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Sample records for exercise-induced fat loss

  1. Green Tea Catechin Consumption Enhances Exercise-Induced Abdominal Fat Loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aim: This study evaluated the influence of a green tea catechin beverage on body composition and fat distribution in overweight and obese adults during exercised-induced weight loss. Methods: Participants (N=132) were randomly assigned to receive a 500 mL beverage containing approximately 625 mg of...

  2. Increased Consumption of Dairy Foods and Protein during Diet- and Exercise-Induced Weight Loss Promotes Fat Mass Loss and Lean Mass Gain in Overweight and Obese Premenopausal Women1234

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Andrea R.; Atkinson, Stephanie A.; Tarnopolsky, Mark A.; Phillips, Stuart M.

    2011-01-01

    Weight loss can have substantial health benefits for overweight or obese persons; however, the ratio of fat:lean tissue loss may be more important. We aimed to determine how daily exercise (resistance and/or aerobic) and a hypoenergetic diet varying in protein and calcium content from dairy foods would affect the composition of weight lost in otherwise healthy, premenopausal, overweight, and obese women. Ninety participants were randomized to 3 groups (n = 30/group): high protein, high dairy (HPHD), adequate protein, medium dairy (APMD), and adequate protein, low dairy (APLD) differing in the quantity of total dietary protein and dairy food-source protein consumed: 30 and 15%, 15 and 7.5%, or 15 and <2% of energy, respectively. Body composition was measured by DXA at 0, 8, and 16 wk and MRI (n = 39) to assess visceral adipose tissue (VAT) volume at 0 and 16 wk. All groups lost body weight (P < 0.05) and fat (P < 0.01); however, fat loss during wk 8–16 was greater in the HPHD group than in the APMD and APLD groups (P < 0.05). The HPHD group gained lean tissue with a greater increase during 8–16 wk than the APMD group, which maintained lean mass and the APLD group, which lost lean mass (P < 0.05). The HPHD group also lost more VAT as assessed by MRI (P < 0.05) and trunk fat as assessed by DXA (P < 0.005) than the APLD group. The reduction in VAT in all groups was correlated with intakes of calcium (r = 0.40; P < 0.05) and protein (r = 0.32; P < 0.05). Therefore, diet- and exercise-induced weight loss with higher protein and increased dairy product intakes promotes more favorable body composition changes in women characterized by greater total and visceral fat loss and lean mass gain. PMID:21775530

  3. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Melanson, Edward L.; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A.

    2013-01-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the sub-population that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, i.e. increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors, and to develop strategies to minimize their impact. PMID:23470300

  4. Resistance to exercise-induced weight loss: compensatory behavioral adaptations.

    PubMed

    Melanson, Edward L; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Donnelly, Joseph E; Braun, Barry; King, Neil A

    2013-08-01

    In many interventions that are based on an exercise program intended to induce weight loss, the mean weight loss observed is modest and sometimes far less than what the individual expected. The individual responses are also widely variable, with some individuals losing a substantial amount of weight, others maintaining weight, and a few actually gaining weight. The media have focused on the subpopulation that loses little weight, contributing to a public perception that exercise has limited utility to cause weight loss. The purpose of the symposium was to present recent, novel data that help explain how compensatory behaviors contribute to a wide discrepancy in exercise-induced weight loss. The presentations provide evidence that some individuals adopt compensatory behaviors, that is, increased energy intake and/or reduced activity, that offset the exercise energy expenditure and limit weight loss. The challenge for both scientists and clinicians is to develop effective tools to identify which individuals are susceptible to such behaviors and to develop strategies to minimize their effect. PMID:23470300

  5. Impact-driven, pulmonary emboli of osseous fat in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Simkin, Peter A; Snitily, Brian K

    2015-11-01

    Exercise induced bronchospasm (EIB) affects approximately 10% of normal individuals with higher prevalence rates among children, obese adults, and competitive athletes. Although hyperpnea with dry air is the best known cause, the problem is multifactorial with atopy, asthma and chlorine all playing established roles. To date, no clear mechanism has connected musculoskeletal loading with the ensuing pulmonary compromise. This paper reviews evidence that impact-driven pulses in subchondral bone pressure may push osseous fat cells into the local venous sinusoids. The resultant showers of microemboli must then travel to the lung where lysis of membrane phospholipids leads to leukotriene formation with resultant inflammation and bronchial hypersensitivity. Concurrently, the same emboli deliver triglyceride fuels for further physical activity. Thus, pulmonary microemboli derived from osseous fat may resolve the seeming paradox of athletic excellence in persons afflicted with exercise-induced bronchospasm. PMID:26328480

  6. Effect of dry warm air on respiratory water loss in children with exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Tabka, Z; Ben Jebria, A; Vergeret, J; Guenard, H

    1988-07-01

    The variation in respiratory water loss (RWL) over time, expressed as the mass of water vapor lost per liter (body temperature and pressure, saturated) of ventilation (MH2O), was investigated in two groups: (1) children with exercise-induced asthma; and (2) healthy children. Children were matched for age and sex and went without medication for at least 12 hours before each experiment. The children breathed dry warm air (TI = 28.4 degrees C +/- 0.3 degree C) for 15 minutes while bicycling at constant and moderate work load (50 W). The MH2O was measured by collecting and weighing the expired water vapor (1) at rest breathing in warm conditions of inspired gas (control values), (2) every five minutes during exercise while breathing dry warm air, and (3) four minutes after the end of exercise. Pulmonary function tests were performed before and six minutes after exercise. The results were abnormal only in children with exercise-induced asthma. During exercise, RWL significantly fell (compared to control value) at the tenth and 15th minute in both groups. Whereas normal subjects recovered their initial values for MH2O four minutes after stopping exercise, asthmatic children still had a reduction in respiratory water loss. During exercise, MH2O decreased a little more in healthy than in asthmatic children. The decrease in MH2O in both groups suggests that the means to fully humidify expired gas are overwhelmed by thermal stress. The lack of increase in MH2O in asthmatic children on stopping exercise suggests that the airway mucosa is unable to produce enough water vapor and is thus dehydrated and probably hyperosmotic. PMID:3383660

  7. Exercise-Induced Weight Loss is More Effective than Dieting for Improving Adipokine Profile, Insulin Resistance, and Inflammation in Obese Men.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Joan; Dhamodaran, Subbiah; Chen, Dan-Dan; Yap, Siew-Yoon; Chen, Richard Yuan-Tud; Tian, Roger Ho-Heng

    2015-12-01

    The adipokines chemerin and adiponectin are reciprocally related in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and inflammation in obesity. Weight loss increases adiponectin and reduces chemerin, insulin resistance, and inflammation, but the effects of caloric restriction and physical activity are difficult to separate in combined lifestyle modification. We compared effects of diet- or exercise-induced weight loss on chemerin, adiponectin, insulin resistance, and inflammation in obese men. Eighty abdominally obese Asian men (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 30 kg/m(2), waist circumference [WC] ≥ 90 cm, mean age 42.6 years) were randomized to reduce daily intake by ~500 kilocalories (n = 40) or perform moderate-intensity aerobic and resistance exercise (200-300 min/week) (n = 40) to increase energy expenditure by a similar amount for 24 weeks. The diet and exercise groups had similar decreases in energy deficit (-456 ± 338 vs. -455 ± 315 kcal/day), weight (-3.6 ± 3.4 vs. -3.3 ± 4.6 kg), and WC (-3.4 ± 4.4 vs. -3.6 ± 3.2 cm). The exercise group demonstrated greater reductions in fat mass (-3.9 ± 3.5 vs. -2.7 ± 5.3 kg), serum chemerin (-9.7 ± 11.1 vs. -4.3 ± 12.4 ng/ml), the inflammatory marker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-2.11 ± 3.13 vs. -1.49 ± 3.08 mg/L), and insulin resistance as measured by homeostatic model assessment (-2.45 ± 1.88 vs. -1.38 ± 3.77). Serum adiponectin increased only in the exercise group. Exercise-induced fat mass loss was more effective than dieting for improving adipokine profile, insulin resistance, and systemic inflammation in obese men, underscoring metabolic benefits of increased physical activity. PMID:26011919

  8. Loss of functional endothelial connexin40 results in exercise-induced hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Morton, Susan K; Chaston, Daniel J; Howitt, Lauren; Heisler, Jillian; Nicholson, Bruce J; Fairweather, Stephen; Bröer, Stefan; Ashton, Anthony W; Matthaei, Klaus I; Hill, Caryl E

    2015-03-01

    During activity, coordinated vasodilation of microcirculatory networks with upstream supply vessels increases blood flow to skeletal and cardiac muscles and reduces peripheral resistance. Endothelial dysfunction in humans attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, resulting in exercise-induced hypertension in otherwise normotensive individuals. Underpinning activity-dependent hyperemia is an ascending vasodilation in which the endothelial gap junction protein, connexin (Cx)40, plays an essential role. Because exercise-induced hypertension is proposed as a forerunner to clinical hypertension, we hypothesized that endothelial disruption of Cx40 function in mice may create an animal model of this condition. To this end, we created mice in which a mutant Cx40T152A was expressed alongside wildtype Cx40 selectively in the endothelium. Expression of the Cx40T152A transgene in Xenopus oocytes and mouse coronary endothelial cells in vitro impaired both electric and chemical conductance and acted as a dominant-negative against wildtype Cx40, Cx43, and Cx45, but not Cx37. Endothelial expression of Cx40T152A in Cx40T152ATg mice attenuated ascending vasodilation, without effect on radial coupling through myoendothelial gap junctions. Using radiotelemetry, Cx40T152ATg mice showed an activity-dependent increase in blood pressure, which was significantly greater than in wildtype mice, but significantly less than in chronically hypertensive, Cx40knockout mice. The increase in heart rate with activity was also greater than in wildtype or Cx40knockout mice. We conclude that the endothelial Cx40T152A mutation attenuates activity-dependent vasodilation, producing a model of exercise-induced hypertension. These data highlight the importance of endothelial coupling through Cx40 in regulating blood pressure during activity. PMID:25547341

  9. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  10. Post-exercise alcohol ingestion exacerbates eccentric-exercise induced losses in performance.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Matthew J; Mündel, Toby; Stannard, Stephen R

    2010-03-01

    The effect of acute alcohol intake on muscular performance in both the exercising and non-exercising legs in the days following strenuous eccentric exercise was investigated to ascertain whether an interaction between post-exercise alcohol use and muscle damage causes an increase in damage-related weakness. Ten healthy males performed 300 maximal eccentric contractions of the quadriceps muscles of one leg on an isokinetic dynamometer. They then consumed either a beverage containing 1 g of ethanol per kg bodyweight ethanol (as vodka and orange juice; ALC) or a non-alcoholic beverage (OJ). At least 2 weeks later they performed an equivalent bout of eccentric exercise on the contralateral leg after which they consumed the other beverage. Measurement of peak and average peak isokinetic (concentric and eccentric) and isometric torque produced by the quadriceps of both exercising and non-exercising legs was made before and 36 and 60 h post-exercise. Greatest decreases in exercising leg performance were observed at 36 h with losses of 28.7, 31.9 and 25.9% occurring for OJ average peak isometric, concentric, and eccentric torques, respectively. However, average peak torque loss was significantly greater in ALC with the same performance measures decreasing by 40.9, 42.8 and 44.8% (all p < 0.05). Performance of the non-exercising leg did not change significantly under either treatment. Therefore, consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol after damaging exercise magnifies the loss of force associated with strenuous eccentric exercise. This weakness appears to be due to an interaction between muscle damage and alcohol rather than the systemic effects of acute alcohol consumption. PMID:20012446

  11. Gene expression changes in adipose tissue with diet- and/or exercise-induced weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kristin L.; Foster-Schubert, Karen E.; Makar, Karen W.; Kratz, Mario; Hagman, Derek; Schur, Ellen A.; Habermann, Nina; Horton, Marc; Abbenhardt, Clare; Kuan, Ling-Yu; Xiao, Liren; Davison, Jerry; Morgan, Martin; Wang, Ching-Yun; Duggan, Catherine; McTiernan, Anne; Ulrich, Cornelia M.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a role in obesity-related cancers via increased production of inflammatory factors, steroid hormones, and altered adipokines. The impact of weight loss on adipose-tissue gene expression may provide insights into pathways linking obesity with cancer risk. We conducted an ancillary study within a randomized trial of diet, exercise, or combined diet+exercise vs. control among overweight/obese postmenopausal women. In 45 women, subcutaneous adipose-tissue biopsies were performed at baseline and after 6 months and changes in adipose-tissue gene expression were determined by microarray with an emphasis on pre-specified candidate pathways, as well as by unsupervised clustering of >37,000 transcripts (Illumina). Analyses were conducted first by randomization group, and then by degree of weight change at 6-months in all women combined. At 6 months, diet, exercise and diet+exercise participants lost a mean of 8.8 kg, 2.5 kg, and 7.9 kg (all p<0.05 vs. no change in controls). There was no significant change in candidate-gene expression by intervention group. In analysis by weight-change category, greater weight loss was associated a decrease in 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-1 (HSD17B1, p-trend<0.01) and leptin (LEP, p-trend<0.01) expression, and marginally significant increased expression of estrogen receptor-1 (ESR1, p-trend=0.08) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3, p-trend=0.08). Unsupervised clustering revealed 83 transcripts with statistically significant changes. Multiple gene-expression changes correlated with changes in associated serum biomarkers. Weight-loss was associated with changes in adipose-tissue gene expression after 6 months, particularly in two pathways postulated to link obesity and cancer, i.e., steroid-hormone metabolism and IGF signaling. PMID:23341572

  12. Respiratory heat/water loss alone does not determine the severity of exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Noviski, N; Bar-Yishay, E; Gur, I; Godfrey, S

    1988-03-01

    Respiratory heat loss (RHL) or water loss (RWL) have been proposed as possible triggering factors in exercise and hyperventilation-induced asthma (EIA and HIA). It has recently been demonstrated that exercise intensity and climatic factors are both important in determining the severity of EIA. Eight young asthmatics performed both exercise and isocapnic hyperventilation (IHV) manoeuvres under identical climatic conditions, as part of our investigation of these interactive factors which determine the severity of the asthmatic response. It was found that, when challenged at low ventilatory levels, exercise produced a significantly attenuated asthmatic response compared to IHV. The fall in forced expired volume in 1 sec (delta FEV1) following exercise was 15 +/- 4% as compared with 27 +/- 3% after IHV (p less than 0.002). It is concluded that while the hypernoea in exercise may serve as a trigger, exercise per se introduces an additional factor which serves to limit the full response seen with IHV. This attenuated response is revealed at low ventilatory levels but is masked at high levels. PMID:3384078

  13. Dietary fat intake, supplements, and weight loss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyck, D. J.

    2000-01-01

    Although there remains controversy regarding the role of macronutrient balance in the etiology of obesity, the consumption of high-fat diets appears to be strongly implicated in its development. Evidence that fat oxidation does not adjust rapidly to acute increases in dietary fat, as well as a decreased capacity to oxidize fat in the postprandial state in the obese, suggest that diets high in fat may lead to the accumulation of fat stores. Novel data is also presented suggesting that in rodents, high-fat diets may lead to the development of leptin resistance in skeletal muscle and subsequent accumulations of muscle triacylglycerol. Nevertheless, several current fad diets recommend drastically reduced carbohydrate intake, with a concurrent increase in fat content. Such recommendations are based on the underlying assumption that by reducing circulating insulin levels, lipolysis and lipid oxidation will be enhanced and fat storage reduced. Numerous supplements are purported to increase fat oxidation (carnitine, conjugated linoleic acid), increase metabolic rate (ephedrine, pyruvate), or inhibit hepatic lipogenesis (hydroxycitrate). All of these compounds are currently marketed in supplemental form to increase weight loss, but few have actually been shown to be effective in scientific studies. To date, there is little or no evidence supporting that carnitine or hydroxycitrate supplementation are of any value for weight loss in humans. Supplements such as pyruvate have been shown to be effective at high dosages, but there is little mechanistic information to explain its purported effect or data to indicate its effectiveness at lower dosages. Conjugated linoleic acid has been shown to stimulate fat utilization and decrease body fat content in mice but has not been tested in humans. The effects of ephedrine, in conjunction with methylxanthines and aspirin, in humans appears unequivocal but includes various cardiovascular side effects. None of these compounds have been

  14. Ergogenic effect of dietary L-carnitine and fat supplementation against exercise induced physical fatigue in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Pandareesh, M D; Anand, T

    2013-12-01

    L-carnitine (LC) plays a central role in fatty acid metabolism and in skeletal muscle bioenergetics. LC supplementation is known to improve physical performance and has become widespread in recent years without any unequivocal support to this practice. A scientific-based knowledge is needed, to understand the implications of LC supplementation on physical fatigue. In current study, we have explored synergistic effects of dietary LC and fat content against physical fatigue in rats. Ninety male Wistar rats were supplemented with different concentrations of LC (0.15, 0.3, and 0.5 %) and fat content (5, 10, and 15 %) through diet in different combinations. Our results elucidated that LC (0.5 %) along with 10 and 15 % fat diet supplemented rats showed significant ergogenic effect. The swimming time until exhaustion was increased by ~2- and ~1.5-fold in rats fed with 10 and 15 % fat diet containing LC (0.5 %). LC supplementation improved the energy charge by increasing the levels of ATP, tissue glycogen, reduced GSH, plasma triglyceride, plasma glucose levels, and enzymatic antioxidant status, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase. LC supplementation also significantly reduced lipid peroxidation, lactic acid, plasma urea nitrogen, creatinine, creatinekinase, and lactate dehydrogenase levels in various tissues compared to its respective control group. Thus the present study indicates that LC ameliorates the various impairments associated with physical endurance in rats. PMID:23661316

  15. Exercise-induced rhabdomyolysis and transient loss of deambulation as outset of partial carnitine palmityl transferase II deficiency.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Bersani, Giulia; Compagnone, Adele; Zampetti, Anna; De Nisco, Alessia; Sacco, Emanuela; Marrocco, Raffaella

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 13-year-old boy with an abrupt onset of leg pain and muscle weakness, incapability of deambulation and a laboratory picture of exercise-induced acute rhabdomyolysis. Intravenous hyperhydration and forced diuresis were adopted to avoid renal complications. No evidence of articular or residual muscular damage was appreciated in the short-term. The recurrence of rhabdomyolysis required a muscular biopsy showing a disturbance of fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. PMID:19855973

  16. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  17. Peripheral Fat Loss and Decline in Adipogenesis in Older Humans

    PubMed Central

    CASO, Giuseppe; MCNURLAN, Margaret A; MILEVA, Izolda; ZEMLYAK, Alla; MYNARCIK, Dennis C; GELATO, Marie C

    2012-01-01

    Objective Aging is associated with a redistribution of body fat including a relative loss of subcutaneous peripheral fat. These changes in body fat can have important clinical consequences since they are linked to increased risk of metabolic complications. The causes and mechanisms of loss of peripheral fat associated with aging are not clear. The aim of this study was to assess whether defects in adipogenesis contribute to fat loss in aging humans, as suggested from animal studies, and to evaluate the role of inflammation on pathogenesis of fat loss. Materials/Methods Preadipocytes isolated from subcutaneous peripheral fat of healthy young and elderly subjects were compared in their ability to replicate and differentiate. Results The results show that both the rate of replication and differentiation of preadipocytes are reduced in older subjects. The reduction in adipogenesis is accompanied by a higher plasma level of the inflammatory marker, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2, and greater release of tumor necrosis factor α from fat tissue. Conclusions Thus, the gradual relative loss of peripheral fat in aging humans may in part result from a defect in adipogenesis, which may be linked to inflammation and increased release of proinflammatory cytokines from fat tissue. PMID:22999012

  18. Weight loss is not mandatory for exercise-induced effects on health indices in females with metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, JB; Dos Santos, DL; Bresciani, G; Bard, LF; de Mello, F; Stefanello, ST; Courtes, AA

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of moderate aerobic training on functional, anthropometric, biochemical, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters on women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Fifteen untrained women with MS performed moderate aerobic training for 15 weeks, without modifications of dietary behaviours. Functional, anthropometric, biochemical, control diet record and HRQOL parameters were assessed before and after the training. Despite body weight maintenance, the patients presented decreases in waist circumference (P = 0.001), number of MS components (P = 0.014), total cholesterol (P = 0.049), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.004), LDL cholesterol (P = 0.027), myeloperoxidase activity (P = 0.002) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels (P = 0.006). There were no differences in total energy, carbohydrate, protein and lipid intake pre- and post-training. Furthermore, improvements in the HRQOL subscales of physical functioning (P = 0.03), role-physical (P = 0.039), bodily pain (P = 0.048), general health (P = 0.046) and social functioning scoring (P = 0.011) were reported. Despite the absence of weight loss, aerobic training induced beneficial effects on functional, anthropometric, biochemical and HRQOL parameters in women with MS. PMID:26028810

  19. Weight loss is not mandatory for exercise-induced effects on health indices in females with metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Farinha, J B; Dos Santos, D L; Bresciani, G; Bard, L F; de Mello, F; Stefanello, S T; Courtes, A A; Soares, Faa

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of moderate aerobic training on functional, anthropometric, biochemical, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) parameters on women with metabolic syndrome (MS). Fifteen untrained women with MS performed moderate aerobic training for 15 weeks, without modifications of dietary behaviours. Functional, anthropometric, biochemical, control diet record and HRQOL parameters were assessed before and after the training. Despite body weight maintenance, the patients presented decreases in waist circumference (P = 0.001), number of MS components (P = 0.014), total cholesterol (P = 0.049), HDL cholesterol (P = 0.004), LDL cholesterol (P = 0.027), myeloperoxidase activity (P = 0.002) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances levels (P = 0.006). There were no differences in total energy, carbohydrate, protein and lipid intake pre- and post-training. Furthermore, improvements in the HRQOL subscales of physical functioning (P = 0.03), role-physical (P = 0.039), bodily pain (P = 0.048), general health (P = 0.046) and social functioning scoring (P = 0.011) were reported. Despite the absence of weight loss, aerobic training induced beneficial effects on functional, anthropometric, biochemical and HRQOL parameters in women with MS. PMID:26028810

  20. Dissociation between exercise-induced reduction in liver fat and changes in hepatic and peripheral glucose homoeostasis in obese patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Cuthbertson, Daniel J; Shojaee-Moradie, Fariba; Sprung, Victoria S; Jones, Helen; Pugh, Christopher J A; Richardson, Paul; Kemp, Graham J; Barrett, Mark; Jackson, Nicola C; Thomas, E Louise; Bell, Jimmy D; Umpleby, A Margot

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with multi-organ (hepatic, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue) insulin resistance (IR). Exercise is an effective treatment for lowering liver fat but its effect on IR in NAFLD is unknown. We aimed to determine whether supervised exercise in NAFLD would reduce liver fat and improve hepatic and peripheral (skeletal muscle and adipose tissue) insulin sensitivity. Sixty nine NAFLD patients were randomized to 16 weeks exercise supervision (n=38) or counselling (n=31) without dietary modification. All participants underwent MRI/spectroscopy to assess changes in body fat and in liver and skeletal muscle triglyceride, before and following exercise/counselling. To quantify changes in hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity, a pre-determined subset (n=12 per group) underwent a two-stage hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamp pre- and post-intervention. Results are shown as mean [95% confidence interval (CI)]. Fifty participants (30 exercise, 20 counselling), 51 years (IQR 40, 56), body mass index (BMI) 31 kg/m(2) (IQR 29, 35) with baseline liver fat/water % of 18.8% (IQR 10.7, 34.6) completed the study (12/12 exercise and 7/12 counselling completed the clamp studies). Supervised exercise mediated a greater reduction in liver fat/water percentage than counselling [Δ mean change 4.7% (0.01, 9.4); P<0.05], which correlated with the change in cardiorespiratory fitness (r=-0.34, P=0.0173). With exercise, peripheral insulin sensitivity significantly increased (following high-dose insulin) despite no significant change in hepatic glucose production (HGP; following low-dose insulin); no changes were observed in the control group. Although supervised exercise effectively reduced liver fat, improving peripheral IR in NAFLD, the reduction in liver fat was insufficient to improve hepatic IR. PMID:26424731

  1. [Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction].

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    Terms exercise-induced asthma (EIA) or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are used to describe transient bronchoconstriction occurring during or immediately after vigorous exercise in some subjects. For the diagnosis of EIB it is necessary to show at least 10% decrease in FEV1 from baseline following physical exercise. The prevalence of EIB has been reported to be 12-15% in general population, 10-20% in summer olympic athletes, affecting up to 50-70% of winter athletes (particularly ski runners and skaters). There are two key theories explaining EIB: thermal and osmotic. Differential diagnosis of EIB should include chronic cardio-pulmonary diseases, vocal cord dysfunction, hyperventilation syndrome and poor physical fitness or overtraining. According to the ATS guidelines from 1999 for the diagnosis of EIB a standardized exercise on a treadmill or cycle ergometer test with stable environmental conditions regarding temperature and humidity of inhaled air, should be employed. Other laboratory tests assessing bronchial hyperresponsiveness to indirect stimuli including eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH), mannitol, hypertonic saline, AMP or measurement of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) are also successfully used. In the prevention of EIB include both pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatment. In patients with poorly controlled asthma intensification of anti-inflammatory treatment can decrease the frequency and severity of EIB. Short and long acting beta2-agonists, antileukotriene drugs can be used prior to exercise to prevent EIB. PMID:21190152

  2. Measuring breath acetone for monitoring fat loss: Review

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Endogenous acetone production is a by‐product of the fat metabolism process. Because of its small size, acetone appears in exhaled breath. Historically, endogenous acetone has been measured in exhaled breath to monitor ketosis in healthy and diabetic subjects. Recently, breath acetone concentration (BrAce) has been shown to correlate with the rate of fat loss in healthy individuals. In this review, the measurement of breath acetone in healthy subjects is evaluated for its utility in predicting fat loss and its sensitivity to changes in physiologic parameters. Results BrAce can range from 1 ppm in healthy non‐dieting subjects to 1,250 ppm in diabetic ketoacidosis. A strong correlation exists between increased BrAce and the rate of fat loss. Multiple metabolic and respiratory factors affect the measurement of BrAce. BrAce is most affected by changes in the following factors (in descending order): dietary macronutrient composition, caloric restriction, exercise, pulmonary factors, and other assorted factors that increase fat metabolism or inhibit acetone metabolism. Pulmonary factors affecting acetone exchange in the lung should be controlled to optimize the breath sample for measurement. Conclusions When biologic factors are controlled, BrAce measurement provides a non‐invasive tool for monitoring the rate of fat loss in healthy subjects. PMID:26524104

  3. Injectable therapies for localized fat loss: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Diane; Rotunda, Adam M

    2011-07-01

    This review presents mechanisms of action and a review of the clinical applications of injections currently in development for localized fat reduction. After being received with initial enthusiasm earlier in the decade, mesotherapy and other injectable methods for fat loss (Lipodissolve, PC/DC, DC, injection lipolysis, adipolysis) have been subjects of critical scrutiny by the media and the US Food and Drug Administration. Several medications with novel detergent and lipolytic activity are in development and have demonstrated potential as minimally invasive fat reducing treatments. PMID:21824545

  4. Exercise-induced purpura.

    PubMed

    Ramelet, Albert-Adrien

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced purpura (EIP) occurs on the lower legs after unusual or major muscular activity, as in marathon runners or as after long walks, especially in the mountains in hot weather. In leisure walkers, patients are otherwise healthy females. There is no relation with chronic venous disorder. Erythematous, urticarial or purpuric plaques arise on the lower leg, usually sparing the skin compressed by socks. Symptoms include itch, pain and a burning sensation. Histopathology demonstrates leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The lesions fade after some days, with frequent relapses at further muscular exercises and may be prevented in some cases by compression, intake of venoactive drugs and local application of steroids. EIP is not uncommon, even if very few descriptions have yet been published. It appears to be consecutive to venous stasis induced by an acute failure of the muscle pump of the calf and thermoregulation decompensation, after a prolonged and unusual exercise, such as running or walking in hot weather. PMID:15178910

  5. Decaffeinated Green Tea and Voluntary Exercise Induce Gene Changes Related to Beige Adipocyte Formation in High Fat-Fed Obese Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Sae-tan, Sudathip; Rogers, Connie J.; Lambert, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that decaffeinated green tea extract (GTE) in combination with voluntary exercise (Ex) reduces metabolic syndrome in high fat-fed C57BL/6J mice. Here, we examined for the first time the effect of treatment with 77 mg/g GTE, Ex, or both (GTE + Ex) on genes related to the conversion of white adipose tissue (WAT) to brown fat-like adipose tissue (BLAT) in this model. GTE+Ex induced genes related to lipolysis (hormone sensitive lipase [3.0-fold] and patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 2 [2-fold]), mitochondrial β-oxidation (NADH dehydrogenase 5 [2.3-fold], cytochrome B [2.0-fold], and cytochrome C oxidase III [1.9-fold increase]), and adipose tissue browning (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α [1.8-fold], bone morphogenetic protein 4 [2.6-fold], and phosphatase and tensin homolog [2.6-fold]) in visceral WAT compared to HF-fed mice. These results suggest that GTE+Ex function in part by inducing the conversion of WAT to BLAT and provides novel mechanistic insight into this combination. PMID:25844091

  6. Calorie for Calorie, Dietary Fat Restriction Results in More Body Fat Loss than Carbohydrate Restriction in People with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hall, Kevin D; Bemis, Thomas; Brychta, Robert; Chen, Kong Y; Courville, Amber; Crayner, Emma J; Goodwin, Stephanie; Guo, Juen; Howard, Lilian; Knuth, Nicolas D; Miller, Bernard V; Prado, Carla M; Siervo, Mario; Skarulis, Monica C; Walter, Mary; Walter, Peter J; Yannai, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrate restriction has been purported to cause endocrine adaptations that promote body fat loss more than dietary fat restriction. We selectively restricted dietary carbohydrate versus fat for 6 days following a 5-day baseline diet in 19 adults with obesity confined to a metabolic ward where they exercised daily. Subjects received both isocaloric diets in random order during each of two inpatient stays. Body fat loss was calculated as the difference between daily fat intake and net fat oxidation measured while residing in a metabolic chamber. Whereas carbohydrate restriction led to sustained increases in fat oxidation and loss of 53 ± 6 g/day of body fat, fat oxidation was unchanged by fat restriction, leading to 89 ± 6 g/day of fat loss, and was significantly greater than carbohydrate restriction (p = 0.002). Mathematical model simulations agreed with these data, but predicted that the body acts to minimize body fat differences with prolonged isocaloric diets varying in carbohydrate and fat. PMID:26278052

  7. Gender Differences in Body Fat Utilization During Weight Gain, Loss, or Maintenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the known gender differences in fat gain, loss, and maintenance, and perhaps more importantly, highlights how little is known about the subject. The effects of gender differences on body fat distribution, fat use as an energy source, and exercise-related fat loss are discussed...

  8. Three-dimensional volumetric quantification of fat loss following cryolipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Garibyan, Lilit; Sipprell, William H; Jalian, H. Ray; Sakamoto, Fernanda H.; Avram, Mathew; Anderson, R. Rox

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives Cryolipolysis is a noninvasive and well-tolerated treatment for reduction of localized subcutaneous fat. Although several studies demonstrate the safety and efficacy of this procedure, volumetric fat reduction from this treatment has not been quantified. This prospective study investigated the change in volume of fat after cryolipolysis treatment using three-dimensional (3D) photography. Materials and Methods A prospective study of subjects treated with cryolipolysis on the flank (love handle) was performed at Massachusetts General Hospital. Volume measurements were performed with a Canfield Scientific Vectra three-dimensional camera and software to evaluate the amount of post procedure volume change. Clinical outcomes were assessed with caliper measurements, subject surveys, and blinded physician assessment of photographs. Results Eleven subjects were enrolled in this study. Each subject underwent a single cycle of cryolipolysis to one flank. The untreated flank served as an internal control. The follow up time after treatment was two months. The mean amount of calculated absolute fat volume loss using 3D photography from baseline to 2 months follow up visit was 56.2 ± 25.6 from the treatment site and 16.6 ± 17.6 cc from the control (p < 0.0001). A mean absolute difference of 39.6 cc between the treated and untreated sides was calculated at 2 months post-treatment. Comparison of caliper measurements from baseline to 2 months post-treatment demonstrated significant reduction of the treated flank from 45.6 ± 5.8 mm at baseline to 38.6 ±4.6 mm at 2 months post-treatment (p<0.001). The untreated flank did not show significant reduction with caliper measurements demonstrating 45.3 ± 5.0 mm at baseline and 44.6 ± 5.1 mm at 2 months post-treatment (p=0.360). No unexpected side effects or adverse events were reported. Post-treatment satisfaction surveys demonstrated 82% of subjects were satisfied with the results. Conclusions Cryolipolysis

  9. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  10. Update on exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Spector, S L

    1993-12-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is a temporary increase in airway resistance that occurs after several minutes of strenuous exercise, generally eight to 15 minutes after the patient has stopped exercising. Some individuals experience a secondary reduction in pulmonary function several hours later, the so-called late-phase response. Many physicians believe that EIA is caused by respiratory water loss or airway cooling. Others incriminate tissue mast cells of the lung. The role of histamine is uncertain because it is detected inconsistently in the serum after an attack. Recent studies suggest that the release of sulfidopeptide leukotrienes may play a major role in EIA. Although the exact pathophysiology has yet to be determined, several highly successful treatment regimens have been developed. Preventive pharmacologic treatment with aerosolized beta-agonists is more successful than treatment with cromolyn sodium; however, coadministration of these agents produces significant symptomatic improvement in more than 90% of patients. Other useful medications include antihistamines, anticholinergic agents, theophylline, oral beta-agonists, calcium channel blockers, alpha-adrenergic antagonists, nedocromil, and leukotriene antagonists. Exercise-induced asthma may be suppressed with warm humidified air. This environment can be simulated by swimming in a heated pool or wearing a scarf over the nose and mouth in cold weather. PMID:8267254

  11. Do changes in energy intake and non-exercise physical activity affect exercise-induced weight loss? Midwest Exercise Trial-2

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Stephen D.; Willis, Erik A.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Lee, Jaehoon; Washburn, Richard A.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare energy intake, total daily energy expenditure (TDEE), non-exercise energy expenditure (NEEx), resting metabolic rate (RMR), non-exercise physical activity (NEPA), and sedentary time between participants with weight loss <5% (non-responders) vs. ≥5% (responders) in response to exercise. Methods Overweight/obese (BMI 25–40 kg/m2), adults (18–30 yrs.) were randomized to exercise: 5 day/week, 400 or 600 kcal/session, 10 months. Results Forty participants responded and 34 did not respond to the exercise protocol. Non-responder energy intake was higher vs. responders, significant only in men (p=0.034). TDEE increased only in responders (p=0.001). NEEx increased in responders and decreased in non-responders, significant only in men (p=0.045). There were no within or between-group differences for change in RMR. NEPA increased in responders and decreased in non-responders (group-by-time interactions: total sample, p=0.049; men, p=0.016). Sedentary time decreased in both groups, significant only in men. Conclusion Men who did not lose weight in response to exercise (<5%) had higher energy intake and lower NEEx compared to men losing ≥5%. No significant differences in any parameters assessed were observed between women who lost <5% vs. those losing ≥5. Factors associated with the weight loss response to exercise in women warrant additional investigation. PMID:26193059

  12. Fat Christians and fit elites: negotiating class and status in Evangelical Christian weight-loss culture.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    As American culture has become increasingly concerned about fatness, the fat body and weight loss have become salient symbols for other social tensions. This article uses the case of evangelical Christian weight-loss culture to argue that class is one of those tensions. Drawing on ethnographic work in a Christian weight-loss program as well as on recent theories of class, I argue that certain recurring concerns in Christians’ weight-loss discourse, notably concerns about fat Christian leaders and appearing healthy, reflect tensions about class-based aspirations and class-based denigrations evangelicals face in negotiating their position in American society. PMID:22826895

  13. Sexually dimorphic responses to fat loss after caloric restriction or surgical lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifei; Strader, April D; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2007-07-01

    White adipose tissue is the principal site for lipid accumulation. Males and females maintain distinctive white adipose tissue distribution patterns. Specifically, males tend to accumulate relatively more visceral fat, whereas females accumulate relatively more subcutaneous fat. The phenomenon of maintaining typical sex-specific fat distributions suggests sex-specific mechanisms that regulate energy balance and adiposity. We used two distinct approaches to reduce fat mass, caloric restriction (CR), and surgical fat removal (termed lipectomy) and assessed parameters involved in the regulation of energy balance. We found that male and female mice responded differentially to CR- and to lipectomy-induced fat loss. Females decreased energy expenditure during CR or after lipectomy. In contrast, males responded by eating more food during food return after CR or after lipectomy. Female CR mice conserved subcutaneous fat, whereas male CR mice lost adiposity equally in the subcutaneous and visceral depots. In addition, female mice had a reduced capability to restore visceral fat after fat loss. After CR, plasma leptin levels decreased in male but not in female mice. The failure to increase food intake after returning to ad libitum intake in females could be due to the relatively stable levels of leptin. In summary, we have found sexual dimorphisms in the response to fat loss that point to important underlying differences in the strategies by which male and female mice regulate body weight. PMID:17426110

  14. Effects of weight loss via high fat vs. low fat alternate day fasting diets on free fatty acid profiles.

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Dam, Vi T; Klempel, Monica C; Horne, Matthew; Cruz, Rani; Kroeger, Cynthia M; Santosa, Sylvia

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease risk is associated with excess body weight and elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentrations. This study examines how an alternate-day fasting (ADF) diet high (HF) or low (LF) in fat affects plasma FFA profiles in the context of weight loss, and changes in body composition and lipid profiles. After a 2-week weight maintenance period, 29 women (BMI 30-39.9 kg/m(2)) 25-65 years old were randomized to an 8-week ADF-HF (45% fat) diet or an ADF-LF (25% fat) diet with 25% energy intake on fast days and ad libitum intake on feed days. Body weight, BMI and waist circumference were assessed weekly and body composition was measured using dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Total and individual FFA and plasma lipid concentrations were measured before and after weight loss. Body weight, BMI, fat mass, total cholesterol, LDL-C and triglyceride concentrations decreased (P < 0.05) in both groups. Total FFA concentrations also decreased (P < 0.001). In the ADF-LF group, decreases were found in several more FFAs than in the ADF-HF group. In the ADF-HF group, FFA concentrations were positively correlated with waist circumference. Depending on the macronutrient composition of a diet, weight loss with an ADF diet decreases FFA concentrations through potentially different mechanisms. PMID:25557754

  15. The effects of weight loss treatments on upper and lower body fat.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, P G

    1997-08-01

    The intra-abdominal visceral deposition of adipose tissue, which characterises upper body obesity, is a major contributor to the development of hypertension, glucose intolerance and hyperlipidaemia. Conversely, individuals with lower body obesity may have comparable amounts of adipose tissue but remain relatively free from the metabolic consequences of obesity. This raises an obvious question-are there particular weight reducing treatments which specifically target intra-abdominal fat? In theory, surgical removal of upper body fat should be effective. In reality, neither liposuction nor apronectomy ('tummy tuck') have any beneficial metabolic effects, they simply remove subcutaneous adipose tissue which is often rapidly replaced. Vertical banded gastroplasty and gastric bypass operations may be dramatically effective in improving blood pressure, insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. However, these benefits result from a parallel reduction in visceral and total body fat. Studies of body fat distribution in postmenopausal women confirm that the marked decrease in adiposity, following a programme of very low calorie diet and exercise, reflects a comparable reduction in visceral and thigh fat. The reduction in waist circumference after a low fat/exercise programme suggests a similar situation in men. Exercise has an important role in treatment but, once again, the fat loss is generalised. Nevertheless, the improved metabolic parameters seen in exercising obese subjects, independent of weight loss, suggest other beneficial actions. Growth hormone (GH) has a marked lipolytic action. GH replacement treatment for GH deficient adults with pronounced abdominal fat deposition, has been shown to reduce intra-abdominal fat by 47% compared to 27% decrease in abdominal subcutaneous fat. Similar beneficial actions on abdominal fat have been reported following treatment with testosterone in obese men. The potential hazards of such treatments make them unsuitable therapy for

  16. Pericardial Fat Loss in Postmenopausal Women under Conditions of Equal Energy Deficit

    PubMed Central

    BRINKLEY, TINA E.; DING, JINGZHONG; CARR, J. JEFFREY; NICKLAS, BARBARA J.

    2013-01-01

    Weight loss induced by caloric restriction (CR) or aerobic exercise can reduce pericardial fat, and these reductions may help improve cardiovascular health. Purpose We examined whether combining CR with aerobic exercise enhances pericardial fat loss compared with a CR-only intervention designed to elicit equivalent reductions in body weight. We also examined the relationship between changes in pericardial fat and changes in maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2max), a measure of cardiorespiratory fitness. Methods Thirty-two abdominally obese postmenopausal women (mean age = 58 yr; 78% Caucasian) were randomly assigned to one of three interventions of equal energy deficit (~2800 kcal·wk−1) for 20 wk: CR only (n = 8), CR + moderate-intensity exercise (n = 15), or CR + vigorous-intensity exercise (n = 9). The volume of pericardial fat around the coronary arteries was measured by computed tomography. Results Women in the CR, CR + moderate-intensity, and CR + vigorous-intensity groups had similar baseline characteristics. The mean ± SD value for pericardial fat before weight loss was 79.07 ± 32.90 cm3 (range = 34.04–152.74 cm3), with no difference among groups (P = 0.89). All three interventions significantly reduced body weight (15%), waist circumference (10%), and abdominal visceral fat (28%) to a similar degree. There was also a 17% reduction in pericardial fat (−12.75 ± 6.29 cm3, P < 0.0001), which did not differ among groups (P = 0.84). Changes in pericardial fat were inversely correlated with changes in V̇O2max (r = −0.37, P = 0.05), but not after adjusting for intervention group and change in body weight. Conclusions Weight loss interventions of equal energy deficit have similar effects on pericardial fat in postmenopausal women, regardless of whether the energy deficit is due to CR alone or CR plus aerobic exercise. PMID:20881884

  17. [Low-carbohydrate or low-fat diet for weight loss--which is better?].

    PubMed

    Hauner, H

    2004-10-01

    Several recent clinical studies show that a low-carbohydrate diet produces a greater initial weight loss than conventional low-fat diets, and is associated with a greater reduction of elevated serum triglycerides. After one year, however, weight loss is similar with both diets. Since the intake of saturated fat is higher on a low-carbohydrate diet, there may be an increased risk of elevated levels of LDL cholesterol, thus furthering atherosclerosis, over the long term. Before low-carbohydrate diets can be considered an equivalent alternative to low-fat diets for the treatment of obesity, long-term clinical trials are urgently required. The greater weight loss under low-carbohydrate diets would appear to be due to a lower caloric intake. Successful weight loss largely depends on restricting the intake of calories, but the supply of essential nutrients should be guaranteed. PMID:15532735

  18. An Evidence-Based Review of Fat Modifying Supplemental Weight Loss Products

    PubMed Central

    Egras, Amy M.; Hamilton, William R.; Lenz, Thomas L.; Monaghan, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To review the literature on fat modifying dietary supplements commonly used for weight loss. Methods. Recently published randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified in PubMed, MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar using the search terms dietary supplement, herbal, weight loss, obesity, and individual supplement names. Discussion. Data for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), Garcinia cambogia, chitosan, pyruvate, Irvingia gabonensis, and chia seed for weight loss were identified. CLA, chitosan, pyruvate, and Irvingia gabonensis appeared to be effective in weight loss via fat modifying mechanisms. However, the data on the use of these products is limited. Conclusion. Many obese people use dietary supplements for weight loss. To date, there is little clinical evidence to support their use. More data is necessary to determine the efficacy and safety of these supplements. Healthcare providers should assist patients in weighing the risks and benefits of dietary supplement use for weight loss. PMID:20847896

  19. An evidence-based review of fat modifying supplemental weight loss products.

    PubMed

    Egras, Amy M; Hamilton, William R; Lenz, Thomas L; Monaghan, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To review the literature on fat modifying dietary supplements commonly used for weight loss. Methods. Recently published randomized, placebo-controlled trials were identified in PubMed, MEDLINE, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Cochrane Database, and Google Scholar using the search terms dietary supplement, herbal, weight loss, obesity, and individual supplement names. Discussion. Data for conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), Garcinia cambogia, chitosan, pyruvate, Irvingia gabonensis, and chia seed for weight loss were identified. CLA, chitosan, pyruvate, and Irvingia gabonensis appeared to be effective in weight loss via fat modifying mechanisms. However, the data on the use of these products is limited. Conclusion. Many obese people use dietary supplements for weight loss. To date, there is little clinical evidence to support their use. More data is necessary to determine the efficacy and safety of these supplements. Healthcare providers should assist patients in weighing the risks and benefits of dietary supplement use for weight loss. PMID:20847896

  20. Exercise-induced asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Cummiskey, J

    2001-10-01

    Asthmatic attack in exercise-induced asthma is brought about by hyperventilation (not necessarily to exercise), cold air, and low humidity of the air breathed. The effects are an increase in airway resistance, damage to bronchial mucosa, and an increase in bronchovascular permeability. The mechanism of these changes is the release of mediators such as histamine, leukotrienes, nitric oxide, sensory neuropeptides, the inhibition of neuronal activity, and bronchovascular permeability. The cause of asthma and exercise-induced asthma is unknown. It is probably an abnormality of vascular control in the peribronchium and/or an alteration in local adrenergic function. The importance of exercise-induced asthma definition and the use of stimulants in sport and antidoping in sport are discussed. PMID:11678516

  1. Health effects from exercise versus those from body fat loss

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess whether body weight confounds the relationships between physical activity and its health benefits. Data sources: Eighty reports from population based studies (Category C) of physical activity or fitness and cardiovascular disease (CVD) or coronary heart disease (CHD).Data synthesis: Eleven of 64 reports found no relationship between physical activity and disease. Of the remaining 53 reports, 11 did not address the possible confounding effects of body weight, 9 cited reasons that weight differences should not explain their observed associations, and 32 statistically adjusted for weight (as required). Only 3 of these changed their associations from significant to nonsignificant when adjusted. Ten of 15 reports on cardiorespiratory fitness and CHD or CVD used statistical adjustment, and none of these changed their findings to nonsignificant. Population studies show that vigorously active individuals also have higher high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration, a major risk factor for CHD and CVD, than sedentary individuals when statistically adjusted for weight. In contrast intervention studies, which relate dynamic changes in weight and HDL, suggest that adjustment for weight loss largely eliminates the increase in HDL-cholesterol in sedentary men who begin exercising vigorously. Adjusting the cross-sectional HDL-cholesterol differences for the dynamic effects of weight loss eliminates most of the HDL-cholesterol difference between active and sedentary men. Conclusion: Thus population studies show that the lower incidence of CHD and CVD and higher HDL of fit, active individuals are not due to lean, healthy individuals choosing to be active (i.e., self-selection bias). Nevertheless, metabolic processed associated weight loss may be primarily responsible for the HDL differences between active and sedentary men, and possibly their differences in CHD and CVD.

  2. Reduction of weight loss and tumour size in a cachexia model by a high fat diet.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M. J.; Brennan, R. A.; Fearon, K. C.

    1987-01-01

    An attempt has been made to reverse cachexia and to selectively deprive the tumour of metabolic substrates for energy production by feeding a ketogenic regime, since ketone bodies are considered important in maintaining homeostasis during starvation. As a model we have used a transplantable mouse adenocarcinoma of the colon (MAC 16) which produces extensive weight loss without a reduction in food intake. When mice bearing the MAC16 tumour were fed on diets in which up to 80% of the energy was supplied as medium chain triglycerides (MCT) with or without arginine 3-hydroxybutyrate host weight loss was reduced in proportion to the fat content of the diet, and there was also a reduction in the percentage contribution of the tumour to the final body weight. The increase in carcass weight in tumour-bearing mice fed high levels of MCT was attributable to an increase in both the fat and the non-fat carcass mass. Blood levels of free fatty acids (FFA) were significantly reduced by MCT addition. The levels of both acetoacetate and 3-hydroxybutyrate were elevated in mice fed the high fat diets, and tumour-bearing mice fed the normal diet did not show increased plasma levels of ketone bodies over the non-tumour-bearing group despite the loss of carcass lipids. Both blood glucose and plasma insulin levels were reduced in mice bearing the MAC16 tumour and this was not significantly altered by feeding the high fat diets. The elevation in ketone bodies may account for the retention of both the fat and the non-fat carcass mass. This is the first example of an attempt to reverse cachexia by a diet based on metabolic differences between tumour and host tissues, which aims to selectively feed the host at the expense of the tumour. PMID:3620317

  3. The Fate of Fat: Pre-Exposure Fat Losses during Nasogastric Tube Feeding in Preterm Newborns.

    PubMed

    Rayyan, Maissa; Rommel, Nathalie; Allegaert, Karel

    2015-08-01

    Deficient nutritional support and subsequent postnatal growth failure are major covariates of short- and long-term outcome in preterm neonates. Despite its relevance, extrauterine growth restriction (EUGR) is still prevalent, occurring in an important portion of extremely preterm infants. Lipids provide infants with most of their energy needs, but also cover specific supplies critical to growth, development and health. The use of human milk in preterm neonates results in practices, such as milk storage, pasteurization and administration by an infusion system. All of these pre-exposure manipulations significantly affect the final extent of lipid deposition in the intestinal track available for absorption, but the impact of tube feeding is the most significant. Strategies to shift earlier to oral feeding are available, while adaptations of the infusion systems (inversion, variable flow) have only more recently been shown to be effective in "in vitro", but not yet in "in vivo" settings. Pre-exposure-related issues for drugs and nutritional compounds show similarities. Therefore, we suggest that the available practices for "in vitro" drug evaluations should also be considered in feeding strategies to further reduce pre-exposure losses as a strategy to improve the nutritional status and outcome of preterm neonates. PMID:26230707

  4. [Exercise-induced bronchospasm. Diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Rosas Miguel, A; Pérez, Jaime; Blandón, Virginia; del Rio, Blanca; Sienra Monge, Juan José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospam is a common entity in asthmatic children. Physiopathology involves airway cooling, airway dehydration and influx of inflammatory cells such as histamine or eicosanoids. Diagnosis is done by a suggestive clinical history, besides a VEF1 reversibility of 15% after the use of a beta agonist. Differential diagnosis should be done with similar presentation pathologies. Warming up routines and beta agonist should be used in regular bases as previous treatment in this kind of disease. PMID:15237914

  5. Exercise associated hormonal signals as powerful determinants of an effective fat mass loss.

    PubMed

    Bajer, B; Vlcek, M; Galusova, A; Imrich, R; Penesova, A

    2015-07-01

    Obesity management for achieving an effective weight loss includes dietary modification and exercise [resistance (strength), endurance (cardiovascular) or intervals training (high-intensity intermittent exercise)]. Regular exercise acutely increases fat oxidation, which induces loss of fat mass and increases energy expenditure. Moreover, it has a positive effect on the physical (improved insulin sensitivity, lipid profile, etc.) and mental health (mood, cognition, memory, sleep, etc.). Endocrine responses to muscle actions are affected by many factors, including the exercise muscle groups (lower and upper body), load/volume, time-under tension, and rest-period intervals between sets, training status, gender, and age. The aim of this review is to summarize, evaluate, and clarify the literature data focusing on the endocrine responses to different types of exercise, including the frequency, intensity, and type of movement with regard to the fat loss strategies. Many studies have investigated anabolic [growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), testosterone] and gluco- and appetite- regulatory (insulin, cortisol, ghrelin) hormone responses and adaptations of skeletal muscles to exercise. Muscle tissue is a critical endocrine organ, playing important role in the regulation of several physiological and metabolic events. Moreover, we are also describing the response of some other substances to exercise, such as myokines [irisin, apelin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), myostatin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21)]. It is proposed that reducing intra-abdominal fat mass and increasing cardiorespiratory fitness through improving nutritional quality, reducing sedentary behavior, and increase the participation in physical activity/exercise, might be associated with clinical benefits, sometimes even in the absence of weight loss. PMID:26238498

  6. Strategies to increase vegetable or reduce energy and fat intake induce weight loss in adults.

    PubMed

    Tanumihardjo, Sherry A; Valentine, Ashley R; Zhang, Zhumin; Whigham, Leah D; Lai, HuiChuan J; Atkinson, Richard L

    2009-05-01

    For obese individuals seeking to optimize health and well-being, healthy dietary strategies are important. Vegetables and fruits contribute to a healthy diet, and increased consumption may cause weight reduction by displacing foods high in energy and fat. The objective of this study was to determine if advising high vegetable (8 servings) and moderate fruit (2-3 servings) consumption would result in weight reduction in obese individuals. We compared this to advising a more traditional strategy of reducing daily energy intake by 500 kcal (2.1 MJ)/d and limiting energy from fat to fat reduction diet resulted in lower weight over time (P<0.0001, treatment effect). Total cholesterol and cholesterol:HDL decreased after 3 mo in both groups (Ploss at 3 mo, but only the group following the caloric and fat reduction advice maintained weight loss at the 12- and 18-mo follow-up assessments. Nonetheless, the group following the high vegetable advice did not regain weight above baseline. In conclusion, traditional messages to reduce calories and fat are important, and increasing vegetable intake can assist individuals to maintain weight. PMID:19234056

  7. Increased vegetable and fruit consumption during weight loss effort correlates with increased weight and fat loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recommendations to increase vegetable and fruit consumption often accompany guidelines for weight loss. A previous study indicated that people who were instructed to count calories lost more weight than those simply instructed to increase vegetable and fruit intake. The objective was to determine if...

  8. Vegetable and fruit consumption during weight loss is positively correlated with weight and fat loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Recommendations to increase vegetable and fruit consumption often accompany guidelines for weight loss. A previous study indicated that people who were instructed to count calories lost more weight than those simply instructed to increase vegetable and fruit intake. Objective: The object...

  9. Imitators of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is described by transient narrowing of the airways after exercise. It occurs in approximately 10% of the general population, while athletes may show a higher prevalence, especially in cold weather and ice rink athletes. Diagnosis of EIB is often made on the basis of self-reported symptoms without objective lung function tests, however, the presence of EIB can not be accurately determined on the basis of symptoms and may be under-, over-, or misdiagnosed. The goal of this review is to describe other clinical entities that mimic asthma or EIB symptoms and can be confused with EIB. PMID:20016690

  10. Update on exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Stacey; Hinchcliff, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) is an important disease of horses that perform high-intensity athletic activity. EIPH is an ongoing concern for the racing industry because of its high prevalence; potential impact on performance; welfare concerns; and use of prophylactic medications, such as furosemide, on race day. During the last 10 years, significant progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis and risk factors for EIPH and the impact of the disease on performance and career. This article summarizes the most recent advances in EIPH. PMID:25770069

  11. Exercise-induced airways constriction 1

    PubMed Central

    Simonsson, Bo G.; Skoogh, B-E.; Ekström-Jodal, B.

    1972-01-01

    Airway conductance was measured in a body plethysmograph at different lung volumes before and after graded exercise. In 14 out of 19 patients, mostly asthmatics, airway conductance fell significantly after exercise. These subjects also showed other signs of an increased bronchial reactivity to different stimuli, including forced breathing, hyperventilation, and cold air, but they had no exogenous allergy. The exercise-induced bronchoconstriction could be blocked by atropine in six of the nine patients tested. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with clinical and physiological evidence of increased airway reactivity thus seems to be primarily mediated via a vagal reflex, probably from hyperresponsive airway mechanoreceptors reacting to increased ventilatory flow or lung distension. No relation was found between PaCO2 or pH and the severity of airways constriction. Cromoglycic acid failed to block the exercise reaction in five of the six hyperreactive patients tested. In addition to or following the vagal reflex a disturbed relation between beta and alpha receptors in bronchial muscles or a release of humoral spasmogens may contribute to the progression of post-exercise airways constriction. PMID:4624586

  12. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis: A clinical view

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) is a distinct form of physical allergy. The development of anaphylaxis during exertion often requires the concomitant exposure to triggering factors such as intake of foods (food dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis) or drugs prior to exercise, extreme environmental conditions. EIA is a rare, but serious disorder, which is often undetected or inadequately treated. This article summarizes current evidences on pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. We reviewed recent advances in factors triggering the release of mediators from mast cells which seems to play a pathogenetic role. A correct diagnosis is essential to avoid unnecessary restricted diet, to allow physical activity in subjects with EIA dependent from triggering factors such as food, and to manage attacks. An algorithm for diagnosing EIA based on medical history, IgE tests and exercise challenge test has been provided. In the long-term management of EIA, there is a need for educating patients and care-givers to avoid exposure to precipitating factors and to recognize and treat episodes. Future researches on existing questions are discussed. PMID:22980517

  13. Switch from Stress Response to Homeobox Transcription Factors in Adipose Tissue After Profound Fat Loss

    PubMed Central

    Stavrum, Anne-Kristin; Stansberg, Christine; Holdhus, Rita; Hoang, Tuyen; Veum, Vivian L.; Christensen, Bjørn Jostein; Våge, Villy; Sagen, Jørn V.; Steen, Vidar M.; Mellgren, Gunnar

    2010-01-01

    Background In obesity, impaired adipose tissue function may promote secondary disease through ectopic lipid accumulation and excess release of adipokines, resulting in systemic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and organ dysfunction. However, several of the genes regulating adipose tissue function in obesity are yet to be identified. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to identify novel candidate genes that may regulate adipose tissue function, we analyzed global gene expression in abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue before and one year after bariatric surgery (biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch, BPD/DS) (n = 16). Adipose tissue from lean healthy individuals was also analyzed (n = 13). Two different microarray platforms (AB 1700 and Illumina) were used to measure the differential gene expression, and the results were further validated by qPCR. Surgery reduced BMI from 53.3 to 33.1 kg/m2. The majority of differentially expressed genes were down-regulated after profound fat loss, including transcription factors involved in stress response, inflammation, and immune cell function (e.g., FOS, JUN, ETS, C/EBPB, C/EBPD). Interestingly, a distinct set of genes was up-regulated after fat loss, including homeobox transcription factors (IRX3, IRX5, HOXA5, HOXA9, HOXB5, HOXC6, EMX2, PRRX1) and extracellular matrix structural proteins (COL1A1, COL1A2, COL3A1, COL5A1, COL6A3). Conclusions/Significance The data demonstrate a marked switch of transcription factors in adipose tissue after profound fat loss, providing new molecular insight into a dichotomy between stress response and metabolically favorable tissue development. Our findings implicate homeobox transcription factors as important regulators of adipose tissue function. PMID:20543949

  14. Changes in Skeletal Integrity and Marrow Adiposity during High-Fat Diet and after Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Scheller, Erica L; Khoury, Basma; Moller, Kayla L; Wee, Natalie K Y; Khandaker, Shaima; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Abrishami, Simin H; Zamarron, Brian F; Singer, Kanakadurga

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has continued to rise over the past three decades leading to significant increases in obesity-related medical care costs from metabolic and non-metabolic sequelae. It is now clear that expansion of body fat leads to an increase in inflammation with systemic effects on metabolism. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity, there is also an expansion of bone marrow adipocytes. However, the persistence of these changes after weight loss has not been well described. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of high-fat diet (HFD) and subsequent weight loss on skeletal parameters in C57Bl6/J mice. Male mice were given a normal chow diet (ND) or 60% HFD at 6 weeks of age for 12, 16, or 20 weeks. A third group of mice was put on HFD for 12 weeks and then on ND for 8 weeks to mimic weight loss. After these dietary challenges, the tibia and femur were removed and analyzed by micro computed-tomography for bone morphology. Decalcification followed by osmium staining was used to assess bone marrow adiposity, and mechanical testing was performed to assess bone strength. After 12, 16, or 20 weeks of HFD, mice had significant weight gain relative to controls. Body mass returned to normal after weight loss. Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) volume in the tibia increased after 16 weeks of HFD and persisted in the 20-week HFD group. Weight loss prevented HFD-induced MAT expansion. Trabecular bone volume fraction, mineral content, and number were decreased after 12, 16, or 20 weeks of HFD, relative to ND controls, with only partial recovery after weight loss. Mechanical testing demonstrated decreased fracture resistance after 20 weeks of HFD. Loss of mechanical integrity did not recover after weight loss. Our study demonstrates that HFD causes long-term, persistent changes in bone quality, despite prevention of marrow adipose tissue accumulation, as demonstrated through changes in bone morphology and mechanical strength in a mouse

  15. Changes in Skeletal Integrity and Marrow Adiposity during High-Fat Diet and after Weight Loss

    PubMed Central

    Scheller, Erica L.; Khoury, Basma; Moller, Kayla L.; Wee, Natalie K. Y.; Khandaker, Shaima; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Abrishami, Simin H.; Zamarron, Brian F.; Singer, Kanakadurga

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has continued to rise over the past three decades leading to significant increases in obesity-related medical care costs from metabolic and non-metabolic sequelae. It is now clear that expansion of body fat leads to an increase in inflammation with systemic effects on metabolism. In mouse models of diet-induced obesity, there is also an expansion of bone marrow adipocytes. However, the persistence of these changes after weight loss has not been well described. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of high-fat diet (HFD) and subsequent weight loss on skeletal parameters in C57Bl6/J mice. Male mice were given a normal chow diet (ND) or 60% HFD at 6 weeks of age for 12, 16, or 20 weeks. A third group of mice was put on HFD for 12 weeks and then on ND for 8 weeks to mimic weight loss. After these dietary challenges, the tibia and femur were removed and analyzed by micro computed-tomography for bone morphology. Decalcification followed by osmium staining was used to assess bone marrow adiposity, and mechanical testing was performed to assess bone strength. After 12, 16, or 20 weeks of HFD, mice had significant weight gain relative to controls. Body mass returned to normal after weight loss. Marrow adipose tissue (MAT) volume in the tibia increased after 16 weeks of HFD and persisted in the 20-week HFD group. Weight loss prevented HFD-induced MAT expansion. Trabecular bone volume fraction, mineral content, and number were decreased after 12, 16, or 20 weeks of HFD, relative to ND controls, with only partial recovery after weight loss. Mechanical testing demonstrated decreased fracture resistance after 20 weeks of HFD. Loss of mechanical integrity did not recover after weight loss. Our study demonstrates that HFD causes long-term, persistent changes in bone quality, despite prevention of marrow adipose tissue accumulation, as demonstrated through changes in bone morphology and mechanical strength in a mouse

  16. Quantification of Abdominal Fat Depots in Rats and Mice during Obesity and Weight Loss Interventions

    PubMed Central

    KN, Bhanu Prakash; Gopalan, Venkatesh; Lee, Swee Shean; Velan, S. Sendhil

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims Obesity is a leading healthcare issue contributing to metabolic diseases. There is a great interest in non-invasive approaches for quantitating abdominal fat in obese animals and humans. In this work, we propose an automated method to distinguish and quantify subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues (SAT and VAT) in rodents during obesity and weight loss interventions. We have also investigated the influence of different magnetic resonance sequences and sources of variability in quantification of fat depots. Materials and Methods High-fat diet fed rodents were utilized for investigating the changes during obesity, exercise, and calorie restriction interventions (N = 7/cohort). Imaging was performed on a 7T Bruker ClinScan scanner using fast spin echo (FSE) and Dixon imaging methods to estimate the fat depots. Finally, we quantified the SAT and VAT volumes between the L1–L5 lumbar vertebrae using the proposed automatic hybrid geodesic region-based curve evolution algorithm. Results Significant changes in SAT and VAT volumes (p<0.01) were observed between the pre- and post-intervention measurements. The SAT and VAT were 44.22±9%, 21.06±1.35% for control, −17.33±3.07%, −15.09±1.11% for exercise, and 18.56±2.05%, −3.9±0.96% for calorie restriction cohorts, respectively. The fat quantification correlation between FSE (with and without water suppression) sequences and Dixon for SAT and VAT were 0.9709, 0.9803 and 0.9955, 0.9840 respectively. The algorithm significantly reduced the computation time from 100 sec/slice to 25 sec/slice. The pre-processing, data-derived contour placement and avoidance of strong background–image boundary improved the convergence accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions We developed a fully automatic segmentation algorithm to quantitate SAT and VAT from abdominal images of rodents, which can support large cohort studies. We additionally identified the influence of non-algorithmic variables including

  17. Influence of artistic gymnastics on iron nutritional status and exercise-induced hemolysis in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Sureira, Thaiz Mattos; Amancio, Olga Silverio; Pellegrini Braga, Josefina Aparecida

    2012-08-01

    This study evaluates the relationship between body iron losses and gains in artistic gymnastics female athletes. It shows that despite the low iron intake and exercise-induced hemolysis, iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia does not occur, but partial changes in the hematological profile do. The hypothesis that gymnasts' nutritional behavior contributes to anemia, which may be aggravated by exercise-induced hemolysis, led to this cross-sectional study, conducted with 43 female artistic gymnasts 6-16 yr old. The control group was formed by 40 nontraining girls, paired by age. Hemogram, serum iron, ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor, haptoglobin, total and fractional bilirubin, Type I urine, and parasitologic and occult fecal blood tests were evaluated. The athletes presented mean hematimetric and serum iron values (p = .020) higher than those of the control group. The bilirubin result discarded any hemolytic alteration in both groups. The haptoglobin results were lower in the athlete group (p = .002), confirming the incidence of exercise-induced hemolysis. Both groups presented low iron intake. The results suggest that artistic gymnastics practice leads to exercise-induced hemolysis and partially changes the hematological profile, although not causing iron deficiency or iron-deficiency anemia, even in the presence of low iron intake. PMID:22645172

  18. Ghrelin Suppression and Fat Loss after Left Gastric Artery Embolization in Canine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bawudun, Dilmurat; Xing Yan; Liu Wenya Huang Yujie; Ren Weixin; Ma Mei; Xu Xiaodong; Teng Gaojun

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects of left gastric artery embolization (LGAE) on plasma ghrelin levels, abdominal fat, and body weight in beagles. Methods: The institutional animal care and use committee approved this study. Fifteen healthy adult beagles (12 male and three female animals) were randomly divided into three experimental groups: LGAE was proceeded with mixed emulsion of bleomycin A{sub 5} hydrochloride and lipiodol (group A), and polyvinyl alcohol particles (group B). Transcatheter saline injections in the left gastric artery were performed as a control. Weight and fasting plasma ghrelin levels were obtained at baseline and at weekly intervals for 8 weeks after the procedure in all animals. All animals were scanned and measured by multidetector computed tomography at baseline and at week 8 for evaluation of abdominal fat. Results: In LGAE-treated animals, plasma ghrelin and body weight significantly decreased compared to control animals (group A: P = 0.007 and P = 0.000; group B: P = 0.004 and P = 0.000, respectively). Subcutaneous fat size was also significantly reduced (P = 0.011 and P = 0.027 for groups A and B, respectively). The decreasing percentage in ghrelin levels at week 6 (peak of recovery) of LGAE-treated animals were negatively correlated with the size of area supplied by left gastric artery (r = -0.693, P = 0.026). Conclusion: LGAE could suppress the plasma concentration of ghrelin, which results in subcutaneous fat size reduction and weight loss. Compensatory ghrelin production might occur in the remnant gastric fundus after LGAE.

  19. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis and antileukotriene montelukast.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Sapna; Agrawal, Rajendra Prasad; Atal, Shubham; Tiwari, Vikalp; Phadnis, Pradeep

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA), occurring exclusively with exercise, without any other associated trigger, detected in the prodromal phase, and prevented from additional anaphylaxis episodes by treatment with cetirizine and 10 mg daily of antileukotriene montelukast to date. EIA is a syndrome in which patients experience a spectrum of the symptoms of anaphylaxis ranging from mild cutaneous signs to severe systemic manifestations such as hypotension, syncope, and even death after increased physical activity. Many people have triggers, such as, a variety of foods, various medications, alcohol, cold weather, humidity, and seasonal and hormonal changes along with exercise that cause the symptoms. Typically, either exercise or the specific trigger alone will rarely cause symptoms. It is differentiated from cholinergic urticaria by the absence of response to passive body warming and emotional stress. PMID:26312002

  20. Interleukin-6 gene knockout antagonizes high-fat-induced trabecular bone loss.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunyu; Tian, Li; Zhang, Kun; Chen, Yaxi; Chen, Xiang; Xie, Ying; Zhao, Qian; Yu, Xijie

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the roles of interleukin-6 (IL6) in fat and bone communication. Male wild-type (WT) mice and IL6 knockout (IL6(-/-)) mice were fed with either regular diet (RD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 12 weeks. Bone mass and bone microstructure were evaluated by micro-computed tomography. Gene expression related to lipid and bone metabolisms was assayed with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Bone marrow cells from both genotypes were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts or osteoclasts, and treated with palmitic acid (PA). HFD increased the body weight and fat pad weight, and impaired lipid metabolism in both WT and IL6(-/-) mice. The dysregulation of lipid metabolism was more serious in IL6(-/-) mice. Trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular bone number and trabecular bone thickness were significantly downregulated in WT mice after HFD than those in the RD (P < 0.05). However, these bone microstructural parameters were increased by 53%, 34% and 40%, respectively, in IL6(-/-) mice than those in WT mice on the HFD (P < 0.05). IL6(-/-) osteoblasts displayed higher alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher mRNA levels of Runx2 and Colla1 than those in WT osteoblasts both in the control and PA treatment group (P < 0.05). IL6(-/-) mice showed significantly lower mRNA levels of PPARγ and leptin and higher mRNA levels of adiponectin in comparison with WT mice on HFD. In conclusion, these findings suggested that IL6 gene deficiency antagonized HFD-induced bone loss. IL6 might bridge lipid and bone metabolisms and could be a new potential therapeutic target for lipid metabolism disturbance-related bone loss. PMID:27493246

  1. FGF21, energy expenditure and weight loss – How much brown fat do you need?

    PubMed Central

    Straub, Leon; Wolfrum, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) belongs to the large family of fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). Even though FGF signaling has been mainly implicated in developmental processes, recent studies have demonstrated that FGF21 is an important regulator of whole body energy expenditure and metabolism, in obesity. Scope of review Given the fact that obesity has developed epidemic proportions, not just in industrialized countries, FGF21 has emerged as a novel therapeutic avenue to treat obesity as well as associated metabolic disorders. While the metabolic effects of FGF21 are undisputed, the mechanisms by which FGF21 regulate weight loss have not yet been fully resolved. Until recently it was believed that FGF21 induces brown fat activity, thereby enhancing energy expenditure, which concomitantly leads to weight loss. Novel studies have challenged this concept as they could demonstrate that a part of the FGF21 mediated effects are retained in a mouse model of impaired brown adipose tissue function. Major conclusions The review illustrates the recent advances in FGF21 research and discusses the role of FGF21 in the regulation of energy expenditure linked to brown fat activity. PMID:26413466

  2. Associations between Obesity, Body Fat Distribution, Weight Loss and Weight Cycling on Serum Pesticide Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Frugé, Andrew Dandridge; Cases, Mallory Gamel; Schildkraut, Joellen Martha; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Objective Preliminary studies suggest pesticides may be linked to increased cancer risk. Since most pesticides are lipophilic and stored within adipose tissue, serum levels of organochlorines are affected not only by environmental exposures, but also by factors related to lipid turnover and storage. Our objective was to investigate whether serum organochlorines are influenced by weight loss, body fat distribution, and weight cycling. Methods Ten overweight women were recruited upon entry into a weight loss program and surveyed regarding weight history, childbearing/lactation, and exposure to environmental contaminants. Anthropometric measures and phlebotomy were conducted at baseline and at four weeks (mean weight loss=5.1 kg). Serum was analyzed for 19 common polychlorinated pesticides and metabolites and 10 PCB congeners. Results Organochlorine levels were not significantly affected by weight loss nor associated with body mass index (BMI). Strong positive correlations were noted between levels of DDE/DDT and age (DDE β=0.6986/p=0.0246/DDT β=0.6536/p=0.0404) and between DDE/DDT and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) (DDE β=0.4356/p=0.0447/DDT β=0.8108/p=0.0044). Trends were noted for decreased levels of DDT in women who reported more episodes of weight cycling. Conclusion Serum organochlorine levels may be affected not only by age, but also factors related to lipid turnover (i.e., episodes of weight cycling and WHR), and warrants further study. PMID:27478857

  3. Exercise-induced bronchospasm - pathophysiology and treatment.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1981-09-01

    The practical importance, prevalence, typical features, physiopathology and therapy of exercise-induced bronchospasm (E.I.B.) are briefly reviewed. The condition is common, especially in children. Prevalence is influenced by the mode, intensity and duration of exercise, the age and possibly the sex of the subjects, the number of test repetitions, and the criterion for presence of spasm. The main site of obstruction is in the large airways. Symptoms appear a few minutes post-effort, peaking 10-15 minutes after exercise. At different times, spasm may arise in the vagal reflex arc, from alterations of sympathetic balance, prostaglandin release, and sensitization of the mast cell. Until recently, the main basis of prophylaxis has been inhalation of sodium cromoglycate (20 mg, 60 minutes prior to competition). Beta agonists have until recently been prohibited in international competitions. However, the use of selective beta agonists such as salbutamol and terbutaline was allowed in the 1978 World Swimming Championship and the 1980 World Cross-Country Championship with a supporting medical letter. The Medical Commission of the International Olympic Committee has also moved recently to sanction the use of salbutamol and terbutaline. Future prophylaxis will thus be based on combinations of selective beta agonists and sodium cromoglycate. PMID:6794921

  4. Telocytes in exercise-induced cardiac growth.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Junjie; Chen, Ping; Qu, Yi; Yu, Pujiao; Yao, Jianhua; Wang, Hongbao; Fu, Siyi; Bei, Yihua; Chen, Yan; Che, Lin; Xu, Jiahong

    2016-05-01

    Exercise can induce physiological cardiac growth, which is featured by enlarged cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes. Telocytes (TCs) are a recently identified distinct interstitial cell type, existing in many tissues and organs including heart. TCs have been shown to form a tandem with cardiac stem/progenitor cells in cardiac stem cell niches, participating in cardiac regeneration and repair. Although exercise-induced cardiac growth has been confirmed as an important way to promote cardiac regeneration and repair, the response of cardiac TCs to exercise is still unclear. In this study, 4 weeks of swimming training was used to induce robust healthy cardiac growth. Exercise can induce an increase in cardiomyocyte cell size and formation of new cardiomyocytes as determined by Wheat Germ Lectin and EdU staining respectively. TCs were identified by three immunofluorescence stainings including double labelling for CD34/vimentin, CD34/platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor-α and CD34/PDGF receptor-β. We found that cardiac TCs were significantly increased in exercised heart, suggesting that TCs might help control the activity of cardiac stem/progenitor cells, cardiomyocytes or endothelial cells. Adding cardiac TCs might help promote cardiac regeneration and renewal. PMID:26987685

  5. Mechanisms of Exercise-Induced Hypoalgesia

    PubMed Central

    Koltyn, Kelli F.; Brellenthin, Angelique G.; Cook, Dane B.; Sehgal, Nalini; Hillard, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine opioid and endocannabinoid mechanisms of exercise-induced hypoalgesia (EIH). Fifty-eight men and women (mean age = 21 yrs) completed three sessions. During the first session, participants were familiarized with the temporal summation of heat pain and pressure pain protocols. In the exercise sessions, following double-blind administration of either an opioid antagonist (50 mg naltrexone) or placebo, participants rated the intensity of heat pulses and indicated their pressure pain thresholds (PPT) and ratings (PPR) before and after 3 minutes of submaximal isometric exercise. Blood was drawn before and after exercise. Results indicated circulating concentrations of two endocannabinoids, N-arachidonylethanolamine (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) as well as related lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoylethanolamide (PEA), N-docsahexaenoylethanolamine (DHEA), and 2-oleoylglycerol (2-OG) increased significantly (p < 0.05) following exercise. PPT increased significantly (p < 0.05) while PPR decreased significantly (p < 0.05) following exercise. Also, temporal summation ratings were significantly lower (p < 0.05) following exercise. These changes in pain responses did not differ between placebo or naltrexone conditions (p > 0.05). A significant association was found between EIH and DHEA. These results suggest involvement of a non-opioid mechanism in EIH following isometric exercise. PMID:25261342

  6. [Cereal-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis].

    PubMed

    Seoane-Rodríguez, Marta; Caralli, María Elisa; Morales-Cabeza, Cristina; Micozzi, Sarah; De Barrio-Fernández, Manuel; Rojas Pérez-Ezquerra, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) is increasing. In vitro test such as omega-5-gliadin levels are useful in the diagnosis, while oral single blind challenge tests (OCT) with wheat plus exercise continuous being the gold standard diagnostic method. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old woman, with several episodes of anaphylaxis after eating different foods and doing exercise after ingestion. An allergy study was performed with positive skin prick tests for wheat, barley and rye. Total IgE 238.0KU/L, positive specific IgE (>100KU/L) to wheat, barley and rye, and negative to rTri-a-19 omega-5 gliadin. OCT with bread and exercise was positive. In this case of wheat-dependent exerciseinduced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) with negative serum specific IgE to omega-5-gliadin, negative results with gamma, alpha, bheta y omega-gliadin doesn't exclude the diagnosis of WDEIA. PMID:26943835

  7. Level of dietary protein does not impact whole body protein turnover during an exercise induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of a high protein diet on whole body protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. A sustained energy deficit induced by energy intake restriction increases protein catabolism which can cause lean-body mass loss. A high-protein diet has be...

  8. Keeping children with exercise-induced asthma active.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, H; Taussig, L M

    1999-09-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and exercise-induced asthma (EIA) are all terms used to describe the phenomenon of transient airflow obstruction associated with physical exertion. It is a prominent finding in children and young adults because of their greater participation in vigorous activities. The symptoms shortness of breath, cough, chest tightness, and wheezing normally follow the brief period of bronchodilation present early in the course of exercise. Bronchospasm typically arises within 10 to 15 minutes of beginning exercise, peaks 8 to 15 minutes after the exertion is concluded, and resolves about 60 minutes later, but it also may appear during sustained exertion. EIA occurs in up to 90% of asthmatics and 40% of patients with allergic rhinitis; among athletes and in the general population its prevalence is between 6% and 13%. EIA frequently goes undiagnosed. Approximately 9% of individuals with EIA have no history of asthma or allergy. Fifty percent of children with asthma who gave a negative history for EIA had a positive response to exercise challenge.6 Among high school athletes, 12% of subjects not considered to be at risk by history or baseline spirometry tested positive. Before the 1984 Olympic games, of 597 members of the US team, 67 (11%) were found to have EIA. Remarkably, only 26 had been previously identified, emphasizing the importance of screening for EIA even in well-conditioned individuals who appear to be in excellent health. The severity of bronchospasm in EIA is related to the level of ventilation, to heat and water loss from the respiratory tree, and also to the rate of airway rewarming and rehydration after the challenge. Postexercise decrease in the peak expiratory flow rate of normal children may be as much as 15%; therefore, only a decrease in excess of 15% should be viewed as diagnostic. EIA is usually provoked by a workload sufficient to produce 80% of maximum oxygen consumption; however, in

  9. Fat-soluble vitamin status in response to non-surgical weight loss in overweight post-menopausal women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of fat soluble vitamin (FSV) deficiencies. The effect of dietary weight loss on FSV status is uncertain. We measured plasma concentrations of carotenoids, alpha-tocopherol, retinol, phylloquinone, and 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in 112 overweight post-...

  10. The 5-HT3 receptor is essential for exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Kondo, M; Nakamura, Y; Ishida, Y; Shimada, S

    2015-11-01

    Exercise has a variety of beneficial effects on brain structure and function, such as hippocampal neurogenesis, mood and memory. Previous studies have shown that exercise enhances hippocampal neurogenesis, induces antidepressant effects and improves learning behavior. Brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) levels increase following exercise, and the 5-HT system has been suggested to have an important role in these exercise-induced neuronal effects. However, the precise mechanism remains unclear. In this study, analysis of the 5-HT type 3A receptor subunit-deficient (htr3a(-/-)) mice revealed that lack of the 5-HT type 3 (5-HT3) receptor resulted in loss of exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects, but not of learning enhancement. Furthermore, stimulation of the 5-HT3 receptor promoted neurogenesis. These findings demonstrate that the 5-HT3 receptor is the critical target of 5-HT action in the brain following exercise, and is indispensable for hippocampal neurogenesis and antidepressant effects induced by exercise. This is the first report of a pivotal 5-HT receptor subtype that has a fundamental role in exercise-induced morphological changes and psychological effects. PMID:25403840

  11. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in Tunisian elite athletes is underdiagnosed

    PubMed Central

    Sallaoui, Ridha; Zendah², Ines; Ghedira², Habib; Belhaouz³, Mohcine; Ghrairi³, Mourad; Amri³, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have shown an increased risk of developing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among the athletic population, particularly at the elite level. Subjective methods for assessing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction such as surveys and questionnaires have been used but have resulted in an underestimation of the prevalence of airway dysfunction when compared with objective measurements. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among Tunisian elite athletes obtained using an objective method with that using a subjective method, and to discuss the possible causes and implications of the observed discrepancy. As the objective method we used spirometry before and after exercise and for the subjective approach we used a medical history questionnaire. All of the recruited 107 elite athletes responded to the questionnaire about respiratory symptoms and medical history and underwent a resting spirometry testing before and after exercise. Post-exercise spirometry revealed the presence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in 14 (13%) of the elite athletes, while only 1.8% reported having previously been diagnosed with asthma. In conclusion, our findings indicate that medical history-based diagnoses of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction lead to underestimations of true sufferers. PMID:24198569

  12. Circulating androgens in women: exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Enea, Carina; Boisseau, Nathalie; Fargeas-Gluck, Marie Agnès; Diaz, Véronique; Dugué, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    Physical exercise is known to strongly stimulate the endocrine system in both sexes. Among these hormones, androgens (e.g. testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone) play key roles in the reproductive system, muscle growth and the prevention of bone loss. In female athletes, excessive physical exercise may lead to disorders, including delay in the onset of puberty, amenorrhoea and premature osteoporosis. The free and total fractions of circulating androgens vary in response to acute and chronic exercise/training (depending on the type), but the physiological role of these changes is not completely understood. Although it is commonly accepted that only the free fraction of steroids has a biological action, this hypothesis has recently been challenged. Indeed, a change in the total fraction of androgen concentration may have a significant impact on cells (inducing genomic or non-genomic signalling). The purpose of this review, therefore, is to visit the exercise-induced changes in androgen concentrations and emphasize their potential effects on female physiology. Despite some discrepancies in the published studies (generally due to differences in the types and intensities of the exercises studied, in the hormonal status of the group of women investigated and in the methods for androgen determination), exercise is globally able to induce an increase in circulating androgens. This can be observed after both resistance and endurance acute exercises. For chronic exercise/training, the picture is definitely less clear and there are even circumstances where exercise leads to a decrease of circulating androgens. We suggest that those changes have significant impact on female physiology and physical performance. PMID:21142281

  13. A whey-protein supplement increases fat loss and spares lean muscle in obese subjects: a randomized human clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Frestedt, Joy L; Zenk, John L; Kuskowski, Michael A; Ward, Loren S; Bastian, Eric D

    2008-01-01

    Background This study evaluated a specialized whey fraction (Prolibra™, high in leucine, bioactive peptides and milk calcium) for use as a dietary supplement to enhance weight loss. Methods This was a randomized, double-blind, parallel-arm, 12-week study. Caloric intake was reduced 500 calories per day. Subjects consumed Prolibra or an isocaloric ready-to-mix beverage 20 minutes before breakfast and 20 minutes before dinner. Body fat and lean muscle tissue were measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Body weight and anthropometric measurements were recorded every 4 weeks. Blood samples were taken at the beginning and end of the study. Statistical analyses were performed on all subjects that completed (completer analysis) and all subjects that lost at least 2.25 kg of body weight (responder analysis). Within group significance was determined at P < 0.05 using a two-tailed paired t-test and between group significance was determined using one way analysis of covariance with baseline data as a covariate. Results Both groups lost a significant amount of weight and the Prolibra group tended to lose more weight than the control group; however the amount of weight loss was not significantly different between groups after 12 weeks. Prolibra subjects lost significantly more body fat compared to control subjects for both the completer (2.81 vs. 1.62 kg P = 0.03) and responder (3.63 vs. 2.11 kg, P = 0.01) groups. Prolibra subjects lost significantly less lean muscle mass in the responder group (1.07 vs. 2.41 kg, P = 0.02). The ratio of fat to lean loss (kg fat lost/kg lean lost) was much larger for Prolibra subjects for both completer (3.75 vs. 1.05) and responder (3.39 vs. 0.88) groups. Conclusion Subjects in both the control and treatment group lost a significant amount of weight with a 500 calorie reduced diet. Subjects taking Prolibra lost significantly more body fat and showed a greater preservation of lean muscle compared to subjects consuming the control

  14. Coping with Exercise-Induced Asthma in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Roger M.

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the history of research on exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and the pathophysiology of the condition, including its development and influencing factors. Four groups of drugs that are effective against EIA--theopyhlline, beta-adrenergic agents, cromolyn sodium, and anticholinergics--are discussed. (Author/CB)

  15. Exercise-induced asthma. What family physicians should do.

    PubMed Central

    D'Urzo, A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma is described as a transitory increase in airway resistance during or after vigorous exercise. Nearly 90% of patients with chronic asthma and 40% of allergic nonasthmatic patients have the condition. Family physicians should try to educate patients about their asthma and, barring contraindications, encourage them to participate in regular physical activity. PMID:8563507

  16. EXERCISE-INDUCED PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE AFTER RUNNING A MARATHON

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report on a healthy 26-year-old male who had an exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage (EIPH) within 24 hours of running a marathon. There were no symptoms, abnormalities on exam, or radiographic infiltrates. He routinely participated in bronchoscopy research and the EIPH was e...

  17. Sleeve Gastrectomy Induces Loss of Weight and Fat Mass in Obese Rats, but Does Not Affect Leptin Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Stefater, Margaret A; Pérez-Tilve, Diego; Chambers, Adam P; Wilson-Pérez, Hilary E; Sandoval, Darleen A; Berger, José; Toure, Mouhamadoul; Tschöep, Matthias; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Surgical intervention produces sustainable weight loss and metabolic improvement in obese individuals. Vertical sleeve gastrectomy (VSG) produces dramatic, sustained weight loss; we investigated whether these changes result from improved sensitivity to leptin. Methods VSG was performed in Long-Evans rats with diet-induced obesity. Naïve or sham-operated rats, fed either ad libitum or pair-fed with the VSG group, were used as controls. Following surgery, body weights and food intake were monitored. We investigated energy expenditure, meal patterns, leptin sensitivity, and expression of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus of the rats. Results We observed sustained losses in weight and body fat in male and female rats after VSG. Weight loss persisted after the disappearance of a transient, post-surgical food intake reduction. Resting energy expenditure was similar between control and VSG rats. VSG rats maintained their reduced body weights. However, they responded to a chronic food restriction challenge by overeating, which resulted in pre-restriction, rather than pre-VSG, body weights. Consistent with lower adiposity, VSG decreased plasma leptin levels. Although VSG slightly improved leptin’s anorectic action, the response was comparable to that observed in controls matched for adiposity by caloric restriction. Changes in hypothalamic neuropeptide expression were consistent with the lower body weight and lower leptin levels but cannot account for the sustained weight loss. Conclusions VSG causes sustained reduction in body weight, which results from loss of fat mass. The maintenance of weight loss observed did not result from changes in sensitivity to leptin. PMID:20226189

  18. DXA, bioelectrical impedance, ultrasonography and biometry for the estimation of fat and lean mass in cats during weight loss

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Few equations have been developed in veterinary medicine compared to human medicine to predict body composition. The present study was done to evaluate the influence of weight loss on biometry (BIO), bioimpedance analysis (BIA) and ultrasonography (US) in cats, proposing equations to estimate fat (FM) and lean (LM) body mass, as compared to dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) as the referenced method. For this were used 16 gonadectomized obese cats (8 males and 8 females) in a weight loss program. DXA, BIO, BIA and US were performed in the obese state (T0; obese animals), after 10% of weight loss (T1) and after 20% of weight loss (T2). Stepwise regression was used to analyze the relationship between the dependent variables (FM, LM) determined by DXA and the independent variables obtained by BIO, BIA and US. The better models chosen were evaluated by a simple regression analysis and means predicted vs. determined by DXA were compared to verify the accuracy of the equations. Results The independent variables determined by BIO, BIA and US that best correlated (p < 0.005) with the dependent variables (FM and LM) were BW (body weight), TC (thoracic circumference), PC (pelvic circumference), R (resistance) and SFLT (subcutaneous fat layer thickness). Using Mallows’Cp statistics, p value and r2, 19 equations were selected (12 for FM, 7 for LM); however, only 7 equations accurately predicted FM and one LM of cats. Conclusions The equations with two variables are better to use because they are effective and will be an alternative method to estimate body composition in the clinical routine. For estimated lean mass the equations using body weight associated with biometrics measures can be proposed. For estimated fat mass the equations using body weight associated with bioimpedance analysis can be proposed. PMID:22781317

  19. Acute Calcium Ingestion Attenuates Exercise-induced Disruption of Calcium Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Daniel W; Hansen, Kent C; Van Pelt, Rachael E; Witten, Michael; Wolfe, Pamela; Kohrt, Wendy M

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Exercise is associated with a decrease in bone mineral density under certain conditions. One potential mechanism is increased bone resorption due to an exercise-induced increase in parathyroid hormone (PTH), possibly triggered by dermal calcium loss. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether calcium supplementation either before or during exercise attenuates exercise-induced increases in PTH and C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX; a marker of bone resorption). Methods Male endurance athletes (n=20) completed three 35-km cycling time trials under differing calcium supplementation conditions: 1) 1000 mg calcium 20 minutes before exercise and placebo during, 2) placebo before and 250 mg calcium every 15 minutes during exercise (1000 mg total), or 3) placebo before and during exercise. Calcium was delivered in a 1000 mg/L solution. Supplementation was double-blinded and trials were performed in random order. PTH, CTX, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP; a marker of bone formation), and ionized calcium (iCa) were measured before and immediately after exercise. Results CTX increased and iCa decreased similarly in response to exercise under all test conditions. When compared to placebo, calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the increase in PTH (55.8 ± 15.0 vs. 74.0 ± 14.2; mean ± SE; p=0.04); there was a similar trend (58.0 ± 17.4; p=0.07) for calcium supplementation during exercise. There were no effects of calcium on changes in CTX, BAP, and iCa. Conclusions Calcium supplementation before exercise attenuated the disruption of PTH. Further research is needed to determine the effects of repeated increases in PTH and CTX on bone (i.e., exercise training), and whether calcium supplementation can diminish any exercise-induced demineralization. PMID:20798655

  20. The role of exercise-induced myokines in muscle homeostasis and the defense against chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Claus; Pedersen, Bente K

    2010-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is involved in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance, atherosclerosis, neurodegeneration, and tumour growth. Regular exercise offers protection against type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, colon cancer, breast cancer, and dementia. Evidence suggests that the protective effect of exercise may to some extent be ascribed to the antiinflammatory effect of regular exercise. Here we suggest that exercise may exert its anti-inflammatory effect via a reduction in visceral fat mass and/or by induction of an anti-inflammatory environment with each bout of exercise. According to our theory, such effects may in part be mediated via muscle-derived peptides, so-called "myokines". Contracting skeletal muscles release myokines with endocrine effects, mediating direct anti-inflammatory effects, and/or specific effects on visceral fat. Other myokines work locally within the muscle and exert their effects on signalling pathways involved in fat oxidation and glucose uptake. By mediating anti-inflammatory effects in the muscle itself, myokines may also counteract TNF-driven insulin resistance. In conclusion, exercise-induced myokines appear to be involved in mediating both systemic as well as local anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:20224659

  1. The "love hormone" oxytocin regulates the loss and gain of the fat-bone relationship.

    PubMed

    Colaianni, Graziana; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Zallone, Alberta

    2015-01-01

    The involvement of oxytocin (OT) in bone metabolism is an interesting area of research that recently achieved remarkable results. Moreover, several lines of evidence have largely demonstrated that OT also participates in the regulation of energy metabolism. Hence, it has recently been determined that the posterior pituitary hormone OT directly regulates bone mass: mice lacking OT or OT receptor display severe osteopenia, caused by impaired bone formation. OT administration normalizes ovariectomy-induced osteopenia, bone marrow adiposity, body weight, and intra-abdominal fat depots in mice. This effect is mediated through inhibition of adipocyte precursor differentiation and reduction of adipocyte size. The exquisite role of OT in regulating the bone-fat connection adds another milestone to the biological evidence supporting the existence of a tight relationship between the adipose tissue and the skeleton. PMID:26042088

  2. Effect of cutting time, temperature, and calcium on curd moisture, whey fat losses, and curd yield by response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Fagan, C C; Castillo, M; Payne, F A; O'Donnell, C P; O'Callaghan, D J

    2007-10-01

    Response surface methodology was used to study the effect of temperature, cutting time, and calcium chloride addition level on curd moisture content, whey fat losses, and curd yield. Coagulation and syneresis were continuously monitored using 2 optical sensors detecting light backscatter. The effect of the factors on the sensors' response was also examined. Retention of fat during cheese making was found to be a function of cutting time and temperature, whereas curd yield was found to be a function of those 2 factors and the level of calcium chloride addition. The main effect of temperature on curd moisture was to increase the rate at which whey was expelled. Temperature and calcium chloride addition level were also found to affect the light backscatter profile during coagulation whereas the light backscatter profile during syneresis was a function of temperature and cutting time. The results of this study suggest that there is an optimum firmness at which the gel should be cut to achieve maximum retention of fat and an optimum curd moisture content to maximize product yield and quality. It was determined that to maximize curd yield and quality, it is necessary to maximize firmness while avoiding rapid coarsening of the gel network and microsyneresis. These results could contribute to the optimization of the cheese-making process. PMID:17881671

  3. Loss of Body Weight and Fat and Improved Lipid Profiles in Obese Rats Fed Apple Pomace or Apple Juice Concentrate

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyung-Dong; Han, Chan-Kyu

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of apple pomace (AP) and apple juice concentrate (AC) supplementation on body weight and fat loss as well as lipid metabolism in obese rats fed a high-fat diet. Diet-induced obese rats were assigned to three groups (n=8 for each group): high fat diet (HFD) control, HFD containing 10% (w/w) AP, and HFD containing 10% (w/w) AC. There was also a normal diet group (n=8). After 5 weeks, body weight gain, adipose tissue weight, serum and hepatic lipid profiles, liver morphology, and adipocyte size were measured. Body weight gain, white adipose tissue (WAT) weight, serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, epididymal adipocyte size, and lesion scores were significantly lower and serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and brown adipose tissue weights were significantly higher in the AP and AC groups compared with the HFD group. In addition, atherogenic indices in the AP and AC groups were significantly lower than in the HFD group. These results indicate that supplementing apple products such as AP and AC may help suppress body weight and WAT gain, as well as improve lipid profiles in diet-induced obese rats. PMID:23909905

  4. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis related to specific foods.

    PubMed

    Tilles, S; Schocket, A; Milgrom, H

    1995-10-01

    We describe the case, documented by challenge results, of a 16-year-old girl with exercise-induced anaphylaxis associated with eating pizza and a cheese sandwich. Patients in whom a specific coprecipitating food has been identified should avoid it for at least 12 hours before exercise. All patients should be instructed to avoid eating 6 to 8 hours before exercise, discontinue exercise at the first sign of symptoms, and exercise only with a companion prepared to administer epinephrine. PMID:7562280

  5. Exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q; Wu, Y; Zhang, P; Sha, H; Jia, J; Hu, Y; Zhu, J

    2012-03-15

    Stroke is a major cause of death worldwide. Previous studies have suggested both exercise and mitochondrial biogenesis contribute to improved post-ischemic recovery of brain function. However, the exact mechanism underlying this effect is unclear. On the other hand, the benefit of exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in brain has been confirmed. In this study, we attempted to determine whether treadmill exercise induces functional improvement through regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis after brain ischemia. We subjected adult male rats to ischemia, followed by either treadmill exercise or non-exercise and analyzed the effect of exercise on the amount of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), expression of mitochondrial biogenesis factors, and mitochondrial protein. In the ischemia-exercise group, only peroxisome proliferator activated receptor coactivator-1 (PGC-1) expression was increased significantly after 3 days of treadmill training. However, after 7 days of training, the levels of mtDNA, nuclear respiratory factor 1, NRF-1, mitochondrial transcription factor A, TFAM, and the mitochondrial protein cytochrome C oxidase subunit IV (COXIV) and heat shock protein-60 (HSP60) also increased above levels observed in non-exercised ischemic animals. These changes followed with significant changes in behavioral scores and cerebral infarct volume. The results indicate that exercise can promote mitochondrial biogenesis after ischemic injury, which may serve as a novel component of exercise-induced repair mechanisms of the brain. Understanding the molecular basis for exercise-induced neuroprotection may be beneficial in the development of therapeutic approaches for brain recovery from the ischemic injury. Based upon our findings, stimulation or enhancement of mitochondrial biogenesis may prove a novel neuroprotective strategy in the future. PMID:22266265

  6. Exercise-induced oxidative stress: glutathione supplementation and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sen, C K; Atalay, M; Hänninen, O

    1994-11-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a central role in coordinating the synergism between different lipid- and aqueous-phase antioxidants. We documented 1) how exogenous GSH and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) may affect exhaustive exercise-induced changes in tissue GSH status, lipid peroxides [thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS)], and endurance and 2) the relative role of endogenous GSH in the circumvention of exercise-induced oxidative stress by using GSH-deficient [L-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine (BSO)-treated] rats. Intraperitoneal injection of GSH remarkably increased plasma GSH; exogenous GSH per se was an ineffective delivery agent of GSH to tissues. Repeated administration of GSH (1 time/day for 3 days) increased blood and kidney total GSH [TGSH; GSH+oxidized GSH (GSSG)]. Neither GSH nor NAC influenced endurance to exhaustion. NAC decreased exercise-induced GSH oxidation in the lung and blood. BSO decreased TGSH pools in the liver, lung, blood, and plasma by approximately 50% and in skeletal muscle and heart by 80-90%. Compared with control, resting GSH-deficient rats had lower GSSG in the liver, red gastrocnemius muscle, heart, and blood; similar GSSG/TGSH ratios in the liver, heart, lung, blood, and plasma; higher GSSG/TGSH ratios in the skeletal muscle; and more TBARS in skeletal muscle, heart, and plasma. In contrast to control, exhaustive exercise of GSH-deficient rats did not decrease TGSH in the liver, muscle, or heart or increase TGSH of plasma; GSSG of muscle, blood, or plasma; or TBARS of plasma or muscle. GSH-deficient rats had approximately 50% reduced endurance, which suggests a critical role of endogenous GSH in the circumvention of exercise-induced oxidative stress and as a determinant of exercise performance. PMID:7868431

  7. Frequent loss of heterozygosity and altered expression of the candidate tumor suppressor gene 'FAT' in human astrocytic tumors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background We had earlier used the comparison of RAPD (Random Amplification of Polymorphic DNA) DNA fingerprinting profiles of tumor and corresponding normal DNA to identify genetic alterations in primary human glial tumors. This has the advantage that DNA fingerprinting identifies the genetic alterations in a manner not biased for locus. Methods In this study we used RAPD-PCR to identify novel genomic alterations in the astrocytic tumors of WHO grade II (Low Grade Diffuse Astrocytoma) and WHO Grade IV (Glioblastoma Multiforme). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the altered region was studied by microsatellite and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) markers. Expression study of the gene identified at the altered locus was done by semi-quantitative reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR). Results Bands consistently altered in the RAPD profile of tumor DNA in a significant proportion of tumors were identified. One such 500 bp band, that was absent in the RAPD profile of 33% (4/12) of the grade II astrocytic tumors, was selected for further study. Its sequence corresponded with a region of FAT, a putative tumor suppressor gene initially identified in Drosophila. Fifty percent of a set of 40 tumors, both grade II and IV, were shown to have Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) at this locus by microsatellite (intragenic) and by SNP markers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR showed low FAT mRNA levels in a major subset of tumors. Conclusion These results point to a role of the FAT in astrocytic tumorigenesis and demonstrate the use of RAPD analysis in identifying specific alterations in astrocytic tumors. PMID:19126244

  8. Continuous feedings of fortified human milk lead to nutrient losses of fat, calcium, and phosphorous

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Substantial losses of nutrients may occur during tube (gavage) feeding of fortified human milk. Our objective was to compare the losses of key macronutrients and minerals based on method of fortification, and gavage feeding method. We used clinically available gavage feeding systems and measured pre...

  9. Initial Metabolic State and Exercise-Induced Endotoxaemia Are Unrelated to Gastrointestinal Symptoms During Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Moncada-Jimènez, José; Plaisance, Eric P.; Mestek, Michael L.; Araya-Ramirez, Felipe; Ratcliff, Lance; Taylor, James K.; Grandjean, Peter W.; Aragonvargas, Luis F.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the initial metabolic state and exercise-induced endotoxaemia on the appearance of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) during exercise. Eleven males (36.6 ± 4.9 yrs, 1.7 ± 0.1 m, 74.5 ± 7.7 kg, DEXA body fat % 17.2 ± 6.6, VO2max 57.4 ± 7.4 ml·kg-1·min-1) underwent two isoenergetic diets designed to change their initial metabolic status by either depleting or maintaining their hepatic and muscular glycogen content. These diets and accompanying exercise sessions were performed by each participant in the days before completing a laboratory-based duathlon (5-km run, 30-km cycling, 10-km run). Blood samples were obtained before, immediately and 1- and 2-h following the duathlon for determination of insulin (IN), glucagon (GL), endotoxin, aspartic aminotransferase (AST), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) markers. GIS were assessed by survey before and after exercise. Diet content produced a different energy status as determined by macronutrient content and the IN/GL ratio (p < 0.05), and mild exercise-induced endotoxaemia was observed in both experimental duathlons. Regardless of the diet, the AST/ALT ratio following exercise and in the recovery phase indicated hepatocyte and liver parenchyma structural damage. In spite of GIS, no significant correlations between endotoxin levels and GIS were found. In conclusion, increased markers of endotoxaemia observed with the high-intensity exercise were unrelated to hepatic function and/or GIS before and after exercise. Key points Gastrointestinal symptoms before, during, and after a competition are reported by approximately 20%-50% of the athletes participating in endurance events such as marathon, cycling and triathlon. Energy status, exercise-induced endotoxaemia and liver structural damage might be related to gastrointestinal symptoms. In this study, gastrointestinal symptoms observed before and after endurance exercise were unrelated to endotoxin levels or

  10. Comparison of energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate and low-fat diets on weight loss and body composition in overweight men and women

    PubMed Central

    Volek, JS; Sharman, MJ; Gómez, AL; Judelson, DA; Rubin, MR; Watson, G; Sokmen, B; Silvestre, R; French, DN; Kraemer, WJ

    2004-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects of isocaloric, energy-restricted very low-carbohydrate ketogenic (VLCK) and low-fat (LF) diets on weight loss, body composition, trunk fat mass, and resting energy expenditure (REE) in overweight/obese men and women. Design Randomized, balanced, two diet period clinical intervention study. Subjects were prescribed two energy-restricted (-500 kcal/day) diets: a VLCK diet with a goal to decrease carbohydrate levels below 10% of energy and induce ketosis and a LF diet with a goal similar to national recommendations (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = ~60:25:15%). Subjects 15 healthy, overweight/obese men (mean ± s.e.m.: age 33.2 ± 2.9 y, body mass 109.1 ± 4.6 kg, body mass index 34.1 ± 1.1 kg/m2) and 13 premenopausal women (age 34.0 ± 2.4 y, body mass 76.3 ± 3.6 kg, body mass index 29.6 ± 1.1 kg/m2). Measurements Weight loss, body composition, trunk fat (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), and resting energy expenditure (REE) were determined at baseline and after each diet intervention. Data were analyzed for between group differences considering the first diet phase only and within group differences considering the response to both diets within each person. Results Actual nutrient intakes from food records during the VLCK (%carbohydrate:fat:protein = ~9:63:28%) and the LF (~58:22:20%) were significantly different. Dietary energy was restricted, but was slightly higher during the VLCK (1855 kcal/day) compared to the LF (1562 kcal/day) diet for men. Both between and within group comparisons revealed a distinct advantage of a VLCK over a LF diet for weight loss, total fat loss, and trunk fat loss for men (despite significantly greater energy intake). The majority of women also responded more favorably to the VLCK diet, especially in terms of trunk fat loss. The greater reduction in trunk fat was not merely due to the greater total fat loss, because the ratio of trunk fat/total fat was also significantly reduced during the VLCK diet in

  11. Weight loss on an energy-restricted, low-fat, sugar-containing diet in overweight sedentary men.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Sandra; Dixon, Kathryn; Griffin, Jane; De Looy, Anne

    2004-06-01

    With the increasing prevalence of obesity in the United Kingdom, the search for an effective weight reducing diet is a priority in helping to reverse this trend. A 12-week dietary intervention study was carried out to test the effectiveness of an energy-restricted, low-fat, sugar-containing diet on weight loss in sedentary overweight men. The study also aimed to assess eating behaviour, to measure change in attitude towards sugar-containing foods and to measure the impact of the study on perceived quality of life. Subjects were recruited from three UK cities; Edinburgh, Birmingham and London. Seventy-six men, aged between 25 and 60 years, completed the study. Baseline diets were assessed by a 7-day diet diary. Compliance to the subsequent dietary advice was measured on four occasions post intervention, by 4-day diaries. Measures of body weight status were also monitored. Eating behaviour, attitudes towards sugar-containing foods and quality of life were assessed by questionnaire. Significant reductions in body weight (5.2%), body fat (11.2%) and waist:hip ratio (3%) were observed following reported dietary changes that included a reduction in reported energy intake of 3.2 MJ/day (770 kcal/day), a reduction in the percent energy from fat (from 38.1% to 26.2%), an increase in the percent energy from total carbohydrate (from 44.4% to 54%) and from protein (from 17.3% to 20.6%). Subjects scored relatively highly for dietary restraint and emotional eating, and were strongly influenced by external eating cues. On completion of the 12-week study, subjects had a more positive attitude towards sugar-containing foods and perceived an improved quality of life. It is concluded, therefore, that including sugar-containing foods in a weight-reducing diet may be an effective strategy to achieve a palatable, low-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, which promotes weight loss in overweight individuals. PMID:15369982

  12. The Curious Question of Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Edema

    PubMed Central

    Bates, Melissa L.; Farrell, Emily T.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether pulmonary edema develops during exercise on land is controversial. Yet, the development of pulmonary edema during swimming and diving is well established. This paper addresses the current controversies that exist in the field of exercise-induced pulmonary edema on land and with water immersion. It also discusses the mechanisms by which pulmonary edema can develop during land exercise, swimming, and diving and the current gaps in knowledge that exist. Finally, this paper discusses how these fields can continue to advance and the areas where clinical knowledge is lacking. PMID:21660232

  13. Weight loss composition is one-fourth fat-free mass: a critical review and critique of this widely cited rule.

    PubMed

    Heymsfield, S B; Gonzalez, M C C; Shen, W; Redman, L; Thomas, D

    2014-04-01

    Maximizing fat loss while preserving lean tissue mass and function is a central goal of modern obesity treatments. A widely cited rule guiding expected loss of lean tissue as fat-free mass (FFM) states that approximately one-fourth of weight loss will be FFM (i.e. ΔFFM/ΔWeight = ∼0.25), with the remaining three-fourths being fat mass. This review examines the dynamic relationships between FFM, fat mass and weight changes that follow induction of negative energy balance with hypocaloric dieting and/or exercise. Historical developments in the field are traced with the 'Quarter FFM Rule' used as a framework to examine evolving concepts on obesity tissue, excess weight and what is often cited as 'Forbes' Rule'. Temporal effects in the fractional contribution of FFM to changes in body weight are examined as are lean tissue moderating effects such as ageing, inactivity and exercise that frequently accompany structured low-calorie diet weight loss protocols. Losses of lean tissue with dieting typically tend to be small, raising questions about study design, power and applied measurement method reliability. Our review elicits important questions related to the fractional loss of lean tissues with dieting and provides a foundation for future research on this topic. PMID:24447775

  14. Dairy foods in a moderate energy restricted diet do not enhance central fat, weight & intra-abdominal adipose tissue loss or reduce adipocyte size & inflammatory markers in overweight & obese adults; Controlled feeding study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Research on the role of dairy foods to enhance weight and fat loss when incorporated into a modest weight loss diet has had mixed results. Objective: A 15 week controlled feeding study to answer the question: do dairy foods enhance central fat and weight loss when incorporated in a mode...

  15. Acute versus chronic exercise-induced left-ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L

    2014-11-01

    Exercise-induced cardiac remodeling (EICR) is the process by which the heart adapts to the physiologic stress of exercise. Non-invasive cardiovascular imaging has led to advances in the understanding of EICR, with sport-specific changes in left-ventricular (LV) structure and function being described; however, the majority of data stem from cross-sectional and short-duration longitudinal studies. Due to the paucity of long-term longitudinal EICR studies, the time course of this process and any distinct differentiation between acute and chronic adaptations remain largely unexplored. In order to clarify the natural history of EICR, longer duration longitudinal study is required. Such work will determine whether exercise-induced changes in myocardial structure and function occur in discrete stages. Examination of prolonged exposures to exercise training will also be necessary to determine normative values across the age and training spectrums of athletic patients. This information will help to distinguish the boundary between physiology and pathology in athletic patients. PMID:25300444

  16. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis: is wheat unique?

    PubMed

    Wong, Gabriel K; Krishna, Mamidipudi T

    2013-12-01

    This review draws comparisons between wheat-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (WDEIA) and other food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIAs) and discusses the importance of co-factors in its pathophysiology. FDEIA remains an enigmatic condition since it was first described 30 years ago. The sporadic and unpredictable nature of its reactions has puzzled clinicians and scientists for decades, but recent studies on WDEIA have enlightened us about the pathophysiology of this condition. The identification of defined allergic epitopes such as Tri a 19, α-gliadin, β-gliadin and γ-gliadin in WDEIA enables it to become the perfect model for studying FDEIA, but WDEIA is by no means a unique condition. On a larger scale, FDEIA represents a crucial link between IgE-mediated and anaphylactoid reactions and provides supportive evidence for the concept of 'summation anaphylaxis' and the need to overcome the 'allergen threshold'. Future work should focus on identifying more of the FDEIA epitopes and understanding their distinct molecular properties. The development of a biomarker in order to identify patients susceptible to co-factor influences would be invaluable. PMID:24127054

  17. Exercise-Induced Oxidative Stress and Dietary Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Abbas; Javadi, Maryam; Mirmiran, Parvin; Bahadoran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Context: Overproduction of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during physical exercise, exercise induced oxidative stress and antioxidant supplementation is interesting and controversial concepts that have been considered during the past decades. Evidence Acquisition: In this review, we aimed to summarize current evidence in relation to antioxidant supplementation outcomes during exercise and physical activity. For this aim, we obtained relevant articles through searches of the Medline and PubMed databases between 1980 to 2013. Although major studies have indicated that antioxidants could attenuate biomarkers of exercise-induced oxidative stress and the use of antioxidant supplement is a common phenomenon among athletes and physically active people, there are some doubts regarding the benefits of these. Results: It seems that the best recommendations regarding antioxidants and exercise are having a balanced diet rich in natural antioxidants and phytochemicals. Conclusions: Regular consumption of various fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and beans, sprouts and seeds is an effective and safe way to meet all antioxidant requirements in physically active persons and athletes. PMID:25883776

  18. Effect of simulated weightlessness on exercise-induced anaerobic threshold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.; Karst, G. M.; Kirby, C. R.; Goldwater, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of simulated weightlessness, induced by ten days of continuous bedrest (BR) in the -6 deg head-down position, on the exercise-induced anaerobic threshold (AT) was determined by comparing specific ventilatory and gas-exchange measurements during an incremental ergometer test performed before and after BR. The primary index for determining the exercise-induced AT values of each subject was visual identification of the workrate or oxygen uptake (VO2) at which the ratio of the expired minute ventilation volume (VE) to VO2 exhibited a systematic increase without a concomitant increase in the VE/VCO2 value. Following BR, the mean VO2max of the subjects decreased by 7.0 percent, and the AT decreased from a mean of 1.26 L/min VO2 before BR to 0.95 L/min VO2 after BR. The decrease in AT was manifested by a decrease in both absolute and relative workrates. The change in AT correlated significantly with the change in plasma volume but not with the change in VO2max. The results suggest that the reduction in AT cannot be completely explained by the reduction in VO2, and that the AT decrease is associated with the reduction in intravascular fluid volume.

  19. Identification of exercise-induced ischemia using QRS slopes.

    PubMed

    Firoozabadi, Reza; Gregg, Richard E; Babaeizadeh, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied a computer-aided approach using QRS slopes as unconventional ECG features to identify the exercise-induced ischemia during exercise stress testing and demonstrated that the performance is comparable to the experts' manual analysis using standard criteria involving ST-segment depression. We evaluated the performance of our algorithm using a database including 927 patients undergoing exercise stress tests and simultaneously collecting the ECG recordings and SPECT results. High resolution 12-lead ECG recordings were collected continuously throughout the rest, exercise, and recovery phases. Patients in the database were classified into three categories of moderate/severe ischemia, mild ischemia, and normal according to the differences in sum of the individual segment scores for the rest and stress SPECT images. Philips DXL 16-lead diagnostic algorithm was run on all 10-s segments of 12-lead ECG recordings for each patient to acquire the representative beats, ECG fiducial points from the representative beats, and other ECG parameters. The QRS slopes were extracted for each lead from the averaged representative beats and the leads with highest classification power were selected. We employed linear discriminant analysis and measured the performance using 10-fold cross-validation. Comparable performance of this method to the conventional ST-segment analysis exhibits the classification power of QRS slopes as unconventional ECG parameters contributing to improved identification of exercise-induced ischemia. PMID:26607407

  20. The protective effect of ketotifen in exercise-induced bronchospasm.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M V; Fernández, M; de la Cuesta, C G; Oehling, A

    1988-01-01

    The present study evaluates the protective action of ketotifen on exercise-induced bronchospasm in patients diagnosed with bronchial asthma of different aetiologies. The patients were classified in 2 groups. The first group with seasonal asthma was made up of patients with pollen hypersensitivity, while the second group with perennial asthma was made up of patients with bacterial aetiology or sensitivity to the Dermatophagoides mite. Spirometry and airway resistance measurements (in basal conditions, 5 to 10 minutes after a resistance test which consisted of 6 minutes' free running on a treadmill) was performed on each patient. Those patients in which significant spirometry or Raw alterations were detected received a 15-day treatment of ketotifen (a dose of 1 mg every 12 hours); after this time, the tests mentioned before were repeated. We found that in the seasonal asthma group, ketotifen was effective in protecting against exercise. However, we did not observe the same effect in the perennial asthma group. In the light of these results, we propose the possible existence of different mechanisms in triggering off exercise-induced bronchospasm, according to their aetiologies. PMID:3394595

  1. 'Fat girls' and 'big guys': gendered meanings of weight loss surgery.

    PubMed

    Newhook, Julia Temple; Gregory, Deborah; Twells, Laurie

    2015-06-01

    Over 80% of weight loss surgery (WLS) patients are women, yet gender is overwhelmingly absent in WLS research. This article discusses the findings of 54 interviews with twenty-one women and six men waiting for WLS in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. We critically examine the ways that gender shapes the meaning of WLS in these narratives. We explore gendered meanings in participants' perspectives on their embodied experiences before surgery, social support as they decided to undergo the procedure, and their expectations for their lives after WLS. We draw on feminist theory to explain how these findings counter the dominant gender-neutral medical model of obesity. PMID:25677753

  2. Effects of lorcaserin on fat and lean mass loss in obese and overweight patients without and with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the BLOSSOM and BLOOM-DM studies.

    PubMed

    Apovian, C; Palmer, K; Fain, R; Perdomo, C; Rubino, D

    2016-09-01

    Body composition was determined using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in a subset of patients without (BLOSSOM) and with (BLOOM-DM) type 2 diabetes who received diet and exercise counselling along with either lorcaserin 10 mg twice daily or placebo. DXA scans were performed on study day 1 (baseline), week 24 and week 52. Baseline demographics of the subpopulations (without diabetes, n = 189; with diabetes, n = 63) were similar between studies and representative of their study populations. At week 52, patients without diabetes on lorcaserin lost significantly more fat mass relative to those on placebo (-12.06% vs -5.93%; p = 0.008). In patients with diabetes, fat mass was also decreased with lorcaserin relative to placebo (-9.87% vs -1.65%; p < 0.05). More fat mass was lost in the trunk region with lorcaserin compared with placebo (without diabetes: -3.31% vs -2.05%; with diabetes: -3.65% vs -0.36%). Weight loss with lorcaserin was associated with a greater degree of fat mass loss than lean mass loss, and most of the fat mass lost for patients without and with diabetes was from the central region of the body. PMID:27173586

  3. Resistance Training Preserves Fat-free Mass Without Impacting Changes in Protein Metabolism After Weight Loss in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Wayne W.; Haub, Mark D.; Wolfe, Robert R.; Ferrando, Arny A.; Sullivan, Dennis H.; Apolzan, John W.; Iglay, Heidi B.

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of resistance training (RT) on energy restriction–induced changes in body composition, protein metabolism, and the fractional synthesis rate of mixed muscle proteins (FSRm) in postmenopausal, overweight women. Sixteen women (age 68 ± 1 years, BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2, mean ± s.e.m.) completed a 16-week controlled diet study. Each woman consumed 1.0 g protein/kg/day. At baseline (weeks B1–B3) and poststudy (weeks RT12–RT13), energy intake matched each subject’s need and during weeks RT1–RT11 was hypoenergetic by 2,092 kJ/day (500 kcal/day). From weeks RT1 to RT13, eight women performed RT 3 day/week (RT group) and eight women remained sedentary (SED group). RT did not influence the energy restriction–induced decrease in body mass (SED −5.8 ± 0.6 kg; RT −5.0 ± 0.2 kg) and fat mass (SED −4.1 ± 0.9 kg; RT −4.7 ± 0.5 kg). Fat-free mass (FFM) and total body water decreased in SED (−1.6 ± 0.4 and −2.1 ± 0.5 kg) and were unchanged in RT (−0.3 ± 0.4 and −0.4 ± 0.7 kg) (group-by-time, P ≤ 0.05 and P = 0.07, respectively). Protein–mineral mass did not change in either group (SED 0.4 ± 0.2 kg; RT 0.1 ± 0.4 kg). Nitrogen balance, positive at baseline (2.2 ± 0.3 g N/day), was unchanged poststudy. After body mass loss, postabsorptive (PA) and postprandial (PP) leucine turnover, synthesis, and breakdown decreased. Leucine oxidation and balance were not changed. PA and total (PA + PP) FSRm in the vastus lateralis were higher after weight loss. RT did not influence these protein metabolism responses. In summary, RT helps older women preserve FFM during body mass loss. The comparable whole-body nitrogen retentions, leucine kinetics, and FSRm between groups are consistent with the lack of differential protein–mineral mass change. PMID:19247271

  4. Gut microbiota composition correlates with changes in body fat content due to weight loss.

    PubMed

    Remely, M; Tesar, I; Hippe, B; Gnauer, S; Rust, P; Haslberger, A G

    2015-01-01

    Genetics, lifestyle, and dietary habits contribute to metabolic syndrome, but also an altered gut microbiota has been identified. Based on this knowledge it is suggested that host bacterial composition tends to change in response to dietary factors and weight loss. The aim of this study was to identify bacteria affecting host metabolism in obesity during weight loss and to correlate them with changes of the body composition obtained from bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA). We recruited obese individuals receiving a dietary intervention according DACH (German, Austrian, and Swiss Society of Nutrition) reference values and guidelines for 'prevention and therapy of obesity' of DAG e.V., DDG, DGE e.V., and DGEM e.V. over three months. Faecal microbiota and BIA measurements were conducted at three time points, before, during, and after the intervention. Gut microbiota was analysed on the basis of 16S rDNA with quantitative real time PCR. Additionally, a food frequency questionnaire with questions to nutritional behaviour, lifestyle, and physical activity was administered before intervention. After weight reduction, obese individuals showed a significant increase of total bacterial abundance. The ratio of Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes significantly decreased during intervention. Lactobacilli significantly increased between the first and the second time point. These differences also correlated with differences in weight percentage. During the intervention period Clostridium cluster IV increased significantly between the second and the third time point. In contrast Clostridium cluster XIVa showed a decreased abundance. The dominant butyrate producer, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, significantly increased as did the abundance of the butyryl-CoA: acetate CoA-transferase gene. Archaea and Akkermansia were significantly more prevalent after weight reduction. Our results show a clear difference in the gut bacterial composition before and after dietary intervention with a rapid

  5. Effect of dietary fat/carbohydrate ratio on progression of alcoholic liver injury and bone loss in rats fed via total enteral nutrition (TEN)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few studies have examined the effects of diet on the dynamics of injury progression or on alcohol-induced bone loss. In the current study, 300 g male Sprague-Dawley rats (N = 10/group) were treated with alcohol containing liquid diets via a stomach tube. Dietary fat content was either 5% (high carbo...

  6. Effects of total and regional fat loss on plasma CRP and IL-6 in overweight and obese, older adults with knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Beavers, Kristen M.; Beavers, Daniel P.; Newman, Jovita J.; Anderson, Andrea M.; Loeser, Richard F.; Nicklas, Barbara J.; Lyles, Mary F.; Miller, Gary D.; Mihalko, Shannon L.; Messier, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To describe associations between total and regional body fat mass loss and reduction of systemic levels of inflammation (C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6)) in obese, older adults with osteoarthritis, undergoing intentional weight loss. Design Data come from a single-blind, 18-month, randomized controlled trial in adults (age: 65.6±6.2; BMI: 33.6±3.7) with knee osteoarthritis. Participants were randomized to diet-induced weight loss plus exercise (D+E; n=150), diet-induced weight loss-only (D; n=149), or exercise-only (E; n=151). Total body and region-specific (abdomen and thigh) fat mass were measured at baseline and 18 months. High-sensitivity CRP and IL-6 were measured at baseline, six and 18 months. Intervention effects were assessed using mixed models and associations between inflammation and adiposity were compared using logistic and mixed linear regression models. Results Intentional total body fat mass reduction was associated with significant reductions in log-adjusted CRP (β=0.06 (95% CI=0.04,0.08) mg/L) and IL-6 (β=0.02 (95% CI=0.01,0.04) pg/mL). Loss of abdominal fat volume was also associated with reduced inflammation, independent of total body fat mass; although models containing measures of total adiposity yielded the best fit. The odds of achieving clinically desirable levels of CRP (<3.0 mg/L) and IL-6 (<2.5 pg/mL) were 3.8 (95% CI=1.6,8.9) and 2.2 (95% CI=1.1,4.6), respectively, with 5% total weight and fat mass loss. Conclusions Achievement of clinically desirable levels of CRP and IL-6 more than double with intentional 5% loss of total body weight and fat mass. Global, rather than regional, measures of adiposity are better predictors of change in inflammatory burden. Clinical Trial Registration Number NCT00381290 PMID:25450847

  7. Evidence for a novel serum factor distinct from zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein that promotes body fat loss early in the development of cachexia.

    PubMed

    Byerley, Lauri O; Lee, Sang Ho; Redmann, Steve; Culberson, Cathy; Clemens, Mark; Lively, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    We provide evidence that a factor other than the previously identified lipid mobilizing factor, zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein, promotes lipolysis in the MCA-induced sarcoma-bearing cachexia model. Cachexia is characterized by progressive loss of adipose tissue and skeletal muscle without a concurrent increase in food intake to restore lost tissue stores. We compared tumor-bearing ad lib fed (TB) animals to nontumor bearing ad lib fed (NTB) animals or nontumor-bearing pair-fed (PF) animals at various time points throughout development of tumor derived cachexia. Prior to cachexia, the TB animals lost more than 10 +/- 0.7% of their body fat before losing protein mass and decreasing their food intake. Fat loss occurred because adipocyte size, not number, was reduced. Increased turnover of palmitate and significantly higher serum triglyceride levels prior to cachexia were further indicators of an early loss of lipid from the adipocytes. Yet, circulating levels of norepinephrine, epinephrine, TNF-alpha, and zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein were not increased prior to the loss of fat mass. We provide evidence for a serum factor(s), other than zinc alpha-2 glycoprotein, that stimulates release of glycerol from 3T3-L1 adipocytes and promotes the loss of stored adipose lipid prior to the loss of lean body mass in this model. PMID:20432169

  8. Familial Paroxysmal Exercise-Induced Dystonia: Atypical Presentation of Autosomal Dominant GTP-Cyclohydrolase 1 Deficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Russell C.; Melchers, Anna; Fung, Victor S. C.; Grattan-Smith, Padraic; Houlden, Henry; Earl, John

    2010-01-01

    Paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia (PED) is one of the rarer forms of paroxysmal dyskinesia, and can occur in sporadic or familial forms. We report a family (male index case, mother and maternal grandfather) with autosomal dominant inheritance of paroxysmal exercise-induced dystonia. The dystonia began in childhood and was only ever induced…

  9. Exploring the Relationship between Exercise-Induced Arousal and Cognition Using Fractionated Response Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Yu-Kai; Etnier, Jennifer L.; Barella, Lisa A.

    2009-01-01

    Although a generally positive effect of acute exercise on cognitive performance has been demonstrated, the specific nature of the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance remains unclear. This study was designed to identify the relationship between exercise-induced arousal and cognitive performance for the central…

  10. Moyamoya disease presenting with paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Lyoo, Chul Hyoung; Kim, Dong Joon; Chang, Hyuk; Lee, Myung Sik

    2007-10-01

    We report a patient with moyamoya disease presenting with paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia (PED). A 31-year-old lathe man developed recurrent attacks of paroxysmal hemichorea. The attacks always affected his left limbs and occurred either after several hours of working or while playing football. The duration of attacks ranged from 30 min to 4h. Attacks were not provoked by sudden movements, consumption of coffee or alcohol, hyperventilation, emotional stress, exposure to cold or passive movement. An MRI of the brain showed no parenchymal lesions. However, (99m)Tc-ethylcysteine dimer SPECT study showed hypoperfusion in the right striatum. Digital subtraction angiography showed stenosis of the right internal carotid and middle cerebral artery with prominent basal collaterals, which was compatible with moyamoya disease. Imaging studies of the cerebral arteries should be done in patients with clinical features of PED in order to detect possible cases of moyamoya disease. PMID:16952479

  11. Exercise-induced endobronchial hemorrhage: a rare clinical presentation.

    PubMed

    Kruavit, Anuk; Jain, Mukesh; Fielding, David; Heraganahally, Subash

    2016-07-01

    The phenomenon of exercise-induced hemoptysis is still relatively underrecognised in humans. We report a case of recurrent hemoptysis brought on by vigorous exercise. A 33-year-old male presented with several episodes of intermittent fresh small-volume hemoptysis reproducible on vigorous exercise. There was no other significant medical history other than a past history of testicular tumor, treated with orchidectomy and adjuvant Bleomycin-based chemotherapy 1 year prior to onset of symptoms. Computed tomography scan showed no major abnormalities other than few small bilateral non-specific nodules. Computed tomography aortogram and pulmonary angiogram, ventilation/perfusion scan, and echocardiography yielded no significant abnormalities. Infectious, autoimmune disease, coagulopathy, vasculitis, and malignant causes were excluded. Bronchoscopy showed possible endobronchial bleeding. This phenomenon is thought to be due to vulnerability of pulmonary capillaries to stress or mechanical failure during strenuous exercise at high cardiorespiratory workload. PMID:27512564

  12. Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Sedentary Woman

    PubMed Central

    Rickard, John W.; Zakaria, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Vasovagal (neurocardiogenic) syncope, a subtype of reflex syncope, has many well-known triggers. However, we found no previous report of vasovagal exercise-induced syncope in a sedentary person. We present the case of a 35-year-old sedentary woman who experienced vasovagal syncope as she underwent an exercise stress test. Results of evaluations, including resting and stress electrocardiography and echocardiography, were normal. Her presentation is highly unusual: syncope has typically not been associated with exercise except in young athletes, people with structural heart abnormalities, or people with a prolonged QT syndrome. To our knowledge, this is the first report of vasovagal syncope associated with exercise in a sedentary patient who had normal cardiac and electrophysiologic function. We suggest possible physiologic mechanisms and diagnostic strategies. PMID:25593529

  13. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction: a myth or reality?

    PubMed

    Ostojic, Sergej M

    2016-08-01

    Beneficial effects of physical activity on mitochondrial health are well substantiated in the scientific literature, with regular exercise improving mitochondrial quality and quantity in normal healthy population, and in cardiometabolic and neurodegenerative disorders and aging. However, several recent studies questioned this paradigm, suggesting that extremely heavy or exhaustive exercise fosters mitochondrial disturbances that could permanently damage its function in health and disease. Exercise-induced mitochondrial dysfunction (EIMD) might be a key proxy for negative outcomes of exhaustive exercise, being a pathophysiological substrate of heart abnormalities, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) or muscle degeneration. Here, we overview possible factors that mediate negative effects of exhaustive exercise on mitochondrial function and structure, and put forward alternative solutions for the management of EIMD. PMID:27389587

  14. Early loss of bone mineral density is correlated with a gain of fat mass in patients starting a protease inhibitor containing regimen: the prospective Lipotrip study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) experience deep and early disorders in fat and bone metabolism, leading to concomitant changes in fat mass and bone mineral density. Methods We conducted a prospective study in treatment-naive HIV-infected patients randomized to receive two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in combination with either a protease inhibitor (PI) or a non-nucleosidic reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), to evaluate early changes in body composition, bone mineral density and metabolic markers as differentially induced by antiretroviral therapies. We measured changes in markers of carbohydrate, of fat and bone metabolism, and, using dual-emission X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), body composition and bone mineral density (BMD). Complete data on changes between baseline and after 21 months treatment were available for 35 patients (16 in the PI group and 19 in the NNRTI group). Results A significant gain in BMI and in total and lower limb fat mass was recorded only in patients receiving PI. A loss of lumbar BMD was observed in both groups, being higher with PI. Plasma markers of bone metabolism (alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, collagen crosslaps) and levels of parathormone and of 1,25diOH-vitamin D3 significantly increased in both groups, concomitant with a decline in 25OH-vitamin D3. Lipids and glucose levels increased in both groups but rise in triglyceride was more pronounced with PI. A correlation between loss of BMD and gain of fat mass is observed in patients starting PI. Conclusions We evidenced an early effect of ART on lipid and bone metabolisms. PI lead to a significant gain in fat mass correlated with a sharp drop in BMD but active bone remodelling is evident with all antiretroviral treatments, associated with low vitamin D levels and hyperparathyroidism. In parallel, signs of metabolic restoration are evident. However, early increases in lean and fat mass, triglycerides, waist circumference and

  15. Effect of dietary fat and residues on fecal loss of sterols and on their microbial degradation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Leroy, C; Lepage, G; Morin, C L; Bertrand, J M; Dufour-Larue, O; Roy, C C

    1986-09-01

    Although various etiologic factors have been implicated, the mechanism responsible for bile acid malabsorption in CF remains unknown. Eight CF children studied twice on a normal diet supplemented with pancreatic enzymes and once during a one-month period of Vivonex administered by continuous nasogastric infusion were compared to age-matched controls. On the fat and residue-free elemental diet, there was a modest decrease in steatorrhea and no change in the daily excretion of nitrogen and neutral sterols. However, normalization of bile acid output (485.6 +/- 65.0 to 160.6 +/- 29.2 mg/24 hr) to control levels (150.2 +/- 60.7) was noted. Diminished microbial degradation of both neutral and acidic sterols and a smaller amount of bile acids adsorbed to decreased residues were also found. The data do not support the possibility of a bile acid ileal transport defect and suggest that the most important single factor responsible for the intraluminal sequestration of bile acids in CF is dietary residues. Because of significant ongoing losses of nitrogen and lipids, pancreatic enzymes should be given to CF patients on elemental diets. PMID:3089744

  16. High-fat diet causes bone loss in young mice by promoting osteoclastogenesis through alteration of the bone marrow environment.

    PubMed

    Shu, Lei; Beier, Eric; Sheu, Tzong; Zhang, Hengwei; Zuscik, Michael J; Puzas, Edward J; Boyce, Brendan F; Mooney, Robert A; Xing, Lianping

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is a severe health problem in children, afflicting several organ systems including bone. However, the role of obesity on bone homeostasis and bone cell function in children has not been studied in detail. Here we used young mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) to model childhood obesity and investigate the effect of HFD on the phenotype of cells within the bone marrow environment. Five-week-old male mice were fed a HFD for 3, 6, and 12 weeks. Decreased bone volume was detected after 3 weeks of HFD treatment. After 6 and 12 weeks, HFD-exposed mice had less bone mass and increased osteoclast numbers. Bone marrow cells, but not spleen cells, from HFD-fed mice had increased osteoclast precursor frequency, elevated osteoclast formation, and bone resorption activity, as well as increased expression of osteoclastogenic regulators including RANKL, TNF, and PPAR-gamma. Bone formation rate and osteoblast and adipocyte numbers were also increased in HFD-fed mice. Isolated bone marrow cells also had a corresponding elevation in the expression of positive regulators of osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Our findings indicate that in juvenile mice, HFD-induced bone loss is mainly due to increased osteoclast bone resorption by affecting the bone marrow microenvironment. Thus, targeting osteoclast formation may present a new therapeutic approach for bone complications in obese children. PMID:25673503

  17. Association of severe insulin resistance with both loss of limb fat and elevated serum tumor necrosis factor receptor levels in HIV lipodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Mynarcik, D C; McNurlan, M A; Steigbigel, R T; Fuhrer, J; Gelato, M C

    2000-12-01

    HIV-lipodystrophy (HIV-LD) is characterized by the loss of body fat from the limbs and face, an increase in truncal fat, insulin resistance, and hyperlipidemia, factors placing affected patients at increased risk for vascular disease. This study evaluated insulin sensitivity and inflammatory status associated with HIV-LD and provides suggestions about its etiology. Insulin sensitivity and immune activation markers were assessed in 12 control subjects and 2 HIV-positive groups, 14 without and 15 with LD syndrome. Peripheral insulin sensitivity (mostly skeletal muscle) was determined with the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Circulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and free fatty acid (FFA) levels, and their response to insulin infusion were indicative of insulin responsiveness of liver and adipose tissue, respectively. Serum levels of soluble type 2 tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) receptor (sTNFR2) were used as an indicator of immune activation. HIV-LD study subjects had significantly reduced (twofold) peripheral insulin sensitivity, but normal levels of FFA and reduced levels of IGFBP-1, relative to the nonlipodystrophy groups, indicating that the loss of insulin sensitivity was more pronounced in skeletal muscle than in liver or fat. The significant loss of peripheral fat in the HIV-LD group (34%; p <.05) closely correlated with the reduced peripheral insulin sensitivity (p =. 0001). Levels of sTNFR2 were elevated in all HIV-infected study subjects, but they were significantly higher in those with lipodystrophy than without, and sTNFR2 levels strongly correlated with the reduction in insulin sensitivity (p =.0001). Loss of peripheral fat, normal levels of FFA, and reduced levels of IGFBP-1 indicate that insulin resistance in HIV-LD is distinct from type 2 diabetes and obesity. The relationship between the degree of insulin resistance and sTNFR2 levels suggests an inflammatory stimulus is contributing to the development of

  18. Association between exercise-induced change in body composition and change in cardiometabolic risk factors in postmenopausal South Asian women.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Iris A; Guenette, Jordan A; Hoogbruin, Amandah; Mackey, Dawn C; Singer, Joel; Gasevic, Danijela; Lear, Scott A

    2016-09-01

    The South Asian population suffers from a high prevalence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). A unique obesity phenotype of elevated visceral adipose tissue (VAT) is associated with CVD risk among South Asians. Exercise-induced reduction in VAT and body fat is an effective mechanism to improve cardiometabolic risk factors but this has not been shown in South Asians. Whether exercise-induced changes in measurements such as waist circumference (WC) are independently related to changes in cardiometabolic risk factors in South Asians is unknown. Multi-slice computed tomography scanning was used to assess VAT, cardiometabolic risk factors through a fasting blood sample, and body fat using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Forty- nine postmenopausal South Asian women who participated in two 12-week aerobic exercise programs were included. Bivariate correlations were used to assess associations between change in cardiometabolic risk factors and change in body composition. Regression analyses were conducted with change in glucose, insulin, and homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) as dependent variables and change in body composition as independent variables of interest. There were significant associations between changes in fasting insulin, glucose, and HOMA-IR with change in VAT. The association between change in VAT and these cardiometabolic risk factors was independent of change in other body composition variables of interest. South Asian women should be encouraged to engage in aerobic activity to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes and CVD, and physicians should be aware of improvements in glucose regulation with exercise training not observed through reductions in WC. PMID:27507007

  19. Subcutaneous and Segmental Fat Loss with and without Supportive Supplements in Conjunction with a Low-Calorie High Protein Diet in Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Paul H.; Tai, Chih Yin; Carson, Laura R.; Joy, Jordan M.; Mosman, Matt M.; Vogel, Roxanne M.; McCann, Tyler R.; Crona, Kevin P.; Griffin, J. Daniel; Kim, Michael P.; Moon, Jordan R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Weight loss benefits of multi-ingredient supplements in conjunction with a low-calorie, high-protein diet in young women are unknown. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a three-week low-calorie diet with and without supplementation on body composition. Methods Thirty-seven recreationally-trained women (n = 37; age = 27.1 ± 4.2; height = 165.1 ± 6.4; weight = 68.5 ± 10.1; BMI = 25.1 ± 3.4) completed one of the following three-week interventions: no change in diet (CON); a high-protein, low-calorie diet supplemented with a thermogenic, conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), a protein gel, and a multi-vitamin (SUP); or the high-protein diet with isocaloric placebo supplements (PLA). Before and after the three-week intervention, body weight, %Fat via dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), segmental fat mass via DXA, %Fat via skinfolds, and skinfold thicknesses at seven sites were measured. Results SUP and PLA significantly decreased body weight (SUP: PRE, 70.47 ± 8.01 kg to POST, 67.51 ± 8.10 kg; PLA: PRE, 67.88 ± 12.28 kg vs. POST, 66.38 ± 11.94 kg; p ≤ 0.05) with a greater (p ≤ 0.05) decrease in SUP than PLA or CON. SUP and PLA significantly decreased %Fat according to DXA (SUP: PRE, 34.98 ± 7.05% to POST, 32.99 ± 6.89%; PLA: PRE, 34.22 ± 6.36% vs. POST, 32.69 ± 5.84%; p ≤ 0.05), whereas only SUP significantly decreased %Fat according to skinfolds (SUP: PRE, 27.40 ± 4.09% to POST, 24.08 ± 4.31%; p ≤ 0.05). SUP significantly (p ≤ 0.05) decreased thicknesses at five skinfolds (chest, waist, hip, subscapular, and tricep) compared to PLA, but not at two skinfolds (axilla and thigh). Conclusions The addition of a thermogenic, CLA, protein, and a multi-vitamin to a three-week low-calorie diet improved weight loss, total fat loss and subcutaneous fat loss, compared to diet alone. PMID:25875200

  20. Intermittent Fasting Promotes Fat Loss With Lean Mass Retention, Increased Hypothalamic Norepinephrine Content, and Increased Neuropeptide Y Gene Expression in Diet-Induced Obese Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Gotthardt, Juliet D; Verpeut, Jessica L; Yeomans, Bryn L; Yang, Jennifer A; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A; Bello, Nicholas T

    2016-02-01

    Clinical studies indicate alternate-day, intermittent fasting (IMF) protocols result in meaningful weight loss in obese individuals. To further understand the mechanisms sustaining weight loss by IMF, we investigated the metabolic and neural alterations of IMF in obese mice. Male C57/BL6 mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD; 45% fat) ad libitum for 8 weeks to promote an obese phenotype. Mice were divided into four groups and either maintained on ad libitum HFD, received alternate-day access to HFD (IMF-HFD), and switched to ad libitum low-fat diet (LFD; 10% fat) or received IMF of LFD (IMF-LFD). After 4 weeks, IMF-HFD (∼13%) and IMF-LFD (∼18%) had significantly lower body weights than the HFD. Body fat was also lower (∼40%-52%) in all diet interventions. Lean mass was increased in the IMF-LFD (∼12%-13%) compared with the HFD and IMF-HFD groups. Oral glucose tolerance area under the curve was lower in the IMF-HFD (∼50%), whereas the insulin tolerance area under the curve was reduced in all diet interventions (∼22%-42%). HPLC measurements of hypothalamic tissue homogenates indicated higher (∼55%-60%) norepinephrine (NE) content in the anterior regions of the medial hypothalamus of IMF compared with the ad libitum-fed groups, whereas NE content was higher (∼19%-32%) in posterior regions in the IMF-LFD group only. Relative gene expression of Npy in the arcuate nucleus was increased (∼65%-75%) in IMF groups. Our novel findings indicate that intermittent fasting produces alterations in hypothalamic NE and neuropeptide Y, suggesting the counterregulatory processes of short-term weight loss are associated with an IMF dietary strategy. PMID:26653760

  1. The Effect of Passive Heat Stress and Exercise-Induced Dehydration on the Compensatory Reserve During Simulated Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Adams, Amy; Rivas, Eric; Mulligan, Jane; Grudic, Gregory Z; Convertino, Victor A; Howard, Jeffrey T; Crandall, Craig G

    2016-09-01

    Compensatory reserve represents the proportion of physiological responses engaged to compensate for reductions in central blood volume before the onset of decompensation. We hypothesized that compensatory reserve would be reduced by hyperthermia and exercise-induced dehydration, conditions often encountered on the battlefield. Twenty healthy males volunteered for two separate protocols during which they underwent lower-body negative pressure (LBNP) to hemodynamic decompensation (systolic blood pressure <80 mm Hg). During protocol #1, LBNP was performed following a passive increase in core temperature of ∼1.2°C (HT) or a normothermic time-control period (NT). During protocol #2, LBNP was performed following exercise during which: fluid losses were replaced (hydrated), fluid intake was restricted and exercise ended at the same increase in core temperature as hydrated (isothermic dehydrated), or fluid intake was restricted and exercise duration was the same as hydrated (time-match dehydrated). Compensatory reserve was estimated with the compensatory reserve index (CRI), a machine-learning algorithm that extracts features from continuous photoplethysmograph signals. Prior to LBNP, CRI was reduced by passive heating [NT: 0.87 (SD 0.09) vs. HT: 0.42 (SD 0.19) units, P <0.01] and exercise-induced dehydration [hydrated: 0.67 (SD 0.19) vs. isothermic dehydrated: 0.52 (SD 0.21) vs. time-match dehydrated: 0.47 (SD 0.25) units; P <0.01 vs. hydrated]. During subsequent LBNP, CRI decreased further and its rate of change was similar between conditions. CRI values at decompensation did not differ between conditions. These results suggest that passive heating and exercise-induced dehydration limit the body's physiological reserve to compensate for further reductions in central blood volume. PMID:27183303

  2. Diaphragmatic breathing reduces exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martarelli, Daniele; Cocchioni, Mario; Scuri, Stefania; Pompei, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Diaphragmatic breathing is relaxing and therapeutic, reduces stress, and is a fundamental procedure of Pranayama Yoga, Zen, transcendental meditation and other meditation practices. Analysis of oxidative stress levels in people who meditate indicated that meditation correlates with lower oxidative stress levels, lower cortisol levels and higher melatonin levels. It is known that cortisol inhibits enzymes responsible for the antioxidant activity of cells and that melatonin is a strong antioxidant; therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of diaphragmatic breathing on exercise-induced oxidative stress and the putative role of cortisol and melatonin hormones in this stress pathway. We monitored 16 athletes during an exhaustive training session. After the exercise, athletes were divided in two equivalent groups of eight subjects. Subjects of the studied group spent 1 h relaxing performing diaphragmatic breathing and concentrating on their breath in a quiet place. The other eight subjects, representing the control group, spent the same time sitting in an equivalent quite place. Results demonstrate that relaxation induced by diaphragmatic breathing increases the antioxidant defense status in athletes after exhaustive exercise. These effects correlate with the concomitant decrease in cortisol and the increase in melatonin. The consequence is a lower level of oxidative stress, which suggests that an appropriate diaphragmatic breathing could protect athletes from long-term adverse effects of free radicals. PMID:19875429

  3. In vivo indomethacin reverse exercise-induced immunosuppression in rats.

    PubMed

    Asselin, P; Benquet, C; Krzystyniak, K; Brousseau, P; Savard, R; Fournier, M

    1996-01-01

    The effect of oral indomethacin on the immunosuppressive effect of exercise was examined in exercised untrained female Wistar rats immunized with sheep red blood cell (SRBC) antigens. Intensity of the 1 h exercise was controlled by 0-50 kPa air pressure, generated by a compressor located at the bottom of a water tank, during continuous swimming of the rats, previously immunized with SRBC. After 48-72 h, depending on the ip (intraperitoneal) or iv (intravenous) route of SRBC immunization, the exercise suppressed humoral PFC response and augmented phagocytosis of peritoneum macrophages. These effects occurred only when exercise was performed at 48 h after antigen injection. Animals receiving indomethacin, however, did not show any exercise-related suppression of the PFC response. The data suggest a relationship between exercise-induced immunosuppression and possible increased in vivo prostaglandin synthesis during the intense exercise. Overall, exercise-related suppression of humoral PFC response was dependent on the intensity of the exercise, was time specific, and was reversible by pharmacological blockade of the cyclooxygenase pathway of prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:9023588

  4. Lycium barbarum polysaccharides reduce exercise-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiaozhong; Zhou, Junlai; Ma, Tao; Chai, Qiongxia

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharides (LBP) on exercise-induced oxidative stress in rats. Rats were divided into four groups, i.e., one control group and three LBP treated groups. The animals received an oral administration of physiological saline or LBP (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days. On the day of the exercise test, rats were required to run to exhaustion on the treadmill. Body weight, endurance time, malondialdehyde (MDA), super oxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) level of rats were measured. The results showed that the body weight of rats in LBP treated groups were not significantly different from that in the normal control group before and after the experiment (P > 0.05). After exhaustive exercise, the mean endurance time of treadmill running to exhaustion of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly prolonged compared with that in the normal control group. MDA levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly decreased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). SOD and GPX levels of rats in LBP treated groups were significantly increased compared with that in the normal control group (P < 0.05). Together, these results indicate that LBP was effective in preventing oxidative stress after exhaustive exercise. PMID:21541044

  5. Exercise-induced effects on a gym atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Hiti, B; Barba, Ž; Rupnik, Z; Založnik, A; Žitnik, E; Rodrìguez, L; Mihevc, I; Žibert, J

    2016-06-01

    We report results of analysis of a month-long measurement of indoor air and environment quality parameters in one gym during sporting activities such as football, basketball, volleyball, badminton, boxing, and fitness. We have determined an average single person's contribution to the increase of temperature, humidity, and dust concentration in the gym air volume of 12500 m(3) : during 90-min exercise performed at an average heart rate of 143 ± 10 bpm, a single person evaporated 0.94 kg of water into the air by sweating, contributed 0.03 K to the air temperature rise and added 1.5 μg/m(3) and 5 ng/m(3) to the indoor concentration of inhalable particles (PM10 ) and Ca concentration, respectively. As the breathing at the observed exercise intensity was about three times faster with respect to the resting condition and as the exercise-induced PM10 concentration was about two times larger than outdoors, a sportsman in the gym would receive about a sixfold higher dose of PM10 inside than he/she would have received at rest outside. PMID:26095910

  6. Exercise-Induced Systemic Venous Hypertension in the Fontan Circulation.

    PubMed

    Navaratnam, Devaraj; Fitzsimmons, Samantha; Grocott, Michael; Rossiter, Harry B; Emmanuel, Yaso; Diller, Gerard-Paul; Gordon-Walker, Timothy; Jack, Sandy; Sheron, Nick; Pappachan, John; Pratap, Jayant Nick; Vettukattil, Joseph J; Veldtman, Gruschen

    2016-05-15

    Increasingly end-organ injury is being demonstrated late after institution of the Fontan circulation, particularly liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. The exact mechanisms for these late phenomena remain largely elusive. Hypothesizing that exercise induces precipitous systemic venous hypertension and insufficient cardiac output for the exercise demand, that is, a possible mechanism for end-organ injury, we sought to demonstrate the dynamic exercise responses in systemic venous perfusion (SVP) and concurrent end-organ perfusion. Ten stable Fontan patients and 9 control subjects underwent incremental cycle ergometry-based cardiopulmonary exercise testing. SVP was monitored in the right upper limb, and regional tissue oxygen saturation was monitored in the brain and kidney using near-infrared spectroscopy. SVP rose profoundly in concert with workload in the Fontan group, described by the regression equation 15.97 + 0.073 watts per mm Hg. In contrast, SVP did not change in healthy controls. Regional renal (p <0.01) and cerebral tissue saturations (p <0.001) were significantly lower and decrease more rapidly in Fontan patients. We conclude that in a stable group of adult patients with Fontan circulation, high-intensity exercise was associated with systemic venous hypertension and reduced systemic oxygen delivery. This physiological substrate has the potential to contribute to end-organ injury. PMID:27032711

  7. Exercise-induced asthma--clinical, physiological, and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, S

    1975-07-01

    Exercise provokes acute airways obstruction, maximum shortly after stopping, in virtually all asthmatic patients. The severity of this exercise-induced asthma (EIA) depends upon the type of exercise, with running being the most asthmogenic, swimming and walking the least, and cycling intermediate even with the same metabolic stress. The duration and severity of the exercise also affect the amount of EIA, the maximum amount of being obtained after 6 to 8 min of running hard enough to raise the heart rate to 180 beats per minute (bpm) in children or 140 bpm in adults. EIA is not the result of hyperventilation or blood gas changes and appears to depend on the release of relatively short-lived transmitter agents during the exercise period. EIA can be prevented by premedication with bronchodilators, especially with sympathomimetics. Cromolyn sodium is not a bronchodilator but inhibits EIA in most subjects if given before the exercise. EIA can also be inhibited by atropine and alpha adrenergic blockers in some patients, but by steroids in only a minority of cases. Exercise testing provides a good model for study of the physiology and pharmacology of clinical asthma, and is some guide to prognosis, but it must be properly standardized and the important differences must be appreciated. PMID:805807

  8. Improvement after training of children with exercise-induced asthma.

    PubMed

    Svenonius, E; Kautto, R; Arborelius, M

    1983-01-01

    Fifty children with exercise-induced asthma (EIA) volunteered to take part in a study of the influence of training on EIA. 1) Ten children did not change physical activity. 2) Twelve children trained after premedication with salbutamol inhalations. 3) Thirteen children trained after premedication with disodium chromoglicate (DSCG) and used that drug for treatment. 4) Fifteen children trained in their own regimen, commonly after premedication with salbutamol. Their training programme (groups 2-3) consisted of high load exercise periods of two minutes interrupted by intervals of rest for two minutes during 30 minutes followed by interval swimming for another 30 minutes, twice a week for 3-4 months. Before the training period the degree of EIA was tested with a battery of lung function tests before and after running for 6 minutes on a treadmill at heart rate 170. EIA after training was measured applying the same procedure. Cardiocirculatory performance was evaluated before and after training with work on a cycle ergometer and expressed as W/kg body weight at heart rate 170. The children in groups 2, 3 and 4 improved their physical working capacity by 11% (p less than 0.01), 21% and 11%, respectively, but no improvement was found in group 1. Significant improvements in EIA after the training periods were found in all training groups, but basal asthma improved most in group 3, probably due to the basal treatment with DSCG. PMID:6407276

  9. Exercise-induced hormesis and skeletal muscle health.

    PubMed

    Ji, Li Li; Kang, Chounghun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-09-01

    Hormesis refers to the phenomenon that an exposure or repeated exposures of a toxin can elicit adaptive changes within the organism to resist to higher doses of toxin with reduced harm. Skeletal muscle shows considerable plasticity and adaptions in response to a single bout of acute exercise or chronic training, especially in antioxidant defense capacity and metabolic functions mainly due to remodeling of mitochondria. It has thus been hypothesized that contraction-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may stimulate the hormesis-like adaptations. Furthermore, there has been considerable evidence that select ROS such as hydrogen peroxide and nitric oxide, or even oxidatively degraded macromolecules, may serve as signaling molecules to stimulate such hermetic adaptations due to the activation of redox-sensitive signaling pathways. Recent research has highlighted the important role of nuclear factor (NF) κB, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ co-activator 1α (PGC-1α), along with other newly discovered signaling pathways, in some of the most vital biological functions such as mitochondrial biogenesis, antioxidant defense, inflammation, protein turnover, apoptosis, and autophagy. The inability of the cell to maintain proper redox signaling underlies mechanisms of biological aging, during which inflammatory and catabolic pathways prevail. Research evidence and mechanisms connecting exercise-induced hormesis and redox signaling are reviewed. PMID:26916558

  10. Metabolic consequences of exercise-induced muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jason C; Bosch, Andrew N; Lambert, Mike I

    2007-01-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is commonly experienced following either a bout of unaccustomed physical activity or following physical activity of greater than normal duration or intensity. The mechanistic factor responsible for the initiation of EIMD is not known; however, it is hypothesised to be either mechanical or metabolic in nature. The mechanical stress hypothesis states that EIMD is the result of physical stress upon the muscle fibre. In contrast, the metabolic stress model predicts that EIMD is the result of metabolic deficiencies, possibly through the decreased action of Ca(2+)-adenosine triphosphatase. Irrespective of the cause of the damage, EIMD has a number of profound metabolic effects. The most notable metabolic effects of EIMD are decreased insulin sensitivity, prolonged glycogen depletion and an increase in metabolic rate both at rest and during exercise. Based on current knowledge regarding the effects that various types of damaging exercise have on muscle metabolism, a new model for the initiation of EIMD is proposed. This model states that damage initiation may be either metabolic or mechanical, or a combination of both, depending on the mode, intensity and duration of exercise and the training status of the individual. PMID:17887809

  11. Differential Effects of Bariatric Surgery Versus Exercise on Excessive Visceral Fat Deposits.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fu-Zong; Huang, Yi-Luan; Wu, Carol C; Wang, Yen-Chi; Pan, Hsiang-Ju; Huang, Chin-Kun; Yeh, Lee-Ren; Wu, Ming-Ting

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare differential impacts of bariatric surgery and exercise-induced weight loss on excessive abdominal and cardiac fat deposition.Excessive fat accumulation around the heart may play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Recent evidences have suggested that bariatric surgery results in relatively less decrease in epicardial fat compared with abdominal visceral fat and paracardial fat.Sixty-four consecutive overweight or obese subjects were enrolled in the study. Clinical characteristics and metabolic profiles were recorded. The volumes of abdominal visceral adipose tissue (AVAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (ASAT), epicardial (EAT), and paracardial adipose tissue (PAT) were measured by computed tomography in the bariatric surgery group (N = 25) and the exercise group (N = 39) at baseline and 3 months after intervention. Subjects in both the surgery and exercise groups showed significant reduction in body mass index (15.97%, 7.47%), AVAT (40.52%, 15.24%), ASAT (31.40, 17.34%), PAT (34.40%, 12.05%), and PAT + EAT (22.31%, 17.72%) (all P < 0.001) after intervention compared with baseline. In both the groups, the decrease in EAT was small compared with the other compartments (P < 0.01 in both groups). Compared with the exercise group, the surgery group had greater loss in abdominal and cardiac visceral adipose tissue (AVAT, ASAT, PAT, EAT+PAT) (P < 0.001), but lesser loss in EAT (P = 0.037).Compared with the exercise group, bariatric surgery results in significantly greater percentage loss of excessive fat deposits except for EAT. EAT, but not PAT, was relatively preserved despite weight reduction in both the groups. The physiological impact of persistent EAT deserves further investigation. PMID:26844473

  12. Calcium plus vitamin D3 supplementation facilitated Fat loss in overweight and obese college students with very-low calcium consumption: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that higher calcium and/or vitamin D intake may be associated with lower body weight and better metabolic health. Due to contradictory findings from intervention trials, we investigated the effect of calcium plus vitamin D3 (calcium+D) supplementation on anthropometric and metabolic profiles during energy restriction in healthy, overweight and obese adults with very-low calcium consumption. Methods Fifty-three subjects were randomly assigned in an open-label, randomized controlled trial to receive either an energy-restricted diet (−500 kcal/d) supplemented with 600 mg elemental calcium and 125 IU vitamin D3 or energy restriction alone for 12 weeks. Repeated measurements of variance were performed to evaluate the differences between groups for changes in body weight, BMI, body composition, waist circumference, and blood pressures, as well as in plasma TG, TC, HDL, LDL, glucose and insulin concentrations. Results Eighty-one percent of participants completed the trial (85% from the calcium + D group; 78% from the control group). A significantly greater decrease in fat mass loss was observed in the calcium + D group (−2.8±1.3 vs.-1.8±1.3 kg; P=0.02) than in the control group, although there was no significant difference in body weight change (P>0.05) between groups. The calcium + D group also exhibited greater decrease in visceral fat mass and visceral fat area (P<0.05 for both). No significant difference was detected for changes in metabolic variables (P>0.05). Conclusion Calcium plus vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 weeks augmented body fat and visceral fat loss in very-low calcium consumers during energy restriction. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01447433, http://clinicaltrials.gov/). PMID:23297844

  13. Exercise-induced neuroprotection in the spastic Han Wistar rat: the possible role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    PubMed

    Van Kummer, Brooke H; Cohen, Randy W

    2015-01-01

    Moderate aerobic exercise has been shown to enhance motor skills and protect the nervous system from neurodegenerative diseases, like ataxia. Our lab uses the spastic Han Wistar rat as a model of ataxia. Mutant rats develop forelimb tremor and hind limb rigidity and have a decreased lifespan. Our lab has shown that exercise reduced Purkinje cell degeneration and delayed motor dysfunction, significantly increasing lifespan. Our study investigated how moderate exercise may mediate neuroprotection by analyzing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor TrkB. To link BDNF to exercise-induced neuroprotection, mutant and normal rats were infused with the TrkB antagonist K252a or vehicle into the third ventricle. During infusion, rats were subjected to moderate exercise regimens on a treadmill. Exercised mutants receiving K252a exhibited a 21.4% loss in Purkinje cells compared to their controls. Cerebellar TrkB expression was evaluated using non-drug-treated mutants subjected to various treadmill running regimens. Running animals expressed three times more TrkB than sedentary animals. BDNF was quantified via Sandwich ELISA, and cerebellar expression was found to be 26.6% greater in mutant rats on 7-day treadmill exercise regimen compared to 30 days of treadmill exercise. These results suggest that BDNF is involved in mediating exercise-induced neuroprotection. PMID:25710032

  14. Exercise-induced albuminuria is related to metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Sharon; Shenhar-Tsarfaty, Shani; Rogowski, Ori; Shapira, Itzhak; Zeltser, David; Weinstein, Talia; Lahav, Dror; Vered, Jaffa; Tovia-Brodie, Oholi; Arbel, Yaron; Berliner, Shlomo; Milwidsky, Assi

    2016-06-01

    Microalbuminuria (MA) is a known marker for endothelial dysfunction and future cardiovascular events. Exercise-induced albuminuria (EiA) may precede the appearance of MA. Associations between EiA and metabolic syndrome (MS) have not been assessed so far. Our aim was to investigate this association in a large sample of apparently healthy individuals with no baseline albuminuria. This was a cross-sectional study of 2,027 adults with no overt cardiovascular diseases who took part in a health survey program and had no baseline MA. Diagnosis of MS was based on harmonized criteria. All patients underwent an exercise test (Bruce protocol), and urinary albumin was measured before and after the examination. Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) values before and after exercise were 0.40 (0.21-0.89) and 1.06 (0.43-2.69) mg/g for median (interquartile range) respectively. A total of 394 (20%) subjects had EiA; ACR rose from normal rest values (0.79 mg/g) to 52.28 mg/g after exercise (P < 0.001); this effect was not shown for the rest of the study population. EiA was related to higher prevalence of MS (13.8% vs. 27.1%, P < 0.001), higher metabolic equivalents (P < 0.001), higher baseline blood pressure (P < 0.001), and higher levels of fasting plasma glucose, triglycerides, and body mass index (P < 0.001). Multivariate binary logistic regression model showed that subjects with MS were 98% more likely to have EiA (95% confidence interval: 1.13-3.46, P = 0.016). In conclusion, EiA in the absence of baseline MA is independently related to MS. PMID:27076648

  15. Exercise-induced hypoalgesia - interval versus continuous mode.

    PubMed

    Kodesh, Einat; Weissman-Fogel, Irit

    2014-07-01

    Aerobic exercise at approximately 70% of maximal aerobic capacity moderately reduces pain sensitivity and attenuates pain, even after a single session. If the analgesic effects depend on exercise intensity, then high-intensity interval exercise at 85% of maximal aerobic capacity should further reduce pain. The aim of this study was to explore the exercise-induced analgesic effects of high-intensity interval aerobic exercise and to compare them with the analgesic effects of moderate continuous aerobic exercise. Twenty-nine young untrained healthy males were randomly assigned to aerobic-continuous (70% heart rate reserve (HRR)) and interval (4 × 4 min at 85% HRR and 2 min at 60% HRR between cycles) exercise modes, each lasting 30 min. Psychophysical pain tests, pressure and heat pain thresholds (HPT), and tonic heat pain (THP) were conducted before and after exercise sessions. Repeated measures ANOVA was used for data analysis. HPT increased (p = 0.056) and THP decreased (p = 0.013) following exercise unrelated to exercise type. However, the main time effect (pre-/postexercise) was a trend of increased HPT (45.6 ± 1.9 °C to 46.2 ± 1.8 °C; p = 0.082) and a significant reduction in THP (from 50.7 ± 25 to 45.9 ± 25.4 numeric pain scale; p = 0.043) following interval exercise. No significant change was found for the pressure pain threshold following either exercise type. In conclusion, interval exercise (85% HRR) has analgesic effects on experimental pain perception. This, in addition to its cardiovascular, muscular, and metabolic advantages may promote its inclusion in pain management programs. PMID:24773287

  16. Modulating exercise-induced hormesis: Does less equal more?

    PubMed

    Peake, Jonathan M; Markworth, James F; Nosaka, Kazunori; Raastad, Truls; Wadley, Glenn D; Coffey, Vernon G

    2015-08-01

    Hormesis encompasses the notion that low levels of stress stimulate or upregulate existing cellular and molecular pathways that improve the capacity of cells and organisms to withstand greater stress. This notion underlies much of what we know about how exercise conditions the body and induces long-term adaptations. During exercise, the body is exposed to various forms of stress, including thermal, metabolic, hypoxic, oxidative, and mechanical stress. These stressors activate biochemical messengers, which in turn activate various signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and adaptive responses. Historically, antioxidant supplements, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cryotherapy have been favored to attenuate or counteract exercise-induced oxidative stress and inflammation. However, reactive oxygen species and inflammatory mediators are key signaling molecules in muscle, and such strategies may mitigate adaptations to exercise. Conversely, withholding dietary carbohydrate and restricting muscle blood flow during exercise may augment adaptations to exercise. In this review article, we combine, integrate, and apply knowledge about the fundamental mechanisms of exercise adaptation. We also critically evaluate the rationale for using interventions that target these mechanisms under the overarching concept of hormesis. There is currently insufficient evidence to establish whether these treatments exert dose-dependent effects on muscle adaptation. However, there appears to be some dissociation between the biochemical/molecular effects and functional/performance outcomes of some of these treatments. Although several of these treatments influence common kinases, transcription factors, and proteins, it remains to be determined if these interventions complement or negate each other, and whether such effects are strong enough to influence adaptations to exercise. PMID:25977451

  17. Exercise-induced oxidative stress and hypoxic exercise recovery.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Christopher; McGinnis, Graham; Peters, Bridget; Slivka, Dustin; Cuddy, John; Hailes, Walter; Dumke, Charles; Ruby, Brent; Quindry, John

    2014-04-01

    Hypoxia due to altitude diminishes performance and alters exercise oxidative stress responses. While oxidative stress and exercise are well studied, the independent impact of hypoxia on exercise recovery remains unknown. Accordingly, we investigated hypoxic recovery effects on post-exercise oxidative stress. Physically active males (n = 12) performed normoxic cycle ergometer exercise consisting of ten high:low intensity intervals, 20 min at moderate intensity, and 6 h recovery at 975 m (normoxic) or simulated 5,000 m (hypoxic chamber) in a randomized counter-balanced cross-over design. Oxygen saturation was monitored via finger pulse oximetry. Blood plasma obtained pre- (Pre), post- (Post), 2 h post- (2Hr), 4 h post- (4Hr), and 6 h (6Hr) post-exercise was assayed for Ferric Reducing Ability of Plasma (FRAP), Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), Lipid Hydroperoxides (LOOH), and Protein Carbonyls (PC). Biopsies from the vastus lateralis obtained Pre and 6Hr were analyzed by real-time PCR quantify expression of Heme oxygenase 1 (HMOX1), Superoxide Dismutase 2 (SOD2), and Nuclear factor (euthyroid-derived2)-like factor (NFE2L2). PCs were not altered between trials, but a time effect (13 % Post-2Hr increase, p = 0.044) indicated exercise-induced blood oxidative stress. Plasma LOOH revealed only a time effect (p = 0.041), including a 120 % Post-4Hr increase. TEAC values were elevated in normoxic recovery versus hypoxic recovery. FRAP values were higher 6Hr (p = 0.045) in normoxic versus hypoxic recovery. Exercise elevated gene expression of NFE2L2 (20 % increase, p = 0.001) and SOD2 (42 % increase, p = 0.003), but hypoxic recovery abolished this response. Data indicate that recovery in a hypoxic environment, independent of exercise, may alter exercise adaptations to oxidative stress and metabolism. PMID:24384982

  18. [Exercise-induced airway obstruction in asthmatic children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Zapletal, A; Zbojan, J; Pohanka, V

    1992-03-01

    In 115 asymptomatic asthmatic children and adolescents (age 6-18 years) there was studied the magnitude of airway obstruction, induced by various physical efforts and assessed from the recording of maximum expiratory flow-volume curves and in some patients by "specific" airway conductance measurement in a body plethysmograph. The effects of 5 minutes free running outdoors, 5 minutes of exercise on a bicycle ergometer (2 watts/kg of body weight), routine swimming training in swimming pool and of forced expiration maneuver on the magnitude of airway obstruction were assessed. The most frequent and largest degree of airway obstruction was observed after 5 min. free running outdoors (heart rate after running 160-200/min). The obstruction was revealed in 80-100% asthmatics in various groups. The chosen lung function parameters showed exercise-induced airway obstruction in the same patients in various proportions as well as the magnitude of the obstruction. Following free running outdoors the values of maximum expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity and "specific" airway conductance were most reduced. Spontaneous retreat of obstruction was observed in the course of 2 hours. The physical exercise on a bicycle ergometer was a small stimulus in inducing of airway obstruction. The swimming in a pool did not provoke any obstruction. In 10% of our asthmatics airway obstruction was observed following forced expiration maneuver. Airway obstruction induced by 5 minutes free running outdoors and assessed best by flow-volume curves appeared as a suitable test in the assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness. PMID:1591810

  19. Noninvasive profiling of exercise-induced hypoxemia in competitive cyclists.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Jason C; Robergs, Robert A; Faria, Eric W; Wyatt, Frank B; McCarthy, Jason

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to profile maximal exercise and the incidence of exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH) at three different altitudes within a group of competitive cyclists residing and training at 1,500 m. Ten male cyclists (category I or II professional road cyclists: ages, 27.7 +/- 6.1; weight, 69.9 +/- 6.9 kg) participated in three randomly assigned VO2max tests at sea level (SL), 1,500 m and 3000 m. Arterial saturation (pulse oximetry), ventilation, and power output (PO) were recorded continuously throughout the test. The SaO2 percentages at VO2max were significantly higher at SL when compared with 1500 m (p < 0.001); however, no difference was observed between VO2max values at either altitude (SL: 72.3 +/- 2.5 mL.kg-1.min-1, 1,500 m: 70.6 +/- 2.3 mL.kg-1.min-1), only when compared with 3,000 m: 63.9 +/- 2.1 mL.kg-1.min-1, p < 0.021. Percent SaO2 did correspond with maximal PO, and there was an overall main effect observed between POs as they continually declined from SL to 3,000 m (SL: 403.3 +/- 10.6 W; 1,500 m: 376.1 +/- 9.8 W; 3,000 m: 353.9 +/- 7.8 W; p < 0.0001). The results of this case study revealed that training and residing at 1,500 m did not reduce the incidence of EIAH during maximal exercise at 1,500 m for this selected group of cyclists. PMID:17365952

  20. Air quality and temperature effects on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Anderson, Sandra D; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is exaggerated constriction of the airways usually soon after cessation of exercise. This is most often a response to airway dehydration in the presence of airway inflammation in a person with a responsive bronchial smooth muscle. Severity is related to water content of inspired air and level of ventilation achieved and sustained. Repetitive hyperpnea of dry air during training is associated with airway inflammatory changes and remodeling. A response during exercise that is related to pollution or allergen is considered EIB. Ozone and particulate matter are the most widespread pollutants of concern for the exercising population; chronic exposure can lead to new-onset asthma and EIB. Freshly generated emissions particulate matter less than 100 nm is most harmful. Evidence for acute and long-term effects from exercise while inhaling high levels of ozone and/or particulate matter exists. Much evidence supports a relationship between development of airway disorders and exercise in the chlorinated pool. Swimmers typically do not respond in the pool; however, a large percentage responds to a dry air exercise challenge. Studies support oxidative stress mediated pathology for pollutants and a more severe acute response occurs in the asthmatic. Winter sport athletes and swimmers have a higher prevalence of EIB, asthma and airway remodeling than other athletes and the general population. Because of fossil fuel powered ice resurfacers in ice rinks, ice rink athletes have shown high rates of EIB and asthma. For the athlete training in the urban environment, training during low traffic hours and in low traffic areas is suggested. PMID:25880506

  1. Hyperthermia, dehydration, and osmotic stress: unconventional sources of exercise-induced reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    King, Michelle A; Clanton, Thomas L; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-15

    Evidence of increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is observed in the circulation during exercise in humans. This is exacerbated at elevated body temperatures and attenuated when normal exercise-induced body temperature elevations are suppressed. Why ROS production during exercise is temperature dependent is entirely unknown. This review covers the human exercise studies to date that provide evidence that oxidant and antioxidant changes observed in the blood during exercise are dependent on temperature and fluid balance. We then address possible mechanisms linking exercise with these variables that include shear stress, effects of hemoconcentration, and signaling pathways involving muscle osmoregulation. Since pathways of muscle osmoregulation are rarely discussed in this context, we provide a brief review of what is currently known and unknown about muscle osmoregulation and how it may be linked to oxidant production in exercise and hyperthermia. Both the circulation and the exercising muscle fibers become concentrated with osmolytes during exercise in the heat, resulting in a competition for available water across the muscle sarcolemma and other tissues. We conclude that though multiple mechanisms may be responsible for the changes in oxidant/antioxidant balance in the blood during exercise, a strong case can be made that a significant component of ROS produced during some forms of exercise reflect requirements of adapting to osmotic challenges, hyperthermia challenges, and loss of circulating fluid volume. PMID:26561649

  2. Restoration of fluid balance after exercise-induced dehydration: effects of alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Shirreffs, S M; Maughan, R J

    1997-10-01

    The effect of alcohol consumption on the restoration of fluid and electrolyte balance after exercise-induced dehydration [2.01 +/- 0.10% (SD) of body mass] was investigated. Drinks containing 0, 1, 2, and 4% alcohol were consumed over 60 min beginning 30 min after the end of exercise; a different beverage was consumed in each of four trials. The volume consumed (2,212 +/- 153 ml) was equivalent to 150% of body mass loss. Peak urine flow rate occurred later (P = 0.024) with the 4% beverage. The total volume of urine produced over the 6 h after rehydration, although not different between trials (P = 0.307), tended to increase as the quantity of alcohol ingested increased. The increase in blood (P = 0.013) and plasma (P = 0.050) volume with rehydration was slower when the 4% beverage was consumed and did not increase to values significantly greater than the dehydrated level (P = 0.013 and P = 0.050 for blood volume and plasma volume, respectively); generally, the increase was an inverse function of the quantity of alcohol consumed. These results suggest that alcohol has a negligible diuretic effect when consumed in dilute solution after a moderate level of hypohydration induced by exercise in the heat. There appears to be no difference in recovery from dehydration whether the rehydration beverage is alcohol free or contains up to 2% alcohol, but drinks containing 4% alcohol tend to delay the recovery process. PMID:9338423

  3. fat-1 transgene expression prevents cell culture-induced loss of membrane n-3 fatty acids in activated CD4+ T-cells.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yang-Yi; Kim, Wooki; Callaway, Evelyn; Smith, Roger; Jia, Qian; Zhou, Lan; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2008-12-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of fatty acids on immune cell membrane structure and function, it is often necessary to maintain cells in culture. However, cell culture conditions typically reverse alterations in polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition achieved by dietary lipid manipulation. Therefore, we hypothesized that T-cells from transgenic mice expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans n-3 desaturase (fat-1) gene would be resistant to the culture-induced loss of n-3 PUFA and, therefore, obviate the need to incorporate fatty acids or homologous serum into the medium. CD4+ T-cells were isolated from (i) control wild type (WT) mice fed a safflower oil-n-6 PUFA enriched diet (SAF) devoid of n-3 PUFA, (ii) fat-1 transgenic mice (enriched with endogenous n-3 PUFA) fed a SAF diet, or (iii) WT mice fed a fish oil (FO) based diet enriched in n-3 PUFA. T-cell phospholipids isolated from WT mice fed FO diet (enriched in n-3 PUFA) and fat-1 transgenic mice fed a SAF diet (enriched in n-6 PUFA) were both enriched in n-3 PUFA. As expected, the mol% levels of both n-3 and n-6 PUFA were decreased in cultures of CD4+ T-cells from FO-fed WT mice after 3d in culture. In contrast, the expression of n-3 desaturase prevented the culture-induced decrease of n-3 PUFA in CD4+ T-cells from the transgenic mice. Carboxyfluorescein succinidyl ester (CFSE) -labeled CD4+ T-cells from fat-1/SAF vs. WT/SAF mice stimulated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 for 3d, exhibited a reduced (P<0.05) number of cell divisions. We conclude that fat-1-containing CD4+ T-cells express a physiologically relevant, n-3 PUFA enriched, membrane fatty acid composition which is resistant to conventional cell culture-induced depletion. PMID:18977126

  4. Exercise-induced ROS in heat shock proteins response.

    PubMed

    Dimauro, Ivan; Mercatelli, Neri; Caporossi, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cells have evolved multiple and sophisticated stress response mechanisms aiming to prevent macromolecular (including proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids) damage and to maintain or re-establish cellular homeostasis. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are among the most highly conserved, ubiquitous, and abundant proteins in all organisms. Originally discovered more than 50 years ago through heat shock stress, they display multiple, remarkable roles inside and outside cells under a variety of stresses, including also oxidative stress and radiation, recognizing unfolded or misfolded proteins and facilitating their restructuring. Exercise consists in a combination of physiological stresses, such as metabolic disturbances, changes in circulating levels of hormones, increased temperature, induction of mild to severe inflammatory state, increased production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS). As a consequence, exercise is one of the main stimuli associated with a robust increase in different HSPs in several tissues, which appears to be also fundamental in facilitating the cellular remodeling processes related to the training regime. Among all factors involved in the exercise-related modulation of HSPs level, the ROS production in the contracting muscle or in other tissues represents one of the most attracting, but still under discussion, mechanism. Following exhaustive or damaging muscle exercise, major oxidative damage to proteins and lipids is likely involved in HSP expression, together with mechanically induced damage to muscle proteins and the inflammatory response occurring several days into the recovery period. Instead, the transient and reversible oxidation of proteins by physiological concentrations of ROS seems to be involved in the activation of stress response following non-damaging muscle exercise. This review aims to provide a critical update on the role of HSPs response in exercise-induced adaptation or damage in humans, focusing on experimental

  5. High-fat diet enhances and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency attenuates bone loss in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study determined the effects of a high-fat diet and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 deficiency (PAI-1-/-) on bone structure in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) in lungs. Reduction in bone volume fraction (BV/TV) by 22% and 21%, trabecular number (Tb.N) by 8% and 4% and bone mineral de...

  6. Effects of genetic strain on stress-induced weight and body fat loss in rats: Application to air pollution research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some air pollutants is suspected of contributing to obesity. Hazelton chambers are commonly used in air pollution studies but we found unexpected reductions in body weight and body fat of rats housed in Hazelton chambers under control conditions. We suspect that stres...

  7. Resistance exercise-induced fluid shifts: change in active muscle size and plasma volume

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ploutz-Snyder, L. L.; Convertino, V. A.; Dudley, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the reduction in plasma volume (PV) induced by resistance exercise reflects fluid loss to the extravascular space and subsequently selective increase in cross-sectional area (CSA) of active but not inactive skeletal muscle. We compared changes in active and inactive muscle CSA and PV after barbell squat exercise. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to quantify muscle involvement in exercise and to determine CSA of muscle groups or individual muscles [vasti (VS), adductor (Add), hamstring (Ham), and rectus femoris (RF)]. Muscle involvement in exercise was determined using exercise-induced contrast shift in spin-spin relaxation time (T2)-weighted MR images immediately postexercise. Alterations in muscle size were based on the mean CSA of individual slices. Hematocrit, hemoglobin, and Evans blue dye were used to estimate changes in PV. Muscle CSA and PV data were obtained preexercise and immediately postexercise and 15 and 45 min thereafter. A hierarchy of muscle involvement in exercise was found such that VS > Add > Ham > RF, with the Ham and RF showing essentially no involvement. CSA of the VS and Add muscle groups were increased 10 and 5%, respectively, immediately after exercise in each thigh with no changes in Ham and RF CSA. PV was decreased 22% immediately following exercise. The absolute loss of PV was correlated (r2 = 0.75) with absolute increase in muscle CSA immediately postexercise, supporting the notion that increased muscle size after resistance exercise reflects primarily fluid movement from the vascular space into active but not inactive muscle.

  8. Examination of mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of exercise-induced weight compensation: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Weight loss induced only by exercise is frequently less than expected, possibly because of compensatory changes in energy intake and/or energy expenditure. The purpose of the Examination of Mechanisms (E-MECHANIC) of Exercise-Induced Weight Compensation trial is to examine whether increased energy intake and/or reduced spontaneous activity or energy expenditure (outside of structured exercise) account for the less than expected, exercise-associated weight loss. Methods/Design E-MECHANIC is a three-arm, 6-month randomized (1:1:1) controlled trial. The two intervention arms are exercise doses that reflect current recommendations for (1) general health (8 kcal/kg body weight per week (8 KKW), about 900 kcal/wk) and (2) weight loss (20 KKW, about 2,250 kcal/wk). The third arm, a nonexercise control group, will receive health information only. The sample will include a combined total of 198sedentary, overweight or obese (body mass index: ≥25 kg/m2 to ≤45 kg/m2) men and women ages 18 to 65 years. The exercise dose will be supervised and tightly controlled in an exercise training laboratory. The primary outcome variables are energy intake, which will be measured using doubly labeled water (adjusted for change in energy stores) and laboratory-based food intake tests, and the discrepancy between expected weight loss and observed weight loss. Secondary outcomes include changes in resting metabolic rate (adjusted for change in body mass), activity levels (excluding structured exercise) and body composition. In an effort to guide the development of future interventions, the participants will be behaviorally phenotyped and defined as those who do compensate (that is, fail to lose the amount of weight expected) or do not compensate (that is, lose the amount of weight expected or more). Discussion In this study, we will attempt to identify underlying mechanisms to explain why exercise elicits less weight loss than expected. This information will guide the

  9. Myoglobin A79G polymorphism association with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage.

    PubMed

    Cui, T; Jiang, M S

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the role of A79G, a polymorphism of the myoglobin gene (MB), in susceptibility to exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. Between January 2012 and December 2014, a total of 166 cases with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage and 166 controls were recruited into our study. Genotyping of MB A79G was carried out using polymerase chain reaction coupled with restriction fragment length polymorphism. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we found that the GG genotype of MB A79G was associated with higher risk of exercise-induced muscle damage compared with the wild-type genotype, and the OR (95%CI) was 2.91 (1.20-7.59). Compared with the AA genotype, the AG+GG genotype was associated with a significantly increased risk of exercise-induced muscle damage for those with blood lactic acid ≥1.80 mM (OR = 2.05; 95%CI = 1.09-3.88). In conclusion, we found that the A79G polymorphism of the MB gene plays an important role in influencing the development of exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. PMID:27323063

  10. Adipose Triglyceride Lipase and Hormone-Sensitive Lipase Are Involved in Fat Loss in JunB-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pinent, Montserrat; Prokesch, Andreas; Hackl, Hubert; Voshol, Peter J.; Klatzer, Ariane; Walenta, Evelyn; Panzenboeck, Ute; Kenner, Lukas; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Hoefler, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    Proteins of the activator protein-1 family are known to have roles in many physiological processes such as proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation. However, their role in fat metabolism has yet to be defined in more detail. Here we study the impact of JunB deficiency on the metabolic state of mice. JunB knockout (JunB-KO) mice show markedly decreased weight gain, reduced fat mass, and a low survival rate compared with control mice. If fed a high-fat diet, the weight gain of JunB-KO mice is comparable to control mice and the survival rate improves dramatically. Along with normal expression of adipogenic marker genes in white adipose tissue (WAT) of JunB-KO mice, this suggests that adipogenesis per se is not affected by JunB deficiency. This is supported by in vitro data, because neither JunB-silenced 3T3-L1 cells nor mouse embryonic fibroblasts from JunB-KO mice show a change in adipogenic potential. Interestingly, the key enzymes of lipolysis, adipose triglyceride lipase and hormone-sensitive lipase, were significantly increased in WAT of fasted JunB-KO mice. Concomitantly, the ratio of plasma free fatty acids per gram fat mass was increased, suggesting an elevated lipolytic rate under fasting conditions. Furthermore, up-regulation of TNFα and reduced expression of perilipin indicate that this pathway is also involved in increased lipolytic rate in these mice. Additionally, JunB-KO mice are more insulin sensitive than controls and show up-regulation of lipogenic genes in skeletal muscle, indicating a shuttling of energy substrates from WAT to skeletal muscle. In summary, this study provides valuable insights into the impact of JunB deficiency on the metabolic state of mice. PMID:21540289

  11. High intensity interval training in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation in physically active men

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Silva, Ana Angélica; Moreira, Eduardo; de Melo-Marins, Denise; Schöler, Cinthia M.; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of circulating markers of lipid and protein oxidation following an incremental test to exhaustion before and after 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat. Methods. To address this question, 16 physically active men (age = 23 ± 2 years; body mass = 73 ± 12 kg; height = 173 ± 6 cm; % body fat = 12.5 ± 6 %; body mass index = 24 ± 4 kg/m2) were allocated into 2 groups: control group (n = 8) performing high-intensity interval training at 22°C, 55% relative humidity and heat group (n = 8) training under 35°C, 55% relative humidity. Both groups performed high-intensity interval training 3 times per week for 4 consecutive weeks, accumulating a total of 12 training sessions. Before and after the completion of 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training, participants performed an incremental cycling test until exhaustion under temperate environment (22°C, 55% relative humidity) where blood samples were collected after the test for determination of exercise-induced changes in oxidative damage biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyls). Results. When high-intensity interval training was performed under control conditions, there was an increase in protein carbonyls (p < 0.05) following the incremental test to exhaustion with no changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Conversely, high-intensity interval training performed in high environmental temperature enhanced the incremental exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (p < 0.05) with no changes in protein carbonyls. Conclusion. In conclusion, 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation following a maximal incremental exercise in healthy active men. PMID:27227083

  12. High intensity interval training in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation in physically active men.

    PubMed

    Souza-Silva, Ana Angélica; Moreira, Eduardo; de Melo-Marins, Denise; Schöler, Cinthia M; de Bittencourt, Paulo Ivo Homem; Laitano, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The purpose of this study was to determine the response of circulating markers of lipid and protein oxidation following an incremental test to exhaustion before and after 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat. Methods. To address this question, 16 physically active men (age = 23 ± 2 years; body mass = 73 ± 12 kg; height = 173 ± 6 cm; % body fat = 12.5 ± 6 %; body mass index = 24 ± 4 kg/m(2)) were allocated into 2 groups: control group (n = 8) performing high-intensity interval training at 22°C, 55% relative humidity and heat group (n = 8) training under 35°C, 55% relative humidity. Both groups performed high-intensity interval training 3 times per week for 4 consecutive weeks, accumulating a total of 12 training sessions. Before and after the completion of 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training, participants performed an incremental cycling test until exhaustion under temperate environment (22°C, 55% relative humidity) where blood samples were collected after the test for determination of exercise-induced changes in oxidative damage biomarkers (thiobarbituric acid reactive species and protein carbonyls). Results. When high-intensity interval training was performed under control conditions, there was an increase in protein carbonyls (p < 0.05) following the incremental test to exhaustion with no changes in thiobarbituric acid reactive species. Conversely, high-intensity interval training performed in high environmental temperature enhanced the incremental exercise-induced increases in thiobarbituric acid reactive species (p < 0.05) with no changes in protein carbonyls. Conclusion. In conclusion, 4 weeks of high-intensity interval training performed in the heat enhances exercise-induced lipid peroxidation, but prevents protein oxidation following a maximal incremental exercise in healthy active men. PMID:27227083

  13. Carbenoxolone Treatment Ameliorated Metabolic Syndrome in WNIN/Ob Obese Rats, but Induced Severe Fat Loss and Glucose Intolerance in Lean Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prasad Sakamuri, Siva Sankara Vara; Sukapaka, Mahesh; Prathipati, Vijay Kumar; Nemani, Harishankar; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Pothana, Shailaja; Koppala, Swarupa Rani; Ponday, Lakshmi Raj Kumar; Acharya, Vani; Veetill, Giridharan Nappan; Ayyalasomayajula, Vajreswari

    2012-01-01

    Background 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1) regulates local glucocorticoid action in tissues by catalysing conversion of inactive glucocorticoids to active glucocorticoids. 11β-HSD1 inhibition ameliorates obesity and associated co-morbidities. Here, we tested the effect of 11β-HSD inhibitor, carbenoxolone (CBX) on obesity and associated comorbidities in obese rats of WNIN/Ob strain, a new animal model for genetic obesity. Methodology/Principal Findings Subcutaneous injection of CBX (50 mg/kg body weight) or volume-matched vehicle was given once daily for four weeks to three month-old WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats (n = 6 for each phenotype and for each treatment). Body composition, plasma lipids and hormones were assayed. Hepatic steatosis, adipose tissue morphology, inflammation and fibrosis were also studied. Insulin resistance and glucose intolerance were determined along with tissue glycogen content. Gene expressions were determined in liver and adipose tissue. CBX significantly inhibited 11β-HSD1 activity in liver and adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats. CBX significantly decreased body fat percentage, hypertriglyceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, insulin resistance in obese rats. CBX ameliorated hepatic steatosis, adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation and fibrosis in obese rats. Tissue glycogen content was significantly decreased by CBX in liver and adipose tissue of obese rats. Severe fat loss and glucose- intolerance were observed in lean rats after CBX treatment. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that 11β-HSD1 inhibition by CBX decreases obesity and associated co-morbidities in WNIN/Ob obese rats. Our study supports the hypothesis that inhibition of 11β-HSD1 is a key strategy to treat metabolic syndrome. Severe fat loss and glucose -intolerance by CBX treatment in lean rats suggest that chronic 11β-HSD1 inhibition may lead to insulin resistance in normal conditions. PMID:23284633

  14. Genetic variation and exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for athletic performance, injury and ageing.

    PubMed

    Baumert, Philipp; Lake, Mark J; Stewart, Claire E; Drust, Barry; Erskine, Robert M

    2016-09-01

    Prolonged unaccustomed exercise involving muscle lengthening (eccentric) actions can result in ultrastructural muscle disruption, impaired excitation-contraction coupling, inflammation and muscle protein degradation. This process is associated with delayed onset muscle soreness and is referred to as exercise-induced muscle damage. Although a certain amount of muscle damage may be necessary for adaptation to occur, excessive damage or inadequate recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage can increase injury risk, particularly in older individuals, who experience more damage and require longer to recover from muscle damaging exercise than younger adults. Furthermore, it is apparent that inter-individual variation exists in the response to exercise-induced muscle damage, and there is evidence that genetic variability may play a key role. Although this area of research is in its infancy, certain gene variations, or polymorphisms have been associated with exercise-induced muscle damage (i.e. individuals with certain genotypes experience greater muscle damage, and require longer recovery, following strenuous exercise). These polymorphisms include ACTN3 (R577X, rs1815739), TNF (-308 G>A, rs1800629), IL6 (-174 G>C, rs1800795), and IGF2 (ApaI, 17200 G>A, rs680). Knowing how someone is likely to respond to a particular type of exercise could help coaches/practitioners individualise the exercise training of their athletes/patients, thus maximising recovery and adaptation, while reducing overload-associated injury risk. The purpose of this review is to provide a critical analysis of the literature concerning gene polymorphisms associated with exercise-induced muscle damage, both in young and older individuals, and to highlight the potential mechanisms underpinning these associations, thus providing a better understanding of exercise-induced muscle damage. PMID:27294501

  15. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kao, Tina; Shumsky, Jed S; Murray, Marion; Moxon, Karen A

    2009-06-10

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/d, 5 d/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping, and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single-neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation, but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  16. Lipolytic Markers, Insulin and Resting Fat Oxidation are Associated with Maximal Fat Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S L; Chambers, E S; Fletcher, G; Wallis, G A

    2016-07-01

    The maximal capacity to oxidize fat during exercise (MFO) is associated with 24-h fat balance and insulin sensitivity. Understanding factors that influence MFO could have implications for metabolic health. We investigated relationships between selected plasma metabolites, hormones and overnight-fasted resting fat oxidation rates (Resting), with MFO. Resting fat oxidation and MFO was measured in 57 men with blood collected at rest and during exercise. Plasma glycerol (R=0.39, P=0.033), non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA: R=0.27, P=0.030) and insulin (R=- 0.36, P=0.007) measured at MFO correlated with MFO; only glycerol remained correlated when controlled for resting concentrations (R=0.36, P=0.008). The change in glycerol from rest to MFO correlated with exercise-induced fat oxidation (R=0.32, P=0.012). V˙O 2max correlated with resting fat oxidation (R=0.44, P=0.001) and MFO (R=0.52, P<0.001). Resting fat oxidation correlated with MFO (R=0.55, P<0.001); this remained when controlled for V˙O 2max (R=0.41, P=0.001). This study reports weak-to-moderate, albeit significant, relationships between plasma lipolytic markers, insulin and resting overnight-fasted fat oxidation with MFO and shows the plasma glycerol response to uniquely reflect exercise-induced fat oxidation. V˙O 2max correlates with fat oxidation but the relationship can be dissociated. Interventions to increase fat oxidation for optimal metabolic health would benefit from, but are not reliant on, increases in V˙O 2max. PMID:27116342

  17. [A case of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by various foods which contained flour for thirty years].

    PubMed

    Terao, Hiroshi; Kishikawa, Reiko; Kato, Mariko; Noda, Keishi; Iwanaga, Tomoaki; Shouji, Shunsuke; Nishima, Sankei

    2004-11-01

    The patient was a 65-year-old man with chief complaints of flare, swelling, itching and loss of consciousness. He had a history of diabetes diagnosed at the age of 34 years and was receiving medication from a local doctor. He had experienced systemic flare, swelling and loss of consciousness 20 minutes after drinking beer at a party at the age of 34 years. Since that time, he had frequently experienced urticaria and loss of consciousness while taking a walk after eating various foods (all of which contained flour). In February 2001, he experienced systemic flare, swelling and loss of consciousness when he returned home from a walk after eating a meal that included meat dumplings. Laboratory tests on admission showed a serum IgE level of 253 IU/ml, and the IgE level for flour in a RAST was 2.13 UA/ml (class 2). The results of exercise tolerance tests were normal during fasting, after ingestion of food that did not include allergens (wheat, shrimps and crab) and after ingestion of half of a thick slice of white bread, but systemic wheal and flare reactions appeared during an exercise tolerance test after ingestion of one thick slice of white bread. A diagnosis of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis caused by flour was made on the basis of the results. PMID:15719649

  18. The effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on isometric and dynamic knee extensor strength and vertical jump performance.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Christopher; Eston, Roger

    2002-05-01

    In this study, we assessed the effect of exercise-induced muscle damage on knee extensor muscle strength during isometric, concentric and eccentric actions at 1.57 rad x s(-1) and vertical jump performance under conditions of squat jump, countermovement jump and drop jump. The eight participants (5 males, 3 females) were aged 29.5+/-7.1 years (mean +/- s). These variables, together with plasma creatine kinase (CK), were measured before, 1 h after and 1, 2, 3, 4 and 7 days after a bout of muscle damaging exercise: 100 barbell squats (10 sets x 10 repetitions at 70% body mass load). Strength was reduced for 4 days (P< 0.05) but no significant differences (P> 0.05) were apparent in the magnitude or rate of recovery of strength between isometric, concentric and eccentric muscle actions. The overall decline in vertical jump performance was dependent on jump method: squat jump performance was affected to a greater extent than countermovement (91.6+/-1.1% vs 95.2+/-1.3% of pre-exercise values, P< 0.05) and drop jump (95.2+/-1.4%, P< 0.05) performance. Creatine kinase was elevated (P < 0.05) above baseline 1 h after exercise, peaked on day 1 and remained significantly elevated on days 2 and 3. Strength loss after exercise-induced muscle damage was independent of the muscle action being performed. However, the impairment of muscle function was attenuated when the stretch-shortening cycle was used in vertical jumping performance. PMID:12043831

  19. Randomised comparison of diets for maintaining obese subjects' weight after major weight loss: ad lib, low fat, high carbohydrate diet v fixed energy intake.

    PubMed Central

    Toubro, S.; Astrup, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare importance of rate of initial weight loss for long term outcome in obese patients and to compare efficacy of two different weight maintenance programmes. DESIGN: Subjects were randomised to either rapid or slow initial weight loss. Completing patients were re-randomised to one year weight maintenance programme of ad lib diet or fixed energy intake diet. Patients were followed up one year later. SETTING: University research department in Copenhagen, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 43 (41 women) obese adults (body mass index 27-40) who were otherwise healthy living in or around Copenhagen. INTERVENTIONS: 8 weeks of low energy diet (2 MJ/day) or 17 weeks of conventional diet (5 MJ/day), both supported by an anorectic compound (ephedrine 20 mg and caffeine 200 mg thrice daily); one year weight maintenance programme of ad lib, low fat, high carbohydrate diet or fixed energy intake diet (< or = 7.8 MJ/day), both with reinforcement sessions 2-3 times monthly. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean initial weight loss and proportion of patients maintaining a weight loss of > 5 kg at follow up. RESULTS: Mean initial weight loss was 12.6 kg (95% confidence interval 10.9 to 14.3 kg) in rapid weight loss group and 12.6 (9.9 to 15.3) kg in conventional diet group. Rate of initial weight loss had no effect on weight maintenance after 6 or 12 months of weight maintenance or at follow up. After weight maintenance programme, the ad lib group had maintained 13.2 (8.1 to 18.3) kg of the initial weight loss of 13.5 (11.4 to 15.5) kg, and the fixed energy intake group had maintained 9.7 (6.1 to 13.3) kg of the initial 13.8 (11.8 to 15.7) kg weight loss (group difference 3.5 (-2.4 to 9.3) kg). Regained weight at follow up was greater in fixed energy intake group than in ad lib group (11.3 (7.1 to 15.5) kg v 5.4 (2.3 to 8.6) kg, group difference 5.9 (0.7 to 11.1) kg, P < 0.03). At follow up, 65% of ad lib group and 40% of fixed energy intake group had maintained a weight loss of > 5 kg (P

  20. Coronary arteriography and left ventriculography during spontaneous and exercise-induced ST segment elevation in patients with variant angina

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, Y.; Ozaki, M.; Ogawa, H.; Naito, H.; Yoshino, F.; Katayama, K.; Fujii, T.; Matsuzaki, M.; Kusukawa, R.

    1983-09-01

    The present study is an angiographic demonstration of coronary artery spasm during both spontaneous and exercise-induced angina in three patients with variant angina. In each case, clinical, ECG, coronary angiographic, and left ventriculographic observations were made at rest, during spontaneous angina, and during exercise-induced angina. The character of chest pain was similar during spontaneous and exercise-induced episodes. ST segment elevation was present in the anterior ECG leads during both episodes. The left anterior descending coronary artery became partially or totally obstructed during both types of attacks. When coronary spasm was demonstrated during both types of attacks, left ventriculography disclosed akinetic or dyskinetic wall motion in the area supplied by the involved artery. In those patients with reproducible exercise-induced ST segment elevation and chest pain, thallium-201 scintigraphy showed areas of reversible anteroseptal hypoperfusion. Thus in selected patients exercise-induced attacks of angina were similar to spontaneous episodes.

  1. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  2. Increased Protein Maintains Nitrogen Balance during Exercise-Induced Energy Deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PURPOSE: This study examined how a high-protein diet affected nitrogen balance and protein turnover during an exercise-induced energy deficit. METHODS: Twenty-two men completed a 4-d (D1-4) baseline period (BL) of an energy balance diet while maintaining usual physical activity level, followed by 7 ...

  3. Exercise-induced haemoptysis as a rare presentation of a rare lung disease.

    PubMed

    Mihalek, Andrew D; Haney, Carissa; Merino, Maria; Roy-Chowdhuri, Sinchita; Moss, Joel; Olivier, Kenneth N

    2016-09-01

    Amyloid primarily affecting the lungs is a seldom seen clinical entity. This case discusses the work-up of a patient presenting with exercise-induced haemoptysis and diffuse cystic lung disease on radiographic imaging. The common clinical and radiographic findings of diffuse cystic lung diseases as well as a brief overview of pulmonary amyloid are presented. PMID:27272655

  4. Unusual Case of Exercise-Induced ST Segment Elevation Alternans: Successful Treatment with Transluminal Angioplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mammen, George; Krajcer, Zvonimir; Leachman, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Alternans of the ST segment is sometimes observed in experimental studies but is rarely seen in the clinical setting. Described is a case of exercise-induced ST segment elevation alternans that was successfully treated with transluminal coronary artery angioplasty. Theories regarding the cause and mechanism of this phenomenon are discussed. Images PMID:15227140

  5. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  6. The Effects of Creatine Supplementation on Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Eric S.; Gunn, Bridget; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the effects of oral creatine (Cr) supplementation on markers of exercise-induced muscle damage following high-force eccentric exercise in men randomly administered Cr or placebo. Results indicated that 5 days of Cr supplementation did not reduce indirect makers of muscle damage or enhance recovery from high-force eccentric exercise.…

  7. High protein diet maintains glucose production during exercise-induced energy deficit: a controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inadequate energy intake induces changes in endogenous glucose production (GP) to preserve muscle mass. Whether addition provision of dietary protein modulates GP response to energy deficit is unclear. The objective was to determine whether exercise-induced energy deficit effects on glucose metaboli...

  8. Exercise Challenge for Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm. Confirming Presence, Evaluating Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Ted A.

    1995-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchospasm commonly strikes young people, keeping many away from activity. The exercise challenge test (a powerful tool in diagnosing the condition, fine-tuning treatment, and improving patient compliance) can help get patients back in action. Knowing how to interpret and use test results helps physicians expedite effective…

  9. Effect of a hypocaloric diet, increased protein intake and resistance training on lean mass gains and fat mass loss in overweight police officers.

    PubMed

    Demling, R H; DeSanti, L

    2000-01-01

    We compare the effects of a moderate hypocaloric, high-protein diet and resistance training, using two different protein supplements, versus hypocaloric diet alone on body compositional changes in overweight police officers. A randomized, prospective 12-week study was performed comparing the changes in body composition produced by three different treatment modalities in three study groups. One group (n = 10) was placed on a nonlipogenic, hypocaloric diet alone (80% of predicted needs). A second group (n = 14) was placed on the hypocaloric diet plus resistance exercise plus a high-protein intake (1.5 g/kg/day) using a casein protein hydrolysate. In the third group (n = 14) treatment was identical to the second, except for the use of a whey protein hydrolysate. We found that weight loss was approximately 2.5 kg in all three groups. Mean percent body fat with diet alone decreased from a baseline of 27 +/- 1.8 to 25 +/- 1.3% at 12 weeks. With diet, exercise and casein the decrease was from 26 +/- 1.7 to 18 +/- 1.1% and with diet, exercise and whey protein the decrease was from 27 +/- 1.6 to 23 +/- 1.3%. The mean fat loss was 2. 5 +/- 0.6, 7.0 +/- 2.1 and 4.2 +/- 0.9 kg in the three groups, respectively. Lean mass gains in the three groups did not change for diet alone, versus gains of 4 +/- 1.4 and 2 +/- 0.7 kg in the casein and whey groups, respectively. Mean increase in strength for chest, shoulder and legs was 59 +/- 9% for casein and 29 +/- 9% for whey, a significant group difference. This significant difference in body composition and strength is likely due to improved nitrogen retention and overall anticatabolic effects caused by the peptide components of the casein hydrolysate. PMID:10838463

  10. Loss of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Function Partially Protects against Peripheral and Cardiac Glucose Metabolic Derangements During a Long-Term High-Fat Diet

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Ellen E.; Rendina-Ruedy, Elisabeth; Smith, Brenda J.; Lacombe, Veronique A.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a chronic inflammatory disease that carries a high risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the pathophysiological link between these disorders is not well known. We hypothesize that TLR4 signaling mediates high fat diet (HFD)-induced peripheral and cardiac glucose metabolic derangements. Mice with a loss-of-function mutation in TLR4 (C3H/HeJ) and age-matched control (C57BL/6) mice were fed either a high-fat diet or normal diet for 16 weeks. Glucose tolerance and plasma insulin were measured. Protein expression of glucose transporters (GLUT), AKT (phosphorylated and total), and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TNF-α and SOCS-3) were quantified in the heart using Western Blotting. Both groups fed a long-term HFD had increased body weight, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as impaired glucose tolerance compared to mice fed a normal diet. TLR4-mutant mice were partially protected against long-term HFD-induced insulin resistance. In control mice, feeding a HFD decreased cardiac crude membrane GLUT4 protein content, which was partially rescued in TLR4-mutant mice. TLR4-mutant mice fed a HFD also had increased expression of GLUT8, a novel isoform, compared to mice fed a normal diet. GLUT8 content was positively correlated with SOCS-3 and IL-6 expression in the heart. No significant differences in cytokine expression were observed between groups, suggesting a lack of inflammation in the heart following a HFD. Loss of TLR4 function partially restored a healthy metabolic phenotype, suggesting that TLR4 signaling is a key mechanism in HFD-induced peripheral and cardiac insulin resistance. Our data further suggest that TLR4 exerts its detrimental metabolic effects in the myocardium through a cytokine-independent pathway. PMID:26539824

  11. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: The effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, James P

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is very common in both patients with asthma and those who are otherwise thought to be normal. The intensity of exercise as well as the type of exercise is important in producing symptoms. This may make some types of exercise such as swimming more suitable and extended running more difficult for patients with this condition. A better understanding of EIB will allow the physician to direct the patient towards a type of exercise and medications that can result in a more active lifestyle without the same concern for resulting symptoms. This is especially important for schoolchildren who are usually enrolled in physical education classes and elite athletes who may desire to participate in competitive sports. Fortunately several medications (short- and long-acting β2-agonists, cromolyn, nedocromil, inhaled corticosteroids, and more recently leukotriene modifiers) have been shown to be effective in preventing or attenuating the effects of exercise in many patients. In addition, inhaled β2-agonists have been shown to quickly reverse the airway obstruction that develops in patients and continue to be the reliever medications of choice. Inhaled corticosteroids are increasingly being recommended as regular therapy now that the role of inflammation and airway injury has been identified in EIB. With the discovery that there is a release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes from cells in the airway following exercise with resulting airway obstruction in susceptible individuals, interest has turned to attenuating their effects with mediator antagonists especially those that block the effects of leukotrienes. Studies with an oral leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, have shown beneficial effects in adults and children aged as young as 6 years with EIB. These effects can be demonstrated as soon as two hours and as long as 24 hours after administration without a demonstrated loss of a protective effect after months of treatment

  12. Pathophysiological mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis: an EAACI position statement.

    PubMed

    Ansley, L; Bonini, M; Delgado, L; Del Giacco, S; Du Toit, G; Khaitov, M; Kurowski, M; Hull, J H; Moreira, A; Robson-Ansley, P J

    2015-10-01

    This document is the result of a consensus on the mechanisms of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn), an unpredictable and potentially fatal syndrome. A multidisciplinary panel of experts including exercise physiologists, allergists, lung physicians, paediatricians and a biostatistician reached the given consensus. Exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIAn) describes a rare and potentially fatal syndrome in which anaphylaxis occurs in conjunction with exercise. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying EIAn have not yet been elucidated although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. This review evaluates the validity of each of the popular theories in relation to exercise physiology and immunology. On the basis of this evidence, it is concluded that proposed mechanisms lack validity, and it is recommended that a global research network is developed with a common approach to the diagnosis and treatment of EIAn in order to gain sufficient power for scientific evaluation. PMID:26100553

  13. Exercise-induced neuroprotective effects on neurodegenerative diseases: the key role of trophic factors.

    PubMed

    Campos, Carlos; Rocha, Nuno Barbosa F; Lattari, Eduardo; Paes, Flávia; Nardi, António E; Machado, Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    Age-related neurodegenerative disorders, like Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease, are becoming a major issue to public health care. Currently, there is no effective pharmacological treatment to address cognitive impairment in these patients. Here, we aim to explore the role of exercise-induced trophic factor enhancement in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in patients with neurodegenerative diseases. There is a significant amount of evidence from animal and human studies that links neurodegenerative related cognitive deficits with changes on brain and peripheral trophic factor levels. Several trials with elderly individuals and patients with neurodegenerative diseases report exercise induced cognitive improvements and changes on trophic factor levels including BDNF, IGF-I, among others. Further studies with healthy aging and clinical populations are needed to understand how diverse exercise interventions produce different variations in trophic factor signaling. Genetic profiles and potential confounders regarding trophic factors should also be addressed in future trials. PMID:27086703

  14. Polyphenols in Exercise Performance and Prevention of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Hrelia, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Although moderate physical exercise is considered an essential component of a healthy lifestyle that leads the organism to adapt itself to different stresses, exercise, especially when exhaustive, is also known to induce oxidative stress, inflammation, and muscle damage. Many efforts have been carried out to identify dietary strategies or micronutrients able to prevent or at least attenuate the exercise-induced muscle damage and stress. Unfortunately most studies have failed to show protection, and at the present time data supporting the protective effect of micronutrients, as antioxidant vitamins, are weak and trivial. This review focuses on those polyphenols, present in the plant kingdom, that have been recently suggested to exert some positive effects on exercise-induced muscle damage and oxidative stress. In the last decade flavonoids as quercetin, catechins, and other polyphenols as resveratrol have caught the scientists attention. However, at the present time drawing a clear and definitive conclusion seems to be untimely. PMID:23983900

  15. Xanthine-based KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/SR-B1, LDL via LDLRs, and HSL via PKA/PKG for hepatic fat loss[S

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Wu, Bin-Nan; Liu, Chung-Pin; Yang, Tzu-Yang; Kao, Li-Pin; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Lai, Wen-Ter; Chen, Ing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI)/eNOS enhancer KMUP-1, targeting G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), improves dyslipidemia. We compared its lipid-lowering effects with simvastatin and explored hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) translocation in hepatic fat loss. KMUP-1 HCl (1, 2.5, and 5 mg/kg/day) and simvastatin (5 mg/kg/day) were administered in C57BL/6J male mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) by gavage for 8 weeks. KMUP-1 inhibited HFD-induced plasma/liver TG, total cholesterol, and LDL; increased HDL/3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR)/Rho kinase II (ROCK II)/PPARγ/ABCA1; and decreased liver and body weight. KMUP-1 HCl in drinking water (2.5 mg/200 ml tap water) for 1–14 or 8–14 weeks decreased HFD-induced liver and body weight and scavenger receptor class B type I expression and increased protein kinase A (PKA)/PKG/LDLRs/HSL expression and immunoreactivity. In HepG2 cells incubated with serum or exogenous mevalonate, KMUP-1 (10−7∼10−5 M) reversed HMGR expression by feedback regulation, colocalized expression of ABCA1/apolipoprotein A-I/LXRα/PPARγ, and reduced exogenous geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate/farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP)-induced RhoA/ROCK II expression. A guanosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) antagonist reversed KMUP-1-induced ROCK II reduction, indicating cGMP/eNOS involvement. KMUP-1 inceased PKG and LDLRs surrounded by LDL and restored oxidized LDL-induced PKA expresion. Unlike simvastatin, KMUP-1 could not inhibit 14C mevalonate formation. KMUP-1 could, but simvastatin could not, decrease ROCK II expression by exogenous FPP/CGPP. KMUP-1 improves HDL via PPARγ/LXRα/ABCA1/Apo-I expression and increases LDLRs/PKA/PKG/HSL expression and immunoreactivity, leading to TG hydrolysis to lower hepatic fat and body weight. PMID:26351364

  16. Suppression of exercise-induced angina by magnesium sulfate in patients with variant angina

    SciTech Connect

    Kugiyama, K.; Yasue, H.; Okumura, K.; Goto, K.; Minoda, K.; Miyagi, H.; Matsuyama, K.; Kojima, A.; Koga, Y.; Takahashi, M.

    1988-11-01

    The effects of intravenous magnesium on exercise-induced angina were examined in 15 patients with variant angina and in 13 patients with stable effort angina and were compared with those of placebo. Symptom-limited bicycle exercise and thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy were performed after intravenous administration of 0.27 mmol/kg body weight of magnesium sulfate and after placebo on different days. In all patients, serum magnesium levels after administration of magnesium sulfate were about twofold higher than levels after placebo. Exercise-induced angina associated with transient ST segment elevation occurred in 11 patients with variant angina receiving placebo and in only 2 of these patients receiving magnesium (p less than 0.005). On the other hand, exercise-induced angina was not suppressed by magnesium in any patient with stable effort angina. In these patients there was no significant difference in exercise duration after administration of placebo versus after administration of magnesium. The size of the perfusion defect as measured by thallium-201 scintigraphy was significantly less in patients with variant angina receiving magnesium than that in those receiving placebo (p less than 0.001), whereas it was not significantly different in patients with stable effort angina receiving placebo versus magnesium. In conclusion, exercise-induced angina is suppressed by intravenous magnesium in patients with variant angina but not in patients with stable effort angina. This beneficial effect of magnesium in patients with variant angina is most likely due to improvement of regional myocardial blood flow by suppression of coronary artery spasm.

  17. PGC-1α promotes exercise-induced autophagy in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Halling, Jens F; Ringholm, Stine; Nielsen, Maja M; Overby, Peter; Pilegaard, Henriette

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence suggests that exercise stimulates the degradation of cellular components in skeletal muscle through activation of autophagy, but the time course of the autophagy response during recovery from exercise has not been determined. Furthermore, the regulatory mechanisms behind exercise-induced autophagy remain unclear, although the muscle oxidative phenotype has been linked with basal autophagy levels. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of the key regulator of muscle oxidative capacity, PGC-1α, in exercise-induced autophagy at several time points during recovery. Mice with transgenic muscle-specific overexpression (TG) or knockout (MKO) of PGC-1α and their respective littermate controls were subjected to a single 1 h bout of treadmill running and euthanized immediately (0 h), 2, 6, and 10 h after exercise. In the PGC-1α MKO strain, quadriceps protein content of the autophagy marker LC3II was increased from 2 h into recovery in lox/lox control, but not in MKO mice. In the PGC-1α TG strain, quadriceps protein content of LC3II was increased from 2 h after exercise in TG, but not in WT. Although AMPK and ACC phosphorylation was increased immediately following exercise, the observed exercise-induced autophagy response was not associated with phosphorylation of the AMPK-target ULK1. However, lower protein carbonyl content was observed in lox/lox and TG mice after exercise coinciding with the increased LC3 lipidation. In conclusion, the present results suggest a role of skeletal muscle PGC-1α in coordinating several exercise-induced adaptive responses including autophagic removal of damaged cellular components. PMID:26869683

  18. Exercise excess pressure and exercise-induced albuminuria in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Climie, Rachel E D; Srikanth, Velandai; Keith, Laura J; Davies, Justin E; Sharman, James E

    2015-05-01

    Exercise-induced albuminuria is common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in response to maximal exercise, but the response to light-moderate exercise is unclear. Patients with T2DM have abnormal central hemodynamics and greater propensity for exercise hypertension. This study sought to determine the relationship between light-moderate exercise central hemodynamics (including aortic reservoir and excess pressure) and exercise-induced albuminuria. Thirty-nine T2DM (62 ± 9 yr; 49% male) and 39 nondiabetic controls (53 ± 9 yr; 51% male) were examined at rest and during 20 min of light-moderate cycle exercise (30 W; 50 revolutions/min). Albuminuria was assessed by the albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) at rest and 30 min postexercise. Hemodynamics recorded included brachial and central blood pressure (BP), aortic stiffness, augmented pressure (AP), aortic reservoir pressure, and excess pressure integral (Pexcess). There was no difference in ACR between groups before exercise (P > 0.05). Exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM but not controls (1.73 ± 1.43 vs. 0.53 ± 1.0 mg/mol, P = 0.002). All central hemodynamic variables were significantly higher during exercise in T2DM (i.e., Pexcess, systolic BP and AP; P < 0.01 all). In T2DM (but not controls), exercise Pexcess was associated with postexercise ACR (r = 0.51, P = 0.002), and this relationship was independent of age, sex, body mass index, heart rate, aortic stiffness, antihypertensive medication, and ambulatory daytime systolic BP (β = 0.003, P = 0.003). Light-moderate exercise induced a significant rise in ACR in T2DM, and this was independently associated with Pexcess, a potential marker of vascular dysfunction. These novel findings suggest that Pexcess could be important for appropriate renal function in T2DM. PMID:25724495

  19. Exercise-induced metacarpophalangeal joint adaptation in the Thoroughbred racehorse.

    PubMed

    Muir, P; Peterson, A L; Sample, S J; Scollay, M C; Markel, M D; Kalscheur, V L

    2008-12-01

    between groups. We conclude that differences in site-specific microdamage accumulation and associated targeted remodeling between athletic and non-athletic horses are much greater than differences in subchondral osteocyte morphology. However, the presence of atypical subchondral bone matrix in athletic horses was associated with extensive osteocyte loss. Although osteocyte mechanotransduction is considered important for functional adaptation, in this model, adaptation is likely regulated by multiple mechanotransduction pathways. PMID:19094186

  20. Ultra-endurance exercise induces stress and inflammation and affects circulating hematopoietic progenitor cell function.

    PubMed

    Stelzer, I; Kröpfl, J M; Fuchs, R; Pekovits, K; Mangge, H; Raggam, R B; Gruber, H-J; Prüller, F; Hofmann, P; Truschnig-Wilders, M; Obermayer-Pietsch, B; Haushofer, A C; Kessler, H H; Mächler, P

    2015-10-01

    Although amateur sports have become increasingly competitive within recent decades, there are as yet few studies on the possible health risks for athletes. This study aims to determine the impact of ultra-endurance exercise-induced stress on the number and function of circulating hematopoietic progenitor cells (CPCs) and hematological, inflammatory, clinical, metabolic, and stress parameters in moderately trained amateur athletes. Following ultra-endurance exercise, there were significant increases in leukocytes, platelets, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, tissue enzymes, blood lactate, serum cortisol, and matrix metalloproteinase-9. Ultra-endurance exercise did not influence the number of CPCs but resulted in a highly significant decline of CPC functionality after the competition. Furthermore, Epstein-Barr virus was seen to be reactivated in one of seven athletes. The link between exercise-induced stress and decline of CPC functionality is supported by a negative correlation between cortisol and CPC function. We conclude that ultra-endurance exercise induces metabolic stress and an inflammatory response that affects not only mature hematopoietic cells but also the function of the immature hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell fraction, which make up the immune system and provide for regeneration. PMID:25438993

  1. Exercise-induced asthma: critical analysis of the protective role of montelukast

    PubMed Central

    Carver, Terrence W

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced asthma/exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIA/EIB) is a prevalent and clinically important disease affecting young children through older adulthood. These terms are often used interchangeably and the differences are not clearly defined in the literature. The pathogenesis of EIA/EIB may be different in those with persistent asthma compared to those with exercise-induced symptoms only. The natural history of EIA is unclear and may be different for elite athletes. Leukotriene biology has helped the understanding of EIB. The type and intensity of exercise are important factors for EIB. Exercise participation is necessary for proper development and control of EIA is recommended. Symptoms of EIB should be confirmed by proper testing. Biologic markers may also be helpful in diagnosis. Not all exercise symptoms are from EIB. Many medication and nonpharmacologic treatments are available. Asthma education is an important component of managing EIA. Many medications have been tested and the comparisons are complicated. Montelukast is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved asthma and EIB controller and has a number of potential advantages to other asthma medications including short onset of action, ease of use, and lack of tolerance. Not all patients improve with montelukast and rescue medication should be available. PMID:21437147

  2. Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis due to wheat in a young woman.

    PubMed

    Ahanchian, Hamid; Farid, Reza; Ansari, Elham; Kianifar, Hamid Reza; Jabbari Azad, Farahzad; Jafari, Seyed Ali; Purreza, Reza; Noorizadeh, Shadi

    2013-03-01

    Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy is a rare condition. However, the occurrence of anaphylaxis is increasing especially in young people. The diagnosis of anaphylaxis is based on clinical criteria and can be supported by laboratory tests such as serum tryptase and positive skin test results for specific IgE to potential triggering allergens. Anaphylaxis prevention needs strict avoidance of confirmed relevant allergen. Food-exercise challenge test may be an acceptable method for diagnosis of Food Dependent Exercise-Induced Allergy and dietary elimination of food is recommended to manage it. In this study, a 32 year-old woman visited the allergy clinic with a history of several episodes of hives since 11 years ago and 3 life-threatening attacks of anaphylaxis during the previous 6 months. The onsets of majority of these attacks were due to physical activity after breakfast. On Blood RAST test, the panel of common food Allergens was used and she had positive test only to wheat flour. On skin prick tests for common food allergens she showed a 6 millimeter wheal with 14 mm flare to Wheat Extract. The rest of allergens were negative.The patient was diagnosed as wheat-dependent exercise-induced, and all foods containing wheat were omitted from her diet. In this report we emphasized on the importance of careful history taking in anaphylaxis diagnosis. PMID:23454785

  3. [Exercise-induced asthma in children and oral terbutaline. A dose-response relationship study].

    PubMed

    Hertz, B; Fuglsang, G; Holm, E B

    1994-09-26

    We wanted to assess the protective effects on exercise-induced asthma as well as the clinical efficacy and safety of increasing doses of a new sustained-release formulation of terbutaline sulphate in 17 asthmatic children aged 6-12 years (mean 9 years). Placebo, 2, 4, and 6 mg terbutaline were given b.i.d. for 14 days in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. At the end of each two week period, an exercise test was performed and plasma terbutaline was measured. Compared with placebo, no significant effect was seen on asthma symptoms monitored at home, or on exercise-induced asthma. The percentage falls in FEV1 after the exercise test were 36, 35, 27 and 28%, after placebo, 4, 8 and 12 mg terbutaline/day, respectively. A small but statistically significant dose-related increase was seen in morning and evening peak expiratory flow (PEF) recordings. It is concluded that continuous treatment, even with high doses or oral terbutaline, does not offer clinically useful protection against exercise-induced asthma. PMID:7985255

  4. Exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias in congestive heart failure and role of ACE inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hasija, P K; Karloopia, S D; Shahi, B N; Chauhan, S S

    1998-02-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are considered to be related to left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. ACE inhibitors though improve LV function their beneficial role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias is not established. To study the effects of ACE inhibitors on exercise capacity vis-a-vis their role on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias, 25 patients of congestive heart failure (CHF) of various etiologies in NYHA Class II and III were subjected to a prospective randomised controlled trial. The control group comprising of 12 patients received conventional treatment (digitalis and diuretics) and the test group was given enalapril/captopril in addition as tolerated. They were followed up for 3 months. Exercise testing on treadmill and monitoring of clinical and biochemical parameters were done at the beginning and end of study in all cases. Ventricular arrhythmias observed during exercise and post-exercise for 10 minutes was analysed using Lown's grading for frequency and severity of ventricular arrhythmia. The mean exercise duration showed significant improvement on ACE inhibitor as compared to the control group (p < 0.05) however there was no significant change in the grades of arrhythmia. Serum electrolytes and other bio-chemical parameter were within normal range. It is concluded that effect of ACE inhibitor on improving functional capacity in CHF is independent of it's any effect on exercise-induced ventricular arrhythmias. PMID:11273109

  5. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients. PMID:26112284

  6. Acute exercise induces biphasic increase in respiratory mRNA in skeletal muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Kizaki, Takako; Haga, Shukoh; Ohno, Hideki; Takemasa, Tohru

    2008-04-04

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} coactivator-1{alpha} (PGC-1{alpha}) promotes the expression of oxidative enzymes in skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that activation of the p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to exercise was associated with exercise-induced PGC-1{alpha} and respiratory enzymes expression and aimed to demonstrate this under the physiological level. We subjected mice to a single bout of treadmill running and found that the exercise induced a biphasic increase in the expression of respiratory enzymes mRNA. The second phase of the increase was accompanied by an increase in PGC-1{alpha} protein, but the other was not. Administration of SB203580 (SB), an inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suppressed the increase in PGC-1{alpha} expression and respiratory enzymes mRNA in both phases. These data suggest that p38 MAPK is associated with the exercise-induced expression of PGC-1{alpha} and biphasic increase in respiratory enzyme mRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle under physiological conditions.

  7. Primary renal magnesium wasting: an unusual clinical picture of exercise-induced symptoms.

    PubMed

    Stark, Christopher M; Nylund, Cade M; Gorman, Gregory H; Lechner, Brent L

    2016-04-01

    Magnesium is one of the most abundant cations in the human body and plays a key role as a metabolic enzyme cofactor and regulatory ion for neurons and cardiomyocytes. Hypomagnesemia due to isolated primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical condition typically associated with neurological hyperexcitability. Exercise-related gastrointestinal symptoms are caused by ischemic, mechanical, or neurohormonal changes. The role of hypomagnesemia in gastrointestinal symptoms is not well understood. We present a case of a 15-year-old male who presented with exercise-induced abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting, who was found to have profound hypomagnesemia and inappropriately elevated fractional excretion of magnesium (FEMg). Testing for multiple intrinsic and extrinsic etiologies of renal magnesium wasting was inconclusive. He was diagnosed with primary renal magnesium wasting and his symptoms resolved acutely with intravenous magnesium sulfate and with long-term oral magnesium chloride. Primary renal magnesium wasting is a rare clinical entity that can cause extreme hypomagnesemia. It has not been associated previously with exercise-induced gastrointestinal symptoms. The effects of hypomagnesemia on the human gastrointestinal tract are not well established. This case offers unique insights into the importance of magnesium homeostasis in the gastrointestinal tract. Exercise-induced splanchnic hypoperfusion may contribute to gastrointestinal symptoms observed in this chronically hypomagnesemic patient. PMID:27117800

  8. Effects of inhaled thiazinamium chloride on histamine-induced and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Gong, H; Brik, A; Tashkin, D P; Dauphinee, B

    1989-03-01

    The protective efficacy of aerosolized thiazinamium chloride (TC) against histamine-induced and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was evaluated in 15 subjects with stable, mild asthma. Following reproducible bronchoprovocation with these stimuli, each subject underwent randomized, double-blind, crossover pretreatment with single doses of nebulized TC (300, 600, and 900 micrograms), placebo, and an active control drug (metaproterenol or cromolyn), followed by histamine or exercise challenge (two separate protocols). The results indicated that all doses of TC significantly blocked histamine-induced bronchoconstriction as compared with placebo. Overall, aerosolized TC was ineffective in blocking exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, although 900 micrograms TC tended to be more effective than placebo. Thiazinamium (900 micrograms) produced a modest bronchodilator effect. No clinically significant adverse effects related to TC occurred. We conclude that aerosolized TC is effective in attenuating histamine-induced but not exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in the doses studied. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the role of TC in asthma therapy. PMID:2564267

  9. Effects of Visceral Fat Accumulation Awareness on a Web-Based Weight-Loss Program: Japanese Study of Visceral Adiposity and Lifestyle Information—Utilization and Evaluation (J-VALUE)

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Naoki; Dohi, Seitaro; Sakata, Koichi; Hagiwara, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Takanobu; Katashima, Mitsuhiro; Yasumasu, Takeshi; Study Group, J-VALUE

    2013-01-01

    A reduction of visceral fat is important for improvement of metabolic risk. This study was designed to compare the effects of a web-based program alone or together with measurement and self-awareness of accumulated visceral fat in Japanese workers. A new noninvasive device to measure visceral fat accumulation was introduced, and efficacy on weight-loss and improvement of healthy behaviors were examined. This study was conducted according to Helsinki declaration and approved by the ethical committee of Japan Hospital Organization, National Kyoto Hospital. Two-hundred and sixteen overweight and obese males with BMI of more than 23 participated from 8 healthcare offices of 3 Japanese private companies. Subjects were randomly allocated into control group, Web-based weight-loss program (Web), or Web + Visceral fat measurement group (Web + VFA). Eighty-one percent of participants completed the study. Reductions of body weight, waist circumference, and BMI were the largest in Web + VFA group, and the differences between groups were significant by ANOVA. Improvements of healthy behaviors were the largest in Web + VFA group, and the differences of healthy eating improvement scores between Web + VFA and control groups were significant. Our findings suggest that measurement and awareness of visceral fat are effective in weight reduction in overweight and obese males in the workplace. PMID:24555144

  10. Abnormal expression of key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway of articular cartilage in a rat model of exercise-induced osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHEN-SHEN; ZHOU, PU; ZHANG, YANQIU

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the molecular pathogenesis of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway in exercise-induced osteoarthritis (OA), 30 male healthy Sprague Dawley rats were divided into three groups (control, normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups) in order to establish the exercise-induced OA rat model. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Runx-2, BMP-2, Ctnnb1, Sox-9, collagen II, Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin in chon-drocytes were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunohistochemical staining. The mRNA levels of Runx-2, BMP-2 and Ctnnb1 were upregulated in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups; while Runx-2 and BMP-2 were upregulated in the injured exercise-induced OA group when compared with the normal exercise-induced OA group. The protein levels of Mmp-13, Wnt-3a and β-catenin were increased and collagen II was reduced in the normal exercise-induced OA and injured exercise-induced OA groups. Ctnnb1, Wnt-3a and β-catenin, which are key genes and proteins in the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway, were abnormally expressed in chondrocytes of the exercise-induced OA rat model. Ctnnb1, β-catenin and Wnt-3a were suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA by abnormally activating the Wnt/β-catenin pathway during physical exercise due to excessive pressure. The results of the present study may provide an improved understanding of the pathogenesis of exercise-induced OA. PMID:26794964

  11. Very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet v. low-fat diet for long-term weight loss: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Nassib Bezerra; de Melo, Ingrid Sofia Vieira; de Oliveira, Suzana Lima; da Rocha Ataide, Terezinha

    2013-10-01

    The role of very-low-carbohydrate ketogenic diets (VLCKD) in the long-term management of obesity is not well established. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate whether individuals assigned to a VLCKD (i.e. a diet with no more than 50 g carbohydrates/d) achieve better long-term body weight and cardiovascular risk factor management when compared with individuals assigned to a conventional low-fat diet (LFD; i.e. a restricted-energy diet with less than 30% of energy from fat). Through August 2012, MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ScienceDirect,Scopus, LILACS, SciELO, ClinicalTrials.gov and grey literature databases were searched, using no date or language restrictions, for randomised controlled trials that assigned adults to a VLCKD or a LFD, with 12 months or more of follow-up. The primary outcome was bodyweight. The secondary outcomes were TAG, HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), systolic and diastolic blood pressure,glucose, insulin, HbA1c and C-reactive protein levels. A total of thirteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria. In the overall analysis,five outcomes revealed significant results. Individuals assigned to a VLCKD showed decreased body weight (weighted mean difference 20·91 (95% CI 21·65, 20·17) kg, 1415 patients), TAG (weighted mean difference 20·18 (95% CI 20·27, 20·08) mmol/l, 1258 patients)and diastolic blood pressure (weighted mean difference 21·43 (95% CI 22·49, 20·37) mmHg, 1298 patients) while increased HDL-C(weighted mean difference 0·09 (95% CI 0·06, 0·12) mmol/l, 1257 patients) and LDL-C (weighted mean difference 0·12 (95% CI 0·04,0·2) mmol/l, 1255 patients). Individuals assigned to a VLCKD achieve a greater weight loss than those assigned to a LFD in the longterm; hence, a VLCKD may be an alternative tool against obesity. PMID:23651522

  12. HIF1α is Necessary for Exercise-Induced Neuroprotection while HIF2α is Needed for Dopaminergic Neuron Survival in the Substantia Nigra pars compacta

    PubMed Central

    Smeyne, Michelle; Sladen, Paul; Jiao, Yun; Dragatsis, Ioannis; Smeyne, Richard Jay

    2015-01-01

    Exercise reduces the risk of developing a number of neurological disorders and increases the efficiency of cellular energy production. However, overly strenuous exercise produces oxidative stress. Proper oxygenation is crucial for the health of all tissues, and tight regulation of cellular oxygen is critical to balance O2 levels and redox homeostasis in the brain. Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF)1α and HIF2α are transcription factors regulated by cellular oxygen concentration that initiate gene regulation of vascular development, redox homeostasis, and cell cycle control. HIF1α and HIF2α contribute to important adaptive mechanisms that occur when oxygen and ROS homeostasis become unbalanced. It has been shown that preconditioning by exposure to a stressor prior to a hypoxic event reduces damage that would otherwise occur. Previously we reported that three months of exercise protects SNpc DA neurons from toxicity caused by Complex I inhibition. Here, we identify the cells in the SNpc that express HIF1α and HIF2α and show that running exercise produces hypoxia in SNpc DA neurons, and alters the expression of HIF1α and HIF2α. In mice carrying a conditional knockout of Hif1α in postnatal neurons we observe that exercise alone produces SNpc TH+ DA neuron loss. Loss of HIF1α also abolishes exercise-induced neuroprotection. In mice lacking Hif2α in postnatal neurons, the number of TH+ DA neurons in the adult SNpc is diminished, but three months of exercise rescues this loss. We conclude that HIF1α is necessary for exercise-induced neuroprotection and both HIF1α and HIF2α are necessary for the survival and function of adult SNpc DA neurons. PMID:25796140

  13. Vitamin D deficiency and exercise-induced laryngospasm in young competitive rowers.

    PubMed

    Heffler, Enrico; Bonini, Matteo; Brussino, Luisa; Solidoro, Paolo; Guida, Giuseppe; Boita, Monica; Nicolosi, Giuliana; Bucca, Caterina

    2016-07-01

    Exercise-induced dyspnea is common among adolescents and young adults and often originates from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Sometimes, dyspnea corresponds to exercise-induced laryngospasm (EILO), which is a paradoxical decrease in supraglottic/glottic area. Vitamin D deficiency, which occurs frequently at northern latitudes, might favor laryngospasm by impairing calcium transport and slowing striate muscle relaxation. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether vitamin D status has an influence on bronchial and laryngeal responses to exercise in young, healthy athletes. EIB and EILO were investigated during winter in 37 healthy competitive rowers (24 males; age range 13-25 years), using the eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation test (EVH). EIB was diagnosed when forced expiratory volume in the first second decreased by 10%, EILO when maximum mid-inspiratory flow (MIF50) decreased by 20%. Most athletes (86.5%) had vitamin D deficiency (below 30 ng/mL), 29 mild-moderate (78.4%) and 3 severe (8.1%). EVH showed EIB in 10 subjects (27%), EILO in 16 (43.2%), and combined EIB and EILO in 6 (16.2%). Athletes with EILO had lower vitamin D (19.1 ng/mL vs. 27.0 ng/mL, p < 0.001) and higher parathyroid hormone (30.5 pg/mL vs. 19.2 pg/mL, p = 0.006) levels. The degree of laryngoconstriction (post-EVH MIF50 as a percentage of pre-EVH MIF50) was related directly with vitamin D levels (r = 0.51; p = 0.001) and inversely with parathyroid hormone levels (r = -0.53; p = 0.001). We conclude that vitamin D deficiency is common during winter in young athletes living above the 40th parallel north and favors laryngospasm during exercise, probably by disturbing calcium homeostasis. This effect may negatively influence athletic performance. PMID:27218140

  14. Personality Does not Influence Exercise-Induced Mood Enhancement Among Female Exercisers.

    PubMed

    Lane, Andrew M; Milton, Karen E; Terry, Peter C

    2005-09-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality on exercise-induced mood changes. It was hypothesised that (a) exercise would be associated with significant mood enhancement across all personality types, (b) extroversion would be associated with positive mood and neuroticism with negative mood both pre- and post-exercise, and (c) personality measures would interact with exercise-induced mood changes. Participants were 90 female exercisers (M = 25.8 yr, SD = 9.0 yr) who completed the Eysenck Personality Inventory (EPI) once and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) before and after a 60-minute exercise session. Median splits were used to group participants into four personality types: stable introverts (n = 25), stable extroverts (n = 20), neurotic introverts (n = 26), and neurotic extroverts (n = 19). Repeated measures MANOVA showed significant mood enhancement following exercise across all personality types. Neuroticism was associated with negative mood scores pre- and post-exercise but the effect of extroversion on reported mood was relatively weak. There was no significant interaction effect between exercise-induced mood enhancement and personality. In conclusion, findings lend support to the notion that exercise is associated with improved mood. However, findings show that personality did not influence this effect, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. Key PointsResearch in general psychology has found that stable personality trait are associated changes in mood states. Ninety females exercisers completed a personality test and mood scales before and after exercise. Results indicated mood changes were not associated with personality, although neuroticism was associated with negative mood. PMID:24453525

  15. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Bibhusan; Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-04-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  16. Where to from here for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: the unanswered questions.

    PubMed

    Hallstrand, Teal S; Kippelen, Pascale; Larsson, Johan; Bougault, Valérie; van Leeuwen, Janneke C; Driessen, Jean M M; Brannan, John D

    2013-08-01

    The role of epithelial injury is an unanswered question in those with established asthma and in elite athletes who develop features of asthma and exercise-induced bronchorestriction (EIB) after years of training. The movement of water in response to changes in osmolarity is likely to be an important signal to the epithelium that may be central to the onset of EIB. It is generally accepted that the mast cell and its mediators play a major role in EIB and the presence of eosinophils is likely to enhance EIB severity. PMID:23830134

  17. Two cases of food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis with different culprit foods

    PubMed Central

    Mobayed, Hassan M.S.; Ali Al-Nesf, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is one of the severe allergic reactions in which symptoms develop only if exercise takes place within a few hours of eating a specific food. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). We herein report the first two cases of FDEIA in the Middle East. The first one is induced by wheat, while the other by peanut. The pathophysiology, predisposing factors, diagnosis, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:24551018

  18. Exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome in a young man, occurring after a short race

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Mousa; Vaitilingham, Siddharthan; Chalise, Shyam; Irooegbu, Nkem; Bang, Jane

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of exercise-induced acute compartment syndrome (ACS) in a 23-year-old man who presented to his primary care physician 48 hours after he attempted to run a 5K race. He noticed searing pain in his left leg after the first half mile but had no other symptoms. He was referred to the emergency department and diagnosed with ACS, and a fasciotomy was done. A presentation of limb pain that is out of proportion to a known or suspected injury should prompt consideration of ACS. Early recognition and surgical management are essential to achieving the best possible outcome. PMID:27034546

  19. Role of creatine supplementation in exercise-induced muscle damage: A mini review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jooyoung; Lee, Joohyung; Kim, Seungho; Yoon, Daeyoung; Kim, Jieun; Sung, Dong Jun

    2015-10-01

    Muscle damage is induced by both high-intensity resistance and endurance exercise. Creatine is a widely used dietary supplement to improve exercise performance by reducing exercise-induced muscle damage. Many researchers have suggested that taking creatine reduces muscle damage by decreasing the inflammatory response and oxidative stress, regulating calcium homeostasis, and activating satellite cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of creatine and muscle damage have not been clarified. Therefore, this review discusses the regulatory effects of creatine on muscle damage by compiling the information collected from basic science and sports science research. PMID:26535213

  20. Acute Exercise-Induced Compartment Syndrome of the Leg- Don’t Miss It

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Manish Kumar; Mishra, Sumanta; Marhual, Jogesh Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Acute exercise induced compartment syndrome of leg is a very rare and very oftenly missed entity which leads to delay in its management. We are presenting such case in which diagnosis was established two days after the onset of symptoms. Urgent decompressive fasciotomy was done. After 3 months of follow up, patient has got full functional recovery of his affected limb. This case highlights the importance of keeping high index of clinical suspicion to diagnose the problem and manage promptly. We have reviewed the English literature and found only about 40 cases since 1945. PMID:27042521

  1. Endogenous N-losses in broilers estimated by a [15N]-isotope dilution technique: effect of dietary fat type and xylanase addition.

    PubMed

    Dänicke, S; Jeroch, H; Simon, O

    2000-01-01

    Male broilers were given a low protein diet (15.5% CP) spiked with [15N]H4HCO3 from day 12 to day 18 of age to label the endogenous N-constituents. Experimental diets were subsequently fed from day 19 to day 24 of age and consisted of a rye based diet (56% dietary inclusion) which contained either 10% soya oil (S) or 10% beef tallow (T), each of which was either unsupplemented (-) or supplemented (+) with a xylanase containing enzyme preparation (2700 IU/kg at pH 5.3). [15N]-atom percent excess (APE) of excreta, faeces and urine were monitored on a daily basis during both experimental periods. Furthermore, APE was measured in various tissues at the end of the experiment. The APE of urine on the last day of the experiment was between the APE of the pancreas and that of the jejunal tissue, an observation which supported the usefulness of using urinary APE as an indicator for the endogenous N-pool. Endogenous N-proportions were estimated by an isotope dilution technique at the end of the experiment by examination of the ratio of APE in faeces and urine. The endogenous N-proportion in the faeces was greatest in birds receiving the T(-) diet. The proportions were 0.321, 0.319, 0.451 and 0.289 in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed groups, respectively. Xylanase addition reduced endogenous N-proportion, a factor which was used to correct apparent crude protein digestibility (85.6, 86.2, 84.3 and 88.5% in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed birds, respectively) for endogenous losses resulting in almost equal true digestibilities of crude protein for all treatments (90.3, 90.6, 90.4 and 91.5%). The amounts of endogenous N in faces were estimated to be 87, 69, 244 and 81 mg per day per kg0.67 body weight in S(-), S(+), T(-) and T(+) fed birds, respectively. It was concluded that xylanase supplementation of a rye based broiler diet does not change endogenous N-secretions when the supplemental fat is soya oil. However, addition of tallow rather than soya oil increased these N-losses

  2. Skin testing with food, codeine, and histamine in exercise-induced anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Lin, R Y; Barnard, M

    1993-06-01

    A 33-year-old Chinese woman with exercise-induced anaphylaxis after ingesting Chinese seafood noodle soup, was studied for skin test reactivity to food, histamine, and codeine. Prick skin tests were negative for shrimp, wheat, and chicken soup base, but were positive at 5 to 6 mm (wheal diameter) to the whole broth after it had been combined with the other ingredients. No significant (> 3 mm) wheals were observed in eight controls who were simultaneously tested with the broth. To assess the role of exercise, three series of skin tests were performed with histamine, codeine, and whole broth before and after aerobic exercise on two occasions. Codeine elicited consistent increases in wheal size after exercise compared with pre-exercise skin tests. Histamine and whole broth wheal sizes did not increase significantly. Three control subjects also had codeine and histamine skin tests before and after exercise, No exercise-associated increases were noted for codeine. Potential insights into mast cell abnormalities in exercise-induced anaphylaxis may be gained by skin testing patterns with codeine and other mast cell degranulating agents. PMID:8507042

  3. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum in Non-Asthmatic Children with Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Anantasit, Nattachai; Manuyakorn, Wiparat; Anantasit, Nualnapa; Choong, Karen; Preuthipan, Aroonwan

    2015-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 11 • Male, 15 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous pneumomediastinum Symptoms: — Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Subcutaneous emphysema can result from rupture of the respiratory or gastrointestinal systems, commonly occurring after trauma or surgery, as well as from rupture of alveoli as pneumothorax or pneumomediastinum. Spontaneous pneumomediastinum with subcutaneous emphysema is rare in children without chest or neck trauma. Here, we report 2 cases of spontaneous pneumomediastinum with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Case Report: The first case is an 11-year-old boy who presented with neck pain after vigorous exercise. Radiography showed pneumomediastinum. The second case is a 15-year-old boy who presented with pleuritic chest pain and respiratory failure requiring intubation. We extensively investigated the possible causes of pneumomediastinum. Both patients had no history of trauma or asthma, and were diagnosed with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. They were discharged after conservative treatment, without complication. Conclusions: Early recognition and investigation of serious conditions should be promptly done in spontaneous pneumomediastinum patients. Conservative treatment, extensive investigations of predisposing factors, and treatment are important. PMID:26394070

  4. Exercise-induced norepinephrine decreases circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell colony-forming capacity.

    PubMed

    Kröpfl, Julia M; Stelzer, Ingeborg; Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/-4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  5. Effects of ginsenosides-Rb1 on exercise-induced oxidative stress in forced swimming mice

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Bo; Zhang, Lan; Zhang, Zhiqun; Ouyang, Jiangqiong; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background: The fleshy root of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer (ginseng) is one of the most well-known and valued herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. Ginsenosides are considered mainly responsible for the pharmacological activities of ginseng. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of ginsenoside-Rb1 (G-Rb1) on swimming exercise-induced oxidative stress in male mice. Materials and Methods: A total of 48 animals were randomly divided into four groups, with twelve mice in each group. The first, second and third groups were designed as G-Rb1 treatment groups, got 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg bodyweight of G-Rb1, respectively. The fourth group was designed as the control group, got physiologic saline. The mice were intragastrically administered once daily for 4 weeks. The weight-loaded forced swimming test was conducted on the final day of experimentation. Then the exhaustive swimming time, blood lactate, serum creatine kinase (CK), malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes in liver of mice were measured. Results: The results showed that G-Rb1 could prolong the exhaustive swimming time and improve exercise endurance capacity of mice, as well as accelerate the clearance of blood lactate and decrease serum CK activities. Meanwhile, G-Rb1 could decrease MDA contents and increase superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase activities in liver of mice. Conclusions: The study suggested that G-Rb1 possessed protective effects on swimming exercise-induced oxidative stress in mice. PMID:25422546

  6. PGC-1α is Dispensable for Exercise-Induced Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Glenn C.; El-Khoury, Riyad; Patten, Ian S.; Rustin, Pierre; Arany, Zolt

    2012-01-01

    Exercise confers numerous health benefits, many of which are thought to stem from exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis (EIMB) in skeletal muscle. The transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α, a potent regulator of metabolism in numerous tissues, is widely believed to be required for EIMB. We show here that this is not the case. Mice engineered to lack PGC-1α specifically in skeletal muscle (Myo-PGC-1αKO mice) retained intact EIMB. The exercise capacity of these mice was comparable to littermate controls. Induction of metabolic genes after 2 weeks of in-cage voluntary wheel running was intact. Electron microscopy revealed no gross abnormalities in mitochondria, and the mitochondrial biogenic response to endurance exercise was as robust in Myo-PGC-1αKO mice as in wildtype mice. The induction of enzymatic activity of the electron transport chain by exercise was likewise unperturbed in Myo-PGC-1αKO mice. These data demonstrate that PGC-1α is dispensable for exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle, in sharp contrast to the prevalent assumption in the field. PMID:22848618

  7. Bricanyl Turbuhaler and Ventolin Rotahaler in exercise-induced asthma in children.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, J M; Costa, H; Ståhl, E; Wirén, J E

    1991-04-01

    Bricanyl Turbuhaler (0.5 mg terbutaline sulphate) and Ventolin Rotahaler (0.4 mg salbutamol) were compared in a randomized double-blind placebo controlled study on exercise-induced asthma in 19 children (14 boys) aged 7-14 years. The study was carried out on 3 separate days. Asthmatic attacks were provoked by free range running. Peak expiratory flow (PEF) was measured before and after exercise. If PEF decreased by greater than 20%, one inhalation from each of the inhalers was given under supervision of the investigator. Only one of the inhalers (none on the placebo day) delivered active drug. PEF was measured again 5 and 10 min after treatment. Already 5 min after treatment PEF had returned to baseline after active treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between the two active treatments. After placebo treatment, PEF did not return to baseline even at the 10 min post-exercise measurement. Ten children needed extra medication after the last PEF measurement on the placebo day, whereas no child needed extra medication after any of the active treatments. No adverse events were reported in this study. In conclusion, Bricanyl Turbuhaler (0.5 mg) and Ventolin Rotahaler (0.4 mg) were equally efficacious in the treatment of exercise-induced asthma in children. PMID:2058816

  8. Exercise-induced interstitial pulmonary edema at sea-level in young and old healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Bryan J.; Carlson, Alex R.; Miller, Andrew D.; Johnson, Bruce D.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether aged adults are more susceptible to exercise-induced pulmonary edema relative to younger individuals. Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO), alveolar-capillary membrane conductance (Dm) and pulmonary-capillary blood volume (Vc) were measured before and after exhaustive discontinuous incremental exercise in 10 young (YNG; 27±3 yr) and 10 old (OLD; 69±5 yr) males. In YNG subjects, Dm increased (11±7%, P=0.031), Vc decreased (−10±9%, P=0.01) and DLCO was unchanged (30.5±4.1 vs. 29.7±2.9 ml/min/mmHg, P=0.44) pre- to post-exercise. In OLD subjects, DLCO and Dm increased (11±14%, P=0.042; 16±14%, P=0.025) but Vc was unchanged (58±23 vs. 56±23 ml, P=0.570) pre- to post-exercise. Group-mean Dm/Vc was greater after vs. before exercise in the YNG and OLD subjects. However, Dm/Vc was lower post-exercise in 2 of the 10 YNG (−7±4%) and 2 of the 10 OLD subjects (−10±5%). These data suggest that exercise decreases interstitial lung fluid in most YNG and OLD subjects, with a small number exhibiting evidence for exercise-induced pulmonary edema. PMID:24200644

  9. Food-Dependent Exercise-Induced Anaphylaxis: A Case Related to Chickpea Ingestion and Review

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA) is recognized as a distinct category of exercise-induced anaphylaxis (EIA) but is very likely underdiagnosed. This report describes a 41-year-old Indian woman who experienced two separate episodes of anaphylaxis while dancing after she had eaten chickpea-containing foods. The chickpea, a small legume, is a staple ingredient in culinary traditions from around the world, especially in India, the Middle East, and North Africa. Chickpea-containing dishes are also becoming more widespread in the Western world with the growing popularity of South Asian, Middle Eastern, and African cuisines. It is important to consider FDEIA in cases of unexplained anaphylaxis as reactions can occur several hours after ingesting the culprit food(s). Furthermore, no reaction occurs if a sensitized individual eats the culprit food(s) without exercising afterward; therefore, triggering foods can easily be overlooked. Current ideas on the pathophysiology, predisposing factors, workup, and treatment of FDEIA are also summarized here. PMID:20525119

  10. Sex Differences in Exercise-Induced Muscle Pain and Muscle Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dannecker, Erin A.; Liu, Ying; Rector, R. Scott; Thomas, Tom R.; Fillingim, Roger B.; Robinson, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    There is uncertainty about sex differences in exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage due to several methodological weaknesses in the literature. This investigation tested the hypothesis that higher levels of exercise-induced muscle pain and muscle damage indicators would be found in women than men when several methodological improvements were executed in the same study. Participants (N = 33; 42% women) with an average age of 23 years (SD = 2.82) consented to participate. After a familiarization session, participants visited the laboratory before and across four days after eccentric exercise was completed to induce arm muscle pain and muscle damage. Our primary outcomes were arm pain ratings and pressure pain thresholds. However, we also measured the following indicators of muscle damage: arm girth; resting elbow extension; isometric elbow flexor strength; myoglobin (Mb); tumor necrosis factor (TNFa); interleukin 1beta (IL1b); and total nitric oxide (NO). Temporary induction of muscle damage was indicated by changes in all outcome measures except TNFa, and IL1b. In contrast to our hypotheses, women reported moderately lower and less frequent muscle pain than men. Also, women’s arm girth and Mb levels increased moderately less than men’s, but the differences were not significant. Few large sex differences were detected. PMID:23182229

  11. Kinetics of exercise-induced neural activation; interpretive dilemma of altered cerebral perfusion.

    PubMed

    Miyazawa, Taiki; Horiuchi, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Sato, Kohei; Tanaka, Naoki; Bailey, Damian M; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2012-02-01

    Neural activation decreases cerebral deoxyhaemoglobin (HHb(C)) and increases oxyhaemoglobin concentration (O(2)Hb(C)). In contrast, patients who present with restricted cerebral blood flow, such as those suffering from cerebral ischaemia or Alzheimer's disease, and during the course of ageing the converse occurs, in that HHb(C) increases and O(2)Hb(C) decreases during neural activation. In the present study, we examined the interpretive implications of altered exercise-induced cerebral blood flow for cortical oxygenation in healthy subjects. Both O(2)Hb(C) and HHb(C) (prefrontal cortex) were determined in 11 healthy men using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean)) was determined via transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. Measurements were performed during contralateral hand-grip exercise during suprasystolic bilateral thigh-cuff occlusion (Cuff+) and within 2 s of cuff release (Cuff-) for the acute manipulation of cerebral perfusion. During Cuff+, both MCA V(mean) and O(2)Hb(C) increased during exercise, whereas HHb(C) decreased. In contrast, the opposite occurred during the Cuff- manipulation. These findings highlight the inverse relationship between cerebral blood flow and cerebral oxygenation as determined by NIRS, which has interpretive implications for the kinetics underlying exercise-induced neural activation. PMID:22041980

  12. Exercise-Induced Norepinephrine Decreases Circulating Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Colony-Forming Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Mangge, Harald; Pekovits, Karin; Fuchs, Robert; Allard, Nathalie; Schinagl, Lukas; Hofmann, Peter; Dohr, Gottfried; Wallner-Liebmann, Sandra; Domej, Wolfgang; Müller, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    A recent study showed that ergometry increased circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (CPC) numbers, but reduced hematopoietic colony forming capacity/functionality under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia. Herein we investigated whether an exercise-induced elevated plasma free/bound norepinephrine (NE) concentration could be responsible for directly influencing CPC functionality. Venous blood was taken from ten healthy male subjects (25.3+/−4.4 yrs) before and 4 times after ergometry under normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (FiO2<0.15). The circulating hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell numbers were correlated with free/bound NE, free/bound epinephrine (EPI), cortisol (Co) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, the influence of exercise-induced NE and blood lactate (La) on CPC functionality was analyzed in a randomly selected group of subjects (n = 6) in vitro under normoxia by secondary colony-forming unit granulocyte macrophage assays. Concentrations of free NE, EPI, Co and IL-6 were significantly increased post-exercise under normoxia/hypoxia. Ergometry-induced free NE concentrations found in vivo showed a significant impairment of CPC functionality in vitro under normoxia. Thus, ergometry-induced free NE was thought to trigger CPC mobilization 10 minutes post-exercise, but as previously shown impairs CPC proliferative capacity/functionality at the same time. The obtained results suggest that an ergometry-induced free NE concentration has a direct negative effect on CPC functionality. Cortisol may further influence CPC dynamics and functionality. PMID:25180783

  13. The endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception in rats.

    PubMed

    Galdino, Giovane; Romero, Thiago R L; Silva, José Felipe P; Aguiar, Daniele C; de Paula, Ana Maria; Cruz, Jader S; Parrella, Cosimo; Piscitelli, Fabiana; Duarte, Igor D; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Perez, Andrea C

    2014-02-01

    Exercise-induced antinociception is widely described in the literature, but the mechanisms involved in this phenomenon are poorly understood. Systemic (s.c.) and central (i.t., i.c.v.) pretreatment with CB₁ and CB₂ cannabinoid receptor antagonists (AM251 and AM630) blocked the antinociception induced by an aerobic exercise (AE) protocol in both mechanical and thermal nociceptive tests. Western blot analysis revealed an increase and activation of CB₁ receptors in the rat brain, and immunofluorescence analysis demonstrated an increase of activation and expression of CB₁ receptors in neurons of the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG) after exercise. Additionally, pretreatment (s.c., i.t. and i.c.v.) with endocannabinoid metabolizing enzyme inhibitors (MAFP and JZL184) and an anandamide reuptake inhibitor (VDM11) prolonged and intensified this antinociceptive effect. These results indicate that exercise could activate the endocannabinoid system, producing antinociception. Supporting this hypothesis, liquid-chromatography/mass-spectrometry measurements demonstrated that plasma levels of endocannabinoids (anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and of anandamide-related mediators (palmitoylethanolamide and oleoylethanolamide) were increased after AE. Therefore, these results suggest that the endocannabinoid system mediates aerobic exercise-induced antinociception at peripheral and central levels. PMID:24148812

  14. Enhanced exercise-induced plasma cytokine response and oxidative stress in COPD patients depend on blood oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Jammes, Yves; Steinberg, Jean Guillaume; Ba, Abdoulaye; Delliaux, Stéphane; Brégeon, Fabienne

    2008-05-01

    In healthy subjects, hypoxemia and exercise represent independent stressors promoting the exercise-induced cytokine response and oxidative stress. We hypothesized that hypoxemia in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) may affect the cytokine production and/or the changes in oxidant-antioxidant status in response to maximal exercise. Exercise-induced changes in PaO2 allowed to transiently increase or decrease baseline hypoxemia and to point out its specific action on muscle metabolism. COPD patients with severe to moderate hypoxemia (56 < PaO2 < 72 mmHg) performed an incremental cycling exercise until volitional exhaustion. Two cytokines [interleukin (IL)-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha] and three blood indices of oxidative stress [plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and two antioxidants, reduced erythrocyte glutathione (GSH), and reduced plasma ascorbic acid, RAA] were measured at rest, then during and after exercise. The changes in the cytokine levels and oxidant-antioxidant status were analysed in relation with the baseline PaO2 and its exercise-induced variations. Data were compared with those obtained in an age- and body mass index-matched group of healthy subjects. Compared with healthy subjects, COPD patients presented a marked accentuation of exercise-induced increase in IL-6 level and earlier changes in their oxidant-antioxidant status. Resting levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha and exercise-induced peak variations of TBARS, IL-6 and TNF-alpha were negatively correlated with the baseline PaO2. In COPD patients, the peak increases in IL-6 and TBARS were attenuated when exercise hyperventilation reduced the baseline hypoxemia. Our study indicates that the PaO2 level affects both the exercise-induced oxidative stress and cytokine response in hypoxemic COPD patients. PMID:18312445

  15. Prevalence and Associated Clinical Characteristics of Exercise-Induced ST-Segment Elevation in Lead aVR

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, Ian; Fordyce, Christopher B.; Yousefi, Masoud; Yeo, Tee Joo; Ignaszewski, Andrew; Isserow, Saul; Chan, Sammy; Ramanathan, Krishnan; Taylor, Carolyn M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Exercise-induced ST-segment elevation (STE) in lead aVR may be an important indicator of prognostically important coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the prevalence and associated clinical features of exercise-induced STE in lead aVR among consecutive patients referred for exercise stress electrocardiography (ExECG) is unknown. Methods All consecutive patients receiving a Bruce protocol ExECG for the diagnosis of CAD at a tertiary care academic center were included over a two-year period. Clinical characteristics, including results of coronary angiography, were compared between patients with and without exercise-induced STE in lead aVR. Results Among 2227 patients undergoing ExECG, exercise-induced STE ≥1.0mm in lead aVR occurred in 3.4% of patients. Patients with STE in lead aVR had significantly lower Duke Treadmill Scores (DTS) (-0.5 vs. 7.0, p<0.01) and a higher frequency of positive test results (60.2% vs. 7.3%, p<0.01). Furthermore, patients with STE in lead aVR were more likely to undergo subsequent cardiac catheterization than those without STE in lead aVR (p<0.01, odds ratio = 4.2). Conclusions Among patients referred for ExECG for suspected CAD, exercise-induced STE in lead aVR was associated with a higher risk DTS, an increased likelihood of a positive ExECG, and referral for subsequent coronary angiography. These results suggest that exercise-induced STE in lead aVR may represent a useful ECG feature among patients undergoing ExECG in the risk stratification of patients. PMID:27467388

  16. Loss of milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) in mice leads to low bone mass and accelerates ovariectomy-associated bone loss by increasing osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sinningen, Kathrin; Albus, Elise; Thiele, Sylvia; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Kurth, Thomas; Udey, Mark C; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Hofbauer, Lorenz C; Rauner, Martina

    2015-07-01

    Milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor 8 (MFG-E8) is a glycoprotein that controls the engulfment of apoptotic cells and exerts inflammation-modulatory effects. Recently, it has been implicated in osteoclastogenesis and the pathogenesis of inflammatory periodontal bone loss, but its role in physiological bone homeostasis is still not well defined. Here, we evaluated the influence of MFG-E8 on osteoblasts and osteoclasts and its impact on bone remodeling in healthy and ovariectomized mice as a model for post-menopausal osteoporosis. Total and trabecular bone mineral densities at the lumbar spine in 6-week-old MFG-E8 KO mice were reduced by 11% (p < 0.05) and 17% (p < 0.01), respectively, as compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Accordingly, serum levels of the bone formation marker P1NP were decreased by 37% (p < 0.01) in MFG-E8 KO mice as were the ex vivo mineralization capacity and expression of osteoblast genes (Runx2, alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin) in MFG-E8 KO osteoblasts. In contrast, serum bone resorption markers CTX1 and TRAP5b were increased by 30% and 60% (p < 0.05), respectively, in MFG-E8 KO mice. Furthermore, bone marrow macrophages from MFG-E8-KO mice differentiated more effectively into osteoclasts, as compared to WT cells. MFG-E8-deficient osteoclasts displayed increased bone resorption ex vivo, which could be reversed by the presence of recombinant MFG-E8. To determine the significance of the enhanced osteoclastogenesis in MFG-E8 KO mice, we performed an ovariectomy, which is associated with bone loss due to increased osteoclast activity. Indeed, MFG-E8 KO mice lost 12% more trabecular bone density than WT mice after ovariectomy. Together, these data indicate that MFG-E8 controls steady-state and pathological bone turnover and may therefore represent a new target gene in the treatment of bone diseases. PMID:25868798

  17. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for exercise-induced muscle damage: implications for skeletal muscle development.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J

    2012-12-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) is a common condition resulting from a bout of vigorous exercise, particularly if the individual is unaccustomed to performance of the given movement. Symptoms of EIMD include delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a loss of physical function. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are routinely prescribed post-exercise to alleviate these symptoms and restore normal physical function. Of potential concern for those who use NSAIDs to treat EIMD is the possibility that they may impair the adaptive response to exercise. Specifically, there is emerging evidence that the action of cyclo-oxygenase (COX) enzymes, and COX-2 in particular, are important and even necessary to achieve maximal skeletal muscle hypertrophy in response to functional overload. Given that NSAIDs exert their actions by blocking COX and thus suppressing prostaglandin production, a theoretical rationale exists whereby these drugs may have detrimental effects on muscle regeneration and supercompensation. Therefore, the purpose of this article is to extensively review the literature and evaluate the effects of NSAIDs on muscle growth and development. Based on current evidence, there is little reason to believe that the occasional use of NSAIDs will negatively affect muscle growth, although the efficacy for their use in alleviating inflammatory symptoms remains questionable. Evidence on the hypertrophic effects of the chronic use of NSAIDs is less clear. In those who are untrained, it does not appear that regular NSAID use will impede growth in the short term, and at least one study indicates that it may in fact have a positive impact. Given their reported impairment of satellite cell activity, however, longer-term NSAID use may well be detrimental, particularly in those who possess greater growth potential. PMID:23013520

  18. Indirubin-3'-oxime, an activator of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, enhances osteogenic commitment of ST2 cells and restores bone loss in high-fat diet-induced obese male mice.

    PubMed

    Zahoor, Muhammad; Cha, Pu-Hyeon; Choi, Kang-Yell

    2014-08-01

    Obesity is a growing issue of the modern world, and its negative impact on bones in obese male patients has been recently reported. The Wnt/β-catenin pathway has an established role in the regulation of body fat content and bone density. We investigated the effects of indirubin-3'-oxime (I3O), the GSK3β inhibitor that activates Wnt/β-catenin signaling, on trabecular bone in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese male mice. I3O reverses the downregulating effect of fatty acid (FA) on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and enhances the osteogenic commitment of the bone marrow-derived stromal cell line ST2. FA induces the adipogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells in vitro. In a male mouse model of HFD-induced obesity, trabecular bone loss was observed in the femora, with a gross increase in abdominal fat; however, the HFD effects were rescued with the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling by I3O treatment. I3O administration also reversed the increase in the number of HFD-induced adipocytes in the femur bone marrow in trabecular bone. Overall, our results indicate that I3O could be a potential therapeutic agent for obese male patients through downregulation of abdominal fat and net increment in trabecular bone density. PMID:24815917

  19. The influence of ice slushy on voluntary contraction force following exercise-induced hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Catriona A; Easthope, Christopher S; Johnson, Nathan A; Chapman, Phillip G; O'Connor, Helen

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of exercise-induced hyperthermia on central fatigue and force decline in exercised and nonexercised muscles and whether ingestion of ice slushy (ICE) ameliorates fatigue. Eight participants (5 males, 3 females) completed 45 s maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) with elbow flexors and knee extensors at baseline and following an exercise-induced rectal temperature (Trec) of 39.3 ± 0.2 °C. Percutaneous electrical muscle stimulation was superimposed at 15, 30 and 44 s during MVICs to assess muscle activation. To increase Trec to 39.3 °C, participants cycled at 60% maximum power output for 42 ± 11 min in 40 °C and 50% relative humidity. Immediately prior to each MVIC, participants consumed 50 g of ICE (-1 °C) or thermoneutral drink (38 °C, CON) made from 7.4% carbohydrate beverage. Participants consumed water (19 °C) during exercise to prevent hypohydration. Voluntary muscle force production and activation in both muscle groups were unchanged at Trec 39.3 °C with ICE (knee extensors: 209 ± 152 N) versus CON (knee extensors: 255 ± 157 N, p = 0.19). At Trec 39.3 °C, quadriceps mean force (232 ± 151 N) decreased versus baseline (302 ± 180 N, p < 0.001) and mean voluntary activation was also decreased (by 15% ± 11%, p < 0.001). Elbow flexor mean force decreased from 179 ± 67 N to 148 ± 65 N when Trec was increased to 39.3 °C (p < 0.001) but mean voluntary activation was not reduced at 39.3 °C (5% ± 25%, p = 0.79). After exercise-induced hyperthermia, ICE had no effect on voluntary activation or force production; however, both were reduced from baseline in the exercised muscle group. Peripheral fatigue was greater than the central component and limited the ability of an intervention designed to alter central fatigue. PMID:24971678

  20. Exercise-Induced Cognitive Plasticity, Implications for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Philip P.; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Kuljiš, Rodrigo O.

    2011-01-01

    Lifestyle factors such as intellectual stimulation, cognitive and social engagement, nutrition, and various types of exercise appear to reduce the risk for common age-associated disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia. In fact, many studies have suggested that promoting physical activity can have a protective effect against cognitive deterioration later in life. Slowing or a deterioration of walking speed is associated with a poor performance in tests assessing psychomotor speed and verbal fluency in elderly individuals. Fitness training influences a wide range of cognitive processes, and the largest positive impact observed is for executive (a.k.a. frontal lobe) functions. Studies show that exercise improves additional cognitive functions such as tasks mediated by the hippocampus, and result in major changes in plasticity in the hippocampus. Interestingly, this exercise-induced plasticity is also pronounced in APOE ε4 carriers who express a risk factor for late-onset AD that may modulate the effect of treatments. Based on AD staging by Braak and Braak (1991) and Braak et al. (1993) we propose that the effects of exercise occur in two temporo-spatial continua of events. The “inward” continuum from isocortex (neocortex) to entorhinal cortex/hippocampus for amyloidosis and a reciprocal “outward” continuum for neurofibrillary alterations. The exercise-induced hypertrophy of the hippocampus at the core of these continua is evaluated in terms of potential for prevention to stave off neuronal degeneration. Exercise-induced production of growth factors such as the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to enhance neurogenesis and to play a key role in positive cognitive effects. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) may mediate the exercise-induced response to exercise on BDNF, neurogenesis, and cognitive performance. It is also postulated to regulate brain amyloid β (Aβ) levels by increased clearance via the choroid

  1. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice

    PubMed Central

    Betts, Corinne A.; Saleh, Amer F.; Carr, Carolyn A.; Hammond, Suzan M.; Coenen-Stass, Anna M. L.; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A.; Roberts, Thomas C.; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J.; Wood, Matthew J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  2. Effects of nicardipine on cardiac volume at rest and during exercise-induced angina

    PubMed Central

    Silke, B.; Verma, S. P.; Frais, M. A.; Hafizullah, M.; Taylor, S. H.

    1985-01-01

    1 The action of nicardipine on cardiac volume, both at rest and during exercise-induced angina, was evaluated in 12 patients with angiographically-proven coronary artery disease. 2 Nicardipine given to patients at rest reduced systemic vascular resistance and mean arterial pressure and increased heart rate and cardiac index. The left ventricular filling pressure, ejection fraction (EF), end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes were unchanged. 3 During supine bicycle exercise, the reduction in systemic arterial blood pressure following nicardipine increased cardiac and stroke index and attenuated the rise in left ventricular filling pressure observed in the control exercise. 4 The effects of nicardipine on EF, end-diastolic and end-systolic cardiac volumes were dependent on the baseline cardiac reserve. In patients with EF < 50%, nicardipine improved EF and left ventricular exercise volumes. PMID:2862901

  3. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice. PMID:25758104

  4. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  5. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  6. Exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in a nonathlete: case report and review of physiology.

    PubMed

    Diwakar, Amit; Schmidt, Gregory A

    2014-04-01

    The integrity of the pulmonary blood-gas barrier is vulnerable to intense exercise in elite athletes, similar to the phenomenon of exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage in thoroughbred racehorses. A 50-year-old previously healthy man presented with acute onset shortness of breath, dry cough, and hypoxemia after engaging in an extremely vigorous game of handball. CT scan of the chest showed diffuse patchy air-space disease. Bronchoalveolar lavage revealed diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. Infectious etiologies and bleeding diatheses were excluded by laboratory testing. Serological tests for ANCA-associated vasculitis, lupus, and Goodpasture's disease also were negative. A transthoracic echocardiogram was normal. The patient recovered completely on supportive therapy in less than 72 h. This case demonstrates strenuous exercise as a cause of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in a previously healthy male with no apparent underlying cardiopulmonary disease. PMID:24532148

  7. Titin, a Central Mediator for Hypertrophic Signaling, Exercise-Induced Mechanosignaling and Skeletal Muscle Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Martina; Kötter, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Titin is a giant scaffold protein with multiple functions in striated muscle physiology. Due to the elastic I-band domains and the filament-like integration in the half-sarcomere titin is an important factor for sarcomere assembly and serves as an adaptable molecular spring that determines myofilament distensibility. Protein-interactions e.g., with muscle ankyrin repeat proteins or muscle LIM-protein link titin to hypertrophic signaling and via p62 and Muscle Ring Finger proteins to mechanisms that control protein quality control. This review summarizes our current knowledge on titin as a central node for exercise-induced mechanosignaling and remodeling and further highlights the pathophysiological implications. PMID:26973541

  8. Exercise-induced cramp, myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in phosphoglycerate mutase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Oh, Shin J; Park, Kyung-Seok; Ryan, Hewitt F; Danon, Moris J; Lu, Jiesheng; Naini, Ali B; DiMauro, Salvatore

    2006-11-01

    We report two patients in whom phosphoglycerate mutase (PGAM) deficiency was associated with the triad of exercise-induced cramps, recurrent myoglobinuria, and tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsy. Serum creatine kinase (CK) levels were elevated between attacks of myoglobinuria. Forearm ischemic exercise tests produced subnormal increases of venous lactate. Muscle biopsies showed subsarcolemmal tubular aggregates in type 2 fibers. Muscle PGAM activities were markedly decreased (3% of the normal mean) and molecular genetic studies showed that both patients were homozygous for a described missense mutation (W78X). A review of 15 cases with tubular aggregates in the muscle biopsies from our laboratory and 15 cases with PGAM deficiency described in the literature showed that this clinicopathological triad is highly suggestive of PGAM deficiency. PMID:16881065

  9. Interaction of myocardial insulin receptor and IGF receptor signaling in exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Shiojima, Ichiro; Ozasa, Yukako; Yoshida, Masashi; Holzenberger, Martin; Kahn, C Ronald; Walsh, Kenneth; Igarashi, Takashi; Abel, E Dale; Komuro, Issei

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling has recently been implicated in the development of cardiac hypertrophy after long-term endurance training, via mechanisms that may involve energetic stress. Given the potential overlap of insulin and IGF-1 signaling we sought to determine if both signaling pathways could contribute to exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy following shorter-term exercise training. Studies were performed in mice with cardiac-specific IGF-1 receptor (IGF1R) knockout (CIGFRKO), mice with cardiac-specific insulin receptor (IR) knockout (CIRKO), CIGFRKO mice that lacked one IR allele in cardiomyocytes (IGFR−/−IR+/−), and CIRKO mice that lacked one IGF1R allele in cardiomyocytes (IGFR+/−IR−/−). Intravenous administration of IGF-1 or 75 hours of swimming over 4 weeks increased IGF1R tyrosine phosphorylation in the heart in control and CIRKO mice but not in CIGFRKO mice. Intriguingly, IR tyrosine phosphorylation in the heart was also increased following IGF-1 administration or exercise training in control and CIGFRKO mice but not in CIRKO mice. The extent of cardiac hypertrophy following exercise training in CIGFRKO and CIRKO mice was comparable to that in control mice. In contrast, exercise-induced cardiac hypertrophy was significantly attenuated in IGFR−/−IR+/− and IGFR+/−IR−/− mice. Thus, IGF-1 and exercise activates both IGF1R and IR in the heart, and IGF1R- and IR-mediated signals may serve redundant roles in the hypertrophic responses of the heart to exercise training. PMID:19744489

  10. Fibroblast growth factor 21 and exercise-induced hepatic mitochondrial adaptations.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Justin A; Linden, Melissa A; Sheldon, Ryan D; Meers, Grace M; Morris, E Matthew; Butterfield, Anthony; Perfield, James W; Thyfault, John P; Rector, R Scott

    2016-05-15

    Exercise stimulates hepatic mitochondrial adaptations; however, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here we tested whether FGF21 plays an obligatory role in exercise induced hepatic mitochondrial adaptations by testing exercise responses in FGF21 knockout mice. FGF21 knockout (FGF21-KO) and wild-type (WT) mice (11-12 wk of age) had access to voluntary running wheels for exercise (EX) or remained sedentary for 8 wk. FGF21 deficiency resulted in greater body weight, adiposity, serum cholesterol, insulin, and glucose concentrations compared with WT mice (P < 0.05). In addition, hepatic mitochondrial complete palmitate oxidation, β-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (β-HAD) activity, and nuclear content of PGC-1α were 30-50% lower in FGF21-KO mice compared with WT mice (P < 0.01). EX effectively lowered body weight, adiposity, serum triglycerides, free fatty acids, and insulin and normalized mitochondrial complete palmitate oxidation in the FGF21-KO mice, whereas the reduced hepatic β-HAD activity and lowered nuclear content of PGC-1α in FGF21-KO mice were not restored by EX. In addition, EX increased hepatic CPT-1α mRNA expression and ACC phosphorylation (a marker of increased AMPK activity) and reduced hepatic triacylglycerol content in both genotypes. However, FGF21-KO mice displayed a lower EX-induced increase in the mRNA expression of the hepatic gluconeogenic gene, PEPCK, compared with WT. In conclusion, FGF21 does not appear necessary for exercise-induced systemic and hepatic mitochondrial adaptations, but the increased adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, and impairments in hepatic mitochondrial function induced by FGF21 deficiency can be partially rescued by daily wheel running exercise. PMID:27012775

  11. Evidence of local exercise-induced systemic oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    Couillard, A; Koechlin, C; Cristol, J P; Varray, A; Prefaut, C

    2002-11-01

    Chronic inactivity may not be the sole factor involved in the myopathy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients. One hypothesis is that exercise-induced oxidative stress that leads to muscle alterations may also be involved. This study investigated whether exercise localised to a peripheral muscle group would induce oxidative stress in COPD patients. Eleven COPD patients (FEV1 1.15+/-0.4 L (mean+/-SD)) and 12 healthy age-matched subjects with a similar low quantity of physical activity performed endurance exercise localised to a peripheral muscle group, the quadriceps of the dominant leg. The authors measured plasma levels of thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARs) as an index of oxidative stress, the release in superoxide anion (O2*-) by stimulated phagocytes as an oxidant, and blood vitamin E as one antioxidant. Quadriceps endurance was significantly lower in the COPD patients compared with healthy subjects (136+/-16 s versus 385+/-69 s (mean+/-SEM), respectively). A significant increase in TBARs 6 h after quadriceps exercise was only found in the COPD patients. In addition, significantly higher O2*- release and lower blood vitamin E levels were found in COPD patients than in controls at rest. This blood vitamin E level was significantly correlated with the resting level of plasma TBARs in the COPD patients. This study mainly showed that quadriceps exercise induced systemic oxidative stress in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and that vitamin E levels were decreased in these patients at rest. The exact relevance of these findings to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease myopathy needs to be elucidated. PMID:12449164

  12. Enhanced vagal modulation and exercise induced ischaemia of the inferoposterior myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, T; Azuma, A; Kuribayashi, T; Taniguchi, T; Asada, S; Kamitani, T; Kawasaki, S; Matsubara, H; Sugihara, H

    2006-01-01

    Objective To determine whether the Bezold‐Jarisch reflex or enhancement of vagal nerves, which are preferentially distributed in the inferoposterior myocardium, results from exercise induced ischaemia in this region. Methods On the basis of exercise myocardial scintigraphy and coronary angiography, 145 patients were classified as follows: group I, 34 patients with inferoposterior ischaemia; group A, 32 with anterior ischaemia; and control, 79 without ischaemia. The relation between ischaemic areas and ECG leads with ST segment changes and vagal modulation assessed by heart rate variability (HRV) (high frequency (HF) component (0.15–0.40 Hz) and coefficient of HF component variance (CCVHF), which is the square root of HF divided by mean RR interval) were assessed. Results The rate of ST segment depression in any lead did not differ between group I and group A. HF and CCVHF were similar before exercise but higher in group I than in group A and the control group after exercise (mean (SEM) HF: 94 (17) ms2, 41 (7) ms2, and 45 (6) ms2, respectively, p  =  0.021; CCVHF: 1.18 (0.09)%, 0.81 (0.07)%, and 0.89 (0.05)%, p  = 0.0053). Furthermore, the percentage change in CCVHF before and after exercise was higher in group I than in group A or controls (mean (SEM) 22 (10)%, −24 (4)%, and −21 (3)%, p < 0.0001). The optimal cut off for diagnosis of inferoposterior ischaemia was −5% with a sensitivity of 74%, specificity 75%, and accuracy 75%. Conclusions Vagal modulation as assessed by HRV analysis was enhanced in association with exercise induced inferoposterior ischaemia. Exercise ECG testing combined with HRV analysis would increase accuracy in the diagnosis of ischaemic areas in selected patients with angina pectoris. PMID:15939725

  13. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Sung, Yun-Hee

    2015-08-01

    Exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD), which is commonly associated with eccentric exercise, unaccustomed exercise, and resistance training, may lead to delayed onset muscle soreness, swelling, decreased muscle strength, and range of motion. Many researchers have evaluated various interventions to treat the signs and symptoms of EIMD. However, the effects of massage after EIMD are unclear. Here, we investigated the effect of massage on muscle strength and proprioception after EIMD. All subjects randomly were divided into an EIMD-treated control group (n = 10) and a massage-treated after EIMD experimental group (n = 11). Exercise-induced muscle damage was induced by repeated exercise. Massage treatment was provided by physiotherapist for 15 minutes. It consists of light stroking, milking, friction, and skin rolling. Lactate was evaluated by Lactate Pro analyzer in pre- and postexercise. Surface electromyography (muscle activity) and sonography (muscle thickness) were used to confirm the muscular characteristics. Proprioception was investigated by dual inclinometer. As a result, massage treatment on the gastrocnemius after EIMD increased activation of the medial gastrocnemius during contraction (p ≤ 0.05). In the lateral and medial gastrocnemius, the θs, which is the angle between muscle fibers and superficial aponeurosis, showed a significant change (p ≤ 0.05). However, there are no differences in the θd, which is the angle between muscle fibers and deep aponeurosis. We also found that proprioceptive acuity in the ankle joint was significantly greater in the massage-treated experimental group compared with that in the control group (p ≤ 0.05). These findings suggest that massage of the gastrocnemius after EIMD can improve muscle strength and proprioception by influencing the superficial layer of the gastrocnemius. PMID:25226328

  14. Attenuated exercise induced hyperaemia with age: mechanistic insight from passive limb movement

    PubMed Central

    McDaniel, John; Hayman, Melissa A; Ives, Steve; Fjeldstad, Anette S; Trinity, Joel D; Wray, D Walter; Richardson, Russell S

    2010-01-01

    The influence of age on the central and peripheral contributors to exercise-induced hyperaemia is unclear. Utilizing a reductionist approach, we compared the peripheral and central haemodynamic responses to passive limb movement (exercise without an increase in metabolism) in 11 old (71 ± 9 years of age s.d.) and 11 young (24 ± 2 years of age) healthy subjects. Cardiac output (CO), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and femoral blood flow of the passively moved and control legs were evaluated second-by-second during 2 min of passive knee extension at a rate of 1 Hz. Compared to the young, the old group exhibited a significantly attenuated increase in HR (7 ± 4%vs. 13 ± 7%s.d.), CO (10 ± 6%vs. 18 ± 8%) and femoral blood flow in the passively moved (123 ± 55%vs. 194 ± 57%) and control legs (47 ± 43%vs. 77 ± 96%). In addition, the change in vascular conductance in the passively moving limb was also significantly attenuated in the old (2.4 ± 1.2 ml min−1 mmHg−1) compared to the young (4.3 ± 1.7 ml min−1 mmHg−1). In both groups all main central and peripheral changes that occurred at the onset of passive knee extension were transient, lasting only 45 s. In a paradigm where metabolism does not play a role, these data reveal that both central and peripheral haemodynamic mechanisms are likely to be responsible for the 30% reduction in exercise-induced hyperaemia with age. PMID:20876201

  15. Role of PGC-1α during acute exercise-induced autophagy and mitophagy in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vainshtein, Anna; Tryon, Liam D.; Pauly, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise leads to systemic metabolic benefits, which require remodeling of energy resources in skeletal muscle. During acute exercise, the increase in energy demands initiate mitochondrial biogenesis, orchestrated by the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). Much less is known about the degradation of mitochondria following exercise, although new evidence implicates a cellular recycling mechanism, autophagy/mitophagy, in exercise-induced adaptations. How mitophagy is activated and what role PGC-1α plays in this process during exercise have yet to be evaluated. Thus we investigated autophagy/mitophagy in muscle immediately following an acute bout of exercise or 90 min following exercise in wild-type (WT) and PGC-1α knockout (KO) animals. Deletion of PGC-1α resulted in a 40% decrease in mitochondrial content, as well as a 25% decline in running performance, which was accompanied by severe acidosis in KO animals, indicating metabolic distress. Exercise induced significant increases in gene transcripts of various mitochondrial (e.g., cytochrome oxidase subunit IV and mitochondrial transcription factor A) and autophagy-related (e.g., p62 and light chain 3) genes in WT, but not KO, animals. Exercise also resulted in enhanced targeting of mitochondria for mitophagy, as well as increased autophagy and mitophagy flux, in WT animals. This effect was attenuated in the absence of PGC-1α. We also identified Niemann-Pick C1, a transmembrane protein involved in lysosomal lipid trafficking, as a target of PGC-1α that is induced with exercise. These results suggest that mitochondrial turnover is increased following exercise and that this effect is at least in part coordinated by PGC-1α. Anna Vainshtein received the AJP-Cell 2015 Paper of the Year award. Listen to a podcast with Anna Vainshtein and coauthor David A. Hood at http://ajpcell.podbean.com/e/ajp-cell-paper-of-the-year-2015-award-podcast/. PMID

  16. Increased renal tubular sodium reabsorption during exercise-induced hypervolemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagashima, K.; Wu, J.; Kavouras, S. A.; Mack, G. W.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that renal tubular Na(+) reabsorption increased during the first 24 h of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion. Renal function was assessed 1 day after no-exercise control (C) or intermittent cycle ergometer exercise (Ex, 85% of peak O(2) uptake) for 2 h before and 3 h after saline loading (12.5 ml/kg over 30 min) in seven subjects. Ex reduced renal blood flow (p-aminohippurate clearance) compared with C (0.83 +/- 0.12 vs. 1.49 +/- 0.24 l/min, P < 0.05) but did not influence glomerular filtration rates (97 +/- 10 ml/min, inulin clearance). Fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) in the proximal tubules was higher in Ex than in C (P < 0.05). Saline loading decreased fractional tubular reabsorption of Na(+) from 99.1 +/- 0.1 to 98.7 +/- 0.1% (P < 0.05) in C but not in Ex (99.3 +/- 0.1 to 99.4 +/- 0.1%). Saline loading reduced plasma renin activity and plasma arginine vasopressin levels in C and Ex, although the magnitude of decrease was greater in C (P < 0.05). These results indicate that, during the acute phase of exercise-induced plasma volume expansion, increased tubular Na(+) reabsorption is directed primarily to the proximal tubules and is associated with a decrease in renal blood flow. In addition, saline infusion caused a smaller reduction in fluid-regulating hormones in Ex. The attenuated volume-regulatory response acts to preserve distal tubular Na(+) reabsorption during saline infusion 24 h after exercise.

  17. Glycopyrrolate abolishes the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion in humans.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Thomas; Fisher, James P; Young, Colin N; Hartwich, Doreen; Ogoh, Shigehiko; Raven, Peter B; Fadel, Paul J; Secher, Niels H

    2010-10-01

    Brain blood vessels contain muscarinic receptors that are important for cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation, but whether a cholinergic receptor mechanism is involved in the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion or affects cerebral metabolism remains unknown. We evaluated CBF and cerebral metabolism (from arterial and internal jugular venous O(2), glucose and lactate differences), as well as the middle cerebral artery mean blood velocity (MCA V(mean); transcranial Doppler ultrasound) during a sustained static handgrip contraction at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction (n = 9) and the MCA V(mean) during ergometer cycling (n = 8). Separate, randomized and counterbalanced trials were performed in control (no drug) conditions and following muscarinic cholinergic receptor blockade by glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate increased resting heart rate from approximately 60 to approximately 110 beats min(-1) (P < 0.01) and cardiac output by approximately 40% (P < 0.05), but did not affect mean arterial pressure. The central cardiovascular responses to exercise with glycopyrrolate were similar to the control responses, except that cardiac output did not increase during static handgrip with glycopyrrolate. Glycopyrrolate did not significantly affect cerebral metabolism during static handgrip, but a parallel increase in MCA V(mean) (approximately 16%; P < 0.01) and CBF (approximately 12%; P < 0.01) during static handgrip, as well as the increase in MCA V(mean) during cycling (approximately 15%; P < 0.01), were abolished by glycopyrrolate (P < 0.05). Thus, during both cycling and static handgrip, a cholinergic receptor mechanism is important for the exercise-induced increase in cerebral perfusion without affecting the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen. PMID:20660020

  18. Epigenetic Modifications of the PGC-1α Promoter during Exercise Induced Expression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lochmann, Timothy L.; Thomas, Ravindar R.; Bennett, James P.; Taylor, Shirley M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator, PGC-1α, is known for its role in mitochondrial biogenesis. Although originally thought to exist as a single protein isoform, recent studies have identified additional promoters which produce multiple mRNA transcripts. One of these promoters (promoter B), approximately 13.7kb upstream of the canonical PGC-1α promoter (promoter A), yields alternative transcripts present at levels much lower than the canonical PGC-1α mRNA transcript. In skeletal muscle, exercise resulted in a substantial, rapid increase of mRNA of these alternative PGC-1α transcripts. Although the β2-adrenergic receptor was identified as a signaling pathway that activates transcription from PGC-1α promoter B, it is not yet known what molecular changes occur to facilitate PGC-1α promoter B activation following exercise. We sought to determine whether epigenetic modifications were involved in this exercise response in mouse skeletal muscle. We found that DNA hydroxymethylation correlated to increased basal mRNA levels from PGC-1α promoter A, but that DNA methylation appeared to play no role in the exercise-induced activation of PGC-1α promoter B. The level of the activating histone mark H3K4me3 increased with exercise 2–4 fold across PGC-1α promoter B, but remained unaltered past the canonical PGC-1α transcriptional start site. Together, these data show that epigenetic modifications partially explain exercise-induced changes in the skeletal muscle mRNA levels of PGC-1α isoforms. PMID:26053857

  19. An open-label study examining the effect of pharmacological treatment on mannitol- and exercise-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in asthmatic children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mannitol- and exercise bronchial provocation tests are both used to diagnose exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. The study aim was to compare the short-term treatment response to budesonide and montelukast on airway hyperresponsiveness to mannitol challenge test and to exercise challenge test in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Methods Patients were recruited from a paediatric asthma rehabilitation clinic located in the Swiss Alps. Individuals with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and a positive result in the exercise challenge test underwent mannitol challenge test on day 0. All subjects then received a treatment with 400 μg budesonide and bronchodilators as needed for 7 days, after which exercise- and mannitol-challenge tests were repeated (day 7). Montelukast was then added to the previous treatment and both tests were repeated again after 7 days (day 14). Results Of 26 children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, 14 had a positive exercise challenge test at baseline and were included in the intervention study. Seven of 14 (50%) also had a positive mannitol challenge test. There was a strong correlation between airway responsiveness to exercise and to mannitol at baseline (r = 0.560, p = 0.037). Treatment with budesonide and montelukast decreased airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise challenge test and to a lesser degree to mannitol challenge test. The fall in forced expiratory volume in one second during exercise challenge test was 21.7% on day 0 compared to 6.7% on day 14 (p = 0.001) and the mannitol challenge test dose response ratio was 0.036%/mg on day 0 compared to 0.013%/mg on day 14 (p = 0.067). Conclusion Short-term treatment with an inhaled corticosteroid and an additional leukotriene receptor antagonist in children and adolescents with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction decreases airway hyperresponsiveness to exercise and to mannitol. PMID:25084607

  20. Fat Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Keefe, Sean F.; Pike, Oscar A.

    Methods for characterizing edible lipids, fats, and oils can be separated into two categories: those developed to analyze bulk oils and fats, and those focusing on analysis of foodstuffs and their lipid extracts. In evaluating foodstuffs, it is usually necessary to extract the lipids prior to analysis. In these cases, if sufficient quantities of lipids are available, methods developed for bulk fats and oils can be utilized.

  1. The Free-Running Asthma Screening Test: An Approach to Screening for Exercise-Induced Asthma in Rural Alabama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaman, Doris J.; Estes, Jenny

    1997-01-01

    This study documented the prevalence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) in rural elementary schools, examining the use of a free-running asthma screening test and peak expiratory flow-rate measurement for school screening. Results indicated that 5.7% of the students had EIA. Absenteeism and poverty were related to EIA. (SM)

  2. Increased dietary protein attenuates C-reactive protein and creatine kinase responses to exercise-induced energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined if dietary protein (P) modulates responses of C-reactive protein (CRP) and creatine kinase (CK), biomarkers of inflammation and muscle damage, during exercise-induced energy deficit (DEF). Thirteen healthy men (22 +/- 1 y, VO2peak 60 +/- 2 ml.kg-1.min-1) balanced energy expenditure (EE...

  3. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Screening for Exercise-Induced Asthma: Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Kelly; Shaw, Michele R.; Postma, Julie; Katz, Janet R.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is a major cause of illness, missed school days, and hospitalization in children. One type of asthma common in children is exercise-induced asthma (EIA). EIA causes airway narrowing with symptoms of cough and shortness of breath during exercise. The purpose of this article is to review the literature relevant to screening children and…

  4. Exercise and Fat Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, H. Harrison, Ed.

    1975-01-01

    This document analyzes the problems encountered by the obese individual and the effects of regular exercise on weight loss and fat reduction. Part one compares the psychological traits of obese children with age groups of normal weight and discusses the organic disorders and social attitudes which plague the overweight individual. Part two states…

  5. Acute and chronic watercress supplementation attenuates exercise-induced peripheral mononuclear cell DNA damage and lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Fogarty, Mark C; Hughes, Ciara M; Burke, George; Brown, John C; Davison, Gareth W

    2013-01-28

    Pharmacological antioxidant vitamins have previously been investigated for a prophylactic effect against exercise-induced oxidative stress. However, large doses are often required and may lead to a state of pro-oxidation and oxidative damage. Watercress contains an array of nutritional compounds such as β-carotene and α-tocopherol which may increase protection against exercise-induced oxidative stress. The present randomised controlled investigation was designed to test the hypothesis that acute (consumption 2 h before exercise) and chronic (8 weeks consumption) watercress supplementation can attenuate exercise-induced oxidative stress. A total of ten apparently healthy male subjects (age 23 (SD 4) years, stature 179 (SD 10) cm and body mass 74 (SD 15) kg) were recruited to complete the 8-week chronic watercress intervention period (and then 8 weeks of control, with no ingestion) of the experiment before crossing over in order to compete the single-dose acute phase (with control, no ingestion). Blood samples were taken at baseline (pre-supplementation), at rest (pre-exercise) and following exercise. Each subject completed an incremental exercise test to volitional exhaustion following chronic and acute watercress supplementation or control. The main findings show an exercise-induced increase in DNA damage and lipid peroxidation over both acute and chronic control supplementation phases (P< 0.05 v. supplementation), while acute and chronic watercress attenuated DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and decreased H₂O₂ accumulation following exhaustive exercise (P< 0.05 v. control). A marked increase in the main lipid-soluble antioxidants (α-tocopherol, γ-tocopherol and xanthophyll) was observed following watercress supplementation (P< 0.05 v. control) in both experimental phases. These findings suggest that short- and long-term watercress ingestion has potential antioxidant effects against exercise-induced DNA damage and lipid peroxidation. PMID:22475430

  6. Meta-Analysis of Prognostic Implications of Exercise-Induced Ventricular Premature Complexes in the General Population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joonseok; Kwon, Minkyung; Chang, Jinsoo; Harris, David; Gerson, Myron C; Hwang, Seung-Sik; Oh, Seung-Won

    2016-09-01

    Ventricular premature complexes (VPCs) during stress testing in the general population are commonly seen in clinical practice, but their prognostic value is not well understood. A comprehensive literature search of MEDLINE, Embase, and the Cochrane Library from January 1970 to May 2015 was conducted. Observational cohort studies on general populations evaluating the association between exercise-induced VPCs and all-cause or cardiovascular mortality were included in the analysis. Nine studies comprising 62,488 participants comparing clinical outcomes of patients with and without exercise-induced VPCs were included. The overall combined relative risks (RRs) for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular mortality in patients with exercise-induced VPCs were 1.41 (95% CI 1.23 to 1.61) and 1.86 (95% CI 1.51 to 2.30), respectively. In subgroup analysis, both frequent VPCs (RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.60) and infrequent VPCs (RR 1.57, 95% CI 1.13 to 2.18) were associated with an adverse outcome. VPCs during recovery were associated with an increased risk of death (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.96). VPCs during exercise did not achieve statistical significance (RR 1.14, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.34), but only a few studies were included in the analysis. In conclusion, our meta-analysis suggests that exercise-induced VPCs in the general population significantly increase the risk of total mortality and cardiovascular mortality. Our study calls for further studies to assess the prognostic significance of exercise-induced VPCs and the utility of efforts to reduce the VPC burden to improve the clinical outcome. PMID:27394411

  7. Loss of NHE1 activity leads to reduced oxidative stress in heart and mitigates high-fat diet-induced myocardial stress

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N.; Miller, Marian L.; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Nieman, Michelle L.; Wang, Yigang; Shull, Gary E.

    2013-01-01

    Acute inhibition of the NHE1 Na+/H+ exchanger protects against ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic inhibition attenuates development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. To determine the cardiac effects of chronic inhibition of NHE1 under non-pathological conditions we used NHE1-null mice as a model of long-term NHE1 inhibition. Cardiovascular performance was relatively normal in Nhe1−/− mice although cardiac contractility and relaxation were slightly improved in mutant mice of the FVB/N background. GSH levels and GSH:GSSG ratios were elevated in Nhe1−/− hearts indicating an enhanced redox potential. Consistent with a reduced need for antioxidant protection, expression of heat shock proteins Hsp60 and Hsp25 was lower in Nhe1−/− hearts. Similarly, expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 was reduced, with no increase in expression of other ROS scavenging enzymes. GLUT1 levels were increased in Nhe1−/− hearts, the number of lipid droplets in myocytes was reduced, and PDK4 expression was refractory to high-fat diet-induced upregulation observed in wild-type hearts. High-fat dietinduced stress was attenuated in Nhe1−/− hearts, as indicated by smaller increases in phosphorylation of Hsp25 and α-B crystallin, and there was better preservation of insulin sensitivity, as evidenced by PKB/Akt phosphorylation. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were lower and high-fat diet-induced hepatic lipid accumulation was reduced in Nhe1−/− mice, demonstrating extracardiac effects of NHE1 ablation. These data indicate that long-term ablation of NHE1 activity increases the redox potential, mitigates high-fat diet-induced myocardial stress and fatty liver disease, leads to better preservation of insulin sensitivity, and may alter both cardiac and systemic metabolic substrate handling in mice. PMID:24080184

  8. Loss of NHE1 activity leads to reduced oxidative stress in heart and mitigates high-fat diet-induced myocardial stress.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vikram; Lorenz, John N; Miller, Marian L; Vairamani, Kanimozhi; Nieman, Michelle L; Wang, Yigang; Shull, Gary E

    2013-12-01

    Acute inhibition of the NHE1 Na(+)/H(+) exchanger protects against ischemia-reperfusion injury and chronic inhibition attenuates development of cardiac hypertrophy and failure. To determine the cardiac effects of chronic inhibition of NHE1 under non-pathological conditions we used NHE1-null mice as a model of long-term NHE1 inhibition. Cardiovascular performance was relatively normal in Nhe1(-/-) mice although cardiac contractility and relaxation were slightly improved in mutant mice of the FVB/N background. GSH levels and GSH:GSSG ratios were elevated in Nhe1(-/-) hearts indicating an enhanced redox potential. Consistent with a reduced need for antioxidant protection, expression of heat shock proteins Hsp60 and Hsp25 was lower in Nhe1(-/-) hearts. Similarly, expression of mitochondrial superoxide dismutase 2 was reduced, with no increase in expression of other ROS scavenging enzymes. GLUT1 levels were increased in Nhe1(-/-) hearts, the number of lipid droplets in myocytes was reduced, and PDK4 expression was refractory to high-fat diet-induced upregulation observed in wild-type hearts. High-fat diet-induced stress was attenuated in Nhe1(-/-) hearts, as indicated by smaller increases in phosphorylation of Hsp25 and α-B crystallin, and there was better preservation of insulin sensitivity, as evidenced by PKB/Akt phosphorylation. Plasma glucose and insulin levels were lower and high-fat diet-induced hepatic lipid accumulation was reduced in Nhe1(-/-) mice, demonstrating extracardiac effects of NHE1 ablation. These data indicate that long-term ablation of NHE1 activity increases the redox potential, mitigates high-fat diet-induced myocardial stress and fatty liver disease, leads to better preservation of insulin sensitivity, and may alter both cardiac and systemic metabolic substrate handling in mice. PMID:24080184

  9. A high-fat jelly diet restores bioenergetic balance and extends lifespan in the presence of motor dysfunction and lumbar spinal cord motor neuron loss in TDP-43A315T mutant C57BL6/J mice.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, Karen S; Halang, Luise; Woods, Ina; Prehn, Jochen H M

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic transactivation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) mice expressing the A315T mutation under control of the murine prion promoter progressively develop motor function deficits and are considered a new model for the study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS); however, premature sudden death resulting from intestinal obstruction halts disease phenotype progression in 100% of C57BL6/J congenic TDP-43(A315T) mice. Similar to our recent results in SOD1(G93A) mice, TDP-43(A315T) mice fed a standard pellet diet showed increased 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation at postnatal day (P)80, indicating elevated energetic stress during disease progression. We therefore investigated the effects of a high-fat jelly diet on bioenergetic status and lifespan in TDP-43(A315T) mice. In contrast to standard pellet-fed mice, mice fed high-fat jelly showed no difference in AMPK activation up to P120 and decreased phosphorylation of acetly-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at early-stage time points. Exposure to a high-fat jelly diet prevented sudden death and extended survival, allowing development of a motor neuron disease phenotype with significantly decreased body weight from P80 onward that was characterised by deficits in Rotarod abilities and stride length measurements. Development of this phenotype was associated with a significant motor neuron loss as assessed by Nissl staining in the lumbar spinal cord. Our work suggests that a high-fat jelly diet improves the pre-clinical utility of the TDP-43(A315T) model by extending lifespan and allowing the motor neuron disease phenotype to progress, and indicates the potential benefit of this diet in TDP-43-associated ALS. PMID:27491077

  10. Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) Gene Influences Exercise Induced Muscle Damage during a Competitive Marathon.

    PubMed

    Del Coso, Juan; Valero, Marjorie; Lara, Beatriz; Salinero, Juan José; Gallo-Salazar, César; Areces, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) phosphorylates the regulatory light chain (RLC) of myosin producing increases in force development during skeletal muscle contraction. It has been suggested that MLCK gene polymorphisms might alter RLC phosphorylation thereby decreasing the ability to produce force and to resist strain during voluntary muscle contractions. Thus, the genetic variations in the MLCK gene might predispose some individuals to higher values of muscle damage during exercise, especially during endurance competitions. The aim of this investigation was to determine the influence of MLCK genetic variants on exercise-induced muscle damage produced during a marathon. Sixty-seven experienced runners competed in a marathon race. The MLCK genotype (C37885A) of these marathoners was determined. Before and after the race, a sample of venous blood was obtained to assess changes in serum myoglobin concentrations and leg muscle power changes were measured during a countermovement jump. Self-reported leg muscle pain and fatigue were determined by questionnaires. A total of 59 marathoners (88.1%) were CC homozygotes and 8 marathoners (11.9%) were CA heterozygotes. The two groups of participants completed the race with a similar time (228 ± 33 vs 234 ± 39 min; P = 0.30) and similar self-reported values for fatigue (15 ± 2 vs 16 ± 2 A.U.; P = 0.21) and lower-limb muscle pain (6.2 ± 1.7 vs 6.6 ± 1.8 cm; P = 0.29). However, CC marathoners presented higher serum myoglobin concentrations (739 ± 792 vs 348 ± 144 μg·mL-1; P = 0.03) and greater pre-to-post- race leg muscle power reduction (-32.7 ± 15.7 vs -21.2 ± 21.6%; P = 0.05) than CA marathoners. CA heterozygotes for MLCK C37885A might present higher exercise-induced muscle damage after a marathon competition than CC counterparts. PMID:27483374