temporomandibular disorders: a randomized study with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Machado, Barbara Cristina Zanandréa; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira; Da Silva, Marco Antonio M Rodrigues; de Felício, Cláudia Maria

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of combining low-level laser therapy (LLLT) with oral motor exercises (OM-exercises) for rehabilitation of patients with chronic temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). Eighty-two patients with chronic TMD and 20 healthy subjects (control group) participated in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to treatment groups: GI (LLLT + OM exercises), GII (orofacial myofunctional therapy-OMT-which contains pain relief strategies and OM-exercises), and GIII (LLLT placebo + OM-exercises) and GIV (LLLT). LLLT (AsGaAl; 780-nm wavelength; average power of 60 mW, 40 s, and 60 ± 1.0 J/cm²) was used to promote analgesia, while OM-exercises were used to reestablish the orofacial functions. Evaluations at baseline (T1), after treatment immediate (T2), and at follow-up (T3) were muscle and joint tenderness to palpation, TMD severity, and orofacial myofunctional status. There was a significant improvement in outcome measures in all treated groups with stability at follow-up (Friedman test, P < 0.05), but GIV did not show difference in orofacial functions after LLLT (P > 0.05). Intergroup comparisons showed that all treated groups had no difference in tenderness to palpation of temporal muscle compared to GC at follow-up (Kruskal-Wallis test, P < 0.01). Moreover, GI, GII, and GIII showed no difference from GC in orofacial functional condition (T2 and T3) while they differed significantly from GIV (P < 0.01). In conclusion, LLLT combined with OM-exercises was more effective in promoting TMD rehabilitation than LLLT alone was. Similar treatment results were verified with the OMT protocol. PMID:27085322

  11. Effects of aerobic exercise on ectopic lipids in patients with growth hormone deficiency before and after growth hormone replacement therapy

    PubMed Central

    Christ, Emanuel R.; Egger, Andrea; Allemann, Sabin; Buehler, Tania; Kreis, Roland; Boesch, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone replacement therapy (GHRT) increases exercise capacity and insulin resistance while it decreases fat mass in growth hormone-deficient patients (GHD). Ectopic lipids (intramyocellular (IMCL) and intrahepatocellular lipids (IHCL) are related to insulin resistance. The effect of GHRT on ectopic lipids is unknown. It is hypothesized that exercise-induced utilization of ectopic lipids is significantly decreased in GHD patients and normalized by GHRT. GHD (4 females, 6 males) and age/gender/waist-matched control subjects (CS) were studied. VO2max was assessed on a treadmill and insulin sensitivity determined by a two-step hyperinsulinaemic-euglycaemic clamp. Visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) fat were quantified by MR-imaging. IHCL and IMCL were measured before and after a 2 h exercise at 50–60% of VO2max using MR-spectroscopy (∆IMCL, ∆IHCL). Identical investigations were performed after 6 months of GHRT. VO2max was similar in GHD and CS and significantly increased after GHRT; GHRT significantly decreased SAT and VAT. 2 h-exercise resulted in a decrease in IMCL (significant in CS and GHRT) and a significant increase in IHCL in CS and GHD pre and post GHRT. GHRT didn’t significantly impact on ∆IMCL and ∆IHCL. We conclude that aerobic exercise affects ectopic lipids in patients and controls. GHRT increases exercise capacity without influencing ectopic lipids. PMID:26792091

  12. Normalization of aberrant resting state functional connectivity in fibromyalgia patients following a three month physical exercise therapy

    PubMed Central

    Flodin, P.; Martinsen, S.; Mannerkorpi, K.; Löfgren, M.; Bileviciute-Ljungar, I.; Kosek, E.; Fransson, P.

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise is one of the most efficient interventions to mitigate chronic pain symptoms in fibromyalgia (FM). However, little is known about the neurophysiological mechanisms mediating these effects. In this study we investigated resting-state connectivity using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) before and after a 15 week standardized exercise program supervised by physical therapists. Our aim was to gain an understanding of how physical exercise influences previously shown aberrant patterns of intrinsic brain activity in FM. Fourteen FM patients and eleven healthy controls successfully completed the physical exercise treatment. We investigated post- versus pre-treatment changes of brain connectivity, as well as changes in clinical symptoms in the patient group. FM patients reported improvements in symptom severity. Although several brain regions showed a treatment-related change in connectivity, only the connectivity between the right anterior insula and the left primary sensorimotor area was significantly more affected by the physical exercise among the fibromyalgia patients compared to healthy controls. Our results suggest that previously observed aberrant intrinsic brain connectivity patterns in FM are partly normalized by the physical exercise therapy. However, none of the observed normalizations in intrinsic brain connectivity were significantly correlated with symptom changes. Further studies conducted in larger cohorts are warranted to investigate the precise relationship between improvements in fibromyalgia symptoms and changes in intrinsic brain activity. PMID:26413476

  13. The effect of exercise therapy on cognitive functions in multiple sclerosis patients: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Morsali, Damineh; Dastoorpoor, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background: The positive impacts of exercise therapy on patients’ cognitive problems still remain unknown. This study was a pilot intervention to examine the effects of combined exercise on the cognitive problems of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Iranian MS Society over 2012 to 2013. Methods: This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the form of a pretest/posttest study. Forty two patients with MS were selected from those visiting the rehabilitation center of Iranian MS Society, using non-probability convenience sampling. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) of each patient was recorded before the intervention and Brief Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological (BRB-N) test was administered before and after the intervention. The data were analyzed using the analytical tests such as Wilcoxon test. Results: Of 21 participants, 17 subjects (82%, n=14) female with mean (±SD) age of 37 (±9.98) years and mean (±SD) EDSS of 2.35 (±0.90) completed all stages of the study. Changes in long-term storage and permanent long-term retrieval of information after the intervention were statistically significant (p<0.001). In addition, the change in the average of total delay after the intervention was also significant by 1.11 (p<0.001). Conclusion: Our study confirmed the possibility of change in the cognitive abilities of MS patients through physical interventions. This finding emphasizes the necessity of more clinical examinations and increases the hopes for new rehabilitation methods for the disorder. PMID:26157723

  14. Neck pain in military helicopter aircrew and the role of exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Danielle M; Harrison, Michael F; Neary, J Patrick

    2011-10-01

    Neck pain is a growing aeromedical concern for military forces on an international scale. Neck pain prevalence in the global military helicopter community has been reported in the range of 56.6-84.5%. Despite this high prevalence, historically, research examining helicopter aircrews has focused predominantly on low back pain. A number of recent studies have emerged examining flight-related factors that are hypothesized to contribute to the development of flight-related neck pain. Loading factors such as the posture adopted during flight, use of night vision goggles, and vibration have all been found to contribute to neck pain and muscular fatigue. Prolonged or repeated exposureto these loading factors has been hypothesized to perpetuate or contribute to the development of neck pain. Despite the high number of helicopter aircrew personnel that suffer from neck pain, very few individuals seek treatment for the disorder. The focus of medical personnel should, therefore, be directed toward a solution that addresses not only the issue of muscular fatigue, but the hesitancy to seek treatment. Previous research in military and civilian populations have used exercise therapy as a treatment modality for neck pain and have found improved endurance capacity in the neck musculature and reduced self-reported neck pain. PMID:21961403

  15. Exercise Is Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elrick, Harold

    1996-01-01

    Suggests that exercise should be the first-line therapy for preventing and treating many common diseases; however, physicians need more training in how best to use exercise therapy. The paper explains the power of exercise and discusses how to motivate individuals to start safe, enjoyable, and life-saving exercise routines. (SM)

  16. Effect of phototherapy (low-level laser therapy and light-emitting diode therapy) on exercise performance and markers of exercise recovery: a systematic review with meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Vanin, Adriane Aver; Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Dal Corso, Simone; Bjordal, Jan Magnus

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have explored if phototherapy with low-level laser therapy (LLLT) or narrow-band light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) can modulate activity-induced skeletal muscle fatigue or subsequently protect against muscle injury. We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis to investigate the effects of phototherapy applied before, during and after exercises. A literature search was performed in Pubmed/Medline database for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published from 2000 through 2012. Trial quality was assessed with the ten-item PEDro scale. Main outcome measures were selected as: number of repetitions and time until exhaustion for muscle performance, and creatine kinase (CK) activity to evaluate risk for exercise-induced muscle damage. The literature search resulted in 16 RCTs, and three articles were excluded due to poor quality assessment scores. From 13 RCTs with acceptable methodological quality (≥6 of 10 items), 12 RCTs irradiated phototherapy before exercise, and 10 RCTs reported significant improvement for the main outcome measures related to performance. The time until exhaustion increased significantly compared to placebo by 4.12 s (95% CI 1.21-7.02, p < 0.005) and the number of repetitions increased by 5.47 (95% CI 2.35-8.59, p < 0.0006) after phototherapy. Heterogeneity in trial design and results precluded meta-analyses for biochemical markers, but a quantitative analysis showed positive results in 13 out of 16 comparisons. The most significant and consistent results were found with red or infrared wavelengths and phototherapy application before exercises, power outputs between 50 and 200 mW and doses of 5 and 6 J per point (spot). We conclude that phototherapy (with lasers and LEDs) improves muscular performance and accelerate recovery mainly when applied before exercise. PMID:24249354

  17. Exercise therapy, cardiorespiratory fitness and their effect on brain volumes: a randomised controlled trial in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Scheewe, Thomas W; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Sarkisyan, Gayane; Schnack, Hugo G; Brouwer, Rachel M; de Glint, Maria; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Backx, Frank J G; Kahn, René S; Cahn, Wiepke

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to examine exercise effects on global brain volume, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness in schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. Irrespective of diagnosis and intervention, associations between brain changes and cardiorespiratory fitness improvement were examined. Sixty-three schizophrenia patients and fifty-five healthy controls participated in this randomised controlled trial. Global brain volumes, hippocampal volume, and cortical thickness were estimated from 3-Tesla MRI scans. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed with a cardiopulmonary ergometer test. Subjects were assigned exercise therapy or occupational therapy (patients) and exercise therapy or life-as-usual (healthy controls) for six months 2h weekly. Exercise therapy effects were analysed for subjects who were compliant at least 50% of sessions offered. Significantly smaller baseline cerebral (grey) matter, and larger third ventricle volumes, and thinner cortex in most areas of the brain were found in patients versus controls. Exercise therapy did not affect global brain and hippocampal volume or cortical thickness in patients and controls. Cardiorespiratory fitness improvement was related to increased cerebral matter volume and lateral and third ventricle volume decrease in patients and to thickening in the left hemisphere in large areas of the frontal, temporal and cingulate cortex irrespective of diagnosis. One to 2h of exercise therapy did not elicit significant brain volume changes in patients or controls. However, cardiorespiratory fitness improvement attenuated brain volume changes in schizophrenia patients and increased thickness in large areas of the left cortex in both schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. PMID:22981376

  18. Comparison of Manual Therapy Techniques with Therapeutic Exercise in the Treatment of Shoulder Impingement: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kachingwe, Aimie F.; Phillips, Beth; Sletten, Eric; Plunkett, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this double-blind, randomized controlled pilot study was to compare the effectiveness of four physical therapy interventions in the treatment of primary shoulder impingement syndrome: 1) supervised exercise only, 2) supervised exercise with glenohumeral mobilizations, 3) supervised exercise with a mobilization-with-movement (MWM) technique, or 4) a control group receiving only physician advice. Thirty-three subjects diagnosed with primary shoulder impingement were randomly assigned to one of these four groups. Main outcome measures included 24-hour pain (VAS), pain with the Neer and Hawkins-Kennedy tests, shoulder active range of motion (AROM), and shoulder function (SPADI). Repeated-measures analyses indicated significant decreases in pain, improved function, and increases in AROM. Univariate analyses on the percentage of change from pre- to post-treatment for each dependent variable found no statistically significant differences (P<0.05) between the four groups. Although not significant, the MWM and mobilization groups had a higher percentage of change from pre- to post-treatment on all three pain measures (VAS, Neer, Hawkins-Kennedy). The three intervention groups had a higher percentage of change on the SPADI. The MWM group had the highest percentage of change in AROM, and the mobilization group had the lowest. This pilot study suggests that performing glenohumeral mobilizations and MWM in combination with a supervised exercise program may result in a greater decrease in pain and improved function although studies with larger samples and discriminant sampling methods are needed. PMID:19771196

  19. EFFECTS OF RESISTANCE EXERCISES AND COMPLEX DECONGESTIVE THERAPY ON ARM FUNCTION AND MUSCULAR STRENGTH IN BREAST CANCER RELATED LYMPHEDEMA.

    PubMed

    Do, J H; Kim, W; Cho, Y K; Lee, J; Song, E J; Chun, Y M; Jeon, J Y

    2015-12-01

    The incorporation of resistance exercises into the lifestyle of patients with lymphedema is understudied and an emerging interest. We investigated the effectiveness and results of adding a moderate intensity resistance exercise program for 8 weeks in conjunction with intensive CDT for 1 or 2 weeks (depending on severity) on arm volume, arm function, QOL, and muscular strength in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema. This prospective, pilot trial included forty-four patients with a history of breast cancer who were beginning complex decongestive therapy for lymphedema. They were assigned to either the intervention (n = 22) or control (n = 22). groups. The intervention comprised of resis- tance band exercises 5 times a week for 8 weeks. These were initially supervised during the intensive lymphedema treatment, but performed independently during the study period. Limb volume, muscular strength, and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QOL Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), EORTC-Breast Cancer-Specific QOL Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-BR23), and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires were assessed at baseline and at 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, the intervention group demonstrated statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) in the DASH score and muscular strength compared to the control group. Our results indicate that upper body resistance exercise demonstrates a positive effect on arm function and muscular strength without increasing arm volume in breast cancer related lymphedema during and shortly post intensive CDT lymphedema treatment. PMID:27164764

  20. The medical evaluation of patients with diabetes mellitus in exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamada, J; Tanaka, S; Sato, T; Suzuki, R; Fujii, S

    1991-12-01

    To investigate myocardial ischemia during exercise, submaximal exercise testing with electrocardiogram and thallium 201-myocardial scintigraphy was performed in non-insulin-dependent diabetics. The relationship between plasma atrial natriuretic polypeptide (ANP) levels in response to exercise and cardiac function assessed by echocardiography was also examined. The following results were obtained: 1) Twelve of the 66 diabetics (18.2%) had ischemic ST-segment changes in exercise ECGs, compared with 4 of 75 control subjects (5.3%)(p less than 0.05). Of the 12 diabetics with positive exercise ECGs, 10 were asymptomatic. 2) The washout rate in thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was significantly less in diabetics with positive exercise ECGs (36.5 +/- 4.1%) than in controls (51.9 +/- 2.8%)(p less than 0.05). 3) Although no difference in heart rate were observed between diabetics and controls, diabetic patients had significantly higher systolic blood pressure than controls during all stages of exercise and at maximal exertion. Rate pressure products in stages 1 and 2 were significantly higher in diabetics than in controls. 4) The increase of plasma ANP concentration during moderate exercise (VO2 max 60%) was significantly greater in diabetics than in controls (32.3 +/- 11.9 pg/ml vs. 15.0 +/- 1.7 pg/ml)(p less than 0.02). 5) There was a significant correlation between the increase in plasma ANP during exercise and the levels of left ventricular diastolic function (A/R:r = 0.504, p less than 0.05, IRT:r = 0.587, p less than 0.02), assessed by echocardiography, in diabetics. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the frequency of asymptomatic myocardial ischemia during exercise was higher in diabetics than in controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1840303

  1. Cardiac regeneration and cellular therapy: is there a benefit of exercise?

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, P A; Appell Coriolano, H-J; Duarte, J A

    2014-03-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are a global epidemic in developed countries. Cumulative evidence suggests that myocyte formation is preserved during postnatal life, in adulthood or senescence, suggesting the existence of a growth reserve of the heart throughout lifespan. Several medical therapeutic approaches to CVD have considerably improved the clinical outcome for patients. Intense interest has been focused on regenerative medicine as an emerging strategy for CVD. Cellular therapeutic approaches have been proposed for enhancing survival and propagation of stem cells in myocardium, leading to cardiac cellular repair. Strong epidemiological and clinical data exists concerning the impact of regular physical exercise on cardiovascular health. Several mechanisms of acute and chronic exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptations to exercise have been presented, considering primary and secondary prevention of CVD. In this context, exercise-related improvements in the function and regeneration of the cardiovascular system may be associated with the exercise-induced activation, mobilization, differentiation, and homing of stem and progenitor cells. In this review several topics will be addressed concerning the relation between exercise, recruitment and biological activity of blood-circulating progenitor cells and resident cardiac stem cells. We hypothesize that exercise-induced stem cell activation may enhance overall heart function and improve the efficacy of cardiac cellular therapeutic protocols. PMID:23900898

  2. Exercise improves quality of life in androgen deprivation therapy-treated prostate cancer: systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Teleni, Laisa; Chan, Raymond J; Chan, Alexandre; Isenring, Elisabeth A; Vela, Ian; Inder, Warrick J; McCarthy, Alexandra L

    2016-02-01

    Men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for prostate cancer (PCa) are likely to develop metabolic conditions such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, abdominal obesity and osteoporosis. Other treatment-related side effects adversely influence quality of life (QoL) including vasomotor distress, depression, anxiety, mood swings, poor sleep quality and compromised sexual function. The objective of this study was to systematically review the nature and effects of dietary and exercise interventions on QoL, androgen deprivation symptoms and metabolic risk factors in men with PCa undergoing ADT. An electronic search of CINAHL, CENTRAL, Medline, PsychINFO and reference lists was performed to identify peer-reviewed articles published between January 2004 and December 2014 in English. Eligible study designs included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with pre- and post-intervention data. Data extraction and assessment of methodological quality with the Cochrane approach was conducted by two independent reviewers. Seven exercise studies were identified. Exercise significantly improved QoL, but showed no effect on metabolic risk factors (weight, waist circumference, lean or fat mass, blood pressure and lipid profile). Two dietary studies were identified, both of which tested soy supplements. Soy supplementation did not improve any outcomes. No dietary counselling studies were identified. No studies evaluated androgen-deficiency symptoms (libido, erectile function, sleep quality, mood swings, depression, anxiety and bone mineral density). Evidence from RCTs indicates that exercise enhances health- and disease-specific QoL in men with PCa undergoing ADT. Further studies are required to evaluate the effect of exercise and dietary interventions on QoL, androgen deprivation symptoms and metabolic risk factors in this cohort. PMID:26584972

  3. [Physical activity and exercise training in the prevention and therapy of type 2 diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Francesconi, Claudia; Lackinger, Christian; Weitgasser, Raimund; Haber, Paul; Niebauer, Josef

    2016-04-01

    Lifestyle in general (nutrition, exercise, smoking habits), besides the genetic predisposition, is known to be a strong predictor for the development of diabetes. Exercise in particular is not only useful in improving glycaemia by lowering insulin resistance and positively affect insulin secretion, but to reduce cardiovascular risk.To gain substantial health benefits a minimum of 150 min of moderate or vigorous intense aerobic physical activity and muscle strengthening activities per week are needed. The positive effect of training correlates directly with the amount of fitness gained and lasts only as long as the fitness level is sustained. The effect of exercise is independent of age and gender. It is reversible and reproducible.Based on the large evidence of exercise referral and prescription the Austrian Diabetes Associations aims to implement the position of a "physical activity adviser" in multi-professional diabetes care. PMID:27052239

  4. Exercise therapy in primary biliary cirrhosis: the importance of moving while sitting on a surgical waiting list—a case study

    PubMed Central

    Hallsworth, Kate; Jopson, Laura; Jones, David E; Trenell, Michael I

    2016-01-01

    Background It is being increasingly recognised that reduced cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with poorer outcomes after major surgery. Exercise limitation and reduced aerobic capacity are common in people with end-stage liver disease. There is limited evidence about the role of exercise therapy in the management of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and no studies have looked at the effect of exercise in people with PBC who are awaiting liver transplantation. This case study is the first to report that personalised exercise therapy improves cardiorespiratory fitness in a patient with PBC without worsening symptoms of severe fatigue. Methods Cardiopulmonary exercise testing was used to assess cardiorespiratory fitness in a patient with end-stage PBC prior to listing for transplantation. A personalised exercise programme was designed to improve cardiorespiratory fitness while the patient was on the transplant waiting list. Results Anaerobic threshold, VO2PEAK and maximum workload all improved with regular exercise. Fatigue levels remained unaltered. Conclusions This patient tolerated and adhered to a personalised exercise programme for a prolonged period of time while awaiting surgery despite significant fatigue and disease burden. Liver transplantation was successfully completed and this woman remains well over 2 years post-surgery. PMID:27429732

  5. Curative effect of Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy on improving obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Qinghua; Yuan, Yandong; Jiao, Chun; Zhu, Ximei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Observe the effect of Tai Chi in combination with auricular plaster therapy on treating obesity patient with secondary hyperlipidemia. Method: Select 45 patients who suffer from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia and then adopt random digital table to divide them into a Tai Chi group, an auricular plaster therapy group and a combination group. Each group consists of 15 patients. The patients in Tai Chi group are trained with Tai Chi twice a day, while those in auricular plaster therapy are treated with auricular plaster therapy 3-5 times a day and those in the combination group are trained with Tai Chi and auricular plaster therapy twice a day. BMI, body fat percentage and blood lipid indexes are respectively detected for the selected patients in the three groups before treatment and after 180 days’ treatment. Results: After 180 days’ treatment, BMI index and body fat percentage of Tai Chi group are significantly improved in comparison with those before treatment (P<0.05) and the blood lipid index also presents the improvement trend, but the overall effect is not obvious; body fat percentage and BMI index of the auricular plaster therapy group are not improved obviously in comparison with those before the treatment (P>0.05) but the blood lipid index is improved significantly (P<0.05); each index of the combination group is improved significantly compared with those before treatment (P<0.05). By comparing the improvement effect after treatment with that of the other two groups, P<0.05, the difference shows the statistical significance and the treatment effect is more obvious. Conclusion: As for the patient suffering from simple obesity and secondary hyperlipidemia, Tai Chi exercise in combination with auricular plaster therapy can show the obvious synergistic therapeutic effect and thus the combined curative effect is obviously superior to that of the single therapy method. PMID:26885081

  6. The perspectives of older women with chronic neck pain on perceived effects of qigong and exercise therapy on aging: a qualitative interview study.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Christine; Rappenecker, Julia; Karner, Julia J; Witt, Claudia M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is prevalent in elderly populations. The goals of this study were 1) to understand the results of a randomized clinical trial - Qigong and Exercise Therapy for Elderly Patients with Chronic Neck Pain (QIBANE) - that showed no difference between qigong, exercise therapy, and no-treatment on quality of life, and 2) to understand how elderly individuals with chronic pain experience interventions of qigong and exercise therapy. A qualitative interview study was conducted with 20 QIBANE participants. Interviews asked about motivation for and expectations of trial participation, experiences with the exercise classes (qigong or exercise therapy), and changes in pain experience. Interviews were transcribed, entered into the software program ATLAS.ti, and coded thematically by two coders. Content analysis was performed. All interviewees reflected positively on their QIBANE experience and described their participation in QIBANE as helpful. However, what was discussed in both groups when they talked about "positive experiences" in the study differed between the two groups. For example, themes that emerged in the exercise-therapy group related to difficulties associated with aging and staying physically active. In the interviews with qigong group members, emergent themes related to qigong as a method that improved bodily experiences and influenced daily activities. The effects that exercise therapy and qigong have on an elderly population cannot be captured by health-related quality-of-life measurements, such as the Short Form (36) Health Survey. Broader concepts of quality of life that include the concepts of self-efficacy and positive affect may be more appropriate. The results presented in this study suggest that for this population group, the approach of patient-centered outcomes is especially pertinent in order to design meaningful intervention studies in the elderly. This means that research questions, interventions, and outcome measurements need to take

  7. The Interaction Between Statins and Exercise: Mechanisms and Strategies to Counter the Musculoskeletal Side Effects of This Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Deichmann, Richard E.; Lavie, Carl J.; Asher, Timothy; DiNicolantonio, James J.; O'Keefe, James H.; Thompson, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Broad indications for the use of statin medications are resulting in more patients using these therapies. Simultaneously, healthcare professionals are strongly advocating recommendations to increase exercise training (ET) as a means of decreasing cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk and improving other parameters of fitness. Methods We review the literature to explore mechanisms that may increase the risk of statin/ET interactions, examine the benefits and risks of combining ET and statin use, and offer strategies to minimize the hazards of this combination therapy. Results The combined use of statins and ET can result in health gains and decreased CVD risk; however, multiple factors may increase the risk of adverse events. Some of the events that have been reported with the combination of statins and ET include decreased athletic performance, muscle injury, myalgia, joint problems, decreased muscle strength, and fatigue. The type of statin, the dose, drug interactions, genetic variants, coenzyme Q10 deficiency, vitamin D deficiency, and underlying muscle diseases are among the factors that may predispose patients to intolerance of this combined therapy. Conclusion Effective strategies exist to help patients who may be intolerant of combined statin therapy and ET so they may benefit from this proven therapy. Careful attention to identifying high-risk groups and strategies to prevent or treat side effects that may occur should be employed. PMID:26730228

  8. Does exercise therapy improve the health-related quality of life of people with knee osteoarthritis? A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ryo; Ozawa, Junya; Kito, Nobuhiro; Moriyama, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exercise therapy on the health-related QOL of people with knee osteoarthritis. [Subjects] Four databases (PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) were searched for randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of exercise therapy on health-related QOL assessed by the SF-36 for inclusion in our systematic review. The methodological qualities of the trials were assessed independently by two reviewers using the PEDro scale. Pooled analyses with a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model were used in the meta-analyses to calculate the standardized mean differences and 95% confidence intervals. [Results] Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria. Our meta-analysis provides high-quality evidence that exercise therapy increases the summary score, physical functioning score, and role-physical score of knee osteoarthritis sufferers. Our meta-analysis also provides moderate-quality evidence that the physical component summary and mental component summary scores were improved to a greater extent by exercise therapy than by control interventions. [Conclusion] Exercise therapy can improve health-related QOL, as assessed by the SF-36, of knee osteoarthritis sufferers. PMID:26644699

  9. Management of pain induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs: views of patients and care providers

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The expectations of patients for managing pain induced by exercise and mobilization (PIEM) have seldom been investigated. We identified the views of patients and care providers regarding pain management induced by exercise and mobilization during physical therapy programs. Methods We performed a qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews with a stratified sample of 12 patients (7 women) and 14 care providers (6 women): 4 general practitioners [GPs], 1 rheumatologist, 1 physical medicine physician, 1 geriatrician, 2 orthopedic surgeons, and 5 physical therapists. Results Patients and care providers have differing views on PIEM in the overall management of the state of disease. Patients' descriptions of PIEM were polymorphic, and they experienced it as decreased health-related quality of life. The impact of PIEM was complex, and patient views were sometimes ambivalent, ranging from denial of symptoms to discontinuation of therapy. Care providers agreed that PIEM is generally not integrated in management strategies. Care providers more often emphasized the positive and less often the negative dimensions of PIEM than did patients. However, the consequences of PIEM cited included worsened patient clinical condition, fears about physical therapy, rejection of the physical therapist and refusal of care. PIEM follow-up is not optimal and is characterized by poor transmission of information. Patients expected education on how better to prevent stress and anxiety generated by pain, education on mobilization, and adaptations of physical therapy programs according to pain intensity. Conclusion PIEM management could be optimized by alerting care providers to the situation, improving communication among care providers, and providing education to patients and care providers. PMID:21781296

  10. Low-Grade Inflammation and Spinal Cord Injury: Exercise as Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Alves, Eduardo; de Aquino Lemos, Valdir; Ruiz da Silva, Francieli; Lira, Fabio Santos; dos Santos, Ronaldo Vagner Thomathieli; Rosa, João Paulo Pereira; Caperuto, Erico; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Tulio

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the prevalence of obesity in people with spinal cord injury can contribute to low-grade chronic inflammation and increase the risk of infection in this population. A decrease in sympathetic activity contributes to immunosuppression due to the lower activation of immune cells in the blood. The effects of physical exercise on inflammatory parameters in individuals with spinal cord injury have not been well described. We conducted a review of the literature published from 1974 to 2012. This review explored the relationships between low-grade inflammation, spinal cord injury, and exercise to discuss a novel mechanism that might explain the beneficial effects of exercise involving an increase in catecholamines and cytokines in people with spinal cord injury. PMID:23533315

  11. Waon therapy improves quality of life as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Sobajima, Mitsuo; Nozawa, Takashi; Fukui, Yasutaka; Ihori, Hiroyuki; Ohori, Takashi; Fujii, Nozomu; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Waon therapy (WT), which in Japanese means soothing warmth, is a repeated sauna therapy that improves cardiac and vascular endothelial function in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). We investigated whether WT could improve the quality of life (QOL) of CHF patients in addition to improving cardiac function and exercise capacity.A total of 49 CHF patients (69 ± 14 years old) were treated with a 60°C far infrared-ray dry sauna bath for 15 minutes and then kept in a bed covered with blankets for 30 minutes once a day for 3 weeks. At baseline and 3 weeks after starting WT, cardiac function, 6-minute walk distance (6MWD), flow mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery, and SF36-QOL scores were determined.WT significantly improved left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), 6MWD, and FMD (3.6 ± 2.3 to 5.1 ± 2.8%, P < 0.01). Moreover, WT significantly improved not only the physical (PC) but also mental component (MC) of the QOL scores. WT-induced improvement of PC was negatively correlated with changes in BNP (r = -0.327, P < 0.05), but MC improvement was not related directly to changes in BNP, LVEF, or 6MWD. WT-induced changes in MC were not parallel to PC improvement.WT improved QOL as well as cardiac function and exercise capacity in patients with CHF. Mental QOL improved independently of WT-induced improvement of cardiac function and exercise capacity. PMID:25740582

  12. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  13. Effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy on muscle tone and upper extremity function in stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Boo, Jung-A; Moon, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Sun-Min; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen chronic stroke patients were included in this study. Prior to occupational therapy, whole-body exercise was performed for 10 minutes, 5 times per week, for a total of 8 weeks. Muscle tone and upper extremity function were measured. The Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure muscle tone, and the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Fugl-Meyer Assessment scale (FugM) were used to measure upper extremity function. [Results] MAS score was significantly decreased, and MFT and FugM were significantly increased. [Conclusion] These results indicate that whole-body vibration exercise in a sitting position prior to therapy had a positive effect on muscle tone, and upper extremity function in stroke patients. PMID:27065354

  14. The effect of low-level laser therapy on oxidative stress and functional fitness in aged rats subjected to swimming: an aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Guaraldo, Simone A; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Amadio, Eliane Martins; Antônio, Ednei Luis; Silva, Flávio; Portes, Leslie Andrews; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conjunction with aerobic training interferes with oxidative stress, thereby influencing the performance of old rats participating in swimming. Thirty Wistar rats (Norvegicus albinus) (24 aged and six young) were tested. The older animals were randomly divided into aged-control, aged-exercise, aged-LLLT, aged-LLLT/exercise, and young-control. Aerobic capacity (VO2max(0.75)) was analyzed before and after the training period. The exercise groups were trained for 6 weeks, and the LLLT was applied at 808 nm and 4 J energy. The rats were euthanized, and muscle tissue was collected to analyze the index of lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activities. VO2 (0.75)max values in the aged-LLLT/exercise group were significantly higher from those in the baseline older group (p <0.01) and the LLLT and exercise group (p <0.05). The results indicate that the activities of CAT, SOD, and GPx were higher and statistically significant (p <0.05) in the LLLT/exercise group than those in the LLLT and exercise groups. Young animals presented lesser and statistically significant activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the aged group. The LLLT/exercise group and the LLLT and exercise group could also mitigate the concentration of TBARS (p > 0.05). Laser therapy in conjunction with aerobic training may reduce oxidative stress, as well as increase VO2 (0.75)max, indicating that an aerobic exercise such as swimming increases speed and improves performance in aged animals treated with LLLT. PMID:26861983

  15. TNF-α and TNFR1 responses to recovery therapies following acute resistance exercise

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Jeremy R.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Fragala, Maren S.; Jajtner, Adam R.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Wells, Adam J.; Mangine, Gerald T.; Fukuda, David H.; Stout, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the effect of two commonly used therapeutic modalities (a) neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) and (b) cold water immersion (CWI) on circulating tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and monocyte TNF-α receptor (TNFR1) expression following intense acute resistance exercise and subsequent recovery. Thirty (n = 30) resistance trained men (22.5 ± 2.7 y) performed an acute heavy resistance exercise protocol on three consecutive days followed by one of three recovery methods (CON, NMES, and CWI). Circulating TNF-α levels were assayed and TNFR1 expression on CD14+ monocytes was measured by flow cytometry measured PRE, immediately post (IP), 30-min post (30M), 24 h post (24H), and 48 h post (48H) exercise. Circulating TNF-α was elevated at IP (p = 0.001) and 30M (p = 0.005) and decreased at 24H and 48H recovery from IP in CON (p = 0.015) and CWI (p = 0.011). TNF-α did not significantly decrease from IP during recovery in NMES. TNFR1 expression was elevated (p < 0.001) at 30M compared to PRE and all other time points. No significant differences between groups were observed in TNFR1 expression. During recovery (24H, 48H) from muscle damaging exercise, NMES treatment appears to prevent the decline in circulating TNF-α observed during recovery in those receiving no treatment or CWI. PMID:25741287

  16. Dual AAV therapy ameliorates exercise-induced muscle injury and functional ischemia in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yadong; Yue, Yongping; Li, Liang; Hakim, Chady H.; Zhang, Keqing; Thomas, Gail D.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) membrane delocalization contributes to the pathogenesis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by promoting functional muscle ischemia and exacerbating muscle injury during exercise. We have previously shown that supra-physiological expression of nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin restores normal blood flow regulation and prevents functional ischemia in transgenic mdx mice, a DMD model. A critical next issue is whether systemic dual adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy can restore nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin expression and mitigate muscle activity-related functional ischemia and injury. Here, we performed systemic gene transfer in mdx and mdx4cv mice using a pair of dual AAV vectors that expressed a 6 kb nNOS-binding mini-dystrophin gene. Vectors were packaged in tyrosine mutant AAV-9 and co-injected (5 × 1012 viral genome particles/vector/mouse) via the tail vein to 1-month-old dystrophin-null mice. Four months later, we observed 30–50% mini-dystrophin positive myofibers in limb muscles. Treatment ameliorated histopathology, increased muscle force and protected against eccentric contraction-induced injury. Importantly, dual AAV therapy successfully prevented chronic exercise-induced muscle force drop. Doppler hemodynamic assay further showed that therapy attenuated adrenergic vasoconstriction in contracting muscle. Our results suggest that partial transduction can still ameliorate nNOS delocalization-associated functional deficiency. Further evaluation of nNOS binding mini-dystrophin dual AAV vectors is warranted in dystrophic dogs and eventually in human patients. PMID:23681067

  17. Effects of short-period exercise training and orlistat therapy on body composition and maximal power production capacity in obese patients.

    PubMed

    Colak, R; Ozcelik, O

    2004-01-01

    We examined the effects of weight loss induced by diet-orlistat (DO) and diet-orlistat combined with exercise (DOE) on maximal work rate production (Wmax) capacity in obese patients. Total of 24 obese patients were involved in this study. Twelve of them were subjected to DO therapy only and the remaining 12 patients participated in a regular aerobic exercise-training program in addition to DO therapy (DOE). Each patient performed two incremental ramp exercise tests up to exhaustion using an electromagnetically-braked cycle ergometer: one at the onset and one at the end of the 4th week. DOE therapy caused a significant decrease in total body weight: 101.5+/-17.4 kg (basal) vs 96.3+/-17.3 kg (4 wk) associated with a significant decrease in body fat mass: 45.0+/-10.5 kg (basal) vs 40.9+/-9.8 kg (4 wk). DO therapy also resulted in a significant decrease of total body weight 94.9+/-14.9 kg (basal) vs 91.6+/-13.5 kg (4 wk) associated with small but significant decreases in body fat mass: 37.7+/-5.6 kg (basal) to 36.0+/-6.2 kg (4 wk). Weight reduction achieved during DO therapy was not associated with increased Wmax capacity: 106+/-32 W (basal) vs 106+/-33 W (4 wk), while DOE therapy resulted in a markedly increased Wmax capacity: 109+/-39 W (basal) vs 138+/-30 W (4 wk). DO therapy combined with aerobic exercise training resulted in a significant reduction of fat mass tissue and markedly improved the aerobic fitness and Wmax capacities of obese patients. Considering this improvement within such a short period, physicians should consider applying an aerobic exercise-training program to sedentary obese patients for improving their physical fitness and thereby reduce the negative outcomes of obesity. PMID:14984314

  18. The Role of Physical Exercise in Wilderness Therapy for Troubled Adolescent Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caulkins, Michael C.; White, Dave D.; Russell, Keith C.

    2006-01-01

    This study explores the impacts of backpacking as a therapeutic process for troubled adolescent women participating in wilderness therapy. A qualitative case study approach was used to investigate the experience of six adolescent women and three female wilderness instructors at an established wilderness therapy program. Data were collected through…

  19. The effect of exercise therapy in head and neck cancer patients in the treatment of radiotherapy-induced trismus: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Scherpenhuizen, Anne; van Waes, Anne M A; Janssen, Luuk M; Van Cann, Ellen M; Stegeman, Inge

    2015-08-01

    Trismus is characterized by a reduced ability to open the mouth, directly affecting many aspects of daily life, such as chewing, swallowing, speaking and maintaining oral hygiene. Several studies have shown that trismus affects health related quality of life. Radiotherapy in the head and neck area is identified as one of the most frequent causes of trismus in head and neck cancer (HNC) patients. Currently, there is no standard treatment for trismus. Several stretching techniques and jaw mobilizing devices are available, but their effect in radiotherapy-induced trismus is still largely unknown. With this review we give an overview of the present relevant literature and compare the effect of exercise therapy versus no exercise therapy on jaw mobility, expressed in millimeters mouth opening, in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. A systematic literature search in four electronic bibliographic databases was conducted in July 2014. Selected articles were critically appraised on relevance and validity. Best available evidence was analyzed and compared. Three of the four selected articles show a significant increase (p-value<0.05) in maximal interincisal opening (MIO) after exercise therapy using a jaw-mobilizing device. One article reports a significant decrease in MIO. However, this decrease is less in the intervention group, which implies a positive effect of exercise therapy. Based on this current best clinical evidence, it can be assumed that exercise therapy with a jaw-mobilizing device yields better results than no exercise, with regards to opening of the mouth in HNC patients with radiotherapy-induced trismus. PMID:26058916

  20. Comparing Supervised Exercise Therapy to Invasive Measures in the Management of Symptomatic Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aherne, Thomas; McHugh, Seamus; Kheirelseid, Elrasheid A.; Lee, Michael J.; McCaffrey, Noel; Moneley, Daragh; Leahy, Austin L.; Naughton, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Consensus rightly demands the incorporation of supervised exercise training (SET) into PAD treatment protocols. However, the exact role of SET particularly its relationship with intervention requires further clarification. While supervised exercise is undoubtedly an excellent tool in the conservative management of mild PAD its use in more advanced disease as an adjunct to open or endovascular intervention is not clearly defined. Indeed its use in isolation in this cohort is incompletely reported. The aim of this review is to clarify the exact role of SET in the management of symptomatic PAD and in particular to assess its role in comparison with or as an adjunct to invasive intervention. A systematic literature search revealed a total 11 randomised studies inclusive of 969 patients. All studies compared SET and intervention with monotherapy. Study results suggest that exercise is a complication-free treatment. Furthermore, it appears to offer significant improvements in patients walk distances with a combination of both SET and intervention offering a superior walking outcome to monotherapy in those requiring invasive measures. PMID:26601122

  1. Effects of Performing Morning Versus Afternoon Exercise on Glycemic Control and Hypoglycemia Frequency in Type 1 Diabetes Patients on Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pump Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Ana Maria; Gomez, Claudia; Aschner, Pablo; Veloza, Angelica; Muñoz, Oscar; Rubio, Claudia; Vallejo, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although physical exercise (PE) is recommended for individuals with type 1 diabetes (DM1), participation in exercise is challenging because it increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia and the available therapeutic options to prevent it frequently result in hyperglycemia. There is no clear recommendation about the best timing for exercise. The aim of this study was to compare the risk of hypoglycemia after morning or afternoon exercise sessions up to 36 hours postworkout. Methods: This randomized crossover study enrolled subjects with DM1, older than 18 years of age, on sensor-augmented insulin pump (SAP) therapy. Participants underwent 2 moderate-intensity exercise sessions; 1 in the morning and 1 in the afternoon, separated by a 7 to 14 day wash-out period. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data were collected 24 hours before, during and 36 hours after each session. Results: Thirty-five subjects (mean age 30.31 ± 12.66 years) participated in the study. The rate of hypoglycemia was significantly lower following morning versus afternoon exercise sessions (5.6 vs 10.7 events per patient, incidence rate ratio, 0.52; 95% CI, 0.43-0.63; P < .0001). Most hypoglycemic events occurred 15-24 hours after the session. On days following morning exercise sessions, there were 20% more CGM readings in near-euglycemic range (70-200 mg/dL) than on days prior to morning exercise (P = .003). Conclusions: Morning exercise confers a lower risk of late-onset hypoglycemia than afternoon exercise and improves metabolic control on the subsequent day. PMID:25555390

  2. Effect of Home Exercise Program Performance in Patients with Osteoarthritis of the Knee or the Spine on the Visual Analog Scale after Discharge from Physical Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Hamilton; Onishi, Kentaro

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to assess the effect of the frequency of home exercise program (HEP) performance on pain [10-point visual analog scale (VAS)] in patients with osteoarthritis of the spine or knee after more than 6 months discharge from physical therapy (PT). We performed a retrospective chart review of 48 adult patients with a clinical…

  3. Metabolic effects of estrogen substitution in combination with targeted exercise training on the therapy of obesity in ovariectomized Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Zoth, Nora; Weigt, Carmen; Zengin, Sinan; Selder, Oliver; Selke, Nadine; Kalicinski, Michael; Piechotta, Marion; Diel, Patrick

    2012-05-01

    Postmenopausal women tend to have a higher risk in developing obesity and thus metabolic syndrome. Recently we could demonstrate that physical activity and estrogen replacement are effective strategies to prevent the development of nutritional induced obesity in an animal model. The aim of this study was to determine the combined effects of estrogen treatment and exercise training on already established obesity. Therefore ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SHAM) female Wistar rats were exposed to a high fat diet for ten months. After this induction period obese SHAM and OVX rats either remained sedentary or performed treadmill training for six weeks. In addition OVX rats were treated with 17β-Estradiol (E(2)) alone, or in combination with training. Before and after intervention effects on lipid and glucose metabolism were investigated. Training resulted in SHAM and OVX rats in a significant decrease of body weight, subcutaneous and visceral body fat, size of adipocytes and the serum levels of leptin, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein and triglycerides. In OVX animals E(2) treatment resulted in similar effects. Often the combination of E(2) treatment and training was most effective. Analysis of the respiratory quotient indicates that SHAM animals had a better fat burning capacity than OVX rats. There was a tendency that training in SHAM animals and E(2) treatment in OVX animals could improve this capacity. Analysis of glucose metabolism revealed that obese SHAM animals had higher glucose tolerance than OVX animals. Training improved glucose tolerance in SHAM and OVX rats, E(2) treatment in OVX rats. The combination of both was most effective. Our results indicate that even after a short intervention period of six weeks E(2) treatment and exercise training improve parameters related to lipid as well as glucose metabolism and energy expenditure in a model of already established obesity. In conclusion a combination of hormone replacement therapy and exercise

  4. Evaluating the Training Effects of Two Swallowing Rehabilitation Therapies Using Surface Electromyography-Chin Tuck Against Resistance (CTAR) Exercise and the Shaker Exercise.

    PubMed

    Sze, Wei Ping; Yoon, Wai Lam; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rickard Liow, Susan J

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the efficacy of two dysphagia interventions, the Chin Tuck against Resistance (CTAR) and Shaker exercises, were evaluated based on two principles in exercise science-muscle-specificity and training intensity. Both exercises were developed to strengthen the suprahyoid muscles, whose contractions facilitate the opening of the upper esophageal sphincter, thereby improving bolus transfer. Thirty-nine healthy adults performed two trials of both exercises in counter-balanced order. Surface electromyography (sEMG) recordings were simultaneously collected from suprahyoid muscle group and sternocleidomastoid muscle during the exercises. Converging results using sEMG amplitude analyses suggested that the CTAR was more specific in targeting the suprahyoid muscles than the Shaker exercise. Fatigue analyses on sEMG signals further indicated that the suprahyoid muscle group were equally or significantly fatigued (depending on metric), when participants carried out CTAR compared to the Shaker exercise. Importantly, unlike during Shaker exercise, the sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly less activated and fatigued during CTAR. Lowering the chin against resistance is therefore sufficiently specific and intense to fatigue the suprahyoid muscles. PMID:26837612

  5. Exercise: Benefits of Exercise

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. Exercise also helps people ... or difficulty walking. To learn about exercise and diabetes, see "Exercise and Type 2 Diabetes" from Go4Life®, ...

  6. Effect of low-level laser therapy (808 nm) on skeletal muscle after endurance exercise training in rats

    PubMed Central

    Assis, Livia; Yamashita, Fernanda; Magri, Angela M. P.; Fernandes, Kelly R.; Yamauchi, Liria; Renno, Ana C. M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has been demonstrated to be effective in optimizing skeletal muscle performance in animal experiments and in clinical trials. However, little is known about the effects of LLLT on muscle recovery after endurance training. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluates the effects of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) applied after an endurance training protocol on biochemical markers and morphology of skeletal muscle in rats. METHOD: Wistar rats were divided into control group (CG), trained group (TG), and trained and laser irradiated group (TLG). The endurance training was performed on a treadmill, 1 h/day, 5 days/wk, for 8 wk at 60% of the maximal speed reached during the maximal effort test (Tmax) and laser irradiation was applied after training. RESULTS: Both trained groups showed significant increase in speed compared to the CG. The TLG demonstrated a significantly reduced lactate level, increased tibialis anterior (TA) fiber cross-section area, and decreased TA fiber density. Myogenin expression was higher in soleus and TA muscles in both trained groups. In addition, LLLT produced myogenin downregulation in the TA muscle of trained animals. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that LLLT could be an effective therapeutic approach for stimulating recovery during an endurance exercise protocol. PMID:26647747

  7. Education, progressive muscle relaxation therapy, and exercise for the treatment of night eating syndrome. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vander Wal, Jillon S; Maraldo, Toni M; Vercellone, Allison C; Gagne, Danielle A

    2015-06-01

    Night eating syndrome (NES) is a circadian rhythm disorder in which food intake is shifted toward the end of the day, interfering with sleep. According to the biobehavioral model of NES, the disorder is the result of a genetic predisposition that, coupled with stress, leads to enhanced reuptake of serotonin, thereby dysregulating circadian rhythms and decreasing satiety. Using the biobehavioral model as a guide, we developed a brief behavioral intervention using education, relaxation strategies, and exercise to address the core symptoms of NES. In this pilot randomized controlled clinical trial, 44 participants with NES were randomly assigned to an educational group (E; n = 14), E plus progressive muscle relaxation therapy (PMR; n = 15); or PMR plus exercise (PMR Plus, n = 15). Participants received a baseline intervention with 1- and 3-week follow-up sessions. Effectiveness analyses showed that participants in all three groups evidenced significant reductions on measures of NES symptoms (p < .001), depression (p < .05), anxiety (p < .01), and perceived stress (p < .05). However, the only significant between group change was for the percent of food eaten after the evening meal, with the PMR group showing the greatest reduction (-30.54%), followed by the PMR Plus group (-20.42%) and the E group (-9.5%); only the difference between the PMR and E groups was statistically significant (p = .012). Reductions in NES scores were significantly associated with reductions on measures of depression (r = .47; p < .01) and perceived stress (r = .37; p < .05), but not anxiety (r = .26, p = ns). Results support the role of education and relaxation in the behavioral treatment of NES. PMID:25660340

  8. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL), provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET) to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS. Methods / Design A multicentre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a postponed information model will be conducted. A sample of 120 patients with ALS (1 month post diagnosis) will be recruited from 3 university hospitals and 1 rehabilitation centre. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1) AET + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care, (3) Usual care. AET consists of a 16-week aerobic exercise programme, on 3 days a week. CBT consists of individual psychological support of patients in 5 to 10 sessions over a 16-week period. QoL, functioning and secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. Discussion The FACTS-2-ALS study is the first theory

  9. Exercise therapy versus arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for degenerative meniscal tear in middle aged patients: randomised controlled trial with two year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Risberg, May Arna; Stensrud, Silje; Ranstam, Jonas; Engebretsen, Lars; Roos, Ewa M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine if exercise therapy is superior to arthroscopic partial meniscectomy for knee function in middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tears. Design Randomised controlled superiority trial. Setting Orthopaedic departments at two public hospitals and two physiotherapy clinics in Norway. Participants 140 adults, mean age 49.5 years (range 35.7-59.9), with degenerative medial meniscal tear verified by magnetic resonance imaging. 96% had no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis. Interventions 12 week supervised exercise therapy alone or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone. Main outcome measures Intention to treat analysis of between group difference in change in knee injury and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS4), defined a priori as the mean score for four of five KOOS subscale scores (pain, other symptoms, function in sport and recreation, and knee related quality of life) from baseline to two year follow-up and change in thigh muscle strength from baseline to three months. Results No clinically relevant difference was found between the two groups in change in KOOS4 at two years (0.9 points, 95% confidence interval −4.3 to 6.1; P=0.72). At three months, muscle strength had improved in the exercise group (P≤0.004). No serious adverse events occurred in either group during the two year follow-up. 19% of the participants allocated to exercise therapy crossed over to surgery during the two year follow-up, with no additional benefit. Conclusion The observed difference in treatment effect was minute after two years of follow-up, and the trial’s inferential uncertainty was sufficiently small to exclude clinically relevant differences. Exercise therapy showed positive effects over surgery in improving thigh muscle strength, at least in the short term. Our results should encourage clinicians and middle aged patients with degenerative meniscal tear and no definitive radiographic evidence of osteoarthritis to consider

  10. [Indication for exercise therapy in infancy in the prevention of childhood cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Weber, S

    1983-01-01

    As in physiotherapy of cerebral palsy early therapy is desired, if possible even in early infancy, a period, when a safe diagnosis does not yet exist, infants at risk have to be identified. The resulting difficulties in early diagnosis and inevitability of treating a considerable number of not affected infants are discussed. The most common methods of physiotherapy are briefly described and evaluated critically concerning possible side effects as well. Superiority in effectivity improving motor efficiency of one method over another cannot be proven. It is shown, however, that in the Vojta method adverse psychological side effects cannot be excluded. Therefore, physiotherapy being a purely prophylactic and not a therapeutic procedure in the multitude of cases should be considered in ordering and selecting a particular method and the one according to Bobath should be favoured. PMID:6632714

  11. Kinesio Taping Does Not Provide Additional Benefits in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain Who Receive Exercise and Manual Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Added, Marco Aurélio Nemitalla; Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; de Freitas, Diego Galace; Fukuda, Thiago Yukio; Monteiro, Renan Lima; Salomão, Evelyn Cassia; de Medeiros, Flávia Cordeiro; Costa, Lucíola da Cunha Menezes

    2016-07-01

    Study Design Randomized controlled trial. Background Many clinical practice guidelines endorse both manual therapy and exercise as effective treatment options for patients with low back pain. To optimize the effects of the treatments recommended by the guidelines, a new intervention known as Kinesio Taping is being widely used in these patients. Objectives To determine the effectiveness of Kinesio Taping in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain when added to a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy. Methods One hundred forty-eight patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain were randomly allocated to receive 10 (twice weekly) sessions of physical therapy, consisting of exercise and manual therapy, or the same treatment with the addition of Kinesio Taping applied to the lower back. The primary outcomes were pain intensity and disability (5 weeks after randomization) and the secondary outcomes were pain intensity, disability (3 months and 6 months after randomization), global perceived effect, and satisfaction with care (5 weeks after treatment). Data were collected by a blinded assessor. Results No between-group differences were observed in the primary outcomes of pain intensity (mean difference, -0.01 points; 95% confidence interval [CI]: -0.88, 0.85) or disability (mean difference, 1.14 points; 95% CI: -0.85, 3.13) at 5 weeks' follow-up. In addition, no between-group differences were observed for any of the other outcomes evaluated, except for disability 6 months after randomization (mean difference, 2.01 points; 95% CI: 0.03, 4.00) in favor of the control group. Conclusion Patients who received a physical therapy program consisting of exercise and manual therapy did not get additional benefit from the use of Kinesio Taping. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 1b. Prospectively registered May 28, 2013 at www.ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01866332). J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):506-513. Epub 6 Jun 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016

  12. Concurrent Intervention With Exercises and Stabilized Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy Reduced the Disease Activity in Patients With Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Li, Wen-Rong; Zhang, Hua; Tian, Xu; Wei, Wei; Wang, Chun-Mei

    2015-12-01

    Since the use of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor therapy is becoming wider, the effects of concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) are different. The study aimed to objectively evaluate whether concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. A search from PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was electronically performed to collect studies which compared concurrent intervention with exercise and TNF inhibitor to conventional approach in terms of disease activity in patients with AS published from their inception to June 2015. Studies that measured the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), and chest expansion as outcomes were included. Two independent investigators screened the identified articles, extracted the data, and assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. Quantitative analysis was performed with Review Manager (RevMan) software (version 5.3.0). A total of 5 studies comprising 221 participants were included in the study. Meta-analyses showed that concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy significantly reduced the BASMI scores (MD, -0.99; 95% CI, -1.61 to -0.38) and BASDAI scores (MD, -0.58; 95% CI, -1.10 to -0.06), but the BASFI scores (MD, -0.31; 95% CI, -0.76 to 0.15) was not reduced, and chest expansion (MD, 0.80; 95% CI, -0.18 to 1.78) was not increased. Concurrent intervention with exercises and stabilized TNF inhibitors therapy can reduce the disease activity in patients with AS. More randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with high-quality, large-scale, and appropriate follow-up are warranted to further establish the benefit of concurrent intervention with exercises and TNF inhibitors for

  13. Group-based exercise in daily clinical practice to improve physical fitness in men with prostate cancer undergoing androgen deprivation therapy: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Østergren, Peter; Ragle, Anne-Mette; Jakobsen, Henrik; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Vinther, Anders; Sønksen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Level 1 evidence supports the use of supervised exercise to mitigate the adverse effects of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in men with prostate cancer. The data, however, have been generated in controlled research settings and might not be transferable to daily clinical practice. This article describes the design of an ongoing prospective observational study to evaluate the potential benefits of exercise in daily clinical practice. Methods and analysis Men diagnosed with prostate cancer starting or already receiving ADT at our facility are invited to participate in a 12-week exercise programme implemented as the standard of care. Exclusion criteria are opioid-demanding treatment for skeletal pain, an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status above 2 or the inability to perform floor and machine exercises independently. The intervention consists of an initial educational session of 1½ hours followed by 12 weeks of group-based supervised training two times a week. The focus of the exercise is progressive resistance training in combination with aerobic training. Participants are measured at baseline, after 12 weeks and after 24 weeks as part of the programme. Primary endpoints of this study are changes in physical fitness evaluated by the 30 s Chair-Stand Test and Graded Cycling Test with Talk Test. Secondary endpoints include changes in quality of life, body composition and safety of exercise. Inclusion started in August 2014, with 169 participants being included by December 2015. Ethics and dissemination The study has been reviewed by the Scientific Ethical Committee of the Capital Region of Denmark (reference number H-3-2013-FSP39). The results of the study will be published in peer-reviewed international journals and will be presented at national and international conferences and symposiums. Trial registration number NCT02631681; Pre-results. PMID:27357198

  14. The effects of scapular stabilization based exercise therapy on pain, posture, flexibility and shoulder mobility in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a controlled randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Moezy, Azar; Sepehrifar, Saeed; Solaymani Dodaran, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysfunction in the kinetic chain caused by poor scapula stabilization can contribute to shoulder injuries and Shoulder Impingement Syndrome (SIS). The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of two treatment approaches scapular stabilization based exercise therapy and physical therapy in patients with SIS. Methods: The study is a randomized clinical trial in which 68 patients with SIS were randomly assigned in two groups of exercise therapy (ET) and physical therapy (PT) and received 18 sessions of treatment. Pain, shoulders' range of abduction and external rotation, shoulder protraction, scapular rotation and symmetry as well as postural assessment and Pectoralis minor length were evaluated pre and post intervention. The paired-sample t test and the independent sample t test were applied respectively to determine the differences in each group and between two groups. Results: Our findings indicated significant differences in abduction and external rotation range, improvement of forward shoulder translation and increase in the flexibility of the involved shoulder between the two groups (respectively ; p=0.024, p=0.001, p<0/0001, p<0/0001). No significant difference was detected in pain reduction between the groups (p=0.576). Protraction of the shoulder (p<0.0001), forward head posture (p<0/0001) and mid thoracic curvature (p<0.0001) revealed a significant improvement in the ET group. Apparent changes occurred in scapular rotation and symmetry in both groups but no significant differences were observed between the two groups (respectively; p=0.183, p=0.578). Conclusion: The scapular stabilization based exercise intervention was successful in increasing shoulder range, decreasing forward head and shoulder postures and Pectoralis minor flexibility. PMID:25664288

  15. Evidence for exercise therapy in the treatment of chronic disease based on at least three randomized controlled trials--summary of published systematic reviews.

    PubMed

    Kujala, Urho M

    2004-12-01

    Final evidence for the overall benefits of exercise therapy in the treatment/rehabilitation of specific chronic disease comes from randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This paper summarizes current evidence that is based on a systematic review including data from at least three RCTs with contrast for exercise only. The quality of specific RCTs as well as the quality of systematic reviews varies, the newest ones usually being of higher quality than the older ones. The most consistent finding of the studies is that aerobic capacity and muscular strength of patients can be improved without causing detrimental effects on disease progression. Severe complications during these carefully tailored programs were rare. The treatment periods and follow-up times of the majority of the RCTs are of a too short duration to document group differences in disease progression. However, exercise reduces disease-related symptoms in many diseases, such as osteoarthritis, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder. Also, RCTs studying patients with coronary heart disease as well as patients with heart failure show that all-cause mortality is lower in exercisers than in controls. PMID:15546328

  16. A study of abdominal ultrasound therapy combined with complex exercise for effective obesity management among shift work employees

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Jin; Lee, Yeon-Seop; Lee, Byoung-Kwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to examine the effects of abdominal ultrasound accompanied by complex exercise in shift work employees working in industry. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty shift work employees were randomly assigned to either a complex exercise group (control group) or a complex exercise and ultrasound treatment group (experimental group). The control group carried out complex exercise five times per week for 4 weeks, while the experimental group performed complex exercise twice per week and received deep ultrasound three times per week for 4 weeks. [Results] The results showed that there were no significant differences in body composition between the two groups. There were significant changes in weight, lean body mass, body fat mass, and body mass index in the control group; meanwhile, significant changes in weight and body fat mass were observed in the experimental group. There were no significant differences in blood lipids between the two groups. There was a significant decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in the control group; furthermore, a significant decrease in total cholesterol was observed in the experimental group, along with significant increases in HDL-C and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. [Conclusion] According to the results of this study concerning short-term obesity management programs, complex exercise was effective for improving of body composition and weight loss, while complex exercise combined with abdominal ultrasound had a good effect on blood lipids and secondary complication prevention. PMID:25642080

  17. Effects of mirror therapy integrated with task-oriented exercise on the balance function of patients with poststroke hemiparesis: a randomized-controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Oh, Duck-Won

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to explore the effects of mirror therapy integrated with task-oriented exercise on balance function in poststroke hemiparesis. Twenty patients with poststroke hemiparesis were assigned randomly to an experimental group (EG) and a control group (CG), with 10 individuals each. Participants of the EG and CG received a task-oriented exercise program with a focus on the strengthening of the lower limb and the practice of balance-related functional tasks. An additional option for the EG was front and side wall mirrors to provide visual feedback for their own movements while performing the exercise. The program was performed for 30 min, twice a day, five times per week for 4 weeks. Outcome measures included the Berg balance scale, the timed up-and-go test, and quantitative data (balance index and dynamic limits of stability). In the EG and CG, all variables showed significant differences between pretest and post-test (P<0.05), and post-test values of all variables appeared to be significantly different between two groups (P<0.05). Furthermore, in the EG, the change values between pretest and post-test values of Berg balance scale (13.00±3.20 vs. 6.60±4.55 scores), and timed up-and-go test (6.45±3.00 vs. 3.61±1.84 s), balance index (2.29±0.51 vs. 0.96±0.65 scores), dynamic limits of stability (7.70±3.83 vs. 3.70±4.60 scores) were significantly higher than those of the CG (P<0.05). The findings suggest that a mirror therapy may be used as a beneficial therapeutic option to facilitate the effects of a task-oriented exercise on balance function of patients with poststroke hemiparesis. PMID:26658524

  18. Effect of Combination Exercise Therapy on Walking Distance, Postural Balance, Fatigue and Quality of Life in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Sangelaji, Bahram; Nabavi, Seyed Massood; Estebsari, Fatemeh; Banshi, Mohammad Reza; Rashidian, Hamideh; Jamshidi, Ensiyeh; Dastoorpour, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease of the nervous system which has numerous disabling effects on patients. Objectives: This study aimed at investigating the short- and long-term effects of a period of combination exercise therapy on walking distance, balance, fatigue and quality of life in multiple sclerosis patients referred to the physiotherapy clinic of Iran's Multiple Sclerosis Society in 2013. Patients and Methods: This study was a randomized controlled clinical trial on 59 patients divided into the intervention (n = 39) and control groups (n = 20). The intervention group received 10 weeks of combination therapy including aerobic, strengthening, balancing and stretching exercises. A week before, a week later and a year after the beginning of the exercises, both groups of patients received BBSS, six minute walking, Family Support Services (FSS), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and quality of life tests. The scores of two groups were then compared using statistical tests such as repeated measures ANOVA test. Results: The results indicated significant changes in the intervention group in comparison to the control group in the second phase of the study comparing to the first one for all tests except EDSS (Mean difference scores of EDSS: -0.13), P-value = 0.60; FSS: -6.9, P-value = 0.02, Mental Quality of Life (QOL): 16.36, P-value = 0.001; Physical QOL: 12.17, P-value = 0.001, six minute walking: 137.2, P-value < 0.0001; and Berg: 3.34, P-value < 0.0001. These changes were not significant in the second phase of the study comparing to the third one; however, they were again significant in the third phase comparing to the first phase of the study (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Exercise has significant effect on improving symptoms of multiple sclerosis, and cessation of exercise may cause recurrence of symptoms in the intervention group with a slope similar to that of the control group. Therefore, continuous rather than short period

  19. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  20. Exercise support for therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, M. J.; Irick, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Constant-value weight-relieving apparatus, which moves on rollers on overhead track, supports weight of walking, stooping, squatting, or standing patient with combination of multiple pulleys and spring clusters. Individually preselected support force is constant for all movements.

  1. How Well Do Randomized Controlled Trials Reflect Standard Care: A Comparison between Scientific Research Data and Standard Care Data in Patients with Intermittent Claudication undergoing Supervised Exercise Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mesters, E. P. E.; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M. W. G.; Teijink, J. A. W.; de Bie, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to assess the degree and impact of patient selection of patients with intermittent claudication undergoing supervised exercise therapy in Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs) by describing commonly used exclusion criteria, and by comparing baseline characteristics and treatment response measured as improvement in maximum walking distance of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care. Methods We compared data from RCTs with unselected standard care data. First, we systematically reviewed RCTs that investigated the effect of supervised exercise therapy in patients with intermittent claudication. For each of the RCTs, we extracted and categorized the eligibility criteria and their justifications. To assess whether people in RCTs (n = 1,440) differed from patients treated in daily practice (n = 3,513), in terms of demographics, comorbidity and walking capacity, we assessed between group-differences using t-tests. To assess differences in treatment response, we compared walking distances at three and six months between groups using t-tests. Differences of ≥15% were set as a marker for a clinically relevant difference. Results All 20 included RCTs excluded large segments of patients with intermittent claudication. One-third of the RCTs eligibility criteria were justified. Despite, the numerous eligibility criteria, we found that baseline characteristics were largely comparable. A statistically significant and (borderline) clinically relevant difference in treatment response after three and six months between trial participants and standard care patients was found. Improvements in maximum walking distance after three and six months were significantly and clinically less in trial participants. Conclusions The finding that baseline characteristics of patients included in RCTs and patients treated in standard care were comparable, may indicate that RCT eligibility criteria are used implicitly by professionals

  2. Rehabilitation, exercise therapy and music in patients with Parkinson's disease: a meta-analysis of the effects of music-based movement therapy on walking ability, balance and quality of life.

    PubMed

    de Dreu, M J; van der Wilk, A S D; Poppe, E; Kwakkel, G; van Wegen, E E H

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that music-based movement (MbM) therapy may be a promising intervention to improve gait and gait-related activities in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, because it naturally combines cognitive movement strategies, cueing techniques, balance exercises and physical activity while focussing on the enjoyment of moving on music instead of the current mobility limitations of the patient. A meta-analysis of RCTs on the efficacy of MbM-therapy, including individual rhythmic music training and partnered dance classes, was performed. Identified studies (K = 6) were evaluated on methodological quality, and summary effect sizes (SES) were calculated. Studies were generally small (total N= 168). Significant homogeneous SESs were found for the Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up and Go test and stride length (SESs: 4.1,2.2,0.11; P-values <0.01; I(2) 0,0,7%, respectively). A sensitivity analysis on type of MbM-therapy (dance- or gait-related interventions) revealed a significant improvement in walking velocity for gait-related MbM-therapy, but not for dance-related MbM-therapy. No significant effects were found for UPDRS-motor score, Freezing of Gait and Quality of Life. Overall, MbM-therapy appears promising for the improvement of gait and gait-related activities in PD. Future studies should incorporate larger groups and focus on long-term compliance and follow-up. PMID:22166406

  3. Effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy on patients with ankylosing spondylitis: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Şilte Karamanlioğlu, Duygu; Aktas, Ilknur; Ozkan, Feyza Unlu; Kaysin, Meryem; Girgin, Nuray

    2016-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate effectiveness of ultrasound treatment applied with exercise therapy in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Fifty-two patients, who were diagnosed according to modified New York criteria, were aged 25-60, and have spine pain, were randomly assigned to two groups. Ultrasound (US) and exercise therapy were applied to treatment group (27); placebo US treatment and exercise therapy were applied to control group (25). Patients were evaluated before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 4 weeks after the treatment. Daily and night pain, morning stiffness, patient global assessment (PGA), doctor global assessment (DGA), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Metrology Index (BASMI), Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire, Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Score (ASDAS) erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and ASDAS C-reactive protein (CRP) were used as clinical parameters. In US group, all parameters showed significant improvements at 2 and 6 weeks, in comparison with the baseline. In placebo US group, significant improvement was obtained for all parameters (except tragus-to-wall distance and modified Schober test at 2 weeks and lumbar side flexion and modified Schober test at 6 weeks). Comparison of the groups showed significantly superior results of US group for parameters of BASMI (p < 0.05), tragus-wall distance (p < 0.05), PGA (p < 0.01), and DGA (p < 0.05) at 2 weeks as well as for the parameters of daily pain (p < 0.01), PGA (p < 0.05), DGA (p < 0.01), BASDAI (p < 0.05), ASDAS-CRP (p < 0.05), ASDAS-ESR (p < 0.01), lumbar side flexion (p < 0.01), the modified Schober test (p < 0.01), and ASQoL (p < 0.05) at 6 weeks. Our study showed that ultrasound treatment increases the effect of exercise in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:26923690

  4. Multidisciplinary approach to non-surgical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player treated with platelet-rich plasma, manual therapy and exercise: a case report

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Eric; MacIntyre, Ian G.; Galea, Anthony M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the clinical management of inguinal disruption in a professional hockey player and highlight the importance of a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis and management. Clinical Features: A professional hockey player with recurrent groin pain presented to the clinic after an acute exacerbation of pain while playing hockey. Intervention: The patient received a clinical diagnosis of inguinal disruption. Imaging revealed a tear in the rectus abdominis. Management included two platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections to the injured tissue, and subsequent manual therapy and exercise. The patient returned to his prior level of performance in 3.5 weeks. Discussion: This case demonstrated the importance of a multidisciplinary team and the need for advanced imaging in athletes with groin pain. Summary: Research quality concerning the non-surgical management of inguinal disruption remains low. This case adds evidence that PRP, with the addition of manual therapy and exercise may serve as a relatively quick and effective non-surgical management strategy. PMID:26816415

  5. Insulin therapy and dietary adjustments to normalize glycemia and prevent nocturnal hypoglycemia after evening exercise in type 1 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Matthew D; Walker, Mark; Bracken, Richard M; Turner, Daniel; Stevenson, Emma J; Gonzalez, Javier T; Shaw, James A; West, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Evening-time exercise is a frequent cause of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes, fear of which deters participation in regular exercise. Recommendations for normalizing glycemia around exercise consist of prandial adjustments to bolus insulin therapy and food composition, but this carries only short-lasting protection from hypoglycemia. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the impact of a combined basal-bolus insulin dose reduction and carbohydrate feeding strategy on glycemia and metabolic parameters following evening exercise in type 1 diabetes. Methods Ten male participants (glycated hemoglobin: 52.4±2.2 mmol/mol), treated with multiple daily injections, completed two randomized study-days, whereby administration of total daily basal insulin dose was unchanged (100%), or reduced by 20% (80%). Participants attended the laboratory at ∼08:00 h for a fasted blood sample, before returning in the evening. On arrival (∼17:00 h), participants consumed a carbohydrate meal and administered a 75% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose and 60 min later performed 45 min of treadmill running. At 60 min postexercise, participants consumed a low glycemic index (LGI) meal and administered a 50% reduced rapid-acting insulin dose, before returning home. At ∼23:00 h, participants consumed a LGI bedtime snack and returned to the laboratory the following morning (∼08:00 h) for a fasted blood sample. Venous blood samples were analyzed for glucose, glucoregulatory hormones, non-esterified fatty acids, β-hydroxybutyrate, interleukin 6, and tumor necrosis factor α. Interstitial glucose was monitored for 24 h pre-exercise and postexercise. Results Glycemia was similar until 6 h postexercise, with no hypoglycemic episodes. Beyond 6 h glucose levels fell during 100%, and nine participants experienced nocturnal hypoglycemia. Conversely, all participants during 80% were protected from nocturnal hypoglycemia, and remained protected for 24

  6. The Impact of a 35-Week Long-Term Exercise Therapy on Psychosocial Health of Children With Benign Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Eom, Soyong; Lee, Mi Kyung; Park, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dongpyo; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Lee, Joon Soo; Jeon, Justin Y; Kim, Heung Dong

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of a 35-week exercise program and its efficacy on neurocognitive and psychological variables in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. Ten children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (aged 8 to 12 years) completed a 35-week exercise program consisting of supervised sport activities for 5 weeks and home-based exercise program for 30 weeks. The children and their parents participated in neurocognitive and psychological evaluations including measures of attention, executive function, behaviors, and quality of life at baseline and postexercise follow-up at the 35th week. At postintervention evaluation, significant improvements were seen relative to baseline in neurocognitive domains such as psychomotor speed, sustained attention, divided attention, and inhibition-disinhibition ability, and in psychological domains including internalizing behavior problems, general health, and general quality of life. Long-term exercise intervention may have benefits for some aspects of neurocognitive and psychological function in children with benign epilepsy. PMID:26961267

  7. Behavioral and Psychosocial Outcomes of a 16-Week Rebound Therapy-Based Exercise Program for People with Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Martyn C.; Walley, Robert M.; Leech, Amanda; Paterson, Marion; Common, Stephanie; Metcalf, Charlotte

    2007-01-01

    People with profound intellectual disabilities rarely experience a physically active lifestyle, and their long-term physical inactivity likely contributes to poor health. The authors developed and implemented a pilot exercise program for persons with a profound intellectual disability and conducted a study to evaluate the effort. The development…

  8. Using Computers to Enable Self-Management of Aphasia Therapy Exercises for Word Finding: The Patient and Carer Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Rebecca; Enderby, Pam; Paterson, Gail

    2013-01-01

    Background: Speech and language therapy (SLT) for aphasia can be difficult to access in the later stages of stroke recovery, despite evidence of continued improvement with sufficient therapeutic intensity. Computerized aphasia therapy has been reported to be useful for independent language practice, providing new opportunities for continued…

  9. Aerobic Exercise Prescription for Rheumatoid Arthritics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Blanche W.; Williams, Hilda L.

    The use of exercise as a general treatment for rheumatoid arthritics (RA) has included range of motion, muscular strength, water exercise and rest therapy while virtually ignoring possible benefits of aerobic exercise. The purposes of this project were to examine the guidelines for exercise prescription in relation to this special population and…

  10. Hypertension. Part 1: How Exercise Helps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanji, Jeffrey L.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews possible mechanisms by which exercise lowers blood pressure and discusses research which indicates exercise is an effective therapy for hypertension. The article presents information to help physicians counsel hypertensive patients wanting to start an exercise program and examines the use of exercise testing to predict the onset of…

  11. Graded Exercise Therapy Guided Self-Help Trial for Patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (GETSET): Protocol for a Randomized Controlled Trial and Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    McCrone, Paul; Ridge, Damien; Cheshire, Anna; Vergara-Williamson, Mario; Pesola, Francesca; White, Peter D

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME), is characterized by chronic disabling fatigue and other symptoms, which are not explained by an alternative diagnosis. Previous trials have suggested that graded exercise therapy (GET) is an effective and safe treatment. GET itself is therapist-intensive with limited availability. Objective While guided self-help based on cognitive behavior therapy appears helpful to patients, Guided graded Exercise Self-help (GES) is yet to be tested. Methods This pragmatic randomized controlled trial is set within 2 specialist CFS/ME services in the South of England. Adults attending secondary care clinics with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE)-defined CFS/ME (N=218) will be randomly allocated to specialist medical care (SMC) or SMC plus GES while on a waiting list for therapist-delivered rehabilitation. GES will consist of a structured booklet describing a 6-step graded exercise program, supported by up to 4 face-to-face/telephone/Skype™ consultations with a GES-trained physiotherapist (no more than 90 minutes in total) over 8 weeks. The primary outcomes at 12-weeks after randomization will be physical function (SF-36 physical functioning subscale) and fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire). Secondary outcomes will include healthcare costs, adverse outcomes, and self-rated global impression change scores. We will follow up all participants until 1 year after randomization. We will also undertake qualitative interviews of a sample of participants who received GES, looking at perceptions and experiences of those who improved and worsened. Results The project was funded in 2011 and enrolment was completed in December 2014, with follow-up completed in March 2016. Data analysis is currently underway and the first results are expected to be submitted soon. Conclusions This study will indicate whether adding GES to SMC will benefit patients who often spend many months

  12. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study.

    PubMed

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96-18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04-7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26-16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness. PMID:27419118

  13. Therapeutic patient education and exercise therapy in patients with cervicogenic dizziness: a prospective case series clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Minguez-Zuazo, Ana; Grande-Alonso, Mónica; Saiz, Beatriz Moral; La Touche, Roy; Lara, Sergio Lerma

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment for patients with cervicogenic dizziness that consisted of therapeutic education and exercises. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Neck Disability Index were used. Secondary outcomes included range of motion, postural control, and psychological variables. Seven patients (two males and five females) aged 38.43±14.10 with cervicogenic dizziness were included. All the participants received eight treatment sessions. The treatment was performed twice a week during a four weeks period. Outcome measures included a questionnaire (demographic data, body chart, and questions about pain) and self-reported disability, pain, and psychological variables. Subjects were examined for cervical range of motion and postural control. All of these variables were assessed pre- and postintervention. Participants received eight sessions of therapeutic education patient and therapeutic exercise. The majority of participants showed an improvement in catastrophism (mean change, 11.57±7.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.96–18.17; d=1.60), neck disability (mean change, 5.14±2.27.28; 95% CI, 3.04–7.24; d=1.32), and dizziness disability (mean change, 9.71±6.96; 95% CI, 3.26–16.15; d=1.01). Patients also showed improved range of motion in the right and left side. Therapeutic patient education in combination with therapeutic exercise was an effective treatment. Future research should investigate the efficacy of therapeutic patient education and exercise with larger sample sizes of patients with cervicogenic dizziness. PMID:27419118

  14. Comparison of early exercise treadmill test and oral dipyridamole thallium-201 tomography for the identification of jeopardized myocardium in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy for acute Q-wave myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.; Hicks, R.R.; Frantz, D.M.; Myers, G.H.; Rowe, M.W. )

    1990-09-01

    Thrombolytic therapy has become the treatment of choice for patients with acute myocardial infarction. Researchers are not yet able to identify patients with salvage of myocardium who are at risk for recurrent coronary events. Thus, a prospective trial was performed in 46 patients with myocardial infarction (28 anterior and 18 inferior) who received thrombolytic therapy to determine if early thallium tomography (4.7 days) using oral dipyridamole would identify more patients with residual ischemia than early symptom-limited exercise treadmill tests (5.5 days). There were no complications during the exercise treadmill tests or oral dipyridamole thallium tomography. Mean duration of exercise was 11 +/- 3 minutes and the peak heart rate was 126 beats/min. Thirteen patients had positive test results. After oral dipyridamole all patients had abnormal thallium uptake on the early images. Positive scans with partial filling in of the initial perfusion defects were evident in 34 patients. Angina developed in 13 patients and was easily reversed with intravenous aminophylline. Both symptom-limited exercise treadmill tests and thallium tomography using oral dipyridamole were safely performed early after myocardial infarction in patients receiving thrombolytic therapy. Thallium tomography identified more patients with residual ischemia than exercise treadmill tests (74 vs 28%). Further studies are required to determine whether the results of thallium tomography after oral dipyridamole can be used to optimize patient management and eliminate the need for coronary angiography in some patients.

  15. Long-term low-level laser therapy promotes an increase in maximal oxygen uptake and exercise performance in a dose-dependent manner in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Perini, Júlia Luiza; Hentschke, Vítor Scotta; Sonza, Anelise; Dal Lago, Pedro

    2016-02-01

    The use of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) represents a new intervention modality that has been explored to enhance exercise performance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of LLLT (GaAIAs-850 nm) at different doses on VO2max and on exercise performance in rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: "placebo" rats (P-LLLT, n = 10), rats at a dose of 0.315 J per treatment point of LLLT (8.7 J/cm(2)-LLLT, n = 10), and rats at a dose of 2.205 J per treatment point of LLLT (61.2 J/cm(2)-LLLT, n = 10). The LLLT was applied bilaterally at the biceps femoris, gluteus, lateral and medial gastrocnemius, iliopsoas, and adductor longus muscles. One spot in each muscle belly was applied, with a sum of 12 spots in each rat, once a day, for 10 days. All animals performed the maximal exercise test (ET) at a metabolic treadmill for rats, with simultaneous gas analysis. The distance covered was measured during ET, before and after the conclusion of the LLLT protocol. The data were compared by a repeated measures two-way ANOVA followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls post hoc tests (p < .05). The 61.2 J/cm(2)-LLLT group increased VO2basal (~40 %), VO2max (~24 %), VCO2max (~17 %), and distance covered (~34 %) after LLLT application on the skeletal muscle. No significant results were found comparing before and after conditions for the studied variables considering P-LLLT and 8.7 J/cm(2)-LLLT groups. The LLLT promoted in a dose-dependent manner an increase in oxygen consumption uptake and a performance increment of male Wistar rats. PMID:26714977

  16. A Feasibility study on Combining Internet-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Physical Exercise as Treatment for Panic Disorder--Treatment Protocol and Preliminary Results.

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Johansen, Henning; Sjøbø, Trond; Vøllestad, Jon; Nordhus, Inger Hilde; Pallesen, Ståle; Havik, Odd E; Martinsen, Egil W; Nordgreen, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) is a recommended, cost-effective and efficacious treatment for panic disorder (PD). However, treatment effects in psychiatric settings indicate that a substantial proportion fail to achieve remission. Physical exercise improves symptoms in patients with PD, and acts through mechanisms that can augment the effect of ICBT. The feasibility of combining these two interventions has not previously been investigated, and this was the aim of this study. The intervention comprised guided ICBT combined with one weekly session of supervised and two weekly sessions of unsupervised physical exercise for a total of 12 weeks. Treatment rationale, procedures and protocols are presented together with preliminary results for four patients with PD who have currently finished treatment. Quantitative and qualitative results are reported on the feasibility of adhering to the treatments, treatment outcome as assessed by clinician rating and estimation of reliable and clinically significant change for outcome measures, and participants' satisfactions with the combined treatment. The preliminary results indicate that the combined treatment is feasible to complete, and that the combination is perceived by the participants as beneficial. PMID:25785484

  17. Questionable Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell; Haydu, Traci; Phillips, Dawn

    1999-01-01

    This publication presents general guidelines for exercise prescription that have an anatomical basis but also consider the exerciser's ability to do the exercise correctly. It reviews various common questionable exercises, explaining how some exercises, especially those designed for flexibility and muscle fitness, can cause harm. Safer…

  18. Cost-effectiveness of postural exercise therapy versus physiotherapy in computer screen-workers with early non-specific work-related upper limb disorders (WRULD); a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Exercise therapies generate substantial costs in computer workers with non-specific work-related upper limb disorders (WRULD). Aims To study if postural exercise therapy is cost-effective compared to regular physiotherapy in screen-workers with early complaints, both from health care and societal perspective. Methods Prospective randomized trial including cost-effectiveness analysis; one year follow-up. Participants: Eighty-eight screen-workers with early non-specific WRULD; six drop-outs. Interventions: A ten week postural exercise program versus regular physiotherapy. Outcome measures: Effectiveness measures: Pain: visual analogous scale (VAS), self-perceived WRULD (yes/no). Functional outcome: Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand- Dutch Language Version (DASH-DLV). Quality of life outcome: EQ-5D. Economic measures: health care costs including patient and family costs and productivity costs resulting in societal costs. Cost-effectiveness measures: health care costs and societal costs related to the effectiveness measures. Outcome measures were assessed at baseline; three, six and twelve months after baseline. Results At baseline both groups were comparable for baseline characteristics except scores on the Pain Catastrophizing Scale and comparable for costs. No significant differences between the groups concerning effectiveness at one year follow-up were found. Effectiveness scores slightly improved over time. After one year 55% of participants were free of complaints. After one year the postural exercise group had higher mean total health care costs, but lower productivity costs compared to the physiotherapy group. Mean societal costs after one year (therefore) were in favor of postural exercise therapy [- €622; 95% CI -2087; +590)]. After one year, only self- perceived WRULD seemed to result in acceptable cost-effectiveness of the postural exercise strategy over physiotherapy; however the probability of acceptable cost-effectiveness did not exceed

  19. Management of knee osteoarthritis by combined stromal vascular fraction cell therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and musculoskeletal exercises: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Nathan; Diamond, Rod; Sekyere, Eric O; Thomas, Wayne D

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Knee osteoarthritis is associated with persistent joint pain, stiffness, joint deformities, ligament damage, and surrounding muscle atrophy. The complexity of the disease makes treatment difficult. There are no therapeutic drugs available to halt the disease progression, leaving patients dependent on pain medication, anti-inflammatory drugs, or invasive joint replacement surgery. Case presentations Four patients with a history of unresolved symptomatic knee osteoarthritis were investigated for the therapeutic outcome of combining an exercise rehabilitation program with intra-articular injections of autologous StroMed (ie, stromal vascular fraction cells concentrated by ultrasonic cavitation from lipoaspirate) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP). The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score questionnaire (KOOS) was administered along with physical function tests over a 12-month period. The first patient achieved a maximum therapeutic outcome of 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and 100 for four subscales (right knee). The second patient scored 100 in all five KOOS subscales (left knee), and greater than 84 in all subscales (right knee). Treatment of the third patient resulted in improved outcomes in both knees of >93 for four KOOS subscales, and 60 for the Function in Sport and Recreation subscale. The fourth patient improved to 100 in all five KOOS subscales. In all patients, the physical function “Get-up and Go” test and “Stair Climbing Test” returned to normal (a value of zero). Conclusion This case series indicates that improved outcomes may be obtained when autologous stromal vascular fraction (StroMed) cell therapy is combined with traditional exercise practices and PRP for osteoarthritis. Of the seven joints treated: all patients’ scores of pain improved to >96; and quality of life scores to >93. Functional performance measures of mobility returned to normal. This simple treatment appears to be extremely effective for

  20. Exercise Prescription.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ribisl, Paul M.

    If exercise programs are to become effective in producing the desired results, then the correct exercise prescription must be applied. Four variables should be controlled in the prescription of exercise: (a) type of activity, (b) intensity, (c) duration, and (d) frequency. The long-term prescription of exercise involves the use of a (a) starter…

  1. Exercise and Inherited Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Christopher C; Laksman, Zachary W M; Mellor, Gregory; Sanatani, Shubhayan; Krahn, Andrew D

    2016-04-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) in an apparently healthy individual is a tragedy that prompts a series of investigations to identify the cause of death and to prevent SCD in potentially at-risk family members. Several inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, including long QT syndrome (LQTS), catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular cardiomyopathy (CPVT), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) are associated with exercise-related SCD. Exercise restriction has been a historical mainstay of therapy for these conditions. Syncope and cardiac arrest occur during exercise in LQTS and CPVT because of ventricular arrhythmias, which are managed with β-blockade and exercise restriction. Exercise may provoke hemodynamic or ischemic changes in HCM, leading to ventricular arrhythmias. ARVC is a disease of the desmosome, whose underlying disease process is accelerated by exercise. On this basis, expert consensus has erred on the side of caution, recommending rigorous exercise restriction for all inherited arrhythmias. With time, as familiarity with inherited arrhythmia conditions has increased and patients with milder forms of disease are diagnosed, practitioners have questioned the historical rigorous restrictions advocated for all. This change has been driven by the fact that these are often children and young adults who wish to lead active lives. Recent evidence suggests a lower risk of exercise-related arrhythmias in treated patients than was previously assumed, including those with previous symptoms managed with an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this review, we emphasize shared decision making, monitored medical therapy, individual and team awareness of precautions and emergency response measures, and a more permissive approach to recreational and competitive exercise. PMID:26927864

  2. Effect of aerobic exercise training and cognitive behavioural therapy on reduction of chronic fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: protocol of the FACTS-2-FSHD trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) muscle function is impaired and declines over time. Currently there is no effective treatment available to slow down this decline. We have previously reported that loss of muscle strength contributes to chronic fatigue through a decreased level of physical activity, while fatigue and physical inactivity both determine loss of societal participation. To decrease chronic fatigue, two distinctly different therapeutic approaches can be proposed: aerobic exercise training (AET) to improve physical capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to stimulate an active life-style yet avoiding excessive physical strain. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-FSHD (acronym for Fitness And Cognitive behavioural TherapieS/for Fatigue and ACTivitieS in FSHD) trial is to study the effect of AET and CBT on the reduction of chronic fatigue as assessed with the Checklist Individual Strength subscale fatigue (CIS-fatigue) in patients with FSHD. Additionally, possible working mechanisms and the effects on various secondary outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) are evaluated. Methods/Design A multi-centre, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial is conducted. A sample of 75 FSHD patients with severe chronic fatigue (CIS-fatigue ≥ 35) will be recruited and randomized to one of three groups: (1) AET + usual care, (2) CBT + usual care or (3) usual care alone, which consists of no therapy at all or occasional (conventional) physical therapy. After an intervention period of 16 weeks and a follow-up of 3 months, the third (control) group will as yet be randomized to either AET or CBT (approximately 7 months after inclusion). Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Discussion The FACTS-2-FSHD study is the first theory-based randomized clinical trial which evaluates the effect and the maintenance of effects

  3. Identifying critically ill patients with acute kidney injury for whom renal replacement therapy is inappropriate: an exercise in futility?

    PubMed Central

    Gabbay, Ezra; Meyer, Klemens B.

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians treating critically ill patients must consider the possibility that painful and expensive aggressive treatments might confer negligible benefit. Such treatments are often described as futile or inappropriate. We discuss the problem of deciding whether to initiate renal replacement therapy (RRT) for critically ill patients with acute kidney injury (AKI) in the context of the debate surrounding medical futility. The main problems in deciding when such treatment would be futile are that the concept itself is controversial and eludes quantitative definition, that available outcome data do not allow confident identification of patients who will not benefit from treatment and that the decision on RRT in a critically ill patient with AKI is qualitatively different from decisions on other modalities of intensive care and resuscitation, as well as from decisions on dialysis for chronic kidney disease. Despite these difficulties, nephrologists need to identify circumstances in which continued aggressive care would be futile before proceeding to initiate RRT. PMID:25949304

  4. The comparison of cold-water immersion and cold air therapy on maximal cycling performance and recovery markers following strength exercises

    PubMed Central

    Hayter, Kane J.; Schumann, Moritz; Deakin, Glen B.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of cold-water immersion (CWI) and cold air therapy (CAT) on maximal cycling performance (i.e. anaerobic power) and markers of muscle damage following a strength training session. Twenty endurance-trained but strength-untrained male (n = 10) and female (n = 10) participants were randomised into either: CWI (15 min in 14 °C water to iliac crest) or CAT (15 min in 14 °C air) immediately following strength training (i.e. 3 sets of leg press, leg extensions and leg curls at 6 repetition maximum, respectively). Creatine kinase, muscle soreness and fatigue, isometric knee extensor and flexor torque and cycling anaerobic power were measured prior to, immediately after and at 24 (T24), 48 (T48) and 72 (T72) h post-strength exercises. No significant differences were found between treatments for any of the measured variables (p > 0.05). However, trends suggested recovery was greater in CWI than CAT for cycling anaerobic power at T24 (10% ± 2%, ES = 0.90), T48 (8% ± 2%, ES = 0.64) and T72 (8% ± 7%, ES = 0.76). The findings suggest the combination of hydrostatic pressure and cold temperature may be favourable for recovery from strength training rather than cold temperature alone. PMID:27069791

  5. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  6. Home-Based Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... do when I don't have access to physical therapy? While VEDA does not recommend doing vestibular exercises ... already existing ringing Fluid discharge from your ears Pain and ... try a general low-impact and balance-strengthening fitness program. The more ...

  7. Design of the Resistance and Endurance exercise After ChemoTherapy (REACT) study: A randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of exercise interventions after chemotherapy on physical fitness and fatigue

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Preliminary studies suggest that physical exercise interventions can improve physical fitness, fatigue and quality of life in cancer patients after completion of chemotherapy. Additional research is needed to rigorously test the effects of exercise programmes among cancer patients and to determine optimal training intensity accordingly. The present paper presents the design of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a high intensity exercise programme compared to a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme and a waiting list control group on physical fitness and fatigue as primary outcomes. Methods After baseline measurements, cancer patients who completed chemotherapy are randomly assigned to either a 12-week high intensity exercise programme or a low-to-moderate intensity exercise programme. Next, patients from both groups are randomly assigned to immediate training or a waiting list (i.e. waiting list control group). After 12 weeks, patients of the waiting list control group start with the exercise programme they have been allocated to. Both interventions consist of equal bouts of resistance and endurance interval exercises with the same frequency and duration, but differ in training intensity. Additionally, patients of both exercise programmes are counselled to improve compliance and achieve and maintain an active lifestyle, tailored to their individual preferences and capabilities. Measurements will be performed at baseline (t = 0), 12 weeks after randomization (t = 1), and 64 weeks after randomization (t = 2). The primary outcome measures are cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength assessed by means of objective performance indicators, and self-reported fatigue. Secondary outcome measures include health-related quality of life, self-reported physical activity, daily functioning, body composition, mood and sleep disturbances, and return to work. In addition, compliance and satisfaction with the

  8. Efficacy of pre-exercise low-level laser therapy on isokinetic muscle performance in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes, also known non-insulin-dependent diabetes, is the most prevalent type of the disease and involves defects in the secretion and action of insulin. The aim of the proposed study is to evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on muscle performance of the quadriceps femoris in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Methods/Design A double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial will be carried out in two treatment phases. In the first phase, quadriceps muscle performance will be evaluated using an isokinetic dynamometer and the levels of creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase (biochemical markers of muscle damage) will be determined. The participants will then be allocated to four LLLT groups through a randomization process using opaque envelopes: Group A (4 Joules), Group B (6 Joules), Group C (8 Joules) and Group D (0 Joules; placebo). Following the administration of LLLT, the participants will be submitted to an isokinetic eccentric muscle fatigue protocol involving the quadriceps muscle bilaterally. Muscle performance and biochemical markers of muscle damage will be evaluated again immediately after as well as 24 and 48 hours after the experimental protocol. One week after the last evaluation the second phase will begin, during which Groups A, B and C will receive the LLLT protocol that achieved the best muscle performance in phase 1 for a period of 4 weeks. At the end of this period, muscle performance will be evaluated again. The protocol for this study is registered with the World Health Organization under Universal Trial Number U1111-1146-7109. Discussion The purpose of this randomized clinical trial is to evaluate the efficacy of pre-exercise LLLT on the performance of the quadriceps muscle (peak torque, total muscle work, maximum power and fatigue index – normalized by body mass) in individuals with DM-2. The study will support the practice of evidence-based to the use of LLLT in improving muscle

  9. Can exercise prevent cognitive decline?

    PubMed

    Behrman, Sophie; Ebmeier, Klaus P

    2014-01-01

    As the tolerability of pharmacological agents decreases with age, exercise may be particularly helpful as a possible treatment or stabiliser of mood and cognitive function in older age. Exercise has been most commonly evaluated for the treatment of depression. Exercise interventions designed primarily for treatment of physical conditions in the elderly do appear to confer psychological benefits as well, with reduction in depressive symptoms over the course of treatment. The effects of exercise on reducing depressive symptoms are not dissimilar to the effects of antidepressant drugs and cognitive behaviour therapy. Exercise may be a useful low-tech intervention for people with mild to moderate depression. In particular, exercise may be helpful in the elderly and in patients who have had insufficient response to, or are intolerant of, pharmacotherapy. Mastery of a new skill and positive feedback from others may increase feelings of self-esteem and improve mood. Exercise may distract participants from persistent negative thoughts. Exercise has been shown to improve executive function acutely in adults of all ages. It is possible that dance routines or other exercise regimens requiring some cognitive input may confer additional benefit to cognitive function. Exercise has a moderate effect on the ability of people with dementia to perform activities of daily living and may improve cognitive function. Midlife exercise may also have an impact on later cognitive function. PMID:24617099

  10. Measurement of stray radiation within a scanning proton therapy facility: EURADOS WG9 intercomparison exercise of active dosimetry systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J. Trompier, F.; Mares, V.; Schinner, K.; Wielunski, M.; Romero-Expósito, M.; Domingo, C.; Trinkl, S.; Dufek, V.; Klodowska, M.; Liszka, M.; Stolarczyk, L.; Olko, P.; Kubancak, J.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: To characterize stray radiation around the target volume in scanning proton therapy and study the performance of active neutron monitors. Methods: Working Group 9 of the European Radiation Dosimetry Group (EURADOS WG9—Radiation protection in medicine) carried out a large measurement campaign at the Trento Centro di Protonterapia (Trento, Italy) in order to determine the neutron spectra near the patient using two extended-range Bonner sphere spectrometry (BSS) systems. In addition, the work focused on acknowledging the performance of different commercial active dosimetry systems when measuring neutron ambient dose equivalents, H{sup ∗}(10), at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room. Detectors included three TEPCs—tissue equivalent proportional counters (Hawk type from Far West Technology, Inc.) and six rem-counters (WENDI-II, LB 6411, RadEye™ NL, a regular and an extended-range NM2B). Meanwhile, the photon component of stray radiation was deduced from the low-lineal energy transfer part of TEPC spectra or measured using a Thermo Scientific™ FH-40G survey meter. Experiments involved a water tank phantom (60 × 30 × 30 cm{sup 3}) representing the patient that was uniformly irradiated using a 3 mm spot diameter proton pencil beam with 10 cm modulation width, 19.95 cm distal beam range, and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field size. Results: Neutron spectrometry around the target volume showed two main components at the thermal and fast energy ranges. The study also revealed the large dependence of the energy distribution of neutrons, and consequently of out-of-field doses, on the primary beam direction (directional emission of intranuclear cascade neutrons) and energy (spectral composition of secondary neutrons). In addition, neutron mapping within the facility was conducted and showed the highest H{sup ∗}(10) value of ∼51 μSv Gy{sup −1}; this was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H{sup ∗}(10) values

  11. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... of power to help them cope with low self-esteem. Although compulsive exercising doesn't have to accompany ... a downward spiral of negative thinking and low self-esteem. continue Why Is Exercising Too Much a Bad ...

  12. Exercise & Sleep

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Back to School, the Healthy Way Exercise & Sleep Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents ... helps kids. Photo: iStock 6 "Bests" About Kids' Exercise At least one hour of physical activity a ...

  13. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke. PMID:27390444

  14. A comparative study of the effects of trunk exercise program in aquatic and land-based therapy on gait in hemiplegic stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Park, Byoung-Sun; Noh, Ji-Woong; Kim, Mee-Young; Lee, Lim-Kyu; Yang, Seung-Min; Lee, Won-Deok; Shin, Yong-Sub; Kim, Ju-Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Uk; Kwak, Taek-Yong; Lee, Tae-Hyun; Park, Jaehong; Kim, Junghwan

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program on gait in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 28 hemiplegic stroke patients (20 males, 8 females). The subjects performed a trunk exercise program for a total of four weeks. [Results] Walking speed and cycle, stance phase and stride length of the affected side, and the symmetry index of the stance phase significantly improved after the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the aquatic and land-based trunk exercise program may help improve gait performance ability after stroke. PMID:27390444

  15. Morning Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Natalie Crohn

    2006-01-01

    In this article, Natalie Schmitt recalls her teaching experiences with morning exercise programs, beginning with her first teaching job as assistant Morning Exercise teacher at the Francis W. Parker School in Chicago. In the Morning Exercises, students were encouraged to employ all means of expression: speaking, drawing, dancing, singing, acting.…

  16. Exercise Capacity and Mortality in Patients with Ischemic Left Ventricular Dysfunction Randomized to Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery or Medical Therapy: An Analysis From the Surgical Treatment for Ischemic Heart Failure (STICH) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Ralph; Szalewska, Dominika; She, Lilin; Lee, Kerry L.; Drazner, Mark H.; Lubiszewska, Barbara; Kosevic, Dragana; Ruengsakulrach, Permyos; Nicolau, José C.; Coutu, Benoit; Choudhary, Shiv K.; Mark, Daniel B.; Cleland, John G.F.; Piña, Ileana L.; Velazquez, Eric J.; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; White, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the prognostic significance of exercise capacity in patients with ischemic left ventricular (LV) dysfunction eligible for coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG). Background Poor exercise capacity is associated with mortality, but it is not known how this influences the benefits and risks of CABG compared to medical therapy. Methods In an exploratory analysis physical activity was assessed by questionnaire and 6-minute walk test in 1,212 patients before randomization to CABG (n=610) or medical management (n=602) in the STICH trial. Mortality (n=462) was compared by treatment allocation during 56 (IQR 48 to 68) months follow-up for subjects able (n=682) and unable (n=530) to walk 300m in 6 minutes and with less (Physical Ability Score >55, n= 749) and more (PAS ≤55, n=433) limitation by dyspnea or fatigue. Results Compared to medical therapy mortality was lower for patients randomized to CABG who walked ≥300m (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.99, p=0.038) and those with a PAS >55 (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.62 to 1.01, p=0.061). Patients unable to walk 300m or with a PAS ≤55 had higher mortality during the first 60 days with CABG (HR 3.24, 95% CI 1.64 to 6.83, p=0.002) and no significant benefit from CABG during total follow-up (HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.19, p=0.626, interaction p=0.167). Conclusion These observations suggest that patients with ischemic LV dysfunction and poor exercise capacity have increased early risk, and similar 5 year mortality with CABG compared to medical therapy, while those with better exercise capacity have improved survival with CABG. PMID:25023813

  17. WE-D-17A-05: Measurement of Stray Radiation Within An Active Scanning Proton Therapy Facility: EURADOS WG9 Intercomparison Exercise of Active Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farah, J; Trompier, F; Stolarczyk, L; Klodowska, M; Liszka, M; Olko, P; Algranati, C; Fellin, F; Schwarz, M; Domingo, C; Romero-Exposito, M; Dufek, V; Frojdh, E; George, S; Harrison, R; Kubancak, J; Ploc, O; Knezevic, Z; Majer, M; Miljanic, S; and others

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Intercomparison of active dosemeters in the measurement of stray radiation at the Trento active-scanning proton therapy facility. Methods: EURADOS WG9 carried out a large intercomparison exercise to test different dosemeters while measuring secondary neutrons within a 230 MeV scanned proton therapy facility. Detectors included two Bonner Sphere Spectrometers (BSS), three tissue equivalent proportional counters (TEPCHawk) and six rem-counters (Wendi II, Berthold, RadEye, a regular and an extended-range Anderson and Braun NM2B counters). Measurements of neutron ambient dose equivalents, H*(10), were done at several positions inside (8 positions) and outside (3 positions) the treatment room while irradiating a water tank phantom with a 10 × 10 × 10 cc field. Results: A generally good agreement on H*(10) values was observed for the tested detectors. At distance of 2.25 m and angles 45°, 90° and 180° with respect to the beam axis, BSS and proportional counters agreed within 30%. Higher differences (up to 60%) were observed at the closest and farthest distances, i.e. at positions where detectors sensitivity, energy, fluence and angular response are highly dependent on neutron spectra (flux and energy). The highest neutron H*(10) value, ∼60 microSv/Gy, was measured at 1.15 m along the beam axis. H*(10) decreased significantly with the distance from the isocenter dropping to 1.1 microSv/Gy at 4.25 m and 90° from beam axis, ∼2 nanoSv/Gy at the entrance of the maze, 0.2 nanoSv/Gy at the door outside the room and below detection limit in the gantry control room and at an adjacent room. These values remain considerately lower than those of passively scattered proton beams. BSS and Hawk unfolded spectra provide valuable inputs when studying the response of each detector. Conclusion: TEPCs and BSS enable accurate measurements of stray neutrons while other rem-meters also give satisfactory results but require further improvements to reduce uncertainties.

  18. A pilot study of the effect of spironolactone therapy on exercise capacity and endothelial dysfunction in pulmonary arterial hypertension: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare disorder associated with poor survival. Endothelial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis and progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Inflammation appears to drive this dysfunctional endothelial phenotype, propagating cycles of injury and repair in genetically susceptible patients with idiopathic and disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therapy targeting pulmonary vascular inflammation to interrupt cycles of injury and repair and thereby delay or prevent right ventricular failure and death has not been tested. Spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid and androgen receptor antagonist, has been shown to improve endothelial function and reduce inflammation. Current management of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension and symptoms of right heart failure includes use of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists for their diuretic and natriuretic effects. We hypothesize that initiating spironolactone therapy at an earlier stage of disease in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension could provide additional benefits through anti-inflammatory effects and improvements in pulmonary vascular function. Methods/Design Seventy patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension without clinical evidence of right ventricular failure will be enrolled in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to investigate the effect of early treatment with spironolactone on exercise capacity, clinical worsening and vascular inflammation in vivo. Our primary endpoint is change in placebo-corrected 6-minute walk distance at 24 weeks and the incidence of clinical worsening in the spironolactone group compared to placebo. At a two-sided alpha level of 0.05, we will have at least 84% power to detect an effect size (group mean difference divided by standard deviation) of 0.9 for the difference in the change of 6-minute walk distance from baseline between the two groups. Secondary endpoints include

  19. Muscular pre-conditioning using light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) for high-intensity exercise: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with a single elite runner

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Beltrame, Thomas; Fabrizzi, Fernando; do Nascimento, Eduardo Sanches Pereira; Karsten, Marlus; de Oliveira Francisco, Cristina; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Cardoso, Daniel Rodrigues; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Hamblin, Michael R.; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Recently, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been used to improve muscle performance. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) and its mechanisms of action to improve muscle performance in an elite athlete. The kinetics of oxygen uptake (VO2), blood and urine markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase – CK and alanine) and fatigue (lactate) were analyzed. Additionally, some metabolic parameters were assessed in urine using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR). A LED cluster with 50 LEDs (λ = 850 nm; 50mW 15 s; 37.5 J) was applied on legs, arms and trunk muscles of a single runner athlete 5 min before a high-intense constant workload running exercise on treadmill. The athlete received either Placebo-1-LEDT; Placebo-2-LEDT; or Effective-LEDT in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with washout period of 7 d between each test. LEDT improved the speed of the muscular VO2 adaptation (~−9 s), decreased O2 deficit (~−10 L), increased the VO2 from the slow component phase (~+348 ml min−1) and increased the time limit of exercise (~+589 s). LEDT decreased blood and urine markers of muscle damage and fatigue (CK, alanine and lactate levels). The results suggest that a muscular pre-conditioning regimen using LEDT before intense exercises could modulate metabolic and renal function to achieve better performance. PMID:25585514

  20. Iyengar-Yoga Compared to Exercise as a Therapeutic Intervention during (Neo)adjuvant Therapy in Women with Stage I–III Breast Cancer: Health-Related Quality of Life, Mindfulness, Spirituality, Life Satisfaction, and Cancer-Related Fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Lötzke, Désirée; Wiedemann, Florian; Rodrigues Recchia, Daniela; Ostermann, Thomas; Sattler, Daniel; Ettl, Johannes; Kiechle, Marion; Büssing, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to test the effects of yoga on health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, cancer-related fatigue, mindfulness, and spirituality compared to conventional therapeutic exercises during (neo)adjuvant cytotoxic and endocrine therapy in women with breast cancer. In a randomized controlled trial 92 women with breast cancer undergoing oncological treatment were randomly enrolled for a yoga intervention (YI) (n = 45) or for a physical exercise intervention (PEI) (n = 47). Measurements were obtained before (t0) and after the intervention (t1) as well as 3 months after finishing intervention (t2) using standardized questionnaires. Life satisfaction and fatigue improved under PEI (p < 0.05) but not under YI (t0 to t2). Regarding quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) a direct effect (t0 to t1; p < 0.001) of YI was found on role and emotional functioning, while under PEI only emotional functioning improved. Significant improvements (p < 0.001) were observed at both t1 and t2 also for symptom scales in both groups: dyspnea, appetite loss, constipation, and diarrhea. There was no significant difference between therapies for none of the analyzed variables neither for t1 nor for t2. During chemotherapy, yoga was not seen as more helpful than conventional therapeutic exercises. This does not argue against its use in the recovery phase. PMID:27019663

  1. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Home-Based Exercise for Cancer-Related Fatigue in Women during and after Chemotherapy with or without Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Marylin J.; Cho, Maria H.; Miaskowski, Christine; Painter, Patricia L.; Paul, Steven M.; Cooper, Bruce A.; Duda, John; Krasnoff, Joanne; Bank, Kayee A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Few studies have evaluated an individualized home-based exercise prescription during and after cancer treatment. Objective The purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of a home-based exercise training intervention, the PRO-SELF FATIGUE CONTROL PROGRAM on the management of cancer related fatigue. Interventions/Methods Participants (N=119) were randomized into one of three groups: Group 1 (EE) received the exercise prescription throughout the study; Group 2 (CE) received their exercise prescription after completing cancer treatment; Group 3 (CC) received usual care. Patients completed the Piper Fatigue Scale, General Sleep Disturbance Scale, Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression scale, and Worst Pain Intensity Scale. Results All groups reported mild fatigue levels, sleep disturbance and mild pain, but not depression. Using multilevel regression analysis significant linear and quadratic trends were found for change in fatigue and pain (i.e., scores increased, then decreased over time). No group differences were found in the changing scores over time. A significant quadratic effect for the trajectory of sleep disturbance was found, but no group differences were detected over time. No significant time or group effects were found for depression. Conclusions Our home-based exercise intervention had no effect on fatigue or related symptoms associated with cancer treatment. The optimal timing of exercise remains to be determined. Implications for practice Clinicians need to be aware that some physical activity is better than none, and there is no harm in exercise as tolerated during cancer treatment. Further analysis is needed to examine the adherence to exercise. More frequent assessments of fatigue, sleep disturbance, depression, and pain may capture the effect of exercise. PMID:20467301

  2. Exercise and autonomic function.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, R L; Bloomfield, D M; Rosenwinkel, E T

    2000-03-01

    The complex interplay between the dichotomous subdivisions of the autonomic nervous system establishes and maintains a delicately tuned homeostasis in spite of an ever-changing environment. Aerobic exercise training can increase activity of the parasympathetic nervous system and decrease sympathetic activity. Conversely, it is well-documented that cardiac disease is often characterized by attenuated parasympathetic activity and heightened sympathetic tone. A correlation between autonomic disequilibrium and disease has led to the hypothesis that exercise training, as a therapy that restores the autonomic nervous system towards normal function, may be associated with, and possibly responsible for, outcome improvements in various populations. This is merely one of the many benefits that is conferred by chronic exercise training and reviewed in this issue. PMID:10758814

  3. Muscular, cardiac, ventilatory and metabolic dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis: Implications for screening, clinical care and endurance and resistance exercise therapy, a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Wens, Inez; Eijnde, Bert O; Hansen, Dominique

    2016-08-15

    In the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), exercise training is now considered a cornerstone. However, most clinicians tend to focus on neurologic deficits only, and thus prefer to prescribe rehabilitation programs specifically to counteract these deficits. However, the present comprehensive review shows that patients with MS (pwMS) also experience significant muscular, cardiac, ventilatory and metabolic dysfunction, which significantly contribute, next to neurologic deficits, to exercise intolerance. In addition, these anomalies also might increase the risk for frequent hospitalization and morbidity and can reduce life expectancy. Unfortunately, the impact of exercise intervention on these anomalies in pwMS are mostly unknown. Therefore, it is suggested that pwMS should be screened systematically for muscular, cardiac, ventilatory and metabolic function during exercise testing. The detection of such anomalies should lead to adaptations and optimisation of exercise training prescription and clinical care/medical treatment of pwMS. In addition, future studies should focus on the impact of exercise intervention on muscular, cardiac, ventilatory and metabolic (dys)function in pwMS, to contribute to improved treatment and care. PMID:27423572

  4. Individualised cognitive functional therapy compared with a combined exercise and pain education class for patients with non-specific chronic low back pain: study protocol for a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Mary; Purtill, Helen; Kennedy, Norelee; O'Sullivan, Peter; Dankaerts, Wim; Tighe, Aidan; Allworthy, Lars; Dolan, Louise; Bargary, Norma; O'Sullivan, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP) is a very common and costly musculoskeletal disorder associated with a complex interplay of biopsychosocial factors. Cognitive functional therapy (CFT) represents a novel, patient-centred intervention which directly challenges pain-related behaviours in a cognitively integrated, functionally specific and graduated manner. CFT aims to target all biopsychosocial factors that are deemed to be barriers to recovery for an individual patient with NSCLBP. A recent randomised controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated the superiority of individualised CFT for NSCLBP compared to manual therapy combined with exercise. However, several previous RCTs have suggested that class-based interventions are as effective as individualised interventions. Therefore, it is important to examine whether an individualised intervention, such as CFT, demonstrates clinical effectiveness compared to a relatively cheaper exercise and education class. The current study will compare the clinical effectiveness of individualised CFT with a combined exercise and pain education class in people with NSCLBP. Methods and analysis This study is a multicentre RCT. 214 participants, aged 18–75 years, with NSCLBP for at least 6 months will be randomised to one of two interventions across three sites. The experimental group will receive individualised CFT and the length of the intervention will be varied in a pragmatic manner based on the clinical progression of participants. The control group will attend six classes which will be provided over a period of 6–8 weeks. Participants will be assessed preintervention, postintervention and after 6 and12 months. The primary outcomes will be functional disability and pain intensity. Non-specific predictors, moderators and mediators of outcome will also be analysed. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been obtained from the Mayo General Hospital Research Ethics Committee (MGH-14-UL). Outcomes will

  5. Muscular pre-conditioning using light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) for high-intensity exercise: a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with a single elite runner.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Beltrame, Thomas; Fabrizzi, Fernando; do Nascimento, Eduardo Sanches Pereira; Karsten, Marlus; Francisco, Cristina de Oliveira; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Cardoso, Daniel Rodrigues; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto; Hamblin, Michael R; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2015-07-01

    Recently, low-level laser (light) therapy (LLLT) has been used to improve muscle performance. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of near-infrared light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) and its mechanisms of action to improve muscle performance in an elite athlete. The kinetics of oxygen uptake (VO2), blood and urine markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase--CK and alanine), and fatigue (lactate) were analyzed. Additionally, some metabolic parameters were assessed in urine using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H NMR). A LED cluster with 50 LEDs (λ = 850 nm; 50 mW 15 s; 37.5 J) was applied on legs, arms and trunk muscles of a single runner athlete 5 min before a high-intense constant workload running exercise on treadmill. The athlete received either Placebo-1-LEDT; Placebo-2-LEDT; or Effective-LEDT in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial with washout period of 7 d between each test. LEDT improved the speed of the muscular VO2 adaptation (∼-9 s), decreased O2 deficit (∼-10 L), increased the VO2 from the slow component phase (∼+348 ml min(-1)), and increased the time limit of exercise (∼+589 s). LEDT decreased blood and urine markers of muscle damage and fatigue (CK, alanine and lactate levels). The results suggest that a muscular pre-conditioning regimen using LEDT before intense exercises could modulate metabolic and renal function to achieve better performance. PMID:25585514

  6. Healthy Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Oberman, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Persons at any age can substantially improve their fitness for work and play through appropriate exercise training. Considerable evidence indicates that physical activity is valuable for weight control, modifying lipids and improving carbohydrate tolerance. Less rigorous scientific data are available for associated long-term blood pressure and psychological changes with habitual exercise. Strenuous physical activity most likely reduces the incidence of coronary heart disease and the detrimental impact of certain chronic diseases on health. Adverse effects may result from a training program, but the major concern is the susceptibility to cardiovascular events during and immediately after exertion. To achieve optimal benefits with minimal risk, exercise must be carefully prescribed within the context of overall health and training objectives. Taken altogether, a distinct rationale exists for regular vigorous exercise as an integral part of a personal health maintenance program. PMID:6395501

  7. Exercise Habit

    MedlinePlus

    ... lungs. Examples of aerobic exercise include walking, hiking, running, aerobic dance, biking, rowing, swimming, and cross-country ... Brisk walking can burn as many calories as running, but it is less likely to cause injuries ...

  8. Compulsive Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Many teens who play sports have higher self-esteem than their less active pals, and exercise can ... may have a distorted body image and low self-esteem. They may see themselves as overweight or out ...

  9. Exercise response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummel, J. A.; Sawin, C. F.; Michel, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The bicycle ergometer and a graded stress protocol were used to conduct exercise stress tests for the Apollo project. The graded exercise tests permitted a progressive evaluation of physiological control system response and provided a better understanding of safe stress limits; heart rate was used for determining stress levels. During each test, workload, heart rate, blood pressure, and respiratory gas exchange (oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, and minute volume) measurements were made. The results are presented and discussed.

  10. Beyond the Mind-Body Exercise Hype.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ives, Jeffrey C.; Sosnoff, Jacob

    2000-01-01

    Mind-body exercises are spreading rapidly throughout the health, fitness, and rehabilitation fields. Many of the claimed benefits are not supported by clinical evidence. As alternative therapies, they carry legal and professional ramifications. Understanding the nature of mind-body exercise and knowing the scientific evidence behind claims for its…

  11. A role for exercise after bariatric surgery?

    PubMed

    Coen, Paul M; Goodpaster, Bret H

    2016-01-01

    Obesity predisposes an individual to develop numerous comorbidities, including type 2 diabetes, and represents a major healthcare issue in many countries worldwide. Bariatric surgery can be an effective treatment option, resulting in profound weight loss and improvements in metabolic health; however, not all patients achieve similar weight loss or metabolic improvements. Exercise is an excellent way to improve health, with well-characterized physiological and psychological benefits. In the present paper we review the evidence to determine whether there may be a role for exercise as a complementary adjunct therapy to bariatric surgery. Objectively measured physical activity data indicate that most patients who undergo bariatric surgery do not exercise enough to reap the health benefits of exercise. While there is a dearth of data on the effects of exercise on weight loss and weight loss maintenance after surgery, evidence from studies of caloric restriction and exercise suggest that similar adjunctive benefits may be extended to patients who perform exercise after bariatric surgery. Recent evidence from exercise interventions after bariatric surgery suggests that exercise may provide further improvements in metabolic health compared with surgery-induced weight loss alone. Additional randomized controlled exercise trials are now needed as the next step to more clearly define the potential for exercise to provide additional health benefits after bariatric surgery. This valuable evidence will inform clinical practice regarding much-needed guidelines for exercise after bariatric surgery. PMID:26228356

  12. Utility of 3-dimensional echocardiography, global longitudinal strain, and exercise stress echocardiography to detect cardiac dysfunction in breast cancer patients treated with doxorubicin-containing adjuvant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Khouri, Michel G.; Hornsby, Whitney E.; Risum, Niels; Velazquez, Eric J.; Thomas, Samantha; Lane, Amy; Scott, Jessica M.; Koelwyn, Graeme J.; Herndon, James E.; Mackey, John R.; Douglas, Pamela S.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional resting left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) assessments have limitations for detecting doxorubicin (DOX)-related cardiac dysfunction. Novel resting echocardiographic parameters, including 3-dimen-sional echocardiography (3DE) and global longitudinal strain (GLS), have potential for early identification of chemotherapy-related myocardial injury. Exercise “stress” is an established method to uncover impairments in cardiac function but has received limited attention in the adult oncology setting. We evaluated the utility of an integrated approach using 3DE, GLS, and exercise stress echocardiography for detecting subclinical cardiac dysfunction in early breast cancer patients treated with DOX-containing chemotherapy. Fifty-seven asymptomatic women with early breast cancer (mean 26 ± 22 months post-chemotherapy) and 20 sex-matched controls were studied. Resting left ventricular (LV) function was assessed by LVEF using 2-dimensional echocardiography (2DE) and 3DE and by GLS using 2-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (2D-STE). After resting assessments, subjects completed cardiopulmonary exercise testing with stress 2DE. Resting LVEF was lower in patients than controls by 3DE (55 ± 4 vs. 59 ± 5 %; p = 0.005) but not 2DE (56 ± 4 vs. 58 ± 3 %; p = 0.169). 10 of 51 (20 %) patients had GLS greater than or equal to −17 %, which was below the calculated lower limit of normal (control mean 2SD); this patient subgroup had a mean 20 % impairment in GLS (−16.1 ± 0.9 vs. −20.1 ± 1.5 %; p < 0.001), despite similar LVEF by 2DE and 3DE compared to controls (p > 0.05). Cardiopulmonary function (VO2peak) was 20 % lower in patients than controls (p < 0.001). Exercise stress 2DE assessments of stroke volume (61 ± 11 vs. 69 ± 15 ml; p = 0.018) and cardiac index (2.3 ± 0.9 vs. 3.1 ± 0.8 1 min−1 m−2 mean increase; p = 0.003) were lower in patients than controls. Post-exercise increase in cardiac index predicted VO2peak (r = 0.429, p = 0

  13. What is the ideal dose and power output of low-level laser therapy (810 nm) on muscle performance and post-exercise recovery? Study protocol for a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent studies involving phototherapy applied prior to exercise have demonstrated positive results regarding the attenuation of muscle fatigue and the expression of biochemical markers associated with recovery. However, a number of factors remain unknown, such as the ideal dose and application parameters, mechanisms of action and long-term effects on muscle recovery. The aims of the proposed project are to evaluate the long-term effects of low-level laser therapy on post-exercise musculoskeletal recovery and identify the best dose andapplication power/irradiation time. Design and methods A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial with be conducted. After fulfilling the eligibility criteria, 28 high-performance athletes will be allocated to four groups of seven volunteers each. In phase 1, the laser power will be 200 mW and different doses will be tested: Group A (2 J), Group B (6 J), Group C (10 J) and Group D (0 J). In phase 2, the best dose obtained in phase 1 will be used with the same distribution of the volunteers, but with different powers: Group A (100 mW), Group B (200 mW), Group C (400 mW) and Group D (0 mW). The isokinetic test will be performed based on maximum voluntary contraction prior to the application of the laser and after the eccentric contraction protocol, which will also be performed using the isokinetic dynamometer. The following variables related to physical performance will be analyzed: peak torque/maximum voluntary contraction, delayed onset muscle soreness (algometer), biochemical markers of muscle damage, inflammation and oxidative stress. Discussion Our intention, is to determine optimal laser therapy application parameters capable of slowing down the physiological muscle fatigue process, reducing injuries or micro-injuries in skeletal muscle stemming from physical exertion and accelerating post-exercise muscle recovery. We believe that, unlike drug therapy, LLLT has a biphasic dose–response pattern. Trial

  14. Exercise for tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrios, Stasinopoulos

    2015-01-01

    Tendinopathies are one of the most common sports/musculoskeletal injury in modern western societies. Many physiotherapy approaches have been recommended in the literature for the management of tendinopathy. The most effective treatment in the management of tendinopathy is the eccentric training. Load, speed and frequency of contractions are the three principles of eccentric exercises, discussed in this report. However, eccentric training is not effective for all patients with tendinopathy and the effectiveness of this approach when applied as monotherapy is lower than it is applied as part of the rehabilitation process. For this reason, clinicians combine eccentric training with other physiotherapy techniques such as stretching, isometric and lumbar stability exercises, electrotherapy, manual therapy, soft tissue manipulation techniques, taping and acupuncture in the management of tendinopathies. Further research is needed to find out which treatment strategy combined with eccentric training will provide the best results in the rehabilitation of tendinopathy. PMID:26140271

  15. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 + 81 to 350 + 77 ml (p < 0.01) and from 52 + 26 to 43 + 20 volume units (p < 0.01), respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 + 10 to 17 + 9 mm Hg and 10 + 5 to and + 5 mm Hg (both p < 0.01). Altough stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 + 6% to 22 + 5% and from 25 + 9% to 29 + 11%, respectively (both p < 0.01). During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. Thus, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  16. Hemodynamic and radionuclide effects of acute captopril therapy for heart failure: changes in left and right ventricular volumes and function at rest and during exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Massie, B.; Kramer, B.L.; Topic, N.; Henderson, S.G.

    1982-06-01

    Although the resting hemodynamic effects of captopril in congestive heart failure are known, little information is available about the hemodynamic response to captopril during exercise or about changes in noninvasive measurements of the size and function of both ventricles. In this study, 14 stable New York Heart Association class III patients were given 25 mg of oral captopril. Rest and exercise hemodynamic measurements and blood pool scintigrams were performed simultaneously before and 90 minutes after captopril. The radionuclide studies were analyzed for left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes, end-systolic volumes, ejection fractions and pulmonary blood volume. The primary beneficial responses at rest were decreases in left and right ventricular end-diastolic volumes from 388 +/- 81 to 350 +/- 77 ml and from 52 +/- 26 to 43 +/- 20 volume units, respectively, and in their corresponding filling pressures, from 24 +/- 10 to 17 +/- 9 mm Hg and 10 +/- 5 to 6 +/- 5 mm Hg. Although stroke volume did not increase significantly, both left and right ventricular ejection fractions increased slightly, from 19 +/- 6% to 22+/- 5% and from 25 +/- 9% to 29 +/- 11%, respectively. During exercise, similar changes were noted in both hemodynamic and radionuclide indexes. This, in patients with moderate symptomatic limitation from chronic heart failure, captopril predominantly reduces ventricular volume and filling pressure, with a less significant effect on cardiac output. These effects persist during exercise, when systemic vascular resistance is already very low. Radionuclide techniques are valuable in assessing the drug effect in these subjects, particularly when ventricular volumes are also measured.

  17. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3. PMID:26424579

  18. Daily exercise routines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Patrick L.; Amoroso, Michael T.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on daily exercise routines are presented. Topics covered include: daily exercise and periodic stress testings; exercise equipment; physiological monitors; exercise protocols; physiological levels; equipment control; control systems; and fuzzy logic control.

  19. Exercise and age

    MedlinePlus

    Age and exercise ... It is never too late to start exercising. Exercise has benefits at any age. Don't worry ... as you age. The right kind of regular exercise can also reduce your risk of heart disease, ...

  20. Exercise and Posture

    MedlinePlus

    ... Info For Teens Message Boards & Forums Donate Shop Exercise & Posture About Spondylitis / Exercise & Posture Overview For The ... Diet Blood Work and Spondylitis Spondylitis Awareness Month Exercise Exercise is an integral part of any spondylitis ...

  1. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  2. Diabetes and exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000083.htm Diabetes and exercise To use the sharing features on this page, ... not exercising at all. Your Blood Sugar and Exercise Check your blood sugar before you exercise. Also, ...

  3. Exercise at Home

    MedlinePlus

    ... Divisions Home Health Insights Exercise Exercise at Home Exercise at Home Make an Appointment Ask a Question ... with the movement and contact your provider. Posture Exercises Better posture means better breathing and movement. Axial ...

  4. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  5. Exercise apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaffner, Grant (Inventor); Bentley, Jason R. (Inventor); Loehr, James A. (Inventor); Gundo, Daniel P. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    An apparatus and method for exercising whereby the user is supported by various mechanisms in such as way that the user's shoulder area is free to translate and rotate; the user's pelvic area is free to translate and rotate; or in any combination.

  6. Budget Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clowes, Darrel A.

    Following a discussion of the factors to be considered in constructing feasible college budgets, an exercise in budget development is presented involving a hypothetical community college with 2,500 full-time equivalent (FTE) students, 500 in developmental education, 750 each in transfer and technical programs, and 500 undecided. Exercise…

  7. Relief of Chronic Posterior Neck Pain Depending on the Type of Forest Therapy: Comparison of the Therapeutic Effect of Forest Bathing Alone Versus Forest Bathing With Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Boram; Kim, Taikon; Kim, Mi Jung; Lee, Kyu Hoon; Choi, Seungyoung; Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Hyo Ryoung; Jun, Byol; Park, Seen Young; Lee, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the pain-reducing effect of forest bathing alone versus forest bathing in combination with stretching and strengthening exercises in patients with chronic posterior neck pain. Methods Sixty-four subjects with posterior neck pain that had lasted more than 3 months were enrolled. They were randomly divided into a forest bathing alone (FBA) group and a forest bathing with exercise (FBE) group; each group included 32 subjects. All subjects from both groups walked every morning in the forest for about 2 hours for 5 days. In the afternoon, the FBE group did a stretching and strengthening exercise for about 4 hours; the FBA group had free time in the woods. Visual analog scale (VAS) on one day, VAS over the previous week, neck disability index (NDI), EuroQol 5D-3L VAS (EQ VAS) and index (EQ index), McGill pain questionnaire (MPQ), the number of trigger points in the posterior neck region (TRPs), and the range of motion of the cervical spine were evaluated on the first and last day of the program and compared between the two groups. Results The number of TRPs were significantly reduced in the FBE group compared with the FBA group (p=0.013). However, the other scales showed no significant difference between the two groups. Conclusion When patients with chronic posterior neck pain underwent a short-term forest bathing (less than 7 days) program, FBE was more effective in the reduction of the number of TRPs than FBA. However, all other pain measurement scales we evaluated showed no statistically significant difference between the two protocols. PMID:26798610

  8. The Submaximal Clinical Exercise Tolerance Test (SXTT) to Establish Safe Exercise Prescription Parameters for Patients with Chronic Disease and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Gappmaier, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To describe how to perform a Submaximal Clinical Exercise Tolerance Test (SXTT) as part of an exercise evaluation in the physical therapy clinic to determine an appropriate exercise prescription and to establish safety of exercise for physical therapy clients. Summary of Key Points Physical activity is crucial for general health maintenance. An exercise evaluation includes a comprehensive patient history, physical examination, exercise testing, and exercise prescription. The SXTT provides important clinical data that form the foundation for an effective and safe exercise prescription. Observations obtained during the exercise evaluation will identify at-risk patients who should undergo further medical evaluation before starting an exercise program. Two case examples of SXTTs administered to individuals with multiple sclerosis are presented to demonstrate the application of these principles. Statement of Recommendations Due to their unique qualifications, physical therapists shall assume responsibility to design and monitor safe and effective physical activity programs for all clients and especially for individuals with chronic disease and disability. To ensure safety and efficacy of prescribed exercise interventions, physical therapists need to perform an appropriate exercise evaluation including exercise testing before starting their clients on an exercise program. PMID:22833706

  9. Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunna

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction. PMID:24409425

  10. Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunna

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction. PMID:24409425

  11. Exercise-related hypoglycemia in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Younk, Lisa M; Mikeladze, Maia; Tate, Donna; Davis, Stephen N

    2011-01-01

    Current recommendations are that people with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus exercise regularly. However, in cases in which insulin or insulin secretagogues are used to manage diabetes, patients have an increased risk of developing hypoglycemia, which is amplified during and after exercise. Repeated episodes of hypoglycemia blunt autonomic nervous system, neuroendocrine and metabolic defenses (counter-regulatory responses) against subsequent episodes of falling blood glucose levels during exercise. Likewise, antecedent exercise blunts counter-regulatory responses to subsequent hypoglycemia. This can lead to a vicious cycle, by which each episode of either exercise or hypoglycemia further blunts counter-regulatory responses. Although contemporary insulin therapies cannot fully mimic physiologic changes in insulin secretion, people with diabetes have several management options to avoid hypoglycemia during and after exercise, including regularly monitoring blood glucose, reducing basal and/or bolus insulin, and consuming supplemental carbohydrates. PMID:21339838

  12. "Exercise as medicine" in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, T J; Shur, N F; Smith, A C

    2016-08-01

    Exercise and physical activity are increasingly becoming key tools in the treatment and prevention of several medical conditions including arthritis and diabetes; this notion has been termed "exercise as medicine". Exercise has favorable effects on reducing cardiovascular risk, inflammation, cachexia, and hypertension, in addition to increasing physical functioning, strength, and cardio-respiratory capacity. Chronic kidney disease, a condition that affects around 10% of the population, is often overlooked as a target for exercise-based therapy. Despite the vast range of severity in kidney disease (e.g., pre-dialysis, dialysis, transplant), exercise has a potential role in all patients suffering from the condition. In this review, we summarise the important role exercise may have in the clinical management of kidney disease and how this form of 'medicine' should be best administered and 'prescribed'. PMID:27334146

  13. Exercise in the menopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Shangold, M M

    1990-04-01

    An exercise program for menopausal women that includes both aerobic and resistance training may prevent or relieve problems such as cardiovascular disease, obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, and depression. The risk of cardiovascular disease increases in women after menopause; in both men and women, regular aerobic exercise may improve cardiorespiratory endurance and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Aerobic exercise also prevents some age-related increases in body fat and it elevates resting metabolic rate, which correlates directly with lean body mass. Inactivity, not hormonal change, is the most common cause of obesity. Resistance training can improve muscle strength and bone density. Increases in bone mineral content have been found at lumbar vertebral and distal radial sites in women who participate in exercise programs. Weight-bearing exercise in conjunction with estrogen replacement therapy and calcium supplementation helps to prevent osteoporosis. Many women experience mood changes at menopause. Some of these symptoms are caused by chronic sleep deprivation due to night flushes and respond best to estrogen; others are related to levels of brain chemicals and respond favorably to exercise. PMID:2179791

  14. [Ventricular bigeminy with fixed with fixed coupling at rest and during exercise as the cause of recurrent dizziness and syncope--successful anti-arrhythmic therapy by high frequency current catheter ablation of a right ventricular arrhythmogenic focus. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, L J; Emmerich, K; Wittmann, N; Probst, H; Krakau, I; Horlitz, M; Klevinghaus, K; Gülker, H

    1995-01-01

    In a 52-year-old patient with beginning dilatative cardiomyopathy dizziness and syncopes could be observed due to a ventricular bigeminy at rest and under exercise conditions. The patient also showed a marked reduction of exercise capacity and was handicapped in his profession as electrician and unable to work for more than 10 months. Antiarrhythmic drug therapy including the subsequent use of all available antiarrhythmic agents failed in suppressing this arrhythmia. In an electrophysiological study the arrhythmogenic focus could be localized in the right ventricular outflow tract. Application of radiofrequency current resulted in instantaneous termination of the extrasystoly; this result could be documented in repeat Holter monitorings over 12 weeks to present. This case report shows that radiofrequency catheter ablation can in special cases be applied for therapy of extrasystolic phenomena when clinical symptoms necessitate treatment and antiarrhythmic drug therapy fails. PMID:7571778

  15. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults ≥ 65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n = 200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT + SRE or 36 weeks SMT + SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs

  16. Physical Therapy For Rheumatic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, C. M.

    1971-01-01

    Physical therapy remains an important tool in rheumatic disease treatment even though great strides have been made with chemotherapy. Much physical therapy is misused, however, and physicians should ensure that the exercises ordered for a patient do not contribute to joint deformity. Underwater exercise, heat therapy, traction, massage and splinting as well as a warm and sympathetic staff are all good aids in rehabilitating the rheumatic patient, but careful supervision is needed for maximum benefit. PMID:20468607

  17. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; Pires de Sousa, Marcelo Victor; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-09-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm(2) , 7.2 J/cm(2) ) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact. PMID:25378263

  18. Light-emitting diode therapy in exercise-trained mice increases muscle performance, cytochrome c oxidase activity, ATP and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Ferraresi, Cleber; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio; de Sousa, Marcelo Victor Pires; Kaippert, Beatriz; Huang, Ying-Ying; Koiso, Tomoharu; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied over the leg, gluteus and lower-back muscles of mice using a LED cluster (630 nm and 850 nm, 80 mW/cm2, 7.2 J/cm2) increased muscle performance (repetitive climbing of a ladder carrying a water-filled tube attached to the tail), ATP and mitochondrial metabolism; oxidative stress and proliferative myocyte markers in mice subjected to acute and progressive strength training. Six bi-daily training sessions LEDT-After and LEDT-Before-After regimens more than doubled muscle performance and increased ATP more than tenfold. The effectiveness of LEDT on improving muscle performance and recovery suggest applicability for high performance sports and in training programs. Positioning of the mice and light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) applied on mouse legs, gluteus and lower-back muscles without contact. PMID:25378263

  19. Orthostasis: exercise and exercise training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geelen, G.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    There are two major problems here that are not independent. One is the more practically oriented problem of determining the effect of various modes of exercise training on gravitational tolerances, i.e., the point of syncope (unconsciousness) usually estimated from the time of appearance of presyncopal signs and symptoms. The other is more theoretical and concerns the mechanism of blood pressure failure that results in syncope. In many experimental designs these two problems or purposes have been intermingled, with equivocal results.

  20. Exercise and Compulsive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polivy, Janet; Clendenen, Vanessa

    Although reports on the positive effects of fitness and exercise predominate in the exercise literature, some researchers describe frequent exercise as compulsive or addictive behavior. This paper addresses these "negative addictions" of exercise. As early as 1970, researchers recognized the addictive qualities of exercise. Short-term studies on…

  1. Patient-reported improvements in health are maintained 2 years after completing a short course of cognitive behaviour therapy, exercise or both treatments for chronic widespread pain: long-term results from the MUSICIAN randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Beasley, Marcus; Prescott, Gordon J; Scotland, Graham; McBeth, John; Lovell, Karina; Keeley, Phil; Hannaford, Philip C; Symmons, Deborah P M; MacDonald, Ross I R; Woby, Steve; Macfarlane, Gary J

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The MUSICIAN study has previously shown short-term benefit but only marginal cost-effectiveness for two non-pharmacological interventions for chronic widespread pain (CWP). We wished to determine their long-term effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Methods A 2×2 factorial randomised controlled trial based in primary care in the UK. People were eligible if they were aged ≥25 years with CWP for which they had consulted their general practitioner. The interventions were a 6-month telephone cognitive behaviour therapy (tCBT) and/or a tailored exercise programme, in comparison to usual care. The primary outcome was patient-reported change in health. Results 884 persons were eligible, 442 were randomised and 81.7% were followed up 24 months post-treatment. In comparison to usual care (positive outcome 12.8%), tCBT (35.4%; OR 3.7 95% CI (1.8 to 8.0)), exercise (29.3%; OR 2.8 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) and both interventions (31.2%; OR 3.1 95% CI (1.3 to 6.0)) were significantly more effective. There was only a small decrease in effectiveness over time for individual and combined treatments. Those with more intense/disabling pain, higher distress and those who exhibited passive coping at baseline were more likely to have a positive outcome with tCBT than persons without these characteristics. tCBT was associated with the greatest increase in quality of life and lowest costs. Cost per quality adjusted life year was £3957–£5917 depending on method of analysis. Conclusions A short course of tCBT for people with CWP was effective long-term and was highly cost-effective. Exercise was also effective but delivered positive outcome for fewer patients at greater cost, and there was no advantage for patients receiving both interventions. Trial registration number ISRCTN67013851. PMID:26509056

  2. Diet and Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health News & Publications Annual Meeting Calendar Diet and Exercise Tips Diet and Exercise Tips News media interested in covering the latest ... Health Statistics concludes that 35 percent of adults exercise regularly (more than 6 of 10 don’t), ...

  3. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  4. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Shoulder exercises ... A key part in your recovery is doing exercises to make the muscles and tendons in your ... for everyday tasks or sports activities Before doing exercises at home, ask your doctor or physical therapist ...

  5. Exercise and Physical Activity

    MedlinePlus

    Alzheimer ’s Caregiving Tips Exercise and Physical Activity Being active and getting exercise helps people with Alzheimer’s disease feel better. Exercise helps keep their muscles, joints, and heart in ...

  6. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... know exactly if or how exercise increases your immunity to certain illnesses, but there are several theories ( ... not exercise more intensely just to increase their immunity. Heavy, long-term exercise (such as marathon running ...

  7. Exercise-Dependent Regulation of NK Cells in Cancer Protection.

    PubMed

    Idorn, Manja; Hojman, Pernille

    2016-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are the most responsive immune cells to exercise, displaying an acute mobilization to the circulation during physical exertion. Recently, exercise-dependent mobilization of NK cells was found to play a central role in exercise-mediated protection against cancer. Here, we review the link between exercise and NK cell function, focusing on circulating exercise factors and additional effects, including vascularization, hypoxia, and body temperature in mediating the effects on NK cell functionality. Exercise-dependent mobilization and activation of NK cells provides a mechanistic explanation for the protective effect of exercise on cancer, and we propose that exercise represents a potential strategy as adjuvant therapy in cancer, by improving NK cell recruitment and infiltration in solid tumors. PMID:27262760

  8. Exercise and Vascular Function – How Much is too Much?

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Matthew J.; Gutterman, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a powerful therapy for preventing the onset and slowing the progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased shear stress during exercise improves vascular homeostasis by both decreasing reactive oxygen species and increasing nitric oxide bioavailability in the endothelium. While these observations are well accepted as they apply to individuals at risk for cardiovascular disease, less is known about how exercise, especially intense exercise, affects vascular function in healthy individuals. This review highlights examples of how vascular function can paradoxically be impaired in otherwise healthy individuals by extreme levels of exercise, with a focus on the causative role that reactive oxygen species play in this impairment. PMID:24873760

  9. [Lung exercise: outpatient exercise program has long-term benefits on COPD].

    PubMed

    Spielmanns, Marc; Göhl, Oliver; Schultz, Konrad; Worth, Heinrich

    2015-06-01

    The positive influence of regular physical training on the course of many chronic diseases in different fields is well documented. Especially for obstructive respiratory diseases the benefit of lung exercise is convincing. An overview will be given in this work how lung exercise can be an effective form of therapy for pulmonary diseases. Actually the evidence of the efficacy of physical activity is particularly overwhelming in obstructive pulmonary diseases. Several clinical trials showed an enhancement in endurance and exercise capacity, quality of life and a decrease of dyspnea and disease-related symptoms. However in comparison to other disease groups, the benefits and awareness and therefore a widespread dissemination is still insufficient. Regular physical activity is an important, effective and also cost-effective component of the therapy of respiratory diseases and is sometimes even superior to a drug therapy. Enough reason to share this kind of therapy with our patients with pulmonary diseases. PMID:26115136

  10. Exercise countermeasures for spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Convertino, V A; Sandler, H

    1995-01-01

    The authors present a physiological basis for the use of exercise as a weightlessness countermeasure, outline special considerations for the development of exercise countermeasures, review and evaluate exercise used during space flight, and provide new approaches and concepts for the implementation of novel exercise countermeasures for future space flight. The discussion of the physiological basis for countermeasures examines maximal oxygen uptake, blood volume, metabolic responses to work, muscle function, bone loss, and orthostatic instability. The discussion of considerations for exercise prescriptions during space flight includes operational considerations, type of exercise, fitness considerations, age and gender, and psychological considerations. The discussion of exercise currently used in space flight examines cycle ergometry, the treadmill, strength training devices, electrical stimulation, and the Penguin suit worn by Russian crews. New approaches to exercise countermeasures include twin bicycles, dynamic resistance exercisers, maximal exercise effects, grasim (gravity simulators), and the relationship between exercise and LBNP. PMID:11541470

  11. Type 2 diabetes mellitus and exercise impairment.

    PubMed

    Reusch, Jane E B; Bridenstine, Mark; Regensteiner, Judith G

    2013-03-01

    Limitations in physical fitness, a consistent finding in individuals with both type I and type 2 diabetes mellitus, correlate strongly with cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. These limitations may significantly contribute to the persistent excess cardiovascular mortality affecting this group. Exercise impairments in VO2 peak and VO2 kinetics manifest early on in diabetes, even with good glycemic control and in the absence of clinically apparent complications. Subclinical cardiac dysfunction is often present but does not fully explain the observed defect in exercise capacity in persons with diabetes. In part, the cardiac limitations are secondary to decreased perfusion with exercise challenge. This is a reversible defect. Similarly, in the skeletal muscle, impairments in nutritive blood flow correlate with slowed (or inefficient) exercise kinetics and decreased exercise capacity. Several correlations highlight the likelihood of endothelial-specific impairments as mediators of exercise dysfunction in diabetes, including insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, decreased myocardial perfusion, slowed tissue hemoglobin oxygen saturation, and impairment in mitochondrial function. Both exercise training and therapies targeted at improving insulin sensitivity and endothelial function improve physical fitness in subjects with type 2 diabetes. Optimization of exercise functions in people with diabetes has implications for diabetes prevention and reductions in mortality risk. Understanding the molecular details of endothelial dysfunction in diabetes may provide specific therapeutic targets for the remediation of this defect. Rat models to test this hypothesis are under study. PMID:23299658

  12. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-01-01

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: 1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and 2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  13. Exercise for the heart: signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lichan; Bei, Yihua; Zhang, Haifeng; Xiao, Junjie; Li, Xinli

    2015-08-28

    Physical exercise, a potent functional intervention in protecting against cardiovascular diseases, is a hot topic in recent years. Exercise has been shown to reduce cardiac risk factors, protect against myocardial damage, and increase cardiac function. This improves quality of life and decreases mortality and morbidity in a variety of cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction, cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetic cardiomyopathy, cardiac aging, and pulmonary hypertension. The cellular adaptation to exercise can be associated with both endogenous and exogenous factors: (1) exercise induces cardiac growth via hypertrophy and renewal of cardiomyocytes, and (2) exercise induces endothelial progenitor cells to proliferate, migrate and differentiate into mature endothelial cells, giving rise to endothelial regeneration and angiogenesis. The cellular adaptations associated with exercise are due to the activation of several signaling pathways, in particular, the growth factor neuregulin1 (NRG1)-ErbB4-C/EBPβ and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1-PI3k-Akt signaling pathways. Of interest, microRNAs (miRNAs, miRs) such as miR-222 also play a major role in the beneficial effects of exercise. Thus, exploring the mechanisms mediating exercise-induced benefits will be instrumental for devising new effective therapies against cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26318584

  14. Kegel Exercise Tips

    MedlinePlus

    ... PDF, 345 KB) Alternate Language URL Español Kegel Exercise Tips Page Content What are Kegel exercises? To do Kegel exercises, you just squeeze your ... help with your bladder control. How do you exercise your pelvic muscles? Find the right muscles. Try ...

  15. Effectiveness of Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Low Back Pain: A Component Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Judith A.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated effects of group behavioral therapy including aerobic exercise, behavioral therapy alone, and aerobic exercise alone on pain and physical and psychological disability among mildly disabled chronic low-back-pain patients (n=96). The combined behavioral therapy and exercise group improved significantly more pretreatment to posttreatment…

  16. A rational program of exercise for patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Bunning, R D; Materson, R S

    1991-12-01

    This report provides a history of exercise therapy, gives background for and defines relevant terms, and describes common gross manifestations of osteoarthritis (OA). Bias and dogmatism concerning arthritis treatment are examined. Treatment using exercise and physical medicine modalities with reference to recent pertinent literature is reviewed. Human and animal studies demonstrating the efficacy of conditioning and strengthening in the treatment of OA are analyzed critically, and methods to enhance compliance and directions of future exercise research are discussed. PMID:1796304

  17. Acute effects of light emitting diodes therapy (LEDT) in muscle function during isometric exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: preliminary results of a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Eduardo Foschini; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique; Dal Corso, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are susceptible to early muscle fatigue. Light-emitting diodes therapy (LEDT) has been used to minimize muscle fatigue in athletes and healthy subjects. The aim of this study is to investigate the acute effects of LEDT on muscle fatigue and perception of effort in patients with COPD during isometric endurance test of the quadriceps femoris (QF). Ten patients (VEF₁ 50 ± 13% of predicted) underwent a single LEDT and sham application, 48 h apart, in a randomized crossover design. The LEDT and sham were applied in three localized areas of the QF (rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, and vastus medialis). Before and after exposure to LEDT and sham, the patients performed an isometric endurance test (60 % of the maximum voluntary isometric contraction), until the limit of tolerance concomitant to surface electromyography recording (median frequency as mean outcome). The slope obtained from linear regression analysis of the median frequency (MF) over endurance time was also used as an endurance index. Endurance time increased significantly after exposure to LEDT (from 26 ± 2 to 53 ± 5 s) as compared to sham (from 23 ± 3 to 30 ± 4 s) (F = 64, P = 0.0001). A greater decline in MF was observed during isometric endurance test after sham, compared to LEDT (F = 14.6, P = 0.004). The slope of the MF over time was lower post-LEDT compared to post-sham (-0.7 ± 0.3 vs. -1.5 ± 0.8; P = 0.004). The dyspnea score corrected for endurance time was lower post-LEDT (P = 0.008) but similar for fatigue both post-LEDT and post-sham. A single application of LEDT minimizes muscle fatigue and increases isometric endurance time. PMID:23743817

  18. Improvisational Acting Exercises and Their Potential Use in Family Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruby, James R.; Ruby, Nanci Carol

    2009-01-01

    Expressive therapy interventions are a useful resource for counselors working with a wide range of presenting issues. This article illustrates a series of improvisational acting exercises that can be used within a family counseling context. Clear directions for specific exercises are provided, along with illustrative case examples.

  19. Exercise as Treatment for Anxiety: Systematic Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stonerock, Gregory L.; Hoffman, Benson M.; Smith, Patrick J.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety, but few studies have studied exercise in individuals pre-selected because of their high anxiety. Purpose To review and critically evaluate studies of exercise training in adults with either high levels of anxiety or an anxiety disorder. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which anxious adults were randomized to an exercise or non-exercise control condition. Data were extracted concerning anxiety outcomes and study design. Existing meta-analyses were also reviewed. Results Evidence from 12 RCTs suggested benefits of exercise, for select groups, similar to established treatments and greater than placebo. However, most studies had significant methodological limitations, including small sample sizes, concurrent therapies, and inadequate assessment of adherence and fitness levels. Conclusions Exercise may be a useful treatment for anxiety, but lack of data from rigorous, methodologically sound RCTs precludes any definitive conclusions about its effectiveness. PMID:25697132

  20. ULTIMATE-SHF trial (UdenafiL Therapy to Improve symptoMAtology, exercise Tolerance and hEmodynamics in patients with chronic systolic heart failure): study protocol for a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the last few years, the use of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitors has been expanded to management of various cardiovascular disorders beyond pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study is designed to investigate the ability of udenafil, a newly developed long-acting PDE5 inhibitor, to improve functional capacity and hemodynamic status in a cohort of chronic systolic heart failure (SHF) patients. Methods/design Stable, chronic SHF patients will be randomly assigned to placebo (26 patients) or udenafil at a dose of 50 mg twice per day (26 patients) for the first 4 weeks followed by 100 mg twice daily for the next 8 weeks. Eligibility criteria will be age ≥18 years, clinical diagnosis of chronic SHF with current New York Heart Association class II to IV symptoms, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%, and experience of at least one of following during the 12 months prior to study entry: hospitalization for decompensated heart failure, acute treatment with intravenous loop diuretics or hemofiltration, or pulmonary artery systolic pressure ≥40mmHg on transthoracic echocardiography. Pharmacological therapy for SHF will be optimized in all patients at least 30 days before study entry. The primary outcome will be the change of maximal oxygen uptake, assessed by cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Secondary outcomes will include changes in ventilatory efficiency (minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production slope), left ventricular systolic and diastolic parameters, pulmonary artery systolic pressure, plasma concentration of brain natriuretic peptide, occurrence of mortality or hospitalization for heart failure, and the occurrence of any adverse event. Clinical trial registration Unique identifier: NCT01646515 PMID:23799908

  1. Exercise and the asthmatic.

    PubMed

    Bundgaard, A

    1985-01-01

    Physical exercise is not hazardous to asthmatics. Some asthmatics may benefit from physical training, and almost all asthmatics can perform any kind of physical exercise. Free running was earlier thought to induce more asthma than swimming, for example; however, when ventilation is identical during running and swimming, the exercise-induced asthma will also be the same. Hyperventilation alone is as good as physical exercise to induce exercise-induced asthma. If the physical exercise provokes an asthmatic attack, this is most often easily reversed by inhaled beta 2-agonists. Pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma is most efficient by inhaled beta 2-agonist; orally dosed beta 2-agonist is not as efficient as inhaled beta 2-agonist in the pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma. Inhaled sodium cromoglycate diminishes exercise-induced asthma, and the effect seems to be better in children than in adults. Inhaled steroids have no immediate effect on exercise-induced asthma, but long term treatment with steroids diminishes exercise-induced asthma. The pathogenesis of exercise-induced asthma remains obscure. If the water content is low in the inhaled air, e.g. in cold air, the changes in ventilatory capacity following exercise. will be greater than when the exercise is performed while inhaling hot air with high humidity. Almost all asthmatics present changes in the ventilatory capacity following exercise. Seasonal changes in exercise-induced asthma are only present in asthmatics with seasonal allergies, e.g. pollen allergy. No diurnal variation is found in exercise-induced asthma. Asthmatics can do any form of physical exercise. Almost all asthmatics can prevent major changes in ventilatory capacity by pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma or be treated for exercise-induced asthma during the physical activity so that they will not suffer from asthma while performing physical exercise. Asthmatics who have been successfully treated for exercise-induced asthma can do

  2. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  3. Are Criticisms of Exercise Well-Founded?

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Roy J.

    1986-01-01

    As with many decisions in public health, reasons for the advocacy of vigorous exercise can never be demonstrated by a large-scale, randomized controlled experiment. Nevertheless, there is strong evidence that physicians should be more active in commending regular physical activity to their patients, not only for its impact on mood state and thus perceived health, but also for its value in preventing and treating such common organic conditions as coronary heart disease, hypertension, maturity onset diabetes, and osteoporosis. For these problems, exercise is more effective and has fewer side effects than many alternative forms of therapy. Although some risks from injudicious exercise remain, they have been greatly exaggerated by those opposed to exercise. The advantages of a well-planned regimen (which should be centred on the enhancement of normal daily activity) far outweigh the risks that a musculoskeletal problem may be provoked or worsened by the prescribed activity. PMID:21274252

  4. Enhancing the Group Experience: Creative Writing Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenz, Kathie; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the literature surrounding the use of personal/creative writing as an adjunct to group therapy. Several writing exercises, including a stain glass poem, personal logo, and epigram, as well as client responses, are discussed. The article concludes with suggestions for using writing with groups. (Author/TE)

  5. Biological Basis of Exercise-Based Treatments for Musculoskeletal Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosio, Fabrisia; Tarabishy, Ayman; Kadic, Fawzi; Brown, Elke H.P.; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2016-01-01

    Exercise-based therapies are the cornerstone of rehabilitation programs. While the benefits of exercise on systemic and tissue function are generally accepted, mechanisms underlying these benefits are sometimes poorly understood. An improved understanding of the effects of mechanical loading on molecular and cellular processes has the potential to lead to more disease-specific and efficacious exercise-based therapies. The purpose of this paper is to review the current literature examining the role of mechanical signaling on muscle and cartilage biology. PMID:21703582

  6. Exercise physiology in heart failure and preserved ejection fraction.

    PubMed

    Haykowsky, Mark J; Kitzman, Dalane W

    2014-07-01

    Recent advances in the pathophysiology of exercise intolerance in patients with heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF) suggest that noncardiac peripheral factors contribute to the reduced peak V(o2) (peak exercise oxygen uptake) and to its improvement after endurance exercise training. A greater understanding of the peripheral skeletal muscle vascular adaptations that occur with physical conditioning may allow for tailored exercise rehabilitation programs. The identification of specific mechanisms that improve whole body and peripheral skeletal muscle oxygen uptake could establish potential therapeutic targets for medical therapies and a means to follow therapeutic response. PMID:24975908

  7. [Effectiveness of physical exercise programs in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Cano-De La Cuerda, Roberto; Aguila-Maturana, Ana María; Miangolarra-Page, Juan Carlos

    2009-02-14

    Clinical studies with methodological rigor have shown that the strategies for lifestyle modification and drug therapies can prevent or at least delay the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) in individuals at high risk. Combination of regular physical exercise and diet is more effective than each one separately to achieve modest weight loss and improve metabolic control in patients with DM. Our objective is to describe the role of exercise in patients with DM and the exercise programs in relation to the previous considerations, taking into account the intensity of the exercise, components of the program, duration, frequency and precautions. PMID:19211086

  8. Writing Exercises from "Exercise Exchange." Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Charles R., Ed.

    Reflecting current practices in the teaching of writing, the exercises in this compilation were drawn from the journal "Exercise Exchange." The articles are arranged into six sections: sources for writing; prewriting; modes for writing; writing and reading; language, mechanics, and style; and revising, responding, and evaluating. Among the topics…

  9. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... can join. Choose your sweet spot. Do you love being outdoors? Choose activities that get you outside, ... Council on Exercise. 5 Tips for Learning to Love Exercise (or at Least Develop a Crush on ...

  10. Clinical Applications for Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, David

    1989-01-01

    Patients with chronic conditions such as coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes, and obesity might benefit from prescribed exercise. Although exercise does not reverse pathologic changes, it may play a role in disease management. (JD)

  11. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise into your daily schedule may seem difficult at ... fine. The key is to find the right exercise for you. It should be fun and should ...

  12. Exercise and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Exercise and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens ... calcium and vitamin D. Include regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. Stop smoking. Limit how much ...

  13. Learn to love exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... mix it up. For example, you might play golf on a Saturdays, take tango classes on Mondays, ... American Council on Exercise. 5 Tips for Learning to Love Exercise (or at Least Develop a Crush on It). ... ...

  14. Kids and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Cold-Weather Sports and Your Family How Can Families Be ... a Fit Kid Why Exercise Is Cool Cold-Weather Sports Strength Training Weight Management: Strength Training Exercises ( ...

  15. Exercising on a budget

    MedlinePlus

    ... use proper form, go to the online exercise library at the American Council on Exercise. They also have sample workout routines you can try. Look for low-cost fitness options Many sports and activities are free ...

  16. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  17. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. There are four main ... jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using ...

  18. Why Exercise Is Wise

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... the reasons: Exercise benefits every part of the body, including the mind. Exercising causes the body to produce endorphins, chemicals ...

  19. Exercise for Seniors

    MedlinePlus

    ... and heart rate. Brisk walking or jogging, dancing, swimming, and biking are examples. Strength exercises make your muscles stronger. Lifting weights or using a resistance band can build strength. Balance exercises help prevent ...

  20. Exercise during Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise During Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise During Pregnancy FAQ119, May 2016 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  1. Exercise After Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pregnancy Patient Education FAQs Exercise After Pregnancy Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Exercise After Pregnancy FAQ131, June 2015 PDF Format ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  2. Diet and Exercise

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types Risk Factors Prevention & Early Detection Diet And Exercise Transplant recipients need to be aware of the ... help arrange for counseling and other support services. Exercise After a Transplant Most people are weak after ...

  3. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  4. Advanced resistive exercise device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raboin, Jasen L. (Inventor); Niebuhr, Jason (Inventor); Cruz, Santana F. (Inventor); Lamoreaux, Christopher D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to an exercise device, which includes a vacuum cylinder and a flywheel. The flywheel provides an inertial component to the load, which is particularly well suited for use in space as it simulates exercising under normal gravity conditions. Also, the present invention relates to an exercise device, which has a vacuum cylinder and a load adjusting armbase assembly.

  5. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  6. Exercising in Cold Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising in Cold Weather Exercise has benefits all year, even during winter. ... activities when it’s cold outside: l Check the weather forecast. If it’s very windy or cold, exercise ...

  7. Sleep, Exercise, and Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrelson, Orvis A.; And Others

    The first part of this booklet concerns why sleep and exercise are necessary. It includes a discussion of what occurs during sleep and what dreams are. It also deals with the benefits of exercise, fatigue, posture, and the correlation between exercise and personality. The second part concerns nutrition and the importance of food. This part covers…

  8. Exercise, Aging and Longevity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Stanley P.; Cundiff, David E.

    1988-01-01

    The question of whether or not a lifelong program of exercise actually has a bearing on longevity is discussed. The effects of exercise on the aging process, and the longevity-exercise relationship are reviewed. The conflicting evidence on the subject is presented. (JL)

  9. Japanese Radio Exercises. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Jocelyn

    This unit focuses on Japanese radio exercises which became popular in Japan just after World War II and are still used among students and workers in companies to help raise morale and form group unity. The exercises reflect the general role of exercise in Japanese culture--to serve as a symbol of unity and cooperation among the Japanese, as well…

  10. Prenatal exercise research.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2012-06-01

    In this review of recent research on prenatal exercise, studies from several different countries suggest that only approximately 40% of pregnant women exercise, even though about 92% are encouraged by their physicians to exercise, albeit with some 69% of the women being advised to limit their exercise. A moderate exercise regime reputedly increases infant birthweight to within the normal range, but only if exercise is decreased in late pregnancy. Lower intensity exercise such as water aerobics has decreased low back pain more than land-based physical exercise. Heart rate and blood pressure have been lower following yoga than walking, and complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension with associated intrauterine growth retardation and prematurity have been less frequent following yoga. No studies could be found on tai chi with pregnant women even though balance and the risk of falling are great concerns during pregnancy, and tai chi is one of the most effective forms of exercise for balance. Potential underlying mechanisms for exercise effects are that stimulating pressure receptors during exercise increases vagal activity which, in turn, decreases cortisol, increases serotonin and decreases substance P, leading to decreased pain. Decreased cortisol is particularly important inasmuch as cortisol negatively affects immune function and is a significant predictor of prematurity. Larger, more controlled trials are needed before recommendations can be made about the type and amount of pregnancy exercise. PMID:22721740

  11. Physical exercise training and neurovascular unit in ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Zhang, M; Feng, R; Li, W B; Ren, S Q; Zhang, J; Zhang, F

    2014-06-20

    Physical exercise could exert a neuroprotective effect in both clinical studies and animal experiments. A series of related studies have indicated that physical exercise could reduce infarct volume, alleviate neurological deficits, decrease blood-brain barrier dysfunction, promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system and increase the survival rate after ischemic stroke. In this review, we summarized the protective effects of physical exercise on neurovascular unit (NVU), including neurons, astrocytes, pericytes and the extracellular matrix. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that exercise training could decrease the blood-brain barrier dysfunction and promote angiogenesis in cerebral vascular system. An awareness of the exercise intervention benefits pre- and post stroke may lead more stroke patients and people with high-risk factors to accept exercise therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke. PMID:24780769

  12. Exercise and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sharman, James E; La Gerche, Andre; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the benefits of regular exercise is irrefutable and increasing physical activity levels should be a major goal at all levels of health care. People with hypertension are less physically active than those without hypertension and there is strong evidence supporting the blood pressure-lowering ability of regular exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals. This narrative review discusses evidence relating to exercise and cardiovascular (CV) risk in people with hypertension. Comparisons between aerobic, dynamic resistance, and static resistance exercise have been made along with the merit of different exercise volumes. High-intensity interval training and isometric resistance training appear to have strong CV protective effects, but with limited data in hypertensive people, more work is needed in this area. Screening recommendations, exercise prescriptions, and special considerations are provided as a guide to decrease CV risk among hypertensive people who exercise or wish to begin. It is recommended that hypertensive individuals should aim to perform moderate intensity aerobic exercise activity for at least 30 minutes on most (preferably all) days of the week in addition to resistance exercises on 2-3 days/week. Professionals with expertise in exercise prescription may provide additional benefit to patients with high CV risk or in whom more intense exercise training is planned. Despite lay and media perceptions, CV events associated with exercise are rare and the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the risks. In summary, current evidence supports the assertion of exercise being a cornerstone therapy in reducing CV risk and in the prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension. PMID:25305061

  13. Rote of adaptation exercises in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Kirtane, M V

    1999-04-01

    Adaptation, habitution and compensation are the mechanisms involved in rehabilitation of vertigo patients. In Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy (VRT), patients are advised to perform a series of maneuvers involving head, eye and body movements which stimulate the in-built adaptive mechanisms. Cawthorne and Cooksey were the first to describe adaptation exercises, which are further modified. Norre has designed VRT test battery of specific exercises. Drug treatment used along with VRT should not interfere with the compensation mechanism. Anti-vertigo drug Betahistine has been shown to hasten the compensation and hence is suitable for use with VRT. PMID:23119512

  14. Exploring the effect of space and place on response to exercise therapy for knee and hip pain—a protocol for a double-blind randomised controlled clinical trial: the CONEX trial

    PubMed Central

    Thorlund, Jonas Bloch; Ulrich, Roger S; Dieppe, Paul A; Roos, Ewa M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Context effects are described as effects of a given treatment, not directly caused by the treatment itself, but rather caused by the context in which treatment is delivered. Exercise is a recommended core treatment in clinical guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders. Although moderately effective overall, variation is seen in size of response to exercise across randomised controlled trial (RCT) studies. Part of this variation may be related to the fact that exercise interventions are performed in different physical environments, which may affect participants differently. The study aims to investigate the effect of exercising in a contextually enhanced physical environment for 8 weeks in people with knee or hip pain. Methods and analysis The study is a double-blind RCT. Eligible participants are 35 years or older with persisting knee and/or hip pain for 3 months. Participants are randomised to one of three groups: (1) exercise in a contextually enhanced environment, (2) exercise in a standard environment and (3) waiting list. The contextually enhanced environment is located in a newly built facility, has large windows providing abundant daylight and overlooks a recreational park. The standard environment is in a basement, has artificial lighting and is marked by years of use; that is, resembling many clinical environments. The primary outcome is the participant's global perceived effect rated on a seven-point Likert scale after 8 weeks exercise. Patient-reported and objective secondary outcomes are included. Ethics and dissemination The Regional Scientific Ethical Committee for Southern Denmark has approved the study. Study findings will be disseminated in peer-reviewed publications and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number NCT02043613. PMID:25818278

  15. Complementary and alternative therapies for weight loss.

    PubMed

    Steyer, Terrence E; Ables, Adrienne

    2009-06-01

    Although many complementary therapies are promoted for the treatment of obesity, few are truly therapeutic. Evidence suggests that food containing diacylglycerol oil, acupuncture, and hypnosis are the only evidence-based complementary therapies for the treatment of obesity, and, at best, these should be used as adjuvants to the more conventional therapies of calorie restriction and exercise. PMID:19501250

  16. Aging, exercise, and attention.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, H L; Kramer, A F; Capaldi, D

    1992-12-01

    The authors investigated the relationship among aging, attentional processes, and exercise in 2 experiments. First they examined age differences on 2 attentional tasks, a time-sharing task and an attentional flexibility task. Young adults alternated attention between 2 sequenced tasks more rapidly and time-shared the processing of 2 tasks more efficiently than older adults. They then investigated the effects of aerobic exercise on the same 2 attentional tasks in older adults. Following the 10-week exercise program, older exercisers showed substantially more improvement in alternation speed and time-sharing efficiency than older controls. Interestingly, this exercise effect was specific to dual-task processing. Both groups of subjects showed equivalent effects on single-task performance. These results indicate that aerobic exercise can exert a beneficial influence on the efficiency of at least 2 different attentional processes in older adults. PMID:1466833

  17. Candidate Exercise Technologies and Prescriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loerch, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews potential exercise technologies to counter the effects of space flight. It includes a overview of the exercise countermeasures project, a review of some of the candidate exercise technologies being considered and a few of the analog exercise hardware devices, and a review of new studies that are designed to optimize the current and future exercise protocols.

  18. Exercise for the Overweight Patient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Work, Janis A.

    1990-01-01

    Exercise can help patients maintain lean body mass during weight loss. Although exercise is not extremely useful in shedding excess pounds, it helps keep off weight lost through calorie restriction. This article discusses the specifics of exercise prescription, types of exercise, motivation to exercise, and special problems such as diabetes. (SM)

  19. Exercise in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rajarajeswaran, P.; Vishnupriya, R.

    2009-01-01

    Physical exercise has attracted increased interest in rehabilitation of oncological patients. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and summarize the evidence of physical exercise in preventing cancer, its ability in attenuating the effect of cancer and its treatments and to provide guidelines for exercise prescription Review of recent literature by electronic search of MEDline (Pub Med), Cancer lit, Cochrane libraries, CINAHL were done using Keywords and the variables were identified and systematically evaluated. There is strong evidence for reduced risk of colorectal and breast cancer with possible association for prostate, endometrial and lung cancer with increasing physical activity. Exercise helps cancer survivors cope with and recover from treatment; exercise may improve the health of long term cancer survivors and extend survival. Physical exercise will benefit throughout the spectrum of cancer. However, an understanding of the amount, type and intensity of exercise needed has not been fully elucidated. There is sufficient evidence to promote exercise in cancer survivors following careful assessment and tailoring on exercise prescription. PMID:20596305

  20. Exercise Training and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Tara L.; Lloyd, Pamela G.; Yang, Hsiao-Tung; Terjung, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a common vascular disease that reduces blood flow capacity to the legs of patients. PAD leads to exercise intolerance that can progress in severity to greatly limit mobility, and in advanced cases leads to frank ischemia with pain at rest. It is estimated that 12–15 million people in the United States are diagnosed with PAD, with a much larger population that is undiagnosed. The presence of PAD predicts a 50–1500% increase in morbidity and mortality, depending on severity. Treatment of patients with PAD is limited to modification of cardiovascular disease risk factors, pharmacological intervention, surgery, and exercise therapy. Extended exercise programs that involve walking ~5 times/wk, at a significant intensity that requires frequent rest periods, are most significant. Pre-clinical studies and virtually all clinical trials demonstrate the benefits of exercise therapy, including: improved walking tolerance, modified inflammatory/hemostatic markers, enhanced vasoresponsiveness, adaptations within the limb (angiogenesis, arteriogenesis, mitochondrial synthesis) that enhance oxygen delivery and metabolic responses, potentially delayed progression of the disease, enhanced quality of life indices, and extended longevity. A synthesis is provided as to how these adaptations can develop in the context of our current state of knowledge and events known to be orchestrated by exercise. The benefits are so compelling that exercise prescription should be an essential option presented to patients with PAD in the absence of contraindications. Obviously, selecting for a life style pattern, that includes enhanced physical activity prior to the advance of PAD limitations, is the most desirable and beneficial. PMID:23720270

  1. Larynx during exercise: the unexplored bottleneck of the airways.

    PubMed

    Røksund, Ola Drange; Heimdal, John-Helge; Olofsson, Jan; Maat, Robert Christiaan; Halvorsen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Exercise-induced shortness of breath is not uncommon in otherwise healthy young people. Based on the presenting symptoms alone, it is challenging to distinguish exercise-induced asthma (EIA) from exercise-induced obstruction of central airways, sometimes leading to diagnostic errors and inadequate treatment. Central airway obstruction usually presents with exercise-induced inspiratory symptoms (EIIS) during ongoing exercise. EIIS tends to peak towards the end of an exercise session or immediately after its completion, contradicting symptoms of EIA typically peaking 3-15 min after the exercise has stopped. EIIS is usually associated with some form of laryngeal obstruction. Transnasal flexible laryngoscopy performed continuously throughout an incremental exercise test from rest to exhaustion or to intolerable symptoms is usually diagnostic, and also provides information that is important for further handling and treatment. Reflecting the complex anatomy and functional features of the larynx, exercise-induced laryngeal obstruction (EILO) appears to be a heterogeneous condition. Contradicting previous beliefs, recent literature suggests that laryngeal adduction in a majority of cases starts in supraglottic structures and that vocal cord adduction (VCD) most often occurs as a secondary phenomenon. However, EILO is poorly understood and more and better research is needed to unravel causal mechanisms. The evidence base for treatment of EILO is weak. Speech therapy, psychotherapy, biofeedback, muscle training, anticholinergic aerosols have all been applied, as has laser supraglottoplasty. Randomized controlled trials with well-defined and verifiable inclusion and success criteria are required to establish evidence-based treatment schemes. PMID:25033930

  2. Evolving Role of Exercise Testing in Contemporary Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Gordon R; Gupta, Shuchita; Forman, Daniel E

    2016-01-01

    Symptom-limited (maximal) exercise testing before cardiac rehabilitation (CR) was once an unambiguous standard of care. In particular, it served as an important screen for residual ischemia and instability before initiating a progressive exercise training regimen. However, improved revascularization and therapy for coronary heart disease has led many clinicians to downplay this application of exercise testing, especially because such testing is also a potential encumbrance to CR enrollment (delaying ease and efficiency of enrollment after procedures and hospitalizations) and patient burden (eg, added costs, logistic hassle, and anxiety). Nonetheless, exercise testing has enduring value for CR, especially because it reveals dynamic physiological responses as well as ischemia, arrhythmias, and symptoms pertinent to exercise prescription and training and to overall stability and prognosis. Moreover, as indications for CR have expanded, the value of exercise testing and functional assessment is more relevant than ever in the growing population of eligible patients, including those with heart failure, valvular heart disease, and posttransplantation, especially as current patients also tend to be more clinically complex, with advanced ages, multimorbidity, frailty, and obesity. This review focuses on the appropriate use of exercise testing in the CR setting. Graded exercise tests, cardiopulmonary exercise tests, submaximal walking tests, and other functional assessments (strength, frailty) for CR are discussed. PMID:27120040

  3. Exercise and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Zisser, H; Gong, P; Kelley, C M; Seidman, J S; Riddell, M C

    2011-02-01

    Diet and exercise form the foundation of a healthy lifestyle. These are especially important for people living with diabetes mellitus, as they are the most practical non-pharmacological means by which patients may significantly improve their blood glucose levels. Exercise increases insulin sensitivity (both short and long term), lowers blood sugar levels, reduces body fat and improves cardiovascular (CV) function. Because of this, exercise offers enormous benefit to patients with diabetes. Blood glucose levels can significantly drop during and after physical activities, due to the increased utilisation of glucose as a fuel during exercise and the up-regulation of glucose transport into working muscles. Therefore, patients (especially those with type 1 diabetes) must account for the effects of exercise and adjust their medications and nutrition accordingly. Improvements in real-time continuous glucose monitoring and optimisation of basal insulin dosing may offer significant benefit to preventing hypoglycaemia in patients with type 1 diabetes who regularly exercise. Diverse exercise programmes and devices can also assist patients in monitoring their activities as well as motivating them to achieve their exercise goals. For patients with type 1 diabetes, questions such as how much, how long, how strenuous and what kind of exercise must be addressed in order for healthcare professionals to offer maximum benefit to their patients. Additionally, since patients with type 2 diabetes often have other significant co-morbidities such as obesity and CV disease, care providers must evaluate each patient's risk factors before designing an exercise programme. Several publications in the last year have addressed these issues and may serve as a valuable resource to provide safe and effective recommendations to patients and their healthcare providers. To be included in the Exercise and Diabetes chapter for the 2010 YEARBOOK, we reviewed leading peer-reviewed manuscripts that were

  4. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be active You can do the following exercises anytime and almost anywhere. As you get stronger, ... your ankles. This will increase how effective the exercise is. Try to exercise 2 or more days ...

  5. Exercises to help prevent falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000493.htm Exercises to help prevent falls To use the sharing ... and easily. Do not hold your breath. Balance exercises You can do some balance exercises during everyday ...

  6. Stay active and exercise - arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your overall health and sense of well-being. Exercise keeps your muscles strong and increases your range ... Water exercises may be the best exercise for your arthritis. Swimming laps, water aerobics, or even just walking in ...

  7. Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home About iChip Articles Directories Videos Resources Contact Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Home » Article Categories » Exercise and Fitness Font Size: A A A A Exercises to Improve Gait Abnormalities Next Page The manner ...

  8. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are a series of exercises designed to strengthen the muscles of the pelvic floor. ... Pelvic floor muscle training exercises are recommended for: Women ... Men with urinary stress incontinence after prostate surgery ...

  9. Lab Exercises for Kinesiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Brett D.; And Others

    This monograph presents descriptions of various exercises and athletic activities with a kinesiological and biomechanical analysis of the muscle systems involved. It is intended as examples of laboratory activities and projects in a college course in kinesiology. A listing of the required laboratory exercises precedes the examples. Specific…

  10. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... you finish doing all 4 exercises, put an ice pack on your shoulder for 20 minutes. It's best to use a plastic bag with ice cubes in it or a bag of frozen peas, not gel packs. If you do all 4 exercises 3 to ...

  11. Exercise and Children's Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowland, Thomas W.

    This book paints a broad picture of the role of exercise in children's health and provides information for the physician and other health care providers on healthful forms of physical activity for children. The book is divided into three parts: (1) "Developmental Exercise Physiology: The Physiological Basis of Physical Fitness in Children"; (2)…

  12. Exercise through Menopause.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuhr, Robyn M.

    2002-01-01

    Menopause is associated with many different health effects and symptoms. This paper explains that regular exercise can play a critical role in protecting health and battling the increased risk of cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, pelvic floor atrophy, and joint stiffness associated with menopause. Exercise programs for menopausal women should…

  13. Literature: Released Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Commission of the States, Denver, CO. National Assessment of Educational Progress.

    This volume contains 1970-71 Literature assessment exercises (all in the public domain) which have been selected for release at this time by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Information furnished for each exercise includes: the literature objective it was designed to measure, the theme (section) in which it appears, relevant…

  14. Water Exercise Causes Ripples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koszuta, Laurie Einstein

    1986-01-01

    Water exercise provides benefits independently of participants' skill levels, and reduces the likelihood of injury from overuse syndromes and heat-related problems. The advantages of water resistance exercises for athletes and for elderly, overweight, or physically disabled people are discussed. (MT)

  15. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Michael A.; Kluding, Patricia M.; Wright, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  16. Emerging Relationships between Exercise, Sensory Nerves, and Neuropathic Pain.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Michael A; Kluding, Patricia M; Wright, Douglas E

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of physical activity as a therapeutic tool is rapidly growing in the medical community and the role exercise may offer in the alleviation of painful disease states is an emerging research area. The development of neuropathic pain is a complex mechanism, which clinicians and researchers are continually working to better understand. The limited therapies available for alleviation of these pain states are still focused on pain abatement and as opposed to treating underlying mechanisms. The continued research into exercise and pain may address these underlying mechanisms, but the mechanisms which exercise acts through are still poorly understood. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of how the peripheral nervous system responds to exercise, the relationship of inflammation and exercise, and experimental and clinical use of exercise to treat pain. Although pain is associated with many conditions, this review highlights pain associated with diabetes as well as experimental studies on nerve damages-associated pain. Because of the global effects of exercise across multiple organ systems, exercise intervention can address multiple problems across the entire nervous system through a single intervention. This is a double-edged sword however, as the global interactions of exercise also require in depth investigations to include and identify the many changes that can occur after physical activity. A continued investment into research is necessary to advance the adoption of physical activity as a beneficial remedy for neuropathic pain. The following highlights our current understanding of how exercise alters pain, the varied pain models used to explore exercise intervention, and the molecular pathways leading to the physiological and pathological changes following exercise intervention. PMID:27601974

  17. Exercise and functional foods.

    PubMed

    Aoi, Wataru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, conditioning, recovery from fatigue after exercise, and avoidance of injury. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. In addition, several natural food components have been found to show physiological effects, and some of them are considered to be useful for promoting exercise performance or for prevention of injury. However, these foods should only be used when there is clear scientific evidence and with understanding of the physiological changes caused by exercise. This article describes various "functional foods" that have been reported to be effective for improving exercise performance or health promotion, along with the relevant physiological changes that occur during exercise. PMID:16749944

  18. Exercise and cancer recovery.

    PubMed

    Visovsky, Constance; Dvorak, Colleen

    2005-05-01

    Disease and cancer treatment-related side effects such as decreased energy level, muscle weakness, and declines in functional status and body mass have been well documented. There is evidence that exercise, such as low intensity aerobics walking, Tai Chi, or cycling, results in an overall decrease in fatigue levels over the course of cancer treatment. Additionally, there is evidence that regular physical activity or exercise can decrease emotional stress, blood pressure, the duration of neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and pain. Exercise also has been shown to increase quality of life and improve the maximal oxygen uptake during exertion, sleep patterns, and cognition. However, the majority of studies of exercise and cancer have been conducted with women with early stage breast cancer, limiting the generalizability of these studies to other cancer populations. The purpose of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of the extant research evidence about th e benefits of exercise related to cancer recovery. PMID:15977980

  19. Exercise and functional foods

    PubMed Central

    Aoi, Wataru; Naito, Yuji; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2006-01-01

    Appropriate nutrition is an essential prerequisite for effective improvement of athletic performance, conditioning, recovery from fatigue after exercise, and avoidance of injury. Nutritional supplements containing carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and minerals have been widely used in various sporting fields to provide a boost to the recommended daily allowance. In addition, several natural food components have been found to show physiological effects, and some of them are considered to be useful for promoting exercise performance or for prevention of injury. However, these foods should only be used when there is clear scientific evidence and with understanding of the physiological changes caused by exercise. This article describes various "functional foods" that have been reported to be effective for improving exercise performance or health promotion, along with the relevant physiological changes that occur during exercise. PMID:16749944

  20. Pelvic floor muscle exercises in genuine urinary stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Cammu, H; Van Nylen, M

    1997-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises, in the treatment of genuine stress incontinence, have been used successfully since 1948. One may expect a significant improvement (warranting no further therapy), or cure rate of about 50%. These exercises have a long-lasting effect. Poorly motivated women should be discouraged to follow exercise sessions. An active co-operation between urogynecologist, physiotherapist and the patient is important in order to avoid undertreated and dissatisfied women. The option to be operated upon must be easily available. PMID:9557995

  1. The role of exercise in the management of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Metsios, George S; Stavropoulos-Kalinoglou, Antonis; Kitas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with significant functional impairment and increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Along with pharmacological therapy, exercise seems to be a very promising intervention to improve disease-related outcomes, including functional ability and systemic manifestations, such as the increased cardiovascular risk. In this review, we discuss the physiological mechanisms by which exercise improves inflammation, cardiovascular risk and psychological health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and describe in detail how exercise can be incorporated in the management of this disease using real examples from our clinical practice. PMID:26178249

  2. Mechanisms governing the health and performance benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Bishop-Bailey, D

    2013-01-01

    Humans are considered among the greatest if not the greatest endurance land animals. Over the last 50 years, as the population has become more sedentary, rates of cardiovascular disease and its associated risk factors such as obesity, type 2 diabetes and hypertension have all increased. Aerobic fitness is considered protective for all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease, a variety of cancers, joint disease and depression. Here, I will review the emerging mechanisms that underlie the response to exercise, focusing on the major target organ the skeletal muscle system. Understanding the mechanisms of action of exercise will allow us to develop new therapies that mimic the protective actions of exercise. PMID:24033098

  3. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population. PMID:27156441

  4. Diabetes, Nutrition, and Exercise.

    PubMed

    Abdelhafiz, Ahmed H; Sinclair, Alan J

    2015-08-01

    Aging is associated with body composition changes that lead to glucose intolerance and increased risk of diabetes. The incidence of diabetes increases with aging, and the prevalence has increased because of the increased life expectancy of the population. Lifestyle modifications through nutrition and exercise in combination with medications are the main components of diabetes management. The potential benefits of nutrition and exercise intervention in older people with diabetes are enormous. Nutrition and exercise training are feasible even in frail older people living in care homes and should take into consideration individual circumstances, cultural factors, and ethnic preferences. PMID:26195102

  5. Effects and potential mechanisms of exercise training on cancer progression: a translational perspective.

    PubMed

    Betof, Allison S; Dewhirst, Mark W; Jones, Lee W

    2013-03-01

    Over the past decade there has been increasing research and clinical interest in the role of exercise therapy/rehabilitation as an adjunct therapy to improve symptom control and management following a cancer diagnosis. More recently, the field of 'exercise - oncology' has broadened in scope to investigate whether the benefits extend beyond symptom control to modulate cancer-specific outcomes (i.e., cancer progression and metastasis). Here we review the extant epidemiological evidence examining the association between exercise behavior, functional capacity/exercise capacity, and cancer-specific recurrence and mortality as well as all-cause mortality individuals following a cancer diagnosis. We also evaluate evidence from clinical studies investigating the effects of structured exercise on blood-based biomarkers associated with cancer progression/metastasis as well findings from preclinical investigations examining the effects and molecular mechanisms of exercise in mouse models of cancer. Current gaps in knowledge are also discussed. PMID:22610066

  6. Exercise and smoking habits among Swedish postmenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Frisk, J; Brynhildsen, J; Ivarsson, T; Persson, P; Hammar, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess exercise habits and their relation to smoking habits and social and medical factors in postmenopausal women. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with a questionnaire to all 1324 55-56 year old women in Linköping, Sweden. RESULTS: Response rate was 85%. About a third of the women took part in some kind of quite strenuous exercise for at least one hour a week. After a quarter worked out once a week; fewer did swimming and jogging. One in four women smoked. Women who used hormone replacement therapy, who were not smoking and who had a physically light occupation more often took part in strenuous sports. Women who had been treated for malignancies or with back problems exercised to the same extent as women in the general population. CONCLUSION: About a third of the post-menopausal women exercised on a regular basis, if exercise involved in getting to and from work was not counted. Since regular physical exercise has many health benefits, more women should be encouraged to take part in regular physical exercise. Factors probably associated with level of education and general awareness of the importance of a healthy lifestyle positively influenced the likelihood of these women to be physically active on a regular basis. A previous malignant disease or current back problems did not prevent women from taking part in exercise on a regular basis. Images Figure 1 PMID:9298557

  7. Aquatic Exercise for the Aged.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Michael; And Others

    The development and implementation of aquatic exercise programs for the aged are discussed in this paper. Program development includes a discussion of training principles, exercise leadership and the setting up of safe water exercise programs for the participants. The advantages of developing water exercise programs and not swimming programs are…

  8. Rotator cuff exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... activities, including your shoulder joint and your shoulder blade Observe your spine and posture as you stand ... band Isometric shoulder exercises Wall push-ups Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - no tubing Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - ...

  9. Exercise and immunity

    MedlinePlus

    ... Going to the gym every other day Playing golf regularly Exercise can help you feel better about ... important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy , ...

  10. Getting Exercise in College

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... hours of studying burn mental energy, both your body and mind need physical exercise to function at their peak. ...

  11. Hand and Finger Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    Hand and Finger Exercises  Place your palm flat on a table. Raise and lower your fingers one ... times for ____ seconds.  Pick up objects with your hand. Start out with larger objects. Repeat ____ times for ____ ...

  12. Exercise stress test

    MedlinePlus

    ... on a treadmill or pedal on an exercise bicycle. Slowly (about every 3 minutes), you will be ... walking on a treadmill or pedaling a stationary bicycle. The pace and incline of the treadmill (or ...

  13. Exercises in Applied Geochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackleton, W. G.

    1977-01-01

    Reviews exercises in the analysis of samples and interpretations of results from the geochemical survey portion of a three year teacher education program in geology presented at Salisbury College of Advanced Education. (SL)

  14. Exercise and Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... supporting your weight against gravity. This promotes bone density and protects against osteoporosis. What does cardiovascular exercise ... doing different activities, such as tennis and swimming. Water-based activities, such as swimming or water aerobics, ...

  15. Exercise and Physical Fitness

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers Strengthen your bones and muscles Improve your mental health and mood Improve your ability to do daily activities and prevent falls, if you're an older adult Increase your chances of living longer Fitting regular exercise ...

  16. Prescribing exercise for women.

    PubMed

    Senter, Carlin; Appelle, Nicole; Behera, Sarina K

    2013-06-01

    One- half of women in the United States do not meet the weekly dose of physical activity recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. Many women could benefit tremendously if they were to adopt a more active lifestyle. Health benefits from exercise include lowering the risk for cardiovascular disease, slowing the rate of bone loss in osteoporosis, and improving mood during pregnancy. In this article, we review the health benefits that women may gain from physical activity and the recommendations for physical activity for adults in the United States. We offer evidence supporting use of the exercise prescription, discuss how to write an exercise prescription, and how to tailor the exercise prescription for women with particular medical problems. PMID:23553380

  17. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms of EIB. Avoid exercising in extremely cold temperatures or when you have a respiratory infection, such ... by T Sinha, MD; AK David, MD (American Family Physician February 15, 2003, http://www.aafp.org/ ...

  18. PULMONARY CIRCULATION AT EXERCISE

    PubMed Central

    NAEIJE, R; CHESLER, N

    2012-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a high flow and low pressure circuit, with an average resistance of 1 mmHg.min.L−1 in young adults, increasing to 2.5 mmHg.min.L−1 over 4–6 decades of life. Pulmonary vascular mechanics at exercise are best described by distensible models. Exercise does not appear to affect the time constant of the pulmonary circulation or the longitudinal distribution of resistances. Very high flows are associated with high capillary pressures, up to a 20–25 mmHg threshold associated with interstitial lung edema and altered ventilation/perfusion relationships. Pulmonary artery pressures of 40–50 mmHg, which can be achieved at maximal exercise, may correspond to the extreme of tolerable right ventricular afterload. Distension of capillaries that decrease resistance may be of adaptative value during exercise, but this is limited by hypoxemia from altered diffusion/perfusion relationships. Exercise in hypoxia is associated with higher pulmonary vascular pressures and lower maximal cardiac output, with increased likelihood of right ventricular function limitation and altered gas exchange by interstitial lung edema. Pharmacological interventions aimed at the reduction of pulmonary vascular tone have little effect on pulmonary vascular pressure-flow relationships in normoxia, but may decrease resistance in hypoxia, unloading the right ventricle and thereby improving exercise capacity. Exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension is associated with sharp increases in pulmonary artery pressure and a right ventricular limitation of aerobic capacity. Exercise stress testing to determine multipoint pulmonary vascular pressures-flow relationships may uncover early stage pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23105961

  19. Troponin and exercise.

    PubMed

    Gresslien, T; Agewall, S

    2016-10-15

    Cardiac troponins are the preferred biomarkers in diagnostic of myocardial infarction, but these markers also can rise in response to exercise. Multiple studies have assessed troponins post-exercise, but the results have varied and there have been disagreements about the mechanism of troponin release. The aim of this paper was to review the literature, and to consider factors and mechanisms regarding exercise-induced increase of troponin. 145 studies were found after a search in pubmed and inclusion of additional articles found in the reference list of the first articles. Results showed that troponin rises in 0-100% of subjects after prolonged heavy exercise like marathon, but also after short-term and intermittent exercise like 30min of running and basketball. The variation can be due to factors like intensity, age, training experience, variation in sample size, blood sample timing and troponin assay. The pattern of troponin level post-exercise corresponds to release from the cytosolic compartment of cardiomyocytes. Increased membrane permeability might be caused by production of reactive oxygen species or alterations in calcium, pH, glucose/fat metabolism or in communication between integrins. Other suggested mechanisms are increased cardiovascular stress, inflammation, vasculitis, release of troponin degradation products in "blebs", dehydration, impaired renal clearance and expression of cardiac troponin in skeletal muscle. It can be concluded that both heavy and light exercise may cause elevated troponin, which have to be considered when patient are suspected to have a myocardial infarction. Several factors probably influence post-exercise levels of troponin, but the mechanism of release is most likely physiologic. PMID:27420587

  20. Parkinson disease and exercise.

    PubMed

    Earhart, Gammon M; Falvo, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative movement disorder. PD was originally attributed to neuronal loss within the substantia nigra pars compacta, and a concomitant loss of dopamine. PD is now thought to be a multisystem disorder that involves not only the dopaminergic system, but other neurotransmitter systems whose role may become more prominent as the disease progresses (189). PD is characterized by four cardinal symptoms, resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia, and postural instability, all of which are motor. However, PD also may include any combination of a myriad of nonmotor symptoms (195). Both motor and nonmotor symptoms may impact the ability of those with PD to participate in exercise and/or impact the effects of that exercise on those with PD. This article provides a comprehensive overview of PD, its symptoms and progression, and current treatments for PD. Among these treatments, exercise is currently at the forefront. People with PD retain the ability to participate in many forms of exercise and generally respond to exercise interventions similarly to age-matched subjects without PD. As such, exercise is currently an area receiving substantial research attention as investigators seek interventions that may modify the progression of the disease, perhaps through neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:23720332

  1. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  2. The potential role of physical exercise in the treatment of epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Arida, Ricardo Mario; Scorza, Fulvio Alexandre; Gomes da Silva, Sérgio; Schachter, Steven C; Cavalheiro, Esper Abrão

    2010-04-01

    The beneficial effects of exercise for people with epilepsy, including reduction of seizure susceptibility, improvement of quality of life, reduction of anxiety and depression, and better social integration, have increasingly been reported. We present data from human and animal studies supporting the role of exercise as a therapy for epilepsy complementary to standard treatments. PMID:20159660

  3. Randomised controlled trial of graded exercise in patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Fulcher, K. Y.; White, P. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To test the efficacy of a graded aerobic exercise programme in the chronic fatigue syndrome. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial with control treatment crossover after the first follow up examination. SETTING: Chronic fatigue clinic in a general hospital department of psychiatry. SUBJECTS: 66 patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome who had neither a psychiatric disorder nor appreciable sleep disturbance. INTERVENTIONS: Random allocation to 12 weeks of either graded aerobic exercise or flexibility exercises and relaxation therapy. Patients who completed the flexibility programme were invited to cross over to the exercise programme afterwards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: The self rated clinical global impression change score, "very much better" or "much better" being considered as clinically important. RESULTS: Four patients receiving exercise and three receiving flexibility treatment dropped out before completion. 15 of 29 patients rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment compared with eight of 30 patients who completed flexibility treatment. Analysis by intention to treat gave similar results (17/33 v 9/33 patients better). Fatigue, functional capacity, and fitness were significantly better after exercise than after flexibility treatment. 12 of 22 patients who crossed over to exercise after flexibility treatment rated themselves as better after completing exercise treatment 32 of 47 patients rated themselves as better three months after completing supervised exercise treatment 35 of 47 patients rated themselves as better one year after completing supervised exercise treatment. CONCLUSION: These findings support the use of appropriately prescribed graded aerobic exercise in the management of patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome. PMID:9180065

  4. Therapeutic exercise attenuates neutrophilic lung injury and skeletal muscle wasting.

    PubMed

    Files, D Clark; Liu, Chun; Pereyra, Andrea; Wang, Zhong-Min; Aggarwal, Neil R; D'Alessio, Franco R; Garibaldi, Brian T; Mock, Jason R; Singer, Benjamin D; Feng, Xin; Yammani, Raghunatha R; Zhang, Tan; Lee, Amy L; Philpott, Sydney; Lussier, Stephanie; Purcell, Lina; Chou, Jeff; Seeds, Michael; King, Landon S; Morris, Peter E; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2015-03-11

    Early mobilization of critically ill patients with the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has emerged as a therapeutic strategy that improves patient outcomes, such as the duration of mechanical ventilation and muscle strength. Despite the apparent efficacy of early mobility programs, their use in clinical practice is limited outside of specialized centers and clinical trials. To evaluate the mechanisms underlying mobility therapy, we exercised acute lung injury (ALI) mice for 2 days after the instillation of lipopolysaccharides into their lungs. We found that a short duration of moderate intensity exercise in ALI mice attenuated muscle ring finger 1 (MuRF1)-mediated atrophy of the limb and respiratory muscles and improved limb muscle force generation. Exercise also limited the influx of neutrophils into the alveolar space through modulation of a coordinated systemic neutrophil chemokine response. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) concentrations were systemically reduced by exercise in ALI mice, and in vivo blockade of the G-CSF receptor recapitulated the lung exercise phenotype in ALI mice. Additionally, plasma G-CSF concentrations in humans with acute respiratory failure (ARF) undergoing early mobility therapy showed greater decrements over time compared to control ARF patients. Together, these data provide a mechanism whereby early mobility therapy attenuates muscle wasting and limits ongoing alveolar neutrophilia through modulation of systemic neutrophil chemokines in lung-injured mice and humans. PMID:25761888

  5. Exercise training in hypertension: Role of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Neves, Vander José das; Fernandes, Tiago; Roque, Fernanda Roberta; Soci, Ursula Paula Renó; Melo, Stéphano Freitas Soares; de Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is a complex disease that constitutes an important public health problem and demands many studies in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involving his pathophysiology. Therefore, an increasing number of studies have been conducted and new therapies are continually being discovered. In this context, exercise training has emerged as an important non-pharmacological therapy to treat hypertensive patients, minimizing the side effects of pharmacological therapies and frequently contributing to allow pharmacotherapy to be suspended. Several mechanisms have been associated with the pathogenesis of hypertension, such as hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin aldosterone system, impaired endothelial nitric oxide production, increased oxygen-reactive species, vascular thickening and stiffening, cardiac hypertrophy, impaired angiogenesis, and sometimes genetic predisposition. With the advent of microRNAs (miRNAs), new insights have been added to the perspectives for the treatment of this disease, and exercise training has been shown to be able to modulate the miRNAs associated with it. Elucidation of the relationship between exercise training and miRNAs in the pathogenesis of hypertension is fundamental in order to understand how exercise modulates the cardiovascular system at genetic level. This can be promising even for the development of new drugs. This article is a review of how exercise training acts on hypertension by means of specific miRNAs in the heart, vascular system, and skeletal muscle. PMID:25228951

  6. Exercise-induced changes of cerebrospinal fluid vascular endothelial growth factor in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Shanahan, Kaitlyn J; Shriver, Leah P; Luciano, Mark G

    2016-02-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a growth factor demonstrated to be a key factor in cerebral angiogenesis and neurogenesis. It has been considered a critical component in hippocampus neurogenesis and memory formation and has been observed to increase in the rat hippocampus after exercise. We previously found increased VEGF levels in experimental chronic hydrocephalus in several brain areas and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), suggesting a role in the adaption to chronic hypoxia. Here we investigate the ability of moderate exercise to increase CSF-VEGF levels in adult chronic hydrocephalus patients. Lumbar CSF samples were collected from 17 normal pressure hydrocephalus patients. During CSF collection, 11 patients (exercise group) underwent a standard in-room occupational therapy session; six patients (no-exercise group) did not undergo a physical therapy session. CSF-VEGF levels were evaluated for increase related to exercise and the clinical response to CSF drainage. CSF-VEGF levels in the exercise group demonstrated significant increases 1-3 hours post-exercise compared with the levels 1-2 hours pre-exercise (p=0.04), and also showed significantly higher levels than the no-exercise groups (p=0.03). The post-exercise CSF-VEGF level in the group that did not clinically improve was significantly higher than both their own pre-exercise level (p=0.02) and that seen in the clinically improving group (p=0.05) after exercise. We conclude that CSF-VEGF levels can increase after moderate exercise even in elderly hydrocephalus patients. This suggests that a potential benefit of exercise, especially in CSF drainage non-improved patients, may exist via a central VEGF mechanism. PMID:26498093

  7. Aquatic Therapy: A Viable Therapeutic Recreation Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broach, Ellen; Dattilo, John

    1996-01-01

    Reviews literature on the effects of aquatic therapy (swimming and exercise) to improve function. Research shows that aquatic therapy has numerous psychological and physical benefits, and it supports the belief that participation can provide a realistic solution to maintaining physical fitness and rehabilitation goals while engaging in enjoyable…

  8. Effects of exercise interventions during different treatments in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fairman, Ciaran M; Focht, Brian C; Lucas, Alexander R; Lustberg, Maryam B

    2016-05-01

    Previous findings suggest that exercise is a safe and efficacious means of improving physiological and psychosocial outcomes in female breast cancer survivors. To date, most research has focused on post-treatment interventions. However, given that the type and severity of treatment-related adverse effects may be dependent on the type of treatment, and that the effects are substantially more pronounced during treatment, an assessment of the safety and efficacy of exercise during treatment is warranted. In this review, we present and evaluate the results of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) conducted during breast cancer treatment. We conducted literature searches to identify studies examining exercise interventions in breast cancer patients who were undergoing chemotherapy or radiation. Data were extracted on physiological and psychosocial outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 17 studies involving 1,175 participants undergoing active cancer therapy met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, exercise interventions resulted in moderate to large improvements in muscular strength: resistance exercise (RE, = 0.86), aerobic exercise (AE, = 0.55), small to moderate improvements in cardiovascular functioning (RE, = 0.45; AE, = 0.17, combination exercise (COMB, = 0.31) and quality of life (QoL; RE, = 0.30; AE, = 0.50; COMB, = 0.63). The results of this review suggest that exercise is a safe, feasible, and efficacious intervention in breast cancer patients who are undergoing different types of treatment. Additional research addressing the different modes of exercise during each type of treatment is warranted to assess the comparable efficacy of the various exercise modes during established breast cancer treatments. PMID:27258052

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Respiratory Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavich, Margot; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these four learning modules to teach respiratory therapy students a variety of job-related skills. The first module, "Anatomy and Physiology of the Central Controls of Respiration" by Margot Lavich, describes the functions of the five centers of the brain that control respiration and identifies…

  10. Estrogen mediation of hormone responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Robert R; Francois, Michelle; Castracane, V Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The roles of estrogens extend from the regulation of reproduction to other functions involved in control of metabolism, fluid balance, as well as gastrointestinal, lung, and brain function, with a strong effect on other hormones that subsequently alter the physiology of multiple tissues. As such, alteration of endogenous estrogens across the menstrual cycle, or from oral contraception and estrogen replacement therapy, can affect these tissues. Due to the important effects that estrogens have on different tissues, there are many investigations concerning the effects of a human estrogenic environment on endocrine responses to exercise. The following review will describe the consequences of varying estrogen levels on pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and endocrine function, followed by discussion of the outcomes of different estrogen levels on endocrine tissues in response to exercise, problems encountered for interpretation of findings, and recommended direction for future research. PMID:22512823

  11. Fish under exercise.

    PubMed

    Palstra, Arjan P; Planas, Josep V

    2011-06-01

    Improved knowledge on the swimming physiology of fish and its application to fisheries science and aquaculture (i.e., farming a fitter fish) is currently needed in the face of global environmental changes, high fishing pressures, increased aquaculture production as well as increased concern on fish well-being. Here, we review existing data on teleost fish that indicate that sustained exercise at optimal speeds enhances muscle growth and has consequences for flesh quality. Potential added benefits of sustained exercise may be delay of ovarian development and stimulation of immune status. Exercise could represent a natural, noninvasive, and economical approach to improve growth, flesh quality as well as welfare of aquacultured fish: a FitFish for a healthy consumer. All these issues are important for setting directions for policy decisions and future studies in this area. For this purpose, the FitFish workshop on the Swimming Physiology of Fish ( http://www.ub.edu/fitfish2010 ) was organized to bring together a multidisciplinary group of scientists using exercise models, industrial partners, and policy makers. Sixteen international experts from Europe, North America, and Japan were invited to present their work and view on migration of fishes in their natural environment, beneficial effects of exercise, and applications for sustainable aquaculture. Eighty-eight participants from 19 different countries contributed through a poster session and round table discussion. Eight papers from invited speakers at the workshop have been contributed to this special issue on The Swimming Physiology of Fish. PMID:21611721

  12. Mitohormesis in exercise training.

    PubMed

    Merry, Troy L; Ristow, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis is a process whereby exposure to a low dose of a potentially harmful stressor promotes adaptive changes to the cell that enables it to better tolerate subsequent stress. In recent years this concept has been applied specifically to the mitochondria (mitohormesis), suggesting that in response to a perturbation the mitochondria can initiate and transduce a signal to the nucleus that coordinates a transcriptional response resulting in both mitochondrial and non-mitochondrial adaptations that return and maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review we summarize the evidence that mitohormesis is a significant adaptive-response signaling pathway, and suggest that it plays a role in mediating exercise-induced adaptations. We discuss potential mitochondrial emitters of retrograde signals that may activate known exercise-sensitive transcription factors to modulate transcription responses to exercise, and draw on evidence from mitochondrial dysfunction animal models to support a role for mitohormesis in mitochondrial biogenesis. Studies directly linking mitohormesis to the exercise training response are lacking, however mounting evidence suggests numerous signals are emitted from the mitochondria during exercise and have the potential to induce a nuclear transcription response, with reactive oxygen species (ROS) being the primary candidate. PMID:26654757

  13. Exercise and Sarcopenia.

    PubMed

    Phu, Steven; Boersma, Derek; Duque, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Sarcopenia is a major component of the frailty syndrome and is also a strong predictor of disability, morbidity, and mortality in older persons. Without any available pharmacological intervention to sarcopenia, non-pharmacological interventions are the only option to prevent these poor outcomes in sarcopenic patients. Among those interventions, physical activity with or without protein supplementation has demonstrated to be effective in improving muscle mass and function and in preventing disability and frailty in older persons. Additionally, to the beneficial effect of physical activity on metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, a regular exercise program (3 times/wk) that includes resistance and endurance exercise training would have a major positive effect on sarcopenic muscle through improving muscle mass, strength, and function. In this review, we looked at the effect of exercise on sarcopenic frail older persons from the biological aspects of the response of the muscle to exercise to some practical aspects of exercise prescription in this high-risk population. We conclude that, although challenging, older persons should be encouraged to participate in this type of programs, which would improve not only their function and independence but also their quality of life. PMID:26071171

  14. Exercise and longevity.

    PubMed

    Gremeaux, Vincent; Gayda, Mathieu; Lepers, Romuald; Sosner, Philippe; Juneau, Martin; Nigam, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Aging is a natural and complex physiological process influenced by many factors, some of which are modifiable. As the number of older individuals continues to increase, it is important to develop interventions that can be easily implemented and contribute to "successful aging". In addition to a healthy diet and psychosocial well-being, the benefits of regular exercise on mortality, and the prevention and control of chronic disease affecting both life expectancy and quality of life are well established. We summarize the benefits of regular exercise on longevity, present the current knowledge regarding potential mechanisms, and outline the main recommendations. Exercise can partially reverse the effects of the aging process on physiological functions and preserve functional reserve in the elderly. Numerous studies have shown that maintaining a minimum quantity and quality of exercise decreases the risk of death, prevents the development of certain cancers, lowers the risk of osteoporosis and increases longevity. Training programs should include exercises aimed at improving cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle function, as well as flexibility and balance. Though the benefits of physical activity appear to be directly linked to the notion of training volume and intensity, further research is required in the elderly, in order to develop more precise recommendations, bearing in mind that the main aim is to foster long-term adherence to physical activity in this growing population. PMID:23063021

  15. Epilepsy and physical exercise.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, José; Tojal, Raquel; Morgado, Joana

    2015-02-01

    Epilepsy is one of the commonest neurologic diseases and has always been associated with stigma. In the interest of safety, the activities of persons with epilepsy (PWE) are often restricted. In keeping with this, physical exercise has often been discouraged. The precise nature of a person's seizures (or whether seizures were provoked or unprovoked) may not have been considered. Although there has been a change in attitude over the last few decades, the exact role of exercise in inducing seizures or aggravating epilepsy still remains a matter of discussion among experts in the field. Based mainly on retrospective, but also on prospective, population and animal-based research, the hypothesis that physical exercise is prejudicial has been slowly replaced by the realization that physical exercise might actually be beneficial for PWE. The benefits are related to improvement of physical and mental health parameters and social integration and reduction in markers of stress, epileptiform activity and the number of seizures. Nowadays, the general consensus is that there should be no restrictions to the practice of physical exercise in people with controlled epilepsy, except for scuba diving, skydiving and other sports at heights. Whilst broader restrictions apply for patients with uncontrolled epilepsy, individual risk assessments taking into account the seizure types, frequency, patterns or triggers may allow PWE to enjoy a wide range of physical activities. PMID:25458104

  16. Exercise and Estrogen in Women's Health: Getting a Clearer Picture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munnings, Frances

    1988-01-01

    This article surveys recent research on how and when exercise or estrogen therapy should be used to treat or prevent athletic amenorrhea, osteoporosis, cancer, and heart disease. The suspected causes of each disease are discussed and the benefits and dangers of each form of treatment/prevention are weighed. (JL)

  17. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercises and thoracic mobilization and exercises on chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Min-Yeong; Kim, Kyoung; Hur,, Beom-Young; Nam, Chan-Woo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate whether pain, balance, and stabilization of the lumbar region can be improved through thoracic mobilization in addition to lumbar stabilizaing exercises. [Subjects and Methods] This study recruited 36 subjects with chronic low back pain lasting more than 12 weeks. The subjects recruited for this study participated voluntarily, and provided their signed consent to participation. [Results] Improvement in balance was largest in the lumbar stabilization exercise group, followed by the thoracic mobilization and exercise group, and the traditional physical therapy group, in decreasing order of effect. [Conclusion] In conclusion, lumbar stabilization exercises combined with thoracic mobilization had greater effects on stabilization of the lumbar region pain relief, and improvement of the function of the patients with chronic low back pain. PMID:26834365

  18. Massage therapy research review.

    PubMed

    Field, Tiffany

    2016-08-01

    In this review, massage therapy has been shown to have beneficial effects on varying conditions including prenatal depression, preterm infants, full-term infants, autism, skin conditions, pain syndromes including arthritis and fibromyalgia, hypertension, autoimmune conditions including asthma and multiple sclerosis, immune conditions including HIV and breast cancer and aging problems including Parkinson's and dementia. Although many of the studies have involved comparisons between massage therapy and standard treatment control groups, several have compared different forms of massage (e.g. Swedish versus Thai massage), and different active therapies such as massage versus exercise. Typically, the massage therapy groups have experienced more positive effects than the control or comparison groups. This may relate to the massage therapy providing more stimulation of pressure receptors, in turn enhancing vagal activity and reducing cortisol levels. Some of the researchers have assessed physical, physiological and biochemical effects, although most have relied exclusively on self-report measures. Despite these methodological problems and the dearth of research from the U.S., the massage therapy profession has grown significantly and massage therapy is increasingly practiced in traditional medical settings, highlighting the need for more rigorous research. PMID:27502797

  19. The oxygen therapy.

    PubMed

    Corsonello, A; Pedone, C; Scarlata, S; Zito, A; Laino, I; Antonelli-Incalzi, R

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen (O(2)) is a vital element. Shortage of O(2) results in deranged metabolism and important changes in vascular tone with opposite effects on the systemic and pulmonary circulation. During hypoxemia, oxidative stress exposes the organism to a sort of accelerated senescence as well as to several acute untoward effects. Thus, hypoxemia should be promptly recognized and treated, hopefully by measures tailored to the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying hypoxemia. However, O(2) therapy remains the most common therapy of hypoxemia, but it must be carefully tailored to relieve hypoxemia without provoking hyperoxia or hypercarbia. Then, the individual response to O(2) as well as changing needs of O(2) during sleep or exercise must be evaluated to provide the best O(2) therapy. Hyperoxia, the effect of overcorrection of hypoxia, can dramatically impact the health status and threaten the survival of the newborn and, through different mechanisms and effects, the adult. A thorough knowledge of the pathophysiological bases of hypoxemia and O(2) storage and delivery devices is then mandatory to administer O(2) therapy guaranteeing for optimal correction of hypoxemia and minimizing the risk of hyperoxia. Consistent with this aim also is a careful scrutiny of instruments and procedures for monitoring the individual response to O(2) over time. Thus, at variance from classical pharmacological therapy, performing O(2) therapy requires a vast array of clinical and technical competences. The optimal integration of these competences is needed to optimize O(2) therapy on individual bases. PMID:23317164

  20. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  1. Exercise in Pregnancy: Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Artal, Raul

    2016-09-01

    In recent years it has been recognized that in all phases of life, including pregnancy, physical activity promotes health benefits and precludes comorbidities, the scientific evidence is indisputable. Several organizations around the world have updated in recent years the guidelines and recommendations for exercise in pregnancy. The December 2015, updated guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists emphasize that physical activity in pregnancy has minimal risk. Although recommending exercise in pregnancy, the anatomic/physiological changes, absolute and relative contraindications should be considered. Women who exercised regularly before pregnancy, in the absence of contraindications, can continue and engage in moderate to strenuous activities, although information on strenuous activities in pregnancy is still limited. This review summarizes the most recent published and recommended guidelines. PMID:27398880

  2. Locomotor exercise in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, W.; Whitmore, H.

    1991-01-01

    The requirements for exercise in space by means of locomotion are established and addressed with prototype treadmills for use during long-duration spaceflight. The adaptation of the human body to microgravity is described in terms of 1-G locomotor biomechanics, the effects of reduced activity, and effective activity-replacement techniques. The treadmill is introduced as a complement to other techniques of force replacement with reference given to the angle required for exercise. A motor-driven unit is proposed that can operate at a variety of controlled speeds and equivalent grades. The treadmills permit locomotor exercise as required for long-duration space travel to sustain locomotor and cardiorespiratory capacity at a level consistent with postflight needs.

  3. [Metabolic intolerance to exercise].

    PubMed

    Arenas, J; Martín, M A

    2003-01-01

    Exercise intolerance (EI) is a frequent cause of medical attention, although it is sometimes difficult to come to a final diagnosis. However, there is a group of patients in whom EI is due to a metabolic dysfunction. McArdle's disease (type V glucogenosis) is due to myophosphorylase (MPL) deficiency. The ischemic exercise test shows a flat lactate curve. The most frequent mutations in the PYGM gene (MPL gene) in Spanish patients with MPL deficiency are R49X and W797R. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) II deficiency is invariably associated to repetitive episodes of myoglobinuria triggered by exercise, cold, fever or fasting. The diagnosis depends on the demonstration of CPT II deficiency in muscle. The most frequent mutation in the CPT2 gene is the S113L. Patients with muscle adenylate deaminase deficiency usually show either a mild myopathy or no symptom. The diagnosis is based on the absence of enzyme activity in muscle and the lack of rise of ammonia in the forearm ischemic exercise test. The mutation Q12X in the AMPD1 gene is strongly associated with the disease. Exercise intolerance is a common complaint in patients with mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) deficiencies, although it is often overshadowed by other symptoms and signs. Only recently we have come to appreciate that exercise intolerance can be the sole presentation of defects in the mtDNA, particularly in complex I, complex III, complex IV, or in some tRNAs. In addition, myoglobinuria can be observed in patients under statin treatment, particularly if associated with fibrates, due to an alteration in the assembly of the complex IV of the MRC. PMID:12838448

  4. Exercise, immunity and aging.

    PubMed

    Venjatraman, J T; Fernandes, G

    1997-01-01

    In general population, many protective immune responses are impaired in old age, leading to an increased risk of infection. However, recent studies in SENIEUR subjects (healthy centenarians who are examples of successful aging) suggest that complex remodeling and reshaping of the immune system occurs with aging. An appropriate regular regimen of endurance exercise might help elderly to lead a quality of life by preserving immune function. However, very little is known regarding the interaction between exercise, aging and the immune system. Given that a number of age-related changes occur in many physiological systems which are known to alter the immune function both at rest and during exercise, it would be of value to learn the extent to which both acute and chronic exercise influence immune function in the elderly. The immune system response to exercise is multifaceted, depending on the nature of exercise. Significant interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems, and the role of lifestyle factors in immune function are known to occur. In theory, moderate exercise should help to reverse the adverse effects of aging upon the immune system by increasing the production of endocrine hormones which may contribute to less accumulation of autoreactive immune cells by enhancing the programmed cell death. Active elderly subjects demonstrated a significantly greater proliferative response to phytohemagglutinins (PHA) and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM), and higher rates of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) production. A moderate training program can enhance the resting natural killer (NK) cell function of healthy elderly people, potentially increasing resistance to both viral infections and preventing the formation of malignant cells. Recent studies have suggested that endurance training in later life is associated with a lesser age-related decline in certain aspects of circulating T cell function and related cytokine

  5. Exercise acts as a drug; the pharmacological benefits of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Vina, J; Sanchis-Gomar, F; Martinez-Bello, V; Gomez-Cabrera, MC

    2012-01-01

    The beneficial effects of regular exercise for the promotion of health and cure of diseases have been clearly shown. In this review, we would like to postulate the idea that exercise can be considered as a drug. Exercise causes a myriad of beneficial effects for health, including the promotion of health and lifespan, and these are reviewed in the first section of this paper. Then we deal with the dosing of exercise. As with many drugs, dosing is extremely important to get the beneficial effects of exercise. To this end, the organism adapts to exercise. We review the molecular signalling pathways involved in these adaptations because understanding them is of great importance to be able to prescribe exercise in an appropriate manner. Special attention must be paid to the psychological effects of exercise. These are so powerful that we would like to propose that exercise may be considered as a psychoactive drug. In moderate doses, it causes very pronounced relaxing effects on the majority of the population, but some persons may even become addicted to exercise. Finally, there may be some contraindications to exercise that arise when people are severely ill, and these are described in the final section of the review. Our general conclusion is that exercise is so effective that it should be considered as a drug, but that more attention should be paid to the dosing and to individual variations between patients. PMID:22486393

  6. Is exercise good for the right ventricle? Concepts for health and disease.

    PubMed

    La Gerche, André; Claessen, Guido

    2015-04-01

    There is substantial evidence supporting the prescription of exercise training in patients with left-sided heart disease, but data on the effects of exercise are far more limited for conditions that primarily affect the right ventricle. There is evolving evidence that right ventricular (RV) function is of critical importance to circulatory function during exercise. Even in healthy individuals with normal pulmonary vascular function, the hemodynamic load on the right ventricle increases relatively more during exercise than that of the left ventricle, and this disproportionate load is far greater in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Exercise-induced increases in pulmonary artery pressures can exceed RV contractile reserve (so-called arterioventricular uncoupling), resulting in attenuated cardiac output and exercise intolerance. In this review, we explore the spectrum of RV reserve-from transient RV dysfunction observed in athletes after extreme bouts of intense endurance exercise to RV failure with minimal exertion in patients with advanced pulmonary hypertension. Recent advances and novel approaches to echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging have provided more accurate means of assessing the right ventricle and pulmonary circulation during exercise such that quantification of exercise reserve may provide a valuable means of assessing prognosis and response to therapies. We discuss the potential benefits and risks of exercise training in both health and disease while recognizing the need for prospective studies that assess the long-term efficacy and safety of exercise interventions in patients with pulmonary vascular and RV pathologic conditions. PMID:25840099

  7. Exercise, Lymphokines, Calories, and Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    A review of epidemiological studies suggesting that exercise reduces the risk of cancer concludes that exercise may help defend against cancer by preventing obesity, stimulating lymphokines, and/or facilitating other healthful changes in behavior. (Author/CB)

  8. Exercise Helps Ease Psychosis Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... has shown that exercise can benefit people with schizophrenia. The study was published recently in the journal ... Health Topics Exercise and Physical Fitness Psychotic Disorders Schizophrenia About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  9. Eye Exercises and Reading Efficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Earl J.; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Evaluated with a total of 60 primary-grade children was the effectiveness in improving ocular motor control of three training programs: the Bender proprioceptive facilitative feedback exercises, the Marsden ball program, and perceptual exercises. (DB)

  10. ISS Update: SPRINT Exercise Program

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Amiko Kauderer interviews Lori Ploutz-Snyder, Ph.D., NASA Lead Exercise Physiology Scientist, about the SPRINT exercise program used by the crew members aboard the Inter...

  11. Exercising with a Muscle Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: • cramping in muscles (probably related to insufficient energy supply for muscles) • pain in muscles • weakness of exercised muscles • dark urine that looks like cola, following exercise (seek ...

  12. Kegel exercises - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000141.htm Kegel exercises - self-care To use the sharing features on ... move up and down. How to do Kegel Exercises Once you know what the movement feels like, ...

  13. Exercise for Your Bone Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Lifestyle Exercise for Your Bone Health Publication available in: PDF ( ... A Complete Osteoporosis Program For Your Information Why Exercise? Like muscle, bone is living tissue that responds ...

  14. Exercise to Improve Your Balance

    MedlinePlus

    ... nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercise to Improve Your Balance Having good balance is important for many everyday activities, such as ... fracture of the arm, hand, ankle, or hip. Balance exercises can help you prevent falls and avoid ...

  15. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis - exercise; Low bone density - exercise ... Osteoporosis is a disease that causes bones to become brittle and more likely to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density is the amount of bone ...

  16. [Music therapy on Parkinson disease].

    PubMed

    Côrte, Beltrina; Lodovici Neto, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    This study is a result of a qualitative research, in the Gerontology and Music therapy scenario. It was analyzed the importance of alternative practices like playing an instrument (piano, violin, etc.), singing, or practicing a guided musical exercise as a therapy activity for elder people with Parkinson Disease. The analysis, systematization and interpretation of the data pointed: music therapy is an excellent way to improve the life of the patient that becomes more sociable, decreasing physical and psychological symptoms ('symptomatology') and the subject change for a singular and own position in the relation with your disease and the people around. PMID:20069199

  17. COPD: benefits of exercise training.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    In patients with stable, moderate or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), general exercise training, including limb exercises, provides sustained improvement in various quality of life domains, compared with care without pulmonary rehabilitation. After a COPD exacerbation, exercise training appears to reduce the risk of hospitalisation in the following months by at least half. Few studies have evaluated the adverse effects of exercise training in COPD, but based on the data available in 2015, its harm-benefit balance appears favourable. PMID:27152405

  18. Exercise and manual physiotherapy arthritis research trial (EMPART): a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    French, Helen P; Cusack, Tara; Brennan, Aisling; White, Breon; Gilsenan, Clare; Fitzpatrick, Martina; O'Connell, Paul; Kane, David; FitzGerald, Oliver; McCarthy, Geraldine M

    2009-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is a major cause of functional disability and reduced quality of life. Management options aim to reduce pain and improve or maintain physical functioning. Current evidence indicates that therapeutic exercise has a beneficial but short-term effect on pain and disability, with poor long-term benefit. The optimal content, duration and type of exercise are yet to be ascertained. There has been little scientific investigation into the effectiveness of manual therapy in hip OA. Only one randomized controlled trial (RCT) found greater improvements in patient-perceived improvement and physical function with manual therapy, compared to exercise therapy. Methods and design An assessor-blind multicentre RCT will be undertaken to compare the effect of a combination of manual therapy and exercise therapy, exercise therapy only, and a waiting-list control on physical function in hip OA. One hundred and fifty people with a diagnosis of hip OA will be recruited and randomly allocated to one of 3 groups: exercise therapy, exercise therapy with manual therapy and a waiting-list control. Subjects in the intervention groups will attend physiotherapy for 6–8 sessions over 8 weeks. Those in the control group will remain on the waiting list until after this time and will then be re-randomised to one of the two intervention groups. Outcome measures will include physical function (WOMAC), pain severity (numerical rating scale), patient perceived change (7-point Likert scale), quality of life (SF-36), mood (hospital anxiety and depression scale), patient satisfaction, physical activity (IPAQ) and physical measures of range of motion, 50-foot walk and repeated sit-to stand tests. Discussion This RCT will compare the effectiveness of the addition of manual therapy to exercise therapy to exercise therapy only and a waiting-list control in hip OA. A high quality methodology will be used in keeping with CONSORT guidelines. The results will contribute

  19. Thoracolumbar spinal manipulation and the immediate impact on exercise performance

    PubMed Central

    Ward, John S.; Coats, Jesse; Ramcharan, Michael; Humphries, Kelley; Tong, Tammy; Chu, Cheuk

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if thoracolumbar chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) had an immediate impact on exercise performance by measuring blood lactate concentration, exercise heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion during a treadmill-based graded exercise test (GXT). Methods Ten healthy, asymptomatic male and 10 female college students (age = 27.5 ± 3.7 years, height = 1.68 ± 0.09 m, body mass = 71.3 ± 11.6 kg: mean ± SD) were equally randomized into an AB:BA crossover study design. Ten participants were in the AB group, and 10 were in the BA group. The study involved 1 week of rest in between each of the 2 conditions: A (prone Diversified T12-L1 CMT) vs B (no CMT). Participants engaged in a treadmill GXT 5 minutes after each week's condition (A or B). Outcome measures were blood lactate concentration, exercise heart rate, and rating of perceived exertion monitored at the conclusion of each 3-minute stage of the GXT. The exercise test continued until the participant achieved greater than 8 mmol/L blood lactate, which correlates with maximal to near-maximal exercise effort. A dependent-samples t test was used to make comparisons between A and B conditions related to exercise performance. Results No statistically significant difference was shown among any exercise response dependent variables in this study. Conclusions The results of this research preliminarily suggest that CMT to T12-L1 does not immediately impact exercise performance during a treadmill-based GXT using healthy college students. PMID:23843754

  20. Exercise and Fluid Balance Update

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlicht, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    One common piece of advice that exercise professionals give their clients is to drink water before, during, and after exercise. During exercise people can lose as much as three liters of water per hour (about 100 ounces) through sweat. Dehydration alters normal sweat patterns, which can lead to an increased core body temperature. Since most of the…

  1. Closing the Loop with Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altizer, Andy

    2008-01-01

    Conducting exercises provides a critical bridge between the theory of an Emergency Action Plan and its effective implementation. When conducted properly, exercises can fill the gap between training and after-action review to close the preparedness loop--before an actual emergency occurs. Often exercises are planned and conducted on campus based on…

  2. Cognitive Aging and Physical Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woo, Ellen; Sharps, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    Younger (n=58) and older (n=49) adults completed the Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test and recall tests of verbal and visual stimuli with maximum and minimum semantic support. Category support did not help young adults who exercised less. Older adults' exercise had no effect on use of category support; less-frequent exercisers had poorer results…

  3. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  4. Life Chances Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Margaret A.

    1992-01-01

    Describes a life chances exercise that helps students identify the life chances that they and society value. Explains that students learn that the attainment of important life chances is related to the family into which one is born. Discusses John Rawls' social theory. Suggests that participants may need to consider alternative systems of economic…

  5. Computer Exercises in Meteorology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trapasso, L. Michael; Conner, Glen; Stallins, Keith

    Beginning with Western Kentucky University's (Bowling Green) fall 1999 semester, exercises required for the geography and meteorology course used computers for learning. This course enrolls about 250 students per year, most of whom choose it to fulfill a general education requirement. Of the 185 geography majors, it is required for those who…

  6. Exercise and Weight Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Victor L.

    This paper describes a number of factors which go into determining weight. The paper describes what calories are, how caloric expenditure is measured, and why caloric expenditure is different for different people. The paper then outlines the way the body tends to adjust food intake and exercise to maintain a constant body weight. It is speculated…

  7. Fluid balance and exercise.

    PubMed

    Maughan, R J

    1992-10-01

    The rate of metabolic heat production during prolonged exercise may be increased to 15-20 times that at rest. Evaporation of sweat secreted onto the skin can effectively limit the rise in body temperature which would otherwise occur, but results in the loss of water and electrolytes from the body. Dehydration and an increased thermal load can accelerate the onset of fatigue during exercise. The available evidence supports the idea that ingestion of fluids during prolonged exercise can improve performance. Heart rate and rectal temperature will generally be lower, and plasma volume will be better maintained when fluids are given. There is, however, no general agreement on the optimum formulation nor on the frequency or volume of drinking that is most appropriate. In practice, the ideal solution will depend on a number of factors, including the duration and intensity of the exercise, the environmental conditions and the characteristics of the individual. The variation between individuals is, however, large and the optimum strategy can only be established by subjective experience. PMID:1483752

  8. Exercising on a budget

    MedlinePlus

    ... Old nylons or tights make great substitutes for resistance bands. Use chairs and stools. Chairs can work as props for doing certain exercises, such as leg lifts. A low, sturdy stool can be used for step training. Hit the stairs. Who needs a stair machine ...

  9. Interdisciplinary Exercises in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gastonguay, Paul R.

    1975-01-01

    Lists a series of thought questions to stimulate a student to undertake his own interdisciplinary exercises to correlate his learnings in his own way. The statements are designed to challenge the mind, in order to develop a personal framework on topics such as life, the meaning of man, and the evolution and bondage of social structure. (BR)

  10. Exercise and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Improve the way the body uses and controls blood sugar (glucose) which reduced the risk of Type II diabetes WHAT ARE THE RISKS OF EXERCISE? You can get dehydrated (lose too much water) if you do not drink enough liquids to keep up your fluid levels. Injuries may take more time to heal. You ...

  11. Exercise and Aging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    In this presentation on exercise and aging, the following explanations are made: the nature of physical fitness, physical fitness values, the importance of recognizing individual differences, physiological changes occurring with age through the adult years, physical fitness studies pertaining to middle-aged persons, the trainability of older…

  12. Cardiovascular benefits of exercise.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Shashi K

    2012-01-01

    Regular physical activity during leisure time has been shown to be associated with better health outcomes. The American Heart Association, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American College of Sports Medicine all recommend regular physical activity of moderate intensity for the prevention and complementary treatment of several diseases. The therapeutic role of exercise in maintaining good health and treating diseases is not new. The benefits of physical activity date back to Susruta, a 600 BC physician in India, who prescribed exercise to patients. Hippocrates (460-377 BC) wrote "in order to remain healthy, the entire day should be devoted exclusively to ways and means of increasing one's strength and staying healthy, and the best way to do so is through physical exercise." Plato (427-347 BC) referred to medicine as a sister art to physical exercise while the noted ancient Greek physician Galen (129-217 AD) penned several essays on aerobic fitness and strengthening muscles. This article briefly reviews the beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22807642

  13. Exercise Prescription for Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    Data on the dose-response gradient for the relation of physical activity or physical fitness to health and function are reviewed, refuting the idea that physical activity programs are either exercise for health or for fitness and suggesting that the key factor is the total energy expenditure of the activity. (SM)

  14. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy. PMID:27390442

  15. The effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dae-Sik; Park, Si-Eun

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] This study was aimed at assessing the effect of lumbar stabilization exercise on the pulmonary function of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were randomly allocated into lumbar stabilization exercise group and a general physical therapy group. The program consisted of 30-min sessions conducted 3 days a week for 8 weeks. Pulmonary function was assessed based on lung performance parameters, including forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume at 1 second, ratio of forced expiratory volume at 1 second to forced vital capacity, and peak expiratory flow. [Results] In the assessment of pulmonary function, the values of all the lung performance parameters were significantly increased in the lumbar stabilization exercise group but were significantly decreased in the general physical therapy group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that lumbar stabilization exercise had a more positive effect on pulmonary function than general physical therapy. PMID:27390442

  16. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Dimmock, James A.; Guelfi, Kym J.; West, Jessica S.; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods. PMID:26083114

  17. Does Motivation for Exercise Influence Post-Exercise Snacking Behavior?

    PubMed

    Dimmock, James A; Guelfi, Kym J; West, Jessica S; Masih, Tasmiah; Jackson, Ben

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that regular exercise plays an important role in achieving a number of health and wellbeing outcomes. However, certain post-exercise behaviors, including the consumption of unhealthy high-calorie foods, can counteract some of the benefits of physical activity. There are at least three overlapping pathways through which exercise may increase the likelihood of consuming pleasurable but unhealthy foods: through impulsive cognitive processes, reflective cognitive processes, and/or physiological responses. It is argued in this paper that motivation toward exercise can influence each of these pathways. Drawing from literature from various domains, we postulate that controlled exercise motivation, as opposed to autonomous exercise motivation, is more likely to influence each of these pathways in a manner that leaves individuals susceptible to the post-exercise consumption of pleasurable but unhealthy foods. PMID:26083114

  18. Physical therapy and occupational therapy: partners in rehabilitation for persons with movement impairments.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David L; Cipriani, Daniel J; Thomas, Julie J

    2002-01-01

    SUMMARY The professions of physical therapy and occupational therapy have legitimate roles in the restoration of human movement in the rehabilitation process. This paper first presents a physical therapy perspective on changing trends in therapeutic exercise. Recent trends in physical therapy reflect a shift away from isolating patterns of movement and open kinetic chain exercises toward a new emphasis on functional patterns of movement and closed kinetic chain exercises. Rehabilitation of persons with hip fracture is used as an example of these shifting trends. Next, the paper presents an occupational therapy perspective. Occupational therapy's historical emphasis on the use of naturalistic occupations as the context for therapeutic exercise is described. Theoretical advantages of occupationally embedded movement are listed, and recent research in support of naturalistic occupations is summarized. Physical therapy and occupational therapy are distinct professions with autonomous outlooks and terminologies, but the responsibilities of physical therapists and occupational therapists potentially overlap in the restoration of movement. Suggestions are made for interdisciplinary teamwork whereby the holistically considered welfare of the patient is always the primary concern of all therapists. PMID:23952022

  19. Mitochondrial myopathies: diagnosis, exercise intolerance, and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Raha, Sandeep

    2005-12-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies are caused by genetic mutations that directly influence the functioning of the electron transport chain (ETC). It is estimated that 1 of 8,000 people have pathology inducing mutations affecting mitochondrial function. Diagnosis often requires a multifaceted approach with measurements of serum lactate and pyruvate, urine organic acids, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), muscle histology and ultrastructure, enzymology, genetic analysis, and exercise testing. The ubiquitous distribution of the mitochondria in the human body explains the multiple organ involvement. Exercise intolerance is a common but often an overlooked hallmark of mitochondrial myopathies. The muscle consequences of ETC dysfunction include increased reliance on anaerobic metabolism (lactate generation, phosphocreatine degradation), enhanced free radical production, reduced oxygen extraction and electron flux through ETC, and mitochondrial proliferation or biogenesis (see article by Hood in current issue). Treatments have included antioxidants (vitamin E, alpha lipoic acid), electron donors and acceptors (coenzyme Q10, riboflavin), alternative energy sources (creatine monohydrate), lactate reduction strategies (dichloroacetate) and exercise training. Exercise is a particularly important modality in diagnosis as well as therapy (see article by Taivassalo in current issue). Increased awareness of these disorders by exercise physiologists and sports medicine practitioners should lead to more accurate and more rapid diagnosis and the opportunity for therapy and genetic counseling. PMID:16331134

  20. Disability predictors in chronic low back pain after aquatic exercise.

    PubMed

    Baena-Beato, Pedro Ángel; Delgado-Fernández, Manuel; Artero, Enrique G; Robles-Fuentes, Alejandro; Gatto-Cardia, María Claudia; Arroyo-Morales, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    The physical and psychological factors associated with reduction of disability after aquatic exercise are not well understood. Sixty participants (30 men and 30 women; age, 50.60 [9.69] yrs; body mass index, 27.21 [5.20] kg/m²) with chronic low back pain were prospectively recruited. The 8-wk aquatic therapy program was carried out in an indoor pool sized 25 × 6 m, with 140-cm water depth and 30°C (1°C) of water temperature, where patients exercised for 2-5 days a week. Each aquatic exercise session lasted 55-60 mins (10 mins of warm-up, 20-25 mins of aerobic exercise, 15-20 mins of resistance exercise, and 10 mins of cooldown). Demographic information, disability (Oswestry Disability Index), back pain (visual analog scale), quality-of-life (Short Form 36), abdominal muscular endurance (curl-up), handgrip strength, trunk flexion and hamstring length (sit and reach), resting heart rate, and body mass index were outcomes variables. Significant correlations between change in disability and visual analog scale (at rest, flexion, and extension), curl-up and handgrip (r ranged between -0.353 and 0.582, all Ps < 0.01) were found. Changes in pain and abdominal muscular endurance were significant predictors of change in disability after therapy. PMID:24887967

  1. Exercise-enhanced Neuroplasticity Targeting Motor and Cognitive Circuitry in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Petzinger, G. M.; Fisher, B. E.; McEwen, S.; Beeler, J. A.; Walsh, J. P.; Jakowec, M. W.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to highlight the potential role of exercise in promoting neuroplasticity and repair in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Exercise interventions in individuals with PD incorporate goal-based motor skill training in order to engage cognitive circuitry important in motor learning. Using this exercise approach, physical therapy facilitates learning through instruction and feedback (reinforcement), and encouragement to perform beyond self-perceived capability. Individuals with PD become more cognitively engaged with the practice and learning of movements and skills that were previously automatic and unconscious. Studies that have incorporated both goal-based training and aerobic exercise have supported the potential for improving both cognitive and automatic components of motor control. Utilizing animal models, basic research is beginning to reveal exercise-induced effects on neuroplasticity. Since neuroplasticity occurs at the level of circuits and synaptic connections, we examine the effects of exercise from this perspective. PMID:23769598

  2. Upright exercise or supine lower body negative pressure exercise maintains exercise responses after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. M.; Bennett, B. S.; Hargens, A. R.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Ballard, R. E.; Murthy, G.; Ford, S. R.; Fortney, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    Adaptation to bed rest or space flight is accompanied by an impaired ability to exercise in an upright position. We hypothesized that a daily, 30-min bout of intense, interval exercise in upright posture or supine against lower body negative pressure (LBNP) would maintain upright exercise heart rate and respiratory responses after bed rest. Twenty-four men (31 +/- 3 yr) underwent 5 d of 6 degree head-down tilt: eight performed no exercise (CON), eight performed upright treadmill exercise (UPex), and eight performed supine treadmill exercise against LBNP at -51.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg (LBNPex). Submaximal treadmill exercise responses (56, 74, and 85% of VO2peak) were measured pre- and post-bed rest. In CON, submaximal heart rate, respiratory exchange ratio, and ventilation were significantly greater (P < or = 0.05) after bed rest. In UPex and LBNPex, submaximal exercise responses were similar pre- and post-bed rest. Our results indicate that a daily 30-min bout of intense, interval upright exercise training or supine exercise training against LBNP is sufficient to maintain upright exercise responses after 5 d of bed rest. These results may have important implications for the development of exercise countermeasures during space flight.

  3. Short term effects of exercise training on exercise capacity and quality of life in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Advances in the understanding and management of pulmonary arterial hypertension have enabled earlier diagnosis and improved prognosis. However, despite best available therapy, symptoms of exertional dyspnoea and fatigue are commonly reported and result in a reduced capacity to perform daily activities and impaired quality of life. Exercise training has demonstrated efficacy in individuals with other respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. Historically, however, exercise training has not been utilised as a form of therapy in pulmonary arterial hypertension due to the perceived risk of sudden cardiac death and the theoretical possibility that exercise would lead to worsening pulmonary vascular haemodynamics and deterioration in right heart function. Now, with the advances in pharmaceutical management, determining the safety and benefits of exercise training in this population has become more relevant. Only three studies of supervised exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension have been published. These studies demonstrated improvements in exercise capacity and quality of life, in the absence of adverse events or clinical deterioration. However, these studies have not utilised an outpatient-based, whole body exercise training program, the most common format for exercise programs within Australia. It is uncertain whether this form of training is beneficial and capable of producing sustained benefits in exercise capacity and quality of life in this population. Design/Methods This randomised controlled trial will determine whether a 12 week, outpatient-based, supervised, whole body exercise training program, followed by a home-based exercise program, is safe and improves exercise capacity and quality of life in individuals with pulmonary arterial hypertension. This study aims to recruit 34 subjects who will be randomly allocated to the exercise group (supervised exercise training 3 times a week for 12 weeks, followed by 3 sessions per week of home

  4. Creative learning: the mandala as teaching exercise.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Margaret Cole

    2003-11-01

    Faculty committed to undergraduate education have discovered the need to address teaching strategies that focus on the new generation of students. In teaching an undergraduate course on Nursing the Client with a Mental Illness, the affective domain of learning is used to develop interpersonal competence, self-awareness, and self-reflection. The teaching technique used is an experiential exercise that asks students to create group mandalas using art materials on circular pieces of butcher-block paper. The mandala concept is derived from the Buddhist tradition and means "circle" or "center" in Sanskrit. Carl Jung introduced this technique to the United States and incorporated it into his therapy. As a creative, active learning strategy, the mandalas helped the faculty meet the clinical objectives for the course and the learning needs of a new generation of students. They also helped students learn about Eastern philosophy, group process, self-awareness, and Jungian therapy. PMID:14626390

  5. Effects of exercise on brain functions in diabetic animal models

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sun Shin

    2015-01-01

    Human life span has dramatically increased over several decades, and the quality of life has been considered to be equally important. However, diabetes mellitus (DM) characterized by problems related to insulin secretion and recognition has become a serious health problem in recent years that threatens human health by causing decline in brain functions and finally leading to neurodegenerative diseases. Exercise is recognized as an effective therapy for DM without medication administration. Exercise studies using experimental animals are a suitable option to overcome this drawback, and animal studies have improved continuously according to the needs of the experimenters. Since brain health is the most significant factor in human life, it is very important to assess brain functions according to the different exercise conditions using experimental animal models. Generally, there are two types of DM; insulin-dependent type 1 DM and an insulin-independent type 2 DM (T2DM); however, the author will mostly discuss brain functions in T2DM animal models in this review. Additionally, many physiopathologic alterations are caused in the brain by DM such as increased adiposity, inflammation, hormonal dysregulation, uncontrolled hyperphagia, insulin and leptin resistance, and dysregulation of neurotransmitters and declined neurogenesis in the hippocampus and we describe how exercise corrects these alterations in animal models. The results of changes in the brain environment differ according to voluntary, involuntary running exercises and resistance exercise, and gender in the animal studies. These factors have been mentioned in this review, and this review will be a good reference for studying how exercise can be used with therapy for treating DM. PMID:25987956

  6. Effects of Aerobic Exercise on Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    de Souza Moura, Antonio Marcos; Lamego, Murilo Khede; Paes, Flávia; Ferreira Rocha, Nuno Barbosa; Simoes-Silva, Vitor; Rocha, Susana Almeida; de Sá Filho, Alberto Souza; Rimes, Ridson; Manochio, João; Budde, Henning; Wegner, Mirko; Mura, Gioia; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Yuan, Ti-Fei; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Machado, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common psychiatric disorders observed currently. It is a normal adaptive response to stress that allows coping with adverse situations. Nevertheless, when anxiety becomes excessive or disproportional in relation to the situation that evokes it or when there is not any special object directed at it, such as an irrational dread of routine stimuli, it becomes a disabling disorder and is considered to be pathological. The traditional treatment used is medication and cognitive behavioral psychotherapy, however, last years the practice of physical exercise, specifically aerobic exercise, has been investigated as a new non-pharmacological therapy for anxiety disorders. Thus, the aim of this article was to provide information on research results and key chains related to the therapeutic effects of aerobic exercise compared with other types of interventions to treat anxiety, which may become a useful clinical application in a near future. Researches have shown the effectiveness of alternative treatments, such as physical exercise, minimizing high financial costs and minimizing side effects. The sample analyzed, 66.8% was composed of women and 80% with severity of symptoms anxiety as moderate to severe. The data analyzed in this review allows us to claim that alternative therapies like exercise are effective in controlling and reducing symptoms, as 91% of anxiety disorders surveys have shown effective results in treating. However, there is still disagreement regarding the effect of exercise compared to the use of antidepressant symptoms and cognitive function in anxiety, this suggests that there is no consensus on the correct intensity of aerobic exercise as to achieve the best dose-response, with intensities high to moderate or moderate to mild. PMID:26556089

  7. Exercise-induced bronchospasm - pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1981-09-01

    The practical importance, prevalence, typical features, physiopathology and therapy of exercise-induced bronchospasm (E.I.B.) are briefly reviewed. The condition is common, especially in children. Prevalence is influenced by the mode, intensity and duration of exercise, the age and possibly the sex of the subjects, the number of test repetitions, and the criterion for presence of spasm. The main site of obstruction is in the large airways. Symptoms appear a few minutes post-effort, peaking 10-15 minutes after exercise. At different times, spasm may arise in the vagal reflex arc, from alterations of sympathetic balance, prostaglandin release, and sensitization of the mast cell. Until recently, the main basis of prophylaxis has been inhalation of sodium cromoglycate (20 mg, 60 minutes prior to competition). Beta agonists have until recently been prohibited in international competitions. However, the use of selective beta agonists such as salbutamol and terbutaline was allowed in the 1978 World Swimming Championship and the 1980 World Cross-Country Championship with a supporting medical letter. The Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee has also moved recently to sanction the use of salbutamol and terbutaline. Future prophylaxis will thus be based on combinations of selective beta agonists and sodium cromoglycate. PMID:6794921

  8. Exercise and Fatigue in Adolescent and Young Adult Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Hooke, Mary C.; Friedman, Debra L.; Campbell, Kristin; Withycombe, Janice; Schwartz, Cindy L.; Kelly, Kara; Meza, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue is a significant problem for adolescent and young adult (AYA) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors. The relationship between exercise and fatigue is complex. This study explored the trajectory of and the relationship between exercise and fatigue over 36 months post-therapy in a cohort of 103 AYA-aged HL survivors treated on Children's Oncology Group (COG) study AHOD0031. Descriptive statistics and generalized estimating equations were used in this secondary data analysis. Exercise and fatigue improved over time but were unrelated; amount of exercise at end of therapy predicted amount of exercise at 12 (p = 0.02) and 36 (p = 0.0008) months post-therapy. PMID:26421221

  9. [Isotretinoin and exercise: can the two walk together?].

    PubMed

    Dalal, Adam; Ben-Barak, Shira; Zlotogorski, Abraham; Constantini, Naama

    2014-02-01

    Since its introduction in 1982, isotretinoin has revolutionized acne treatment, targeting the underlying mechanism of the disease, with effective and long-lasting results. During the first decade of its marketing, several cases of hyperCKemia and rhabdomyolysis were linked to isotretinon therapy. A special concern was given to the possible triggering of muscle toxicity by vigorous exercise. These potential effects discouraged the prescription of isotretinoin to physically active patients or required them to abstain from exercise during treatment. Common musculoskeletal adverse effects of isotretinoin include muscle or joint pains. HyperCKemia is frequently found in patients receiving treatment for rare cases of rhabdomyolysis. Isotretinoin-associated muscle toxicity is usually detected in asymptomatic patients, even though symptoms can appear without hyperCKemia. A possible synergistic effect of isotretinoin and exercise is plausible, although supported by weak evidence and mediated by an unknown mechanism. There are only two reports of myoglobinuria and no reports of decreased renal function in exercising patient under treatment. In conclusion, we believe that current data should not deter physicians from offering isotretinoin to physically active patients nor require them to abstain from exercise. Physicians must explain to patients the possible side effects of treatment, ask them to refrain from an unusual change in their exercise regimen and advise them to avoid other triggers of rhabdomyolysis. Patients should be aware of possible signs of muscle toxicity and inform their doctors about any relevant symptoms. PMID:24716429

  10. Effect of exercise on motor and nonmotor symptoms of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Johnson, Eric; Kani, Camellia; Kani, Kayvan; Hadi, Ehsan; Ghamsary, Mark; Pezeshkian, Shant; Chen, Jack J

    2015-01-01

    Background. Novel rehabilitation strategies have demonstrated potential benefits for motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). Objective. To compare the effects of Lee Silverman Voice Therapy BIG (LSVT BIG therapy) versus a general exercise program (combined treadmill plus seated trunk and limb exercises) on motor and non-motor symptoms of PD. Methods. Eleven patients with early-mid stage PD participated in the prospective, double-blinded, randomized clinical trial. Both groups received 16 one-hour supervised training sessions over 4 weeks. Outcome measures included the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and Modified Fatigue Impact Scale (MFIS). Five patients performed general exercise and six patients performed LSVT BIG therapy. Post-intervention evaluations were conducted at weeks 4, 12 and 24. Results. The combined cohort made improvements at all follow-up evaluations with statistical significance for UPDRS total and motor, BDI, and MFIS (P < 0.05). Conclusion. This study demonstrated positive effects of general exercise and LSVT BIG therapy on motor and non-motor symptoms of patients with PD. Our results suggest that general exercise may be as effective as LSVT BIG therapy on symptoms of PD for patients not able to readily access outpatient LSVT BIG therapy. PMID:25722915

  11. Kinect-based rehabilitation exercises system: therapist involved approach.

    PubMed

    Yao, Li; Xu, Hui; Li, Andong

    2014-01-01

    The Kinect-based physical rehabilitation receives increasing recognition as an approach to provide convenience for the patients who need the therapy usually from the health professions. Most of the previous studies were driven from the patients' point of view. This paper proposes a system aiming to simplify the recovery instruction from therapists, increasing patients' motivation to participate in the rehabilitation exercise. Furthermore, the architecture for developing such rehabilitation system is designed by motion capture, human action recognition and standard exercises prototype with Kinect device. PMID:25226964

  12. Exercise Intolerance In Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Gupte, Anisha A.; Hamilton, Dale J.

    2016-01-01

    More than 50% of Americans with heart failure have preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Exercise intolerance is a hallmark of HFpEF, but the pathophysiology is not well understood. Diverse etiologies and incomplete mechanistic understanding have resulted in ineffective management strategies to improve the outcomes of HFpEF. Traditional therapies that have been beneficial in the treatment of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), neurohormonal blockade in particular, have not been effective in treating HFpEF. In this review, we address underlying mechanisms of HFpEF and present the rationale supporting exercise as a component of comprehensive management. PMID:27486493

  13. Role of Exercise in Reducing Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mottola, Michelle F; Artal, Raul

    2016-09-01

    Exercise plays an important role in reducing the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in women with or without risk factors. GDM risk factors include obesity, family history of diabetes, high-risk ethnicity, increased maternal age, history of GDM, delivering a macrosomic infant, excessive gestational weight gain early in pregnancy (before glucose screening), sedentary behavior, low physical activity, and vitamin D deficiency. Most GDM patients can be managed with lifestyle modifications that include medical nutrition therapy and physical activity. When adherence is high and women are fully engaged in the exercise program, GDM can be effectively managed and prevented. PMID:27135873

  14. Automatic evaluations and exercise setting preference in frequent exercisers.

    PubMed

    Antoniewicz, Franziska; Brand, Ralf

    2014-12-01

    The goals of this study were to test whether exercise-related stimuli can elicit automatic evaluative responses and whether automatic evaluations reflect exercise setting preference in highly active exercisers. An adapted version of the Affect Misattribution Procedure was employed. Seventy-two highly active exercisers (26 years ± 9.03; 43% female) were subliminally primed (7 ms) with pictures depicting typical fitness center scenarios or gray rectangles (control primes). After each prime, participants consciously evaluated the "pleasantness" of a Chinese symbol. Controlled evaluations were measured with a questionnaire and were more positive in participants who regularly visited fitness centers than in those who reported avoiding this exercise setting. Only center exercisers gave automatic positive evaluations of the fitness center setting (partial eta squared = .08). It is proposed that a subliminal Affect Misattribution Procedure paradigm can elicit automatic evaluations to exercising and that, in highly active exercisers, these evaluations play a role in decisions about the exercise setting rather than the amounts of physical exercise. Findings are interpreted in terms of a dual systems theory of social information processing and behavior. PMID:25602145

  15. Effects of Exercise Rehab on Male Asthmatic Patients: Aerobic Verses Rebound Training

    PubMed Central

    Zolaktaf, Vahid; Ghasemi, Gholam A; Sadeghi, Morteza

    2013-01-01

    Background: There are some auspicious records on applying aerobic exercise for asthmatic patients. Recently, it is suggested that rebound exercise might even increase the gains. This study was designed to compare the effects of rebound therapy to aerobic training in male asthmatic patients. Methods: Sample included 37 male asthmatic patients (20-40 years) from the same respiratory clinic. After signing the informed consent, subjects volunteered to take part in control, rebound, or aerobic groups. There was no change in the routine medical treatment of patients. Supervised exercise programs continued for 8 weeks, consisting of two sessions of 45 to 60 minutes per week. Criteria measures were assessed pre- and post exercise program. Peak exercise capacity (VO2peak) was estimated by modified Bruce protocol, Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), and FEV1% were measured by spirometer. Data were analyzed by repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results: Significant interactions were observed for all 4 criteria measures (P < 0.01), meaning that both the exercise programs were effective in improving FVC, FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Rebound exercise produced more improvement in FEV1, FEV1%, and VO2peak. Conclusions: Regular exercise strengthens the respiratory muscles and improves the cellular respiration. At the same time, it improves the muscular, respiratory, and cardio-vascular systems. Effects of rebound exercise seem to be promising. Findings suggest that rebound exercise is a useful complementary means for asthmatic male patients. PMID:23717762

  16. Caffeine and exercise.

    PubMed

    Paluska, Scott A

    2003-08-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly consumed drug in the world, and athletes frequently use it as an ergogenic aid. It improves performance and endurance during prolonged, exhaustive exercise. To a lesser degree it also enhances short-term, high-intensity athletic performance. Caffeine improves concentration, reduces fatigue, and enhances alertness. Habitual intake does not diminish caffeine's ergogenic properties. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the physiologic effects of caffeine, but adenosine receptor antagonism most likely accounts for the primary mode of action. It is relatively safe and has no known negative performance effects, nor does it cause significant dehydration or electrolyte imbalance during exercise. Routine caffeine consumption may cause tolerance or dependence, and abrupt discontinuation produces irritability, mood shifts, headache, drowsiness, or fatigue. Major sport governing bodies ban excessive use of caffeine, but current monitoring techniques are inadequate, and ethical dilemmas persist regarding caffeine intake by athletes. PMID:12834577

  17. Exercise and the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Taunton, J.; Rhodes, E.; Donnelly, M.; Warren, J.; O'Brien, S.

    1992-01-01

    By the year 2025, more than 25% of Canadians will be older than 65; and nearly half the population older than 65 has some degree of disability. With physiologic aging comes a gradual loss of functional capacity and independence that becomes a major health burden. Researchers have shown that lifelong, moderate levels of exercise are associated with increased longevity, enhanced physical function, and longer-lasting independent living. PMID:21221294

  18. [New strategies for exercise training in osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Winkelmann, A; Schilling, S; Neuerburg, C; Mutschler, W; Böcker, W; Felsenberg, D; Stumpf, U

    2015-11-01

    In the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis, movement with muscle strengthening and proprioceptive training plays a major role. This was taken into consideration in the guidelines by the governing body on osteoporosis (Dachverband Osteoporose, DVO) from 2014 on prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis and in the DVO guidelines from 2008 on physiotherapy and exercise therapy for osteoporosis. Increases in lumbar bone density of between 0.5 % and 2.5 % can be achieved in women by strengthening exercises with high resistance. With this combination and strengthening of the quadriceps muscle a reduction of falls and hence the fracture risk could also be achieved. In traumatology, training for muscle strengthening is not always possible, especially for elderly patients. Practically relevant alternatives are regular walking and aquatraining, which may also lead to a significant increase in bone mineral density. Furthermore, large effects can be achieved with alternating side whole-body vibration (WBV) training with whole body vibration plates with only 3 days of training per week and with short training periods (15-20 min). Rates of increase in leg strength between 20 % and almost 40 % and in bone density between 0.5 % and 4 % in 6 months have been described. Whether and with what intensity whole body vibration therapy could be used for e.g. more rapid healing of fractures, is currently unclear. Initial positive results have been described in animal models. PMID:26467265

  19. Exercise Responses after Inactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    1986-01-01

    The exercise response after bed rest inactivity is a reduction in the physical work capacity and is manifested by significant decreases in oxygen uptake. The magnitude of decrease in maximal oxygen intake V(dot)O2max is related to the duration of confinement and the pre-bed-rest level of aerobic fitness; these relationships are relatively independent of age and gender. The reduced exercise performance and V(dot)O2max following bed rest are associated with various physiological adaptations including reductions in blood volume, submaximal and maximal stroke volume, maximal cardiac output, sceletal muscle tone and strength, and aerobic enzyme capacities, as well as increases in venous compliance and submaximal and maximal heart rate. This reduction in physiological capacity can be partially restored by specific countermeasures that provide regular muscular activity or orhtostatic stress or both during the bed rest exposure. The understanding of these physiological and physical responses to exercise following bed rest inactivity has important implications for the solution to safety and health problems that arise in clinical medicine, aerospace medicine, sedentary living, and aging.

  20. Exercise preconditioning of the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Kavazis, Andreas N

    2009-01-01

    Diseases of the heart (e.g. myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury) remain the major cause of death in the industrialized world. Therefore, developing a pragmatic countermeasure to reduce myocardial ischaemia reperfusion injury is vital. In this regard, a plethora of evidence indicates that regular exercise can protect the heart during an ischaemia reperfusion insult (i.e. cardioprotection). This review summarizes studies indicating that both short-term (i.e. 1-5 days) and long-term (i.e. weeks to months) endurance exercise provides cardioprotection. Data are presented showing that exercise duration and exercise intensity are both important factors in achieving a cardioprotective phenotype. Importantly, it appears that the exercise duration of a single exercise session should last for 60 minutes and should be performed at about 75% maximum oxygen consumption in order to achieve exercise-induced cardioprotection. Furthermore, data are presented showing that exercise-induced cardioprotection against myocardial stunning can persist for at least 9 days after the cessation of exercise training, but is lost 18 days after exercise. This review also summarizes the exercise-induced adaptations that occur to the myocardium. In particular, extrinsic changes observed in human and animal models include neural, hormonal, humoral, vascular and reduced body fat. Other anatomical and biochemical/molecular changes that have been studied as putative mechanisms in exercise-induced cardioprotection include alterations in anatomic coronary arteries, induction of myocardial heat shock proteins, increased myocardial cyclooxygenase-2 activity, elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress proteins, nitric oxide production, improved function of sarcolemmal and/or mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium channels and increased myocardial antioxidant capacity. However, the most compelling evidence for exercise-induced cardioprotection is the fact that exercise training

  1. Role of nutrition and exercise in osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Santora, A C

    1987-01-26

    Both adequate nutrition and exercise are essential for development of peak adult bone mass and maintenance of bone during aging. The optimal dietary level of a nutrient may vary from individual to individual and may change with age, intake of other nutrients, disease, drug therapy, or sex hormone status. Effects on spinal trabecular bone may not parallel effects on axial cortical bone. Calcium nutrition is important in the prevention of osteoporosis, as calcium is a major constituent of bone. The intake of calcium among most American adults is below the levels recommended by public health agencies. There have been no adequate prospective studies to determine the optimal intake of calcium for preservation of bone mass in young or middle-aged adults, although calcium balance studies indicate that premenopausal women require approximately 1,000 mg of calcium per day. The negative calcium balance of early menopause may be ameliorated by 1,000 mg of calcium per day; however, there is no proof that greater intakes fully reverse the effects of estrogen deficiency. Calcium requirements of both elderly men and women are likely to be greater (between 1,000 and 1,500 mg per day) due to an age-related decrease in the efficiency of intestinal calcium absorption. The optimal level of weight-bearing exercise for maintenance of bone mass in old age is probably similar to that of an active young adult. Maintenance of this activity level in middle and old age improves bone mass. An exercise prescription for elderly individuals must include an appraisal of cardiovascular and muscular-skeletal health and be designed to minimize the risk of trauma during exercise. PMID:3544836

  2. Wearable Sensor-Based Rehabilitation Exercise Assessment for Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kun-Hui; Chen, Po-Chao; Liu, Kai-Chun; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2015-01-01

    Since the knee joint bears the full weight load of the human body and the highest pressure loads while providing flexible movement, it is the body part most vulnerable and susceptible to osteoarthritis. In exercise therapy, the early rehabilitation stages last for approximately six weeks, during which the patient works with the physical therapist several times each week. The patient is afterwards given instructions for continuing rehabilitation exercise by him/herself at home. This study develops a rehabilitation exercise assessment mechanism using three wearable sensors mounted on the chest, thigh and shank of the working leg in order to enable the patients with knee osteoarthritis to manage their own rehabilitation progress. In this work, time-domain, frequency-domain features and angle information of the motion sensor signals are used to classify the exercise type and identify whether their postures are proper or not. Three types of rehabilitation exercise commonly prescribed to knee osteoarthritis patients are: Short-Arc Exercise, Straight Leg Raise, and Quadriceps Strengthening Mini-squats. After ten subjects performed the three kinds of rehabilitation activities, three validation techniques including 10-fold cross-validation, within subject cross validation, and leave-one-subject cross validation are utilized to confirm the proposed mechanism. The overall recognition accuracy for exercise type classification is 97.29% and for exercise posture identification it is 88.26%. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed mechanism which can help patients perform rehabilitation movements and progress effectively. Moreover, the proposed mechanism is able to detect multiple errors at once, fulfilling the requirements for rehabilitation assessment. PMID:25686308

  3. Physical Therapy Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Loredan Biomedical, Inc.'s LIDO, a computerized physical therapy system, was purchased by NASA in 1985 for evaluation as a Space Station Freedom exercise program. In 1986, while involved in an ARC muscle conditioning project, Malcom Bond, Loredan's chairman, designed an advanced software package for NASA which became the basis for LIDOSOFT software used in the commercially available system. The system employs a "proprioceptive" software program which perceives internal body conditions, induces perturbations to muscular effort and evaluates the response. Biofeedback on a screen allows a patient to observe his own performance.

  4. Aerobic exercise augments muscle transcriptome profile of resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Tommy R; Fernandez-Gonzalo, Rodrigo; Tesch, Per A; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Recent reports suggest that aerobic exercise may boost the hypertrophic response to short-term resistance training. This study explored the effects of an acute aerobic exercise bout on the transcriptional response to subsequent resistance exercise. Ten moderately trained men performed ∼45 min cycling on one leg followed by 4 × 7 maximal knee extensions for each leg, 15 min later. Thus, one limb performed aerobic and resistance exercise (AE + RE) while the opposing leg did resistance exercise only (RE). Biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle of each leg 3 h after the resistance exercise bout. Using DNA microarray, we analyzed differences [≥1.5-fold, false discovery rate (FDR) ≤10%] in gene expression profiles for the two modes of exercise. There were 176 genes up (127)- or downregulated (49) by AE + RE compared with RE. Among the most significant differentially expressed genes were established markers for muscle growth and oxidative capacity, novel cytokines, transcription factors, and micro-RNAs (miRNAs). The most enriched functional categories were those linked to carbohydrate metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Upstream analysis revealed that vascular endothelial growth factor, cAMP-response element-binding protein, Tet methylcytosine dioxygenase, and mammalian target of rapamycin were regulators highly activated by AE + RE, whereas JnK, NF-κβ, MAPK, and several miRNAs were inhibited. Thus, aerobic exercise alters the skeletal muscle transcriptional signature of resistance exercise to initiate important gene programs promoting both myofiber growth and improved oxidative capacity. These results provide novel insight into human muscle adaptations to diverse exercise modes and offer the very first genomic basis explaining how aerobic exercise may augment, rather than compromise, muscle growth induced by resistance exercise. PMID:27101291

  5. [Benefits of oxygen on exercise performance in patients with chronic lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Nasiłowski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Chronic respiratory diseases limit exercise capacity, due to breathlessness and hypoxemia. A decrease in daily activity results in impairment of quality of life and higher mortality. Oxygen therapy improves exercise capacity. The main mechanism of this improvement in COPD patients is a reduction in dynamic hyperinflation. The benefits of oxygen therapy is present not only in patients with severe hypoxemia at rest (PaO2 < 60 mm Hg) requiring long-term oxygen therapy, but also in mild hypoxemic patients who develop desaturation during exercise. An improvement in exercise tolerance is proportional to the administered oxygen flow. Provision of oxygen flow from ambulatory source may be continuous or intermittent only during inspiration. Both methods seem to be comparable in terms of improving exercise tolerance and reducing hypoxemia. Ambulatory oxygen should be prescribed to all patients on long-term oxygen therapy who report outdoor activity. Moreover, normoxemic patients with severe exertional desaturation and low exercise tolerance should also be prescribed ambulatory oxygen. The flow of oxygen should be titrated to prevent desaturation during activities. The long-term effects of ambulatory oxygen such as improvement of quality of life and increasing daily activity have not been confirmed and require further investigation. PMID:23609430

  6. Can exercise affect the course of inflammatory bowel disease? Experimental and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Bilski, Jan; Mazur-Bialy, Agnieszka; Brzozowski, Bartosz; Magierowski, Marcin; Zahradnik-Bilska, Janina; Wójcik, Dagmara; Magierowska, Katarzyna; Kwiecien, Slawomir; Mach, Tomasz; Brzozowski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    The inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are defined as idiopathic, chronic and relapsing intestinal disorders occurring in genetically predisposed individuals exposed to environmental risk factors such as diet and microbiome changes. Since conventional drug therapy is expensive and not fully efficient, there is a need for alternative remedies that can improve the outcome in patients suffering from IBD. Whether exercise, which has been proposed as adjunct therapy in IBD, can be beneficial in patients with IBD remains an intriguing question. In this review, we provide an overview of the effects of exercise on human IBD and experimental colitis in animal models that mimic human disease, although the information on exercise in human IBD are sparse and poorly understood. Moderate exercise can exert a beneficial ameliorating effect on IBD and improve the healing of experimental animal colitis due to the activity of protective myokines such as irisin released from working skeletal muscles. CD patients with higher levels of exercise were significantly less likely to develop active disease at six months. Moreover, voluntary exercise has been shown to exert a positive effect on IBD patients' mood, weight maintenance and osteoporosis. On the other hand, depending on its intensity and duration, exercise can evoke transient mild systemic inflammation and enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release, thereby exacerbating the gastrointestinal symptoms. We discuss recent advances in the mechanism of voluntary and strenuous exercise affecting the outcome of IBD in patients and experimental animal models. PMID:27255494

  7. Exercise Training in Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Chyu, Christopher; Halnon, Nancy

    2016-06-01

    Numerous observational reports suggesting the positive benefits of physical activity in patients diagnosed with cancer have prompted multiple investigative studies involving exercise training for patients throughout the continuum of a cancer diagnosis. Physicians and primary caregivers struggle to find clearly defined guidelines or recommendations for exercise prescriptions that are specific to their widely variable cancer patient populations. Although there continues to be emerging evidence supporting physical activity in cancer survivors, further research is required to investigate new and existing outcomes, methods to sustain positive effects of exercise over time, and to better define guidelines for exercise interventions that include exercise type, frequency, intensity, duration, and timing. Studies of exercise interventions on patients with a range of cancer diagnoses and differing cancer treatments, and involving the pediatric population should be further investigated to document benefit and develop more refined recommendations for physical activity in all cancer survivors. PMID:27155861

  8. Gravity-independent constant force resistive exercise unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colosky, Jr., Paul E. (Inventor); Ruttley, Tara M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    This invention describes a novel gravity-independent exercise unit designed for use in microgravity, or on the ground, as a means by which to counter muscle atrophy and bone degradation due to disuse or underuse. Modular resistive packs comprising constant torque springs provide constant force opposing the withdrawal of an exercise cable from the device. In addition to uses within the space program, the compact resistive packs of the CFREU allow the unit to be small enough for easy use as a home gym for personal use, or as a supplement for rehabilitation programs. Resistive packs may be changed conveniently out of the CFREU according to the desired exercise regimen. Thus, the resistive packs replace the need for expensive, heavy, and bulky traditional weight plates. The CFREU may be employed by hospitals, rehabilitation and physical therapy clinics, and other related professional businesses.

  9. Aerobic Exercise for Reducing Migraine Burden: Mechanisms, Markers, and Models of Change Processes

    PubMed Central

    Irby, Megan B.; Bond, Dale S.; Lipton, Richard B.; Nicklas, Barbara; Houle, Timothy T.; Penzien, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Engagement in regular exercise routinely is recommended as an intervention for managing and preventing migraine, and yet empirical support is far from definitive. We possess at best a weak understanding of how aerobic exercise and resulting change in aerobic capacity influence migraine, let alone the optimal parameters for exercise regimens as migraine therapy (eg, who will benefit, when to prescribe, optimal types, and doses/intensities of exercise, level of anticipated benefit). These fundamental knowledge gaps critically limit our capacity to deploy exercise as an intervention for migraine. Overview Clear articulation of the markers and mechanisms through which aerobic exercise confers benefits for migraine would prove invaluable and could yield insights on migraine pathophysiology. Neurovascular and neuroinflammatory pathways, including an effect on obesity or adiposity, are obvious candidates for study given their role both in migraine as well as the changes known to accrue with regular exercise. In addition to these biological pathways, improvements in aerobic fitness and migraine alike also are mediated by changes in psychological and sociocognitive factors. Indeed a number of specific mechanisms and pathways likely are operational in the relationship between exercise and migraine improvement, and it remains to be established whether these pathways operate in parallel or synergistically. As heuristics that might conceptually benefit our research programs here forward, we: (1) provide an extensive listing of potential mechanisms and markers that could account for the effects of aerobic exercise on migraine and are worthy of empirical exploration and (2) present two exemplar conceptual models depicting pathways through which exercise may serve to reduce the burden of migraine. Conclusion Should the promise of aerobic exercise as a feasible and effective migraine therapy be realized, this line of endeavor stands to benefit migraineurs (including the

  10. Exercise and pregnancy: a review.

    PubMed

    Bell, R; O'Neill, M

    1994-06-01

    The effects of pregnancy on the maternal cardiorespiratory system include increases in oxygen consumption, cardiac output, heart rate, stroke volume, and plasma volume. The increase in oxygen reserve seen in early pregnancy is reduced later, suggesting that maternal exercise may present a greater physiologic stress in the third trimester. Evidence suggests that weight-bearing exercise produces a greater decrease in oxygen reserve than nonweight-bearing exercise. Furthermore, to maintain a heart rate below 140 beats per minute during pregnancy, the intensity of weight-bearing exercise must be reduced. Nonweight-bearing, water-based exercise results in smaller fetal heart rate changes and a lower maternal heart rate than the same exercise performed on land. Exercising in the supine position in late pregnancy has raised concerns because cardiac output in the supine position is lower than in the lateral position at rest, presumably because the gravid uterus partially obstructs the inferior vena cava. Sustained exercise produces a training effect on the mother, although reported associations between this effect and the experience of labor are not consistent. Short-term changes in fetal heart rate provide circumstantial evidence that physical activity can influence the fetus. Acute effects of exercise that can potentially affect the fetus include hyperthermia, changes in uteroplacental flow, reduced levels of maternal glucose, and increased uterine contractions. Moderate to high levels of sustained maternal exercise have been associated with reduced birthweight. Much research remains to be done on the effects of specific exercise regimens during pregnancy, the effects on previously sedentary women, and the long-term health consequences to the offspring of women who perform vigorous exercise during pregnancy. PMID:7857452

  11. Individualizing Exercise: Some Biomechanical and Physiological Reminders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browder, Kathy D.; Darby, Lynn A.

    1998-01-01

    It is important to individualize exercise programs to safely achieve exercise goals. The article reviews several key points to help exercise leaders individualize new exercise programs or rejuvenate routine workouts, focusing on cardiorespiratory and muscular training. The article emphasizes that individualizing exercise programs reduces injury,…

  12. Automatic Activation of Exercise and Sedentary Stereotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya; Spence, John C.

    2009-01-01

    We examined the automatic activation of "sedentary" and "exerciser" stereotypes using a social prime Stroop task. Results showed significantly slower response times between the exercise words and the exercise control words and between the sedentary words and the exercise control words when preceded by an attractive exerciser prime. Words preceded…

  13. [Muscle enzyme activity and exercise].

    PubMed

    Gojanovic, B; Feihl, F; Gremion, G; Waeber, B

    2009-02-01

    Exercise is classically associated with muscular soreness, presenting one to two days later, delayed onset muscular soreness. Blood muscle enzymes and protein elevations are characteristic, and may cause renal failure. Creatin phosphokinase peak appears on the fourth day and depends on exercise type and individual parameters. This effect is attenuated with repeated bouts, by habituation. Metabolic complications are rare. The knowledge of this reaction, even with common exercises, allows to postpone investigations for a complex metabolic disorder, or to avoid stopping a medication for fear of a side effect, as with statins. Indeed, it is necessary to wait for seven days without any exercise before interpreting an elevated CK result. PMID:19180440

  14. Exercise regulation of adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Stanford, Kristin I; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2016-01-01

    Exercise training results in adaptations to numerous organ systems and offers protection against metabolic disorders including obesity and type 2 diabetes, and recent reports suggest that adipose tissue may play a role in these beneficial effects of exercise on overall health. Multiple studies have investigated the effects of exercise training on both white adipose tissue (WAT) and brown adipose tissue (BAT), as well as the induction of beige adipocytes. Studies from both rodents and humans show that there are exercise training-induced changes in WAT including decreased cell size and lipid content, and increased mitochondrial activity. In rodents, exercise training causes an increased beiging of WAT. Whether exercise training causes a beiging of human scWAT, as well as which factors contribute to the exercise-induced beiging of WAT are areas of current investigation. Studies investigating the effects of exercise training on BAT mass and function have yielded conflicting data, and hence, is another area of intensive investigation. This review will focus on studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms regulating exercise training induced-adaptations to adipose tissue. PMID:27386159

  15. Exercise limitation following transplantation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Trevor J; McKenna, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Organ transplantation is one of the medical miracles or the 20th century. It has the capacity to substantially improve exercise performance and quality of life in patients who are severely limited with chronic organ failure. We focus on the most commonly performed solid-organ transplants and describe peak exercise performance following recovery from transplantation. Across all of the common transplants, evaluated significant reduction in VO2peak is seen (typically renal and liver 65%-80% with heart and/or lung 50%-60% of predicted). Those with the lowest VO2peak pretransplant have the lowest VO2peak posttransplant. Overall very few patients have a VO2peak in the normal range. Investigation of the cause of the reduction of VO2peak has identified many factors pre- and posttransplant that may contribute. These include organ-specific factors in the otherwise well-functioning allograft (e.g., chronotropic incompetence in heart transplantation) as well as allograft dysfunction itself (e.g., chronic lung allograft dysfunction). However, looking across all transplants, a pattern emerges. A low muscle mass with qualitative change in large exercising skeletal muscle groups is seen pretransplant. Many factor posttransplant aggravate these changes or prevent them recovering, especially calcineurin antagonist drugs which are key immunosuppressing agents. This results in the reduction of VO2peak despite restoration of near normal function of the initially failing organ system. As such organ transplantation has provided an experiment of nature that has focused our attention on an important confounder of chronic organ failure-skeletal muscle dysfunction. PMID:23723030

  16. Resistive Exercise Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Damon C. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An exercise device 10 is particularly well suited for use in low gravity environments, and includes a frame 12 with plurality of resistance elements 30,82 supported in parallel on the frame. A load transfer member 20 is moveable relative to the frame for transferring the applied force to the free end of each captured resistance element. Load selection template 14 is removably secured both to the load transfer member, and a plurality of capture mechanisms engage the free end of corresponding resistance elements. The force applying mechanism 53 may be a handle, harness or other user interface for applying a force to move the load transfer member.

  17. Microgravity strategic planning exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpern, Richard; Downey, Jim; Harvey, Harold

    1991-01-01

    The Center for Space and Advanced Technology supported a planning exercise for the Microgravity Program management at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The effort focused on the status of microgravity work at MSFC and elsewhere with the objective of preparing a goal-oriented strategic planning document which could be used for informational/brochure purposes. The effort entailed numerous interactions and presentations with Field Center programmatic components and Headquarters personnel. Appropriate material was consolidated in a draft format for a MSFC Strategic Plan.

  18. Protective Role of Aerobic Exercise Against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zeynali, Farzaneh; Nematbakhsh, Mehdi; Mojtahedi, Hossain; Poorshahnazari, Aliasghar; Talebi, Ardeshir; Pezeshki, Zahra; Mazaheri, Safoora; Moslemi, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CP) is a chemotherapy drug and nephrotoxicity is considered as its major side effect. Aerobic exercise is well known as an approach to reduce the side effects of many drugs. Objectives: This study was designed to determine the protective role of aerobic exercise against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups. Group I had aerobic exercise on a treadmill one hour per day and five days per week for eight weeks. Then, the exercise protocol was continued for another week, but during this week, the animals also received CP (2.5 mg/kg/day; ip). Group II underwent the same protocol as group I without exercise in the last week during the CP therapy. Groups III and IV were assigned as positive and negative control groups, and were treated with CP and saline without exercise, respectively. Finally, the animals were sacrificed for the biochemical measurement and tissue histopathology investigation. Results: CP alone without exercise increased serum levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine (Cr), and malondialdehyde (MDA); and kidney nitrite level, while treadmill exercise in group I significantly ameliorated these parameters (P < 0.05). Kidney and serum levels of MDA and nitrite did not alter significantly. Also, the severity of kidney tissue damage decreased significantly in groups I and II (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Aerobic exercise may reduce CP-induced nephrotoxicity with a favorable effect on renal function by increasing activation of antioxidant system. PMID:26448855

  19. Aerobic Exercise Training in Post-Polio Syndrome: Process Evaluation of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Voorn, Eric L.; Koopman, Fieke S.; Brehm, Merel A.; Beelen, Anita; de Haan, Arnold; Gerrits, Karin H. L.; Nollet, Frans

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore reasons for the lack of efficacy of a high intensity aerobic exercise program in post-polio syndrome (PPS) on cardiorespiratory fitness by evaluating adherence to the training program and effects on muscle function. Design A process evaluation using data from an RCT. Patients Forty-four severely fatigued individuals with PPS were randomized to exercise therapy (n = 22) or usual care (n = 22). Methods Participants in the exercise group were instructed to exercise 3 times weekly for 4 months on a bicycle ergometer (60–70% heart rate reserve). Results The attendance rate was high (median 89%). None of the participants trained within the target heart rate range during >75% of the designated time. Instead, participants exercised at lower intensities, though still around the anaerobic threshold (AT) most of the time. Muscle function did not improve in the exercise group. Conclusion Our results suggest that severely fatigued individuals with PPS cannot adhere to a high intensity aerobic exercise program on a cycle ergometer. Despite exercise intensities around the AT, lower extremity muscle function nor cardiorespiratory fitness improved. Improving the aerobic capacity in PPS is difficult through exercise primarily focusing on the lower extremities, and may require a more individualized approach, including the use of other large muscle groups instead. Trial Registration Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1371 PMID:27419388

  20. Exercise in multiple sclerosis -- an integral component of disease management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in young adults. The disease causes a wide range of symptoms depending on the localization and characteristics of the CNS pathology. In addition to drug-based immunomodulatory treatment, both drug-based and non-drug approaches are established as complementary strategies to alleviate existing symptoms and to prevent secondary diseases. In particular, physical therapy like exercise and physiotherapy can be customized to the individual patient's needs and has the potential to improve the individual outcome. However, high quality systematic data on physical therapy in MS are rare. This article summarizes the current knowledge on the influence of physical activity and exercise on disease-related symptoms and physical restrictions in MS patients. Other treatment strategies such as drug treatments or cognitive training were deliberately excluded for the purposes of this article. PMID:22738091

  1. Exercise limitation, exercise testing and exercise recommendations in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Connes, Philippe; Machado, Roberto; Hue, Olivier; Reid, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA or SS homozygous sickle cell disease) is an inherited blood disorder caused by single nucleotide substitution in the β-globin gene that renders their hemoglobin (HbS) much less soluble than normal hemoglobin (HbA) when deoxygenated. The polymerization of HbS upon deoxygenation is the basic pathophysiologic event leading to RBC sickling, hemolysis, vasoocclusion and ultimately to chronic organ damage. The metabolic changes imposed by exercise may initiate sickling and vaso-occlusive episodes. Further, in patients with SCA, exercise limitation may be related to anemia or chronic complications such as pulmonary vascular disease, congestive heart failure and chronic parenchymal lung disease. Few studies have investigated the cardiorespiratory responses of patients with SCA during either symptom-limited maximal exercise test on cyclo-ergometer or during a six minute walk test. Therefore, patients are advised to start exercise slowly and progressively, to maintain adequate hydration during and after exercise, to avoid cold exposure or sudden change in temperature, and to avoid sports associated with mechanical trauma. There are, however, lack of evidence to allow practitioners to prescribe an exercise program for patients with SCA, and individuals are usually encouraged to exercise on a symptom-limited basis. Finally, this review will also highlight the basic principles that are often used for exercise practice and could be used for exercise prescription and rehabilitation in patients with sickle cell anemia. PMID:22214686

  2. Headaches and exercise.

    PubMed

    McCrory, P

    2000-09-01

    Exercise-related headache is one of the most common medical problems affecting the modern-day athlete. Despite the high prevalence of headache in community populations, the epidemiology of sports-related headache is unclear. In certain collision sports, up to 50% of athletes report regular headaches as a consequence of their athletic participation. The classification of the different types of sport-related headache by the International Headache Society (IHS) and in previously published articles does not adequately encompass the clinical problem faced by team physicians. Confusion exists where terms such as 'effort headache' and 'exertional headache' may be used to describe similar entities. In this review, the specific headache entities discussed include benign exertional headache, effort headache, acute post-traumatic headache and cervicogenic headache. For the sports physician, an understanding of the variety of specific headache syndromes that occur with particular sports is necessary for everyday clinical practice. This article reviews the common exercise-related headache syndromes and attempts to provide a framework for their overall management. Team physicians also need to be cognisant that many of the standard preparations used to treat headaches may be banned drugs under International Olympic Committee (IOC) rules. PMID:10999425

  3. Metabolic response to exercise.

    PubMed

    De Feo, P; Di Loreto, C; Lucidi, P; Murdolo, G; Parlanti, N; De Cicco, A; Piccioni, F; Santeusanio, F

    2003-09-01

    At the beginning, the survival of humans was strictly related to their physical capacity. There was the need to resist predators and to provide food and water for life. Achieving these goals required a prompt and efficient energy system capable of sustaining either high intensity or maintaining prolonged physical activity. Energy for skeletal muscle contraction is supplied by anaerobic and aerobic metabolic pathways. The former can allow short bursts of intense physical activity (60-90 sec) and utilizes as energetic source the phosphocreatine shuttle and anaerobic glycolysis. The aerobic system is the most efficient ATP source for skeletal muscle. The oxidative phosporylation of carbohydrates, fats and, to a minor extent, proteins, can sustain physical activity for many hours. Carbohydrates are the most efficient fuel for working muscle and their contribution to total fuel oxidation is positively related to the intensity of exercise. The first metabolic pathways of carbohydrate metabolism to be involved are skeletal muscle glycogenolysis and glycolysis. Later circulating glucose, formed through activated gluconeogenesis, becomes an important energetic source. Among glucose metabolites, lactate plays a primary role as either direct or indirect (gluconeogenesis) energy source for contracting skeletal muscle. Fat oxidation plays a primary role during either low-moderate intensity exercise or protracted physical activity (over 90-120 min). Severe muscle glycogen depletion results in increased rates of muscle proteolysis and branched chain amino acid oxidation. Endurance training ameliorates physical performance by improving cardiopulmonary efficiency and optimizing skeletal muscle supply and oxidation of substrates. PMID:14964437

  4. Are You Getting Too Much Exercise?

    MedlinePlus

    ... level of exercise. Decrease your workouts before a competition. Drink enough water when you exercise. Aim to ... 634 . Accessed May 6, 2014. American College of Sports Medicine. Overtraining with Resistance Exercise. www.acsm.org/ ...

  5. Exercise May Help Ease Adult ADHD Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... co-director of the University of Georgia's Exercise Psychology Laboratory. O'Connor said it's possible that exercise ... Ph.D., professor, kinesiology, and co-director, Exercise Psychology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Athens; Russell A. Barkley, ...

  6. Upper Body Exercise: 'Jarming' Instead of Jogging.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cindy Christian

    1986-01-01

    The virtues of "armchair exercise" and "jarming" (jogging with the arms) are being extolled far and wide. The relative merits of arm and leg exercise are discussed. People who could benefit from arm exercise are described. (MT)

  7. Exercise + Classwork May = Better Math Scores

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_157446.html Exercise + Classwork May = Better Math Scores Dutch study also found bringing exercise to ... time learning if exercise is part of their math and spelling lessons, a new study suggests. Dutch ...

  8. Kegel Exercises for Your Pelvic Muscles

    MedlinePlus

    ... control until after 6 to 12 weeks of daily exercises. Still, most women notice an improvement after just ... Weak pelvic muscles often lead to urine leakage. Daily exercises can strengthen pelvic muscles. These exercises often improve ...

  9. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism. PMID:24384982

  10. The effects of exercise using PNF in patients with a supraspinatus muscle tear

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jwa-jun; Lee, Sang-yeol; Ha, Kyungjin

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise on subjective pain reduction and blood flow velocity in supraspinatus tear patients and to evaluate muscle recovery. [Subjects and Methods] The 20 subjects of this study were diagnosed with supraspinatus tears by MRI. The subjects have performed PNF techniques and Simple exercise for 12 weeks. [Results] After 12 weeks of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise, the blood flow velocity, Visual Analogue Scale, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand score showed statistically significant difference. Also, the difference between the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation techniques and simple exercise was statistically significant. [Conclusion] In conclusion, 12 weeks of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation treatment and simple exercise therapy had no effect on pain reduction in patients with supraspinatus tear, but in terms of functionality, the proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation treatment was effective. PMID:26356542

  11. Exercise Prescription for Physical Fitness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Michael L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines current guidelines for physical fitness, noting issues that may influence the updating of the American College of Sports Medicine exercise statement. Differences between exercise prescription for fitness and physical activity for health are discussed, noting the importance of designing individualized programs with appropriate levels of…

  12. Nutrition, Weight Control, and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Frank I.; McArdle, William D.

    This book contains information on nutrition, weight control, and exercise. Some basic information from the biological sciences is included but a specialized background is not necessary to understand the text. The content is appropriate for nutrition, weight control, exercise, and physical fitness courses at the university level, for the various…

  13. Effects of Exercise on Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rarick, G. Lawrence

    Exercise is generally held to be a significant factor in the growth, development, and health of children and adolescents. The effects of physical activity regimens on general growth, as well as quantitative and qualitative changes, in animal muscle and bone tissue have been clearly demonstrated. Less is known about the role of exercise and related…

  14. Exercise hypertension: an adverse prognosis?

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan G; Rubin, Stanley A; Ellestad, Myrvin H

    2009-01-01

    We sought to clarify the prognostic importance of an "exaggerated" or "hypertensive" systolic blood pressure response to exercise during an exercise test. Studies evaluating the prognosis for cardiovascular events and cardiovascular mortality in those with hypertension during exercise testing were systematically reviewed. Fourteen studies were identified. Six studies were of healthy volunteers or hypertensives. Eight studies were in subjects with known or suspected heart disease. Without established heart disease, exercise hypertension predicted cardiovascular events and cardiovascular death. However, two of the six studies included a multivariate analysis; both demonstrated no independent association. Studies in subjects with known or suspected heart disease demonstrated that exercise hypertension predicted fewer cardiac events and lesser mortality or, after multivariate adjustment, no associated risk. In a healthy population, a higher exercise blood pressure may indicate hypertension or prehypertension, instead of normal vascular function, and an associated long-term adverse prognosis. In a population with a high burden of heart disease, the highest risk subjects with the most extensive cardiac disease may not be capable of generating pressure or workload to allow the manifestation of exercise systolic hypertension. By comparison, therefore, those with exercise hypertension have a better prognosis. PMID:20409979

  15. Exercise enclosures for guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Cyndi

    2009-11-01

    Exercise and exploration are important to the health and happiness of guinea pigs. Laboratory housing does not always provide the space necessary for such opportunities. This article presents an inexpensive, versatile option for an enclosed exercise area for the laboratory guinea pig. PMID:19847177

  16. Ethical issues in exercise psychology.

    PubMed

    Pauline, Jeffrey S; Pauline, Gina A; Johnson, Scott R; Gamble, Kelly M

    2006-01-01

    Exercise psychology encompasses the disciplines of psychiatry, clinical and counseling psychology, health promotion, and the movement sciences. This emerging field involves diverse mental health issues, theories, and general information related to physical activity and exercise. Numerous research investigations across the past 20 years have shown both physical and psychological benefits from physical activity and exercise. Exercise psychology offers many opportunities for growth while positively influencing the mental and physical health of individuals, communities, and society. However, the exercise psychology literature has not addressed ethical issues or dilemmas faced by mental health professionals providing exercise psychology services. This initial discussion of ethical issues in exercise psychology is an important step in continuing to move the field forward. Specifically, this article will address the emergence of exercise psychology and current health behaviors and offer an overview of ethics and ethical issues, education/training and professional competency, cultural and ethnic diversity, multiple-role relationships and conflicts of interest, dependency issues, confidentiality and recording keeping, and advertisement and self-promotion. PMID:17036424

  17. Program development for exercise countermeasures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, J. C.; Stewart, D. F.; Harris, B. A.; Siconolfi, S. F.; Greenisen, M. C.; Larochelle, F. T.

    1992-01-01

    The concern of NASA's Exercise Countermeasures Project (ECP) is to ensure crew physical effectiveness for flight- or mission-related tasks, and encompasses postflight as well as preflight and inflight exercise components. Attention is given to the implementation of ECP via the Space Shuttle Orbiter's treadmill, rower, cycle ergometer, and lower body negative pressure apparatus.

  18. Biologic Influences on Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Diagnostic profiles of 362 male participants in an exercise program were analyzed to determine the biological variables between exercise adherence and symptoms of coronary disease. Findings indicated that individuals with lower metabolic capacity tended to adhere longer, to be less fit, were leaner, and began with more symptoms related to coronary…

  19. An Elementary Organic Review Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Darrell H.

    1980-01-01

    An elementary organic review exercise is described which can be given to a secondary school student who has completed an elementary unit on the chemistry of carbon. This is recommended as an exercise, not a test, but can be utilized for evaluative purposes. The format includes both multiple-choice and essay questions. (DS)

  20. Prescriptive Exercise for Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piscopo, John

    1985-01-01

    In addition to physical benefits, exercise also provides a natural way to sustain mental alertness in the aging individual by supplying oxygen to the brain. A table focuses on 10 specific health-fitness problems with suggested prescriptive exercises designed to ameliorate the condition. (MT)

  1. Laboratory Exercise on Active Transport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalheim-Smith, Ann; Fitch, Greg K.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which demonstrates qualitatively the specificity of the transport mechanism, including a consideration of the competitive inhibition, and the role of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in active transport. The exercise, which can be completed in two to three hours by groups of four students, consistently produces reliable…

  2. Mind Maps as Classroom Exercises

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, John W.

    2004-01-01

    A Mind Map is an outline in which the major categories radiate from a central image and lesser categories are portrayed as branches of larger branches. The author describes an in-class exercise in which small groups of students each create a Mind Map for a specific topic. This exercise is another example of an active and collaborative learning…

  3. Respiratory weight losses during exercise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. W.; Nadel, E. R.; Stolwijk, J. A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Evaporative water loss from the respiratory tract was determined over a wide range of exercise. The absolute humidity of the expired air was the same at all levels of exercise and equal to that measured at rest. The rate of respiratory water loss during exercise was found to be 0.019 of the oxygen uptake times (44 minus water vapor pressure). The rate of weight loss during exercise due to CO2-O2 exchange was calculated. For exercise at oxygen consumption rates exceeding 1.5 L/min in a dry environment with a water vapor pressure of 10 mm Hg, the total rate of weight loss via the respiratory tract is on the order of 2-5 g/min.

  4. Exercise Promotion in Geriatric Oncology.

    PubMed

    Burhenn, Peggy S; Bryant, Ashley Leak; Mustian, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    Evidence of the benefits of exercise for people with cancer from diagnosis through survivorship is growing. However, most cancers occur in older adults and little exercise advice is available for making specific recommendations for older adults with cancer. Individualized exercise prescriptions are safe, feasible, and beneficial for the geriatric oncology population. Oncology providers must be equipped to discuss the short- and long-term benefits of exercise and assist older patients in obtaining appropriate exercise prescriptions. This review provides detailed information about professionals and their roles as it relates to functional assessment, intervention, and evaluation of the geriatric oncology population. This review addresses the importance of functional status assessment and appropriate referrals to other oncology professionals. PMID:27484061

  5. Exercise Dose in Clinical Practice.

    PubMed

    Wasfy, Meagan M; Baggish, Aaron L

    2016-06-01

    There is wide variability in the physical activity patterns of the patients in contemporary clinical cardiovascular practice. This review is designed to address the impact of exercise dose on key cardiovascular risk factors and on mortality. We begin by examining the body of literature that supports a dose-response relationship between exercise and cardiovascular disease risk factors, including plasma lipids, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity. We next explore the relationship between exercise dose and mortality by reviewing the relevant epidemiological literature underlying current physical activity guideline recommendations. We then expand this discussion to critically examine recent data pertaining to the impact of exercise dose at the lowest and highest ends of the spectrum. Finally, we provide a framework for how the key concepts of exercise dose can be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:27267537

  6. Behaviour therapy for obesity treatment considering approved drug therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kossmann, Beate; Ulle, Tanja; Kahl, Kai G.; Wasem, Jürgen; Aidelsburger, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Obesity is a worldwide health problem whose prevalence is on the increase. Many obesity-associated diseases require intensive medical treatment and are the cause of a large proportion of health-related expenditures in Germany. Treatment of obesity includes nutritional, exercise and behaviour therapy, usually in combination. The goal of behaviour therapy for obesity is to bring about a long-term alteration in the eating and exercise habits of overweight and obese individuals. Under certain circumstances, drug treatment may be indicated. Objectives What is the effectiveness of behaviour therapy for obesity considering approved drugs reduce weight under medical, economic, ethical-social and legal aspects? Methods A systematic review was conducted using relevant electronic literature databases. Publications chosen according to predefined criteria are evaluated by approved methodical standards of the evidence-based medicine systematically and qualitatively. Results In total 18 studies, included one HTA and one meta-analysis could be identified according to the predefined inclusion criteria. Three studies compare behaviour therapy to other therapy forms (advice or instruction on nutritional changes, physical activity or a combination of the two), six studies evaluate different forms of behaviour therapy, four studies and four studies compare behaviour therapies mediated by Internet or telephone. Three studies could be identified examining the effect of the combination of behaviour and drug therapy. Furthermore one HTA and one meta-analysis could be included in the evaluation. The behaviour therapy in comparison with other therapy forms reveals a higher effectiveness. In comparison of the different therapeutic approaches of the behaviour therapy intensive behaviour therapy forms and group therapy show a higher effectiveness. Studies related to behaviour therapy based on media support demonstrate a weight reduction both through the interventions of media alone

  7. The detection of coronary artery disease: a comparison of exercise thallium imaging and exercise equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    McGhie, I; Martin, W; Tweddel, A; Hutton, I

    1987-01-01

    This study compared the accuracy of rest and exercise gated equilibrium technetium ventriculography with exercise thallium imaging in 50 consecutive male patients undergoing routine coronary angiography for the evaluation of chest pain. No patients were excluded on the basis of prior myocardial infarction, nature of angiographically defined coronary disease or symptoms. Antianginal therapy was continued in all patients. Eight patients had normal coronary arteries, 9 had single vessel, disease, 20 had double vessel disease and 13 had triple vessel disease. Sixteen patients had previously documented myocardial infarction. Using exercise radionuclide ventriculography, 34 patients with coronary disease were detected resulting in a sensitivity of 81%; 6 patients with normal coronary arteries had normal scans, a specificity of 75%, with a predictive accuracy of 80%. In comparison, thallium imaging detected 42 patients with coronary disease resulting in a sensitivity of 100%. Six patients with normal coronary arteries had normal thallium images resulting in a specificity of 75% and a predictive accuracy of 96%. These results suggest that exercise thallium imaging is a more accurate investigation than exercise equilibrium radio-nuclide ventriculography and is the investigation of choice in the noninvasive detection of coronary artery disease. PMID:3036530

  8. The Effectiveness of Pilates Exercise in People with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Cherie; Kolt, Gregory S.; Marshall, Paul; Hill, Bridget; Bialocerkowski, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of Pilates exercise in people with chronic low back pain (CLBP) through a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Data Sources A search for RCTs was undertaken using Medical Search Terms and synonyms for “Pilates” and “low back pain” within the maximal date range of 10 databases. Databases included the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature; Cochrane Library; Medline; Physiotherapy Evidence Database; ProQuest: Health and Medical Complete, Nursing and Allied Health Source, Dissertation and Theses; Scopus; Sport Discus; Web of Science. Study Selection Two independent reviewers were involved in the selection of evidence. To be included, relevant RCTs needed to be published in the English language. From 152 studies, 14 RCTs were included. Data Extraction Two independent reviewers appraised the methodological quality of RCTs using the McMaster Critical Review Form for Quantitative Studies. The author(s), year of publication, and details regarding participants, Pilates exercise, comparison treatments, and outcome measures, and findings, were then extracted. Data Synthesis The methodological quality of RCTs ranged from “poor” to “excellent”. A meta-analysis of RCTs was not undertaken due to the heterogeneity of RCTs. Pilates exercise provided statistically significant improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity between 4 and 15 weeks, but not at 24 weeks. There were no consistent statistically significant differences in improvements in pain and functional ability with Pilates exercise, massage therapy, or other forms of exercise at any time period. Conclusions Pilates exercise offers greater improvements in pain and functional ability compared to usual care and physical activity in the short term. Pilates exercise offers equivalent improvements to massage therapy and other forms of exercise. Future research should explore optimal Pilates

  9. Aerobic exercise improves gastrointestinal motility in psychiatric inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Song, Bong Kil; Oh, Ji Sun; Woo, Seung Seok

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the benefit of aerobic exercise on colonic transit time (CTT) for psychiatric inpatients in a closed ward. METHODS: Sixty consecutive adult inpatients of the Somang Hospital Psychiatry Unit (Eumsung-gun, South Korea), without CTT-related diseases or drug therapies, were recruited for study from March to June of 2012. Upon enrollment, the patients were randomly assigned to partake in a 12-wk instructor-led group aerobic exercise program (exercise group; n = 30) or to maintain their ordinary daily activities (control group; n = 30). The exercise program was structured as 10 min warm-up (stretching), 40 min exercise, and 10 min cool-down (stretching) for three days each week. The exercise sessions consisted of walking only in week one and aerobics from weeks two to 12, with increasing intensity (50% heart rate reserve (HRR) for weeks one to four, 60% HRR for weeks five to eight, and 70% HRR for weeks nine to 12). CTT was measured before (baseline) and after (week 12) the exercise program, in duplicate (on days four and seven), using abdominal radiography and the multiple radio-opaque marker technique. Changes in the exercising patients’ CTT and weight-, cardiovascular- and fitness-related parameters were statistically assessed. RESULTS: The study dropout rate was 30.0%, with 23 patients in the exercise group and 19 patients in the control group completing the study. At week 12, the exercise group showed decreases in body weight (mean ± SE) baseline: 69.4 ± 2.8 vs study-end: 67.6 ± 2.7; P < 0.635) and body mass index (BMI) (25.2 ± 1.1 vs 24.9 ± 0.8; P < 0.810), but the extent of change was not significantly different from that experienced by the control group (body weight: 68.8 ± 4.0 vs 68.8 ± 3.9; BMI: 24.3 ± 1.1 vs 24.4 ± 1.2). However, the exercise group showed significant improvements in leg muscle strength (baseline: 41.7 ± 4.3 vs study-end: 64.1 ± 5.0; P < 0.001), cardio-respiratory endurance (120.5 ± 4.5 vs 105.4 ± 2.8; P < 0

  10. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  11. Health Instruction Packages: Venipuncture and Intravenous Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, P. Allen, Jr.; And Others

    Text, illustrations, and exercises are utilized in these five learning modules to instruct nursing students in techniques for initiating intravenous (I.V.) therapy. The first module, "Selection of a Venipuncture Site: Arm" by P. Allen Gray, Jr., describes the utilization of a tourniquet in locating filled veins in the arm. The second module,…

  12. Workshop--cough: exercise, speech and music.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, John; Fontana, Giovanni; Gibson, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Twelve distinguished scientists attended the workshop, heard three presentations, and took part in the discussions. Fontana first described his unpublished studies on cough in exercise and during hyperventilation with healthy subjects. Both activities depressed cough induced by inhalation of distilled water aerosol (fog). The possible mechanisms were discussed. Gibson then described the successful use of speech therapy to treat chronic cough, and discussed the possible mechanisms, centering on the role of the larynx and its neural control. A comparison was made with the ability of speech and laughter to precipitate cough. Widdicombe discussed the scanty literature on the effect of singing and playing wind instruments on cough, most of the evidence being anecdotal. In the discussion periods several matters for future study arose. It is usually not clear if the modulation of cough, its depression, enhancement or excitation, arose primarily at peripheral sites (reflexes from the airways), or at a cortical level, or both. Nor is it clear whether the same results would be obtained with provoked cough and with spontaneous cough. But all three aspects of 'behavioual' changes in cough sensitivity (exercise, speech and music) could be further explored, and current techniques should make this possible. PMID:19135543

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Women with Lifelong Vaginismus: A Randomized Waiting-List Controlled Trial of Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Lankveld, Jacques J. D. M.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.; de Groot, H. Ellen; Melles, Reinhilde; Nefs, Janneke; Zandbergen, Maartje

    2006-01-01

    Women with lifelong vaginismus (N = 117) were randomly assigned to cognitive-behavioral group therapy, cognitive-behavioral bibliotherapy, or a waiting list. Manualized treatment comprised sexual education, relaxation exercises, gradual exposure, cognitive therapy, and sensate focus therapy. Group therapy consisted of ten 2-hr sessions with 6 to 9…

  14. Toward Exercise as Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D.; Church, Timothy S.

    2013-01-01

    The early 21st century has witnessed a steady push by scientists, industry leaders, and government officials to make medicine more personalized. To date, the concept of personalized medicine has referred largely to the field of pharmacogenomics. In contrast, relatively few data exist regarding the application of preventive strategies such as physical exercise in the context of personalized medicine. Within this review, we highlight the extant literature and propose five strategies for scientists that may propel the exercise and sports science fields toward this global goal. Notably, these approaches are in addition to methods to maintain adherence to training – a well-known factor in determining exercise responsiveness. Briefly, these strategies include (1) evaluating participant responses to training at the individual as well as group level; (2) identifying sources of variability in responsiveness to training; (3) optimizing exercise dosing strategies to maximize benefits while minimizing barriers to participation; (4) evaluating the efficacy of multimodal interventions for relevant population subgroups; and (5) increasing the clinical relevance of study populations and outcomes in exercise trials. We look forward to seeing these strategies considered in trials of preventive health interventions such as exercise. Extensive future research in this area is needed for the vision of exercise as a personalized form of medicine to become a reality. PMID:23382011

  15. Youth Exercise Intention and Past Exercise Behavior: Examining the Moderating Influences of Sex and Meeting Exercise Recommendations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Danielle Symons; Graham, George M.; Yang, Stephen; Bargainnier, Sandra; Vasil, Jay

    2006-01-01

    The study purposes were to examine: (a) the determinants of exercise intention and past exercise behavior (PEB) using the theories of reasoned action and planned behavior, and (b) the moderating influences of sex and exercise group (meeting or not meeting exercise guidelines). Participants (n = 676 adolescents) completed self-reported measures of…

  16. Negotiating Corporate Culture: An Exercise in Documentation (Exercise Exchange).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Tracy T.

    1991-01-01

    Describes an exercise for a technical writing course on documenting a problem within a corporate environment, thus giving students experience in appropriate documentation to tackle some of the operational, political, and ethical problems common in the workplace. (SR)

  17. Data processing of exercise ECG's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pahlm, Olle; Sornmo, Leif

    1987-02-01

    Computer processing of exercise ECG's is a well-established technique which aims at improving the signal-to-noise ratio of the ECG for more accurate measurements. In this way the interpretation of the ECG response to exercise is facilitated. This brief review considers the problems pertinent to signal processing in exercise ECG analysis and provides an overview of algorithms employed by research groups as well as manufacturers. The clinical utility of computer measurements and criteria for ECG changes in patients with suspected coronary artery disease is treated.

  18. Radiation therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001918.htm Radiation therapy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Radiation therapy uses high-powered x-rays, particles, or ...

  19. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  20. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment. It uses high doses of radiation to kill cancer cells and stop them ... places inside your body. The type of radiation therapy you receive depends on many factors, including The ...

  1. Radiation Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... people who have radiation therapy may feel more tired than usual, not feel hungry, or lose their ... of radiation therapy include: Fatigue. Fatigue, or feeling tired, is the most common side effect of radiation ...

  2. Basal insulin delivery reduction for exercise in type 1 diabetes: finding the sweet spot.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Hood; Leelarathna, Lalantha

    2016-08-01

    Exercise poses significant challenges to glucose management in type 1 diabetes. In spite of careful planning and manipulation of subcutaneous insulin administration, increased risk of hypoglycaemia and glycaemic variability during and after exercise may occur as a result of inherent delays in insulin action and impaired counter-regulatory hormone responses. Various strategies to mitigate this issue have been advocated in clinical practice, including ingestion of supplementary carbohydrate prior to exercise, reducing background and pre-meal insulin bolus and performing bouts of resistance/high intensity exercise before aerobic exercise. Insulin pump therapy, considered the most physiological form of insulin replacement for type 1 diabetes allows modulation of basal insulin delivery before, during and after exercise. However uncertainty remains regarding the optimal strategy to reduce basal insulin delivery and its efficacy. In this issue of Diabetologia, McAuley and colleagues (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3981-9 ) report on the impact of a 50% reduction of basal insulin delivery before, during and after moderate-intensity aerobic exercise. Results from this study may contribute to a better understanding of the effects of basal insulin delivery manipulation and may aid in devising therapeutic approaches for glucose management during exercise. PMID:27287376

  3. Exercise London: a disaster exercise involving numerous casualties

    PubMed Central

    Theoret, J.J.

    1976-01-01

    A large-scale disaster exercise was conducted to assess how one large community would handle such a situation — particularly, how it would deal with 150 casualties. The planning, undertaken by a subcommittee composed of representatives of all resource groups in the city, took more than a year. The deficiencies of the disaster plan detected during the exercise, which included a lack of trained personnel and various problems of communication, are now being corrected. PMID:1260617

  4. Complementary therapies for depression: an overview.

    PubMed

    Ernst, E; Rand, J I; Stevinson, C

    1998-11-01

    Depression is one of the most common reasons for using complementary and alternative therapies. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the evidence available on the treatment of depression with complementary therapies. Systematic literature searches were performed using several databases, reference list searching, and inquiry to colleagues. Data extraction followed a predefined protocol. The amount of rigorous scientific data to support the efficacy of complementary therapies in the treatment of depression is extremely limited. The areas with the most evidence for beneficial effects are exercise, herbal therapy (Hypericum perforatum), and, to a lesser extent, acupuncture and relaxation therapies. There is a need for further research involving randomized controlled trials into the efficacy of complementary and alternative therapies in the treatment of depression. PMID:9819072

  5. Adolphe Abrahams memorial lecture, 1988. Exercise and lifestyle change.

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, R J

    1989-01-01

    While the evidence for a clustering of health habits is not particularly strong, there are both pedagogic and economic arguments in favour of a multifaceted approach to health education. The present review thus examines the impact of regular physical exercise upon other forms of health behaviour, testing the extent to which an activity programme can be a catalyst of improved lifestyle in both primary and secondary preventive therapy. The conceptual framework of health promotion is examined with particular reference to the models of Skinner, Becker, Fishbein, Triandis and Rokeach. Certain differences are noted between the decision to exercise and the marketing decisions for which Fishbein's model was originally designed. Nevertheless, in its later modifications, it provides a basic framework for understanding how human lifestyle is shaped. Theoretical mechanisms are suggested whereby exercise could influence such behaviours as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and drug usage, seat-belt usage, hypertension, body mass, lipid profile, promiscuous sexual behaviour, the carrying of lethal weapons, and acceptance of regular preventive medical examinations. The empirical evidence from both cross-sectional and longitudinal experiments shows a relatively weak association between exercise habits and other desirable forms of health behaviour. Moreover, it is arguable that other forms of health intervention such as smoking withdrawal or dieting might be equally effective as a primary change agent, and much of the observed association between exercise and other health habits could be attributable to a common dependence on demographic and socio-economic factors. On the other hand, the apparent weakness of associations may arise in part from difficulties in measuring both habitual physical activity and other forms of health behaviour, with a resultant attenuation of correlations. Possibly, a stronger association between exercise participation and other favourable health

  6. Work, exercise, and space flight. 3: Exercise devices and protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, William

    1989-01-01

    Preservation of locomotor capacity by earth equivalent, exercise in space is the crucial component of inflight exercise. At this time the treadmill appears to be the only way possible to do this. Work is underway on appropriate hardware but this and a proposed protocol to reduce exercise time must be tested. Such exercise will preserve muscle, bone Ca(++) and cardiovascular-respiratory capacity. In addition, reasonable upper body exercise can be supplied by a new force generator/measurement system-optional exercise might include a rowing machine and bicycle ergometer. A subject centered monitoring-evaluation program will allow real time adjustments as required. Absolute protection for any astronaut will not be possible and those with hypertrophied capacities such as marathoners or weight lifters will suffer significant loss. However, the program described should return the crew to earth with adequate capacity of typical activity on earth including immediate ambulation and minimal recovery time and without permanent change. An understanding of the practical mechanics and biomechanics involved is essential to a solution of the problem.

  7. Feminist Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laidlaw, Toni; Malmo, Cheryl

    1991-01-01

    Traces roots of feminist therapy and its independence from traditional and prevalent theories and therapy practices. Asserts that Freudian theory and humanistic assumptions are sexist and contribute to powerlessness of women. In contrast, feminist therapy is seen as dealing directly with client-counselor relationships, trust, advocacy, and…

  8. Enhancing Adherence in Clinical Exercise Trials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neal, Heather A.; Blair, Steven N.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses exercise adherence from the perspective of adhering to an exercise treatment in a controlled trial, focusing on: adherence (to intervention and measurement); the development of randomized clinical trials; exemplary randomized clinical trials in exercise science (exercise training studies and physical activity interventions); and study…

  9. Relation Between Obligatory Exercise and Eating Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brehm, Bonnie J.; Steffen, John J.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the prevalence of eating-disordered cognitions and behaviors among adolescent obligatory exercisers (those for whom exercise is the central focus of their lives). Surveys of 250 male and female adolescents indicated that obligatory exercisers had more eating-disordered attitudes and traits than did nonobligatory exercisers, sharing…

  10. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  11. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  12. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  13. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  14. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  15. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  16. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  17. 33 CFR 103.515 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exercises. 103.515 Section 103... MARITIME SECURITY: AREA MARITIME SECURITY Area Maritime Security (AMS) Plan § 103.515 Exercises. (a) The... exercise at least once each calendar year, with no more than 18 months between exercises, to test...

  18. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  19. 33 CFR 154.1055 - Exercises.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exercises. 154.1055 Section 154... Exercises. (a) A response plan submitted by an owner or operator of an MTR facility must include an exercise program containing both announced and unannounced exercises. The following are the minimum...

  20. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  1. Exercise Attenuates the Major Hallmarks of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garatachea, Nuria; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Santos-Lozano, Alejandro; Fiuza-Luces, Carmen; Morán, María; Emanuele, Enzo; Joyner, Michael J.; Lucia, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Regular exercise has multi-system anti-aging effects. Here we summarize how exercise impacts the major hallmarks of aging. We propose that, besides searching for novel pharmaceutical targets of the aging process, more research efforts should be devoted to gaining insights into the molecular mediators of the benefits of exercise and to implement effective exercise interventions for elderly people. PMID:25431878

  2. Questionable Exercises--Some Safer Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, Ruth; Corbin, Charles

    1989-01-01

    Some commonly misused or abused exercises which are potentially harmful are identified. Each questionable exercise is illustrated, its potential for harm discussed, and an alternative suggested. Ten general rules are offered to help teachers, coaches, exercise leaders, and individuals avoid exercise-related injuries. (IAH)

  3. Rehabilitation (exercise and strength training) and osteoarthritis: A critical narrative review.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Christelle; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Poiraudeau, Serge; Rannou, François

    2016-06-01

    Rehabilitation is widely recommended in national and international guidelines for managing osteoarthritis (OA) in primary care settings. According to the 2014 OA Research Society International (OARSI) recommendations, rehabilitation is even considered the core treatment of OA and is recommended for all patients. Rehabilitation for OA widely includes land- and water-based exercise, strength training, weight management, self-management and education, biomechanical interventions, and physically active lifestyle. We performed a critical narrative review of the efficacy and safety of rehabilitation for managing OA and discuss evidence-based international recommendations. The process of article selection was unsystematic. Articles were selected based on authors' expertise, self-knowledge, and reflective practice. For the purpose of the review, we focused on land- and water-based exercise and strength training for knee, hip and hand OA. Other aspects of rehabilitation in OA are treated elsewhere in this special issue. Exercise therapy is widely recommended for managing knee, hip and hand OA. However, the level of evidence varies according to OA location. Overall, consistent evidence suggests that exercise therapy and specific strengthening exercise or strength training for the lower limb reduce pain and improve physical function in knee OA. Evidence for other OA sites are less consistent. Therefore, because of the lack of specific studies, recommendations for hip and hand OA are mainly derived from studies of knee OA. In addition, no recommendations have been established regarding the exercise regimen. The efficacy and safety of exercise therapy and strength training need to be further evaluated in randomized controlled trials of patients with hip and hand OA. The optimal delivery of exercise programs also has to be more clearly defined. PMID:27155923

  4. Does nebulized fentanyl relieve dyspnea during exercise in healthy man?

    PubMed

    Kotrach, Houssam G; Bourbeau, Jean; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-06-01

    Few therapies exist for the relief of dyspnea in restrictive lung disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that nebulized opioids selective for the mu-receptor subtype may relieve dyspnea by modulating intrapulmonary opioid receptor activity. Our respective primary and secondary objectives were to test the hypothesis that nebulized fentanyl (a mu-opioid receptor agonist) relieves dyspnea during exercise in the presence of abnormal restrictive ventilatory constraints and to identify the physiological mechanisms of this improvement. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of 250 μg nebulized fentanyl, chest wall strapping (CWS), and their interaction on detailed physiological and perceptual responses to constant work rate cycle exercise (85% of maximum incremental work rate) in 14 healthy, fit young men. By design, CWS decreased vital capacity by ∼20% and mimicked the negative consequences of a mild restrictive lung disorder on exercise endurance time and on dyspnea, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, and diaphragmatic electromyographic and respiratory muscle function during exercise. Compared with placebo under both unrestricted control and CWS conditions, nebulized fentanyl had no effect on exercise endurance time, integrated physiological response to exercise, sensory intensity, unpleasantness ratings of exertional dyspnea. Our results do not support a role for intrapulmonary opioids in the neuromodulation of exertional dyspnea in health nor do they provide a physiological rationale for the use of nebulized fentanyl in the management of dyspnea due to mild restrictive lung disorders, specifically those arising from abnormalities of the chest wall and not affiliated with airway inflammation. PMID:26031762

  5. Does nebulized fentanyl relieve dyspnea during exercise in healthy man?

    PubMed Central

    Kotrach, Houssam G.; Bourbeau, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Few therapies exist for the relief of dyspnea in restrictive lung disorders. Accumulating evidence suggests that nebulized opioids selective for the mu-receptor subtype may relieve dyspnea by modulating intrapulmonary opioid receptor activity. Our respective primary and secondary objectives were to test the hypothesis that nebulized fentanyl (a mu-opioid receptor agonist) relieves dyspnea during exercise in the presence of abnormal restrictive ventilatory constraints and to identify the physiological mechanisms of this improvement. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study, we examined the effect of 250 μg nebulized fentanyl, chest wall strapping (CWS), and their interaction on detailed physiological and perceptual responses to constant work rate cycle exercise (85% of maximum incremental work rate) in 14 healthy, fit young men. By design, CWS decreased vital capacity by ∼20% and mimicked the negative consequences of a mild restrictive lung disorder on exercise endurance time and on dyspnea, breathing pattern, dynamic operating lung volumes, and diaphragmatic electromyographic and respiratory muscle function during exercise. Compared with placebo under both unrestricted control and CWS conditions, nebulized fentanyl had no effect on exercise endurance time, integrated physiological response to exercise, sensory intensity, unpleasantness ratings of exertional dyspnea. Our results do not support a role for intrapulmonary opioids in the neuromodulation of exertional dyspnea in health nor do they provide a physiological rationale for the use of nebulized fentanyl in the management of dyspnea due to mild restrictive lung disorders, specifically those arising from abnormalities of the chest wall and not affiliated with airway inflammation. PMID:26031762

  6. Exercise Training Restores Cardiac Protein Quality Control in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Juliane C.; Queliconi, Bruno B.; Dourado, Paulo M. M.; Cunha, Telma F.; Zambelli, Vanessa O.; Bechara, Luiz R. G.; Kowaltowski, Alicia J.; Brum, Patricia C.; Mochly-Rosen, Daria; Ferreira, Julio C. B.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise training is a well-known coadjuvant in heart failure treatment; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects remain elusive. Despite the primary cause, heart failure is often preceded by two distinct phenomena: mitochondria dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption. The objective of the study was to determine the contribution of exercise training in regulating cardiac mitochondria metabolism and cytosolic protein quality control in a post-myocardial infarction-induced heart failure (MI-HF) animal model. Our data demonstrated that isolated cardiac mitochondria from MI-HF rats displayed decreased oxygen consumption, reduced maximum calcium uptake and elevated H2O2 release. These changes were accompanied by exacerbated cardiac oxidative stress and proteasomal insufficiency. Declined proteasomal activity contributes to cardiac protein quality control disruption in our MI-HF model. Using cultured neonatal cardiomyocytes, we showed that either antimycin A or H2O2 resulted in inactivation of proteasomal peptidase activity, accumulation of oxidized proteins and cell death, recapitulating our in vivo model. Of interest, eight weeks of exercise training improved cardiac function, peak oxygen uptake and exercise tolerance in MI-HF rats. Moreover, exercise training restored mitochondrial oxygen consumption, increased Ca2+-induced permeability transition and reduced H2O2 release in MI-HF rats. These changes were followed by reduced oxidative stress and better cardiac protein quality control. Taken together, our findings uncover the potential contribution of mitochondrial dysfunction and cytosolic protein quality control disruption to heart failure and highlight the positive effects of exercise training in re-establishing cardiac mitochondrial physiology and protein quality control, reinforcing the importance of this intervention as a non-pharmacological tool for heart failure therapy. PMID:23300764

  7. How to avoid exercise injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as: Walking Swimming Riding a stationary bike Golf These types of exercise are less likely to ... good working condition Is used correctly and consistently Learn Good Form If you are new to an ...

  8. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma attack, modify PE activities. For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk ... whole distance Run part of the distance Alternate running and walking Some exercises may be less likely ...

  9. Health Psychology and Exercise Adherence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dishman, Rod K.

    1981-01-01

    Although the association between vigorous exercise and certain aspects of mental health is well documented, explanations for this relationship are not well understood. Research in this area is reviewed, and recommendations for more study are presented. (CJ)

  10. Exercising Safely in Hot Weather

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nia.nih.gov/Go4Life Exercising Safely in Hot Weather Many people enjoy outdoor activities—walking, gardening, ... older adults and people with health problems. Being hot for too long can cause hyperthermia—a heat- ...

  11. Understanding Correlations: Two Computer Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Miriam D.; Strube, Michael J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes two QuickBASIC programs that provide students direct experience with interpreting correlation scatter-plots. Maintains that the programs can be used in classroom exercises to highlight factors that influence the size of a Pearson correlation coefficient. (CFR)

  12. The Exercise of Effective Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Robert R.; Mouton, Jane Srygley

    1981-01-01

    Describes an exercise that provides a basis for resolving the controversy over which leadership theory is better, the Situational Contingency approach or the one-best-style approach. Thirty-two references are listed. (Author/LLS)

  13. Exercising and asthma at school

    MedlinePlus

    ... fields or lawns. A student with asthma should warm up before exercising and cool down afterward. ... For example, a running program might be set up this way: Walk the ... The warm, moist air may keep symptoms away. Football, baseball, ...

  14. How Are Diet & Exercise Affected?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Pain Management Nutrition and Exercise Holistic Care Pathology Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms Islet Cell Tumors & Endocrine ... 410-933-7262 Site Map Policies & Credits News Pathology Home Goldman Center © 2016 Johns Hopkins University

  15. Creater-cizes: Creativity Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Creativity exercises, or creater-cizes, can help camp staff generate ideas and solve problems. Common techniques are brainstorming, story-boarding, analogies and metaphors, association and free association, spinning, and lists. Defines and gives examples of each technique. (SAS)

  16. Exercise Science: A New Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricci, Benjamin

    1982-01-01

    Exercise science represents an integrated approach to the study of the physiological, biochemical, and mechanical adaptations of humans to stresses imposed by a variety of physical performances as well as ambient conditions such as temperature and humidity. (MLW)

  17. Exercise, lifestyle, and your bones

    MedlinePlus

    ... dancing, or other weight-bearing activities such as aerobics and other sports Careful weight training, using weight ... you are older, do not do high-impact aerobics, such as step aerobics. This type of exercise ...

  18. Exercise Training During +Gz Acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Chou, J. L.; Simonson, S. R.; Jackson, C. G. R.; Barnes, P. R.

    1999-01-01

    The overall purpose is to study the effect of passive (without exercise) and active (with exercise) +Gz (head-to-foot) acceleration training, using a short-arm (1.9m radius) centrifuge, on post- training maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max, work capacity) and 70 deg head-up tilt (orthostatic) tolerance in ambulatory subjects to test the hypothesis that (a) both passive and active acceleration training will improve post-training tilt-tolerance, and (b) there will be no difference in tilt-tolerance between passive and active exercise acceleration training because increased hydrostatic and blood pressures, rather than increased muscular metabolism, will provide the major adaptive stimulus. The purpose of the pilot study was to test the hypothesis that there would be no significant difference in the metabolic responses (oxygen uptake, heart rate, pulmonary ventilation, or respiratory exchange ratio) during supine exercise with moderate +Gz acceleration.

  19. NASA Now: Exercise Physiology: Countermeasures

    NASA Video Gallery

    Aaron Weaver is a biomedical engineer responsible for setting up and running experiments and recruiting test subjects in the Exercise Countermeasures Laboratory at NASA’s Glenn Research Center in...

  20. Our World: Exercise in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out why exercise is so important to the astronauts who travel into space. Learn how gravity affects our bodies and what astronauts must do in reduced gravity environments to keep their bodies ...