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Sample records for exhibit non-classical effects

  1. A non-classical Kirchhoff plate model incorporating microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, X.-L.; Zhang, G. Y.

    2016-03-01

    A new non-classical Kirchhoff plate model is developed using a modified couple stress theory, a surface elasticity theory and a two-parameter elastic foundation model. A variational formulation based on Hamilton's principle is employed, which leads to the simultaneous determination of the equations of motion and the complete boundary conditions and provides a unified treatment of the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects. The new plate model contains a material length scale parameter to account for the microstructure effect, three surface elastic constants to describe the surface energy effect, and two foundation moduli to represent the foundation effect. The current non-classical plate model reduces to its classical elasticity-based counterpart when the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects are all suppressed. In addition, the newly developed plate model includes the models considering the microstructure dependence or the surface energy effect or the foundation influence alone as special cases and recovers the Bernoulli-Euler beam model incorporating the microstructure, surface energy and foundation effects. To illustrate the new model, the static bending and free vibration problems of a simply supported rectangular plate are analytically solved by directly applying the general formulas derived. For the static bending problem, the numerical results reveal that the deflection of the simply supported plate with or without the elastic foundation predicted by the current model is smaller than that predicted by the classical model. Also, it is observed that the difference in the deflection predicted by the new and classical plate models is very large when the plate thickness is sufficiently small, but it is diminishing with the increase of the plate thickness. For the free vibration problem, it is found that the natural frequency predicted by the new plate model with or without the elastic foundation is higher than that predicted by the

  2. Enhancing non-classicality in mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Gröblacher, Simon; Paternostro, Mauro

    2013-03-01

    We study the effects of post-selection measurements on both the non-classicality of the state of a mechanical oscillator and the entanglement between two mechanical systems that are part of a distributed optomechanical network. We address the cases of both Gaussian and non-Gaussian measurements, identifying in which cases simple photon counting and Geiger-like measurements are effective in distilling a strongly non-classical mechanical state and enhancing the purely mechanical entanglement between two elements of the network.

  3. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase

    PubMed Central

    Lomelino, Carrie L.; Supuran, Claudiu T.; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  4. Non-Classical Inhibition of Carbonic Anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Lomelino, Carrie L; Supuran, Claudiu T; McKenna, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Specific isoforms from the carbonic anhydrase (CA) family of zinc metalloenzymes have been associated with a variety of diseases. Isoform-specific carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) are therefore a major focus of attention for specific disease treatments. Classical CAIs, primarily sulfonamide-based compounds and their bioisosteres, are examined as antiglaucoma, antiepileptic, antiobesity, antineuropathic pain and anticancer compounds. However, many sulfonamide compounds inhibit all CA isoforms nonspecifically, diluting drug effectiveness and causing undesired side effects due to off-target inhibition. In addition, a small but significant percentage of the general population cannot be treated with sulfonamide-based compounds due to a sulfa allergy. Therefore, CAIs must be developed that are not only isoform specific, but also non-classical, i.e. not based on sulfonamides, sulfamates, or sulfamides. This review covers the classes of non-classical CAIs and the recent advances in the development of isoform-specific inhibitors based on phenols, polyamines, coumarins and their derivatives. PMID:27438828

  5. Behavior of thin-walled beams made of advanced composite materials and incorporating non-classical effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Librescu, Liviu; Song, Ohseop

    1991-11-01

    Several results concerning the refined theory of thin-walled beams of arbitrary closed cross-section incorporating nonclassical effects are presented. These effects are related both with the exotic properties characterizing the advanced composite material structures and the nonuniform torsional model. A special case of the general equations is used to study several problems of cantilevered thin-walled beams and to assess the influence of the incorporated effects. The results presented in this paper could be useful toward a more rational design of aeronautical or aerospace constructions, as well as of helicopter or tilt rotor blades constructed of advanced composite materials.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the 'non-classical immune cell'.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can infect 'non-classical immune cells', which comprise a significant constituency of cells that reside outside of those defined as 'classical immune cells' from myeloid or lymphoid origin. Here we address the influence of specific 'non-classical immune cells' in host responses and their effects in controlling mycobacterial growth or enabling an environment conducive for bacilli persistence. The interaction of M. tuberculosis with epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocytes, glia and neurons and downstream cellular responses that often dictate immune regulation and disease outcome are discussed. Functional integration and synergy between 'classical' and 'non-classical immune cells' are highlighted as critical for determining optimal immune outcomes that favour the host. PMID:25801479

  7. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bendtsen, Jannick D; Kiemer, Lars; Fausbøll, Anders; Brunak, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online. PMID:16212653

  8. Non-classical divalent lanthanide complexes.

    PubMed

    Nief, François

    2010-08-01

    The synthesis of non-classical divalent lanthanide complexes, i.e. those not containing the classical samarium(II), europium(II) or ytterbium(II), was once thought impossible. Since 1997, when the first stable complex of thulium(II) was discovered, there has been many more examples of stable coordination and organometallic complexes of lanthanum(II), neodymium(II) and dysprosium(II) in addition to thulium(II), and the influence of the ligand system on the stability of the complexes is beginning to be understood. These non-classical divalent compounds show exceptional reactivity as some of them have been shown to activate dinitrogen at room temperature, together with related reduced divalent-like systems, and to undergo spontaneous intramolecular carbon-hydrogen bond activation. Many more examples of non-classical divalent compounds together with new aspects of their exciting reactivity should be discovered in the near future. PMID:20631944

  9. The Effect of Simvastatin on Plasma Steroid Hormone Levels in Metformin-Treated Women with Non-Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Kowalcze, K; Bednarska-Czerwińska, A; Okopień, B

    2016-04-01

    Non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NC-CAH), one of the most common genetic disorders, is often associated with the presence of hyperandrogenism. Recently both simvastatin and metformin were found to reduce plasma steroid hormone levels in this disorder. This study included 8 women with NC-CAH and diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, as well as 12 matched women with similar glucose metabolism abnormalities but normal adrenal function. Both groups of women, receiving metformin for at least 6 months, were then treated with simvastatin (20 mg daily) for the following 12 weeks. Compared to patients with normal adrenal function, metformin-treated women with NC-CAH showed increased plasma levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, total testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione and DHEA-S. Simvastatin reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels in both patients with NC-CAH and normal adrenal function. Moreover, in the former group of women, statin therapy decreased plasma levels of testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and tended to reduce 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Our results suggest that metformin-statin combination therapy may be useful in the management of symptomatic women with NC-CAH. PMID:26824284

  10. Non-classical nonlinear feature extraction from standard resonance vibration data for damage detection.

    PubMed

    Eiras, J N; Monzó, J; Payá, J; Kundu, T; Popovics, J S

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic non-classical nonlinear analyses show promise for improved damage diagnostics in materials that exhibit such structure at the mesoscale, such as concrete. In this study, nonlinear non-classical dynamic material behavior from standard vibration test data, using pristine and frost damaged cement mortar bar samples, is extracted and quantified. The procedure is robust and easy to apply. The results demonstrate that the extracted nonlinear non-classical parameters show expected sensitivity to internal damage and are more sensitive to changes owing to internal damage levels than standard linear vibration parameters. PMID:25234919

  11. Non-classical types of loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iriondo, M. H.; Kröhling, D. M.

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to describe the sequence of physical and chemical processes resulting in the sediment-type named loess, a fine-grained sediment deposit of universal occurrence. Owing to historical causes, loess has been (and still is) implicitly linked to glacial/periglacial environments among most naturalists. However it is known today that most eolian dust is deflated from tropical deserts. Hence, that sequence of processes is more comprehensive than the former narrow cold scenario. Six examples of different "non-classical" cases (from South America and Europe) that fit well to the loess definition are developed: 1) volcanic loess in Ecuador: pyroclastic eruptions/valley wind/mountain praire/silica structuring; 2) tropical loess in northeastern Argentina, Brazil and Uruguay: deflation of river and fan splays/savanna/iron sesquioxide structuring; 3) gypsum loess in northern Spain: destruction of anhydrite/gypsiferous layers in a dry climate/valley wind/Saharian shrub peridesert/gypsum structuring; 4) trade-wind deposits in Venezuela and Brazil: deflation in tidal flats/trade wind into the continent/savanna/iron hydroxide structuring; 5) anticyclonic gray loess in Argentina: continental anticyclone on plains/anti-clockwise winds and whirls/steppe/carbonate structuring. All these non-classical types conform to the accepted loess definitions and they also share the most important field characteristics of loess such as grain size, friability, vertical or sub-vertical slopes in outcrops, subfusion and others. Other cases can probably be recognized when systematically scrutinized.

  12. Traveling Exhibitions: translating current science into effective science exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Morrow, C.; Harold, J.

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop two other exhibitions called Cosmic Origins and InterActive Earth. Museum exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of earth and space outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on the Institute's MarsQuest exhibition. This project is a 5000 square-foot, 2.5M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient host museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents). The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. SSI is also developing an interactive web site called MarsQuest On-line. The linkage between the web site, education program and exhibit will be discussed. MarsQuest and SSI's other exhibitions are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education.

  13. Quantitative characterization of non-classic polarization of cations on clay aggregate stability.

    PubMed

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10-5 to 10-1 mol L-1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation-surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  14. Quantitative Characterization of Non-Classic Polarization of Cations on Clay Aggregate Stability

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Feinan; Li, Hang; Liu, Xinmin; Li, Song; Ding, Wuquan; Xu, Chenyang; Li, Yue; Zhu, Longhui

    2015-01-01

    Soil particle interactions are strongly influenced by the concentration, valence and ion species and the pH of the bulk solution, which will also affect aggregate stability and particle transport. In this study, we investigated clay aggregate stability in the presence of different alkali ions (Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+) at concentrations from10−5 to 10−1 mol L−1. Strong specific ion effects on clay aggregate stability were observed, and showed the order Cs+>K+>Na+>Li+. We found that it was not the effects of ion size, hydration, and dispersion forces in the cation–surface interactions but strong non-classic polarization of adsorbed cations that resulted in these specific effects. In this study, the non-classic dipole moments of each cation species resulting from the non-classic polarization were estimated. By comparing non-classic dipole moments with classic values, the observed dipole moments of adsorbed cations were up to 104 times larger than the classic values for the same cation. The observed non-classic dipole moments sharply increased with decreasing electrolyte concentration. We conclude that strong non-classic polarization could significantly suppress the thickness of the diffuse layer, thereby weakening the electric field near the clay surface and resulting in improved clay aggregate stability. Even though we only demonstrated specific ion effects on aggregate stability with several alkali ions, our results indicate that these effects could be universally important in soil aggregate stability. PMID:25874864

  15. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  16. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  17. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder. PMID:24891708

  18. Simulation of non-classical diffusion in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmers, Jana; Bargmann, Swantje

    2014-05-01

    The present contribution is concerned with the computational modelling of non-classical diffusion in amorphous polymers. Special attention is paid to the limiting case of Case II diffusion. Application of the dual-phase-lag concept to Fick's first law leads to a description of Case II behaviour. The change in material properties during the glass transition is explicitly accounted for by a concentration dependent formulation of the material parameters. The proposed model is well suited for modelling the sharp diffusion front and linear uptake kinetics associated with Case II diffusion. Application of a concentration dependent diffusion coefficient reduces the concentration gradient behind the front to a minimum. For the solution procedure, a finite element scheme in space and a finite difference method in time are applied. Three-dimensional numerical results are presented for classical Fickian and non-classical Case II diffusion. This paper adds to the basic understanding of the computational modelling of the Case II diffusion phenomenon.

  19. Study of higher order non-classical properties of squeezed Kerr state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Devendra Kumar

    2010-09-01

    Recently, Prakash and Mishra [J. Phys. B: at. Mol. Opt. Phys., 39, 2291(2006); 40, 2531(2007)] have studied higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistic conditions for non-classicality in the form of general inequalities for expectation values of products of arbitrary powers of photon number and of photon-number fluctuation. It is, therefore, vital to study the generation of these higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics (phase-insensitive behavior) in a physically realizable medium and their relations to higher order squeezing (phase-sensitive behavior). In the present paper, we study higher order non-classical properties, such as Hong and Mandel squeezing, amplitude-squared squeezing and higher order sub-Poissonian photon statistics, of squeezed Kerr state which is generated by squeezing the output of a Kerr medium whose input is coherent light. Such states can be realized if laser light is sent through an optical fiber and then into a degenerate parametric amplifier. It is established that the squeezed Kerr state can exhibit higher order non-classical properties.

  20. Beyond iron: non-classical biological functions of bacterial siderophores.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Timothy C; Nolan, Elizabeth M

    2015-04-14

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of "non-classical" siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  1. Maximal non-classicality in multi-setting Bell inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Zohren, Stefan; Pawlowski, Marcin

    2016-04-01

    The discrepancy between maximally entangled states and maximally non-classical quantum correlations is well-known but still not well understood. We aim to investigate the relation between quantum correlations and entanglement in a family of Bell inequalities with N-settings and d outcomes. Using analytical as well as numerical techniques, we derive both maximal quantum violations and violations obtained from maximally entangled states. Furthermore, we study the most non-classical quantum states in terms of their entanglement entropy for large values of d and many measurement settings. Interestingly, we find that the entanglement entropy behaves very differently depending on whether N = 2 or N\\gt 2: when N = 2 the entanglement entropy is a monotone function of d and the most non-classical state is far from maximally entangled, whereas when N\\gt 2 the entanglement entropy is a non-monotone function of d and converges to that of the maximally entangled state in the limit of large d.

  2. Preparation of Entangled Coherent States and Correspondence Between Entanglement and Non-Classical Properties in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Juju; Xu, Lin

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the controllable generation of entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED). In our scheme, the easy integration of solid-state quantum circuit is exploited. In particular, through manipulating the external capacitor or external classical microwave impulse, the coupling between superconducting qubits and cavity can be manipulated, the entanglement effect between qubit and field modes can be enhanced and the decoherence effect can be effectively suppressed. We further discuss the correspondence between quantum entanglement and some non-classical effects such as the squeezing of entangled coherent state field, the anti-buching effect. The results show that the time evolution of the quantum entanglement between field modes is always accompanied by the synchronous changes of certain non-classical effect. When the quantum entanglement reaches maximum, the anti-bunching (or compression effect) almost reaches maximum synchronously. Once entanglement sudden death occurs, the non-classical effects disappear.

  3. Non-classical Signature of Parametric Fluorescence and its Application in Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamar, M.; Michálek, V.; Pathak, A.

    2014-08-01

    The article provides a short theoretical background of what the non-classical light means. We applied the criterion for the existence of non-classical effects derived by C.T. Lee on parametric fluorescence. The criterion was originally derived for the study of two light beams with one mode per beam. We checked if the criterion is still working for two multimode beams of parametric down-conversion through numerical simulations. The theoretical results were tested by measurement of photon number statistics of twin beams emitted by nonlinear BBO crystal pumped by intense femtoseconds UV pulse. We used ICCD camera as the detector of photons in both beams. It appears that the criterion can be used for the measurement of the quantum efficiencies of the ICCD cameras.

  4. Kaempferol Exhibits Progestogenic Effects in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Toh, May Fern; Mendonca, Emma; Eddie, Sharon L.; Endsley, Michael P.; Lantvit, Daniel D.; Petukhov, Pavel A.; Burdette, Joanna E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Progesterone (P4) plays a central role in women's health. Synthetic progestins are used clinically in hormone replacement therapy (HRT), oral contraceptives, and for the treatment of endometriosis and infertility. Unfortunately, synthetic progestins are associated with side effects, including cardiovascular disease and breast cancer. Botanical dietary supplements are widely consumed for the alleviation of a variety of gynecological issues, but very few studies have characterized natural compounds in terms of their ability to bind to and activate progesterone receptors (PR). Kaempferol is a flavonoid that functions as a non-steroidal selective progesterone receptor modulator (SPRM) in vitro. This study investigated the molecular and physiological effects of kaempferol in the ovariectomized rat uteri. Methods Since genistein is a phytoestrogen that was previously demonstrated to increase uterine weight and proliferation, the ability of kaempferol to block genistein action in the uterus was investigated. Analyses of proliferation, steroid receptor expression, and induction of well-established PR-regulated targets Areg and Hand2 were completed using histological analysis and qPCR gene induction experiments. In addition, kaempferol in silico binding analysis was completed for PR. The activation of estrogen and androgen receptor signalling was determined in vitro. Results Molecular docking analysis confirmed that kaempferol adopts poses that are consistent with occupying the ligand-binding pocket of PRA. Kaempferol induced expression of PR regulated transcriptional targets in the ovariectomized rat uteri, including Hand2 and Areg. Consistent with progesterone-l ke activity, kaempferol attenuated genistein-induced uterine luminal epithelial proliferation without increasing uterine weight. Kaempferol signalled without down regulating PR expression in vitro and in vivo and without activating estrogen and androgen receptors. Conclusion Taken together, these data

  5. Beyond Iron: Non-Classical Biological Functions of Bacterial Siderophores

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Timothy C.; Nolan, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete small molecules known as siderophores to acquire iron from their surroundings. For over 60 years, investigations into the bioinorganic chemistry of these molecules, including fundamental coordination chemistry studies, have provided insight into the crucial role that siderophores play in bacterial iron homeostasis. The importance of understanding the fundamental chemistry underlying bacterial life has been highlighted evermore in recent years because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the need to prevent the global rise of these superbugs. Increasing reports of siderophores functioning in capacities other than iron transport have appeared recently, but reports of “non-classical” siderophore functions have long paralleled those of iron transport. One particular non-classical function of these iron chelators, namely antibiotic activity, was even documented before the role of siderophores in iron transport was established. In this Perspective, we present an exposition of past and current work into non-classical functions of siderophores and highlight the directions in which we anticipate that this research is headed. Examples include the ability of siderophores to function as zincophores, chalkophores, and metallophores for a variety of other metals, sequester heavy metal toxins, transport boron, act as signalling molecules, regulate oxidative stress, and provide antibacterial activity. PMID:25764171

  6. New fundamental evidence of non-classical structure in the combination of natural concepts.

    PubMed

    Aerts, D; Sozzo, S; Veloz, T

    2016-01-13

    We recently performed cognitive experiments on conjunctions and negations of two concepts with the aim of investigating the combination problem of concepts. Our experiments confirmed the deviations (conceptual vagueness, underextension, overextension etc.) from the rules of classical (fuzzy) logic and probability theory observed by several scholars in concept theory, while our data were successfully modelled in a quantum-theoretic framework developed by ourselves. In this paper, we isolate a new, very stable and systematic pattern of violation of classicality that occurs in concept combinations. In addition, the strength and regularity of this non-classical effect leads us to believe that it occurs at a more fundamental level than the deviations observed up to now. It is our opinion that we have identified a deep non-classical mechanism determining not only how concepts are combined but, rather, how they are formed. We show that this effect can be faithfully modelled in a two-sector Fock space structure, and that it can be exactly explained by assuming that human thought is the superposition of two processes, a 'logical reasoning', guided by 'logic', and a 'conceptual reasoning', guided by 'emergence', and that the latter generally prevails over the former. All these findings provide new fundamental support to our quantum-theoretic approach to human cognition. PMID:26621983

  7. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    PubMed

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells. PMID:27448212

  8. Immunomodulation of classical and non-classical HLA molecules by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gallegos, Cristina E; Michelin, Severino; Dubner, Diana; Carosella, Edgardo D

    2016-05-01

    Radiotherapy has been employed for the treatment of oncological patients for nearly a century, and together with surgery and chemotherapy, radiation oncology constitutes one of the three pillars of cancer therapy. Ionizing radiation has complex effects on neoplastic cells and on tumor microenvironment: beyond its action as a direct cytotoxic agent, tumor irradiation triggers a series of alterations in tumoral cells, which includes the de novo synthesis of particular proteins and the up/down-regulation of cell surface molecules. Additionally, ionizing radiation may induce the release of "danger signals" which may, in turn lead to cellular and molecular responses by the immune system. This immunomodulatory action of ionizing radiation highlights the importance of the combined use (radiotherapy plus immunotherapy) for cancer healing. Major histocompatibility complex antigens (also called Human Leukocyte Antigens, HLA in humans) are one of those molecules whose expression is modulated after irradiation. This review summarizes the modulatory properties of ionizing radiation on the expression of HLA class I (classical and non-classical) and class II molecules, with special emphasis in non-classical HLA-I molecules. PMID:27113815

  9. The Thermodynamics Of Calcite Nucleation On Organic Surfaces: Classical Vs. Non-Classical Pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, M.; Hu, Q.; Hamm, L. M.; Lee, J. R.; Becker, U.; Dove, P. M.; De Yoreo, J.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleation in the natural world often occurs at organic surfaces. During biomineralization, living organisms use macromolecular matrices to direct nucleation of a variety of inorganic materials by controlling the timing, polymorphism, morphology, and crystallographic orientation of mineral nuclei. In geochemical settings, mineral surfaces, which are often covered with organic layers or biofilms, surround the volume within which nucleation occurs. Despite the importance of nucleation phenomena in these natural settings, our understanding of the reaction dynamics and energetics of the process is limited. Issues such as the role of pre-nucleation clusters, formation of amorphous precursors, and polymorph selection during the initial stages of nucleation, as well as the structural relationships between the organic matrix and the emerging nucleus are poorly understood. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols as simple models for macromolecular matrices and organic films, we address the gaps in our understanding by employing a suite of in situ methods to investigate CaCO3 nucleation. From optical measurements of calcite nucleation rates on alkanethiol SAMs, we find that for two carboxyl-terminated alkanethiol SAMs with odd (mercaptoundecanoic acid) and even (mercaptohexadecanoic acid) carbon chains, the rate exhibits the supersaturation dependence expected from classical theory and the effective interfacial energy is reduced from about 109 mJ/m2 in bulk solution to 81 mJ/m2 and 72 mJ/m2, respectively. Theoretical analysis shows that the corresponding free energy barrier is reduced from 105kT for homogeneous nucleation in bulk solution to 27KT and 19kT, respectively. The results demonstrate that calcite nucleation on these carboxyl SAMs is described well in purely classical terms through a reduction in the thermodynamic barrier due to decreased interfacial free energy. In addition, although amorphous particles form prior to crystal nucleation on hydroxyl

  10. The uncertainty principle enables non-classical dynamics in an interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlsten, Oscar C. O.; Garner, Andrew J. P.; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-08-01

    The quantum uncertainty principle stipulates that when one observable is predictable there must be some other observables that are unpredictable. The principle is viewed as holding the key to many quantum phenomena and understanding it deeper is of great interest in the study of the foundations of quantum theory. Here we show that apart from being restrictive, the principle also plays a positive role as the enabler of non-classical dynamics in an interferometer. First we note that instantaneous action at a distance should not be possible. We show that for general probabilistic theories this heavily curtails the non-classical dynamics. We prove that there is a trade-off with the uncertainty principle that allows theories to evade this restriction. On one extreme, non-classical theories with maximal certainty have their non-classical dynamics absolutely restricted to only the identity operation. On the other extreme, quantum theory minimizes certainty in return for maximal non-classical dynamics.

  11. How to create an effective scientific exhibit: analysis of award-winning exhibits from the 1998 RSNA meeting.

    PubMed

    Choi, J R; Kruskal, J B; Rosen, M P; Davis, R B

    2000-01-01

    Although the most important component of an effective scientific exhibit is content, the way in which an exhibit is constructed can greatly influence its overall effectiveness. Choice of format should be determined by carefully analyzing the purpose of one's exhibit, expected audience, and data at hand, as well as type of meeting and funding. Depending on the type of data to be presented and available equipment and budget, the most appropriate style for a scientific exhibit may be a traditional mat board, computer-generated tiles or large-print backboard panel, traditional mat board with viewbox exhibit, matted transparency tiles with viewbox exhibit, or computer-generated large-film display. The authors analyzed 993 of 1, 041 (95.4%) scientific exhibits on display at the 84th RSNA Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting and categorized each exhibit according to the following characteristics: display type and size, color scheme, display font size, and graphic styles. These characteristics were then correlated with scientific exhibit and design awards as well as invitations for submission to RadioGraphics. Chance of winning an award or being asked to publish the presentation in RadioGraphics was significantly increased for viewbox exhibits (compared with backboard panel exhibits) and for larger exhibits (compared with smaller exhibits). PMID:10903695

  12. Interferometry with non-classical motional states of a Bose–Einstein condensate

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Negretti, A.; Berrada, T.; Bücker, R.; Montangero, S.; Schaff, J.-F.; Schumm, T.; Calarco, T.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2014-01-01

    The Ramsey interferometer is a prime example of precise control at the quantum level. It is usually implemented using internal states of atoms, molecules or ions, for which powerful manipulation procedures are now available. Whether it is possible to control external degrees of freedom of more complex, interacting many-body systems at this level remained an open question. Here we demonstrate a two-pulse Ramsey-type interferometer for non-classical motional states of a Bose–Einstein condensate in an anharmonic trap. The control sequences used to manipulate the condensate wavefunction are obtained from optimal control theory and are directly optimized to maximize the interferometric contrast. They permit a fast manipulation of the atomic ensemble compared to the intrinsic decay processes and many-body dephasing effects. This allows us to reach an interferometric contrast of 92% in the experimental implementation. PMID:24874019

  13. New neptunium(V) borates that exhibit the alexandrite effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2012-01-01

    A new neptunium(V) borate, K[(NpO(2))B(10)O(14)(OH)(4)], was synthesized using boric acid as a reactive flux. The compound possesses a layered structure in which Np(V) resides in triangular holes, creating a hexagonal-bipyramidal environment around neptunium. This compound is unusual in that it exhibits the Alexandrite effect, a property that is typically restricted to neptunium(IV) compounds. PMID:22145669

  14. Homogeneous illusion device exhibiting transformed and shifted scattering effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Jin-Shuo; Wu, Qun; Zhang, Kuang; He, Xun-Jun; Wang, Yue

    2016-06-01

    Based on the theory of transformation optics, a type of homogeneous illusion device exhibiting transformed and shifted scattering effect is proposed in this paper. The constitutive parameters of the proposed device are derived, and full-wave simulations are performed to validate the electromagnetic properties of transformed and shifted scattering effect. The simulation results show that the proposed device not only can visually shift the image of target in two dimensions, but also can visually transform the shape of target. It is expected that such homogeneous illusion device could possess potential applications in military camouflage and other field of electromagnetic engineering.

  15. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse

    PubMed Central

    LOONG, Shih Keng; MAHFODZ, Nur Hidayana; WALI, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; TALIB, Siti Aisyah A.; NASRAH, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; WONG, Pooi Fong; ABUBAKAR, Sazaly

    2016-01-01

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species. PMID:26782013

  16. Molecular and antimicrobial analyses of non-classical Bordetella isolated from a laboratory mouse.

    PubMed

    Loong, Shih Keng; Mahfodz, Nur Hidayana; Wali, Haryanti Azura Mohamad; Talib, Siti Aisyah A; Nasrah, Siti Noraisah Ahmad; Wong, Pooi Fong; Abubakar, Sazaly

    2016-05-01

    Accurate identification and separation of non-classical Bordetella species is very difficult. These species have been implicated in animal infections. B. hinzii, a non-classical Bordetella, has been isolated from mice in experimental facilities recently. We isolated and characterized one non-classical Bordetella isolate from the trachea and lung of an ICR mouse. Isolate BH370 was initially identified as B. hinzii by 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA sequencing. Additionally, isolate BH370 also displayed antimicrobial sensitivity profiles similar to B. hinzii. However, analyses of nrdA sequences determined its identity as Bordetella genogroup 16. The isolation of BH370 from a healthy mouse suggests the possibility of it being a commensal. The nrdA gene was demonstrated to possess greater phylogenetic resolution as compared with 16S ribosomal DNA and ompA for the discrimination of non-classical Bordetella species. PMID:26782013

  17. The uncertainty principle enables non-classical dynamics in an interferometer.

    PubMed

    Dahlsten, Oscar C O; Garner, Andrew J P; Vedral, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    The quantum uncertainty principle stipulates that when one observable is predictable there must be some other observables that are unpredictable. The principle is viewed as holding the key to many quantum phenomena and understanding it deeper is of great interest in the study of the foundations of quantum theory. Here we show that apart from being restrictive, the principle also plays a positive role as the enabler of non-classical dynamics in an interferometer. First we note that instantaneous action at a distance should not be possible. We show that for general probabilistic theories this heavily curtails the non-classical dynamics. We prove that there is a trade-off with the uncertainty principle that allows theories to evade this restriction. On one extreme, non-classical theories with maximal certainty have their non-classical dynamics absolutely restricted to only the identity operation. On the other extreme, quantum theory minimizes certainty in return for maximal non-classical dynamics. PMID:25105741

  18. Hydrogenation of Liquid Styrene by Alumina Supported Nickel Catalysts: Comparison between Classical and Non-Classical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. C.; Abu Bakar, N. H. H.; Tan, W. L.; Abu Bakar, M.

    2016-06-01

    Almina supported Ni catalysts (Ni/Al2O3) with different Ni weight percentages (wt%) were prepared via classical and non-classical methods. All samples were prepared via impregnation technique. The samples prepared via non-classical methods were reduced using KBH4 as the reducing agent. The catalysts were tested for the hydrogenation of styrene in liquid phase. Optimum activation conditions for the hydrogenation reaction were found to be 633 K for 2 hours. Comparison of the catalytic reactivity for all catalysts at these activation conditions showed that catalysts prepared via classical methods exhibited better activity. Furthermore the 7.6wt% Ni-Al2O3/C showed enhanced activity when compared to the 5.9wt% and 13.8wt% Ni-Al2O3/C catalyst. This phenomenon is mainly attributed to the type of Ni active sites available on the catalyst. The surface properties of the catalysts investigated via H2- temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR), H2-chemisorption and H2-temperature programmed desorption (H2-TPD) confirm this.

  19. Non-classical adhesive-bonded joints in practical aerospace construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart-Smith, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Solutions are derived for adhesive-bonded joints of non-classical geometries. Particular attention is given to bonded doublers and to selective reinforcement by unidirectional composites. Non-dimensionalized charts are presented for the efficiency limit imposed on the skin as the result of the eccentricity in the load path through the doubler. It is desirable to employ a relativly large doubler to minimize the effective eccentricity in the load path. The transfer stresses associated with selective reinforcement of metal structures by advanced composites are analyzed. Reinforcement of bolt holes in composites by bonded metal doublers is covered quantitatively. Also included is the adhesive joint analysis for shear flow in a multi-cell torque box, in which the bond on one angle becomes more critical sooner than those on the others, thereby restricting the strength to less than the total of each maximum strength when acting alone. Adhesive plasticity and adherend stiffness and thermal imbalances are included. A simple analysis/design technique of solution in terms of upper and lower bounds on an all-plastic adhesive analysis is introduced.

  20. Non-classical symmetries and invariant solutions of non-linear Dirac equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocha, P. M. M.; Khanna, F. C.; Rocha Filho, T. M.; Santana, A. E.

    2015-09-01

    We apply Lie and non-classical symmetry methods to partial differential equations in order to derive solutions of the non-linear Dirac equation corresponding to the Gross-Neveu model in d = (1 + 1) and d = (2 + 1) space-time dimensions. For each d, we first identify sub-algebras of the Poincaré-Lie algebra and for each such sub-algebra, we calculate the invariant solution. Non-classical symmetries are also determined and used to derive new solutions for the Gross-Neveu model.

  1. Non-classical testosterone signaling mediated through ZIP9 stimulates claudin expression and tight junction formation in Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Bulldan, Ahmed; Dietze, Raimund; Shihan, Mazen; Scheiner-Bobis, Georgios

    2016-08-01

    In the classical signaling pathway, testosterone regulates gene expression by activating the cytosolic/nuclear androgen receptor. In the non-classical pathway, testosterone activates cytosolic signaling cascades that are normally triggered by growth factors. The nature of the receptor involved in this signaling pathway is a source of controversy. In the Sertoli cell line 93RS2, which lacks the classical AR, we determined that testosterone stimulates the non-classical signaling pathway, characterized by the phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and transcription factors CREB and ATF-1. We also demonstrated that testosterone increases the expression of the tight junction (TJ) proteins claudin-1 and claudin-5. Both of these proteins are known to be essential constituents of TJs between Sertoli cells, and as a consequence of their increased expression transepithelial resistance across Sertoli cell monolayers is increased. ZIP9 is a Zn(2+)transporter that was recently shown to be a membrane-bound testosterone receptor. Silencing its expression in 93RS2 Sertoli cells by siRNA completely prevents Erk1/2, CREB, and ATF-1 phosphorylation as well the stimulation of claudin-1 and -5 expression and TJ formation between neighboring cells. The study presented here demonstrates for the first time that in Sertoli cells testosterone acts through the receptor ZIP9 to trigger the non-classical signaling cascade, resulting in increased claudin expression and TJ formation. Since TJ formation is a prerequisite for the maintenance of the blood-testis barrier, the testosterone/ZIP9 effects might be significant for male physiology. Further assessment of these interactions will help to supplement our knowledge concerning the mechanism by which testosterone plays a role in male fertility. PMID:27164415

  2. Pimecrolimus micelle exhibits excellent therapeutic effect for Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca.

    PubMed

    Yingfang, Fan; Zhuang, Bo; Wang, Cheng; Xu, Xuelian; Xu, Wei; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-04-01

    Poor corneal penetration and short residence time on the ocular surface are two major bottlenecks for conventional ophthalmic formulations. To overcome the foregoing dilemmas, we prepared two novel formulations of pimecrolimus nanomicelles (PNM) with particle size of 37.85 ± 1.21 nm and thermosensitive hydrogel (PTH) for treating Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS). PNM were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Malvern laser particle size analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD) system, and the content of drug in PNM was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The drug loading and encapsulation efficiency reached to 7.57% ± 0.10% and 97.9% ± 1.26%, respectively. PTH displayed special gel-sol transition behavior with temperature increasing from 4 °C to 37 °C. The in vitro release profile demonstrated that PNM and PTH exhibited sustained-release behavior compared with free pimecrolimus oil-based eye drop (FPO). In addition, we established a mouse model of KCS induced by benzalkonium chloride to evaluate the therapeutic outcome of different pimecrolimus formulations. The production of tear, fluorescein staining scores and histopathologic examinations of the cornea were assessed in detail. The results confirmed that PNM had the best therapeutic effect among all formulations based on its higher drug encapsulation capability, favourable permeability and sustained release. All these indicated that PNM could serve as a potent ophthalmologic agent for KCS. PMID:26731192

  3. Bonobos and chimpanzees exhibit human-like framing effects.

    PubMed

    Krupenye, Christopher; Rosati, Alexandra G; Hare, Brian

    2015-02-01

    Humans exhibit framing effects when making choices, appraising decisions involving losses differently from those involving gains. To directly test for the evolutionary origin of this bias, we examined decision-making in humans' closest living relatives: bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). We presented the largest sample of non-humans to date (n = 40) with a simple task requiring minimal experience. Apes made choices between a 'framed' option that provided preferred food, and an alternative option that provided a constant amount of intermediately preferred food. In the gain condition, apes experienced a positive 'gain' event in which the framed option was initially presented as one piece of food but sometimes was augmented to two. In the loss condition, apes experienced a negative 'loss' event in which they initially saw two pieces but sometimes received only one. Both conditions provided equal pay-offs, but apes chose the framed option more often in the positive 'gain' frame. Moreover, male apes were more susceptible to framing than were females. These results suggest that some human economic biases are shared through common descent with other apes and highlight the importance of comparative work in understanding the origins of individual differences in human choice. PMID:25672997

  4. Influences on the Talent Development Process of Non-Classical Musicians: Psychological, Social and Environmental Influences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamin, Sara; Richards, Hugh; Collins, Dave

    2007-01-01

    Twelve professional, non-classical musicians were interviewed about the impact of internal and external factors on their development as musicians. The data were qualitatively analyzed, and observations concerning psychological characteristics of developing excellence (PCDEs), social and environmental influences are reported. The insights of the…

  5. A non-classical view of the modulation of mineral precipitation by organic additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Ruiz-Agudo, Cristina; Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Putnis, Christine; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos; Putnis, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    Questions persist on the mechanisms of crystallization of sparingly soluble minerals such as calcium carbonate, calcium oxalate or barium sulphate. Compared to CaCO3, the mechanisms of nucleation and growth in the CaC2O4-H2O or BaSO4-H2O systems have received less attention. These phases are important due to their relevance as biominerals and/or unwanted mineral deposits in technological applications. Growing evidence suggests that sparingly soluble salts form by non-classical nucleation and growth pathways, where pre-nucleation ion associates and amorphous (solid or liquid) precursor phase(s) play a critical role (e.g. Rodríguez-Navarro et al. (2015), Ruiz-Agudo et al. (2015)). Indeed the identification of pre-nucleation species in these systems and their strong interactions with organic compounds (Verch et al. 2011) raises the possibility that the control of organics on biomineralization may begin even earlier than previously thought. A sound knowledge of the physical mechanisms by which acidic macromolecules affect nucleation and early growth may offer general insights concerning the molecular control of biomineralization, as well as being critical for improving strategies to control unwanted mineral deposition or for the synthesis of biomimetic materials. Here we present investigations on the initial stages of the precipitation of these relevant minerals in organic-free solutions to identify the precipitation pathway and to look for any potential precursor phase(s) to the final, crystalline polymorph. As well, we explore the effects that several acidic organic compounds have on the different precipitation stages identified. We find that organic additives such as citric acid, polyacrilic acid or a commercial copolymer of maleic acid/allyl sulfonic acid with phosphonate groups can be active at modifying pre-nucleation stages (destabilizing of pre-nucleation species or hampering the aggregation and growth of pre-nucleation associates) and subsequently strongly

  6. Contribution of a Non-classical HLA Gene, HLA-DOA, to the Risk of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Suzuki, Akari; Ikari, Katsunori; Terao, Chikashi; Kochi, Yuta; Ohmura, Koichiro; Higasa, Koichiro; Akiyama, Masato; Ashikawa, Kyota; Kanai, Masahiro; Hirata, Jun; Suita, Naomasa; Teo, Yik-Ying; Xu, Huji; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Takahashi, Atsushi; Momozawa, Yukihide; Matsuda, Koichi; Momohara, Shigeki; Taniguchi, Atsuo; Yamada, Ryo; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Kubo, Michiaki; Brown, Matthew A; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Matsuda, Fumihiko; Yamanaka, Hisashi; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2016-08-01

    Despite the progress in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) causal variant mapping, independent localization of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) risk from classical HLA genes is challenging. Here, we conducted a large-scale MHC fine-mapping analysis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in a Japanese population (6,244 RA cases and 23,731 controls) population by using HLA imputation, followed by a multi-ethnic validation study including east Asian and European populations (n = 7,097 and 23,149, respectively). Our study identified an independent risk of a synonymous mutation at HLA-DOA, a non-classical HLA gene, on anti-citrullinated protein autoantibody (ACPA)-positive RA risk (p = 1.4 × 10(-9)), which demonstrated a cis-expression quantitative trait loci (cis-eQTL) effect on HLA-DOA expression. Trans-ethnic comparison revealed different linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns in HLA-DOA and HLA-DRB1, explaining the observed HLA-DOA variant risk heterogeneity among ethnicities, which was most evident in the Japanese population. Although previous HLA fine-mapping studies have identified amino acid polymorphisms of the classical HLA genes as driving genetic susceptibility to disease, our study additionally identifies the dosage contribution of a non-classical HLA gene to disease etiology. Our study contributes to the understanding of HLA immunology in human diseases and suggests the value of incorporating additional ancestry in MHC fine-mapping. PMID:27486778

  7. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes.

    PubMed

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10 μm spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6 MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150 V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560-700 nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers. PMID:26510889

  8. Electrical stimulation of non-classical photon emission from diamond color centers by means of sub-superficial graphitic electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Forneris, Jacopo; Traina, Paolo; Monticone, Daniele Gatto; Amato, Giampiero; Boarino, Luca; Brida, Giorgio; Degiovanni, Ivo P.; Enrico, Emanuele; Moreva, Ekaterina; Grilj, Veljko; Skukan, Natko; Jakšić, Milko; Genovese, Marco; Olivero, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Focused MeV ion beams with micrometric resolution are suitable tools for the direct writing of conductive graphitic channels buried in an insulating diamond bulk, as already demonstrated for different device applications. In this work we apply this fabrication method to the electrical excitation of color centers in diamond, demonstrating the potential of electrical stimulation in diamond-based single-photon sources. Differently from optically-stimulated light emission from color centers in diamond, electroluminescence (EL) requires a high current flowing in the diamond subgap states between the electrodes. With this purpose, buried graphitic electrode pairs, 10 μm spaced, were fabricated in the bulk of a single-crystal diamond sample using a 6 MeV C microbeam. The electrical characterization of the structure showed a significant current injection above an effective voltage threshold of 150 V, which enabled the stimulation of a stable EL emission. The EL imaging allowed to identify the electroluminescent regions and the residual vacancy distribution associated with the fabrication technique. Measurements evidenced isolated electroluminescent spots where non-classical light emission in the 560–700 nm spectral range was observed. The spectral and auto-correlation features of the EL emission were investigated to qualify the non-classical properties of the color centers. PMID:26510889

  9. Studying thin film damping in a micro-beam resonator based on non-classical theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, Mina; Hossainpour, Siamak; Rezazadeh, Ghader

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model is presented for studying thin film damping of the surrounding fluid in an in-plane oscillating micro-beam resonator. The proposed model for this study is made up of a clamped-clamped micro-beam bound between two fixed layers. The micro-gap between the micro-beam and fixed layers is filled with air. As classical theories are not properly capable of predicting the size dependence behaviors of the micro-beam, and also behavior of micro-scale fluid media, hence in the presented model, equation of motion governing longitudinal displacement of the micro-beam has been extracted based on non-local elasticity theory. Furthermore, the fluid field has been modeled based on micro-polar theory. These coupled equations have been simplified using Newton-Laplace and continuity equations. After transforming to non-dimensional form and linearizing, the equations have been discretized and solved simultaneously using a Galerkin-based reduced order model. Considering slip boundary conditions and applying a complex frequency approach, the equivalent damping ratio and quality factor of the micro-beam resonator have been obtained. The obtained values for the quality factor have been compared to those based on classical theories. We have shown that applying non-classical theories underestimate the values of the quality factor obtained based on classical theories. The effects of geometrical parameters of the micro-beam and micro-scale fluid field on the quality factor of the resonator have also been investigated.

  10. Macroscopic non-classical states and terahertz quantum processing in room-temperature diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, K. C.; Sussman, B. J.; Sprague, M. R.; Michelberger, P.; Reim, K. F.; Nunn, J.; Langford, N. K.; Bustard, P. J.; Jaksch, D.; Walmsley, I. A.

    2012-01-01

    The nature of the transition between the familiar classical, macroscopic world and the quantum, microscopic one continues to be poorly understood. Expanding the regime of observable quantum behaviour to large-scale objects is therefore an exciting open problem. In macroscopic systems of interacting particles, rapid thermalization usually destroys any quantum coherence before it can be measured or used at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate quantum processing in the vibrational modes of a macroscopic diamond sample under ambient conditions. Using ultrafast Raman scattering, we create an extended, highly non-classical state in the optical phonon modes of bulk diamond. Direct measurement of phonon coherence and correlations establishes the non-classical nature of the crystal dynamics. These results show that optical phonons in diamond provide a unique opportunity for the study of large-scale quantum behaviour, and highlight the potential for diamond as a micro-photonic quantum processor capable of operating at terahertz rates.

  11. Characterisation of non-classical MHC class I genes in the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuanyuan; Belov, Katherine

    2014-12-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is a carnivorous marsupial that is under threat of extinction due to an unusual transmissible disease called Devil Facial Tumour Disease (DFTD). Previous studies on the classical MHC genes have provided important insights into immune responses in this endangered species; however, so far, very little is known about the non-classical MHC genes of this species, which can also play significant roles in the immune system. Here, we report characterisation of five non-classical class I genes in the Tasmanian devil, including Saha-UD, -UK, -UM, -MR1 and -CD1. Saha-UD has been isolated previously and is known to have low genetic polymorphism, though its categorisation as classical or non-classical gene has remained undetermined. In this study, we observed tissue-specific expression of Saha-UD, suggesting that it is more characteristic of a non-classical gene. Restricted tissue expression patterns were also observed for other genes, with an exception of Saha-MR1 being ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues. Saha-UK, -UM and -MR1 were found to be genetically monomorphic, while four alleles were found at Saha-CD1 with signs of positive selection detected within the α1 domain. Among the four Saha-CD1 alleles, one predominant allele (Saha-CD1*01) showed a high allele frequency of 0.906 in the Tasmanian devil population, resulting in a low heterozygosity (0.188) at this locus. Alternative splicing takes place in Saha-CD1, giving rise to a full-length transcript and a splice variant lacking intact antigen-binding, β2m-binding, transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains. PMID:25267059

  12. Aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B8 is secreted via non-classical pathway

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Zhenwang; Xia, Chenglai; Huang, Renbin; Li, Xiaoning; Wang, Wan-Chun; Guo, Wangyuan; Duan, Lili; Luo, Weihao; Cao, Deliang; Luo, Di-Xian

    2014-01-01

    Mouse aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B8 (AKR1B8) has the highest similarity to human aldo-keto reductase family 1 member B10 (AKR1B10), a secretory protein through lysosomes-mediated non-classical secretory pathway. To identify whether AKR1B8 is secreted through the same pathway, we carried out this study. Self-developed sandwich ELISA and western blot were used to detect AKR1B8 in cells and culture medium of CT-26 murine colon carcinoma cells. AKR1B8 releases in an independent manner to Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of ER-to-Golgi classical secretion pathway. Several factors, which are involved in the non-classical secretion pathway, such as temperature, ATP and calcium ion, regulated AKR1B8 secretion from mouse colorectal cancer cells CT-26. Lysosomotropic NH4Cl increased AKR1B8 secretion, and AKR1B8 was located in isolated lysosomes. Therefore, AKR1B8 is a new secretory protein through the lysosomes-mediated non-classical pathway. PMID:25120755

  13. Non-classical logic inverter coupling a ZnO nanowire-based Schottky barrier transistor and adjacent Schottky diode.

    PubMed

    Hosseini Shokouh, Seyed Hossein; Raza, Syed Raza Ali; Lee, Hee Sung; Im, Seongil

    2014-08-21

    On a single ZnO nanowire (NW), we fabricated an inverter-type device comprising a Schottky diode (SD) and field-effect transistor (FET), aiming at 1-dimensional (1D) electronic circuits with low power consumption. The SD and adjacent FET worked respectively as the load and driver, so that voltage signals could be easily extracted as the output. In addition, NW FET with a transparent conducting oxide as top gate turned out to be very photosensitive, although ZnO NW SD was blind to visible light. Based on this, we could achieve an array of photo-inverter cells on one NW. Our non-classical inverter is regarded as quite practical for both logic and photo-sensing due to its performance as well as simple device configuration. PMID:24985947

  14. Do cannabinoids exhibit a tyramine-like effect?

    PubMed

    Ilayan, Eman; Feliszek, Monika; Malinowska, Barbara; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2013-12-01

    The major constituent of the cannabis plant, Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, has stimulatory and depressant effects on cardiovascular functions. There is evidence from an in vivo study on the urethane-anaesthetized rat that part of the stimulatory effects is related to a tyramine-like activity. In the present study, we examined whether Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol induces carrier-mediated noradrenaline release in vitro. The study was extended to another phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol, to the synthetic cannabinoids CP 55,940 and WIN 55,212-2 and to the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol. Tissue pieces of the renal cortex from the mouse and the rat were preincubated with (3)H-noradrenaline and superfused. The effect of the cannabinoids on basal (3)H-noradrenaline release was studied. Tyramine served as a positive control. In the mouse kidney, basal (3)H-noradrenaline release was increased by tyramine 0.1, 1 and 10 μM by 39, 91 and 212 %, respectively, and, in the rat kidney, (3)H-noradrenaline release was increased by tyramine 10 μM by 158 %. All effects were abolished by desipramine 1 μM, an inhibitor of the neuronal noradrenaline transporter. The cannabinoids at 0.1, 1 and 10 μM (CP 55,940 at 0.1, 1 and 3.2 μM) did not affect (3)H-noradrenaline release in the mouse kidney. The highest concentration of the cannabinoids (10 μM and in the case of CP 55,940 3.2 μM) also failed to affect (3)H-noradrenaline release in the rat kidney. In conclusion, the cannabinoids Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, CP 55,940, WIN 55,212-2, anandamide and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol do not possess a tyramine-like effect on noradrenaline release. PMID:23900610

  15. Olive oil exhibits osteoprotection in ovariectomized rats without estrogenic effects

    PubMed Central

    ZHENG, XIAOHUA; HUANG, HUIJUAN; ZHENG, XIAOBING; LI, BAOHENG

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of olive oil on bone and uterus in ovariectomized rats. A total of 34 surgically ovariectomized or sham-operated virgin Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: i) Sham-operated control rats (sham group); ii) Ovariectomized rats (OVX group); iii) Olive oil-supplemented ovariectomized rats (olive group); and iv) Diethylstilbestrol-supplemented ovariectomized rats (E2 group). At 12 weeks following left ventricular blood sacrificed to detect plasma estradiol (E2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6 levels. Bone mineral density (BMD) of the lumbar spine was evaluated using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and the left femur proximal 1/3 slices were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Uterine wet weight and the uterus index (ratio of uterine wet weight and body weight) were compared, and the uterine endometrium was observed using a light microscope. In the OVX group, serum E2 was significantly lower and IL-1β and IL-6 levels were significantly higher compared with the sham group. By contrast, serum E2 levels increased and IL-1β levels decreased in the olive group, but showed no significant difference compared with the sham group. The lumbar spine BMD in the olive group was increased compared with OVX group. Electron microscopy revealed sparse collagen fibers in the OVX group, with decreased density and multi-cavity, showing pathological features of osteoporosis. By contrast, the situation was improved in the E2 and olive groups, in which organelles such as the rough endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and Golgi apparatus were visible and active. Compared with the sham group rats, the uterine wet weight and uterine index decreased in the OVX and olive groups; however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the E2 group. Furthermore, endometrial hyperplasia was not observed in the olive group, which were apparently different from E2 group. The present results suggest that olive

  16. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells.

    PubMed

    Parasar, Parveen; Wilhelm, Amanda; Rutigliano, Heloisa M; Thomas, Aaron J; Teng, Lihong; Shi, Bi; Davis, William C; Suarez, Carlos E; New, Daniel D; White, Kenneth L; Davies, Christopher J

    2016-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-classical MHC-I isoforms, we expressed the MHC proteins in murine P815 and human K562 (MHC-I deficient) cells. Following antibiotic selection, stably transfected cell lines were stained with H1A or W6/32 antibodies to detect expression of the MHC-I proteins by flow cytometry. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00501 and BoLA-NC3*00101) were expressed on the cell surface in both cell lines. Surprisingly, the BoLA-NC4*00201 protein was expressed on the cell membrane of human K562 but not mouse P815 cells. Two non-classical proteins (BoLA-NC1*00401, which lacks a transmembrane domain, and BoLA-NC2*00102) did not exhibit cell surface expression. Nevertheless, Western blot analyses demonstrated expression of the MHC-I heavy chain in all transfected cell lines. Ammonium-sulfate precipitation of proteins from culture supernatants showed that BoLA-NC1*00401 was secreted and that all surface expressed proteins where shed from the cell membrane by the transfected cells. Interestingly, the surface expressed MHC-I proteins were present in culture supernatants at a much higher concentration than BoLA-NC1*00401. This comprehensive study shows that bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins BoLA-NC1*00501, BoLA-NC3*00101, and BoLA-NC4*00201 are expressed as surface isoforms with the latter reaching the cell membrane only in K562 cells. Furthermore, it demonstrated that BoLA-NC1*00401 is a secreted isoform and that significant quantities of membrane associated MHC-I proteins can be shed from the cell membrane. PMID:27473990

  17. Inhibition of rhotekin exhibits antitumor effects in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIZHEN; LIANG, ZHENYU; LI, JING

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause for cancer-related death, however, the pathogenesis mechanism is poorly understood. Although the rhotekin (RTKN) gene has been reported to encode an effector for the Rho protein that has critical roles in regulating cell growth, the role of RTKN in lung cancer has not been investigated. In clinical lung cancer patient tumor samples, we identified that the RTKN gene expression level was significantly higher in tumor tissues compared to that of the adjacent normal tissues. To investigate the molecular mechanisms of RTKN in lung cancer, we established RTKN stable knock-down A549 and SPC-A-1 lung adenocarcinoma cell lines using lentiviral transfection of RTKN shRNA and evaluated the antitumor effects. The results showed that RTKN knock-down inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cell viability, induced S phase arrest and increased cell apoptosis. In addition, RTKN knock-down inhibited lung cancer cell invasion and adhesion. Further analysis showed that the S phase promoting factors cyclindependent kinase (CDK)1 and CDK2 levels were decreased in RTKN knock-down cells, and that the DNA replication initiation complex proteins Minichromosome maintenance protein complex (MCM)2 and MCM6 were decreased as well in RTKN knock-down cells. These results indicated that the RTKN protein was associated with lung cancer in clinic samples and exerted anticancer activity in lung adenocarcinoma cells through inhibiting cell cycle progression and the DNA replication machinery. These findings suggest that RTKN inhibition may be a novel therapeutic strategy for lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26935528

  18. Treatment of beta amyloid 1–42 (Aβ1–42)-induced basal forebrain cholinergic damage by a non-classical estrogen signaling activator in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kwakowsky, Andrea; Potapov, Kyoko; Kim, SooHyun; Peppercorn, Katie; Tate, Warren P.; Ábrahám, István M.

    2016-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), there is a loss in cholinergic innervation targets of basal forebrain which has been implicated in substantial cognitive decline. Amyloid beta peptide (Aβ1–42) accumulates in AD that is highly toxic for basal forebrain cholinergic (BFC) neurons. Although the gonadal steroid estradiol is neuroprotective, the administration is associated with risk of off-target effects. Previous findings suggested that non-classical estradiol action on intracellular signaling pathways has ameliorative potential without estrogenic side effects. After Aβ1–42 injection into mouse basal forebrain, a single dose of 4-estren-3α, 17β-diol (estren), the non-classical estradiol pathway activator, restored loss of cholinergic cortical projections and also attenuated the Aβ1–42-induced learning deficits. Estren rapidly and directly phosphorylates c-AMP-response–element-binding-protein and extracellular-signal-regulated-kinase-1/2 in BFC neurons and restores the cholinergic fibers via estrogen receptor-α. These findings indicated that selective activation of non-classical intracellular estrogen signaling has a potential to treat the damage of cholinergic neurons in AD. PMID:26879842

  19. Classical and non-classical proangiogenic factors as a target of antiangiogenic therapy in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Marech, Ilaria; Leporini, Christian; Ammendola, Michele; Porcelli, Mariangela; Gadaleta, Cosmo Damiano; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Ranieri, Girolamo

    2016-09-28

    Angiogenesis is sustained by classical and non-classical proangiogenic factors (PFs) acting in tumor microenvironment and these factors are also potential targets of antiangiogenic therapies. All PFs induce the overexpression of several signaling pathways that lead to migration and proliferation of endothelial cells contributing to tumor angiogenesis and survival of cancer cells. In this review, we have analyzed each PF with its specific receptor/s and we have summarized the available antiangiogenic drugs (e.g. monoclonal antibodies) targeting these PFs, some of these agents have already been approved, others are currently in development for the treatment of several human malignancies. PMID:26238184

  20. Heat control in opto-mechanical system using quantum non-classicality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sushamana; Senwar, Subash

    2016-05-01

    Cooling of matter to the quantum ground state is a primary directive of quantum control. In other words, to extract entropy from a quantum system, efficient indirect quantum measurements may be implemented. The main objective is the cooling of the oscillator either to its motional ground state or to non-classical states, such as low-number Fock states, squeezed states or entangled states. It is shown that the use of quantum control procedure is better choice for even experimental realizations because it leads to a squeezed steady state with less than one phonon on average. The steady state of system corresponds to cooling of the system.

  1. Non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons from a mechanical oscillator.

    PubMed

    Riedinger, Ralf; Hong, Sungkun; Norte, Richard A; Slater, Joshua A; Shang, Juying; Krause, Alexander G; Anant, Vikas; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Gröblacher, Simon

    2016-02-18

    Interfacing a single photon with another quantum system is a key capability in modern quantum information science. It allows quantum states of matter, such as spin states of atoms, atomic ensembles or solids, to be prepared and manipulated by photon counting and, in particular, to be distributed over long distances. Such light-matter interfaces have become crucial to fundamental tests of quantum physics and realizations of quantum networks. Here we report non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons--the quanta of mechanical motion--from a nanomechanical resonator. We implement a full quantum protocol involving initialization of the resonator in its quantum ground state of motion and subsequent generation and read-out of correlated photon-phonon pairs. The observed violation of a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is clear evidence for the non-classical nature of the mechanical state generated. Our results demonstrate the availability of on-chip solid-state mechanical resonators as light-matter quantum interfaces. The performance we achieved will enable studies of macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as applications in quantum communication, as quantum memories and as quantum transducers. PMID:26779950

  2. Non-classical amine recognition evolved in a large clade of olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Tachie-Baffour, Yaw; Liu, Zhikai; Baldwin, Maude W; Kruse, Andrew C; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules, and the structural basis for their recognition by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) is well understood. Amines are also potent odors, with some activating olfactory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Here, we report that teleost TAARs evolved a new way to recognize amines in a non-classical orientation. Chemical screens de-orphaned eleven zebrafish TAARs, with agonists including serotonin, histamine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, and agmatine. Receptors from different clades contact ligands through aspartates on transmembrane α-helices III (canonical Asp3.32) or V (non-canonical Asp5.42), and diamine receptors contain both aspartates. Non-classical monoamine recognition evolved in two steps: an ancestral TAAR acquired Asp5.42, gaining diamine sensitivity, and subsequently lost Asp3.32. Through this transformation, the fish olfactory system dramatically expanded its capacity to detect amines, ecologically significant aquatic odors. The evolution of a second, alternative solution for amine detection by olfactory receptors highlights the tremendous structural versatility intrinsic to GPCRs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10441.001 PMID:26519734

  3. Non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons from a mechanical oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Ralf; Hong, Sungkun; Norte, Richard A.; Slater, Joshua A.; Shang, Juying; Krause, Alexander G.; Anant, Vikas; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Gröblacher, Simon

    2016-02-01

    Interfacing a single photon with another quantum system is a key capability in modern quantum information science. It allows quantum states of matter, such as spin states of atoms, atomic ensembles or solids, to be prepared and manipulated by photon counting and, in particular, to be distributed over long distances. Such light-matter interfaces have become crucial to fundamental tests of quantum physics and realizations of quantum networks. Here we report non-classical correlations between single photons and phonons—the quanta of mechanical motion—from a nanomechanical resonator. We implement a full quantum protocol involving initialization of the resonator in its quantum ground state of motion and subsequent generation and read-out of correlated photon-phonon pairs. The observed violation of a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality is clear evidence for the non-classical nature of the mechanical state generated. Our results demonstrate the availability of on-chip solid-state mechanical resonators as light-matter quantum interfaces. The performance we achieved will enable studies of macroscopic quantum phenomena as well as applications in quantum communication, as quantum memories and as quantum transducers.

  4. Discriminating strength: a bona fide measure of non-classical correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farace, A.; De Pasquale, A.; Rigovacca, L.; Giovannetti, V.

    2014-07-01

    A new measure of non-classical correlations is introduced and characterized. It tests the ability of using a state ρ of a composite system AB as a probe for a quantum illumination task (e.g. see Lloyd 2008 Science 321 1463), in which one is asked to remotely discriminate between the two following scenarios: (i) either nothing happens to the probe, or (ii) the subsystem A is transformed via a local unitary {{R}_{A}} whose properties are partially unspecified when producing ρ. This new measure can be seen as the discrete version of the recently introduced interferometric power measure (Girolami et al 2013 e-print arXiv:1309.1472) and, at least for the case in which A is a qubit, it is shown to coincide (up to an irrelevant scaling factor) with the local quantum uncertainty measure of Girolami, Tufarelli and Adesso (2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 240402). Analytical expressions are derived which allow us to formally prove that, within the set of separable configurations, the maximum value of our non-classicality measure is achieved over the set of quantum-classical states (i.e. states ρ which admit a statistical unravelling where each element of the associated ensemble is distinguishable via local measures on B).

  5. On the non-classicality features of new classes of nonlinear coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoly, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, using an exponential function of intensity of radiation field, two new classes of nonlinear coherent states will be constructed. For the first class, we choose the nonlinearity function as fβ( n) = exp( βn), where β characterizes the strength of the nonlinearity of the quantum system. We show that, the corresponding β-states possess a collection of non-classicality features, only for the particular values of β and z. But, interestingly there exists finite (threshold) values of β, for which all of the non-classicality signs will disappear, in appropriate regions around the origin of the complex plane ( z < | Z|). It is then illustrated that, using this threshold (or greater) value of β, the corresponding β-states behave very similar to canonical coherent states, as the most classical quantum states, in approximately whole of the space. In the continuation, we motivate to find another class of nonlinear coherent states, limited to a unit disk centered at the origin, looking like the canonical coherent states in behavior, in exactly the whole range of | z| < 1. This purpose also will be achieved by considering the nonlinearity function as f(n)=exp(λ/n)/√{n}, where λ is a tunable nonlinearity parameter. The canonical coherent state's aspects of the corresponding λ-states will be refreshed, in particular cases, working with a threshold (or greater) value of λ.

  6. Non-classical amine recognition evolved in a large clade of olfactory receptors.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Tachie-Baffour, Yaw; Liu, Zhikai; Baldwin, Maude W; Kruse, Andrew C; Liberles, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules, and the structural basis for their recognition by G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) is well understood. Amines are also potent odors, with some activating olfactory trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs). Here, we report that teleost TAARs evolved a new way to recognize amines in a non-classical orientation. Chemical screens de-orphaned eleven zebrafish TAARs, with agonists including serotonin, histamine, tryptamine, 2-phenylethylamine, putrescine, and agmatine. Receptors from different clades contact ligands through aspartates on transmembrane α-helices III (canonical Asp(3.32)) or V (non-canonical Asp(5.42)), and diamine receptors contain both aspartates. Non-classical monoamine recognition evolved in two steps: an ancestral TAAR acquired Asp(5.42), gaining diamine sensitivity, and subsequently lost Asp(3.32). Through this transformation, the fish olfactory system dramatically expanded its capacity to detect amines, ecologically significant aquatic odors. The evolution of a second, alternative solution for amine detection by olfactory receptors highlights the tremendous structural versatility intrinsic to GPCRs. PMID:26519734

  7. Non-classical photon correlation in a two-dimensional photonic lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jiao, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng; Gao, Zhen-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Yuan; Tang, Hao; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Quantum interference and quantum correlation, as two main features of quantum optics, play an essential role in quantum information applications, such as multi-particle quantum walk and boson sampling. While many experimental demonstrations have been done in one-dimensional waveguide arrays, it remains unexplored in higher dimensions due to tight requirement of manipulating and detecting photons in large-scale. Here, we experimentally observe non-classical correlation of two identical photons in a fully coupled two-dimensional structure, i.e. photonic lattice manufactured by three-dimensional femtosecond laser writing. Photon interference consists of 36 Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and 9 bunching. The overlap between measured and simulated distribution is up to $0.890\\pm0.001$. Clear photon correlation is observed in the two-dimensional photonic lattice. Combining with controllably engineered disorder, our results open new perspectives towards large-scale implementation of quantum simulation on integrated photonic chips.

  8. Contour detection based on the contextual modulation of non-classical receptive field facilitation and suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jie; Guo, Zhaoli; Cai, Chao

    2013-10-01

    Outside the classical receptive field (CRF), there exists a broad non-classical receptive field (NCRF). The response of the central neuron is affected not only by the stimulus inside the CRF, but also modulated by the stimulus surrounding it. The contextual modulation is mediated by horizontal connections across the visual cortex. In this paper, a contour detection method inspired by the visual mechanism in the primary visual cortex (V1) is proposed. The method is divided in three steps. Firstly, the response of every single visual neuron in V1 is computed by local energy. Secondly, the facilitation and suppression (the contextual influence) on a neuron through horizontal interactions are obtained by constructing a two neighbor modulating functions. Finally, the total output response of one neuron to complex visual stimuli is acquired by combing the influence of local visual context on the neuron and energy response by itself. We tested it on natural image and encouraging results were acquired.

  9. A case of androgen-secreting adrenal carcinoma with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Varma, Tarun; Panchani, Roopal; Goyal, Ashutosh; Maskey, Robin

    2013-10-01

    Androgen excess is one of the most common and disturbing endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women, affecting approximately 7% of this population Androgen excess results in the development of androgenic features in the women affected, with the development of hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, ovulatory dysfunction, and, if extreme, even virilization and masculinization. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy accounting for 0.02% of all annual cancers reported. About 60% are functional tumors secreting hormones, with its consequent clinical manifestations, the Cushing's syndrome due to cortisone, virilization due to androgens, feminization due to estrogens, or hypertension due to aldosterone. Adrenal tumors that secrete androgens exclusively are extremely rare. Here, we present a rare case of androgen-secreting adrenocortical carcinoma with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:24251173

  10. Non-classical photon correlation in a two-dimensional photonic lattice.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun; Qiao, Lu-Feng; Lin, Xiao-Feng; Jiao, Zhi-Qiang; Feng, Zhen; Zhou, Zheng; Gao, Zhen-Wei; Xu, Xiao-Yun; Chen, Yuan; Tang, Hao; Jin, Xian-Min

    2016-06-13

    Quantum interference and quantum correlation, as two main features of quantum optics, play an essential role in quantum information applications, such as multi-particle quantum walk and boson sampling. While many experimental demonstrations have been done in one-dimensional waveguide arrays, it remains unexplored in higher dimensions due to tight requirement of manipulating and detecting photons in large-scale. Here, we experimentally observe non-classical correlation of two identical photons in a fully coupled two-dimensional structure, i.e. photonic lattice manufactured by three-dimensional femtosecond laser writing. Photon interference consists of 36 Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and 9 bunching. The overlap between measured and simulated distribution is up to 0.890 ± 0.001. Clear photon correlation is observed in the two-dimensional photonic lattice. Combining with controllably engineered disorder, our results open new perspectives towards large-scale implementation of quantum simulation on integrated photonic chips. PMID:27410282

  11. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  12. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-03-01

    In this manuscript, we have quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of the critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depends on the overall Cr concentration as well as on the temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase-field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: (1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; (2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics and (3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than does a non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  13. The generation of arbitrary order, non-classical, Gauss-type quadrature for transport applications

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, Peter J.

    2015-09-01

    A method is presented, based upon the Stieltjes method (1884), for the determination of non-classical Gauss-type quadrature rules, and the associated sets of abscissae and weights. The method is then used to generate a number of quadrature sets, to arbitrary order, which are primarily aimed at deterministic transport calculations. The quadrature rules and sets detailed include arbitrary order reproductions of those presented by Abu-Shumays in [4,8] (known as the QR sets, but labelled QRA here), in addition to a number of new rules and associated sets; these are generated in a similar way, and we label them the QRS quadrature sets. The method presented here shifts the inherent difficulty (encountered by Abu-Shumays) associated with solving the non-linear moment equations, particular to the required quadrature rule, to one of the determination of non-classical weight functions and the subsequent calculation of various associated inner products. Once a quadrature rule has been written in a standard form, with an associated weight function having been identified, the calculation of the required inner products is achieved using specific variable transformations, in addition to the use of rapid, highly accurate quadrature suited to this purpose. The associated non-classical Gauss quadrature sets can then be determined, and this can be done to any order very rapidly. In this paper, instead of listing weights and abscissae for the different quadrature sets detailed (of which there are a number), the MATLAB code written to generate them is included as Appendix D. The accuracy and efficacy (in a transport setting) of the quadrature sets presented is not tested in this paper (although the accuracy of the QRA quadrature sets has been studied in [12,13]), but comparisons to tabulated results listed in [8] are made. When comparisons are made with one of the azimuthal QRA sets detailed in [8], the inherent difficulty in the method of generation, used there, becomes apparent

  14. SPRED: A machine learning approach for the identification of classical and non-classical secretory proteins in mammalian genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Kandaswamy, Krishna Kumar; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Hartmann, Enno; Kalies, Kai-Uwe; Moeller, Steffen; Suganthan, P.N.; Martinetz, Thomas

    2010-01-15

    Eukaryotic protein secretion generally occurs via the classical secretory pathway that traverses the ER and Golgi apparatus. Secreted proteins usually contain a signal sequence with all the essential information required to target them for secretion. However, some proteins like fibroblast growth factors (FGF-1, FGF-2), interleukins (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta), galectins and thioredoxin are exported by an alternative pathway. This is known as leaderless or non-classical secretion and works without a signal sequence. Most computational methods for the identification of secretory proteins use the signal peptide as indicator and are therefore not able to identify substrates of non-classical secretion. In this work, we report a random forest method, SPRED, to identify secretory proteins from protein sequences irrespective of N-terminal signal peptides, thus allowing also correct classification of non-classical secretory proteins. Training was performed on a dataset containing 600 extracellular proteins and 600 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. The algorithm was tested on 180 extracellular proteins and 1380 cytoplasmic and/or nuclear proteins. We obtained 85.92% accuracy from training and 82.18% accuracy from testing. Since SPRED does not use N-terminal signals, it can detect non-classical secreted proteins by filtering those secreted proteins with an N-terminal signal by using SignalP. SPRED predicted 15 out of 19 experimentally verified non-classical secretory proteins. By scanning the entire human proteome we identified 566 protein sequences potentially undergoing non-classical secretion. The dataset and standalone version of the SPRED software is available at (http://www.inb.uni-luebeck.de/tools-demos/spred/spred).

  15. Ashwagandha root in the treatment of non-classical adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Bahtiyar, Gul; Sacerdote, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a well-characterised family of disorders of the adrenal cortices, resulting in varying degrees of cortisol, aldosterone and androgen deficiency or androgen excess, depending on the enzyme(s) affected and the degree of quantitative or functional enzyme deficit. Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is a medicinal plant that has been employed for centuries in ayurvedic medicine. Preclinical studies have shown that WS increases circulating cortisol levels and improves insulin sensitivity. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with non-classical adrenal hyperplasia due to both 3-β-ol dehydrogenase deficiency and aldosterone synthase deficiency who was self-treated with WS for 6 months. After 6 months of treatment her serum 18-OH-hydroxycorticoserone, 17-OH-pregnenolone, corticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol decreased by 31%, 66%, 69% and 55%, respectively. The biochemical improvement was accompanied by a noticeable reduction in scalp hair loss. PMID:22987912

  16. Observation of Non-Classical Rotational Inertia in Bulk Solid 4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Motoshi; Takada, Shunichi; Shibayama, Yoshiyuki; Shirahama, Keiya

    2007-09-01

    In recent torsional oscillator experiments by Kim and Chan (KC), a decrease of rotational inertia has been observed in solid 4He in porous materials (Kim, E., Chan, M.H.W. in Nature 427:225, 2004; J. Low Temp. Phys. 138:859, 2005) and in a bulk annular channel (Kim, E., Chan, M.H.W. in Science 305:1941, 2004). This observation strongly suggests the existence of “non-classical rotational inertia” (NCRI), i.e. superflow, in solid 4He. In order to study such a possible “supersolid” phase, we perform torsional oscillator experiments for cylindrical solid 4He samples. We have observed decreases in rotational inertia below 200 mK for two solid samples (pressures P=4.1 and 3.0 MPa). The observed NCRI fraction at 70 mK is 0.14%, which is about 1/3 of the fraction observed in the annulus by KC. Our observation is the first experimental confirmation of the possible supersolid finding by KC.

  17. Simultaneous Measurement of Non-Classical Rotational Inertia and Shear Modulus of Solid ^4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wonsuk; Shin, Jaeho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Shirahama, Keiya; Kim, Eunseong

    2012-02-01

    A failure to rotate or oscillate is the essential nature of low temperature superfluid helium, and more technically known as non-classical rotational inertia (NCRI). It is counter-intuitive, but NCRI is also found in solid helium-4 below ˜200 mK [1,2]. Recently, shear modulus showed unusual increase with striking resemblance to those of NCRI [3]. Extended measurements show the NCRI occurs only in a stiffened Bose solid, but it is not understood how they are related. Here we report the first simultaneous measurement of shear modulus and NCRI in solid helium to elucidate the fundamental connection between them. Both emerge at remarkably similar temperatures, whereas no quantitative agreement between the increase of the shear modulus and the magnitude of NCRI is found. The increase of shear modulus seems to be the necessary condition for the onset of NCRI.[4pt] [1] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Nature 427, 225-227 (2004)[0pt] [2] E. Kim and M. H. W. Chan Science 305, 1942 (2004)[0pt] [3] J. Day and J. Beamish Nature 450, 853-856 (2007)

  18. Multiscale Geometry of the Olsen Model and Non-classical Relaxation Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, Christian; Szmolyan, Peter

    2015-06-01

    We study the Olsen model for the peroxidase-oxidase reaction. The dynamics is analyzed using a geometric decomposition based on multiple timescales. The Olsen model is four-dimensional, not in a standard form required by geometric singular perturbation theory and contains multiple small parameters. These three obstacles are the main challenges we resolve by our analysis. Scaling and the blow-up method are used to identify several subsystems. The results presented here provide a rigorous analysis for two oscillatory modes. In particular, we prove the existence of non-classical relaxation oscillations in two cases. The analysis is based on desingularization of lines of transcritical and submanifolds of fold singularities in combination with an integrable relaxation phase. In this context, our analysis also explains an assumption that has been utilized, based purely on numerical reasoning, in a previous bifurcation analysis by Desroches et al. (Discret Contin Dyn Syst S 2(4):807-827, 2009). Furthermore, the geometric decomposition we develop forms the basis to prove the existence of mixed-mode and chaotic oscillations in the Olsen model, which will be discussed in more detail in future work.

  19. A nanofiber assembly directed by the non-classical antiparallel β-structure from 4S-(OH) proline polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Bansode, Nitin D; Sonar, Mahesh V; Ganesh, Krishna N

    2016-04-01

    The antiparallel arrangement of two strands of the non-classical β-structure, formed exclusively via cis-4S-(OH) prolyl polypeptide as established by FRET, propagates into self-assembled nanofibers upon conjugation with C12/C14/C16 hydrocarbon chains. PMID:26961970

  20. Arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus by affecting transmembrane flow of calcium.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhenying; Yin, Yongqiang; Wang, Zengyong; Fang, Runping; Wu, Hong; Jiang, Min; Bai, Gang; Luo, Guo'an

    2013-12-01

    Arctigenin, a lignan extract from Arctium lappa (L.), exhibits anti-inflammation, antioxidation, vasodilator effects, etc. However, the effects of arctigenin on bronchus relaxation are not well investigated. This study aimed to investigate how arctigenin regulates bronchus tone and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) flow. Trachea strips of guinea pigs were prepared for testing the relaxation effect of arctigenin to acetylcholine, histamine, KCl, and CaCl2, respectively. Furthermore, L-type calcium channel currents were detected by patch-clamp, and intracellular Ca(2+) concentration was detected by confocal microscopy. The results showed that arctigenin exhibited relaxation effect on tracheae to different constrictors, and this was related to decreasing cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx partly through L-type calcium channel as well as promoting Ca(2+) efflux. In summary, this study provides new insight into the mechanisms by which arctigenin exhibits relaxation effect on bronchus and suggests its potential use for airway disease therapy. PMID:24114345

  1. An improved non-classical method for the solution of fractional differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birk, Carolin; Song, Chongmin

    2010-10-01

    A procedure to construct temporally local schemes for the computation of fractional derivatives is proposed. The frequency-domain counterpart (i ω) α of the fractional differential operator of order α is expressed as an improper integral of a rational function in i ω. After applying a quadrature rule, the improper integral is approximated by a series of partial fractions. Each term of the partial fractions corresponds to an exponential kernel in the time domain. The convolution integral in a fractional derivative can be evaluated recursively leading to a local scheme. As the arguments of the exponential functions are always real and negative, the scheme is stable. The present procedure provides a convenient way to evaluate the quality of a given algorithm by examining its accuracy in fitting the function (i ω) α . It is revealed that the non-classical solution methods for fractional differential equations proposed by Yuan and Agrawal (ASME J Vib Acoust 124:321-324, 2002) and by Diethelm (Numer Algorithms 47:361-390, 2008) can also be interpreted as applying specific quadrature rules to evaluate the improper integral numerically. Over a wider range of frequencies, Diethelm’s algorithm provides a more accurate fitting than the YA algorithm. Therefore, it leads to better performance. Further exploiting this advantage of the proposed derivation, a novel quadrature rule leading to an even better performance than Diethelm’s algorithm is proposed. Significant gains in accuracy are achieved at the extreme ends of the frequency range. This results in significant improvements in accuracy for late time responses. Several numerical examples, including fractional differential equations of degree α = 0.3 and α = 1.5, demonstrate the accuracy and efficiency of the proposed method.

  2. Increased aortic stiffness and blood pressure in non-classic Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    Wens, Stephan C A; Kuperus, Esther; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U S; Kruijshaar, Michelle E; Brusse, Esther; van Montfort, Kees C A G M; de Boer, Marjan Scheltens-; Sijbrands, Eric J G; van der Ploeg, Ans T; van Doorn, Pieter A

    2014-05-01

    Vascular abnormalities and glycogen accumulation in vascular smooth muscle fibres have been described in Pompe disease. Using carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV), the gold standard methodology for determining aortic stiffness, we studied whether aortic stiffness is increased in patients with Pompe disease. Eighty-four adult Pompe patients and 179 age- and gender-matched volunteers participated in this cross-sectional case-controlled study. Intima media thickness and the distensibility of the right common carotid artery were measured using a Duplex scanner. Aortic augmentation index, central pulse pressure, aortic reflexion time and cfPWV were assessed using the SphygmoCor® system. CfPWV was higher in patients than in volunteers (8.8 versus 7.4 m/s, p < 0.001). This difference was still present after adjustment for age, gender, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate and diabetes mellitus (p = 0.001), and was shown by subgroup analysis to apply to the 40-59 years age group (p = 0.004) and 60+ years age group (p = 0.01), but not to younger age groups (p = 0.99). Except for a shorter aortic reflexion time (p = 0.02), indirect indicators of arterial stiffness did not differ between patients and volunteers. Relative to volunteers (20%), more Pompe patients had a history of hypertension (36%, p = 0.005), and the MAP was higher than in volunteers (100 versus 92 mmHg, p < 0.001). This study shows that patients with non-classic Pompe disease have increased aortic stiffness and blood pressure. Whether this is due to glycogen accumulation requires further investigation. To reduce the potential risk of cardiovascular diseases, we recommend that blood pressure and other common cardiovascular risk factors are monitored regularly. PMID:24407465

  3. HESS J1943+213: A Non-classical High-frequency-peaked BL Lac Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straal, S. M.; Gabányi, K. É.; van Leeuwen, J.; Clarke, T. E.; Dubner, G.; Frey, S.; Giacani, E.; Paragi, Z.

    2016-05-01

    HESS J1943+213 is an unidentified TeV source that is likely a high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object, but that is also compatible with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) nature. Each of these enormously different astronomical interpretations is supported by some of the observed unusual characteristics. In order to finally classify and understand this object, we took a three-pronged approach, through time-domain, high angular resolution, and multi-frequency radio studies. First, our deep time-domain observations with the Arecibo telescope failed to uncover the putative pulsar powering the proposed PWN. We conclude with ˜70% certainty that HESS J1943+213 does not host a pulsar. Second, long-baseline interferometry of the source with e-MERLIN at 1.5 and 5 GHz shows only a core, that is, a point source at ˜ 1–100 mas resolution. Its 2013 flux density is about one-third lower than that detected in the 2011 observations with similar resolution. This radio variability of the core strengthens the HBL object hypothesis. Third, additional evidence against the PWN scenario comes from the radio spectrum we compiled. The extended structure follows a power-law behavior with spectral index α \\=\\-0.54+/- 0.04 while the core component displays a flat spectrum (α \\=\\-0.03+/- 0.03). In contrast, the radio synchrotron emission of PWNe predicts a single power-law distribution. Overall, we rule out the PWN hypothesis and conclude that the source is a BL Lac object. The consistently high fraction (70%) of the flux density from the extended structure then leads us to conclude that HESS J1943+213 must be a non-classical HBL object.

  4. HESS J1943+213: A Non-classical High-frequency-peaked BL Lac Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straal, S. M.; Gabányi, K. É.; van Leeuwen, J.; Clarke, T. E.; Dubner, G.; Frey, S.; Giacani, E.; Paragi, Z.

    2016-05-01

    HESS J1943+213 is an unidentified TeV source that is likely a high-frequency-peaked BL Lac (HBL) object, but that is also compatible with a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) nature. Each of these enormously different astronomical interpretations is supported by some of the observed unusual characteristics. In order to finally classify and understand this object, we took a three-pronged approach, through time-domain, high angular resolution, and multi-frequency radio studies. First, our deep time-domain observations with the Arecibo telescope failed to uncover the putative pulsar powering the proposed PWN. We conclude with ∼70% certainty that HESS J1943+213 does not host a pulsar. Second, long-baseline interferometry of the source with e-MERLIN at 1.5 and 5 GHz shows only a core, that is, a point source at ∼ 1–100 mas resolution. Its 2013 flux density is about one-third lower than that detected in the 2011 observations with similar resolution. This radio variability of the core strengthens the HBL object hypothesis. Third, additional evidence against the PWN scenario comes from the radio spectrum we compiled. The extended structure follows a power-law behavior with spectral index α \\=\\-0.54+/- 0.04 while the core component displays a flat spectrum (α \\=\\-0.03+/- 0.03). In contrast, the radio synchrotron emission of PWNe predicts a single power-law distribution. Overall, we rule out the PWN hypothesis and conclude that the source is a BL Lac object. The consistently high fraction (70%) of the flux density from the extended structure then leads us to conclude that HESS J1943+213 must be a non-classical HBL object.

  5. An Investigation into the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Highly Effective Classroom Management Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Chuck; Hargrove, Pauline; Harris, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers exhibiting effective classroom management. This study explores the beliefs, background, and experiences of exemplary teachers in the area of classroom management. The goal of this study was to develop a deeper understanding of how individuals…

  6. Characterization of SLCO5A1/OATP5A1, a Solute Carrier Transport Protein with Non-Classical Function

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, Katrin; Detro-Dassen, Silvia; Rinis, Natalie; Fahrenkamp, Dirk; Müller-Newen, Gerhard; Merk, Hans F.; Schmalzing, Günther

    2013-01-01

    Organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP/SLCO) have been identified to mediate the uptake of a broad range of mainly amphipathic molecules. Human OATP5A1 was found to be expressed in the epithelium of many cancerous and non-cancerous tissues throughout the body but protein characterization and functional analysis have not yet been performed. This study focused on the biochemical characterization of OATP5A1 using Xenopus laevis oocytes and Flp-In T-REx-HeLa cells providing evidence regarding a possible OATP5A1 function. SLCO5A1 is highly expressed in mature dendritic cells compared to immature dendritic cells (∼6.5-fold) and SLCO5A1 expression correlates with the differentiation status of primary blood cells. A core- and complex- N-glycosylated polypeptide monomer of ∼105 kDa and ∼130 kDa could be localized in intracellular membranes and on the plasma membrane, respectively. Inducible expression of SLCO5A1 in HeLa cells led to an inhibitory effect of ∼20% after 96 h on cell proliferation. Gene expression profiling with these cells identified immunologically relevant genes (e.g. CCL20) and genes implicated in developmental processes (e.g. TGM2). A single nucleotide polymorphism leading to the exchange of amino acid 33 (L→F) revealed no differences regarding protein expression and function. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OATP5A1 might be a non-classical OATP family member which is involved in biological processes that require the reorganization of the cell shape, such as differentiation and migration. PMID:24376674

  7. The origin of non-classical effects in a one-dimensional superposition of coherent states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzek, V.; Knight, P. L.; Barranco, A. Vidiella

    1992-01-01

    We investigate the nature of the quantum fluctuations in a light field created by the superposition of coherent fields. We give a physical explanation (in terms of Wigner functions and phase-space interference) why the 1-D superposition of coherent states in the direction of the x-quadrature leads to the squeezing of fluctuations in the y-direction, and show that such a superposition can generate the squeezed vacuum and squeezed coherent states.

  8. Non-classical size-dependent particle diffusion in active fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Patteson, Alison; Arratia, Paulo

    2015-11-01

    We experimentally investigate the effect of particle size on the motion of passive polystyrene spheres in suspensions of Escherchia coli, a flagellated bacterium that is approximately 2 microns long and swims using a sequence of runs punctuated by tumbles. Using particles covering a range of sizes from 0.6 to 39 microns, we probe particle dynamics at both short and long time scales. In all cases, the particles exhibit super-diffusive ballistic behavior at short times before eventually transitioning to diffusive behavior. Surprisingly, the long-time hydrodynamic effective diffusivity is non-monotonic with particle size; an anomalous response that is fundamentally different from classical thermal diffusion. Consistent with recent theory, we find that for fixed bacterial type, the active contribution to particle diffusion can be predicted by a single dimensionless parameter, the Peclét number. Combining our experimental results, we propose a minimal model that allows us to predict the requirements for a peak in the diffusivity as well as the location and magnitude of the peak as a function of particle size and bacterial concentration. Our results have broad implications on characterizing active fluids using concepts drawn from classical (passive) thermodynamics. This work was supported by NSF-DMR-1104705 and NSF-CBET-1437482.

  9. Generation of non-classical correlated photon pairs via a ladder-type atomic configuration: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Dong-Sheng; Zhou, Zhi-Yuan; Shi, Bao-Sen; Zou, Xu-Bo; Guo, Guang-Can

    2012-05-01

    We experimentally generate a non-classical correlated two-color photon pair at 780 and 1529.4 nm in a ladder-type configuration using a hot 85Rb atomic vapor with the production rate of ~10(7)/s. The non-classical correlation between these two photons is demonstrated by strong violation of Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by the factor R = 48 ± 12. Besides, we experimentally investigate the relations between the correlation and some important experimental parameters such as the single-photon detuning, the powers of pumps. We also make a theoretical analysis in detail and the theoretical predictions are in reasonable agreement with our experimental results. PMID:22565763

  10. Properties of epitaxial (210) iron garnet films exhibiting the magnetoelectric effect

    SciTech Connect

    Arzamastseva, G. V.; Balbashov, A. M.; Lisovskii, F. V. Mansvetova, E. G.; Temiryazev, A. G.; Temiryazeva, M. P.

    2015-04-15

    The properties of epitaxial magnetic (LuBi){sub 3}(FeGa){sub 5}O{sub 12} iron garnet films grown on (210) substrates, which exhibit the magnetoelectric effect, are experimentally studied. The induced anisotropy and the behavior of the domain structure in the films are investigated in uniform and nonuniform external fields. The existing hypotheses about the nature of the magnetoelectric coupling in such films are critically analyzed.

  11. Substrate-based inhibitors exhibiting excellent protective and therapeutic effects against Botulinum Neurotoxin A intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jiubiao; Wang, Jinglin; Gao, Shan; Ji, Bin; Waichi Chan, Edward; Chen, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Potent inhibitors to reverse Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) activity in neuronal cells are currently not available. A better understanding of the substrate recognition mechanism of BoNTs enabled us to design a novel class of peptide inhibitors which were derivatives of the BoNT/A substrate, SNAP25. Through a combination of in vitro, cellular based, and in vivo mouse assays, several potent inhibitors of approximately one nanomolar inhibitory strength both in vitro and in vivo have been identified. These compounds represent the first set of inhibitors that exhibited full protection against BoNT/A intoxication in mice model with undetectable toxicity. Our findings validated the hypothesis that a peptide inhibitor targeting the two BoNT structural regions which were responsible for substrate recognition and cleavage respectively could exhibit excellent inhibitory effect, thereby providing insight on future development of more potent inhibitors against BoNTs. PMID:26584873

  12. Nano-scale spatial and temporal fluorescence fluctuations in near-field microscopy, photobleaching recovery, and non-classical elementary reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monson, Eric E.

    1999-11-01

    The study of spatial and temporal fluctuations ties together the disparate topics covered here, although this work is as much about the tools we use to study these fluctuations. Near-field microscopy uses the nature of light transmitted through a sub-wavelength metal aperture to image spatial fluctuations beyond the resolution limits of conventional far-field microscopy. We present a novel near-field scanning optical microscope and use it to image dynamics of single fluorescent molecules. Liquid polymer based fiber-optic ion sensors contain fluorescent chromoionophores that photobleach during use. We show that in nanosensors, diffusional replenishing of these fluorophores from the bulk of the unilluminated film extends the life of these sensors enormously. Utilizing the natural spatial and temporal fluctuations in the indicator populations and the ultra-small sensor volume, the sensors can be used for short periods interspersed by rest intervals allowing recovery. In diffusion-limited chemical reaction kinetics, natural or induced spatial variations in reactant distributions lead to temporally anomalous reaction rates when compared with the classical (``textbook''), mean-field rate laws. In the case of a trapping reaction, A+T --> T, we have shown experimentally, using localized photobleaching of fluorescein in quasi-1D and 2D chambers, dimension-dependent rate behaviors predicted analytically and by computer simulations, and destroyed by stirring. In the case of A+B --> 0 reactions, naturally inefficient diffusional transport creates a ``memory'' of the initial reactant distribution, which leads to segregated pockets of reactants with intervening gaps, and thus, to anomalously slow reaction rates. We study a case in which one reactant is randomly distributed and the other has a ``speckled'' distribution created by a UV laser pulse. This reaction exhibits one rate regime due to the speckles, and another rooted in reactant self- segregation, exhibiting the non-classical

  13. Impressive electromagnetic shielding effects exhibited by highly ordered, micrometer thick polyaniline films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Ranjini R.; Varma, Sreekanth J.; Sankaran, Jayalekshmi

    2016-04-01

    The present work highlights the remarkably high shielding effectiveness of about 68 dB, exhibited by highly ordered and doped polyaniline films, in the microwave frequency range 4-12 GHz, obtained by self-stabilized dispersion polymerization as the synthesis route. The observed shielding effectiveness is found to depend quite sensitively on the electrical conducting properties, which are predominantly controlled by the nature and concentration of the dopants. The structural and morphological characterization of the films using XRD and TEM techniques reveals surprisingly high extent of crystallinity, which contributes significantly towards enhancing the electrical conductivity of the films. Most of the available reports on the microwave response of conducting polymer film samples deal with much thicker films, compared to the micrometer thick films of the present studies. The shielding effectiveness of acid doped, micrometer thick polyaniline films reported in the present work far exceeds most of the previously reported values and meets the commercial requirements.

  14. Lipid-Coated Cisplatin Nanoparticles Induce Neighboring Effect and Exhibit Enhanced Anticancer Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shutao; Wang, Yuhua; Miao, Lei; Xu, Zhenghong; Lin, C. Michael; Zhang, Yuan; Huang, Leaf

    2014-01-01

    Encapsulation of cisplatin (CDDP) into nanoparticles (NPs) with high drug loading and encapsulation efficiency has been difficult due to the poor solubility of CDDP. However, this barrier has been overcome with a reverse microemulsion method appropriating CDDP’s poor solubility to our advantage promoting the synthesis of a pure cisplatin nanoparticle with a high drug loading capacity (approximately 80.8wt%). Actively targeted CDDP NPs exhibited significant accumulation in human A375M melanoma tumor cells in vivo. In addition, CDDP NPs achieved potent anti-tumor efficacy through the neighboring effect at a dose of 1 mg/kg when injected weekly via IV without inducing nephrotoxicity. The neighboring effect regards an observation made in vivo when the tumor cells that took up CDDP NPs released active drug following apoptosis. Via diffusion, surrounding cells that were previously unaffected showed intake of the released drug and their apoptosis soon followed. This observation was also made in vitro when A375M melanoma tumor cells incubated with CDDP NPs exhibited release of active drug and induced apoptosis on untreated neighboring cells. However, the neighboring effect was unique to rapidly proliferating tumor cells. Liver functional parameters and H&E staining of liver tissue in vivo failed to detect any difference between CDDP NP treated and control groups in terms of tissue health. By simultaneously promoting an increase in cytotoxicity and a lesser degree of side effects over free CDDP, CDDP NPs show great therapeutic potential with lower doses of drug while enhancing anti-cancer effectiveness. PMID:24083505

  15. Supercritical fluid extracts of rosemary leaves exhibit potent anti-inflammation and anti-tumor effects.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chiung-Huei; Su, Jeng-De; Chyau, Charng-Cherng; Sung, Tzu-Ying; Ho, Shin-Shien; Peng, Chiung-Chi; Peng, Robert Y

    2007-09-01

    Supercritical fluid SF-CO2 treatment of Rosemarinus officinalis L. fresh leaves under optimum conditions (80 degrees C at 5,000 psi) yielded 5.3% of extract supercritical fluid extraction (SFE)-80, in which five major active principles were identified by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS), viz., rosmarinic acid, carnosol, 12-methoxycarnosic acid, carnosic acid, and methyl carnosate. Total phenolic content was 155.8 mg/ gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g in SFE-80, which showed 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging of 81.86% at 0.01 mg/ml. When treated in RAW 264.7, apparent dose-dependent NO inhibition occurred at dosages of 1.56 to 6.25 microg/ml, and more drastically at 12.5 and 25 microg/ml. At 0.5 to 5.0 microg/ml, SFE-80 exhibited dose-dependent viability suppression and significant tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) production in Hep 3B, whereas no effect was found in Chang liver cells. Furthermore, no effect was observed in RAW 264.7 at dosages of 3.13 to 25 microg/ml, indicating that SFE-80 exhibited a noncytotoxic character. Conclusively, rosemary can be considered an herbal anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor agent. PMID:17827696

  16. On the nature of the polarization opposition effect exhibited by Saturn's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.

    1993-01-01

    The nature of the unusually narrow photometric and polarization opposition effects exhibited by Saturn's A and B rings is examined using a theory and results of laboratory measurements. It is pointed out that the small angular width of both phenomena makes it difficult to explain them on the basis of the commonly used shadowing models. On the other hand, it is known from laboratory experiments and theoretical studies, that a strong and very narrow opposition peak in the reflected intensity can be produced by coherent backscattering of light from powderlike layers of small regolithic grains. Using Ozrin's (1992) rigorous vector theory of coherent backscattering, it is shown that, for subwavelength-sized regolithic particles, the photometric opposition effect is accompanied by a polarization opposition effect of the same angular width. This suggests that the polarization opposition effect of the Saturn's ring has the same origin as the photometric opposition effect and is due to coherent backscattering of light from the regolithic layer composed of the submicrometer-sized ice grains.

  17. The triterpenoid fraction from Trichosanthes dioica root exhibits in vitro antileishmanial effect against Leishmania donovani promastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sanjib; Biswas, Moulisha; Haldar, Pallab K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Trichosanthes dioica Roxb. (Cucurbitaceae), called pointed gourd in English is a dioecious climber found wild throughout the plains of the Indian subcontinent and traditionally used in India for several medicinal purposes. Objective: The present study was aimed at the evaluation of in vitro antileishmanial effect of triterpenoid fraction from T. dioica root (CETD). Materials and Methods: The antileishmanial activity of CETD was evaluated against Leishmania donovani (strain MHOM/IN/83/AG83)) promastigotes by in vitro promastigote cell toxicity assay by using MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide). Potassium antimonyl tartrate was used as reference. Results: Here, CETD markedly inhibited the growth of L. donovani promastigotes in vitro in a concentration dependent manner and demonstrated IC50 value of 18.75 μg/ml. The reference drug potassium antimonyl tartrate exhibited IC50 of 7.52 μg/ml. Conclusion: From the present study it can be inferred that the triterpenoid fraction of T. dioica root exhibited remarkable antileishmanial activity against Leishmania donovani promastigotes in vitro. PMID:23798885

  18. Increasing awareness and preparedness by an exhibition and studying the effect of visuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2013-04-01

    Damages caused by natural hazards can be reduced not only by protection, management and intervention activities, but also by information and communication to improve awareness and preparedness of local communities and tourists. Risk communication is particularly crucial for mountainous areas, such as the Ubaye Valley (France), as they are affected by multiple hazards and are particularly sensitive to the potential effects of climate and socio-economic changes which may increase the risk associated with natural hazards significantly. An exhibition is a powerful tool to communicate with the general public. It allows1: (1) targeting specific audiences, (2) transmitting technical and scientific knowledge using a suitable language, (3) anchoring the collective memory of past events, (4) visualize and emotionalize the topic of natural hazards, (5) strengthening the communication between peers, and (6) highlighting local resources and knowledge. In addition to these theoretical advantages, an exhibition may fulfill the requirements of a community. In the Ubaye Valley (France), this tool was proposed by the stakeholders themselves to increase awareness and preparedness of the general public. To meet this demand, the exhibition was designed following three general topics: (1) the natural phenomena and their potential consequences on the elements at risk, (2) the management and protection measures (individual and collective) and (3) the evolution of events and knowledge throughout past up to the present and the anticipation of the future situations. Besides being a real risk communication practice, this exhibition will be the setting for an extensive research project studying the effect of the use of visualization tools on the awareness and preparedness of a community. A wide range of visuals (photos, videos, maps, models, animations, multimedia, etc.) will present many dimensions of locally occurring natural hazards and risk problems. The aim of the research is (1) to

  19. Computational design of donor-bridge-acceptor systems exhibiting pronounced quantum interference effects.

    PubMed

    Gorczak, Natalie; Renaud, Nicolas; Galan, Elena; Eelkema, Rienk; Siebbeles, Laurens D A; Grozema, Ferdinand C

    2016-03-01

    Quantum interference is a well-known phenomenon that dictates charge transport properties of single molecule junctions. However, reports on quantum interference in donor-bridge-acceptor molecules are scarce. This might be due to the difficulties in meeting the conditions for the presence of quantum interference in a donor-bridge-acceptor system. The electronic coupling between the donor, bridge, and acceptor moieties must be weak in order to ensure localised initial and final states for charge transfer. Yet, it must be strong enough to allow all bridge orbitals to mediate charge transfer. We present the computational route to the design of a donor-bridge-acceptor molecule that features the right balance between these contradicting requirements and exhibits pronounced interference effects. PMID:26878200

  20. New class of generalized photon-added coherent states and some of their non-classical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojaveri, B.; Dehghani, A.; Mahmoodi, S.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we construct a new class of generalized photon added coherent states (GPACSs), |z,m{{\\rangle }_{r}} by excitations on a newly introduced family of generalized coherent states (GCSs) |z{{\\rangle }_{r}} (A Dehghani and B Mojaveri 2012 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 45 095304), obtained via generalized hypergeometric type displacement operators acting on the vacuum state of the simple harmonic oscillator. We show that these states realize resolution of the identity property through positive definite measures on the complex plane. Meanwhile, we demonstrate that the introduced states can also be interpreted as nonlinear coherent states (NLCSs), with a spacial nonlinearity function. Finally, some of their non-classical features as well as their quantum statistical properties are compared with Agarwal's photon-added coherent states (PACSs), \\left| z,m \\right\\rangle .

  1. Non-classical MHC class Ib-restricted cytotoxic T cells monitor antigen processing in the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Gonzalez, Federico; Shastri, Nilabh

    2012-01-01

    The ER aminopeptidase associated with antigen processing, ERAAP, is essential for trimming peptides presented by MHC I molecules. ERAAP inhibition by cytomegalovirus causes immune evasion, and ERAAP polymorphisms are associated with autoimmune disorders. How normal ERAAP function is monitored is unknown. We found that ERAAP inhibition rapidly induced presentation of the FL9 peptide by the Qa-1b MHC Ib molecule. Antigen-experienced T cells specific for the Qa-1b-FL9 complex were frequent in naïve mice. Wild-type mice immunized with ERAAP-deficient cells mounted a potent CD8+ T cell response specific for the Qa-1b-FL9- complex. MHC Ib-restricted cytolytic effectors specifically eliminated ERAAP-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, non-classical peptide-Qa-1b complexes direct cytotoxic T cells to targets with defective antigen processing in the ER. PMID:22522492

  2. Non-Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency that Developed into Symptomatic Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Sawako; Ookawara, Susumu; Takase, Kaoru; Goto, Mizue; Nakayama, Takahiro; Oyama, Yuhta; Tabei, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency had been under glucocorticoid replacement therapy since the age of 17 years. After several weeks of suffering from gastroenteritis with vomiting, she presented with disturbance of consciousness, hypotension, dehydration, and severe hyponatremia (108 mEq/L) and a markedly increased serum vasopressin concentration (45.5 pg/mL). She regained consciousness after correcting her body-fluid balance with hypertonic saline and intravenous hydrocortisone sodium therapy. Her hyponatremia was likely caused by extra-renal sodium loss and impaired water excretion induced by an increase of serum vasopressin due to volume depletion and glucocorticoid deficiency. PMID:25986269

  3. Simvastatin exhibits antiproliferative effects on spheres derived from canine mammary carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Torres, Cristian G; Olivares, Araceli; Stoore, Caroll

    2015-05-01

    Mammary cancer is the most frequent type of tumor in the female canine. Treatments are mainly limited to surgery and chemotherapy; however, these tumors may develop clinical recurrence, metastasis and chemoresistance. The existence of a subpopulation of cancer cells with stemness features called cancer stem-like cells, may explain in part these characteristics of tumor progression. The statins, potent blockers of cholesterol synthesis, have also shown antitumor effects on cancer mammary cells, changes mediated by a decrease in the isoprenylation of specific proteins. Few studies have shown that simvastatin, a lipophilic statin, sensitizes cancer stem-like cells eliminating drug resistance. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on spheres derived from CF41.Mg canine mammary tumor cells, which were characterized by phenotypic and functional analyses. Spheres exhibited characteristics of stemness, primarily expressing a CD44⁺/CD24⁻/low phenotype, displaying auto-renewal and relative chemoresistance. Exposure to simvastatin induced a decrease in the sphere-forming capacity and cell viability, accompanied by a concentration- and time-dependent increase in caspase-3/7 activity. In addition, modulation of β-catenin and p53 expression was observed. Simvastatin triggered a synergistic effect with doxorubicin, sensitizing the spheres to the cytotoxic effect exerted by the drug. Invasiveness of spheres was decreased in response to simvastatin and this effect was counteracted by the presence of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. Our results suggest that simvastatin targets canine mammary cancer stem-like cells, supporting its therapeutical application as a novel agent to treat canine mammary cancer. PMID:25778435

  4. Nuclear translocation of glutathione S-transferase {pi} is mediated by a non-classical localization signal

    SciTech Connect

    Kawakatsu, Miho; Goto, Shinji; Yoshida, Takako; Urata, Yoshishige; Li, Tao-Sheng

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is abrogated by the deletion of the last 16 amino acid residues in the carboxy-terminal region, indicating that residues 195-208 of GST{pi} are required for nuclear translocation. {yields} The lack of a contiguous stretch of positively charged amino acid residues within the carboxy-terminal region of GST{pi}, suggests that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is mediated by a non-classical nuclear localization signal. {yields} An in vitro transport assay shows that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} is dependent on cytosolic factors and ATP. -- Abstract: Glutathione S-transferase {pi} (GST{pi}), a member of the GST family of multifunctional enzymes, is highly expressed in human placenta and involved in the protection of cellular components against electrophilic compounds or oxidative stress. We have recently found that GST{pi} is expressed in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus in some cancer cells, and that the nuclear expression of GST{pi} appears to correlate with resistance to anti-cancer drugs. Although the mitochondrial targeting signal of GST{pi} was previously identified in the amino-terminal region, the mechanism of nuclear translocation remains completely unknown. In this study, we find that the region of GST{pi}195-208 is critical for nuclear translocation, which is mediated by a novel and non-classical nuclear localization signal. In addition, using an in vitro transport assay, we demonstrate that the nuclear translocation of GST{pi} depends on the cytosolic extract and ATP. Although further experiments are needed to understand in depth the precise mechanism of nuclear translocation of GST{pi}, our results may help to establish more efficient anti-cancer therapy, especially with respect to resistance to anti-cancer drugs.

  5. Fistular onion stalk extract exhibits anti-atherosclerotic effects in rats

    PubMed Central

    HE, BENHONG; HAO, JIANJUN; SHENG, WEIWEI; XIANG, YUANCAI; ZHANG, JIEMEIA; ZHU, HAO; TIAN, JINGCHENG; ZHU, XU; FENG, YUNXIA; XIA, HAO

    2014-01-01

    Fistular onion stalk is used as a traditional herbal medicine, and its extract exhibits certain beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease. In this study, the effects of fistular onion stalk extract on the pathological features, circulating inflammatory cytokines, local renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) and signaling pathway activities were examined using an in vivo model of atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis of the aorta was induced by loading Sprague Dawley rats with a high-fat diet and vitamin D2. Fistular onion stalk extract administration began five weeks after the induction of atherosclerosis and continued for 12 weeks. Rats treated with fistular onion stalk extract showed a significant reduction in the pathological region compared with the vehicle-treated controls. Inhibition of atherosclerosis was associated with preservation of the vascular wall and immune cell infiltration. The extract also reduced the levels of the local inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α. Furthermore, the extract downregulated the local activity of the RAAS. In addition, extract treatment inhibited several inflammatory signaling pathways by preventing phosphorylation, including the nuclear factor κB, Janus kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. These data indicate that fistular onion stalk extract may be useful for the attenuation of atherosclerosis, and the mechanism includes the regulation of the local inflammatory response. PMID:25120600

  6. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-02-28

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The I{sub d}-V{sub g} characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics.

  7. Arsenite and insulin exhibit opposing effects on epidermal growth factor receptor and keratinocyte proliferative potential

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Timothy J.; Rice, Robert H. . E-mail: rhrice@ucdavis.edu

    2007-05-15

    Previous work has suggested that arsenic exposure contributes to skin carcinogenesis by preserving the proliferative potential of human epidermal keratinocytes, thereby slowing the exit of putative target stem cells into the differentiation pathway. To find a molecular basis for this action, present work has explored the influence of arsenite on keratinocyte responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF). The ability of cultured keratinocytes to found colonies upon passaging several days after confluence was preserved by arsenite and EGF in an additive fashion, but neither was effective when the receptor tyrosine kinase activity was inhibited. Arsenite prevented the loss of EGF receptor protein and phosphorylation of tyrosine 1173, preserving its capability to signal. The level of nuclear {beta}-catenin was higher in cells treated with arsenite and EGF in parallel to elevated colony forming ability, and expression of a dominant negative {beta}-catenin suppressed the increase in both colony forming ability and yield of putative stem cells induced by arsenite and EGF. As judged by expression of three genes regulated by {beta}-catenin, this transcription factor had substantially higher activity in the arsenite/EGF-treated cells. Trivalent antimony exhibited the same effects as arsenite. A novel finding is that insulin in the medium induced the loss of EGF receptor protein, which was largely prevented by arsenite exposure.

  8. Modeling of the Propagation of Seismic Waves in Non-Classical Media: Reduced Cosserat Continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grekova, E.; Kulesh, M.; Herman, G.; Shardakov, I.

    2006-12-01

    In rock mechanics, elastic wave propagation is usually modeled in terms of classical elasticity. There are situations, however, when rock behaviour is still elastic but cannot be described by the classical model. In particular, current effective medium theories, based on classical elasticity, do not properly describe strong dispersive or attenuative behaviour of wave propagation observed sometimes. The approach we have taken to address this problem is to introduce supplementary and independent degrees of freedom of material particles, in our case rotational ones. Various models of this kind are widely used in continuum mechanics: Cosserat theory, micropolar model of Eringen, Cosserat pseudocontinuum, reduced Cosserat continuum etc. We have considered the reduced Cosserat medium where the couple stress is zero, while the rotation vector is independent of the translational displacement. In this model, the stress depends on the rotation of a particle relatively to the background continuum of mass centers, but it does not depend on the relative rotation of two neighboring particles. This model seems to be adequate for the description of granular media, consolidated soils, and rocks with inhomogeneous microstructure. A real inhomogeneous medium is considered as effective homogeneous enriched continuum, where proper rotational dynamics of inhomogeneities are taken into account by means of rotation of a particle of the enriched continuum. We have obtained and analyzed theoretical solutions for this model describing the propagation of body waves and surface waves. We have shown both the dispersive character of these waves in elastic space and half space, and the existence of forbidden frequency zones. These results can be used for the preparation, execution, and interpretation of seismic experiments, which would allow one to determine whether (and in which situations) polar theories are important in rock mechanics, and to help with the identification of material parameters

  9. Non-classical azoreductase secretion in Clostridium perfringens in response to sulfonated azo dye exposure.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Jessica M; John, Gilbert H

    2015-08-01

    Clostridium perfringens, a strictly anaerobic microorganism and inhabitant of the human intestine, has been shown to produce an azoreductase enzyme (AzoC), an NADH-dependent flavin oxidoreductase. This enzyme reduces azo dyes into aromatic amines, which can be carcinogenic. A significant amount of work has been completed on the activity of AzoC. Despite this, much is still unknown, including whether azoreduction of these dyes occurs intracellularly or extracellulary. A physiological study of C. perfringens involving the effect of azo dye exposure was completed to answer this question. Through exposure studies, azo dyes were found to cause cytoplasmic protein release, including AzoC, from C. perfringens in dividing and non-dividing cells. Sulfonation (negative charge) of azo dyes proved to be the key to facilitating protein release of AzoC and was found to be azo-dye-concentration-dependent. Additionally, AzoC was found to localize to the Gram-positive periplasmic region. Using a ΔazoC knockout mutant, the presence of additional azoreductases in C. perfringens was suggested. These results support the notion that the azoreduction of these dyes may occur extracellularly for the commensal C. perfringens in the intestine. PMID:25881497

  10. Classical androgen receptors in non-classical sites in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Sarkey, Sara; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Garcia-Ovejero, Daniel; DonCarlos, Lydia L.

    2008-01-01

    Androgen receptors are expressed in many different neuronal populations in the central nervous system where they often act as transcription factors in the cell nucleus. However, recent studies have detected androgen receptor immunoreactivity in neuronal and glial processes of the adult rat neocortex, hippocampal formation, and amygdala as well as in the telencephalon of Eastern Fence and green anole lizards. This review discusses previously published findings on extranuclear androgen receptors, as well as new experimental results that begin to establish a possible functional role for androgen receptors in axons within cortical regions. Electron microscopic studies have revealed that androgen receptor immunoreactive processes in the rat brain correspond to axons, dendrites and glial processes. New results show that lesions of the dorsal CA1 region by local administration of ibotenic acid reduce the density of androgen receptor immunoreactive axons in the cerebral cortex and the amygdala, suggesting that these axons may originate in the hippocampus. Androgen receptor immunoreactivity in axons is also decreased by the intracerebroventricular administration of colchicine, suggesting that androgen receptor protein is transported from the perikaryon to the axons by fast axonal transport. Androgen receptors in axons located in the cerebral cortex and amygdala and originating in the hippocampus may play an important role in the rapid behavioral effects of androgens. PMID:18402960

  11. S100A13-C2A binary complex structure-a key component in the acidic fibroblast growth factor for the non-classical pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Mohan, Sepuru K.; Rani, Sandhya G.; Kumar, Sriramoju M.; Yu Chin

    2009-03-13

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) are key regulators of cell proliferation, differentiation, tumor-induced angiogenesis and migration. FGFs are essential for early embryonic development, organ formation and angiogenesis. They play important roles in tumor formation, inflammation, wound healing and restenosis. The biological effects of FGFs are mediated through the activation of the four transmembrane phosphotyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) in the presence of heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) and therefore require the release of FGFs into the extracellular space. However, FGF-1 lacks the signal peptide required for the releasing of these proteins through the classical endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi secretary pathway. Maciag et al. demonstrated that FGF-1 is exported through a non-classical release pathway involving the formation of a specific multiprotein complex [M. Landriscina, R. Soldi, C. Bagala, I. Micucci, S. Bellum, F. Tarantini, I. Prudovsky, T. Maciag, S100A13 participates in the release of fibroblast growth factor 1 in response to heat shock in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001) 22544-22552; C.M. Carreira, T.M. LaVallee, F. Tarantini, A. Jackson, J.T. Lathrop, B. Hampton, W.H. Burgess, T. Maciag, S100A13 is involved in the regulation of fibroblast growth factor-1 and p40 synaptotagmin-1 release in vitro, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22224-22231; T.M. LaValle, F. Tarantini, S. Gamble, C.M. Carreira, A. Jackson, T. Maciag, Synaptotagmin-1 is required for fibroblast growth factor-1 release, J. Biol. Chem. 273 (1998) 22217-22223; C. Bagala, V. Kolev, A. Mandinova, R. Soldi, C. Mouta, I. Graziani, I, Prudovsky, T. Maciag, The alternative translation of synaptotagmin 1 mediates the non-classical release of FGF1, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 310 (2003) 1041-1047]. The protein constituents of this complex include FGF-1, S100A13 (a Ca{sup 2+}-binding protein), and the p40 form of synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1). To understand the molecular events in the FGF-1 releasing

  12. Diagnosis and molecular characterization of non-classic forms of Tay-Sachs disease in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, R; Kok, F; Burin, M G; Sá Miranda, M C; Vasques, C; Henriques-Souza, A M M; Giugliani, R; Vainzof, Mariz; Pereira, L V

    2006-06-01

    Molecular analysis of five Brazilian families, including eight patients presenting with nonclassic Tay-Sachs disease, was performed to identify frequent causative mutations and their correlation with clinical course. Three patients were affected by the B1 subacute variant and were shown to carry the R178H mutation (the DN allele), which is also common among Portuguese patients. Two of them were compound heterozygotes, whereas the third presented with the mutation in both alleles. Since Brazil was a Portuguese colony for over two centuries, common ancestry might be the probable explanation. The fourth patient presented with a juvenile phenotype and carries the R499H mutation, which has been reported only once worldwide and is associated with residual enzyme activity, responsible for a slower clinical course. The fifth family, of an Ashkenazi Jewish background, showed an extensive intrafamilial clinical variability among three affected sibs presenting with muscle atrophy, ataxia, and psychiatric symptoms. They were first diagnosed as having atypical spinal muscular atrophy and, subsequently, spinocerebellar ataxia, but, recently, the diagnosis of late-onset Tay-Sachs disease was confirmed based on reduced plasma hexosaminidase A activity and the G269S/InsTATC1278 genotype. It is therefore highly recommended to test patients with a similar clinical history for Tay-Sachs disease. In the same family, one first cousin committed suicide at the age of 24 years, presenting with a clinical phenotype that suggested an undiagnosed case and highlighting the effect of the intrafamilial clinical variability in delaying a prompt diagnosis. It is now recognized that his parents are, in fact, a carrier couple. Additionally, another relative had been previously identified as a heterozygote in a Tay-Sachs disease screening program, but the information was not shared among the family. Since this information might anticipate diagnosis and genetic counseling, it is advisable that

  13. Tricarboxylate-based Gd(III) coordination polymers exhibiting large magnetocaloric effects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sui-Jun; Cao, Chen; Xie, Chen-Chao; Zheng, Teng-Fei; Tong, Xiao-Lan; Liao, Jin-Sheng; Chen, Jing-Lin; Wen, He-Rui; Chang, Ze; Bu, Xian-He

    2016-05-31

    Two Gd(III) coordination polymers with the formula [Gd(cit)(H2O)]∞ () and [Gd(nta)(H2O)2]∞ () (H4cit = citric acid, H3nta = nitrilotriacetic acid) have been successfully prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Complex exhibits a three-dimensional (3D) structure based on carboxylate-bridged layers, while complex is a double-layer structure containing eight-coordinated Gd(III). Magnetic investigations reveal that weak antiferromagnetic couplings between adjacent Gd(III) ions in both and with different Weiss values result in large cryogenic magnetocaloric effects. It is notable that the maximum entropy changes (-ΔS) of and reach 31.3 J kg(-1) K(-1) and 32.2 J kg(-1) K(-1) at 2 K for a moderate field change (ΔH = 3 T), and a remarkable -ΔS (41.5 J kg(-1) K(-1) for and 42.0 J kg(-1) K(-1) for ) could be obtained for ΔH = 7 T. PMID:27171744

  14. Lactobacillus plantarum TN8 exhibits protective effects on lipid, hepatic and renal profiles in obese rat.

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, Riadh; Trabelsi, Imen; Hamden, Khaled; Chouayekh, Hichem; Bejar, Samir

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to first investigate the immuno-modulatory effects of six newly isolated lactic acid bacteria (LAB) on the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of Wistar rats. Except for Lactobacillus plantarum TN8, all the other strains were noted to induce high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-12 and low levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. The strains also generated low ratios of IL-10/IL-12 cytokine. Strain TN8 was, on the other hand, noted to induce an increase in anti-inflammatory IL-10 cytokine secretion rates and a decrease in pro-inflammatory IL-12, IFN-γ and TNF-α cytokine production. The oral administration of TN8 improved the hepatic and urinary functions of obese rats by inducing decreases (P < 0.05) in alanine amino transferase (ALAT), gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), plasmatic triglycerides, total cholesterol concentrations, creatinine, urea, and body weight when compared to the control group of animals that underwent an increase in aspartate amino transferase (ASAT) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). Overall, the findings indicate that strain TN8 exhibited a number of attractive properties that might open new promising opportunities for the improvement of various parameters related to animal health performance and the avoidance of antibiotics and drugs as promoting factors. PMID:23891961

  15. On the Stark Effect in Open Shell Complexes Exhibiting Partially Quenched Electronic Angular Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douberly, Gary E.; Moradi, Christopher P.

    2015-06-01

    The Stark effect is considered for polyatomic open shell complexes that exhibit partially quenched electronic angular momentum. Specifically, a zero-field model Hamiltonian is employed that accounts for the partial quenching of electronic orbital angular momentum in hydroxyl radical containing molecular complexes. Spherical tensor operator formalism is employed to derive matrix elements of the Stark Hamiltonian in a parity conserving, Hund's case (a) basis for the most general case, in which the permanent dipole moment has projections on all three inertial axes of the system. Ro-vibrational transition intensities are derived, again for the most general case; namely, the laser polarization is projected onto axes parallel and perpendicular to the Stark electric field, and the transition dipole moment vector is projected onto all three inertial axes in the molecular frame. The model discussed here is compared to experimental spectra of OH-(C2H2), OH-(C2H4), and OH-(H2O) complexes formed in He nanodroplets. M. D. Marshall and M. I. Lester, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 3019 (2004). G. E. Douberly, P. L. Raston, T. Liang, and M. D. Marshall, J. Chem. Phys. in press

  16. Hemodynamic effects of high intensity interval training in COPD patients exhibiting exercise-induced dynamic hyperinflation.

    PubMed

    Nasis, I; Kortianou, E; Vasilopoulou, Μ; Spetsioti, S; Louvaris, Z; Kaltsakas, G; Davos, C H; Zakynthinos, S; Koulouris, N G; Vogiatzis, I

    2015-10-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) has a significant adverse effect on cardiovascular function during exercise in COPD patients. COPD patients with (n = 25) and without (n = 11) exercise-induced DH undertook an incremental (IET) and a constant-load exercise test (CLET) sustained at 75% peak work (WRpeak) prior to and following an interval cycling exercise training regime (set at 100% WRpeak with 30-s work/30-s rest intervals) lasting for 12 weeks. Cardiac output (Q) was assessed by cardio-bio-impedance (PhysioFlow, enduro, PF-O7) to determine Q mean response time (QMRT) at onset (QMRT(ON)) and offset (QMRT(OFF)) of CLET. Post-rehabilitation only those patients exhibiting exercise-induced DH demonstrated significant reductions in QMRT(ON) (from 82.2 ± 4.3 to 61.7 ± 4.2 s) and QMRT(OFF) (from 80.5 ± 3.8 to 57.2 ± 4.9 s ). These post-rehabilitation adaptations were associated with improvements in inspiratory capacity, thereby suggesting that mitigation of the degree of exercise-induced DH improves central hemodynamic responses in COPD patients. PMID:26112284

  17. Toward Effective Shell Modeling of Wrinkled Thin-Film Membranes Exhibiting Stress Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tessler, Alexander; Sleight, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Geometrically nonlinear shell finite element analysis has recently been applied to solar-sail membrane problems in order to model the out-of-plane deformations due to structural wrinkling. Whereas certain problems lend themselves to achieving converged nonlinear solutions that compare favorably with experimental observations, solutions to tensioned membranes exhibiting high stress concentrations have been difficult to obtain even with the best nonlinear finite element codes and advanced shell element technology. In this paper, two numerical studies are presented that pave the way to improving the modeling of this class of nonlinear problems. The studies address the issues of mesh refinement and stress-concentration alleviation, and the effects of these modeling strategies on the ability to attain converged nonlinear deformations due to wrinkling. The numerical studies demonstrate that excessive mesh refinement in the regions of stress concentration may be disadvantageous to achieving wrinkled equilibrium states, causing the nonlinear solution to lock in the membrane response mode, while totally discarding the very low-energy bending response that is necessary to cause wrinkling deformation patterns. An element-level, strain-energy density criterion is suggested for facilitating automated, adaptive mesh refinements specifically aimed at the modeling of thin-film membranes undergoing wrinkling deformations.

  18. Flavonoids exhibit diverse effects on CYP11B1 expression and cortisol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-02-01

    CYP11B1 catalyzes the final step of cortisol biosynthesis. The effects of flavonoids on transcriptional expression and enzyme activity of CYP11B1 were investigated using the human adrenocortical H295R cell model. All tested nonhydroxylated flavones including 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone, α-naphthoflavone, and β-naphthoflavone upregulated CYP11B1 expression and cortisol production, whereas apigenin and quercetin exhibited potent cytotoxicity and CYP11B1 repression at high concentrations. Nonhydroxylated flavones stimulated CYP11B1-catalyzed cortisol formation at transcriptional level. Resveratrol increased endogenous and substrate-supported cortisol production like nonhydroxylated flavones tested, but it had no effect on CYP11B1 gene expression and enzyme activity. Resveratrol appeared to alter cortisol biosynthesis at an earlier step. The Ad5 element situated in the − 121/− 106 region was required for basal and flavone-induced CYP11B1 expression. Overexpression of COUP-TFI did not improve the responsiveness of Ad5 to nonhydroxylated flavones. Although COUP-TFI overexpression increased CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 promoter activation, its effect was not mediated through the common Ad5 element. Treating cells with PD98059 (a flavone-type MEK1 inhibitor) increased CYP11B1 promoter activity, but not involving ERK signaling because phosphorylation of ERK1/2 remained unvarying throughout the course of treatment. Likewise, AhR was not responsible for the CYP11B1-modulating effects of flavonoids because inconsistency with their effects on AhR activation. 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone and 8-Br-cAMP additively activated CYP11B1 promoter activity. H-89 reduced 3′,4′-dimethoxyflavone-induced CYP11B1 promoter activation but to a lesser extent as compared to its inhibition on cAMP-induced transactivation. Our data suggest that constant exposure to nonhydroxylated flavones raises a potential risk of high basal and cAMP-induced cortisol synthesis in consequence of increased CYP11B1

  19. Hydrogen sulfide exhibits cardioprotective effects by decreasing endoplasmic reticulum stress in a diabetic cardiomyopathy rat model.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Luo, Jian; Wu, Zhixiong; Xiao, Ting; Zeng, Ou; Li, Lin; Li, Yan; Yang, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is critical in the occurrence and development of diabetic cardiomyopathy (DC). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to be the third gaseous signaling molecule with anti‑ER stress effects. Previous studies have shown that H2S acts as a potent inhibitor of fibrosis in the heart of diabetic rats. This study aimed to demonstrate whether H2S exhibits protective effects on the myocardium of streptozotocin (STZ)‑induced diabetic rats by suppressing ER stress. In this study, diabetic models were established by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 40 mg/kg STZ. The STZ‑treated mice were divided into three groups, and subsequently treated with normal saline, 30 µmol/kg or 100 µmol/kg NaHS, i.p., respectively, for 8 weeks. The extent of myocyte hypertrophy was measured using hematoxylin and eosin‑stained sections and collagen components were investigated using immunostaining. The expression of glucose-regulated protein (Grp78), C/EBP‑homologous protein (CHOP) and caspase‑12 in the heart tissue of each group was detected by western blot analysis. It was demonstrated that H2S could improve myocardial hypertrophy and myocardial collagen deposition in diabetic rats. In addition, it could reduce the expression of Grp78, caspase-12 and CHOP. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that H2S suppresses STZ‑induced ER stress in the hearts of rats, and it may serve as a novel cardioprotective agent for DC. PMID:27222111

  20. Loss of CCR2 expressing non-classical monocytes are associated with cognitive impairment in antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-infected Thais.

    PubMed

    Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; D'Antoni, Michelle L; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Byron, Mary Margaret; Chalermchai, Thep; Sithinamsuwan, Pasiri; Tipsuk, Somporn; Ho, Erika; Slike, Bonnie M; Schuetz, Alexandra; Zhang, Guangxiang; Agsalda-Garcia, Melissa; Shiramizu, Bruce; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Valcour, Victor

    2015-11-15

    HIV DNA in monocytes has been linked to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), however, characterization of monocyte subsets associated with HAND remains unclear. We completed a prospective study of antiretroviral therapy-naïve, HIV-infected Thais, with varying degrees of cognitive impairment, compared to HIV-uninfected controls. Monocyte subsets' CCR2, CCR5 and CD163 expression were profiled and inflammatory markers in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), measured. Lower numbers of CCR2(+)non-classical monocytes were associated with worse neuropsychological test performance (r=0.43, p=0.024). CCR2(+)non-classical monocyte count inversely correlated with CSF neopterin (r=-0.43, p=0.035) and plasma TNF-α levels (r=-0.40, p=0.041). These data benchmark CCR2(+)non-classical monocytes as an independent index of cognitive impairment. PMID:26531691

  1. Airship Observations of Formaldehyde in the Po Valley as a Probe of Boundary Layer Development and Non-Classical Radical Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Wolfe, G. M.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2012-12-01

    Stagnant meteorological conditions and high anthropogenic emissions make the Po Valley in Northern Italy one of Europe's most polluted regions. Understanding the processes controlling ozone production in this environment is essential for developing effective mitigation strategies. As both a source of HO2 radicals and an intermediate in the oxidation of most volatile organic compounds (VOCs), formaldehyde (HCHO) is a useful tracer for the oxidative processing of hydrocarbons that leads to ozone production. During the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOls Climate Interaction Study (PEGASOS), HCHO measurements were acquired via a Fiber Laser-Induced Fluorescence (FiLIF) instrument onboard a Zeppelin airship. This mission represents the first successful airborne deployment of the FiLIF instrument. With low flight speeds and vertical profiling capabilities, these Zeppelin-based observations in conjunction with other measurements may offer new insights into the spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric composition within the Po Valley region. Preliminary comparisons of modeled and measured HCHO concentrations at various altitudes and VOC/NOx regimes will be presented. Analysis will focus on 1) the transition from nocturnal to daytime boundary layers, and 2) the potential role of "non-classical" radical chemistry in ozone production.

  2. Imatinib Treatment Causes Substantial Transcriptional Changes in Adult Schistosoma mansoni In Vitro Exhibiting Pleiotropic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Katia C.; Dissous, Colette; Cailliau, Katia; Marhöfer, Richard J.; Selzer, Paul M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Grevelding, Christoph G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. For decades Praziquantel (PZQ) is the only drug widely used for controlling schistosomiasis. The absence of a vaccine and fear of PZQ resistance have motivated the search for alternatives. Studies on protein kinases (PKs) demonstrated their importance for diverse physiological processes in schistosomes. Among others two Abl tyrosine kinases, SmAbl1 and SmAbl2, were identified in Schistosoma mansoni and shown to be transcribed in the gonads and the gastrodermis. SmAbl1 activity was blocked by Imatinib, a known Abl-TK inhibitor used in human cancer therapy (Gleevec/Glivec). Imatinib exhibited dramatic effects on the morphology and physiology of adult schistosomes in vitro causing the death of the parasites. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show modeling data supporting the targeting of SmAbl1/2 by Imatinib. A biochemical assay confirmed that SmAbl2 activity is also inhibited by Imatinib. Microarray analyses and qRT-PCR experiments were done to unravel transcriptional processes influenced by Imatinib in adult schistosomes in vitro demonstrating a wide influence on worm physiology. Surface-, muscle-, gut and gonad-associated processes were affected as evidenced by the differential transcription of e.g. the gynecophoral canal protein gene GCP, paramyosin, titin, hemoglobinase, and cathepsins. Furthermore, transcript levels of VAL-7 and egg formation-associated genes such as tyrosinase 1, p14, and fs800-like were affected as well as those of signaling genes including a ribosomal protein S6 kinase and a glutamate receptor. Finally, a comparative in silico analysis of the obtained microarray data sets and previous data analyzing the effect of a TGFβR1 inhibitor on transcription provided first evidence for an association of TGFβ and Abl kinase signaling. Among others GCP and egg formation-associated genes were identified as common targets. Conclusions

  3. Characterization and comparative 3D modeling of CmPI-II, a novel 'non-classical' Kazal-type inhibitor from the marine snail Cenchritis muricatus (Mollusca).

    PubMed

    González, Yamile; Pons, Tirso; Gil, Jeovanis; Besada, Vladimir; Alonso-del-Rivero, Maday; Tanaka, Aparecida S; Araujo, Mariana S; Chávez, María A

    2007-11-01

    The complete amino acid sequence obtained by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry of the proteinase inhibitor CmPI-II isolated from Cenchritis muricatus is described. CmPI-II is a 5480-Da protein with three disulfide bridges that inhibits human neutrophil elastase (HNE) (K(i) 2.6+/-0.2 nM), trypsin (K(i) 1.1+/-0.9 nM), and other serine proteinases such as subtilisin A (K(i) 30.8+/-1.2 nM) and pancreatic elastase (K(i) 145.0+/-4.4 nM); chymotrypsin, pancreatic and plasma kallikreins, thrombin and papain are not inhibited. CmPI-II shares homology with the Kazal-type domain and may define a new group of 'non-classical' Kazal inhibitors according to its Cys(I)-Cys(V) disulfide bridge position. The 3D model of CmPI-II exhibits similar secondary structure characteristics to Kazal-type inhibitors and concurs with circular dichroism experiments. A 3D model of the CmPI-II/HNE complex provides a structural framework for the interpretation of its experimentally determined K(i) value. The model shows both similar and different contacts at the primary binding sites in comparison with the structure of turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3)/HNE used as template. Additional contacts calculated at the protease-inhibitor interface could also contribute to the association energy of the complex. This inhibitor represents an exception in terms of specificity owing to its ability to strongly inhibit elastases and trypsin. PMID:17976011

  4. Metabolic Substrates Exhibit Differential Effects on Functional Parameters of Mouse Sperm Capacitation1

    PubMed Central

    Goodson, Summer G.; Qiu, Yunping; Sutton, Keith A.; Xie, Guoxiang; Jia, Wei; O'Brien, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although substantial evidence exists that sperm ATP production via glycolysis is required for mammalian sperm function and male fertility, conflicting reports involving multiple species have appeared regarding the ability of individual glycolytic or mitochondrial substrates to support the physiological changes that occur during capacitation. Several mouse models with defects in the signaling pathways required for capacitation exhibit reductions in sperm ATP levels, suggesting regulatory interactions between sperm metabolism and signal transduction cascades. To better understand these interactions, we conducted quantitative studies of mouse sperm throughout a 2-h in vitro capacitation period and compared the effects of single substrates assayed under identical conditions. Multiple glycolytic and nonglycolytic substrates maintained sperm ATP levels and comparable percentages of motility, but only glucose and mannose supported hyperactivation. These monosaccharides and fructose supported the full pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas nonglycolytic substrates supported at least partial tyrosine phosphorylation. Inhibition of glycolysis impaired motility in the presence of glucose, fructose, or pyruvate but not in the presence of hydroxybutyrate. Addition of an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation reduced motility with pyruvate or hydroxybutyrate as substrates but unexpectedly stimulated hyperactivation with fructose. Investigating differences between glucose and fructose in more detail, we demonstrated that hyperactivation results from the active metabolism of glucose. Differences between glucose and fructose appeared to be downstream of changes in intracellular pH, which rose to comparable levels during incubation with either substrate. Sperm redox pathways were differentially affected, with higher levels of associated metabolites and reactive oxygen species generated during incubations with fructose than during incubations with glucose. PMID

  5. Differentiation of the causal characteristics and influences of virtual reality and the effects on learning at a science exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Strulle, Arlene

    Within the context of the informal science center, exhibits are the main interface for public learning. Essential to the success of a science center is how well exhibits model effective strategies for learning. Virtual Reality (VR) technology with its flexible, adaptive, multimedia, and immersive-learning capabilities is emerging for use by science centers in exhibits; however, research on learning in virtual environments at exhibits is scarce. To support the future development of VR science exhibits it is critical to investigate VR's pedagogical value and effects on science learning. Research investigated the Smoke & Mirrors VR exhibit at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego, California. Inquiry focused on the interplay between elements of the exhibit's design, assessing the separate and interactive effects of visual imagery, moving images, sound, narration, and interactive tools to differentiate the causal characteristics and influences that enhanced and detracted from learning. Case study methodology was employed utilizing visitor observations and interviews with 14 participants. Findings indicated that realistic visual elements with text were the primary sources of content learning; however, positive results were limited to only a few participants. High cognitive load due to interactive tools; instructional design; and movement of visual images were found to be significant detracting characteristics of participant learning. Other characteristics and influences of VR were also found that directly effected learning. Research results will inform the forthcoming design of a new VR exhibit at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center and to the design and development of future VR exhibits at informal science centers. A prior brief mixed-methods evaluation of Smoke & Mirrors was conducted in 2003, contributing background to the study and its future implications and strategies.

  6. Ion-association complexes unite classical and non-classical theories for the biomimetic nucleation of calcium phosphate.

    PubMed

    Habraken, Wouter J E M; Tao, Jinhui; Brylka, Laura J; Friedrich, Heiner; Bertinetti, Luca; Schenk, Anna S; Verch, Andreas; Dmitrovic, Vladimir; Bomans, Paul H H; Frederik, Peter M; Laven, Jozua; van der Schoot, Paul; Aichmayer, Barbara; de With, Gijsbertus; DeYoreo, James J; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2013-01-01

    Despite its importance in many industrial, geological and biological processes, the mechanism of crystallization from supersaturated solutions remains a matter of debate. Recent discoveries show that in many solution systems nanometre-sized structural units are already present before nucleation. Still little is known about the structure and role of these so-called pre-nucleation clusters. Here we present a combination of in situ investigations, which show that for the crystallization of calcium phosphate these nanometre-sized units are in fact calcium triphosphate complexes. Under conditions in which apatite forms from an amorphous calcium phosphate precursor, these complexes aggregate and take up an extra calcium ion to form amorphous calcium phosphate, which is a fractal of Ca(2)(HPO(4))(3)(2-) clusters. The calcium triphosphate complex also forms the basis of the crystal structure of octacalcium phosphate and apatite. Finally, we demonstrate how the existence of these complexes lowers the energy barrier to nucleation and unites classical and non-classical nucleation theories. PMID:23422675

  7. The spatial summation characteristics of three categories of V1 neurons differing in non-classical receptive field modulation properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Song, Xue-Mei; Dai, Zheng-Qiang; Yin, Jiao-Jiao; Xu, Xing-Zhen; Li, Chao-Yi

    2014-03-01

    The spatial summation of excitation and inhibition determines the final output of neurons in the cat V1. To characterize the spatial extent of the excitatory classical receptive field (CRF) and inhibitory non-classical receptive field (nCRF) areas, we examined the spatial summation properties of 169 neurons in cat V1 at high (20-90%) and low (5-15%) stimulus contrasts. Three categories were classified based on the difference in the contrast dependency of the surround suppression. We discovered that the three categories significantly differed in CRF size, peak firing rate, and the proportion of simple/complex cell number. The classification of simple and complex cells was determined at both high and low contrasts. While the majority of V1 neurons had stable modulation ratios in their responses, 10 cells (6.2%) in our sample crossed the classification boundary under different stimulus contrasts. No significant difference was found in the size of the CRF between simple and complex cells. Further comparisons in each category determined that the CRFs for complex cells were significantly larger than those for simple cells in category type I neurons, with no significant differences between simple and complex cells in category type II and type III neurons. In addition, complex cells have higher peak firing rates than simple cells. PMID:24508921

  8. Successful pregnancy after the treatment of primary amenorrhea in a patient with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Purwana, Indri N; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency in a 30-year-old Japanese woman who achieved pregnancy after treatment of primary amenorrhea. Hirsutism and clitoromegaly were present. Ultrasound examination showed polycystic appearance of the ovary. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) test resulted in exaggerated LH response, showing a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) pattern. The diagnosis was based on the elevated intial levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (55 ng/mL) and dihydroepiandosterone (7780 ng/mL). The first withdrawal bleeding occurred within 6 weeks after treatment with hydrocortisone (20 mg/day) combined with conjugated estrogens (1.25 mg/day) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (10 mg/day), which were continued for five courses. The bleeding remained cyclic every 28 days with maintenance doses of hydrocortisone. Subsequently, ovulation was induced using clomiphene citrate (100 mg/day). Pregnancy was achieved at the second attempt of ovulation induction and was within 10 months after initial presentation. Continuing hydrocortisone, the patient delivered a healthy baby at term. PMID:22672538

  9. On-chip detection of non-classical light by scalable integration of single-photon detectors

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Faraz; Mower, Jacob; Harris, Nicholas C.; Bellei, Francesco; Dane, Andrew; Lee, Catherine; Hu, Xiaolong; Kharel, Prashanta; Marsili, Francesco; Assefa, Solomon; Berggren, Karl K.; Englund, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Photonic-integrated circuits have emerged as a scalable platform for complex quantum systems. A central goal is to integrate single-photon detectors to reduce optical losses, latency and wiring complexity associated with off-chip detectors. Superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs) are particularly attractive because of high detection efficiency, sub-50-ps jitter and nanosecond-scale reset time. However, while single detectors have been incorporated into individual waveguides, the system detection efficiency of multiple SNSPDs in one photonic circuit—required for scalable quantum photonic circuits—has been limited to <0.2%. Here we introduce a micrometer-scale flip-chip process that enables scalable integration of SNSPDs on a range of photonic circuits. Ten low-jitter detectors are integrated on one circuit with 100% device yield. With an average system detection efficiency beyond 10%, and estimated on-chip detection efficiency of 14–52% for four detectors operated simultaneously, we demonstrate, to the best of our knowledge, the first on-chip photon correlation measurements of non-classical light. PMID:25575346

  10. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  11. CD95 maintains stem cell-like and non-classical EMT programs in primary human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Drachsler, M; Kleber, S; Mateos, A; Volk, K; Mohr, N; Chen, S; Cirovic, B; Tüttenberg, J; Gieffers, C; Sykora, J; Wirtz, C R; Mueller, W; Synowitz, M; Martin-Villalba, A

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive types of cancer with limited therapeutic options and unfavorable prognosis. Stemness and non-classical epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (ncEMT) features underlie the switch from normal to neoplastic states as well as resistance of tumor clones to current therapies. Therefore, identification of ligand/receptor systems maintaining this privileged state is needed to devise efficient cancer therapies. In this study, we show that the expression of CD95 associates with stemness and EMT features in GBM tumors and cells and serves as a prognostic biomarker. CD95 expression increases in tumors and with tumor relapse as compared with non-tumor tissue. Recruitment of the activating PI3K subunit, p85, to CD95 death domain is required for maintenance of EMT-related transcripts. A combination of the current GBM therapy, temozolomide, with a CD95 inhibitor dramatically abrogates tumor sphere formation. This study molecularly dissects the role of CD95 in GBM cells and contributes the rational for CD95 inhibition as a GBM therapy. PMID:27124583

  12. Blending Effective Behavior Management and Literacy Strategies for Preschoolers Exhibiting Negative Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Sometimes students will exhibit various aggressive behaviors in the preschool classroom. Early childhood educators need to have behavior management strategies to manage the students' negative behaviors within the classroom setting. This article will provide a rationale for embedding literacy instruction within behavior management strategies to…

  13. Simple Exhibits, Effective Learning: Presenting the United Farm Workers' Experience on the World Wide Web.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golodner, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of an online exhibit about the history of the United Farm Workers union that was created on the World Wide Web by the Walter P. Reuther Library/Archives of Labor and Urban History. Discusses Web design, hypertext links, and ease of navigation. (Author/LRW)

  14. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  15. TiO2 microsphere-based metamaterials exhibiting effective magnetic response in the terahertz regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiaoui, R.; Němec, H.; Kadlec, C.; Kadlec, F.; Kužel, P.; Chung, U.-C.; Elissalde, C.; Maglione, M.; Mounaix, P.

    2012-12-01

    Thin layers of all-dielectric metamaterials based on TiO2 spherical particle resonators are investigated. A new method based on spray drying of dissolved nanoparticles is used in the fabrication process. Spectral footprints of electric and magnetic dipoles are reported numerically and through experimental tests. It is a promising step for the construction of novel three-dimensional isotropic metamaterials exhibiting desired electromagnetic properties for terahertz applications.

  16. Corrigendum to "Reflection and damping properties for semi-infinite string equations with non-classical boundary conditions" [J. Sound & Vibration Vib. 336 (2014) 179-190

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akkaya, Tugce; van Horssen, Wim T.

    2015-03-01

    The authors regret that the following mistakes in referencing for the article "Reflection and damping properties for semi-infinite string equations with non-classical boundary conditions" ran through to the production version of this paper and therefore wish to correct this mistake in this corrigendum.

  17. Expression of bovine non-classical major histocompatibility complex class 1 proteins in mouse P815 and human K562 cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) proteins can be expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins. To investigate whether bovine non-classical MHC-I proteins are expressed as cell surface or secreted proteins, and to assess the reactivity pattern of monoclonal antibodies with non-class...

  18. The covalent structure of the elastase inhibitor from Anemonia sulcata--a "non-classical" Kazal-type protein.

    PubMed

    Tschesche, H; Kolkenbrock, H; Bode, W

    1987-10-01

    The amino-acid sequence of the proteinase inhibitor specific for elastases from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata was determined from performic-acid oxidized inhibitor and from three cyanogen bromide fragments of reduced and carboxymethylated inhibitor. The molecule consists of a single polypeptide chain formed from 48 amino-acid residues and is stabilized by three intramolecular disulfide bridges. After cyanogen bromide cleavage of the native protein at methionines 10 and 28 followed by chymotryptic cleavage two fragments each containing a single disulfide bridge were isolated. These indicated the location of three intramolecular disulfide linkages between Cys4 and Cys34 (part of A-loop), Cys8 and Cys27 (B-loop) and Cys16 and Cys48 (C-loop). The sequential homology and the disulfide pattern identified the elastase inhibitor as a Kazal-type inhibitor in which, however, not only the CysI-CysII segment is rather short but interestingly the Cys4-Cys34 disulfide anchoring point (i.e. CysI-CysV) in the C-loop is shifted by one turn in the alpha-helical segment towards the C-terminus. Thus, the elastase inhibitor is a non-classical Kazal-type inhibitor with respect to the positioning of the half-cystines. The inhibitor molecule was modelled based on the known three-dimensional structure of the silver pheasant ovomucoid third domain. The shortened amino-terminal segment was arranged in such a manner to allow disulfide bridge formation between the first cysteine Cys4 and the replaced Cys34 under maintenance of a suitable binding loop conformation. The characteristic ovomucoid scaffold consisting of a central alpha-helix, an adjacent three-stranded beta-sheet and the proteinase-binding loop cross-connected through disulfide bridges CysI-CysV and CysIII-CysVI was conserved. PMID:2892502

  19. Factors influencing effectiveness of exhibit displays on family learning in a public aquarium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Kodi Rae

    An important goal in science education reform is to create a scientifically literate society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (1989b) has stated that for people to understand biology, they must first have personal experiences with it. There are severe limitations on the types of firsthand biology experiences available in the classroom. Informal learning institutions, however, are not limited by these constraints. Visitors enjoy a free-choice environment, where they can thoroughly explore things unavailable in most classrooms. Thus, museums are key resources that may help society achieve scientific literacy. This study asked what aspects of the Aquarium of the America's labeling system promote visitor learning. I looked at characteristics of both the text and the displays themselves. By using open-ended interviews rather than formal questionnaires, I allowed visitors to identify information pertinent to them. After observing families viewing the Aquarium's "Living in Water" exhibit, I interviewed them to learn what had made an impact on them. One to two months later, I conducted follow-up interviews with each family member. Although families did not come away with the strong cognitive gains we might desire, they did come away with some strong episodic memories. Visitors tended to describe their interactions with each other and the displays rather than the actual label content---except for cartoon labels. Nevertheless, when visitors found displays that raised questions, they were curious to find answers and more likely to mention them. Families also described more details of interactive displays, particularly those that used various senses and emotions. Such potentially powerful interactives must be carefully tested, or we may create tenacious misconceptions rather than greater understanding. Based on my observations, I developed an Exhibit Interactivity Rubric (EIR) which may be useful in developing meaningful exhibits. Some families created

  20. Judgement heuristics and bias in evidence interpretation: The effects of computer generated exhibits.

    PubMed

    Norris, Gareth

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of multi-media applications, trial presentation software and computer generated exhibits (CGE) has raised questions as to the potential impact of the use of presentation technology on juror decision making. A significant amount of the commentary on the manner in which CGE exerts legal influence is largely anecdotal; empirical examinations too are often devoid of established theoretical rationalisations. This paper will examine a range of established judgement heuristics (for example, the attribution error, representativeness, simulation), in order to establish their appropriate application for comprehending legal decisions. Analysis of both past cases and empirical studies will highlight the potential for heuristics and biases to be restricted or confounded by the use of CGE. The paper will conclude with some wider discussion on admissibility, access to justice, and emerging issues in the use of multi-media in court. PMID:26341308

  1. Simultaneity and Temporal Order Judgments Exhibit Distinct Reaction Times and Training Effects.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Nestor; Welch, Leslie; Achtman, Rebecca; Fenton, Rachel; FitzGerald, Brynn

    2016-01-01

    A considerable body of sensory research has addressed the rules governing simultaneity judgments (SJs) and temporal order judgments (TOJs). In principle, neural events that register stimulus-arrival-time differences at an early sensory stage could set the limit on SJs and TOJs alike. Alternatively, distinct limits on SJs and TOJs could arise from task-specific neural events occurring after the stimulus-driven stage. To distinguish between these possibilities, we developed a novel reaction-time (RT) measure and tested it in a perceptual-learning procedure. The stimuli comprised dual-stream Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) displays. Participants judged either the simultaneity or temporal order of red-letter and black-number targets presented in opposite lateral hemifield streams of black-letter distractors. Despite identical visual stimulation across-tasks, the SJ and TOJ tasks generated distinct RT patterns. SJs exhibited significantly faster RTs to synchronized targets than to subtly asynchronized targets; TOJs exhibited the opposite RT pattern. These task-specific RT patterns cannot be attributed to the early, stimulus-driven stage and instead match what one would predict if the limits on SJs and TOJs arose from task-specific decision spaces. That is, synchronized targets generate strong evidence for simultaneity, which hastens SJ RTs. By contrast, synchronized targets provide no information about temporal order, which slows TOJ RTs. Subtly asynchronizing the targets reverses this information pattern, and the corresponding RT patterns. In addition to investigating RT patterns, we also investigated training-transfer between the tasks. Training to improve SJ precision failed to improve TOJ precision, and vice versa, despite identical visual stimulation across tasks. This, too, argues against early, stimulus-driven limits on SJs and TOJs. Taken together, the present study offers novel evidence that distinct rules set the limits on SJs and TOJs. PMID:26756716

  2. Dietary Phenolic Acids Act as Effective Antioxidants in Membrane Models and in Cultured Cells, Exhibiting Proapoptotic Effects in Leukaemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zambonin, Laura; Caliceti, Cristiana; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Fiorentini, Diana; Hrelia, Silvana; Landi, Laura; Prata, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    Caffeic, syringic, and protocatechuic acids are phenolic acids derived directly from food intake or come from the gut metabolism of polyphenols. In this study, the antioxidant activity of these compounds was at first evaluated in membrane models, where caffeic acid behaved as a very effective chain-breaking antioxidant, whereas syringic and protocatechuic acids were only retardants of lipid peroxidation. However, all three compounds acted as good scavengers of reactive species in cultured cells subjected to exogenous oxidative stress produced by low level of H2O2. Many tumour cells are characterised by increased ROS levels compared with their noncancerous counterparts. Therefore, we investigated whether phenolic acids, at low concentrations, comparable to those present in human plasma, were able to decrease basal reactive species. Results show that phenolic acids reduced ROS in a leukaemia cell line (HEL), whereas no effect was observed in normal cells, such as HUVEC. The compounds exhibited no toxicity to normal cells while they decreased proliferation in leukaemia cells, inducing apoptosis. In the debate on optimal ROS-manipulating strategies in cancer therapy, our work in leukaemia cells supports the antioxidant ROS-depleting approach. PMID:22792417

  3. Cinnamon extract exhibits insulin-like and independent effects on gene expression in adipocytes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cinnamon is beneficial to people with insulin resistance due in part to the insulin-like activity of the cinnamon extract (CE). Molecular effects of CE are limited. This study tested the hypothesis that CE has insulin-like and insulin-independent effects at the molecular level. Quantitative real-tim...

  4. [Luliberin analogues exhibiting a cytotoxic effect on tumor cells in vitro].

    PubMed

    Burov, S V; Iablokova, T V; Dorosh, M Iu; Shkarubskaia, Z P; Blank, M; Epshteĭn, N; Fridkin, M

    2006-01-01

    Luliberin analogues modified at the N-terminus were synthesized to search for drugs exerting a cytotoxic effect on cells of hormone-dependent tumors. A synthetic scheme effective in the preparation of analogues containing fatty acid residues was proposed. The cytotoxic effect of the peptides was studied on a number of cell lines of human tumors in vitro. The dependence of the antitumor effect on the length of peptide chain, amino acid sequence, and structure of the N-terminal group was demonstrated. Modification with palmitic acid was found to result in highly active compounds in the case of analogues containing more than ten aa, whereas modifications with lauric, caproic, or trimethylacetic acid led to compounds with significantly lower activities. Analogues of luliberin containing a palmitic acid residue and effectively inhibiting the growth of tumor cells in vitro were synthesized. PMID:17042263

  5. Fluoxetine Exhibits Pharmacological Effects and Trait-Based Sensitivity in a Marine Worm.

    PubMed

    Hird, Cameron M; Urbina, Mauricio A; Lewis, Ceri N; Snape, Jason R; Galloway, Tamara S

    2016-08-01

    Global production of pharmacologically active compounds exceeds 100 000 tons annually, a proportion of which enters aquatic environments through patient use, improper medicine disposal, and production. These compounds are designed to have mode-of-action (MoA) effects on specific biological pathways, with potential to impact nontarget species. Here, we used MoA and trait-based approaches to quantify uptake and biological effects of fluoxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, in filter and deposit feeding marine worms (Hediste diversicolor). Worms exposed to 10 μg L(-1), accumulated fluoxetine with a body burden over 270 times greater than exposure concentrations, resulting in ∼10% increased coelomic fluid serotonin, a pharmacological effect. Observed effects included weight loss (up to 2% at 500 μg L(-1)), decreased feeding rate (68% at 500 μg L(-1)), and altered metabolism (oxygen consumption, ammonia excretion, and O/N from 10 μg L(-1)). Bioconcentration of fluoxetine was dependent on route of uptake, with filter feeding worms experiencing up to 130 times greater body burden ratios and increased magnitudes of effects than deposit feeders, a trait-based sensitivity likely as a consequence of fluoxetine partitioning to sediment. This study highlights how novel approaches such as MoA and trait-based methods can supplement environmental risk assessments of pharmaceuticals. PMID:27379928

  6. Classical and non-classical MHC I molecule manipulation by human cytomegalovirus: so many targets—but how many arrows in the quiver?

    PubMed Central

    Halenius, Anne; Gerke, Carolin; Hengel, Hartmut

    2015-01-01

    Major mechanisms for the recognition of pathogens by immune cells have evolved to employ classical and non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules. Classical MHC I molecules present antigenic peptide ligands on infected cells to CD8+ T cells, whereas a key function for non-classical MHC I molecules is to mediate inhibitory or activating stimuli in natural killer (NK) cells. The structural diversity of MHC I puts immense pressure on persisting viruses, including cytomegaloviruses. The very large coding capacity of the human cytomegalovirus allows it to express a whole arsenal of immunoevasive factors assigned to individual MHC class I targets. This review summarizes achievements from more than two decades of intense research on how human cytomegalovirus manipulates MHC I molecules and escapes elimination by the immune system. PMID:25418469

  7. Mitochondria-Targeted Analogues of Metformin Exhibit Enhanced Antiproliferative and Radiosensitizing Effects in Pancreatic Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Zielonka, Jacek; Ouari, Olivier; Lopez, Marcos; McAllister, Donna; Boyle, Kathleen; Barrios, Christy S; Weber, James J; Johnson, Bryon D; Hardy, Micael; Dwinell, Michael B; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2016-07-01

    Metformin (Met) is an approved antidiabetic drug currently being explored for repurposing in cancer treatment based on recent evidence of its apparent chemopreventive properties. Met is weakly cationic and targets the mitochondria to induce cytotoxic effects in tumor cells, albeit not very effectively. We hypothesized that increasing its mitochondria-targeting potential by attaching a positively charged lipophilic substituent would enhance the antitumor activity of Met. In pursuit of this question, we synthesized a set of mitochondria-targeted Met analogues (Mito-Mets) with varying alkyl chain lengths containing a triphenylphosphonium cation (TPP(+)). In particular, the analogue Mito-Met10, synthesized by attaching TPP(+) to Met via a 10-carbon aliphatic side chain, was nearly 1,000 times more efficacious than Met at inhibiting cell proliferation in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Notably, in PDAC cells, Mito-Met10 potently inhibited mitochondrial complex I, stimulating superoxide and AMPK activation, but had no effect in nontransformed control cells. Moreover, Mito-Met10 potently triggered G1 cell-cycle phase arrest in PDAC cells, enhanced their radiosensitivity, and more potently abrogated PDAC growth in preclinical mouse models, compared with Met. Collectively, our findings show how improving the mitochondrial targeting of Met enhances its anticancer activities, including aggressive cancers like PDAC in great need of more effective therapeutic options. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3904-15. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27216187

  8. Spirulina exhibits hepatoprotective effects against lead induced oxidative injury in newborn rats.

    PubMed

    Gargouri, M; Ben Saad, H; Ben Amara, I; Magné, C; El Feki, A

    2016-01-01

    Lead is a toxic metal that induces a wide range of biochemical and physiological effects. The present investigation was designed at evaluating the toxic effects of a prenatal exposure to lead of mothers on hepatic tissue of newborn rats, and potent protective effects of spirulina. Female rats were randomly divided into 4 groups which were given a normal diet (control),a diet enriched with spirulina (S), lead acetate administered through drinking water (Pb), or a diet enriched with spirulina and lead contaminated water (S Pb), respectively. The duration of treatments was from the 5th day of gestation to 14 days postpartum. Lead toxicity was assessed by measuring body and liver weights, blood and stomach lead levels, hepatic DNA, RNA and protein amounts, blood enzyme activities (AST and ALT), as well as lipid peroxidation level and activities of antioxidant enzymes in hepatic tissues of neonates. Lead intoxication of mothers caused reduction of liver weight as well as of hepatic DNA, mRNA and protein levels in newborns. Moreover, oxidative stress and changes in antioxidant enzyme activities were recorded. Conversely, supplementation of mothers with spirulina mitigated these effects induced by lead. These results substantiated the potential hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of spirulina. PMID:27609480

  9. Buformin exhibits anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects in endometrial cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kilgore, Joshua; Jackson, Amanda L; Clark, Leslie H; Guo, Hui; Zhang, Lu; Jones, Hannah M; Gilliam, Timothy P; Gehrig, Paola A; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Biguanides are anti-diabetic drugs that are thought to have anti-tumorigenic effects. Most pre-clinical studies have focused on metformin for cancer treatment and prevention; however, buformin may be potentially more potent than metformin. Given this, our goal was to evaluate the effects of buformin on cell growth, adhesion and invasion in endometrial cancer cell lines. Methods: The ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines were used. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle analysis was performed by FITC Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Adhesion was analyzed using the laminin adhesion assay. Invasion was assessed using the transwell invasion assay. The effects of buformin on the AMPK/mTOR pathway were determined by Western immunoblotting. Results: Buformin and metformin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines. IC50s were 1.4-1.6 mM for metformin and 8-150 μM for buformin. Buformin induced cell cycle G1 phase arrest in the ECC-1 cells and G2 phase arrest in the Ishikawa cells. For both ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells, treatment with buformin resulted in induction of apoptosis, reduction in adhesion and invasion, activation of AMPK and inhibition of phosphorylated-S6. Buformin potentiated the anti-proliferative effects of paclitaxel in both cell lines. Conclusion: Buformin has significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells through modulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway. IC50 values were lower for buformin than metformin, suggesting that buformin may be more potent for endometrial cancer treatment and worthy of further investigation. PMID:27398153

  10. Anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in ferrofluids containing nanoparticles exhibiting magnetic dipole interaction.

    PubMed

    Gerth-Noritzsch, M; Borin, D Yu; Odenbach, S

    2011-08-31

    The aim of this work has been the investigation of the anisotropy of the viscosity of a ferrofluid with magnetically interacting particles which are able to form structures in an applied magnetic field. The results of the experiments show a significant deviation from the case of a fluid without strong dipolar interactions. Furthermore, we have determined the dependence of the ratio of the viscosity coefficients on shear rate providing an insight into the microstructural reasons for the observed effects. PMID:21841240

  11. Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl Exhibit Temperature Dependent Effects on Human Respiratory Cilia

    PubMed Central

    Welchering, Nils; Ochoa, Sebastian; Tian, Xin; Francis, Richard; Zahid, Maliha; Muñoz, Ricardo; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine (dex) is commonly used in intensive care due to its effective sedation and analgesia with few adverse effects and minimal respiratory depression. However, we recently observed that exposing mouse epithelial respiratory cells to dex decreased ciliary beat frequency (CBF), suggesting dex may pose pulmonary risk. Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of dex at clinically relevant doses on CBF in human respiratory epithelia. Methods: Human nasal epithelial cilia were obtained from the inferior nasal turbinate with a rhinoprobe and placed in culture medium at 15°C and 37°C. At 5 and 30 min, video-microscopy was used to assess CBF, either without (control) or with different concentrations (1, 5, and 10 nM) of dex, fentanyl (fen), and dex + fen combination. Results: At 15°C, CBF was lower in the dex group compared to controls at 5 and 30 min. At 37°C, there was a significant increase in CBF with dex at 5 and 30 min, except for dex at 5 nM after 5 min, which showed a significant decrease. At 15°C the combination of dex + fen showed a positive interaction, causing less ciliary inhibition as expected. In contrast, no interaction between drugs was seen between dex and fen at 37°C. Conclusion: At low temperatures, dex reduces CBF in human respiratory epithelia, whereas dex increases CBF at physiologic temperature in vitro. Whether these effects translate into clinical consequences during hypothermia, as with cardiopulmonary bypass surgery will require further studies. PMID:25717467

  12. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) exhibit the decoy effect in a perceptual discrimination task.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Audrey E; Evans, Theodore A; Beran, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The asymmetric dominance effect (or decoy effect) is a form of context-dependent choice bias in which the probability of choosing one of two options is impacted by the introduction of a third option, also known as the decoy. Decoy effects are documented widely within the human consumer choice literature, and even extend to preference testing within nonhuman animals. Here, we extended this line of research to a perceptual discrimination task with rhesus monkeys to determine whether decoy stimuli would impact size judgments of rectangular stimuli. In a computerized task, monkeys attempted to choose the larger of two rectangles that varied in size and orientation (horizontally or vertically oriented). In probe trials, a third stimulus (the decoy) was presented that was smaller than the other two rectangles but matched the orientation of one of them. On half of the probe trials, the presented decoy matched the orientation of the larger stimulus, and on the other half, the decoy matched the orientation of the smaller stimulus. Monkeys rarely selected the decoy stimulus. However, their performance (selection of the largest rectangle) increased relative to the baseline trials (with only two choices) when the decoy was congruent in its orientation with the largest rectangle, but decreased relative to baseline when the decoy was incongruent with the largest rectangle. Thus, a decoy stimulus impacted monkeys' perceptual choice behavior even when it was not a viable choice option itself. These results are explained with regard to comparative evaluation mechanisms. PMID:25832189

  13. TPGS-Stabilized Curcumin Nanoparticles Exhibit Superior Effect on Carrageenan-Induced Inflammation in Wistar Rat.

    PubMed

    Rachmawati, Heni; Safitri, Dewi; Pradana, Aditya Trias; Adnyana, I Ketut

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a hydrophobic polyphenol compound derived from the rhizome of the Curcuma genus, has a wide spectrum of biological and pharmacological applications. Previously, curcumin nanoparticles with different stabilizers had been produced successfully in order to enhance solubility and per oral absorption. In the present study, we tested the anti-inflammatory effect of d-α-Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate (TPGS)-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles in vivo. Lambda-carrageenan (λ-carrageenan) was used to induce inflammation in rats; it was given by an intraplantar route and intrapelurally through surgery in the pleurisy test. In the λ-carrageenan-induced edema model, TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles were given orally one hour before induction and at 0.5, 4.5, and 8.5 h after induction with two different doses (1.8 and 0.9 mg/kg body weight (BW)). Sodium diclofenac with a dose of 4.5 mg/kg BW was used as a standard drug. A physical mixture of curcumin-TPGS was also used as a comparison with a higher dose of 60 mg/kg BW. The anti-inflammatory effect was assessed on the edema in the carrageenan-induced paw edema model and by the volume of exudate as well as the number of leukocytes reduced in the pleurisy test. TPGS-stabilized curcumin nanoparticles with lower doses showed better anti-inflammatory effects, indicating the greater absorption capability through the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27537907

  14. Diosmin exhibits anti-hyperlipidemic effects in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats.

    PubMed

    Queenthy, S Sharmila; John, Babu

    2013-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the protective effects of diosmin on experimentally induced myocardial infarcted rats. Diosmin (5 and 10mg/kg body weight) was administered orally as pretreatment daily for a period of 10 days. Then isoproterenol (100mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously into rats at an interval of 24h for 2 days (on 11th and 12th day). Isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats showed significant changes in electrocardiogram and an increase in the levels of cardiac markers, compared with normal rats. Additionally, increased plasma lipid peroxidation products and altered lipid metabolism in the plasma were observed in the isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats. Pretreatment with diosmin (5 and 10mg/kg body weight) minimized the electrocardiographic changes, decreased the levels of serum cardiac marker enzymes reduced plasma lipid peroxidation and minimized the alterations in the lipid metabolism of isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarcted rats. Also, diosmin inhibited the enhanced activity of liver HMG CoA reductase. The in vitro study revealed the free radical scavenging activity of diosmin. The free radical scavenging and anti-hyperlipidaemic effects are the reasons for the cardioprotective effects of diosmin. PMID:24036254

  15. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Shamsaei, Nabi; Khaksari, Mehdi; Erfani, Sohaila; Rajabi, Hamid; Aboutaleb, Nahid

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral ischemic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction through occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic exercise significantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration. PMID:26487851

  16. MicroRNAs-449a and -449b exhibit tumor suppressive effects in retinoblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Alissa; Jones, Aunica; Bryar, Paul J.; Mets, Marilyn; Weinstein, Joanna; Zhang, Gang; Laurie, Nikia A.

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •We validate miR-449a/b expression in primary human retinoblastomas and cell lines. •Exogenous miRs-449a/b inhibited proliferation in retinoblastoma cell lines. •Exogenous miRs-449a/b increased apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. •miRs-449a/b could serve as viable therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma treatment. -- Abstract: Retinoblastoma is the most common pediatric cancer of the eye. Currently, the chemotherapeutic treatments for retinoblastoma are broad-based drugs such as vincristine, carboplatin, or etoposide. However, therapies targeted directly to aberrant signaling pathways may provide more effective therapy for this disease. The purpose of our study is to illustrate the relationship between the expressions of miRs-449a and -449b to retinoblastoma proliferation and apoptosis. We are the first to confirm an inhibitory effect of miR-449a and -449b in retinoblastoma by demonstrating significantly impaired proliferation and increased apoptosis of tumor cells when these miRNAs are overexpressed. This study suggests that these miRNAs could serve as viable therapeutic targets for retinoblastoma treatment.

  17. High Dose Simvastatin Exhibits Enhanced Lipid Lowering Effects Relative to Simvastatin/Ezetimibe Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Settergren, Magnus; D'Alexandri, Fabio Luiz; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Fiehn, Oliver; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Newman, John W.; Orešič, Matej; Pernow, John; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Statins are the frontline in cholesterol reduction therapies; however use in combination with agents that possess complimentary mechanisms of action may achieve further reductions in LDL-C. Thirty-nine patients were treated with either 80mg simvastatin (n=20) or 10mg simvastatin plus 10mg ezetimibe (n=19) for 6 weeks. Dosing was designed to produce comparable LDL-C reductions, while enabling assessment of potential simvastatin-associated pleiotropic effects. Baseline and post-treatment plasma were analyzed for lipid mediators (e.g., eicosanoids, endocannabinoids) and structural lipids by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Following statistical analysis and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS) multivariate modeling, no changes were observed in lipid mediator levels, while global structural lipids were reduced in response to both mono- (R2Y=0.74, Q2=0.66, CV-ANOVA p=7.0×10-8) and combination therapy (R2Y=0.67, Q2=0.54, CV-ANOVA p=2.6×10−5). OPLS modeling identified a subset of 12 lipids that classified the two treatment groups after 6 weeks (R2Y=0.65, Q2=0.61, CV-ANOVA p=5.4×10−8). Decreases in the lipid species PC(15:0/18:2) and HexCer(d18:1/24:0) were the strongest discriminators of LDL-C reductions for both treatment groups (q<0.00005), while PE(36:3e) contributed most to distinguishing treatment groups (q=0.017). Shifts in lipid composition were similar for high-dose simvastatin and simvastatin/ezetimibe combination therapy, but the magnitude of the reduction was linked to simvastatin dosage. Simvastatin therapy did not affect circulating levels of lipid mediators, suggesting that pleiotropic effects are not associated with eicosanoid production. Only high-dose simvastatin reduced the relative proportion of sphingomyelin and ceramide to phosphatidylcholine (q=0.008), suggesting a pleiotropic effect previously associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. PMID:25516625

  18. Controlled self-assembly of multiferroic core-shell nanoparticles exhibiting strong magneto-electric effects

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenivasulu, Gollapudi; Hamilton, Sean L.; Lehto, Piper R.; Srinivasan, Gopalan; Popov, Maksym; Chavez, Ferman A.

    2014-02-03

    Ferromagnetic-ferroelectric composites show strain mediated coupling between the magnetic and electric sub-systems due to magnetostriction and piezoelectric effects associated with the ferroic phases. We have synthesized core-shell multiferroic nano-composites by functionalizing 10–100 nm barium titanate and nickel ferrite nanoparticles with complementary coupling groups and allowing them to self-assemble in the presence of a catalyst. The core-shell structure was confirmed by electron microscopy and magnetic force microscopy. Evidence for strong strain mediated magneto-electric coupling was obtained by static magnetic field induced variations in the permittivity over 16–18 GHz and polarization and by electric field induced by low-frequency ac magnetic fields.

  19. Plasmonic copper sulfide nanocrystals exhibiting near-infrared photothermal and photodynamic therapeutic effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shunhao; Riedinger, Andreas; Li, Hongbo; Fu, Changhui; Liu, Huiyu; Li, Linlin; Liu, Tianlong; Tan, Longfei; Barthel, Markus J; Pugliese, Giammarino; De Donato, Francesco; Scotto D'Abbusco, Marco; Meng, Xianwei; Manna, Liberato; Meng, Huan; Pellegrino, Teresa

    2015-02-24

    Recently, plasmonic copper sulfide (Cu2-xS) nanocrystals (NCs) have attracted much attention as materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). Previous reports have correlated photoinduced cell death to the photothermal heat mechanism of these NCs, and no evidence of their photodynamic properties has been reported yet. Herein we have prepared physiologically stable near-infrared (NIR) plasmonic copper sulfide NCs and analyzed their photothermal and photodynamic properties, including therapeutic potential in cultured melanoma cells and a murine melanoma model. Interestingly, we observe that, besides a high PTT efficacy, these copper sulfide NCs additionally possess intrinsic NIR induced photodynamic activity, whereupon they generate high levels of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo acute toxic responses of copper sulfide NCs were also elicited. This study highlights a mechanism of NIR light induced cancer therapy, which could pave the way toward more effective nanotherapeutics. PMID:25603353

  20. Tangzhining exhibits a protective effect against cognitive dysfunction in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaomei; Wang, Wei; Kang, Yaguo; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Yi; Yue, Zhenggang; Tang, Zhishu

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that diabetes significantly impairs the cognitive function. Tangzhining (TZN), as a kind of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), has been widely used to treat diabetes in China. However, the effect of TZN on treatment of diabetes-induced learning and memory deficits has not been well documented. The present study was to investigate the effect of TZN on diabetes-induced learning and memory deficits and delineate the underlying molecular mechanism. Diabetic rats were randomly grouped and treated with various doses of TZN (0.47, 0.94 and 1.4 g/kg) by intraperitoneal injection. Using the Morris water maze, TZN treatment (0.94 g/kg and 1.4 g/kg) reduced markedly the escape latency and path length of diabetic rats. The morphological changes of pyramidal cells in hippocampus of diabetic rats were apparently reversed and improved by TZN treatment, in comparison with that in diabetic rats without TZN treatment. Moreover, the results of Western blot analysis showed that TZN treatment significantly increased the protein expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) in hippocampus of diabetic rats. Furthermore, TZN treatment increased the protein expression of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor subunits including NR1 and NR2B. Taken together, our data suggest that TZN sustains the balance between glutamate (Glu) and GABA by regulating GAD and EAAC1, and maintains the NMDA receptors activity for learning and memory function through regulating the subunits NR1 and NR2B. PMID:26309554

  1. Silver polyvinyl pyrrolidone nanoparticles exhibit a capsular polysaccharide influenced bactericidal effect against Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bibbs, Ronda K.; Harris, Rhonda D.; Peoples, Veolanda A.; Barnett, Cleon; Singh, Shree R.; Dennis, Vida A.; Coats, Mamie T.

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The highly adaptive nature of S. pneumoniae exemplifies the need for next generation antimicrobials designed to avoid high level resistance. Metal based nanomaterials fit this criterion. Our study examined the antimicrobial activity of gold nanospheres, silver coated polyvinyl pyrrolidone (AgPVP), and titanium dioxide (TiO2) against various serotypes of S. pneumoniae. Twenty nanometer spherical AgPVP demonstrated the highest level of killing among the tested materials. AgPVP (0.6 mg/mL) was able to kill pneumococcal serotypes 2, 3, 4, and 19F within 4 h of exposure. Detailed analysis of cultures during exposure to AgPVP showed that both the metal ions and the solid nanoparticles participate in the killing of the pneumococcus. The bactericidal effect of AgPVP was lessened in the absence of the pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. Capsule negative strains, JD908 and RX1, were only susceptible to AgPVP at concentrations at least 33% higher than their respective capsule expressing counterparts. These findings suggest that mechanisms of killing used by nanomaterials are not serotype dependent and that the capsular polysaccharide participates in the inhibition. In the near future these mechanisms will be examined as targets for novel antimicrobials. PMID:25520713

  2. Metabolomic analysis revealed glycylglycine accumulation in astrocytes after methionine enkephalin administration exhibiting neuron protective effects.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chungang; Du, Huijie; Xu, Li; Wang, Jiao; Tang, Ling; Cao, Yunfeng; Li, Chen; Wang, Qingjun; Liu, Yang; Shan, Fengping; Feng, Juan; Xu, Fang; Gao, Peng

    2015-11-10

    Owing to its unrevealed etiology, multiple sclerosis lacks specific therapies up to now. Experiential administration of methionine enkephalin (MENK) on mouse model improved disease manifestations to some extent. In order to gain more insight on the significance of MENK application, a capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) technique was employed to profile intracellular metabolite fluctuation in 5 astrocytoma cell lines challenged by MENK. The processed data were first evaluated through a bioinformatic process to ensure their compatibility with the study aims and then subjected to multivariate analysis. The results indicated that MENK administration increased intracellular tyrosine, phenylalanine, methionine and glycylglycine. Exemplified by U87 cells, glycylglycine inhibited cell proliferation as well as MENK but it also decreased cell nitric oxide excretion which could not be evoked by MENK. The neuron protective effects were also mirrored by the increased expression of some genes related to remyelination. This study demonstrated CE-MS to be a promising tool for cell metabolomic analysis and benefited the therapeutic exploring of multiple sclerosis with respect to metabolism intervention. PMID:26163404

  3. Optical Kerr effect exhibited by carbon nanotubes and carbon/metal nanohybrid materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; Mercado-Zúñiga, C.; Martínez-González, C. L.; Martínez-Gutiérrez, H.; Rebollo, N. R.; Trejo-Valdez, M.; Vargas-García, J. R.; Torres-Martínez, R.

    2015-09-01

    Structural modification of carbon nanotubes in combination with metallic nanoparticles is reported. An enhancement in the nonlinear optical refraction of multi-wall carbon nanotubes by the incorporation of platinum nanoparticles was observed. Comparative results were analyzed taking into account the participation of single-wall carbon nanotubes that originate a decrease in the nonlinear optical response of the multi-wall carbon nanotubes integrating a thin film. A Nd:YAG laser system featuring 532 nm wavelength with 4 ns pulse duration in a two-wave mixing experiment was employed for exploring the studied optical nonlinearities of the samples. The contribution of optical processes to mechanical characteristics dependent on high optical irradiance in carbon nanotubes was described. A variation in the mass density associated to the optically irradiated tubes allowed us to calculate the change in Young's modulus in a thin film configuration. The estimation of an opto-mechanical phenomenon was based on the evaluation of the nonlinearity of index responsible for the optical Kerr effect. According to Raman and optical evaluations, the inclusion of metallic nanoparticles in carbon structures results in a modification of surface that also gives origin to noticeable optical Kerr nonlinearities. Potential applications for developing laser-induced controlled opto-mechanical nanohybrid systems can be contemplated.

  4. The effects of the interaction between cognitive style and instructional strategy on the educational outcomes for a science exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knappenberger, Naomi

    This dissertation examines factors which may affect the educational effectiveness of science exhibits. Exhibit effectiveness is the result of a complex interaction among exhibit features, cognitive characteristics of the museum visitor, and educational outcomes. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative proportions of field-dependent and field-independent visitors in the museum audience, and to ascertain if the cognitive style of visitors interacted with instructional strategies to affect the educational outcomes for a computer-based science exhibit. Cognitive style refers to the self-consistent modes of selecting and processing information that an individual employs throughout his or her perceptual and intellectual activities. It has a broad influence on many aspects of personality and behavior, including perception, memory, problem solving, interest, and even social behaviors and self-concept. As such, it constitutes essential dimensions of individual differences among museum visitors and has important implications for instructional design in the museum. The study was conducted in the spring of 1998 at the Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum in Chicago. Two experimental treatments of a computer-based exhibit were tested in the study. The first experimental treatment utilized strategies designed for field-dependent visitors that limited the text and provided more structure and cueing than the baseline treatment of the computer program. The other experimental treatment utilized strategies designed for field-independent visitors that provided hypothesis-testing and more contextual information. Approximately two-thirds of the visitors were field-independent. The results of a multiple regression analysis indicated that there was a significant interaction between cognitive style and instructional strategy that affected visitors' posttest scores on a multiple-choice test of the content. Field-independent visitors out- performed the field

  5. ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects via impaired endothelial cell function and blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Su, Min; Huang, Jingjia; Li, Jijia; Qin, Xiyuan; Tang, Xiaoning; Jin, Fang; Chen, Shali; Jiang, Chuanming; Zou, Zizheng; Peng, Kunjian; Nuruzzaman, Mohammed; Zhang, Jianting; Luo, Junli; Liu, Suyou; Luo, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of angiogenesis is a promising therapeutic strategy against cancer. In this study, we reported that ZLM-7, a combretastain A-4 (CA-4) derivative, exhibited anti-angiogenic activity in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, ZLM-7 induced microtubule cytoskeletal disassembly. It decreased VEGF-induced proliferation, migration, invasion and tube formation in endothelial cells, which are critical steps in angiogenesis. In vivo, ZLM-7 significantly inhibited neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model and reduced the microvessel density in tumor tissues of MCF-7 xenograft mouse model. ZLM-7 also displayed comparable antiangiogenic and anti-tumor activities associated with the lead compound CA-4, but exhibited lower toxicity compared with CA-4. The anti-angiogenic effect of ZLM-7 was exerted via blockade of VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling. ZLM-7 treatment suppressed the expression and secretion of VEGF in endothelial cells and MCF-7 cells under hypoxia. Further, ZLM-7 suppressed the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and its downstream signaling mediators including activated AKT, MEK and ERK in endothelial cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that ZLM-7 exhibits anti-angiogenic activities by impairing endothelial cell function and blocking VEGF/VEGFR-2 signaling, suggesting that ZLM-7 might be a potential angiogenesis inhibitor. PMID:26967559

  6. Method of growing composites of the type exhibiting the Soret effect. [improved structure of eutectic alloy crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B. N. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A predetermine amount of segregation is introduced into a molten sample of a composite that exhibits the Soret effect, such amount approximating the amount of segregation resulting from directional solidification of the sample. The molten sample is then directionally solidified starting at the end opposite the end richer in the constituent that would migrate toward the cooler part of a liquid solution of the composite maintained in a temperature gradient. Since solidification commences at the end deficient in such constituent, its migration toward the interface between the solid and liquid during the solidification will compensate for the deficiency, yielding a more homogeneous product.

  7. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  8. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump in Pancreatic Cancer Cells Exhibiting the Warburg Effect Relies on Glycolytic ATP*

    PubMed Central

    James, Andrew D.; Patel, Waseema; Butt, Zohra; Adiamah, Magretta; Dakhel, Raga; Latif, Ayse; Uggenti, Carolina; Swanton, Eileithyia; Imamura, Hiromi; Siriwardena, Ajith K.; Bruce, Jason I. E.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA), which is critical for maintaining a low intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), utilizes glycolytically derived ATP in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and that inhibition of glycolysis in PDAC cell lines results in ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and an irreversible [Ca2+]i overload. We explored whether this is a specific weakness of highly glycolytic PDAC by shifting PDAC cell (MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1) metabolism from a highly glycolytic phenotype toward mitochondrial metabolism and assessing the effects of mitochondrial versus glycolytic inhibitors on ATP depletion, PMCA inhibition, and [Ca2+]i overload. The highly glycolytic phenotype of these cells was first reversed by depriving MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 cells of glucose and supplementing with α-ketoisocaproate or galactose. These culture conditions resulted in a significant decrease in both glycolytic flux and proliferation rate, and conferred resistance to ATP depletion by glycolytic inhibition while sensitizing cells to mitochondrial inhibition. Moreover, in direct contrast to cells exhibiting a high glycolytic rate, glycolytic inhibition had no effect on PMCA activity and resting [Ca2+]i in α-ketoisocaproate- and galactose-cultured cells, suggesting that the glycolytic dependence of the PMCA is a specific vulnerability of PDAC cells exhibiting the Warburg phenotype. PMID:26294767

  9. Saraca indica Bark Extract Shows In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibreast Cancer Activity and Does Not Exhibit Toxicological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Navneet Kumar; Saini, Karan Singh; Hossain, Zakir; Omer, Ankur; Sharma, Chetan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Singh, Poonam; Arya, K. R.; Singh, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Medicinal plants are used as a complementary and alternative medicine in treatment of various diseases including cancer worldwide, because of their ease of accessibility and cost effectiveness. Multicomposed mixture of compounds present in a plant extract has synergistic activity, increases the therapeutic potential many folds, compensates toxicity, and increases bioavailability. Saraca indica (family Caesalpiniaceae) is one of the most ancient sacred plants with medicinal properties, exhibiting a number of pharmacological effects. Antioxidant, antibreast cancer activity and toxicological evaluation of Saraca indica bark extract (SIE) were carried out in the present study. The results of the study indicated that this herbal preparation has antioxidant and antibreast cancer activity. Toxicological studies suggest that SIE is safer to use and may have a potential to be used as complementary and alternative medicine for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25861411

  10. Aminoflavone-loaded EGFR-targeted unimolecular micelle nanoparticles exhibit anti-cancer effects in triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Ashley M; Chen, Guojun; Wang, Yidan; Hedman, Curtis J; Sherer, Nathan M; Havighurst, Thomas C; Gong, Shaoqin; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    Triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive subtype of breast cancer for which there is no available targeted therapy. TNBC cases contribute disproportionately to breast cancer-related mortality, thus the need for novel and effective therapeutic methods is urgent. We have previously shown that a National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigational drug aminoflavone (AF) exhibits strong growth inhibitory effects in TNBC cells. However, in vivo pulmonary toxicity resulted in withdrawal or termination of several human clinical trials for AF. Herein we report the in vivo efficacy of a nanoformulation of AF that enhances the therapeutic index of AF in TNBC. We engineered a unique unimolecular micelle nanoparticle (NP) loaded with AF and conjugated with GE11, a 12 amino acid peptide targeting epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), since EGFR amplification is frequently observed in TNBC tumors. These unimolecular micelles possessed excellent stability and preferentially released drug payload at endosomal pH levels rather than blood pH levels. Use of the GE11 targeting peptide resulted in enhanced cellular uptake and strong growth inhibitory effects in TNBC cells. Further, AF-loaded, GE11-conjugated (targeted) unimolecular micelle NPs significantly inhibit orthotopic TNBC tumor growth in a xenograft model, compared to treatment with AF-loaded, GE11-lacking (non-targeted) unimolecular micelle NPs or free AF. Interestingly, the animals treated with AF-loaded, targeted NPs had the highest plasma and tumor level of AF among different treatment groups yet exhibited no increase in plasma aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity level or observable tissue damage at the time of sacrifice. Together, these results highlight AF-loaded, EGFR-targeted unimolecular micelle NPs as an effective therapeutic option for EGFR-overexpressing TNBC. PMID:27267625

  11. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  12. Antibodies induced by vaccination with purified chick embryo cell culture vaccine (PCECV) cross-neutralize non-classical bat lyssavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Malerczyk, Claudius; Selhorst, Thomas; Tordo, Noël; Moore, Susan; Müller, Thomas

    2009-08-27

    Tissue-culture vaccines like purified chick embryo cell vaccine (PCECV) have been shown to provide protection against classical rabies virus (RABV) via pre-exposure or post-exposure prophylaxis. A cross-neutralization study was conducted using a panel of 100 human sera, to determine, to what extent after vaccination with PCECV protection exists against non-classical bat lyssavirus strains like European bat lyssavirus (EBLV) type 1 and 2 and Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV). Virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) concentrations against the rabies virus variants CVS-11, ABLV, EBLV-1 and EBLV-2 were determined by using a modified rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. For ABLV and EBLV-2, the comparison to CVS-11 revealed almost identical results (100% adequate VNA concentrations >or=0.5 IU/mL; correlation coefficient r(2)=0.69 and 0.77, respectively), while for EBLV-1 more scattering was observed (97% adequate VNA concentrations; r(2)=0.50). In conclusion, vaccination with PCECV produces adequate VNA concentrations against classical RABV as well as non-classical lyssavirus strains ABLV, EBLV-1, and EBLV-2. PMID:19615958

  13. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in the treatment of non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Thomas, Nithin; Sacerdote, Alan; Bahtiyar, Gül

    2013-01-01

    Non-classic adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) has been associated with insulin resistance (IR). Therapies such as metformin, thiazolidinediones and lifestyle alterations improve IR and also ameliorate the biochemical and clinical abnormalities of NCAH, much as they do in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). More recently, bariatric surgery, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), has also been associated with improvement in IR and amelioration of PCOS and may, therefore, be beneficial in NCAH. We report a case of a 39-year-old, deaf-mute, obese woman with NCAH due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency who underwent RYGBP followed by improvement of NCAH manifestations. She was initially treated with metformin and pioglitazone, which lowered serum 11-deoxycortisol from 198 ng/dl (<51) to 26 ng/dl. Five weeks after undergoing RYGBP her body mass index fell from 44.18 kg/m2 to 39.54 kg/m2 and, despite not taking metformin or pioglitazone, serum 11-deoxycortisol remained normal at <40 ng/dl. Concurrently and subsequently, her NCAH symptoms, for example, alopecia, hirsutism and irregular menses normalised as well. We conclude that RYGBP, like other interventions that reduce IR, may be another way of treating non-classic 11-hydroxylase deficiency in selected patients. PMID:23513016

  14. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  15. Subtle Changes in Peptide Conformation Profoundly Affect Recognition of the Non-Classical MHC Class I Molecule HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 Natural Killer Cell Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hoare, Hilary L; Sullivan, Lucy C; Clements, Craig S; Ely, Lauren K; Beddoe, Travis; Henderson, Kate N; Lin, Jie; Reid, Hugh H; Brooks, Andrew G; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2008-03-31

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-E is a non-classical major histocompatibility complex class I molecule that binds peptides derived from the leader sequences of other HLA class I molecules. Natural killer cell recognition of these HLA-E molecules, via the CD94-NKG2 natural killer family, represents a central innate mechanism for monitoring major histocompatibility complex expression levels within a cell. The leader sequence-derived peptides bound to HLA-E exhibit very limited polymorphism, yet subtle differences affect the recognition of HLA-E by the CD94-NKG2 receptors. To better understand the basis for this peptide-specific recognition, we determined the structure of HLA-E in complex with two leader peptides, namely, HLA-Cw*07 (VMAPRALLL), which is poorly recognised by CD94-NKG2 receptors, and HLA-G*01 (VMAPRTLFL), a high-affinity ligand of CD94-NKG2 receptors. A comparison of these structures, both of which were determined to 2.5-Å resolution, revealed that allotypic variations in the bound leader sequences do not result in conformational changes in the HLA-E heavy chain, although subtle changes in the conformation of the peptide within the binding groove of HLA-E were evident. Accordingly, our data indicate that the CD94-NKG2 receptors interact with HLA-E in a manner that maximises the ability of the receptors to discriminate between subtle changes in both the sequence and conformation of peptides bound to HLA-E.

  16. Mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma of the kidney with prominent papillary component, a non-classic morphologic variant. A histologic, immunohistochemical, electron microscopic and fluorescence in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Alexiev, Borislav A; Burke, Allen P; Drachenberg, Cinthia B; Richards, Stephanie M; Zou, Ying S

    2014-07-01

    Mucinous tubular and spindle cell carcinoma (MTSCC) is a rare type of kidney tumor with relatively indolent behavior. Non-classic morphological variants have not been well studied and rarely been reported. We report a challenging case MTSCC with a peculiar morphology in a 42-year-old man, arising in a background of end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Predominant areas with extensive papillary architecture, psammoma bodies and stromal macrophageal aggregates, reminiscent of a papillary renal cell carcinoma (papillary RCC), were intermixed with foci that transitioned into a MTSCC-like morphology exhibiting elongated tubules and a low grade spindle cell component in a background of mucinous stroma. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated diffuse positivity for P504s/AMACR and vimentin in tumor cells. Focal positivity for RCC, CD10 and CK7 was also noted. Kidney-specific cadherin, cytokeratin 34betaE12 and TFE3 stains were negative in the tumor. The major differential diagnostic considerations were papillary RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, and Xp11.2 translocation carcinoma. Negative FISH studies for trisomy 7 and 17 in both papillary and spindled components supported the diagnosis of MTSCC. The ultrastructural profile was not entirely indicative of the cellular origin of the tumor. Cytogenetic analysis should be performed in atypical cases of MTSCC for precise diagnosis. PMID:24702883

  17. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Solarte, Víctor A.; Rosas, Jaiver E.; Rivera, Zuly J.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.; García, Javier E.; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20–25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC. PMID:26609531

  18. Large-area 2D periodic crystalline silicon nanodome arrays on nanoimprinted glass exhibiting photonic band structure effects.

    PubMed

    Becker, C; Lockau, D; Sontheimer, T; Schubert-Bischoff, P; Rudigier-Voigt, E; Bockmeyer, M; Schmidt, F; Rech, B

    2012-04-01

    Two-dimensional silicon nanodome arrays are prepared on large areas up to 50 cm² exhibiting photonic band structure effects in the near-infrared and visible wavelength region by downscaling a recently developed fabrication method based on nanoimprint-patterned glass, high-rate electron-beam evaporation of silicon, self-organized solid phase crystallization and wet-chemical etching. The silicon nanodomes, arranged in square lattice geometry with 300 nm lattice constant, are optically characterized by angular resolved reflection measurements, allowing the partial determination of the photonic band structure. This experimentally determined band structure agrees well with the outcome of three-dimensional optical finite-element simulations. A 16% photonic bandgap is predicted for an optimized geometry of the silicon nanodome arrays. By variation of the duration of the selective etching step, the geometry as well as the optical properties of the periodic silicon nanodome arrays can be controlled systematically. PMID:22422473

  19. A new synthetic route to a family of non-classical addition-type thermoplastics. I - Concept and demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.

    1988-01-01

    A synthesis scheme was developed for a host of nonclassical addition-type thermoplastics (ATT) that can be cured by an addition reaction, leading to a linear polymer structure. The synthesis involves the reaction of an acetylene-terminated prepolymer with either a bismaleimide (BMI) or a biscitraconimide. A new polymer, designated LaRC-RP80, synthesized using this scheme, was found to exhibit several significantly improved properties over the commercial BMI, Kerimid 601, including an eight-fold increase in toughness while maintaining a high Tg, a higher (by 167 C) heat stability, and a 50-percent increase in moisture resistance. In addition, LaRC-RP80 has good hot/wet lap shear strength and processes easily at 288 C without voids in the finished product.

  20. Combined use of vitamin D3and metformin exhibits synergistic chemopreventive effects on colorectal neoplasia in rats and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wan; Wang, Qi-Long; Liu, Xia; Dong, Shu-Hong; Li, Hong-Xia; Li, Chun-Yang; Guo, Li-Shu; Gao, Jing-Miao; Berger, Nathan A.; Li, Li; Ma, Lan; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D3 and metformin are widely used in humans for regulating mineral metabolism and as an anti-diabetic drug respectively; and both of them have been shown to have chemopreventive effects against various tumors. This study was designed to investigate the potential synergistic chemopreventive effects of vitamin D3 and metformin against the development of early colon neoplasia in two models. The first model was a 1, 2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) induced colon cancer rat model and the second, a DMH-dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) induced colitis-associated colon neoplasia mouse model. Compared to either vitamin D3 or metformin alone, combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin showed more pronounced effect in reducing the numbers of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) and tumor in the colon. The most prominent inhibitory effects were observed in the vitamin D3 medium dose (100 IU/kg/day) and metformin medium dose (120 mg/kg/day) combination group. Furthermore, our results showed that enhancement of metformin’s chemopreventive effects by vitamin D3 was associated with down-regulation of S6P expression, via the AMPK (IGF-1)/mTOR pathway. In addition, and enhancement of vitamin D3’s chemopreventive effects by metformin was associated with inhibition of the protein expressions of c-Myc and Cyclin D1, via the vitamin D receptor/β-catenin pathway. These findings show that combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin exhibits synergistic effects against the development of early colon neoplasia. They suggest that the combined use of vitamin D3 and metformin may represent a novel strategy for chemoprevention of colorectal cancer. PMID:25416412

  1. H4 receptor antagonism exhibits anti-nociceptive effects in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models in rats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Gin C; Chandran, Prasant; Salyers, Anita K; Pai, Madhavi; Zhu, Chang Z; Wensink, Erica J; Witte, David G; Miller, Thomas R; Mikusa, Joe P; Baker, Scott J; Wetter, Jill M; Marsh, Kennan C; Hancock, Arthur A; Cowart, Marlon D; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Brioni, Jorge D; Honore, Prisca

    2010-03-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is expressed primarily on cells involved in inflammation and immune responses. To determine the potential role of H(4)R in pain transmission, the effects of JNJ7777120, a potent and selective H(4) antagonist, were characterized in preclinical pain models. Administration of JNJ7777120 fully blocked neutrophil influx observed in a mouse zymosan-induced peritonitis model (ED(50)=17 mg/kg s.c., 95% CI=8.5-26) in a mast cell-dependent manner. JNJ7777120 potently reversed thermal hyperalgesia observed following intraplantar carrageenan injection of acute inflammatory pain (ED(50)=22 mg/kg i.p., 95% CI=10-35) in rats and significantly decreased the myeloperoxide activity in the carrageenan-injected paw. In contrast, no effects were produced by either H(1)R antagonist diphenhydramine, H(2)R antagonists ranitidine, or H(3)R antagonist ABT-239. JNJ7777120 also exhibited robust anti-nociceptive activity in persistent inflammatory (CFA) pain with an ED(50) of 29 mg/kg i.p. (95% CI=19-40) and effectively reversed monoiodoacetate (MIA)-induced osteoarthritic joint pain. This compound also produced dose-dependent anti-allodynic effects in the spinal nerve ligation (ED(50)=60 mg/kg) and sciatic nerve constriction injury (ED(50)=88 mg/kg) models of chronic neuropathic pain, as well as in a skin-incision model of acute post-operative pain (ED(50)=68 mg/kg). In addition, the analgesic effects of JNJ7777120 were maintained following repeated administration and were evident at the doses that did not cause neurologic deficits in rotarod test. Our results demonstrate that selective blockade of H(4) receptors in vivo produces significant anti-nociception in animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:20004681

  2. Cell-specific expression of artificial microRNAs targeting essential genes exhibit potent antitumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Chenyu; Liu, Hao; Chen, Ping; Ye, Jingjia; Teng, Lisong; Jia, Zhenyu; Cao, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    To achieve specific and potent antitumor effect of hepatocyte carcinoma cells, replication defective adenoviral vectors, namely rAd/AFP-amiRG, rAd/AFP-amiRE and rAd/AFP-amiRP, were constructed which were armed with artificial microRNAs (amiRs) targeting essential functional genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E and DNA polymerase α respectively under the control of a recombinant promoter comprised of human α-fetoprotein enhancer and basal promoter. The AFP enhancer/promoter showed specific high transcription activity in AFP-positive HCC cells Hep3B, HepG2 and SMMC7721, while low in AFP-negative cell Bcap37. All artificial microRNAs exhibited efficient knockdown of target genes. Decreased ATP production and protein synthesis was observed in rAd/AFP-amiRG and rAd/AFP-amiRE treated HCC cells. All three recombinant adenoviruses showed efficient blockage of cell cycle progression and significant suppression of HCC cells in vitro. In nude mice model bearing Hep3B xenograft, administration of rAd/AFP-amiRG showed potent antitumor effect. The strategy of tumor-specific knockdown of genes essential for cell survival and proliferation may suggest a novel promising approach for HCC gene therapy. PMID:25691059

  3. Rat hippocampal glutamate and GABA release exhibit biphasic effects as a function of chronic lead exposure level.

    PubMed

    Lasley, S M; Gilbert, M E

    2002-03-01

    Previous work has suggested that the lead (Pb) exposure-induced decrease in K(+)-evoked hippocampal glutamate (GLU) release is an important factor in the elevated threshold and diminished magnitude reported for hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in exposed animals. In addition, complex dose-effect relationships between Pb exposure level and LTP have been reported. This investigation was conducted to determine the effects of Pb on hippocampal GLU and GABA release as a function of exposure level. Rats were continuously exposed to 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, or 1.0% Pb in the drinking water beginning at gestational day 15-16. Hippocampal transmitter release was induced in adult males by perfusion of 150 mM K(+) in the presence of Ca(+2) (total release) through a microdialysis probe in one test session, followed by perfusion through a contralateral probe in the absence of Ca(+2) (Ca(+2)-independent release) in the second session. Chronic exposure produced decreases in total K(+)-stimulated hippocampal GLU and GABA release at exposure levels of 0.1-0.5% Pb. Maximal effects were seen in the 0.2% group (blood Pb = 40 microg/100 ml), and changes in total release could be directly traced to alterations in the Ca(+2)-dependent component. However, these effects were less evident in the 0.5% group and were no longer present in the 1.0% Pb group, thus defining U-shaped dose-effect relationships. Moreover, in the absence of Ca(+2) in the dialysis perfusate, K(+)-induced release was elevated in the 2 highest exposure groups, suggesting a Pb(+2)-induced enhancement in evoked release. This pattern of results indicates the presence of 2 actions of Pb on in vivo transmitter release: a more potent suppression of stimulated release seen at lower exposure levels (27-62 microg/100 ml) combined with Ca+2-mimetic actions to independently induce exocytosis that is exhibited at higher exposure levels (> or =62 microg/100 ml). Furthermore, significant similarities in the dose-effect relationships

  4. Synthesis of New 2-Halo-2-(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirines via a Non-Classical Wittig Reaction.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana L; Sousa, Carmo; Henriques, Marta S C; Paixão, José A; Pinho e Melo, Teresa M V D

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis and reactivity of tetrazol-5-yl-phosphorus ylides towards N-halosuccinimide/TMSN₃ reagent systems was explored, opening the way to new haloazidoalkenes bearing a tetrazol-5-yl substituent. These compounds were obtained as single isomers, except in one case. X-ray crystal structures were determined for three derivatives, establishing that the non-classical Wittig reaction leads to the selective synthesis of haloazidoalkenes with (Z)-configuration. The thermolysis of the haloazidoalkenes afforded new 2-halo-2-(tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirines in high yields. Thus, the reported synthetic methodologies gave access to important building blocks in organic synthesis, vinyl tetrazoles and 2-halo-2-(tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-azirine derivatives. PMID:26703533

  5. Nanometer-size hard magnetic ferrite exhibiting high optical-transparency and nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect

    PubMed Central

    Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Namai, Asuka; Imoto, Kenta; Yoshikiyo, Marie; Tarora, Waka; Nakagawa, Kosuke; Komine, Masaya; Miyamoto, Yasuto; Nasu, Tomomichi; Oka, Syunsuke; Tokoro, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Development of nanometer-sized magnetic particles exhibiting a large coercive field (Hc) is in high demand for densification of magnetic recording. Herein, we report a single-nanosize (i.e., less than ten nanometers across) hard magnetic ferrite. This magnetic ferrite is composed of ε-Fe2O3, with a sufficiently high Hc value for magnetic recording systems and a remarkably high magnetic anisotropy constant of 7.7 × 106 erg cm−3. For example, 8.2-nm nanoparticles have an Hc value of 5.2 kOe at room temperature. A colloidal solution of these nanoparticles possesses a light orange color due to a wide band gap of 2.9 eV (430 nm), indicating a possibility of transparent magnetic pigments. Additionally, we have observed magnetization-induced second harmonic generation (MSHG). The nonlinear optical-magnetoelectric effect of the present polar magnetic nanocrystal was quite strong. These findings have been demonstrated in a simple iron oxide, which is highly significant from the viewpoints of economic cost and mass production. PMID:26439914

  6. Effects of an Informal Energy Exhibit on Knowledge and Attitudes of Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, David Wayne

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the growing need for renewable energy education by looking at the design, development, and implementation of an informal energy education exhibit that was developed for placement into a regional science museum, school, and community center. This study examined several research questions related to the concept that an…

  7. Dynamics of States in the Nonlinear Interaction Regime Between a Three-Level Atom and Generalized Coherent States and Their Non-Classical Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoly, M. K.; Yadollahi, F.

    The present study investigates the interaction of an equidistant three-level atom and a single-mode cavity field that has been initially prepared in a generalized coherent state. The atom-field interaction is considered to be, in general, intensity-dependent. We suppose that the nonlinearity of the initial generalized coherent state of the field and the intensity-dependent coupling between atom and field are distinctly chosen. Interestingly, an exact analytical solution for the time evolution of the state of atom-field system can be found in this general regime in terms of the nonlinearity functions. Finally, the presented formalism has been applied to a few known physical systems such as Gilmore-Perelomov and Barut-Girardello coherent states of SU(1,1) group, as well as a few special cases of interest. Mean photon number and atomic population inversion will be calculated, in addition to investigating particular non-classicality features such as revivals, sub-Poissonian statistics and quadratures squeezing of the obtained states of the entire system. Also, our results will be compared with some of the earlier works in this particular subject.

  8. Non-classical HLA-class I expression in serous ovarian carcinoma: Correlation with the HLA-genotype, tumor infiltrating immune cells and prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Emilia; Poschke, Isabel; Villabona, Lisa; Carlson, Joseph W; Lundqvist, Andreas; Kiessling, Rolf; Seliger, Barbara; Masucci, Giuseppe V

    2016-01-01

    In our previous studies, we have shown that patients with serous ovarian carcinoma in advanced surgical stage disease have a particularly poor prognosis if they carry the HLA-A*02 genotype. This represent a stronger prognostic factor than loss or downregulation of the MHC class I heavy chain (HC) on tumor cells. In this study, we investigated the expression of the non-classical, immune tolerogenic HLA -G and -E on the tumor cells along with the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor microenvironment. FFPE primary tumors from 72 patients with advanced stages of serous adenocarcinoma and metastatic cells present in ascites fluid from 8 additional patients were included in this study. Both expression of HLA-G and aberrant expression of HLA-E were correlated to a significant worse prognosis in patients with HLA-A*02, but not with different HLA genotypes. Focal cell expression of HLA-G correlated to a site-specific downregulation of classical MHC class I HC products and aberrant HLA-E expression, showing a poor survival. HLA-G was more frequently expressed in metastatic cells than in primary tumor lesions and the expression of HLA-G inversely correlated with the frequency of tumor infiltrating immune cells. All these parameters can contribute together to identify and discriminate subpopulations of patients with extremely poor prognosis and can give them the opportunity to receive, and benefit of individually tailored treatments. PMID:26942060

  9. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    , teachers, artists, and web designers, a smaller scale collaborative effort can result in an effective mini-exhibit. Online concept maps can present a large quantity of information in bite-size chunks, demonstrating interrelationships between pieces of information without inundating visitors. SpicyNodes uses radial mapping technology to enable visitors to learn about a topic or search for information in intuitive and organic ways. This online concept mapping tool can be used as a portal to invite exploration into topics, or as a means of displaying hierarchies of information. With nodes that contain text, audio, video, and links, interactive online concept maps especially engage visual, kinesthetic, and nonlinear learners. SpicyNodes is also useful for scientists who wish to complement papers, chapters, and books with an online interface that is especially appealing to nonlinear learners. Essentially, SpicyNodes shifts the burden of discovery from the reader to the author. For example, the author may create a nodemap on climate change with hundreds of nodes, but as visitors drill through the nodemap for information (e.g. from climate change to atmospheric gases to carbon dioxide), they see only a few nodes at a time and are not overwhelmed.

  10. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    SciTech Connect

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.; Kursula, Petri

    2011-04-26

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki=1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1:2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation.

  11. Secretory expression of a heterologous protein, Aiio-AIO6BS, in Bacillus subtilis via a non-classical secretion pathway.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xingliang; Yang, Yalin; Liu, Xuewei; Li, Dong; Li, Juan; Guo, Xiaoze; Zhou, Zhigang

    2016-09-16

    The quenching enzyme AIO6 (AiiO-AIO6) has been reported as a feed additive preparation for application in aquaculture and biological control of pathogenic Aeromonas hydrophila. We developed an economical strategy to express AIO6BS (AiiO-AIO6BS, codon optimized AIO6 in Bacillus subtilis) in Bacillus subtilis for facilitating its widespread application. Promoter p43 without the signal peptide was used for secretory expression of AIO6BS in B. subtilis. Western blotting analysis demonstrated that AIO6BS was successfully expressed and secreted into the cell culture. Expression analysis of AIO6BS in the single or double mutant of the lytC and lytD genes for cell autolysis in B. subtilis 1A751 and cell autolysis-resistant engineered strain LM2531 derived from the wild type 168 indicated that the release of the heterologous protein AIO6BS was not simply mediated by cell lysis. Expression level of AIO6BS did not change in the mutants of B. subtilis that harbored mutations in the secA, tatAC, or ecsA genes compared with that in the parent wild type strain. These results suggested the AIO6BS protein was likely secreted via a non-classical secretion pathway. The expression analysis of the various N- or C-terminal truncated gene products indicated that AIO6BS probably acts as an export signal to direct its self-secretion across the cell membrane. PMID:27514447

  12. Non-classical antigen processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J.; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-01-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4+ T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4+ T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157–170 peptide vaccination in ovarian cancer patients. While both subsets similarly recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04+ target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8–9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4+ T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing (TAP)-mediated peptide transport were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacological inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrated that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple non-classical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4+ T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. PMID:24764581

  13. Structural basis for dual-inhibition mechanism of a non-classical Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor from horseshoe crab in complex with subtilisin.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Rajesh T; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation. PMID:21541315

  14. Structural Basis for Dual-Inhibition Mechanism of a Non-Classical Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitor from Horseshoe Crab in Complex with Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Rajesh T.; Thangamani, Saravanan; Velazquez-Campoy, Adrian; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling; Sivaraman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteases play a crucial role in host-pathogen interactions. In the innate immune system of invertebrates, multi-domain protease inhibitors are important for the regulation of host-pathogen interactions and antimicrobial activities. Serine protease inhibitors, 9.3-kDa CrSPI isoforms 1 and 2, have been identified from the hepatopancreas of the horseshoe crab, Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda. The CrSPIs were biochemically active, especially CrSPI-1, which potently inhibited subtilisin (Ki = 1.43 nM). CrSPI has been grouped with the non-classical Kazal-type inhibitors due to its unusual cysteine distribution. Here we report the crystal structure of CrSPI-1 in complex with subtilisin at 2.6 Å resolution and the results of biophysical interaction studies. The CrSPI-1 molecule has two domains arranged in an extended conformation. These two domains act as heads that independently interact with two separate subtilisin molecules, resulting in the inhibition of subtilisin activity at a ratio of 1:2 (inhibitor to protease). Each subtilisin molecule interacts with the reactive site loop from each domain of CrSPI-1 through a standard canonical binding mode and forms a single ternary complex. In addition, we propose the substrate preferences of each domain of CrSPI-1. Domain 2 is specific towards the bacterial protease subtilisin, while domain 1 is likely to interact with the host protease, Furin. Elucidation of the structure of the CrSPI-1: subtilisin (1∶2) ternary complex increases our understanding of host-pathogen interactions in the innate immune system at the molecular level and provides new strategies for immunomodulation. PMID:21541315

  15. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  16. Getting the point across: exploring the effects of dynamic virtual humans in an interactive museum exhibit on user perceptions.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Gutierrez, Diego; Ferdig, Rick; Li, Jian; Lok, Benjamin

    2014-04-01

    We have created “You, M.D.”, an interactive museum exhibit in which users learn about topics in public health literacy while interacting with virtual humans. You, M.D. is equipped with a weight sensor, a height sensor and a Microsoft Kinect that gather basic user information. Conceptually, You, M.D. could use this user information to dynamically select the appearance of the virtual humans in the interaction attempting to improve learning outcomes and user perception for each particular user. For this concept to be possible, a better understanding of how different elements of the visual appearance of a virtual human affects user perceptions is required. In this paper, we present the results of an initial user study with a large sample size (n =333) ran using You, M.D. The study measured users’ reactions based on the user’s gender and body-mass index (BMI) when facing virtual humans with BMI either concordant or discordant from the user’s BMI. The results of the study indicate that concordance between the users’ BMI and the virtual human’s BMI affects male and female users differently. The results also show that female users rate virtual humans as more knowledgeable than male users rate the same virtual humans. PMID:24650991

  17. Volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines exhibit antiparasitic activity against human Demodex with no adverse effects in vivo

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JI-XIN; SUN, YAN-HONG; LI, CHAO-PIN

    2015-01-01

    Demodex is a type of permanent obligatory parasite, which can be found on the human body surface. Currently, drugs targeting Demodex usually result in adverse effects and have a poor therapeutic effect. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the use of Chinese crude medicine volatile oils for targeting and inhibiting Demodex in vitro. The volatile oils of six Chinese crude medicines were investigated, including clove, orange fruit, Manchurian wildginger, cinnamon bark, Rhizome Alpiniae Officinarum and pricklyash peel, which were extracted using a distillation method. The exercise status of Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis and the antiparasitic effects of the volatile oils against the two species were observed using microscopy. A skin irritation test was used to examine the irritation intensity of the volatile oils. In addition, an acute toxicity test was utilized to observe the toxicity effects of the volatile oils on the skin. Xin Fumanling ointment was employed as a positive control to identify the therapeutic effects of the volatile oils. The results indicated that all six volatile oils were able to kill Demodex efficiently. In particular, the clove volatile oil was effective in inducing optimized anti-Demodex activity. The lethal times of the volatile oils were significantly decreased compared with the Xin Fumanling ointment (P<0.05). Furthermore, the skin irritation test results indicated that the clove volatile oil did not trigger any irritation (0.2 and 0.3 points for intact and scratched skin, respectively), and had a safety equal to that of distilled water. There were not any adverse effects observed following application of the clove volatile oil on the intact or scratched skin. In conclusion, the volatile oils of Chinese crude medicines, particularly that of clove, demonstrated an evident anti-Demodex activity and were able to kill Demodex effectively and safely in vivo. PMID:25780426

  18. Estrogen Exhibits a Biphasic Effect on Prostate Tumor Growth through the Estrogen Receptor β-KLF5 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Osakabe, Asami; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Akaogi, Kensuke; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Homma, Yukio; Inoue, Satoshi; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2015-01-01

    Estrogens are effective in the treatment of prostate cancer; however, the effects of estrogens on prostate cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we demonstrated that estrogen (17β-estradiol [E2]) has biphasic effects on prostate tumor growth. A lower dose of E2 increased tumor growth in mouse xenograft models using DU145 and PC-3 human prostate cancer cells, whereas a higher dose significantly decreased tumor growth. We found that anchorage-independent apoptosis in these cells was inhibited by E2 treatment. Similarly, in vivo angiogenesis was suppressed by E2. Interestingly, these effects of E2 were abolished by knockdown of either estrogen receptor β (ERβ) or Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor 5 (KLF5). Ιn addition, E2 suppressed KLF5-mediated transcription through ERβ, which inhibits proapoptotic FOXO1 and proangiogenic PDGFA expression. Furthermore, we revealed that a nonagonistic ER ligand GS-1405 inhibited FOXO1 and PDGFA expression through the ERβ-KLF5 pathway and regulated prostate tumor growth without ERβ transactivation. Therefore, these results suggest that E2 biphasically modulates prostate tumor formation by regulating KLF5-dependent transcription through ERβ and provide a new strategy for designing ER modulators, which will be able to regulate prostate cancer progression with minimal adverse effects due to ER transactivation. PMID:26483416

  19. Merestinib blocks Mnk kinase activity in acute myeloid leukemia progenitors and exhibits antileukemic effects in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kosciuczuk, Ewa M; Saleiro, Diana; Kroczynska, Barbara; Beauchamp, Elspeth M; Eckerdt, Frank; Blyth, Gavin T; Abedin, Sameem M; Giles, Francis J; Altman, Jessica K; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2016-07-21

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase interacting protein kinases (Mnks) play important roles in the development and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by regulating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) activation. Inhibiting Mnk1/2-induced phosphorylation of eIF4E may represent a unique approach for the treatment of AML. We provide evidence for antileukemic effects of merestinib, an orally bioavailable multikinase inhibitor with suppressive effects on Mnk activity. Our studies show that merestinib effectively blocks eIF4E phosphorylation in AML cells and suppresses primitive leukemic progenitors from AML patients in vitro and in an AML xenograft model in vivo. Our findings provide evidence for potent preclinical antileukemic properties of merestinib and support its clinical development for the treatment of patients with AML. PMID:27307295

  20. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  1. Effects of Activity Schedules on Challenging Behavior Exhibited in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lequia, Jenna; Machalicek, Wendy; Rispoli, Mandy J.

    2012-01-01

    We reviewed studies implementing activity schedules to decrease challenging behavior of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Systematic searches of electronic databases, journals, and reference lists identified 18 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies were evaluated in terms of the effectiveness of activity schedules to…

  2. The hop constituent xanthohumol exhibits hepatoprotective effects and inhibits the activation of hepatic stellate cells at different levels

    PubMed Central

    Weiskirchen, Ralf; Mahli, Abdo; Weiskirchen, Sabine; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Xanthohumol is the principal prenylated flavonoid of the female inflorescences of the hop plant. In recent years, various beneficial xanthohumol effects including anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, hypoglycemic activities, and anticancer effects have been revealed. This review summarizes present studies indicating that xanthohumol also inhibits several critical pathophysiological steps during the development and course of chronic liver disease, including the activation and pro-fibrogenic genotype of hepatic stellate cells. Also the various mechanism of action and molecular targets of the beneficial xanthohumol effects will be described. Furthermore, the potential use of xanthohumol or a xanthohumol-enriched hop extract as therapeutic agent to combat the progression of chronic liver disease will be discussed. It is notable that in addition to its hepatoprotective effects, xanthohumol also holds promise as a therapeutic agent for treating obesity, dysregulation of glucose metabolism and other components of the metabolic syndrome including hepatic steatosis. Thus, therapeutic xanthohumol application appears as a promising strategy, particularly in obese patients, to inhibit the development as well as the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:25999863

  3. An Investigation of the Life Experiences and Beliefs of Teachers Exhibiting Effective Classroom Management Behaviors in Diverse Rural Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, William Charles

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the life experiences and beliefs of highly effective teachers regarding classroom management in diverse rural school populations. The research for this phenomenological study utilized the narrative inquiry method of data collection. This study explores the beliefs, background and experiences…

  4. Does School Board Training Encourage and Equip School Board Members to Exhibit the Behaviors of Effective Governance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gates, Issaic

    2013-01-01

    This study applied 3 theoretical frameworks--Lee Bolman and Terrence Deal's four frames, the Lighthouse Inquiry of the Iowa Association of School Boards, and effective governance characteristics--to examine the impact of the Masters in Governance (MIG) training offered by the California School Boards Association on the ability of school board…

  5. Classic and non-classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency can be discriminated from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in Japanese infants by urinary steroid metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Yuhei; Homma, Keiko; Fukami, Maki; Miwa, Masayuki; Ikeda, Kazushige; Ogata, Tsutomu; Murata, Mitsuru; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We previously reported a two-step biochemical diagnosis to discriminate classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (C21OHD) from P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) by using urinary steroid metabolites: the pregnanetriolone/tetrahydrocortisone ratio (Ptl / the cortisol metabolites 5α- and 5β-tetrahydrocortisone (sum of these metabolites termed THEs), and 11β-hydroxyandrosterone (11OHAn). The objective of this study was to investigate whether both C21OHD and non-classic 21OHD (C+NC21OHD) could be biochemically differentiated from PORD. We recruited 55 infants with C21OHD, 8 with NC21OHD, 16 with PORD, 57 with transient hyper-17α-hydroxyprogesteronemia (TH17OHP), and 2,473 controls. All infants were Japanese with ages between 0–180 d. In addition to Ptl, THEs, and 11OHAn, we measured urinary tetrahydroaldosterone (THAldo) and pregnenediol (PD5). The first step: by Ptl with the age-specific cutoffs 0.06 mg/g creatinine (0–10 d of age) and 0.3 mg/g creatinine (11–180 d of age), we were able to differentiate C+NC21OHD and PORD from TH17OHP and controls (0–10 d of age: 0.065–31 vs. < 0.001–0.052, 11–180 d of age: 0.40–42 vs. < 0.001–0.086) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. The second step: by the 11OHAn/THAldo or 11OHAn/PD5 ratio with a cutoff of 0.80 or 1.0, we were able to discriminate between C+NC21OHD and PORD (1.0–720 vs. 0.021–0.61 or 1.8–160 vs. 0.005–0.32, respectively) with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Ptl, 11OHAn/THAldo, and 11OHAn/PD5 could differentiate between C+NC21OHD and PORD in Japanese infants. PMID:27212795

  6. Dimethyl Cardamonin Exhibits Anti-inflammatory Effects via Interfering with the PI3K-PDK1-PKCα Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wan-Guo; He, Hao; Yao, Jing-Yun; Zhu, Yi-Xiang; Lu, Yan-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of herbal tea [flower buds of Cleistocalyx operculatus (Roxb.) Merr. et Perry (Myrtaceae)] is associated with health beneficial effects against multiple diseases including diabetes, asthma, and inflammatory bowel disease. Emerging evidences have reported that High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is considered as a key “late” proinflammatory factor by its unique secretion pattern in aforementioned diseases. Dimethyl cardamonin (2′,4′-dihydroxy-6′-methoxy-3′,5′-dimethylchalcone, DMC) is a major ingredient of C. operculatus flower buds. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of DMC and its underlying molecular mechanisms were investigated on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced macrophages. DMC notably suppressed the mRNA expressions of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and HMGB1, and also markedly decreased their productions in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Intriguingly, DMC could notably reduce LPS-stimulated HMGB1 secretion and its nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation. Furthermore, DMC dose-dependently inhibited the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), and protein kinase C alpha (PKCα). All these data demonstrated that DMC had anti-inflammatory effects through reducing both early (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and late (HMGB1) cytokines expressions via interfering with the PI3K-PDK1-PKCα signaling pathway. PMID:26535080

  7. D-Amino acid oxidase-induced oxidative stress, 3-bromopyruvate and citrate inhibit angiogenesis, exhibiting potent anticancer effects.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Yorita, K; Chung, S P; Tran, D H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-10-01

    Angiogenesis is critical for cancer growth and metastasis. Steps of angiogenesis are energy consuming, while vascular endothelial cells are highly glycolytic. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor and this enhances its aggressiveness. D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) is a promising therapeutic protein that induces oxidative stress upon acting on its substrates. Oxidative stress-energy depletion (OSED) therapy was recently reported (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther, 19, 1-18, 2012). OSED combines DAO-induced oxidative stress with energy depletion caused by glycolytic inhibitors such as 3-bromopyruvate (3BP), a hexokinase II inhibitor that depleted ATP in cancer cells and induced production of hydrogen peroxide. 3BP disturbs the Warburg effect and antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate (El Sayed et al., J Bioenerg Biomembr, 44, 61-79, 2012). Citrate is a natural organic acid capable of inhibiting glycolysis by targeting phosphofructokinase. Here, we report that DAO, 3BP and citrate significantly inhibited angiogenesis, decreased the number of vascular branching points and shortened the length of vascular tubules. OSED delayed the growth of C6/DAO glioma cells. 3BP combined with citrate delayed the growth of C6 glioma cells and decreased significantly the number and size of C6 glioma colonies in soft agar. Human GBM cells (U373MG) were resistant to chemotherapy e.g. cisplatin and cytosine arabinoside, while 3BP was effective in decreasing the viability and disturbing the morphology of U373MG cells. PMID:22802136

  8. One exhibition, many goals. A case study on how to combine scientific questions with stakeholder views on effective communication of risks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charriere, M. K. M.; Junier, S.; Bogaard, T.; Mostert, E.; Malet, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    How effective is visual communication to increase awareness of natural hazards and risks? To answer this research question, we developed a research design that was at the same time an experimental setting and an actual communication effort. This contribution will address the scientists-stakeholders interaction that was involved, the resulting exhibition, the lessons learned and the value it had for the researchers and for the other stakeholders. Throughout the full length of the 2-years project held in the Ubaye valley (southeastern France) we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). Informal meetings with local stakeholders were organized to determine what they perceived as the needs in term of risk communication and to investigate the potential to develop activities that would benefit both them and us. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. We proposed the content and this was adjusted in interaction with the stakeholders. Later local technicians and inhabitants contributed to the content of the exhibition and regional stakeholders helped with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, employees of the public library took the lead in advertising the activity, gathering participants and they helped designing the scientific survey. This survey was the key activity from a scientific point of view as it allowed us to measure the impact of this communication activity on risk awareness. Moreover, the principal scientist was present during all opening hours of the exhibition. This allowed direct and indirect contact with the visitors. The benefits of this exhibition for the community included triggering memories, encouraging exchanges, especially inter-generational, reinforcing stakeholders-to-stakeholders relationships and promote further communication on the topic. The scientific benefits are that we have an experiment that allows us to measure the impact of a communication effort, not

  9. San Rafael Schools Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Rafael City Schools, CA.

    The San Rafael City Schools' exhibit which was displayed at the 1983 Marin County Fair (California) is described. The exhibit, entitled "Education - A Real Winner," consisted of 12 display panels illustrating the following aspects of the school system: (1) early history from 1861; (2) present board and administration; (3) present schools and…

  10. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  11. Visitors Center Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A child enjoys building his own LEGO model at a play table which was included in the exhibit 'Travel in Space' World Show. The exhibit consisted of 21 displays designed to teach children about flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles.

  12. Colon-available raspberry polyphenols exhibit anti-cancer effects on in vitro models of colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Coates, Emma M; Popa, Gina; Gill, Chris IR; McCann, Mark J; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Rowland, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Background There is a probable association between consumption of fruit and vegetables and reduced risk of cancer, particularly cancer of the digestive tract. This anti-cancer activity has been attributed in part to anti-oxidants present in these foods. Raspberries in particular are a rich source of the anti-oxidant compounds, such as polyphenols, anthocyanins and ellagitannins. Methods A "colon-available" raspberry extract (CARE) was prepared that contained phytochemicals surviving a digestion procedure that mimicked the physiochemical conditions of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The polyphenolic-rich extract was assessed for anti-cancer properties in a series of in vitro systems that model important stages of colon carcinogenesis, initiation, promotion and invasion. Results The phytochemical composition of CARE was monitored using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The colon-available raspberry extract was reduced in anthocyanins and ellagitannins compared to the original raspberry juice but enriched in other polyphenols and polyphenol breakdown products that were more stable to gastrointestinal digestion. Initiation – CARE caused significant protective effects against DNA damage induced by hydrogen peroxide in HT29 colon cancer cells measured using single cell microgelelectrophoresis. Promotion – CARE significantly decreased the population of HT29 cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, effectively reducing the number of cells entering the cell cycle. However, CARE had no effect on epithelial integrity (barrier function) assessed by recording the trans-epithelial resistance (TER) of CACO-2 cell monolayers. Invasion – CARE caused significant inhibition of HT115 colon cancer cell invasion using the matrigel invasion assay. Conclusion The results indicate that raspberry phytochemicals likely to reach the colon are capable of inhibiting several important stages in colon carcinogenesis in vitro. PMID:17442116

  13. Flaxseed extract exhibits mucosal protective effect in acetic acid induced colitis in mice by modulating cytokines, antioxidant and antiinflammatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palla, Amber Hanif; Iqbal, Najeeha Talat; Minhas, Khurram; Gilani, Anwarul-Hassan

    2016-09-01

    New treatments for inflammatory bowel disease are of interest due to high rate of remission failure. Natural products have been effective in IBD therapeutics as they have multiple constituents. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Flaxseed extract (Fs.Cr) on ulcerative colitis and identify the possible mechanisms involved. Colitis was induced by intrarectal administration of 6% AA in BALB/c mice. Colonic mucosal damage was assessed after 24h by calculating disease activity index (DAI), macroscopic and histological damage scores, biochemical measurement of myeloperoxidase (MPO), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT), and total glutathione activities. Since cytokines are involved in exacerbating inflammatory cascade with emerging role of innate immune cytokines in IBD therapeutics, we hence assessed the effect on the levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-17, at 6, 12 and 24h by ELISA. Fs.Cr ameliorated the severity of AA colitis as evident by improved DAI, macroscopic damage and the histopathological scores along with restoration of goblet cells. Fs.Cr decreased MDA and MPO activities and enhanced antioxidant activity compared to the AA group. Finally, Fs.Cr in doses (300 and 500mg/kg) decreased TNF-α and IFN-γ levels at all time points with simultaneous increase in IL-17 levels at 24h as compared to the AA group. These results suggest that Fs.Cr ameliorates the severity of AA colitis by reducing goblet cell depletion, scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, reduce neutrophil infiltration that may be attributed due to decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α and increasing IL-17 levels. PMID:27280586

  14. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C; Lee, Lai S; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0-1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  15. Phytoestrogen Bakuchiol Exhibits In Vitro and In Vivo Anti-breast Cancer Effects by Inducing S Phase Arrest and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Chen, Xueping; Liu, Chi C.; Lee, Lai S.; Man, Cornelia; Cheng, Shuk H.

    2016-01-01

    Phytoestrogen has been proposed as an alternative to hormone replacement therapy, which has been demonstrated to promote a high risk of breast cancer. However, the effect of phytoestrogen on breast cancer development has not been fully understood. Bakuchiol is an active ingredient of a traditional Chinese herbal medicine Fructus Psoraleae, the dried ripe fruit of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Fabaceae). The in vitro and in vivo estrogenic activities and anti-breast cancer effects of bakuchiol have not been well-studied. We found that bakuchiol induced the GFP expression in transgenic medaka (Oryzias melastigma, Tg, Chg:GFP) dose-dependently (0–1 μg/ml), demonstrating its in vivo estrogenic activity. Low dose of bakuchiol (1 μg/ml) induced the cell proliferation and ERα expression in MCF-7 cells, which could be blocked by the anti-estrogen ICI 182780, suggesting the in vitro estrogenic activity of bakuchiol. Our data indicated that high doses of bakuchiol (>2 μg/ml) inhibited breast cancer cell growth, with a stronger anti-proliferative effect than resveratrol, a widely studied analog of bakuchiol. High doses of bakuchiol (4, 7, and 10 μg/ml) were used for the further in vitro anti-breast cancer studies. Bakuchiol induced ERβ expression and suppressed ERα expression in MCF-7 cells. It also induced S phase arrest in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which could be rescued by caffeine. Knock-down of p21 also marginally rescued S phase arrest in MCF-7 cells. The S phase arrest was accompanied by the upregulation of ATM, P-Cdc2 (Tyr15), Myt1, P-Wee1 (Ser642), p21 and Cyclin B1, suggesting that blocking of Cdc2 activation may play an important role in bakuchiol-induced S phase arrest. Furthermore, bakuchiol induced cell apoptosis and disturbed mitochondrial membrane potential in MCF-7 cells. The bakuchiol-induced apoptosis was associated with increased expression of Caspase family and Bcl-2 family proteins, suggesting that bakuchiol may induce apoptosis via intrinsic

  16. Polymer ferroelectric field-effect memory device with SnO channel layer exhibits record hole mobility

    PubMed Central

    Caraveo-Frescas, J. A.; Khan, M. A.; Alshareef, H. N.

    2014-01-01

    Here we report for the first time a hybrid p-channel polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory device with record mobility. The memory device, fabricated at 200°C on both plastic polyimide and glass substrates, uses ferroelectric polymer P(VDF-TrFE) as the gate dielectric and transparent p-type oxide (SnO) as the active channel layer. A record mobility of 3.3 cm2V−1s−1, large memory window (∼16 V), low read voltages (∼−1 V), and excellent retention characteristics up to 5000 sec have been achieved. The mobility achieved in our devices is over 10 times higher than previously reported polymer ferroelectric field-effect transistor memory with p-type channel. This demonstration opens the door for the development of non-volatile memory devices based on dual channel for emerging transparent and flexible electronic devices. PMID:24912617

  17. The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, simvastatin, exhibits anti-metastatic and anti-tumorigenic effects in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xiugui; Han, Xiaoyun; Schointuch, Monica N.; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. The mevalonate pathway is thought to be a potential oncogenic pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitor, is a widely used drug for inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol and may also have anti-tumorigenic activity. Our goal was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on ovarian cancer cell lines, primary cultures of ovarian cancer cells and in an orthotopic ovarian cancer mouse model. Simvastatin significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis, and caused cellular stress via reduction in the enzymatic activity of HMGCR and inhibition of the MAPK and mTOR pathways in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, simvastatin induced DNA damage and reduced cell adhesion and invasion. Simvastatin also exerted anti-proliferative effects on primary cell cultures of ovarian cancer. Treatment with simvastatin in an orthotopic mouse model reduced ovarian tumor growth, coincident with decreased Ki-67, HMGCR, phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated-p42/44 protein expression. Our findings demonstrate that simvastatin may have therapeutic benefit for ovarian cancer treatment and be worthy of further exploration in clinical trials. PMID:26503475

  18. The Effect of Docetaxel (Taxotere®) on Human Gastric Cancer Cells Exhibiting Low-Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Balcer-Kubiczek, Elizabeth K.; Attarpour, Mona; Wang, Jian Z.; Regine, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Low-dose radiation hypersensitivity (HRS) describes a phenomenon of excessive sensitivity to X ray doses <0.5 Gy. Docetaxel is a taxane shown to arrest cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Some previous studies suggested that HRS might result from the abrogation of the early G2 checkpoint arrest. First we tested whether HRS occurs in gastric cancer—derived cells, and whether pre-treatment of cells with low docetaxel concentrations can enhance the magnitude of HRS in gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated HRS at ~0.3 Gy and the synergy between 0.3 Gy and docetaxel (3 nM for 24 h), and the additivity of other drug/dose combinations. The synergistic effect was associated with a significant docetaxel-induced G2 accumulation. Next, we evaluated in time-course experiments ATM kinase activity and proteins associated with the induction and maintenance of the early G2 checkpoint. The results of multi-immunoblot analysis demonstrate that HRS does not correlate with the ATM-dependent early G2 checkpoint arrest. We speculate that G2 checkpoint adaptation, a phenomenon associated with a prolonged cell cycle arrest, might be involved in HRS. Our results also suggest a new approach for the improvement the effectiveness of docetaxel-based radiotherapy using low doses per fraction. PMID:21892291

  19. Extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. Flower Exhibit Antidiabetic Effects via the Inhibition of α-Glucosidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Wujie; Yu, Lijing; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Li; Kong, Siyuan; Tan, Hongsheng; Xu, Hongxi; Huang, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assay the effects of Coreopsis tinctoria Nutt. flower extracts on hyperglycemia of diet-induced obese mice and the underlying mechanisms. Coreopsis tinctoria flower was extracted with ethanol and water, respectively. The total phenol, flavonoid levels, and the constituents of the extracts were measured. For the animal experiments, C57BL/6 mice were fed with a chow diet, high-fat diet, or high-fat diet mixed with 0.4% (w/w) water and ethanol extracts of Coreopsis tinctoria flower for 8 weeks. The inhibitory effects of the extracts on α-glucosidase activity and the antioxidant properties were assayed in vitro. We found that the extracts blocked the increase of fasting blood glucose, serum triglyceride (TG), insulin, leptin, and liver lipid levels and prevented the development of glucose tolerance impairment and insulin resistance in the C57BL/6 mice induced by a high-fat diet. The extracts inhibited α-glycosidase activity and increased oxidant activity in vitro. In conclusion, Coreopsis tinctoria flower extracts may ameliorate high-fat diet-induced hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. The underling mechanism may be via the inhibition of α-glucosidase activity. Our data indicate that Coreopsis tinctoria flower could be used as a beverage supplement and a potential source of drugs for treatment of diabetics. PMID:27088095

  20. Multiplex gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 exhibits desirable muscle hypertrophy without detectable off-target effects in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaolong; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Honghao; Kou, Qifang; Lei, Anmin; Zhao, Xiaoe; Yan, Hailong; Cai, Bei; Shen, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Shiwei; Zhu, Haijing; Zhou, Guangxian; Niu, Wenzhi; Hua, Jinlian; Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xingxu; Ma, Baohua; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a flexible approach for genome engineering of genetic loci. Here, we successfully achieved precise gene targeting in sheep by co-injecting one-cell-stage embryos with Cas9 mRNA and RNA guides targeting three genes (MSTN, ASIP, and BCO2). We carefully examined the sgRNAs:Cas9-mediated targeting effects in injected embryos, somatic tissues, as well as gonads via cloning and sequencing. The targeting efficiencies in these three genes were within the range of 27–33% in generated lambs, and that of simultaneously targeting the three genes was 5.6%, which demonstrated that micro-injection of zygotes is an efficient approach for generating gene-modified sheep. Interestingly, we observed that disruption of the MSTN gene resulted in the desired muscle hypertrophy that is characterized by enlarged myofibers, thereby providing the first detailed evidence supporting that gene modifications had occurred at both the genetic and morphological levels. In addition, prescreening for the off-target effect of sgRNAs was performed on fibroblasts before microinjection, to ensure that no detectable off-target mutations from founder animals existed. Our findings suggested that the CRISPR/Cas9 method can be exploited as a powerful tool for livestock improvement by simultaneously targeting multiple genes that are responsible for economically significant traits. PMID:27562433

  1. Multiplex gene editing via CRISPR/Cas9 exhibits desirable muscle hypertrophy without detectable off-target effects in sheep.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Niu, Yiyuan; Zhou, Jiankui; Yu, Honghao; Kou, Qifang; Lei, Anmin; Zhao, Xiaoe; Yan, Hailong; Cai, Bei; Shen, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Shiwei; Zhu, Haijing; Zhou, Guangxian; Niu, Wenzhi; Hua, Jinlian; Jiang, Yu; Huang, Xingxu; Ma, Baohua; Chen, Yulin

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a flexible approach for genome engineering of genetic loci. Here, we successfully achieved precise gene targeting in sheep by co-injecting one-cell-stage embryos with Cas9 mRNA and RNA guides targeting three genes (MSTN, ASIP, and BCO2). We carefully examined the sgRNAs:Cas9-mediated targeting effects in injected embryos, somatic tissues, as well as gonads via cloning and sequencing. The targeting efficiencies in these three genes were within the range of 27-33% in generated lambs, and that of simultaneously targeting the three genes was 5.6%, which demonstrated that micro-injection of zygotes is an efficient approach for generating gene-modified sheep. Interestingly, we observed that disruption of the MSTN gene resulted in the desired muscle hypertrophy that is characterized by enlarged myofibers, thereby providing the first detailed evidence supporting that gene modifications had occurred at both the genetic and morphological levels. In addition, prescreening for the off-target effect of sgRNAs was performed on fibroblasts before microinjection, to ensure that no detectable off-target mutations from founder animals existed. Our findings suggested that the CRISPR/Cas9 method can be exploited as a powerful tool for livestock improvement by simultaneously targeting multiple genes that are responsible for economically significant traits. PMID:27562433

  2. Genome Survey and Characterization of Endophytic Bacteria Exhibiting a Beneficial Effect on Growth and Development of Poplar Trees ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Taghavi, Safiyh; Garafola, Craig; Monchy, Sébastien; Newman, Lee; Hoffman, Adam; Weyens, Nele; Barac, Tanja; Vangronsveld, Jaco; van der Lelie, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    The association of endophytic bacteria with their plant hosts has a beneficial effect for many different plant species. Our goal is to identify endophytic bacteria that improve the biomass production and the carbon sequestration potential of poplar trees (Populus spp.) when grown in marginal soil and to gain an insight in the mechanisms underlying plant growth promotion. Members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated a collection of 78 bacterial endophytes isolated from poplar and willow trees. As representatives for the dominant genera of endophytic gammaproteobacteria, we selected Enterobacter sp. strain 638, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia R551-3, Pseudomonas putida W619, and Serratia proteamaculans 568 for genome sequencing and analysis of their plant growth-promoting effects, including root development. Derivatives of these endophytes, labeled with gfp, were also used to study the colonization of their poplar hosts. In greenhouse studies, poplar cuttings (Populus deltoides × Populus nigra DN-34) inoculated with Enterobacter sp. strain 638 repeatedly showed the highest increase in biomass production compared to cuttings of noninoculated control plants. Sequence data combined with the analysis of their metabolic properties resulted in the identification of many putative mechanisms, including carbon source utilization, that help these endophytes to thrive within a plant environment and to potentially affect the growth and development of their plant hosts. Understanding the interactions between endophytic bacteria and their host plants should ultimately result in the design of strategies for improved poplar biomass production on marginal soils as a feedstock for biofuels. PMID:19060168

  3. Luteolin exhibits anti-inflammatory effects by blocking the activity of heat shock protein 90 in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Bi, Aijing; Dong, Xiaoliang; Jiang, Yi; Rui, Bing; Liu, Jinjiao; Yin, Zhimin; Luo, Lan

    2014-01-01

    Septic diseases represent the prevalent complications in intensive care units. Luteolin, a plant flavonoid, has potent anti-inflammatory properties; however, the molecular mechanism beneath luteolin mediated immune modulation remains unclear. Here in vitro investigations showed that luteolin dose-dependently inhibited LPS-triggered secretion and relocation of high mobility group B-1 (HMGB1) and LPS-induced production of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nitric oxide (NO) in macrophages. The mechanism analysis demonstrated that luteolin reduced the release of HMGB1 through destabilizing c-Jun and suppressed HMGB1-induced aggravation of inflammatory cascade through reducing Akt protein level. As an inhibitor of Hsp90, luteolin destabilized Hsp90 client protein c-Jun and Akt. In vivo investigations showed that luteolin effectively protected mice from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lethality. In conclusion, the present study suggested that luteolin may act as a potential therapeutic reagent for treating septic diseases. PMID:24321097

  4. Distinct effects of boar seminal plasma fractions exhibiting different protein profiles on the functionality of highly diluted boar spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    García, E M; Calvete, J J; Sanz, L; Roca, J; Martínez, E A; Vázquez, J M

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate how different protein profiles of seminal plasma (SP) fractions affect sperm functionality in vitro. Ejaculates from three boars were separated into six fractions. The fractions differed from each other in their sperm content, in their total SP protein content, and their spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II and heparin-binding protein (HBP) concentrations. Spermatozoa were mainly recovered in fraction 2 (sperm-rich fraction, >1800 x 10(6) spermatozoa/ml), whereas the pre-sperm fraction 1 and the post-sperm fractions 4-6 contained low numbers of spermatozoa (<500 x 10(6)/ml). Except in fraction 2, the total SP protein concentration and the concentration of both, spermadhesin PSP-I/PSP-II and the HBPs increased with fraction order. Distinct time-dependent effects were observed on motility characteristics and membrane integrity of highly diluted boar spermatozoa upon incubation with a 10% dilution of the SP from each fraction. The highest sperm viability was recorded after exposure for 5 h to fraction 2, followed by fractions 1 and 3. The percentages of motile spermatozoa also differed significantly among fractions after 5 h of incubation. Spermatozoa incubated with SP of fractions 1-3 showed the highest percentage motility. We conclude that different SP fractions exert distinct effects on the functionality of highly diluted boar spermatozoa. Fractions 1-3 appear to promote sperm survival, whereas fractions 4-6 seem to be harmful for preserving the physiological functions of highly diluted boar spermatozoa. PMID:19323794

  5. Dimethyl fumarate and monoethyl fumarate exhibit differential effects on KEAP1, NRF2 activation, and glutathione depletion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Melanie S; Matos, Maria F; Li, Bing; Hronowski, Xiaoping; Gao, Benbo; Juhasz, Peter; Rhodes, Kenneth J; Scannevin, Robert H

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (also known as gastro-resistant dimethyl fumarate), an oral therapeutic containing dimethyl fumarate (DMF) as the active ingredient, is currently approved for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. DMF is also a component in a distinct mixture product with 3 different salts of monoethyl fumarate (MEF), which is marketed for the treatment of psoriasis. Previous studies have provided insight into the pharmacologic properties of DMF, including modulation of kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1), activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) pathway, and glutathione (GSH) modulation; however, those of MEF remain largely unexplored. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effects of DMF and MEF on KEAP1 modification, activation of the NRF2 pathway, and GSH conjugation. Using mass spectrometry, DMF treatment resulted in a robust modification of specific cysteine residues on KEAP1. In comparison, the overall degree of KEAP1 modification following MEF treatment was significantly less or undetectable. Consistent with KEAP1 cysteine modification, DMF treatment resulted in nuclear translocation of NRF2 and a robust transcriptional response in treated cells, as did MEF; however, the responses to MEF were of a lower magnitude or distinct compared to DMF. DMF was also shown to produce an acute concentration-dependent depletion of GSH; however, GSH levels eventually recovered and rose above baseline by 24 hours. In contrast, MEF did not cause acute reductions in GSH, but did produce an increase by 24 hours. Overall, these studies demonstrate that DMF and MEF are both pharmacologically active, but have differing degrees of activity as well as unique actions. These differences would be expected to result in divergent effects on downstream biology. PMID:25793262

  6. 20(S)-protopanaxadiol, an active ginseng metabolite, exhibits strong antidepressant-like effects in animal tests.

    PubMed

    Xu, Changjiang; Teng, Jijun; Chen, Weidong; Ge, Qiang; Yang, Zhiqi; Yu, Chunying; Yang, Zirong; Jia, William

    2010-12-01

    Ginseng has been used for mood adjustment in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. Our previous study has shown that, total ginsenosides, the major pharmacologically functional ingredients of ginseng, possess antidepressant activity. In the present study, we hypothesized that an intestinal metabolite of ginseng, 20(S)-protopanaxadiol (code name S111), as a post metabolism compound (PMC) of ingested ginsenosides, may be responsible for the antidepressant activity of ginseng. To test this hypothesis, antidepressant-like activity of orally given S111 was measured in animal tests including tail suspension test, forced swimming test and rat olfactory bulbectomy depression model. In all those tests, S111 demonstrated antidepressant-like activity as potent as fluoxetine. S111 treated bulbectomy animals had higher levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in the brain and in vitro reuptake assay showed that S111 had a mild inhibitory effect. Furthermore, S111 but not fluoxetine significantly reduced brain oxidative stress and down-regulated serum corticosterone concentration in bulbectomy animals. No disturbance to central nervous system (CNS) normal functions were found in S111 treated animals. These results suggest that the ginseng active metabolite S111 is a potential antidepressant. Since the monoamine reuptake activity of this compound is rather weak, it remains to be investigated whether its antidepressant-like effect is by mechanisms that are different from current antidepressants. Furthermore, this study has demonstrated that post metabolism compounds (PMCs) of herb medicines such as S111 may be a novel source for drug discovery from medicinal herbs. PMID:20647027

  7. Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 exhibit strong antifungal effects against vulvovaginal candidiasis-causing Candida glabrata isolates

    PubMed Central

    Chew, SY; Cheah, YK; Seow, HF; Sandai, D; Than, LTL

    2015-01-01

    Aims This study investigates the antagonistic effects of the probiotic strains Lactobacillus rhamnosus GR-1 and Lactobacillus reuteri RC-14 against vulvovaginal candidiasis (VVC)-causing Candida glabrata. Methods and Results Growth inhibitory activities of Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains against C. glabrata were demonstrated using a spot overlay assay and a plate-based microtitre assay. In addition, these probiotic lactobacilli strains also exhibited potent candidacidal activity against C. glabrata, as demonstrated by a LIVE/DEAD yeast viability assay performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The metabolic activities of all C. glabrata strains were completely shut down in response to the challenges by the probiotic lactobacilli strains. In addition, both probiotic lactobacilli strains exhibited strong autoaggregation and coaggregation phenotypes in the presence of C. glabrata, which indicate that these lactobacilli strains may exert their probiotic effects through the formation of aggregates and, thus the consequent prevention of colonization by C. glabrata. Conclusions Probiotic Lact. rhamnosus GR-1 and Lact. reuteri RC-14 strains exhibited potent antagonistic activities against all of the tested C. glabrata strains. These lactobacilli exhibited antifungal effects, including those attributed to their aggregation abilities, and their presence caused the cessation of growth and eventual cell death of C. glabrata. Significance and Impact of the Study This is the first study to report on the antagonistic effects of these probiotic lactobacilli strains against the non-Candida albicans Candida (NCAC) species C. glabrata. PMID:25688886

  8. Monolayer Single-Crystal 1T'-MoTe2 Grown by Chemical Vapor Deposition Exhibits Weak Antilocalization Effect.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Carl H; Parkin, William M; Ping, Jinglei; Gao, Zhaoli; Zhou, Yu Ren; Kim, Youngkuk; Streller, Frank; Carpick, Robert W; Rappe, Andrew M; Drndić, Marija; Kikkawa, James M; Johnson, A T Charlie

    2016-07-13

    Growth of transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) monolayers is of interest due to their unique electrical and optical properties. Films in the 2H and 1T phases have been widely studied but monolayers of some 1T'-TMDs are predicted to be large-gap quantum spin Hall insulators, suitable for innovative transistor structures that can be switched via a topological phase transition rather than conventional carrier depletion [ Qian et al. Science 2014 , 346 , 1344 - 1347 ]. Here we detail a reproducible method for chemical vapor deposition of monolayer, single-crystal flakes of 1T'-MoTe2. Atomic force microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy confirm the composition and structure of MoTe2 flakes. Variable temperature magnetotransport shows weak antilocalization at low temperatures, an effect seen in topological insulators and evidence of strong spin-orbit coupling. Our approach provides a pathway to systematic investigation of monolayer, single-crystal 1T'-MoTe2 and implementation in next-generation nanoelectronic devices. PMID:27223343

  9. RGD-modifided oncolytic adenovirus exhibited potent cytotoxic effect on CAR-negative bladder cancer-initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Y; Xu, H; Shen, J; Yang, Y; Wu, S; Xiao, J; Xu, Y; Liu, X-Y; Chu, L

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-initiating cell (CIC) is critical in cancer development, maintenance and recurrence. The reverse expression pattern of coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αν integrin in bladder cancer decreases the infection efficiency of adenovirus. We constructed Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-modified oncolytic adenovirus, carrying EGFP or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) gene (OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP/TRAIL), and applied them to CAR-negative bladder cancer T24 cells and cancer-initiating T24 sphere cells. OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-EGFP had enhanced infection ability and cytotoxic effect on T24 cells and T24 sphere cells, but little cytoxicity on normal urothelial SV-HUC-1 cells compared with the unmodified virus OncoAd.hTERT-EGFP. Notably, OncoAd.RGD-hTERT-TRAIL induced apoptosis in T24 cells and T24 sphere cells. Furthermore, it completely inhibited xenograft initiation established by the oncolytic adenovirus-pretreated T24 sphere cells, and significantly suppressed tumor growth by intratumoral injection. These results provided a promising therapeutic strategy for CAR-negative bladder cancer through targeting CICs. PMID:25973680

  10. Desmodium gangeticum (Linn.) DC. exhibits antihypertrophic effect in isoproterenol-induced cardiomyoblasts via amelioration of oxidative stress and mitochondrial alterations.

    PubMed

    Sankar, Vandana; Pangayarselvi, Balasubramaniam; Prathapan, Ayyappan; Raghu, Kozhiparambil Gopalan

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy occurs in response to increased workload, such as hypertension or valvular heart disease. Oxidative stress has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and in its transition to heart failure. This study was taken up with the objective to evaluate the role of oxidative stress in cardiomyoblast hypertrophy and its modulation by Desmodium gangeticum (DG) that has been traditionally used in Ayurveda, an Indian system of medicine. The methanolic root extract was analyzed for total phenolic content and tested for antioxidant potential. Hypertrophy was induced by exposing H9c2 cell line to β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol (ISO), for 96 hours. Analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, mitochondrial transmembrane potential ([INCREMENT]Ψm), and integrity of permeability transition were performed in ISO as well as Desmodium and ISO-cotreated cells. The results demonstrated potent free radical scavenging activity of DG. Cell line studies showed significant increase in ROS generation, dissipation of [INCREMENT]Ψm, and permeability transition pore opening in ISO-treated cells. Desmodium was found to attenuate ISO-induced hypertrophy by reduction of ROS generation, restoration of [INCREMENT]Ψm, and prevention of permeability transition pore opening. This study is the first documentation of the modulatory effect of DG on cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:23052030

  11. Humulus japonicus extract exhibits antioxidative and anti-aging effects via modulation of the AMPK-SIRT1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    SUNG, BOKYUNG; CHUNG, JI WON; BAE, HA RAM; CHOI, JAE SUE; KIM, CHEOL MIN; KIM, NAM DEUK

    2015-01-01

    The perennial herb, Humulus japonicus, has been previously described as possessing potential antituberculosis and anti-inflammatory properties. In the present study, the anti-aging activity of ethanol extracts from the leaves of H. japonicus (HJE) was evaluated in yeast and human fibroblast cells. In addition, the antioxidant activity of HJE was analyzed using free radical scavenging assays. Furthermore, the mechanism underlying the hypothesized HJE-associated extension of lifespan was investigated, and the results indicated that HJE was able to extend the lifespan of yeast cells. Further experiments demonstrated that HJE upregulated the longevity-associated proteins, sirtuin 1 and AMP-activated protein kinase, and effectively inhibited the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In addition, the antioxidative potential of the active constituents of HJE, including luteolin, luteolin 7-glycoside, quercetin and quercitrin, was evaluated and the results demonstrated that these flavonoids were able to scavenge ROS in cell-free and intracellular systems. In summary, the results revealed that HJE possessed the potential for antioxidative activity; however, further in vivo investigations are required with the aim of developing safe, high-efficacy anti-aging agents. PMID:26136899

  12. Deep sea water modulates blood pressure and exhibits hypolipidemic effects via the AMPK-ACC pathway: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Ming-Jyh; Chou, Pei-Yu; Lin, Wen-Hsin; Pan, Chun-Hsu; Chien, Yi-Chung; Chung, Yun-Lung; Liu, Fon-Chang; Wu, Chieh-Hsi

    2013-06-01

    Deep sea water (DSW), originally pumped from the Pacific Rim off the coast of Hualien County (Taiwan), and its mineral constituents, were concentrated by a low-temperature vacuum evaporation system to produce a hardness of approximately 400,000 mg/L of seawater mineral concentrate. The primary composition of this seawater mineral concentrate was ionic magnesium (Mg²⁺), which was approximately 96,000 mg/L. Referring to the human recommended daily allowance (RDA) of magnesium, we diluted the mineral concentrate to three different dosages: 0.1 × DSW (equivalent to 3.75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); 1 × DSW (equivalent to 37.5 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW); and 2 × DSW (equivalent to 75 mg Mg²⁺/kg DSW). Additionally, a magnesium chloride treatment was conducted for comparison with the DSW supplement. The study indicated that 0.1 × DSW, 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW decreased the systolic and diastolic pressures in spontaneous hypertensive rats in an eight-week experiment. DSW has been shown to reduce serum lipids and prevent atherogenesis in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Our results demonstrated that 1 × DSW and 2 × DSW significantly suppressed the serum cholesterol levels, reduced the lipid accumulation in liver tissues, and limited aortic fatty streaks. These findings indicated that the antiatherogenic effects of DSW are associated with 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) stimulation and the consequent inhibition of phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) in atherosclerotic rabbits. We hypothesize that DSW could potentially be used as drinking water because it modulates blood pressure, reduces lipids, and prevents atherogenesis. PMID:23774889

  13. Sorafenib and its derivative SC-1 exhibit antifibrotic effects through signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tung-Hung; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Jao, Ping; Liu, Chen-Hua; Liu, Chun-Jen; Tai, Wei-Tien; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Yang, Hung-Chih; Tseng, Tai-Chung; Huang, Hsiang-Po; Cheng, Huei-Ru; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Kuen-Feng; Kao, Jia-Horng; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) had been involved in liver fibrogenesis. We aimed to explore the antifibrotic activities of sorafenib and its derivative SC-1 (devoid of Raf kinase inhibition activity) both in vivo and in vitro with special focus on the STAT3 pathway in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). The clinical role of STAT3 in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) was also investigated. Experimental fibrosis mouse models were established by thioacetamide injection and bile duct ligation in Balb/C mice and treated with sorafenib and SC-1. Rat and human HSCs were used for mechanistic investigations. Forty CHB patients were enrolled to quantify the hepatic phospho-STAT3 (p-STAT3) levels and correlated with liver fibrosis. Both sorafenib and SC-1 ameliorated liver fibrosis in vivo and promoted HSC apoptosis in vitro. p-STAT3 and downstream signals were down-regulated after sorafenib and SC-1 treatment in HSC. STAT3 overexpression in HSC enhanced cell proliferation and undermined the apoptotic effects of sorafenib and SC-1, whereas STAT3-specific inhibition promoted HSC apoptosis. Sorafenib and SC-1 activated Src-homology protein tyrosine phosphatase-1 (SHP-1) and STAT3 inhibition followed. Of particular interest, in CHB patients with advanced liver fibrosis, p-STAT3 in HSC was significantly overexpressed and positively correlated with the severity of liver fibrosis and plasma IL-6 levels. In conclusion, sorafenib and SC-1 ameliorate liver fibrosis through STAT3 inhibition in HSC and STAT3 may potentially serve as a promising fibrotic biomarker and target in liver fibrosis. SHP-1 phosphatase-directed STAT3 inhibition may represent a previously unidentified strategy for antifibrotic drug discovery. PMID:26039995

  14. In Vivo Acute on Chronic Ethanol Effects in Liver: A Mouse Model Exhibiting Exacerbated Injury, Altered Metabolic and Epigenetic Responses

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Shivendra D.; Aroor, Annayya R.; Restrepo, Ricardo; Kharbanda, Kusum K.; Ibdah, Jamal A.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic alcoholics who also binge drink (i.e., acute on chronic) are prone to an exacerbated liver injury but its mechanism is not understood. We therefore investigated the in vivo effects of chronic and binge ethanol ingestion and compared to chronic ethanol followed by three repeat binge ethanol on the liver of male C57/BL6 mice fed ethanol in liquid diet (4%) for four weeks followed by binge ethanol (intragastric administration, 3.5 g/kg body weight, three doses, 12h apart). Chronic followed by binge ethanol exacerbated fat accumulation, necrosis, decrease in hepatic SAM and SAM:SAH ratio, increase in adenosine levels, and elevated CYP2E1 levels. Histone H3 lysine acetylation (H3AcK9), dually modified phosphoacetylated histone H3 (H3AcK9/PS10), and phosphorylated H2AX increased after binge whereas phosphorylation of histone H3 ser 10 (H3S10) and H3 ser 28 (H3S28) increased after chronic ethanol-binge. Histone H3 lysine 4 and 9 dimethylation increased with a marked dimethylation in H3K9 in chronic ethanol binge group. Trimethylated histone H3 levels did not change. Nuclear levels of histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and histone deacetylase HDAC3 were elevated whereas phospho-CREB decreased in a distinctive manner. Taken together, acute on chronic ethanol ingestion caused amplification of liver injury and elicited characteristic profiles of histone modifications, metabolic alterations, and changes in nuclear protein levels. These findings demonstrate that chronic ethanol exposure renders liver more susceptible to repeat acute/binge ethanol induced acceleration of alcoholic liver disease. PMID:26610587

  15. MiR-145 regulates PAK4 via the MAPK pathway and exhibits an antitumor effect in human colon cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Xiaoping; Yang, Zhili; Du, Hangxiang; Wu, Zhenqian; Gong, Jianfeng; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 played an important role in inhibiting cell growth by directly targeting PAK4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MiR-145 may function as tumor suppressors. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulators of numerous cellular events; accumulating evidence indicates that miRNAs play a key role in a wide range of biological functions, such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in cancer. Down-regulated expression of miR-145 has been reported in colon cancer tissues and cell lines. The molecular mechanisms underlying miR-145 and the regulation of colon carcinogenesis remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the levels of miR-145 in human colon cancer cells using qRT-PCR and found markedly decreased levels compared to normal epithelial cells. We identified PAK4 as a novel target of miR-145 using informatics screening. Additionally, we demonstrated that miR-145 targets a putative binding site in the 3 Prime UTR of PAK4 and that its abundance is inversely associated with miR-145 expression in colon cancer cells; we confirmed this relationship using the luciferase reporter assay. Furthermore, restoration of miR-145 by mimics in SW620 cells significantly attenuated cell growth in vitro, in accordance with the inhibitory effects induced by siRNA mediated knockdown of PAK4. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that miR-145 downregulates P-ERK expression by targeting PAK4 and leads to inhibition of tumor growth.

  16. Electroacupuncture pretreatment exhibits anti-depressive effects by regulating hippocampal proteomics in rats with chronic restraint stress

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhuo; Tu, Ya; Guo, Tian-wei; Wu, Yun-chu; Yang, Xue-qin; Sun, Lan; Yang, Xin-jing; Zhang, Wen-yue; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Xu-hui

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effect of electroacupuncture on depression is widely recognized. However, the signal transduction pathways and target proteins involved remain unclear. In the present study, rat models of chronic restraint stress were used to explore the mechanism by which electroacupuncture alleviates depression. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, and electroacupuncture groups. Chronic restraint stress was induced in the model and electroacupuncture groups by restraining rats for 28 days. In the electroacupuncture group, electroacupuncture pretreatment at Baihui (GV20) and Yintang (GV29) acupoints was performed daily (1 mA, 2 Hz, discontinuous wave, 20 minutes) prior to restraint for 28 days. Open field tests and body weight measurements were carried out to evaluate the depressive symptoms at specific time points. On day 28, the crossing number, rearing number, and body weights of the model group were significantly lower than those in the control group. Behavior test results indicated that rat models of depressive-like symptoms were successfully established by chronic restraint stress combined with solitary raising. On day 28, an isobaric tag for a relative and absolute quantitation-based quantitative proteomic approach was performed to identify differentially expressed proteins in hippocampal samples obtained from the model and electroacupuncture groups. The potential function of these differential proteins was predicted through the use of the Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG) database. Twenty-seven differential proteins (uncharacteristic proteins expected) were selected from the model and electroacupuncture groups. In addition to unknown protein functions, COG are mainly concentrated in general prediction function, mechanism of signal transduction, amino acid transport and metabolism groups. This suggests that electroacupuncture improved depressive-like symptoms by regulating differential proteins, and most of these related proteins exist

  17. Natural Stilbenoids Isolated from Grapevine Exhibiting Inhibitory Effects against HIV-1 Integrase and Eukaryote MOS1 Transposase In Vitro Activities

    PubMed Central

    Chaignepain, Stéphane; Subra, Frederic; Munir, Soundasse; Delelis, Olivier; Lesbats, Paul; Calmels, Christina; Andreola, Marie-Line; Merillon, Jean-Michel; Auge-Gouillou, Corinne; Parissi, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Polynucleotidyl transferases are enzymes involved in several DNA mobility mechanisms in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Some of them such as retroviral integrases are crucial for pathogenous processes and are therefore good candidates for therapeutic approaches. To identify new therapeutic compounds and new tools for investigating the common functional features of these proteins, we addressed the inhibition properties of natural stilbenoids deriving from resveratrol on two models: the HIV-1 integrase and the eukaryote MOS-1 transposase. Two resveratrol dimers, leachianol F and G, were isolated for the first time in Vitis along with fourteen known stilbenoids: E-resveratrol, E-piceid, E-pterostilbene, E-piceatannol, (+)-E-ε-viniferin, E-ε-viniferinglucoside, E-scirpusin A, quadragularin A, ampelopsin A, pallidol, E-miyabenol C, E-vitisin B, hopeaphenol, and isohopeaphenol and were purified from stalks of Vitis vinifera (Vitaceae), and moracin M from stem bark of Milliciaexelsa (Moraceae). These compounds were tested in in vitro and in vivo assays reproducing the activity of both enzymes. Several molecules presented significant inhibition on both systems. Some of the molecules were found to be active against both proteins while others were specific for one of the two models. Comparison of the differential effects of the molecules suggested that the compounds could target specific intermediate nucleocomplexes of the reactions. Additionally E-pterostilbene was found active on the early lentiviral replication steps in lentiviruses transduced cells. Consequently, in addition to representing new original lead compounds for further modelling of new active agents against HIV-1 integrase, these molecules could be good tools for identifying such reaction intermediates in DNA mobility processes. PMID:24312275

  18. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shayan; Jain, Sumeet; Rai, Vineeta; Sahoo, Dipak K.; Raha, Sumita; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2015-01-01

    The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4) selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV) and apoplast signal peptide (aTP) in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR, and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT), apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era. PMID:26500666

  19. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  20. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  1. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  2. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  3. Exhibitions in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    During this past year a vast number of art shows have been exhibited across the United States. Their most striking features were their range and diversity. Here are some comments on Ben Shahn's paintings and photography focusing on social realism, some works by the Polish Constructivists, interested in redefining form in relation to space, the…

  4. A Novel Bufalin Derivative Exhibited Stronger Apoptosis-Inducing Effect than Bufalin in A549 Lung Cancer Cells and Lower Acute Toxicity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Feng, Li-Xing; Sun, Peng; Liu, Wang; Wu, Wan-Ying; Jiang, Bao-Hong; Yang, Min; Hu, Li-Hong; Guo, De-An; Liu, Xuan

    2016-01-01

    BF211 is a synthetic molecule derived from bufalin (BF). The apoptosis-inducing effect of BF211 was stronger than that of BF while the acute toxicity of BF211 was much lower than that of BF. BF211 exhibited promising concentration-dependent anti-cancer effects in nude mice inoculated with A549 cells in vivo. The growth of A549 tumor xenografts was almost totally blocked by treatment with BF211 at 6 mg/kg. Notably, BF and BF211 exhibited differences in their binding affinity and kinetics to recombinant proteins of the α subunits of Na+/K+-ATPase. Furthermore, there was a difference in the effects of BF or BF211 on inhibiting the activity of porcine cortex Na+/K+-ATPase and in their time-dependent effects on intracellular Ca2+ levels in A549 cells. The time-dependent effects of BF or BF211 on the activation of Src, which was mediated by the Na+/K+-ATPase signalosome, in A549 cells were also different. Both BF and BF211 could induce apoptosis-related cascades, such as activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of PARP (poly ADP-ribose polymerase) in A549 cells, in a concentration-dependent manner; however, the effects of BF211 on apoptosis-related cascades was stronger than that of BF. The results of the present study supported the importance of binding to the Na+/K+-ATPase α subunits in the mechanism of cardiac steroids and also suggested the possibility of developing new cardiac steroids with a stronger anti-cancer activity and lower toxicity as new anti-cancer agents. PMID:27459387

  5. Glutathione reductase: Comparison of steady-state and rapid reaction primary kinetic isotope effects exhibited by the yeast, spinach, and Escherichia coli enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Vanoni, M.A.; Wong, K.K.; Ballou, D.P.; Blanchard, J.S. )

    1990-06-19

    Kinetic parameters for NADPH and NADH have been determined at pH 8.1 for spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases. NADPH exhibited low Km values for all enzymes (3-6 microM), while the Km values for NADH were 100 times higher (approximately 400 microM). Under our experimental conditions, the percentage of maximal velocities with NADH versus those measured with NADPH were 18.4, 3.7, and 0.13% for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli enzymes, respectively. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects were independent of GSSG concentration between Km and 15Km levels, supporting a ping-pong kinetic mechanism. For each of the three enzymes, NADPH yielded primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on Vmax only, while NADH exhibited primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on both V and V/K. The magnitude of DV/KNADH at pH 8.1 is 4.3 for the spinach enzyme, 2.7 for the yeast enzyme, and 1.6 for the E. coli glutathione reductase. The experimentally determined values of TV/KNADH of 7.4, 4.2, and 2.2 for the spinach, yeast, and E. coli glutathione reductases agree well with those calculated from the corresponding DV/KNADH using the Swain-Schaad expression. This suggests that the intrinsic primary kinetic isotope effect on NADH oxidation is fully expressed. In order to confirm this conclusion, single-turnover experiments have been performed. The measured primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects on the enzyme reduction half-reaction using NADH match those measured in the steady state for each of the three glutathione reductases.

  6. Nitidine chloride inhibits proliferation, induces apoptosis via the Akt pathway and exhibits a synergistic effect with doxorubicin in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Feng; Liu, Tianfeng; Yu, Nina; Li, Shihong; Zhang, Xiaofei; Zheng, Guanghong; Lv, Chunming; Mou, Kai; Xu, Jia; Li, Bo; Wang, Surong; Song, Haibo

    2016-09-01

    Nitidine chloride (NC) exhibits anti-tumor properties in various types of tumor. However, to the best of our knowledge there is no previous evidence of NC involvement in the apoptosis or proliferation of ovarian cancer cells and the underlying molecular mechanisms. The present study aimed to investigate the influence of NC on the viability and apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells and the synergistic effect NC and doxorubicin (DOX) may have on ovarian cancer cells. The viability and proliferation of ovarian cancer cells were examined using a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and 3H-thymidine incorporation assay. The apoptotic rate of ovarian cancer cells was detected by flow cytometry. The expression of apoptosis‑associated proteins and Akt serine/threonine kinase 1 (Akt) were determined by western blot analysis following NC treatment. The inhibitory effect of NC on the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells was demonstrated in a time and dose‑dependent manner. The pro-apoptotic effect of NC on ovarian cancer cells was also observed. It was determined that NC significantly downregulated the protein expression levels of B‑cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulated the expression of Bcl‑2‑associated X protein, p53, caspase‑3 and ‑9. NC suppressed Akt phosphorylation. Additionally, the present study demonstrated that the effect of NC on the proliferation and apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells was Akt‑dependent by using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway inhibitor, LY294002. NC exhibited a synergistic inhibitory effect on the viability of ovarian cancer cells when combined with DOX. The current study demonstrated that NC inhibited the proliferation and induced the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells via the Akt signaling pathway and highlighted its potential clinical application for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:27485415

  7. Skylab Exhibit Ribbon Cutting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A metal strap became tangled over one of the folded solar array panels when Skylab lost its micro meteoroid shield during its launch. Cutters like the ones used to free the solar array were used to cut the ribbon opening to the public a new full-scale Skylab cluster exhibit at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Wielding the cutters are (left to right): Alabama Senator James B. Allen; Marshall Space Flight Center director, Dr. William R. Lucas, Huntsville Mayor, Joe Davis; Madison County Commission Chairman, James Record (standing behind Mayor Davis); and chairman of the Alabama Space Science Exhibit Commission, Jack Giles. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin used the same type of tool in Earth orbit to cut the aluminum strap which jammed the Skylab solar array.

  8. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica.

    PubMed

    Torres-Torres, C; López-Suárez, A; Can-Uc, B; Rangel-Rojo, R; Tamayo-Rivera, L; Oliver, A

    2015-07-24

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions. PMID:26135968

  9. Collective optical Kerr effect exhibited by an integrated configuration of silicon quantum dots and gold nanoparticles embedded in ion-implanted silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Torres, C.; López-Suárez, A.; Can-Uc, B.; Rangel-Rojo, R.; Tamayo-Rivera, L.; Oliver, A.

    2015-07-01

    The study of the third-order optical nonlinear response exhibited by a composite containing gold nanoparticles and silicon quantum dots nucleated by ion implantation in a high-purity silica matrix is presented. The nanocomposites were explored as an integrated configuration containing two different ion-implanted distributions. The time-resolved optical Kerr gate and z-scan techniques were conducted using 80 fs pulses at a 825 nm wavelength; while the nanosecond response was investigated by a vectorial two-wave mixing method at 532 nm with 1 ns pulses. An ultrafast purely electronic nonlinearity was associated to the optical Kerr effect for the femtosecond experiments, while a thermal effect was identified as the main mechanism responsible for the nonlinear optical refraction induced by nanosecond pulses. Comparative experimental tests for examining the contribution of the Au and Si distributions to the total third-order optical response were carried out. We consider that the additional defects generated by consecutive ion irradiations in the preparation of ion-implanted samples do not notably modify the off-resonance electronic optical nonlinearities; but they do result in an important change for near-resonant nanosecond third-order optical phenomena exhibited by the closely spaced nanoparticle distributions.

  10. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  11. Plumbagin exhibits an anti-proliferative effect in human osteosarcoma cells by downregulating FHL2 and interfering with Wnt/β-catenin signalling

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan-Liang; Meng, Xiang-Qi; Ma, Long-Jun; Yuan, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Plumbagin, a naphthoquinone constituent of Plumbago zeylanica L. (Plumbaginaceae) is widely used in traditional Chinese medicine as an antifungal, antibacterial and anti-inflammatory agent. Plumbagin is known to exhibit proapoptotic, antiangiogenic and antimetastatic effects in cancer cells. The transcriptional co-factor four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) is a multifunctional adaptor protein that is involved in the regulation of gene expression, signal transduction and cell proliferation and differentiation, and also acts as a tumor suppressor or oncoprotein depending on the tissue microenvironment. The present study investigated the effect of plumbagin on FHL2 expression, Wnt/β-catenin signalling and its anti-proliferative activity in various human osteosarcoma cell lines, including SaOS2, MG63, HOS and U2OS. The cells were exposed to plumbagin and the expression of FHL2 was evaluated using western blot analysis. Furthermore, the anti-proliferative effect of plumbagin was evaluated using a 3-(4,5 dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. In addition, since FHL2 is involved in Wnt/β-catenin signaling, the effect of plumbagin on β-catenin and its primary target genes, including v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (c-Myc) and WNT1 inducible signaling pathway protein-1 (WISP-1), was evaluated using western blot analysis. It was observed that plumbagin suppressed the expression of FHL2 and exhibited significant anti-proliferative activity in osteosarcoma cells. It also attenuated Wnt/β-catenin signalling by downregulating β-catenin and its target genes, including c-Myc and WISP-1. In conclusion, plumbagin demonstrated anti-proliferative activity in osteosarcoma cells by downregulating FHL2 and interfering with Wnt/β-catenin signalling. PMID:27446400

  12. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  13. The flavonoid p-hydroxycinnamic acid exhibits anticancer effects in human pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells in vitro: Comparison with gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Murata, Tomiyasu; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Shoji, Mamoru

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy with a notoriously dismal prognosis. A major contributor to this poor clinical outcome is pancreatic cancer's prominent chemoresistance. The present study was undertaken to determine whether the flavonoid p‑hydroxycinnamic acid (HCA), which is a botanical factor, possesses anticancer effects on cloned human pancreatic cancer MIA PaCa‑2 cells that possess resistance to radiation therapy in vitro. Proliferation of MIA PaCa‑2 cells was suppressed after culture with HCA (10‑1,000 nM). Such an effect was also noted in human pancreatic cancer Pt45P1 cells. In the MIA PaCa‑2 cells, HCA induced G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest in the cells. The suppressive effects of HCA on proliferation were suggested to be mediated through the inhibition of various signaling pathways related to nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB), extracellular signal‑regulated kinase (ERK), protein kinase C, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase (PI3K) or nuclear transcription activity. Moreover, HCA was found to stimulate cell death in the MIA PaCa‑2 and Pt45P1 cells in vitro. The anticancer effects of HCA on MIA PaCa‑2 cells were exhibited at a lower concentration than gemcitabine, a potent cancer drug. The flavonoid HCA may be a useful tool in the therapy of human pancreatic cancer in vivo. PMID:26397991

  14. The addition effects of alkaline earth ions in the chemical synthesis of ɛ-Fe2O3 nanocrystals that exhibit a huge coercive field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohkoshi, Shin-ichi; Sakurai, Shunsuke; Jin, Jian; Hashimoto, Kazuhito

    2005-05-01

    An iron oxide/silica composite material, which was prepared by combining reverse-micelle and sol-gel techniques, exhibited a huge coercive field Hc of 20kOe (1.6×105Am-1) in our previous work. The key of this synthetic procedure was the added Ba2+ ions that created a single phase of ɛ-Fe2O3. In the present work, the addition effect of Ca2+ ions to this procedure was investigated. Consequently, rod-shape ɛ-Fe2O3 nanocrystals (40-120nm ×15-20nm) were obtained and a Hc value of 20kOe was observed. Thermodynamical analysis that considered the surface energy of nanoparticle suggested that a single ɛ-Fe2O3 phase was generated by retarding the crystal growth of Fe2O3 particles under the presence of alkaline earth ions.

  15. Fucoidan from sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa exhibits anti-hyperglycemic effects in insulin resistant mice via activating the PI3K/PKB pathway and GLUT4.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yiming; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhao, Yanlei; Hu, Shiwei; Shi, Di; Xue, Changhu

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the anti-hyperglycemic properties and mechanisms of fucoidan, isolated from Cucumaria frondosa (Cf-FUC), in insulin resistant mice. Male C57BL/6J mice were fed regular diet or high-fat/high-sucrose diet for 19 weeks. Model animals were dietary administrated either rosiglitazone (RSG, 1 mg/kg·bw), fucoidan (Cf-FUC, 80 mg/kg·bw) or their combinations. Results showed that Cf-FUC significantly reduced fasting blood glucose and insulin levels, and enhanced glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance in insulin-resistant mice. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that Cf-FUC increased the mRNA expressions of insulin receptors (IR), insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB), and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4). Western blot assays demonstrated that Cf-FUC showed no effect on total protein expression but nevertheless enhanced the phosphorylation of proteins listed above and increased translocation of GLUT4 to the cell membrane. Furthermore, Cf-FUC enhanced the effects of RSG. These results indicated that Cf-FUC exhibited significant anti-hyperglycemic effects via activating PI3K/PKB pathway and GLUT4 in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. PMID:26194305

  16. A method to decrease the harmonic distortion in Mn-Zn ferrite/PZT and Ni-Zn ferrite/PZT layered composite rings exhibiting high magnetoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyau, V.; Morin, V.; Fortineau, J.; LoBue, M.; Mazaleyrat, F.

    2015-10-01

    We have investigated the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in layered composite rings subjected to circumferential AC magnetic fields and DC magnetic fields in radial, axial, or circumferential directions. Bilayer samples were obtained combining different grades of commercial Mn-Zn ferrites or Ni-Zn ferrites with commercial lead zirconate titanate (PZT). Mn-Zn ferrites with low magnetostriction saturation ( λs<10-6 ) and low magneto-crystalline anisotropy constants show high ME capabilities when associated with PZT in ring structures. In certain conditions, these ME effects are higher than those obtained with Terfenol-D/PZT composites in the same layered ring structure. Magnetostrictive and mechanical characterizations have given results that explain these high ME performances. Nevertheless, Mn-Zn ferrite/PZT composites exhibit voltages responses with low linearity especially at high signal level. Based on the particular structure of the ME device, a method to decrease the nonlinear harmonic distortion of the ME voltages is proposed. Harmonic distortion analysis of ME voltages measured in different configurations allows us to explain the phenomenon.

  17. Orally active opioid μ/δ dual agonist MGM-16, a derivative of the indole alkaloid mitragynine, exhibits potent antiallodynic effect on neuropathic pain in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kenjiro; Narita, Minoru; Muramatsu, Naotaka; Nakayama, Terumi; Misawa, Kaori; Kitajima, Mariko; Tashima, Kimihito; Devi, Lakshmi A; Suzuki, Tsutomu; Takayama, Hiromitsu; Horie, Syunji

    2014-03-01

    (E)-Methyl 2-((2S,3S,7aS,12bS)-3-ethyl-7a-hydroxy-8-methoxy-1,2,3,4,6,7,7a,12b-octahydroindolo[2,3-a]quinolizin-2-yl)-3-methoxyacrylate (7-hydroxymitragynine), a main active constituent of the traditional herbal medicine Mitragyna speciosa, is an indole alkaloid that is structurally different from morphine. 7-Hydroxymitragynine induces a potent antinociceptive effect on mouse acute pain through μ-opioid receptors. In this study, we developed dual-acting μ- and δ-opioid agonists MGM-15 and MGM-16 from 7-hydroxymitragynine for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. MGM-16 showed a higher potency than that of 7-hydroxymitragynine and MGM-15 in in vitro and in vivo assays. MGM-16 exhibited a high affinity for μ- and δ-opioid receptors, with K(i) values of 2.1 and 7.0 nM, respectively. MGM-16 showed μ- and δ-opioid full agonistic effects in a guanosine 5'-O-(3-[(35)S]thiotriphosphate) binding assay and in a functional test using electrically elicited guinea pig ileum and mouse vas deferens contractions. Systemic administration of MGM-16 produced antinociceptive effects in a mouse acute pain model and antiallodynic effects in a chronic pain model. The antinociceptive effect of MGM-16 was approximately 240 times more potent than that of morphine in a mouse tail-flick test, and its antiallodynic effect was approximately 100 times more potent than that of gabapentin in partial sciatic nerve-ligated mice, especially with oral administration. The antinociceptive effect of MGM-16 was completely and partially blocked by the μ-selective antagonist β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride (β-FNA) and by the δ-selective antagonist naltrindole, respectively, in a tail-flick test. The antiallodynic effect of MGM-16 was completely blocked by β-FNA and naltrindole in a neuropathic pain model. These findings suggest that MGM-16 could become a class of a compound with potential therapeutic utility for treating neuropathic pain. PMID:24345467

  18. Taraxacum mongolicum extract exhibits a protective effect on hepatocytes and an antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus in animal and human cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Guan, Rong-Fa; Wu, Yi-Hang; Yu, Xiao-Ping; Lin, Wen-Yan; Zhang, Yong-Yong; Liu, Tao; Zhao, Jun; Shi, Shu-Yun; Zhao, Yu

    2014-04-01

    In order to validate the antiviral effect against hepatitis B virus (HBV) of Taraxacum mongolicum (T. mongolicum), the protective effect on hepatocytes, and antiviral properties against duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) and HBV of T. mongolicum extract (TME) were evaluated in chemically-injured neonatal rat hepatocytes, DHBV-infected duck fetal hepatocytes and HBV-transfected HepG2.2.15 cells, respectively. The results demonstrated that TME at 50-100 µg/ml improved D-galactosamine (D-GalN), thioacetamide (TAA) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP)-injured rat hepatocytes, and produced protection rates of 42.2, 34.6 and 43.8% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, TME at 1-100 µg/ml markedly inhibited DHBV DNA replication. Additionally, TME at 25-100 µg/ml reduced HBsAg and HBeAg levels and produced inhibition rates of 91.39 and 91.72% at 100 µg/ml, respectively. TME markedly inhibited HBV DNA replication at 25-100 µg/ml. The results demonstrate the potent antiviral effect of T. mongolicum against HBV effect. The protective of TME effect on hepatocytes may be achieved by its ability to ameliorate oxidative stress. The antiviral properties of TME may contribute to blocking protein synthesis steps and DNA replication. Furthermore, major components of TME were quantificationally analyzed. These data provide scientific evidence supporting the traditional use of TME in the treatment of hepatitis. PMID:24481875

  19. Lichen Secondary Metabolites in Flavocetraria cucullata Exhibit Anti-Cancer Effects on Human Cancer Cells through the Induction of Apoptosis and Suppression of Tumorigenic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yoon, Somy; Yang, Yi; Lee, Ho-Bin; Oh, Soonok; Jeong, Min-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Yee, Sung-Tae; Crişan, Florin; Moon, Cheol; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2014-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms which produce distinct secondary metabolic products. In the present study, we tested the cytotoxic activity of 17 lichen species against several human cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer activity. We found that among 17 lichens species, F. cucullata exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity in several human cancer cells. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the acetone extract of F. cucullata contains usnic acid, salazinic acid, Squamatic acid, Baeomycesic acid, d-protolichesterinic acid, and lichesterinic acid as subcomponents. MTT assay showed that cancer cell lines were more vulnerable to the cytotoxic effects of the extract than non-cancer cell lines. Furthermore, among the identified subcomponents, usnic acid treatment had a similar cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines but with lower potency than the extract. At a lethal dose, treatment with the extract or with usnic acid greatly increased the apoptotic cell population and specifically activated the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, using sub-lethal doses, extract and usnic acid treatment decreased cancer cell motility and inhibited in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials. In these cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and phosphor-Akt, while phosphor-c-Jun and phosphor-ERK1/2 levels were only marginally affected. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of the extract is more potent than that of usnic acid alone. Taken together, F. cucullata and its subcomponent, usnic acid together with additional component, exert anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of EMT. PMID:25360754

  20. Celastrol enhances Nrf2 mediated antioxidant enzymes and exhibits anti-fibrotic effect through regulation of collagen production against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Divya, Thomas; Dineshbabu, Vadivel; Soumyakrishnan, Syamala; Sureshkumar, Anandasadagopan; Sudhandiran, Ganapasam

    2016-02-25

    Pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is characterized by excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix components in the alveolar region which distorts the normal lung architecture and impairs the respiratory function. The aim of this study is to evaluate the anti-fibrotic effect of celastrol, a quinine-methide tri-terpenoid mainly found in Thunder God Vine root extracts against bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF through the enhancement of antioxidant defense system. A single intratracheal instillation of BLM (3 U/kg.bw) was administered in rats to induce PF. Celastrol (5 mg/kg) was given intraperitoneally, twice a week for a period of 28 days. BLM-induced rats exhibits declined activities of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants which were restored upon treatment with celastrol. BLM-induced rats show increased total and differential cell counts as compared to control and celastrol treated rats. Histopathological analysis shows increased inflammation and alveolar damage; while assay of hydroxyproline and Masson's trichrome staining shows an increased collagen deposition in BLM-challenged rats that were decreased upon celastrol treatment. Celastrol also reduces inflammation in BLM-induced rats as evidenced by decrease in the expressions of mast cells, Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF- α) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) 2 and 9. Further, Western blot analysis shows that celastrol is a potent inducer of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and it restores the activities of Phase II enzymes such as hemoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutathione-S-transferase (GSTs) and NADP(H): quinine oxidoreductase (NQO1) which were declined upon BLM administration. The results of this study show evidence on the protective effect of celastrol against BLM-induced PF through its antioxidant and anti-fibrotic effects. PMID:26768587

  1. Lichen secondary metabolites in Flavocetraria cucullata exhibit anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and suppression of tumorigenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yoon, Somy; Yang, Yi; Lee, Ho-Bin; Oh, Soonok; Jeong, Min-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Yee, Sung-Tae; Crişan, Florin; Moon, Cheol; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2014-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms which produce distinct secondary metabolic products. In the present study, we tested the cytotoxic activity of 17 lichen species against several human cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer activity. We found that among 17 lichens species, F. cucullata exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity in several human cancer cells. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the acetone extract of F. cucullata contains usnic acid, salazinic acid, Squamatic acid, Baeomycesic acid, d-protolichesterinic acid, and lichesterinic acid as subcomponents. MTT assay showed that cancer cell lines were more vulnerable to the cytotoxic effects of the extract than non-cancer cell lines. Furthermore, among the identified subcomponents, usnic acid treatment had a similar cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines but with lower potency than the extract. At a lethal dose, treatment with the extract or with usnic acid greatly increased the apoptotic cell population and specifically activated the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, using sub-lethal doses, extract and usnic acid treatment decreased cancer cell motility and inhibited in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials. In these cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and phosphor-Akt, while phosphor-c-Jun and phosphor-ERK1/2 levels were only marginally affected. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of the extract is more potent than that of usnic acid alone. Taken together, F. cucullata and its subcomponent, usnic acid together with additional component, exert anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of EMT. PMID:25360754

  2. Elevation of Non-Classical (CD14+/lowCD16++) Monocytes Is Associated with Increased Albuminuria and Urine TGF-β1 in HIV-Infected Individuals on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Brooks I.; Byron, Mary Margaret; Ng, Roland C.; Chow, Dominic C.; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective High rates of albuminuria are observed among HIV-infected individuals on stable antiretroviral therapy (ART). Though pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic responses are described as components of albuminuria in the general population, it is unclear how these responses are associated to albuminuria in ART-treated chronic HIV. We investigated the relationship of monocyte subsets and urine inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers to albuminuria in ART-treated HIV-infected participants. Design and Methods Cross-sectional analyses were performed on Hawaii Aging with HIV-cardiovascular disease study cohort participants who were required at entry to be ≥40 years old and on ART ≥3 months. Monocyte subpopulations were determined in banked peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using multi-parametric flow-cytometry. Entry random urine samples were assessed for albumin-to-creatinine ratios (UACR). Urine samples were measured for inflammatory and fibrotic biomarkers using Luminex technology. Results Among 96 HIV-infected subjects with measured UACR (87% male, 59% Caucasian, and 89% undetectable HIV RNA with median CD4 of 495.5 cells/μL), 18 patients (19%) had albuminuria. Non-classical (CD14low/+CD16++) monocytes were significantly elevated in subjects with albuminuria (p = 0.034) and were correlated to UACR (r = 0.238, p = 0.019). Elevated non-classical monocyte counts were significant predictors of worsening albuminuria, independent of traditional- and ART-associated risk factors (β = 0.539, p = 0.007). Urine TGF-β1 and collagen-IV were significantly higher in albuminuric compared to non-albuminuric participants (TGF-β1; p = 0.039 and collagen-IV; p = 0.042). Urine TGF-β1 was significantly correlated with non-classical monocyte counts (r = 0.464, p = 0.017). Conclusion Alterations in monocyte subpopulations and urine pro-fibrotic factors may play a role in kidney dysfunction during chronic HIV infection and warrants further study. PMID:27097224

  3. A prototypic modified risk tobacco product exhibits reduced effects on chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of monocytes compared with a reference cigarette.

    PubMed

    van der Toorn, Marco; Frentzel, Stefan; Goedertier, Didier; Peitsch, Manuel; Hoeng, Julia; De Leon, Hector

    2015-06-01

    Monocyte adhesion and migration to the subendothelial space represent critical steps in atherogenesis. Here, we investigated whether extracts from the aerosol of a prototypic modified risk tobacco product (pMRTP), based on heating rather than combusting tobacco, exhibited differential effects on the migratory behavior of monocytes compared with that from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. THP-1 cells, a monocytic cell line, and human coronary arterial endothelial cells (HCAECs) were used to investigate chemotaxis and transendothelial migration (TEM) of monocytes in conventional and impedance-based systems. THP-1 cells migrated through a monolayer of HCAECs in response to C-X-C motif ligand 12 (CXCL12), a chemokine involved in diverse cellular functions including chemotaxis and survival of stem cells. Treatment of THP-1 cells with extracts from 3R4F or pMRTP induced concentration-dependent increases in cytotoxicity (7-aminoactinomycin D), and inflammation (IL-8 and TNF-α). CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis and TEM were decreased in extract-treated THP-1 cells. Extracts from 3R4F were ~21 times more potent than those from pMRTP in all examined endpoints. Extracts from 3R4F and pMRTP induced concentration-dependent responses in assays of inflammation, cytotoxicity, chemotaxis, and TEM. Furthermore, our findings indicate that extracts from a pMRTP are significantly less cytotoxic and induce less inflammation than those from the reference cigarette, 3R4F. PMID:25839901

  4. The erbB3- and IGF-1 receptor-initiated signaling pathways exhibit distinct effects on lapatinib sensitivity against trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hui; Yang, Xiao He; Edgerton, Susan M; Thor, Ann D; Wu, Xiaoying; He, Zhimin; Liu, Bolin

    2016-01-19

    Both erbB3 and IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) have been shown to play an important role in trastuzumab resistance. However, it remains unclear whether erbB3- and IGF-1R-initiated signaling pathways possess distinct effects on the sensitivity of lapatinib, a dual tyrosine kinase inhibitor against both EGFR and erbB2, in trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer. Here, we show that the trastuzumab-resistant SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 breast cancer sublines, as compared the parental SKBR3 and BT474 cells, respectively, exhibit refractoriness to lapatinib. Knockdown of erbB3 inhibited Akt in SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 cells, significantly increased lapatinib efficacy, and dramatically re-sensitized the cells to lapatinib-induced apoptosis. In contrast, specific knockdown of IGF-1R did not alter the cells' responsiveness to lapatinib. While the levels of phosphorylated Src (P-Src) were reduced upon IGF-1R downregulation, the P-Akt levels remained unchanged. Furthermore, a specific inhibitor of Akt, but not Src, significantly enhanced lapatinib-mediated anti-proliferative/anti-survival effects on SKBR3-pool2 and BT474-HR20 cells. These data indicate that erbB3 signaling is critical for both trastuzumab and lapatinib resistances mainly through the PI-3K/Akt pathway, whereas IGF-1R-initiated Src activation results in trastuzumab resistance without affecting lapatinib sensitivity. Our findings may facilitate the development of precision therapeutic regimens for erbB2-positive breast cancer patients who become resistant to erbB2-targeted therapy. PMID:26621843

  5. Towards the small and the beautiful: a small dibromotyrosine derivative from Pseudoceratina sp. sponge exhibits potent apoptotic effect through targeting IKK/NFκB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Su, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Cheng; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Du, Ying-Chi; Su, Chiang-Wen; Tsao, Chia-Wei; Liu, Li-Lian; Chou, Yalan; Chang, Wen-Been; Su, Yin-Di; Chiang, Michael Y; Yeh, Yao-Tsung; Lu, Mei-Chin

    2013-09-01

    A dibromotyrosine derivative, (1'R,5'S,6'S)-2-(3',5'-dibromo-1',6'-dihydroxy-4'-oxocyclohex-2'-enyl) acetonitrile (DT), was isolated from the sponge Pseudoceratina sp., and was found to exhibit a significant cytotoxic activity against leukemia K562 cells. Despite the large number of the isolated bromotyrosine derivatives, studies focusing on their biological mechanism of action are scarce. In the current study we designed a set of experiments to reveal the underlying mechanism of DT cytotoxic activity against K562 cells. First, the results of MTT cytotoxic and the annexin V-FITC/PI apoptotic assays, indicated that the DT cytotoxic activity is mediated through induction of apoptosis. This effect was also supported by caspases-3 and -9 activation as well as PARP cleavage. DT induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as indicated by flow cytometric assay. The involvement of ROS generation in the apoptotic activity of DT was further corroborated by the pretreatment of K562 cells with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, which prevented apoptosis and the disruption of MMP induced by DT. Results of cell-free system assay suggested that DT can act as a topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor, unlike the clinical anticancer drug, etoposide, which acts as a topoisomerase poison. Additionally, we found that DT treatment can block IKK/NFκB pathway and activate PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings suggest that the cytotoxic effect of DT is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent apoptosis which is mediated through oxidative stress. Therefore, DT represents an interesting reference point for the development of new cytotoxic agent targeting IKK/NFκB pathway. PMID:24065159

  6. Towards the Small and the Beautiful: A Small Dibromotyrosine Derivative from Pseudoceratina sp. Sponge Exhibits Potent Apoptotic Effect through Targeting IKK/NFκB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jui-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Cheng; El-Shazly, Mohamed; Du, Ying-Chi; Su, Chiang-Wen; Tsao, Chia-Wei; Liu, Li-Lian; Chou, Yalan; Chang, Wen-Been; Su, Yin-Di; Chiang, Michael Y.; Yeh, Yao-Tsung; Lu, Mei-Chin

    2013-01-01

    A dibromotyrosine derivative, (1′R,5′S,6′S)-2-(3′,5′-dibromo-1′,6′-dihydroxy-4′-oxocyclohex-2′-enyl) acetonitrile (DT), was isolated from the sponge Pseudoceratina sp., and was found to exhibit a significant cytotoxic activity against leukemia K562 cells. Despite the large number of the isolated bromotyrosine derivatives, studies focusing on their biological mechanism of action are scarce. In the current study we designed a set of experiments to reveal the underlying mechanism of DT cytotoxic activity against K562 cells. First, the results of MTT cytotoxic and the annexin V-FITC/PI apoptotic assays, indicated that the DT cytotoxic activity is mediated through induction of apoptosis. This effect was also supported by caspases-3 and -9 activation as well as PARP cleavage. DT induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) as indicated by flow cytometric assay. The involvement of ROS generation in the apoptotic activity of DT was further corroborated by the pretreatment of K562 cells with N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), a ROS scavenger, which prevented apoptosis and the disruption of MMP induced by DT. Results of cell-free system assay suggested that DT can act as a topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor, unlike the clinical anticancer drug, etoposide, which acts as a topoisomerase poison. Additionally, we found that DT treatment can block IKK/NFκB pathway and activate PI3K/Akt pathway. These findings suggest that the cytotoxic effect of DT is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction-dependent apoptosis which is mediated through oxidative stress. Therefore, DT represents an interesting reference point for the development of new cytotoxic agent targeting IKK/NFκB pathway. PMID:24065159

  7. Maraviroc and Other HIV-1 Entry Inhibitors Exhibit a Class-Specific Redistribution Effect That Results in Increased Extracellular Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Victor G.; Schader, Susan M.; Oliveira, Maureen; Colby-Germinario, Susan P.; Donahue, Daniel A.; Singhroy, Diane N.; Tressler, Randy; Sloan, Richard D.

    2012-01-01

    HIV entry inhibitors, such as maraviroc (MVC), prevent cell-free viruses from entering the cells. In clinical trials, patients who were treated with MVC often displayed viral loads that were above the limit of conventional viral load detection compared to efavirenz-based regimens. We hypothesize that viruses blocked by entry inhibitors may be redistributed to plasma, where they artificially increase viral load measurements compared to those with the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) that act intracellularly. We infected PM-1 cells with CCR5-tropic HIV-1 BaL or CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 NL4-3 in the presence of inhibitory concentrations of efavirenz, raltegravir, enfuvirtide, maraviroc, and AMD3100, the latter three being entry inhibitors. Supernatant viral load, reverse transcriptase enzyme activity, and intracellular nucleic acid levels were measured at times up to 24 h postinfection. Infectivity of redistributed dual-tropic HIV-1 was assessed using TZM-bl cells. Extracellular viral load analysis revealed that entry inhibitor-treated cells had higher levels of virus in the supernatant than the cells treated with other ARVs at 8 h postinfection. By 24 h, the supernatant viral load was still higher for entry inhibitors than other ARVs. We observed a correlation between viral load and the step of entry inhibition. Dual-tropic virus infectivity was undiminished utilizing the CCR5 coreceptor following redistribution by CXCR4 entry inhibition. This in vitro model indicates that entry inhibitors exhibit a redistribution effect unseen with intracellular ARV drugs. Based on these results, the effectiveness of some entry inhibitors may be underestimated if plasma viral load is used as a sole indicator of clinical success. PMID:22615275

  8. Combined treatment with fenretinide and indomethacin induces AIF-mediated, non-classical cell death in human acute T-cell leukemia Jurkat cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hojka-Osinska, Anna; Ziolo, Ewa; Rapak, Andrzej

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The combination of fenretinide and indomethacin induces a high level of cell death. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic pathway is caspase-independent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Jurkat cells undergo AIF-mediated cell death. -- Abstract: Currently used cytotoxic drugs in cancer therapy have a similar mechanism of action and low specificity. Applied simultaneously, they show an additive effect with strong side effects. Clinical trials with the use of different agents in cancer therapy show that the use of these compounds alone is not very effective in fighting cancer. An alternative solution could be to apply a combination of these agents, because their combination has a synergistic effect on some cancer cells. Therefore, in our investigations we examined the effects of a synthetic retinoid-fenretinide when combined with a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-indomethacin on the process of apoptosis in the acute human T-cell leukemia cell line Jurkat. We demonstrate that treatment with the combination of the tested compounds induces the death of cells, that is peculiar and combines features of apoptosis as well as non-apoptotic cell death. In detail we observed, cell membrane permeabilization, phosphatydylserine exposure, no oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation, no caspase-3 activation, but apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation. Taken together these results indicate, that Jurkat cells after treatment with a combination of fenretinide and indomethacin undergo AIF-mediated programmed cell death.

  9. NMR characterization of copper and lipid interactions of the C2B domain of synaptotagmin I—relevance to the non-classical secretion of the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-1)

    PubMed Central

    Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Gao, Li; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy; Daily, Anna E.; Brixey, Sherri; Liu, Huimin; Davis, Dan; Adams, Paul; Prudovsky, Igor; Kumar, Thallapuranam Krishnaswamy Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Human fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-1) is a ~17 kDa heparin binding cytokine. It lacks the conventional hydrophobic N-terminal signal sequence and is secreted through non-classical secretion routes. Under stress, hFGF-1 is released as a multiprotein complex consisting of hFGF-1, S100A13 (a calcium binding protein), and p40 synaptotagmin (Syt1). Copper (Cu2+) is shown to be required for the formation of the multiprotein hFGF-1 release complex (Landriscina et al.,2001; Di Serio et al., 2008). Syt1, containing the lipid binding C2B domain, is believed to play an important role in the eventual export of the hFGF-1 across the lipid bilayer. In this study, we characterize Cu2+ and lipid interactions of the C2B domain of Syt1 using multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. The results highlight how Cu2+ appears to stabilize the protein bound to pS vesicles. Cu2+ and lipid binding interface mapped using 2D 1H–15N heteronuclear single quantum coherence experiments reveal that residues in β-strand I contributes to the unique Cu2+ binding site in the C2B domain. In the absence of metal ions, residues located in Loop II and β-strand IV contribute to binding to unilamelar pS vesicles. In the presence of Cu2+, additional residues located in Loops I and III appear to stabilize the protein-lipid interactions. The results of this study provide valuable information towards understanding the molecular mechanism of the Cu2+-induced non-classical secretion of hFGF-1. PMID:19835837

  10. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells delivering sTRAIL home to lung cancer mediated by MCP-1/CCR2 axis and exhibit antitumor effects.

    PubMed

    Yan, Cihui; Song, Xinmiao; Yu, Wenwen; Wei, Feng; Li, Hui; Lv, Mengguo; Zhang, Xinwei; Ren, Xiubao

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are believed to be a potential vehicle delivering antitumor agents for their tumor-homing capacity, while the underlying mechanism is yet to be explored. The apoptotic ligand TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been suggested as a promising candidate for cancer gene therapy owing to its advantage of selectively inducing apoptosis in cancer cells while sparing normal cells. An isoleucine zipper (ISZ) added to the N-terminal of secretable soluble TRAIL (sTRAIL) can generate the trimeric form of TRAIL (ISZ-sTRAIL) and increase its antitumor potential. However, the inefficient delivery and toxicity are still obstacles for its use. In this study, the migration of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) to lung cancer was observed through transwell migration assay and animal bioluminescent imaging both in vitro and in vivo. We found that the homing ability of HUMSCs was suppressed after either knocking down the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1(MCP-1) in lung cancer cells or blocking CCR2 expressed on the surface of HUMSCs, indicating the important role of MCP-1/CCR2 axis in the tropism of HUMSCs to lung cancer. Furthermore, we genetically modified HUMSCs to deliver ISZ-sTRAIL to tumor sites specifically. This targeted therapeutic system exhibited promising apoptotic induction and antitumor potential in a xenograft mouse model without obvious side effects. In conclusion, HUMSCs expressing ISZ-sTRAIL might be an efficient therapeutic approach against lung cancer and MCP-1/CCR2 axis is essential for the tumor tropism of HUMSCs. PMID:26733169

  11. Paradoxical stimulatory effects of the "standard" histamine H4-receptor antagonist JNJ7777120: the H4 receptor joins the club of 7 transmembrane domain receptors exhibiting functional selectivity.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Roland; Schneider, Erich H; Dove, Stefan; Brunskole, Irena; Neumann, Detlef; Strasser, Andrea; Buschauer, Armin

    2011-04-01

    The histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) is expressed in several cell types of the immune system and is assumed to play an important pro-inflammatory role in various diseases, including bronchial asthma, atopic dermatitis, and pruritus. Accordingly, H(4)R antagonists have been suggested to provide valuable drugs for the treatment of these diseases. Over the past decade, the indole derivative 1-[(5-chloro-1H-indol-2-yl)carbonyl]-4-methylpiperazine (JNJ7777120) has become the "standard" H(4)R antagonist and has been extensively used to assess the pathophysiological role of the H(4)R. However, the situation has now become more complicated by recent data (p. 749 and Naunyn Schmiedebergs Arch Pharmacol doi: 10.1007/s00210-011-0612-3) showing that JNJ7777120 can also activate β-arrestin in a supposedly G(i)-protein-independent (pertussis toxin-insensitive) manner and that at certain H(4)R species orthologs, JNJ7777120 exhibits partial agonist efficacy with respect to G(i)-protein activation (steady-state high-affinity GTPase activity). These novel findings can be explained within the concept of functional selectivity or biased signaling, assuming unique ligand-specific receptor conformations with distinct signal transduction capabilities. Thus, great caution must be exerted when interpreting in vivo effects of JNJ7777120 as H(4)R antagonism. We discuss future directions to get out of the current dilemma in which there is no "standard" H(4)R antagonist available to the scientific community. PMID:21266488

  12. Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine isolated from Cucumaria frondosa exhibits anti-hyperglycemic effects via activating phosphoinositide 3-kinase/protein kinase B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shiwei; Xu, Leilei; Shi, Di; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Yuming; Lou, Qiaoming; Xue, Changhu

    2014-04-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid-enriched phosphatidylcholine was isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa (Cucumaria-PC) and its effects on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemic rats were investigated. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal control, model control (STZ), low- and high-dose Cucumaria-PC groups (STZ + Cucumaria-PC at 25 and 75 mg/Kg·b·wt, intragastrically, respectively). Blood glucose, insulin, glycogen in liver and gastrocnemius were determined over 60 days. Insulin signaling in the rats' gastrocnemius was determined by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blotting. The results showed that Cucumaria-PC significantly decreased blood glucose level, increased insulin secretion and glycogen synthesis in diabetic rats. RT-PCR analysis revealed that Cucumaria-PC significantly promoted the expressions of glycometabolism-related genes of insulin receptor (IR), insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1), phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), protein kinase B (PKB), and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in gastrocnemius. Western blotting assay demonstrated that Cucumaria-PC remarkably enhanced the proteins abundance of IR-β, PI3K, PKB, GLUT4, as well as phosphorylation of Tyr-IR-β, p85-PI3K, Ser473-PKB (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). These findings suggested that Cucumaria-PC exhibited significant anti-hyperglycemic activities through up-regulating PI3K/PKB signal pathway mediated by insulin. Nutritional supplementation with Cucumaria-PC, if validated for human studies, may offer an adjunctive therapy for diabetes mellitus. PMID:24168893

  13. Effects of the η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr Ligand on the Properties Exhibited by Its Tungsten Nitrosyl Complexes.

    PubMed

    Fabulyak, Diana; Baillie, Rhett A; Patrick, Brian O; Legzdins, Peter; Rosenfeld, Devon C

    2016-02-15

    Reaction of Na[η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr] with W(CO)6 in refluxing THF for 4 days generates a solution of Na[(η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(CO)3] that when treated with N-methyl-N-nitroso-p-toluenesulfonamide at ambient temperatures affords (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)(CO)2 (1) that is isolable in good yield as an analytically pure orange oil. Treatment of 1 with an equimolar amount of I2 in Et2O at ambient temperatures affords (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)I2 (2) as a dark brown solid in excellent yield. Sequential treatment at low temperatures of 2 with 0.5 equiv of Mg(CH2CMe3)2 and Mg(CH2CH═CMe2)2 in Et2O produces the alkyl allyl complex, (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)(CH2CMe3)(η(3)-CH2CHCMe2) (3), as a thermally sensitive yellow liquid. Complex 3 may also be synthesized, albeit in low yield, in one vessel at low temperatures by reacting 1 first with 1 equiv of PCl5 and then with the binary magnesium reagents specified above. Interestingly, similar treatment of 1 in Et2O with PCl5 and only 0.5 equiv of Mg(CH2CH═CMe2)2 results in the formation of the unusual complex (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)(PCl2CMe2CH═CH2)Cl2 (4), which probably is formed via a metathesis reaction of the binary magnesium reagent with (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)(PCl3)Cl2. The C-D activation of C6D6 by complex 3 has been investigated and compared to that exhibited by its η(5)-C5Me5, η(5)-C5Me4H, and η(5)-C5Me4(n)Pr analogues. Kinetic analyses of the various activations have established that the presence of the η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr ligand significantly increases the rate of the reaction, an outcome that can be attributed to a combination of steric and electronic factors. In addition, mechanistic studies have established that in solution 3 loses neopentane under ambient conditions to generate exclusively the 16e η(2)-diene intermediate complex (η(5)-C5H4(i)Pr)W(NO)(η(2)-CH2═CMeCH═CH2), which then effects the subsequent C-D activations. This behavior contrasts with that exhibited by the η(5)-C5Me5 analogue of 3 which forms both η(2

  14. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  15. Silver Nanoparticles Exhibit the Dose-Dependent Anti-Proliferative Effect against Human Squamous Carcinoma Cells Attenuated in the Presence of Berberine.

    PubMed

    Dziedzic, Arkadiusz; Kubina, Robert; Bułdak, Rafał J; Skonieczna, Magda; Cholewa, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    The biological activity of nanosize silver particles towards oral epithelium-derived carcinoma seems to be still underinvestigated. We evaluated the influence of low doses of nanosize scale silver particles on the proliferation and viability of malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes in vitro, alone and in conjunction with the plant alkaloid berberine. Cells of human tongue squamous carcinoma SCC-25 (ATCC CRL-1628), cultivated with the mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, were exposed to silver nanoparticles alone (AgNPs, concentrations from 0.31 to 10 μg/mL) and to a combination of AgNPs with berberine chloride (BER, 1/2 IC50 concentration) during 24 h and 48 h. The cytotoxic activity of AgNPs with diameters of 10 nm ± 4 nm was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Cell cycle analysis was performed by treating cells with propidium iodide followed by flow-activated cell sorting. RT-QPCR reaction was used to assess expression of anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and pro-apoptotic protein Bcl-2-associated X protein Bax genes expression. Monodisperse silver nanoparticles at a concentration of 10 μg/mL arrested SCC-25 cells cycle after 48 h at the G0/G1 phase in a dose- and time-dependent manner through disruption G0/G1 checkpoint, with increase of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio gene expression. AgNPs exhibit cytotoxic effects on SCC-25 malignant oral epithelial keratinocytes, which is diminished when combined with BER. The AgNPs concentration required to inhibit the growth of carcinoma cells by 50% (IC50) after 48 h was estimated at 5.19 μg/mL. AgNPs combined with BER increased the expression of Bcl-2 while decreasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2 in SCC-25 cells. Silver particles at low doses therefore reduce the proliferation and viability of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. SCC-25 cells are susceptible to damage from AgNPs-induced stress, which can be regulated by the natural alkaloid berberine, suggesting that nanoparticles

  16. An Empirical Analysis of the Effects of a Possible Sinus Infection and Weighted Vest on Functional Analysis Outcomes of Self-Injury Exhibited by a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2005-01-01

    Analogue functional analysis methodology was used to assess potential maintaining contingencies of episodic self-injurious behavior (SIB) of a 4-year-old child diagnosed with autism. Analogue conditions were presented within a multielement design when the child did, and did not exhibit signs of a possible sinus infection, and when the participant,…

  17. Non-classical shallow water flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Carina M.; Howison, S. D.; Ockendon, H.; Ockendon, J. R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with violent discontinuities in shallow water flows with large Froude number F. On a horizontal base, the paradigm problem is that of the impact of two fluid layers in situations where the flow can be modelled as two smooth regions joined by a singularity in the flow field. Within the framework of shallow water theory, we show that, over a certain time-scale, this discontinuity may be described by a delta shock, which is a weak solution of the underlying conservation laws in which the depth and mass and momentum fluxes have both delta function and step function components. We also make some conjectures about how this model evolves from the traditional model for jet impacts in which a spout is emitted. For flows on a sloping base, we show that for flow with an aspect ratio of O(F-2) on a base with an O(1) or larger slope, the governing equations admit a new type of discontinuous solution that is also modelled as a delta shock. The physical manifestation of this discontinuity is a small tube' of fluid bounding the flow. The delta-shock conditions for this flow are derived and solved for a point source on an inclined plane. This latter delta-shock framework also sheds light on the evolution of the layer impact on a horizontal base

  18. Cystamine preparations exhibit anticoagulant activity.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Maria M; Holle, Lori A; Stember, Katherine G; Devette, Christa I; Monroe, Dougald M; Wolberg, Alisa S

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  19. Cystamine Preparations Exhibit Anticoagulant Activity

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Maria M.; Holle, Lori A.; Stember, Katherine G.; Devette, Christa I.; Monroe, Dougald M.; Wolberg, Alisa S.

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminases are a superfamily of isoenzymes found in cells and plasma. These enzymes catalyze the formation of ε-N-(γ-glutamyl)-lysyl crosslinks between proteins. Cystamine blocks transglutaminase activity and is used in vitro in human samples and in vivo in mice and rats in studies of coagulation, immune dysfunction, and inflammatory disease. These studies have suggested cystamine blocks fibrin crosslinking and has anti-inflammatory effects, implicating transglutaminase activity in the pathogenesis of several diseases. We measured the effects of cystamine on fibrin crosslinking, tissue factor-triggered plasma clot formation and thrombin generation, and coagulation factor enzymatic activity. At concentrations that blocked fibrin crosslinking, cystamine also inhibited plasma clot formation and reduced thrombin generation. Cystamine inhibited the amidolytic activity of coagulation factor XI and thrombin towards chromogenic substrates. These findings demonstrate that cystamine exhibits anticoagulant activity during coagulation. Given the close relationship between coagulation and inflammation, these findings suggest prior studies that used cystamine to implicate transglutaminase activity in disease pathogenesis warrant re-examination. PMID:25915545

  20. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  1. Exhibitions: Facing Outward, Pointing Inward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) Exhibitions Project of the early 1990s produced a range of work that continues to inform the practice of using exhibitions as a "360 degree" method of transforming teaching and learning, community connections, school design, and assessment. Among that work was this paper coupling the origins of exhibitions…

  2. Changes in magnetic domain structure during twin boundary motion in single crystal Ni-Mn-Ga exhibiting magnetic shape memory effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopecký, V.; Fekete, L.; Perevertov, O.; Heczko, O.

    2016-05-01

    The complexity of Ni-Mn-Ga single crystal originates from the interplay between ferromagnetic domain structure and ferroelastic twinned microstructure. Magnetic domain structure in the vicinity of single twin boundary was studied using magneto-optical indicator film and magnetic force microscopy technique. The single twin boundary of Type I was formed mechanically and an initial magnetization state in both variants were restored by local application of magnetic field (≈40 kA/m). The differently oriented variants exhibited either stripe or labyrinth magnetic domain pattern in agreement with the uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the martensite. The twin boundary was then moved by compressive or tensile stress. The passage of the boundary resulted in the formation of granular or rake domains, respectively. Additionally, the specific magnetic domains pattern projected by twin boundary gradually vanished during twin boundary motion.

  3. 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' Titers in and Infection Effects on Potato Tuber Chemistry of Promising Germplasm Exhibiting Tolerance to Zebra Chip Disease.

    PubMed

    Wallis, C M; Munyaneza, J E; Chen, J; Novy, R; Bester, G; Buchman, J L; Nordgaard, J; van Hest, P

    2015-12-01

    Long-term sustainable management of zebra chip (ZC) disease of potato requires development of tolerant or resistant germplasm. To this end, 283 potato varieties and breeding clones were infected with the ZC putative causal agent 'Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum' (Lso) by potato psyllid vector inoculations in 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013. Potato germplasm was then examined for development of fresh and fried ZC symptoms. Over multiple years 29 breeding clones exhibited little to no symptoms in freshly cut tuber slices, and five exhibited little to no symptoms in fried slices. These five presumed tolerant breeding clones were chosen for further screening to determine whether the lack of physiological responses to Lso infection was the cause of observed tolerance. To this end, tuber amino acid, sugar, and phenolic levels were compared between noninfected and Lso-infected plants. The five putative tolerant clones had less dramatic shifts in host physiology following Lso infection than the susceptible Atlantic cultivar. This suggested lack of host responses to Lso infection that result in major changes in tuber biochemistry is a potential mechanism of ZC resistance. However, the susceptible Atlantic cultivar did have consistently greater Lso titers compared with two of the tolerant entries, so for these reductions in Lso pathogen progression also might be a factor. Regardless, lack of host responses could still remain one trait that could be used to aid in selection of ZC-resistant potato varieties, as other tolerant lines had infection levels consistent with susceptible Atlantic cultivar. These results also suggest that germplasm derived from relatives of cultivated potato plants are viable sources of ZC disease resistance. PMID:26312966

  4. Effects of An Integrated Format for Reading Instruction on the Comprehension and Word-Recognition Performance of Fourth- and Fifth-Grade Students Who Exhibit Severe Reading Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmer, Lavada Jacumin; Thames, Dana G.; Kazelskis, Richard

    A study examined the effectiveness of an integrated language arts instructional format for teaching reading compared with the effectiveness of the typical traditional reading program. The study investigated the effectiveness of approaches that are representative of both viewpoints of the reading process (i.e., word recognition and the construction…

  5. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Md. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson NIH Director Dr. Elias ... addresses visitors to the opening of the exhibition. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson Brothers Niko and Theo ...

  6. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Against the Odds Exhibition Opens Past Issues / Spring 2008 ... Research in Bethesda. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson "Against the Odds" is a remarkable story of achievement ...

  7. T cells expressing CD123-specific chimeric antigen receptors exhibit specific cytolytic effector functions and antitumor effects against human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mardiros, Armen; Dos Santos, Cedric; McDonald, Tinisha; Brown, Christine E.; Wang, Xiuli; Budde, L. Elizabeth; Hoffman, Lauren; Aguilar, Brenda; Chang, Wen-Chung; Bretzlaff, William; Chang, Brenda; Jonnalagadda, Mahesh; Starr, Renate; Ostberg, Julie R.; Jensen, Michael C.; Bhatia, Ravi

    2013-01-01

    Induction treatments for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have remained largely unchanged for nearly 50 years, and AML remains a disease of poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation can achieve cures in select patients and highlights the susceptibility of AML to donor-derived immunotherapy. The interleukin-3 receptor α chain (CD123) has been identified as a potential immunotherapeutic target because it is overexpressed in AML compared with normal hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, we developed 2 chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) containing a CD123-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with a CD28 costimulatory domain and CD3-ζ signaling domain, targeting different epitopes on CD123. CD123-CAR–redirected T cells mediated potent effector activity against CD123+ cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples. CD123 CAR T cells did not eliminate granulocyte/macrophage and erythroid colony formation in vitro. Additionally, T cells obtained from patients with active AML can be modified to express CD123 CARs and are able to lyse autologous AML blasts in vitro. Finally, CD123 CAR T cells exhibited antileukemic activity in vivo against a xenogeneic model of disseminated AML. These results suggest that CD123 CAR T cells are a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of high-risk AML. PMID:24030378

  8. The primary structure of bdellin B-3 from the leech Hirudo medicinalis. Bdellin B-3 is a compact proteinase inhibitor of a "non-classical" Kazal type. It is present in the leech in a high molecular mass form.

    PubMed

    Fink, E; Rehm, H; Gippner, C; Bode, W; Eulitz, M; Machleidt, W; Fritz, H

    1986-12-01

    A proteinase inhibitor was isolated from extracts of the leech Hirudo medicinalis by gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. This inhibitor is similar to the bdellins in that it blocks the activity of trypsin, plasmin and sperm acrosin but has a molecular mass, as estimated by SDS polyacrylamide electrophoresis, of about 20 kDa, whereas the bdellins have molecular masses in the range 5-6 kDa. It is therefore designated as high-molecular mass bdellin B-3 (HMB). The amino-acid sequence of the inhibitor was elucidated as far as position 56. This revealed that the molecule consists of a bdellin B-3 moiety, corresponding to the N-terminal 46 residues, which is then extended at the C-terminus by a polypeptide chain of the composition Asx15, Glx25, Gly6, Val, His26-27 and Lys4. It has been formerly concluded from a partial amino-acid sequence that bdellin B-3 is a Kazal-type inhibitor. However, the complete sequence of bdellin B-3, represented by the N-terminal 46 residues of HMB, discloses that bdellin B-3 is a non-classical Kazal-type inhibitor when the number of amino-acid residues between half-cystines are considered. Presuming that formation of disulfide bridges principally follows the same pattern as in classical Kazal-type inhibitors the bdellin B-3 molecule was modeled based on the known three-dimensional structure of the third ovomucoid domains. This showed that a compact arrangement of the peptide chain of bdellin B-3 is conceivable.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3828073

  9. Disease-causing mutations associated with four bestrophinopathies exhibit disparate effects on the localization, but not the oligomerization, of Bestrophin-1.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Adiv A; Lee, Yong-Suk; Chadburn, Andrew J; Tammaro, Paolo; Manson, Forbes D; Marmorstein, Lihua Y; Marmorstein, Alan D

    2014-04-01

    BEST1 encodes Bestrophin-1 (Best1), a homo-oligomeric, integral membrane protein localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of the retinal pigment epithelium. Mutations in BEST1 cause five distinct retinal degenerative diseases, including adult vitelliform macular dystrophy (AVMD), autosomal recessive bestrophinopathy (ARB), autosomal dominant vitreoretinochoroidopathy (ADVIRC), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). The mechanisms underlying these diseases and why mutations cause one disease over another are, for the most part, unknown. To gain insights into these four diseases, we expressed 28 Best1 mutants fused to YFP in polarized MDCK monolayers and, via confocal microscopy and immunofluorescence, live-cell FRET, and reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments, screened these mutants for defects in localization and oligomerization. All 28 mutants exhibited comparable FRET efficiencies to and co-immunoprecipitated with WT Best1, indicating unimpaired oligomerization. RP- and ADVIRC-associated mutants were properly localized to the basolateral plasma membrane of cells, while two AVMD and most ARB mutants were mislocalized. When co-expressed, all mislocalized mutants caused mislocalization of WT Best1 to intracellular compartments. Our current and past results indicate that mislocalization of Best1 is not an absolute feature of any individual bestrophinopathy, occurring in AVMD, BVMD, and ARB. Furthermore, some ARB mutants that do not also cause dominant disease cause mislocalization of Best1, indicating that mislocalization is not a cause of disease, and that absence of Best1 activity from the plasma membrane is tolerated. Lastly, we find that the ARB truncation mutants L174Qfs*57 and R200X can form oligomers with WT Best1, indicating that the first ∼174 amino acids of Best1 are sufficient for oligomerization to occur. PMID:24560797

  10. Two short-acting kappa opioid receptor antagonists (zyklophin and LY2444296) exhibited different behavioral effects from the long-acting antagonist norbinaltorphimine in mouse anxiety tests.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peng; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Aldrich, Jane V; Tunis, Julia; Parry, Christopher; Liu-Chen, Lee-Yuan

    2016-02-26

    Prototypical long-acting kappa opioid receptor (KOPR) antagonists [e.g., norbinaltorphimine (norBNI)] have been reported to exert anxiolytic-like effects in several commonly used anxiety tests in rodents including the novelty-induced hypophagia (NIH) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. It remains unknown if the short-acting KOPR antagonists (e.g., zyklophin and LY2444296) have similar effects. In this study effects of zyklophin and LY2444296 (s.c.) were investigated in the NIH and EPM tests in mice 1h post-injection and compared with norBNI (i.p.) 48h post-administration. In the NIH test, zyklophin at 3 and 1mg/kg, but not 0.3mg/kg, or LY2444296 at 30mg/kg decreased the latency of palatable food consumption in novel cages, but had no effect in training cages, similar to norBNI (10mg/kg). Zyklophin at 3 or 1mg/kg increased or had a trend of increasing the amount of palatable food consumption in novel cages, with no effects in training cages, further indicating its anxiolytic-like effect, but norBNI (10mg/kg) and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) did not. In the EPM test, norBNI (10mg/kg) increased open arm time and % open arm entries or time, but zyklophin at all three doses and LY2444296 (30mg/kg) had no effects. In addition, zyklophin at 3mg/kg increased numbers of close and total arm entries on EPM, suggesting increased activity; however, norBNI and LY2444296 had no effects on close and total arm entries. Thus, all three KOPR antagonists had anxiolytic-like effects in the NIH test. However, only the long-acting one (norBNI), but not the short-acting ones (zyklophin and LY2444296), demonstrated anti-anxiety like effects in the EPM test. It remains to be investigated if the differences are due to the differences in their durations of action and/or pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:26780565

  11. A pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic approach to show that not all fluoroquinolones exhibit similar sensitivity toward the proconvulsant effect of biphenyl acetic acid in rats.

    PubMed

    Marchand, S; Pariat, C; Boulanger, A; Bouquet, S; Couet, W

    2001-12-01

    The proconvulsant effect of biphenyl acetic acid (BPAA) on several fluoroquinolones (FQs) was investigated in vivo, by measuring drug concentrations in the biophase at the onset of convulsions. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 134) were given BPAA orally, at various doses 1 h before starting FQ infusion, which was maintained until the onset of maximal seizures, when cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma samples were collected for drug concentration determination. The FQ-BPAA interactions in the biophase (CSF) were adequately described on most occasions by an inhibitory Emax effect model with a baseline effect parameter. The efficacy of the proconvulsant effect was characterized by the ratio of the CSF concentrations of FQs at the onset of convulsant activity when BPAA was absent (CCSF0, FQs) and as BPAA CSF concentrations tended toward infinity (CCSFbase, FQs). This ratio varied from 15 for enoxacin to 1.9 for sparfloxacin. The potency of the proconvulsant effect was characterized by the CSF concentration of BPAA corresponding to a proconvulsant effect half of its maximum. This parameter varied between 0.18 +/- 0.06 micromol/L with enoxacin and 15.0 +/- 12.1 micromol/L with sparfloxacin. The CSF diffusion of all FQs was apparently non-linear, as well as the plasma protein binding of BPAA, complicating interpretation of plasma data. The important variability in the proconvulsant effect of BPAA demonstrated in this study between various FQs suggests that in vitro gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding experiments conducted in the presence of BPAA are unlikely to be good predictors of FQ convulsant risk in clinical practice. PMID:11733465

  12. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice

    PubMed Central

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, JN; Chain, F; Miquel, S; de Maredsous, C Desclée; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, EF; van Hylckama Vlieg, JET; Bermúdez-Humarán, LG; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities. PMID:25517879

  13. Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 and the commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prausnitzii A2-165 exhibit similar protective effects to induced barrier hyper-permeability in mice.

    PubMed

    Laval, L; Martin, R; Natividad, J N; Chain, F; Miquel, S; Desclée de Maredsous, C; Capronnier, S; Sokol, H; Verdu, E F; van Hylckama Vlieg, J E T; Bermúdez-Humarán, L G; Smokvina, T; Langella, P

    2015-01-01

    Impaired gut barrier function has been reported in a wide range of diseases and syndromes and in some functional gastrointestinal disorders. In addition, there is increasing evidence that suggests the gut microbiota tightly regulates gut barrier function and recent studies demonstrate that probiotic bacteria can enhance barrier integrity. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 on intestinal barrier function. In vitro results using a Caco-2 monolayer cells stimulated with TNF-α confirmed the anti-inflammatory nature of the strain CNCM I-3690 and pointed out a putative role for the protection of the epithelial function. Next, we tested the protective effects of L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 in a mouse model of increased colonic permeability. Most importantly, we compared its performance to that of the well-known beneficial human commensal bacterium Faecalibacterium prauznitzii A2-165. Increased colonic permeability was normalized by both strains to a similar degree. Modulation of apical tight junction proteins expression was then analyzed to decipher the mechanism underlying this effect. We showed that CNCM I-3690 partially restored the function of the intestinal barrier and increased the levels of tight junction proteins Occludin and E-cadherin. The results indicate L. rhamnosus CNCM I-3690 is as effective as the commensal anti-inflammatory bacterium F. prausnitzii to treat functional barrier abnormalities. PMID:25517879

  14. Furnished Cage System and Hen Well-Being: Comparative Effects of Furnished Cages and Battery Cages on Behavioral Exhibitions in White Leghorn Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The battery cage system is being banned in the European Union before or by 2012; and the furnished cage system will be the only cage system allowed after 2012. This study was conducted to examine the different effects of caging systems, furnished cages vs. battery cages, on bird behaviors. One hundr...

  15. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  16. Dual blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) exhibits potent anti-angiogenic effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Dong; Xie, Kun; Zhang, Longzhen; Yao, Xuejing; Li, Hongwen; Xu, Qiaoyu; Wang, Xin; Jiang, Jing; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-07-28

    Both vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF or FGF-2) are potent pro-angiogenic factors and play a critical role in cancer development and progression. Clinical anti-VEGF therapy trials had a major challenge due to upregulated expression of other pro-angiogenic factor, like FGF-2. This study developed a novel chimeric decoy receptor VF-Trap fusion protein to simultaneously block activity of both VEGF and FGF pathways in order to achieve an additive or synergistic anti-tumor effect. Our in vitro data showed that VF-Trap potently blocked proliferation and migration of both VEGF- and FGF-2-induced vascular endothelial cells. In animal models, treatment of xenograft tumors with VF-Trap resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth compared to blockage of the single molecule, like VEGF or FGF blocker. In addition, VF-Trap was also more potent in inhibition of ocular angiogenesis in a mouse oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model. These data demonstrated the potent anti-angiogenic effects of this novel VF-Trap fusion protein on blockage of VEGF and FGF-2 activity in vitro and in animal models. Further study will assess its effects in clinic as a therapeutic agent for angiogenesis-related disorders, such as cancer and ocular vascular diseases. PMID:27130666

  17. Ethanol extract of lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) root exhibits an anti-adipogenic effect in human pre-adipocytes and anti-obesity and anti-oxidant effects in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    You, Jeong Soon; Lee, Yun Ju; Kim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2014-03-01

    Lotus (Nelumbo Nucifera) root, a well-known medicinal plant in Asia, is reported to have various therapeutic benefits, including anti-diabetes, anti-hypertension, and anti-hyperlipidaemia. We hypothesized that the ethanol extract of lotus root (ELR) would exhibit an anti-adipogenic effect in human pre-adipocytes as well as anti-obesity and anti-oxidant effects in rats fed a high-fat diet. Treatment with ELR in human pre-adipocytes resulted in inhibition of lipid accumulation and attenuated expression of adipogenic transcription factors such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and adipocyte marker genes, such as glucose transporter 4 and leptin. Administration of ELR resulted in a significant decrease in relative weights of adipose tissues in rats fed a high-fat diet. Consumption of a high-fat diet resulted in an increase in serum total cholesterol (TC) and triglyceride (TG) levels; however, administration of ELR resulted in a decrease in the levels of TC and TG. Administration of ELR resulted in a decrease in the level of serum leptin and insulin. Administration of ELR in rats fed a high-fat diet resulted in a decrease in hepatic thiobarbituric acid reactive substance content, elevated by a high-fat diet and an increase in superoxide dismutase activity and hepatic glutathione content. These results suggest that lotus root exerts anti-oxidant and anti-obesity effects and could be used as a functional and nutraceutical ingredient in combatting obesity-related diseases. PMID:24655493

  18. Considering High-Tech Exhibits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a variety of high-tech exhibit media used in The Living World, an educational facility operated by The Saint Louis Zoo. Considers the strengths and weaknesses of holograms, video, animatronics, video-equipped microscopes, and computer interactives. Computer interactives are treated with special attention. (LZ)

  19. Heat-killed and live Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 exhibit similar effects on improving metabolic functions in high-fat diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Feng-Ching; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Huang, Tsui-Yin; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chai, Chee-Yin; Chen, Wan-Tzu; Fang, Ai-Hui; Chen, Yi-Hsing; Wu, Ching-Shuang

    2016-05-18

    Our objective was to investigate and compare the effects of heat-killed (HK) and live Lactobacillus reuteri GMNL-263 (Lr263) on insulin resistance and its related complications in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a HFD with either HK or live Lr263 for 12 weeks. The increases in the weight gain, serum glucose, insulin, and lipid profiles in the serum and liver observed in the HFD group were significantly reduced after HK or live Lr263 administration. Feeding HK or live Lr263 reversed the decreased number of probiotic bacteria and increased the number of pathogenic bacteria induced by high-fat treatment. The decreased intestinal barrier in the HFD group was markedly reversed by HK or live Lr263 treatments. The elevations of pro-inflammatory associated gene expressions in both adipose and hepatic tissues by high-fat administration were markedly decreased by HK or live Lr263 treatments. The increased macrophage infiltration noticed in adipose tissue after high-fat treatment was effectively suppressed by HK or live Lr263 consumption. The insulin resistance associated gene expressions in both adipose and hepatic tissues, which were downregulated in the HFD group, were markedly enhanced after HK or live Lr263 administration. HK or live Lr263 consumption significantly decreased hepatic lipogenic gene expressions stimulated by high-fat treatment. Administration of HK or live Lr263 significantly reduced hepatic oil red O staining and ameliorated the hepatic steatosis observed in high-fat treated rats. Our data suggested that similar to live Lr263, HK Lr263 exerted significant effects on attenuating obesity-induced metabolic abnormalities by reducing insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis formation. PMID:27163114

  20. Salivary α-amylase exhibits antiproliferative effects in primary cell cultures of rat mammary epithelial cells and human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is one of the most diagnosed cancers in females, frequently with fatal outcome, so that new strategies for modulating cell proliferation in the mammary tissue are urgently needed. There is some, as yet inconclusive evidence that α-amylase may constitute a novel candidate for affecting cellular growth. Methods The present investigation aimed to examine if salivary α-amylase, an enzyme well known for the metabolism of starch and recently introduced as a stress marker, is able to exert antiproliferative effects on the growth of mammary gland epithelial cells. For this purpose, primary epithelial cultures of breast tissue from two different inbred rat strains, Fischer 344 (F344) and Lewis, as well as breast tumor cells of human origin were used. Treatment with human salivary α-amylase was performed once daily for 2 days followed by cell counting (trypan blue assay) to determine alterations in cell numbers. Cell senescence after α-amylase treatment was assessed by β-galactosidase assay. Endogenous α-amylase was detected in cells from F344 and Lewis by immunofluorescence. Results Salivary α-amylase treatment in vitro significantly decreased the proliferation of primary cells from F344 and Lewis rats in a concentration-dependent manner. Noticeably, the sensitivity towards α-amylase was significantly higher in Lewis cells with stronger impact on cell growth after 5 and 50 U/ml compared to F344 cells. An antiproliferative effect of α-amylase was also determined in mammary tumor cells of human origin, but this effect varied depending on the donor, age, and type of the cells. Conclusions The results presented here indicate for the first time that salivary α-amylase affects cell growth in rat mammary epithelial cells and in breast tumor cells of human origin. Thus, α-amylase may be considered a novel, promising target for balancing cellular growth, which may provide an interesting tool for tumor prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:22027017

  1. Competition between potential energy minimization and number of contact points in two-dimension granular materials exhibiting Brazil-nut effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viridi, Sparisoma; Khotimah, Siti Nurul; Widayani, Novitrian

    2015-09-01

    The granular materials phenomenon known as Brazil-nut effect is discussed in this work, where its grain configurations are constructed artificially as time-independent using 2-d disks. Single intruder with 2.6 cm diameter is introduced to granular bed consisted of 1.3 cm diameter disks. Each created configuration is designed similar to observed one in experiments and simulations. Potential energy and number of contact points between grains are observed between initial and final configurations. Contactopy parameter change is also discussed. As comparison results from real experiment and simulation are also presented.

  2. Wild fish from the Bay of Quinte Area of Concern contain elevated tissue concentrations of PCBs and exhibit evidence of endocrine-related health effects.

    PubMed

    Simmons, D B D; McMaster, M E; Reiner, E J; Hewitt, L M; Parrott, J L; Park, B J; Brown, S B; Sherry, J P

    2014-05-01

    The Bay of Quinte (BOQ) is an Area of Concern listed under the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. The presence of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs in fish in the BOQ AOC has led to restrictions on fish consumption by humans, which is a beneficial use impairment. Adult yellow perch (Perca flavescens) and brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) were sampled from Trenton, Belleville, and Deseronto (reference site) in the BOQ. A suite of hormone assays and various measures of exposure and/or sublethal health effects were used to assess the health status of fish of both species and sex. Condition factor, hepatosomatic index, ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase activity, circulating steroid and thyroid hormones, thyroid activation, oocyte size distribution, spermatogenic cell stages, and plasma vitellogenin were among the endpoints that were significantly (p < 0.05) affected by location. Many of those effects corresponded with significantly (p < 0.05) greater tissue concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at Belleville and Trenton. Hepatic extracts from brown bullhead sampled from Trenton had significantly (p < 0.05) greater binding activity to the androgen receptor and sex steroid binding protein. Taken together, these data and preliminary data from a concomitant study suggest that PCBs are likely being hydroxylated in vivo, resulting in enhanced bioactivity at endocrine receptors and measurable health responses. The present study supports the growing body of evidence that PCBs and their metabolites can affect fish thyroid and steroid hormone systems. PMID:24576942

  3. Lovastatin and tumor necrosis factor-alpha exhibit potentiated antitumor effects against Ha-ras-transformed murine tumor via inhibition of tumor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Feleszko, W; Bałkowiec, E Z; Sieberth, E; Marczak, M; Dabrowska, A; Giermasz, A; Czajka, A; Jakóbisiak, M

    1999-05-17

    Lovastatin, a drug commonly used in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia, has previously been reported to exert potentiated antitumor activity when combined with either tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), cisplatin or doxorubicin in a melanoma model in mice. Since lovastatin interferes with the function of ras oncogene-encoded (Ras) proteins, we have investigated the antitumor activity of lovastatin and TNF-alpha using a Ha-ras-transformed murine tumor model. In in vitro studies, lovastatin inhibited the growth of cells transformed with Ha-ras oncogene (Ras-3T3 and HBL100-ras cells) more effectively than control NIH-3T3 and HBL100-neo cells. In in vivo experiments, the Ras-3T3 tumor demonstrated significantly increased sensitivity to combined treatment with both lovastatin (50 mg/kg) and TNF-alpha (1 microg/day) compared with either agent alone. Combined treatment with both agents also resulted in greater inhibition of blood-vessel formation. Ras-3T3 tumor cells produced increased amounts of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and lovastatin effectively suppressed VEGF production by these cells. Our results suggest that lovastatin increases antitumor activity of TNF-alpha against tumor cells transformed with v-Ha-ras oncogene via inhibition of tumor-induced blood-vessel formation. PMID:10225445

  4. Forsythiaside A Exhibits Anti-inflammatory Effects in LPS-Stimulated BV2 Microglia Cells Through Activation of Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Zhao, Hongfei; Lin, Chuangxin; Ren, Jie; Zhang, Shizhong

    2016-04-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress have been reported to play critical roles in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disease. Forsythiaside A, a phenylethanoside product isolated from air-dried fruits of Forsythia suspensa, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. In this study, the anti-inflammatory effects of forsythiaside A on LPS-stimulated BV2 microglia cells and primary microglia cells were investigated. The production of inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, NO and PGE2 were detected in this study. NF-κB, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression were detected by western blot analysis. Our results showed that forsythiaside A significantly inhibited LPS-induced inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-1β, NO and PGE2 production. LPS-induced NF-κB activation was suppressed by forsythiaside A. Furthermore, forsythiaside A was found to up-regulate the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that forsythiaside A inhibits LPS-induced inflammatory responses in BV2 microglia cells and primary microglia cells through inhibition of NF-κB activation and activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway. PMID:26498935

  5. Tempol, a Membrane-Permeable Radical Scavenger, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory and Cardioprotective Effects in the Cerulein-Induced Pancreatitis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Andrzej; Walczyna, Beata; Rajtar, Grażyna; Marciniak, Sebastian; Wojtak, Andrzej; Lasiecka, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    To date, it remains unclear whether mild form of acute pancreatitis (AP) may cause myocardial damage which may be asymptomatic for a long time. Pathogenesis of AP-related cardiac injury may be attributed in part to ROS/RNS overproduction. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the oxidative stress changes in both the pancreas and the heart and to estimate the protective effects of 1-oxyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-hydroxypiperidine (tempol) at the early phase of AP. Cerulein-induced AP led to the development of acute edematous pancreatitis with a significant decrease in the level of sulfhydryl (–SH) groups (oxidation marker) both in heart and in pancreatic tissues as well as a substantial increase in plasma creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB) activity (marker of the heart muscle lesion) which confirmed the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cardiac damage. The tempol treatment significantly reduced the intensity of inflammation and oxidative damage and decreased the morphological evidence of pancreas injury at early AP stages. Moreover, it markedly attenuated AP-induced cardiac damage revealed by normalization of the –SH group levels and CK-MB activity. On the basis of these studies, it is possible to conclude that tempol has a profound protective effect against cardiac and pancreatic damage induced by AP. PMID:26770650

  6. Simultaneous Inhibition of CXCR4 and VLA-4 Exhibits Combinatorial Effect in Overcoming Stroma-Mediated Chemotherapy Resistance in Mantle Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Ri; Eom, Ki-Seong

    2014-12-01

    There is growing evidence that crosstalk between mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) cells and stromal microenvironments, such as bone marrow and secondary lymphoid tissues, promotes tumor progression by enhancing survival and growth as well as drug resistance of MCL cells. Recent advances in the understanding of lymphoma microenvironment have led to the identification of crucial factors involved in the crosstalk and subsequent generation of their targeted agents. In the present study, we evaluated the combinatory effect of blocking antibodies (Ab) targeting CXCR4 and VLA-4, both of which were known to play significant roles in the induction of environment-mediated drug resistance (EMDR) in MCL cell line, Jeko-1. Simultaneous treatment with anti-CXCR4 and anti-VLA-4 Ab not only reduced the migration of Jeko-1 cells into the protective stromal cells, but also enhanced sensitivity of Jeko-1 to a chemotherapeutic agent to a greater degree than with either Ab alone. These combinatorial effects were associated with decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2, AKT and NF-κB. Importantly, drug resistance could not be overcome once the adhesion of Jeko-1 to the stromal occurred despite the combined use of Abs, suggesting that the efforts to mitigate migration of MCLs should be attempted as much as possible. Our results provide a basis for a future development of therapeutic strategies targeting both CXCR4 and VLA-4, such as Ab combinations or bispecific antibodies, to improve treatment outcomes of MCL with grave prognosis. PMID:25550696

  7. Naturally occurring autoantibodies against Aβ oligomers exhibited more beneficial effects in the treatment of mouse model of Alzheimer's disease than intravenous immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Teng; Xie, Xi-Xiu; Ji, Mei; Wang, Shao-Wei; Zha, Jun; Zhou, Wei-Wei; Yu, Xiao-Lin; Wei, Chen; Ma, Shan; Xi, Zhi-Ying; Pang, Guang-Li; Liu, Rui-Tian

    2016-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory loss, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and extracellular plaque deposits composed of β-amyloid (Aβ). Previous reports showed that naturally occurring autoantibodies, such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG), benefited patients with moderate-stage AD who carried an APOE-ε4 allele. However, the mechanism underlying the role of IVIG remains unclear. In this study, we identified naturally occurring autoantibodies against Aβ oligomers (NAbs-Aβo), which were purified by Aβ42 oligomer or Cibacron Blue affinity chromatography from IVIG and termed as Oli-NAbs and Blue-NAbs, respectively. Oli-NAbs and Blue-NAbs recognized Aβ42 oligomers or both Aβ40 and 42 oligomers, differently. Both antibodies inhibited Aβ42 aggregation and attenuated Aβ42-induced cytotoxicity. Compared with vehicles, Oli-NAbs, Blue-NAbs and IVIG significantly improved the memory and cognition, and reduced the soluble and oligomeric Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1dE9 transgenic mice. Further investigation showed that Blue-NAbs at increased doses effectively decreased plaque burden and insoluble Aβ levels, whereas Oli-NAbs significantly declined the microgliosis and astrogliosis, as well as the production of proinflammatory cytokines in vivo. Therefore, high levels of these antibodies against oligomeric Aβ40 or Aβ42 were required, correspondingly, to achieve the optimal effect. NAbs-Aβo could be condensed to a high concentration by affinity chromatography and its isolation from IVIG may not interfere with the normal function of conventional IVIG as its concentration is very low. Thus, the isolated NAbs-Aβo as an extra product of plasma required low cost and the enriched NAbs-Aβo may be more feasible than IVIG for the treatment of AD. PMID:26907803

  8. MARCKSL1 exhibits anti-angiogenic effects through suppression of VEGFR-2-dependent Akt/PDK-1/mTOR phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Boh-Ram; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Park, Mi-Sun; Seo, Seung-Hee; Park, Young-Min; Kwon, Young-Joo; Rho, Seung-Bae

    2016-02-01

    Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate-like 1 (MARCKSL1) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of apoptosis and has been shown to maintain antitumor and metastasis-suppressive properties. In the present study, we examined the effects of MARCKSL1 as a novel anti-angiogenic agent on the inhibition of angiogenesis-mediated cell migration. MARCKSL1 also reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation, as well as capillary-like tubular structure formation in vitro. MARCKSL1 disrupted phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) in ovarian tumorigenesis. In addition, MARCKSL1 showed potent anti-angiogenic activity and reduced the levels of VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) expression, an essential regulator of angiogenesis. Consistently, MARCKSL1 decreased VEGF‑induced phosphorylation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway components, including phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK-1), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC-2), p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase (p70S6K), and glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) protein. Collectively, our results provide evidence for the physiological/biological function of an endothelial cell system involved in angiogenesis through suppression of Akt/PDK-1/mTOR phosphorylation by interaction with VEGFR-2. PMID:26555156

  9. Momordica charantia seed extract exhibits strong anticoagulant effect by specifically interfering in intrinsic pathway of blood coagulation and dissolves fibrin clot.

    PubMed

    Manjappa, Bhagyalakshmi; Gangaraju, Sowmyashree; Girish, Kesturu S; Kemparaju, Kempaiah; Gonchigar, Sathish J; Shankar, Rohit L; Shinde, Manohar; Sannaningaiah, Devaraja

    2015-03-01

    The current study explores the anticoagulant and fibrin clot-hydrolyzing properties of Momordica charantia seed extract (MCSE). MCSE hydrolyzed casein with the specific activity of 0.780 units/mg per min. Interestingly, it enhanced the clot formation process of citrated human plasma from control 146 to 432 s. In addition, the intravenous injection of MCSE significantly prolonged the bleeding time in a dose-dependent manner from control 150 to more than 800 s, and strengthened its anticoagulant activity. Interestingly, MCSE specifically prolonged the clotting time of only activated partial thromboplastin time, but not prothrombin time, and revealed the participation of MCSE in the intrinsic pathway of the blood coagulation cascade. Furthermore, MCSE completely hydrolyzed both Aα and Bβ chains of the human fibrinogen and partially hydrolyzed the γ chain. However, it hydrolyzed all the chains (α polymer, α chain, β chain and γ-γ dimmers) of partially cross-linked human fibrin clot. The proteolytic activity followed by the anticoagulant effect of the MCSE was completely abolished by the 1,10-phenanthroline and phenyl methyl sulphonyl fluoride, but iodoacetic acid, EDTA, and ethylene glycol-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid did not. Curiously, MCSE did not hydrolyze any other plasma proteins except the plasma fibrinogen. Moreover, MCSE was devoid of RBC lysis, edema and hemorrhagic properties, suggesting its nontoxic nature. Taken together, MCSE may be a valuable candidate in the treatment of blood clot/thrombotic disorders. PMID:25192240

  10. Gracilaria edulis exhibit antiproliferative activity against human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 without causing adverse toxic effect in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sakthivel, Ravi; Muniasamy, Samuthirapandi; Archunan, Govindaraju; Devi, Kasi Pandima

    2016-02-17

    In the present study, the antiproliferative potential of various solvent extracts of Gracilaria edulis (GE) was tested against various cancer cell lines. In the A549 lung cancer cell line model, GE ethyl acetate extract (GEEA) (100 μg mL(-1)) treated group showed the maximum and significant (P < 0.05) growth inhibition at 48 h. The IC50 value was found to be 24.5 ± 19.1 μg mL(-1) at 48 h. Moreover, a low level of LDH release was observed at 48 h at various concentrations of (40, 60, 80 and 100 μg mL(-1)) GEEA extract-treated group compared to a control group. Changes in the cell morphology and echinoid spikes formation were observed at 48 h. Safety evaluation of GEEA in a non-cancerous liver cell line, PBMC and in Wistar rats positively revealed that the extract did not show any adverse toxic effects. The GEEA extract was partially purified by column chromatography and the active fraction was characterized through LC-MS analysis. Furthermore, HPLC and FT-IR analysis of the active fractions confirmed the presence of phytol, a diterpene compound with potent antiproliferative activity, which positively suggests that the red alga G. edulis contains a potent anticancer active principle. PMID:26822457

  11. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex Vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Beverly, Brandiese E. J.; Lambright, Christy S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Sampson, Hunter; Wilson, Vickie S.; McIntyre, Barry S.; Foster, Paul M. D.; Travlos, Gregory; Gray, L. Earl

    2014-01-01

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and consequently, lowering fetal androgen and Insl3 hormone levels. Simvastatin (SMV) is a cholesterol-lowering drug that directly inhibits HMG-CoA reductase. SMV may also disrupt steroid biosynthesis, but through a different mode of action (MOA) than the PEs. As cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormone biosynthesis, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to SMV during the critical period of sex differentiation would lower fetal testicular testosterone (T) production without affecting genes involved in cholesterol and androgen synthesis and transport. Secondly, we hypothesized that a mixture of SMV and a PE, which may have different MOAs, would reduce testosterone levels in an additive manner. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were dosed orally with SMV, dipentyl phthalate (DPeP), or SMV plus DPeP from gestational days 14-18, and fetuses were evaluated on GD18. On GD18, SMV lowered fetal T production and serum triglycerides, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol levels, and downregulated two genes in the fetal testis that were different from those altered by PEs. When SMV and DPeP were administered as a mixture, fetal T production was significantly reduced in an additive manner, thus demonstrating that a mixture of chemicals can induce additive effects on fetal T production even though they display different MOAs. PMID:25055962

  12. A porous 4-fold-interpenetrated chiral framework exhibiting vapochromism, single-crystal-to-single-crystal solvent exchange, gas sorption, and a poisoning effect.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ming-Hua; Tan, Yan-Xi; He, Yan-Ping; Yin, Zheng; Chen, Qing; Kurmoo, Mohamedally

    2013-03-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a 4-fold-interpenetrated pseudodiamond metal-organic framework (MOF), Co(II)(pybz)2·2DMF [pybz = 4-(4-pyridyl)benzoate], are reported. N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) of the channels can be removed to give the porous framework, and it can also be exchanged for methanol, ethanol, benzene, and cyclohexane. It is a rare example of a stable MOF based on a single octahedral building unit. The single-crystal structures of Co(II)(pybz)2·2DMF, Co(II)(pybz)2, Co(II)(pybz)2·4MeOH, and Co(II)(pybz)2·2.5EtOH have been successfully determined. In all of them, the framework is marginally modified and contains a highly distorted and strained octahedral node of cobalt with two pyridine nitrogen atoms and two chelate carboxylate groups. In air, the crystals of Co(II)(pybz)2·2DMF readily change color from claret red to light pink. Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy indicate a change in coordination, where the carboxylate becomes monodentate and an additional two water molecules are coordinated to each cobalt atom. In a dry solvent, this transformation does not take place. Tests show that Co(II)(pybz)2 may be a more efficient drying agent than silica gel and anhydrous CuSO4. The desolvated Co(II)(pybz)2 can absorb several gases such as CO2, N2, H2, and CH4 and also vapors of methanol, ethanol, benzene, and cyclohexane. If Co(II)(pybz)2 is exposed to air and followed by reactivation, its sorption capacity is considerably reduced, which we associate with a poisoning effect. Because of the long distance between the cobalt atoms in the structure, the magnetic properties are those of a paramagnet. PMID:23398593

  13. 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) analogues exhibit differential effects on synaptosomal release of 3H-dopamine and 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine

    SciTech Connect

    McKenna, D.J.; Guan, X.M.; Shulgin, A.T. )

    1991-03-01

    The effect of various analogues of the neurotoxic amphetamine derivative, MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) on carrier-mediated, calcium-independent release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA from rat brain synaptosomes was investigated. Both enantiomers of the neurotoxic analogues MDA and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) induce synaptosomal release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA in vitro. The release of 3H-5-HT induced by MDMA is partially blocked by 10(-6) M fluoxetine. The (+) enantiomers of both MDA and MDMA are more potent than the (-) enantiomers as releasers of both 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA. Eleven analogues, differing from MDA with respect to the nature and number of ring and/or side chain substituents, also show some activity in the release experiments, and are more potent as releasers of 3H-5-HT than of 3H-DA. The amphetamine derivatives {plus minus}fenfluramine, {plus minus}norfenfluramine, {plus minus}MDE, {plus minus}PCA, and d-methamphetamine are all potent releasers of 3H-5-HT and show varying degrees of activity as 3H-DA releasers. The hallucinogen DOM does not cause significant release of either 3H-monoamine. Possible long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity was assessed by quantifying the density of 5-HT uptake sites in rats treated with multiple doses of selected analogues using 3H-paroxetine to label 5-HT uptake sites. In the neurotoxicity study of the compounds investigated, only (+)MDA caused a significant loss of 5-HT uptake sites in comparison to saline-treated controls. These results are discussed in terms of the apparent structure-activity properties affecting 3H-monoamine release and their possible relevance to neurotoxicity in this series of MDA congeners.

  14. OTX2 exhibits cell-context-dependent effects on cellular and molecular properties of human embryonic neural precursors and medulloblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Ravinder; Aiken, Christopher; Morrison, Ludivine Coudière; Rao, Radhika; Del Bigio, Marc R; Rampalli, Shravanti; Werbowetski-Ogilvie, Tamra

    2015-10-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant primary pediatric brain tumor and is currently divided into four subtypes based on different genomic alterations, gene expression profiles and response to treatment: WNT, Sonic Hedgehog (SHH), Group 3 and Group 4. This extensive heterogeneity has made it difficult to assess the functional relevance of genes to malignant progression. For example, expression of the transcription factor Orthodenticle homeobox2 (OTX2) is frequently dysregulated in multiple MB variants; however, its role may be subtype specific. We recently demonstrated that neural precursors derived from transformed human embryonic stem cells (trans-hENs), but not their normal counterparts (hENs), resemble Groups 3 and 4 MB in vitro and in vivo. Here, we tested the utility of this model system as a means of dissecting the role of OTX2 in MB using gain- and loss-of-function studies in hENs and trans-hENs, respectively. Parallel experiments with MB cells revealed that OTX2 exerts inhibitory effects on hEN and SHH MB cells by regulating growth, self-renewal and migration in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. This was accompanied by decreased expression of pluripotent genes, such as SOX2, and was supported by overexpression of SOX2 in OTX2+ SHH MB and hENs that resulted in significant rescue of self-renewal and cell migration. By contrast, OTX2 is oncogenic and promotes self-renewal of trans-hENs and Groups 3 and 4 MB independent of pluripotent gene expression. Our results demonstrate a novel role for OTX2 in self-renewal and migration of hENs and MB cells and reveal a cell-context-dependent link between OTX2 and pluripotent genes. Our study underscores the value of human embryonic stem cell derivatives as alternatives to cell lines and heterogeneous patient samples for investigating the contribution of key developmental regulators to MB progression. PMID:26398939

  15. 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) analogues exhibit differential effects on synaptosomal release of 3H-dopamine and 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed

    McKenna, D J; Guan, X M; Shulgin, A T

    1991-03-01

    The effect of various analogues of the neurotoxic amphetamine derivative, MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) on carrier-mediated, calcium-independent release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA from rat brain synaptosomes was investigated. Both enantiomers of the neurotoxic analogues MDA and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) induce synaptosomal release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA in vitro. The release of 3H-5-HT induced by MDMA is partially blocked by 10(-6) M fluoxetine. The (+) enantiomers of both MDA and MDMA are more potent than the (-) enantiomers as releasers of both 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA. Eleven analogues, differing from MDA with respect to the nature and number of ring and/or side chain substituents, also show some activity in the release experiments, and are more potent as releasers of 3H-5-HT than of 3H-DA. The amphetamine derivatives (+/-)fenfluramine, (+/-)norfenfluramine, (+/-)MDE, (+/-)PCA, and d-methamphetamine are all potent releasers of 3H-5-HT and show varying degrees of activity as 3H-DA releasers. The hallucinogen DOM does not cause significant release of either 3H-monoamine. Possible long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity was assessed by quantifying the density of 5-HT uptake sites in rats treated with multiple doses of selected analogues using 3H-paroxetine to label 5-HT uptake sites. In the neurotoxicity study of the compounds investigated, only (+)MDA caused a significant loss of 5-HT uptake sites in comparison to saline-treated controls. These results are discussed in terms of the apparent structure-activity properties affecting 3H-monoamine release and their possible relevance to neurotoxicity in this series of MDA congeners. PMID:1829838

  16. Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. Extract Has a High Antioxidant Capacity and Exhibits Hair Growth-promoting Effects in Male C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jin; Choi, Joo Yeon; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Bog-Hieu

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of Platycarya strobilacea S. et Z. (PSE) extract on mouse hair growth and to determine the mechanism of action of PSE. PSE was purchased and its antioxidant activities, such as electron donating ability, total polyphenol content, and flavonoid content were tested. Toxicity during topical treatment was determined by the CCK-8 assay, a cell viability test. Fifteen 4-week-old male C57BL/6 mice were assigned to receive one of three treatments: dimethyl sulfoxide (negative control), minoxidil (positive control) or PSE. Test materials were topically applied to the shaved dorsal skin of each mouse daily for 3 weeks. After 21 days, we observed skin tissue hair follicle morphology and length, mast cell number, and stem cell factor (SCF) expression using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), toluidine blue, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. Furthermore, the expression of cytokines involved in hair growth [i.e., insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1] was determined by PCR. PSE was found to have very high antioxidant activity. The cell viability rate of PSE-treated mice was markedly higher than that of mice in the control group. We also observed an increase in hair follicle length, strong SCF staining, and a decrease in mast cell number in the PSE group. In addition, PSE-treated mice had higher IGF-1 and KGF expression and lower TGF-β1 expression than mice in the minoxidil-treated group. These results suggest that topical application of PSE promotes hair growth by intensifying SCF, suppressing mast cell production, and increasing hair growth-promoting cytokine expression. PMID:25320710

  17. Zinc-Oxide Nanoparticles Exhibit Genotoxic, Clastogenic, Cytotoxic and Actin Depolymerization Effects by Inducing Oxidative Stress Responses in Macrophages and Adult Mice.

    PubMed

    Pati, Rashmirekha; Das, Ishani; Mehta, Ranjit Kumar; Sahu, Rojalin; Sonawane, Avinash

    2016-04-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) have wide biological applications, which have raised serious concerns about their impact on the health and environment. Although, various studies have shown ZnO-NP toxicity on different cells underin vitroconditions, sufficient information is lacking regarding toxicity and underlying mechanisms underin vivoconditions. In this work, we investigated genotoxic, clastogenic, and cytotoxic effects of ZnO-NPs on macrophages and in adult mice. ZnO-NP-treated mice showed signs of toxicity such as loss in body weight, passive behavior and reduced survival. Further mechanistic studies revealed that administration of higher dose caused severe DNA damage in peripheral blood and bone marrow cells as evident by the formation of COMET tail, micronuclei, chromosomal fragmentation, and phosphorylation of H2A histone family member X. Moreover, ZnO-NPs inhibited DNA repair mechanism by downregulating the expression offen-1andpolBproteins. Histopathological examinations showed severe inflammation and damage to liver, lungs, and kidneys. Cell viability and wound healing assays revealed that ZnO-NPs killed macrophages in a dose-dependent manner, caused severe wounds and inhibited cellular migration by irreversible actin depolymerization and degradation. Reduction in the viability of macrophages was due to the arrest of the cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase, inhibition of superoxide dismutase and catalase and eventually reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with an antioxidant drug N-acetyl cysteine significantly reduced the ZnO-NP induced genotoxicity bothin vitroandin vivo Altogether, this study gives detailed pathological insights of ZnO-NP that impair cellular functions, thus will enable to arbitrate their biological applications. PMID:26794139

  18. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  19. Longwall - USA: International exhibition & conference

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    The Longwall-USA International Exhibition and Conference was held June 4-6, 1996 in Pittsburgh, PA. Seventeen papers are included in the proceedings that covered such topics as health and safety, development of gate roads, telemetry monitoring systems, fires, longwall miners, roof support technologies, dust control, moving car bunker systems, reducing longwall noise, vibration of longwall equipment, and the USBM`s strategic structures testing laboratory. A separate abstract with indexing was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  1. 18 CFR 157.16 - Exhibits relating to acquisitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., Sales, Service, Construction, Extension, Acquisition or Abandonment § 157.16 Exhibits relating to acquisitions. In addition to the exhibits required by § 157.14, every application involving acquisition of... follow the procedures set out in § 157.10(d). (a) Exhibit Q—Effect of acquisition on existing...

  2. The E = mc{sup 2} exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.; Peshkin, M.

    1995-08-01

    The goal of this DOE-supported exhibition is to demystify Einstein`s formula E = mc{sup 2} by illustrating the interchangeability of matter (m) and energy (E), c{sup 2} being the exchange rate. The exhibition has two major parts, {open_quotes}matter into energy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, plus a video to connect them. {open_quotes}Matter into energy{close_quotes} has now been completed and has been placed on the museum floor. Positrons from a {sup 22}Na source are annihilated to produce gamma rays that are caught in NaI detectors. The viewer can alter the alignment of the detectors and observe the consequences for the rates of single and coincident counts. The viewer can also observe the effects of placing absorbers in front of the counters. Prototype explanatory graphics were placed around the exhibit and those will probably be changed after we have some experience with their effectiveness. The connecting video is in the process of being produced in collaboration with Fermilab. A cloud chamber for {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, where gamma rays from a small Th source will produce observable pairs, was purchased and work to make the pairs visible has commenced.

  3. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuki; Harada, Shinya; Choi, Wonje; Fujino, Rika; Tokunaga, Akinobu; Gao, YueYun; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders' satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality). A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors' impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits. PMID:24782807

  4. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuki; Harada, Shinya; Choi, Wonje; Fujino, Rika; Tokunaga, Akinobu; Gao, Yueyun; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders' satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality). A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors' impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits. PMID:24782807

  5. Dopamine D4 ligands and models of receptor activation: 2-(4-pyridin-2-ylpiperazin-1-ylmethyl)-1H-benzimidazole and related heteroarylmethylarylpiperazines exhibit a substituent effect responsible for additional efficacy tuning.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Andrew O; Cowart, Marlon D; Moreland, Robert B; Latshaw, Steve P; Matulenko, Mark A; Bhatia, Pramila A; Wang, Xueqing; Daanen, Jerome F; Nelson, Sherry L; Terranova, Marc A; Namovic, Marian T; Donnelly-Roberts, Diana L; Miller, Loan N; Nakane, Masaki; Sullivan, James P; Brioni, Jorge D

    2004-04-22

    A series of subtype selective dopamine D(4) receptor ligands from the hetroarylmethylphenylpiperazine class have been discovered that exhibit a remarkable structure-activity relationship (SAR), revealing a substituent effect in which regiosubstitution on the terminal arylpiperazine ring can modulate functional or intrinsic activity. Other structure-dependent efficacy studies in the dopamine D(4) field have suggested a critical interaction of the heteroarylmethyl moiety with specific protein microdomains in controlling intrinsic activity. Our studies indicate that for some binding orientations, the phenylpiperazine moiety also plays a key role in determining efficacy. These data also implicate a kinetic or efficiency term, contained within measured functional affinities for agonists, which support a sequential binding and conformational stabilization model for receptor activation. The structural similarity between partial agonist and antagonist, within this subset of ligands, and lack of bioisosterism for this substituent effect are key phenomena for these hypotheses. PMID:15084133

  6. Assemblies based on the directing effect of non-classical W{sub 18} anionic clusters and the rod-like trans-1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)-ethylen (bpe)

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Zhangang; Wang, Yanna; Song, Xuejun; Huang, Jiao; Zhai, Xueliang

    2011-03-15

    Two polyoxometalate (POM) supramolecular assemblies based on W{sub 18} clusters and the rigid organic trans-1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)-ethylen (bpe) have been synthesized and fully characterized, namely (H{sub 2}bpe)3.5H{sub 2}[SbW{sub 18}O{sub 60}].5H{sub 2}O (1), and (H{sub 2}bpe)5[Ni{sub 4}(AsW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}].3H2O (2). Compounds 1-2 are formed from organic bpe cations and different polytungstate anions: pseudo-Dawson-type [SbW{sub 18}O{sub 60}]{sup 9-} in 1 and sandwich-type [Ni{sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(AsW{sub 9}O{sub 34}){sub 2}]{sup 10-} in 2. Both of compounds 1-2 crystallize in a low-symmetrical space group of P-1 and consist of a complicated supramolecular network based on non-covalent intermolecular weak interactions, including hydrogen bonding and {pi}...{pi} stacking. The multipoint hydrogen bonding interactions constitute the structural feature in two supramolecular frameworks. The UV-vis, fluorescence and electrochemistry properties are also studied. -- Graphical abstract: Two polyoxometalate-based supramolecular assemblies built upon W{sub 18} clusters and the rigid organic trans-1,2-di-(4-pyridyl)-ethylen (bpe) have been synthesized and characterized. Research highlights: > Sb{sup 3+} has a larger ionic radius to prevent the formation of the sandwich-type polyoxometalate cluster. > Non-covalent interactions play important roles in the self-organization process. > Polyanion can structure the conjugated organic molecule into a parallel and ordered arrangement. > Polyanion-based hybrid is a potential candidate in the modified material for electrode.

  7. Making Your Trade Fair Exhibit More Productive and More Interesting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Jack

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions for producing a successful exhibit booth include the following: the effectiveness of an exhibit depends on the effectiveness of the people staffing it; avoid games and unrelated giveaway items; demonstrate product in the booth; give special attention to existing customers; and make literature available only from the booth personnel.…

  8. On the Stark effect in open shell complexes exhibiting partially quenched electronic angular momentum: Infrared laser Stark spectroscopy of OH-C2H2, OH-C2H4, and OH-H2O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Christopher P.; Douberly, Gary E.

    2015-08-01

    The Stark effect is considered for polyatomic open shell complexes that exhibit partially quenched electronic angular momentum. Matrix elements of the Stark Hamiltonian represented in a parity conserving Hund's case (a) basis are derived for the most general case, in which the permanent dipole moment has projections on all three inertial axes of the system. Transition intensities are derived, again for the most general case, in which the laser polarization has projections onto axes parallel and perpendicular to the Stark electric field, and the transition dipole moment vector is projected onto all three inertial axes in the molecular frame. Simulations derived from this model are compared to experimental rovibrational Stark spectra of OH-C2H2, OH-C2H4, and OH-H2O complexes formed in helium nanodroplets.

  9. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  10. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  11. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition... proceeding. (f) Request for custody of physical exhibit. Any person may on motion to the Executive...

  12. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  13. ClimateInterpreter.org: an online sharing platform with best practices and resources on effective climate change communication, climate change exhibits, and sustainability efforts at aquariums, zoos, and science museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. K.; MacKenzie, S.

    2011-12-01

    Many aquariums, zoos, museums, and other informal science education (ISE) centers across the country want to connect their visitors with the important issue of climate change. Communicating climate change and the science it embodies is no easy task though, and ISE institutions are seeking creative and collaborative ways to best interpret the issue with their audiences. Some of these institutions, particularly aquariums and zoos, have live specimens on exhibit that stand to be severely impacted by climate change. Others see it as an educational and moral imperative to address such an important issue affecting the world today, especially one so close to the core mission of their institution. Regardless, informal science educators have noticed that the public is increasingly coming to them with questions related to climate change, and they want to be able to respond as effectively as they can. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is one partner in a coalition of aquariums, zoos, museums and informal science education institutions that are working together to present climate change to its visitors. These institutions hold enormous public trust as sources of sound scientific information. Whether it is through exhibitions like the Aquarium's Hot Pink Flamingos: Stories of Hope in a Changing Sea, interpretive and communication techniques to navigate challenging climate change discussions, or with sustainability planning and operational greening efforts, there is a concerted movement to improve the capacity of these institutions to respond to the issue. Ultimately, their goal is to inspire visitors in a way that positively impacts the country's discourse surrounding climate change, and helps steer our dialog toward a focus on solutions. In addition to the Hot Pink Flamingos exhibit, the Aquarium is also working with the coalition to build a website, www.climateinterpreter.org, that can serve as an online platform for sharing the experiences of what different partners have learned at

  14. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices. PMID:23919764

  15. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Allen, J. S.; Mortillaro, C.; Ducceschi, C.; Rawlings, P.; Stocco, K.; Tobola, K.; Olendzenski, L.; Angermiller, L.

    2001-03-01

    A JSC-SCH team has produced an astrobiology exhibit and education module to augment the 'Microbes!' traveling exhibit. The astrobiology section focuses on life in extreme environments and considers the possibility of extraterrestrrial life.

  16. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  17. Nematic liquid crystals exhibiting high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Dabrowski, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two fluorinated isothiocyanato nematic liquid crystalline compounds, 4'-butylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocyanatobiphenyl and 4'-pentylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocynatobiphenyl are studied in detail to obtain their different physical parameters. Optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, density and dielectric studies have been carried out for the two samples. Both the samples were found to have high clearing temperature (>100 °C) and exhibit small enthalpy of transition. The two samples exhibit high optical birefringence (Δ n > 0.2). The values of order parameters for the two samples were obtained using different approaches, namely, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method from birefringence data. Experimentally obtained values of order parameters have also been compared with theoretical Maier-Saupe values. The parallel and perpendicular components of dielectric permittivity values of the two compounds were also calculated and their anisotropy values were found to be small. The effect of temperature on the molecular dipole moment μ and the angle of inclination β of the dipole axis with the director have also been investigated in this work.

  18. Y-doped La{sub 0.7}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} manganites exhibiting a large magnetocaloric effect and the crossover of first-order and second-order phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Phan, The-Long; Jung, C. U.; Lee, B. W.; Ho, T. A.; Manh, T. V.; Dang, N. T.; Thanh, T. D.

    2015-10-14

    We prepared orthorhombic La{sub 0.7−x}Y{sub x}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} samples (x = 0, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08) by conventional solid-state reaction and then studied their magnetic properties and magnetocaloric (MC) effect based on magnetization versus temperature and magnetic-field measurements, M(T, H). The experimental results revealed that an x increase in La{sub 0.7−x}Y{sub x}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} reduced the ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition temperature (T{sub C}) from 260 K (for x = 0) to ∼126 K (for x = 0.08). Around the T{sub C}, maximum magnetic-entropy changes for a magnetic-field variation interval H = 50 kOe are about 10.7, 8.5, 7.4, and 5.8 J·kg{sup −1}·K{sup −1} for x = 0, 0.04, 0.06, and 0.08, respectively, corresponding to refrigerant capacities RC = 250–280 J·kg{sup −1}. These values are comparable to those of some conventional MC materials, revealing the applicability of La{sub 0.7−x}Y{sub x}Ca{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} in magnetic refrigeration. Using the Arrott method and scaling hypothesis as analyzing high-field M(H, T) data, and the universal-curve construction of the magnetic entropy change, we found a magnetic-phase separation. While the samples x = 0−0.06 exhibit a first-order magnetic phase transition, x = 0.08 exhibits the crossover of the first-to-second-order phase transformation (with its critical-exponent values close to those expected for the tricritical mean-field theory) and has the presence of ferromagnetic clusters even above the T{sub C}. Such the variations in the magnetism and MC effect are related to the changes in structural parameters caused by the Y substitution for La because Y doping does not change the concentration ratio of Mn{sup 3+}/Mn{sup 4+}.

  19. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  20. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  1. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  2. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  3. 49 CFR 1114.7 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... practical the sheets of each exhibit and the lines of each sheet should be numbered. If the exhibit consists of five or more sheets, the first sheet or title-page should be confined to a brief statement of what the exhibit purports to show with reference by sheet and line to illustrative or typical...

  4. Essential oil of Artemisia vestita exhibits potent in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity: Investigation of the effect of oil on biofilm formation, leakage of potassium ions and survival curve measurement

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CHANG; HU, DONG-HUI; FENG, YAN

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the chemical composition of the essential oil of Artemisia vestita and to determine the antibacterial activity of the essential oil and its two major components, grandisol and 1,8-cineole, against certain respiratory infection-causing bacterial strains, in vitro and in vivo. The chemical composition of the essential oil was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A micro-well dilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values of the essential oil and its major constituents. A model of Streptococcus pyogenes infection in mice was used to determine its in vivo activities. Lung and blood samples were obtained to assess bacterial cell counts. Toxicity evaluation of the essential oil and its components was completed by performing biochemical analysis of the serum, particularly monitoring aspartate transaminase, alanine transaminase, urea and creatinine. The essential oil exhibited potent antibacterial activity, whereas the two major constituents were less potent. The essential oil exhibited MIC values between 20 and 80 μg/ml, while the values of the two constituents were between 130 and 200 μg/ml. Scanning electron microscopy results demonstrated that the essential oil inhibited biofilm formation and altered its architecture. Survival curves indicated that the essential oil led to a reduction in the viability of different bacteria. The essential oil also induced significant leakage of potassium ions from S. pyogenes. The essential oil (100 μg/mouse) and grandisol (135 μg/mouse) significantly reduced the number of viable bacterial cells in the lungs (P<0.01). However, intake of 100 μg/mouse of essential oil or grandisol 135 μg/mouse once or twice each day for 9 days did not produce any toxic effects in the mice. In conclusion, the in vitro and in vivo results suggested that the essential oil of A. vestita and one of its major constituents, grandisol, can significantly

  5. miR-375 exhibits a more effective tumor-suppressor function in laryngeal squamous carcinoma cells by regulating KLF4 expression compared with simple co-transfection of miR-375 and miR-206.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan; An, Ran; Zhao, Rui; Sun, Yanan; Liu, Ming; Tian, Linli

    2016-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are reported to be important regulators of cancer-related processes, and function either as oncogenes or as tumor-suppressor genes. It was found that miR-375 was downregulated in samples of laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas (LSCCs) as compared to the level noted in adjacent non-tumor tissues, and it was inversely correlated with T grade, lymph node metastases and clinical tumor stage. Overexpression of miR-375 led to a decreased protein level of Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) and marked suppression of the proliferation and invasion, and induced apoptosis of LSCC cell line Hep-2 using Cell Counting Kit-8, Transwell chamber and cell cycle assays. In addition, we examined the influence of the upregulation of miR-206 alone and upregulation of both miR-375 and miR-206 on the expression of KLF4 and Hep-2 cell behavior. The results showed that compared with the function of miR-375 in tumor suppression by regulating KLF4, co-transfection of miR-375 and miR-206 exhibited a less effective inhibitory effect not only on tumor cell proliferation and invasion, but also on tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, miR-375 is possibly a tumor suppressor in LSCC by regulating KLF4. In addition, simple overexpression of several miRNAs did not entail higher efficacy than a single miRNA, similar to co-transfecions of miR-375 and miR-206. PMID:27279635

  6. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  7. Effect of serum from postmenopausal women with osteoporosis exhibiting the Kidney-Yang deficiency pattern on bone formation in an hFOB 1.19 human osteoblastic cell line

    PubMed Central

    LI, YACHAN; LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; YIN, LIANHUA; SHEN, JIANYING; KANG, JIE; DING, SHANSHAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the underlying mechanism of the Kidney-Yang deficiency (KYD) pattern of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women of a certain age range by comparing the effect of serum from postmenopausal women with osteoporosis exhibiting the KYD pattern with that of serum from postmenopausal women without osteoporosis on bone formation in an hFOB 1.19 human osteoblastic cell line. A random selection of 30 female, postmenopausal volunteers aged 60–70 years, including 15 cases without osteoporosis and 15 cases with the KYD pattern of osteoporosis, were enrolled at the Physical Examination Center of the Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian University of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Venous blood was extracted and the serum was separated. The hFOB 1.19 cells were treated with 10% KYD pattern-serum or control serum from postmenopausal women of the same age range without osteoporosis. It was found that the KYD pattern-serum significantly decreased the cell viability, activity of alkaline phosphatase and number of calcified nodules, as well as downregulated the expression of osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and upregulated that of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) in the hFOB 1.19 cells. In addition, the present results showed that the concentrations of estradiol (E2), OPG and insulin-like factor-1 (IGF-1) in the KYD pattern-serum were lower than those in the control serum. In combination, these findings suggest that the downregulation of E2, OPG and IGF-1 in the KYD pattern-serum inhibits the OPG/RANKL system, leading to a decrease in bone formation in the hFOB 1.19 cells. This indicates that the alterations in E2, OPG and IGF-1 may account for the susceptibility of certain postmenopausal women to the KYD pattern of osteoporosis. PMID:26622445

  8. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  9. An Attention Model for Museum Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, John W.

    A qualitative study determined which factors in the museum exhibit environment or within the museum visitor may influence the visitor to attend an exhibit. Observations and interviews were conducted of 14 groups that visited a Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. An inductive or grounded theory…

  10. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  11. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (respondent) necessary for the rendition of service requested by the applicant. (6) Exhibit G—Flow diagram showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with proposed transmission facilities. A flow...—Flow diagram reflecting maximum capabilities. If Exhibit G does not reflect the maximum deliveries...

  12. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (respondent) necessary for the rendition of service requested by the applicant. (6) Exhibit G—Flow diagram showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with proposed transmission facilities. A flow...—Flow diagram reflecting maximum capabilities. If Exhibit G does not reflect the maximum deliveries...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not...

  18. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  19. Museum Exhibitions: Optimizing Development Using Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado, has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop a third exhibit called InterActive Earth. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The development of these exhibitions included a comprehensive evaluation plan. I will report on the important role evaluation plays in exhibit design and development using MarsQuest and InterActive Earth as models. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is nearing the end of a highly successful, fully-booked three-year tour. The Institute plans to send an enhanced and updated MarsQuest on a second three-year tour and is also developing Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest designed for smaller venues. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions into classrooms and museum-based education programs in an ongoing fashion. The centerpiece of the InterActive Earth project is a traveling exhibit that will cover about 4,000 square feet. The major goal of the proposed exhibit is to introduce students and the public to the complexity of the interconnections in the Earth system, and thereby, to inspire them to better understand planet Earth. Evaluation must be an integral part of the exhibition development process. For MarsQuest, a 3-phase evaluation (front end, formative and summative) was conducted by Randi Korn and Associates in close association with the development team. Sampling procedures for all three evaluation phases ensured the participation of all audiences, including family groups, students, and adults. Each phase of

  20. Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Barbara W.

    2006-04-01

    The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museum’s Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earth’s atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq —an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of “a friend acting strangely.” Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over most—though not all—of the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 15¬–20% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a ‘bell-weather’ for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

  1. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  2. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  3. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... tractor-trailer transportation should be forwarded prior to November 15th previous to the year desired. A... time for which an exhibit is authorized will be determined by the nature of the event and the type...

  4. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... tractor-trailer transportation should be forwarded prior to November 15th previous to the year desired. A... time for which an exhibit is authorized will be determined by the nature of the event and the type...

  5. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1996. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1996 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award-winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  6. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1997. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1997 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  7. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  8. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  9. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  10. Non-classical export of an adenovirus structural protein.

    PubMed

    Trotman, Lloyd C; Achermann, Dominik P; Keller, Stephan; Straub, Monika; Greber, Urs F

    2003-06-01

    The icosahedral capsids of Adenoviruses (Ads) consist of the hexon and stabilizing proteins building the facettes, and of the vertex protein penton base (Pb) anchoring the protruding fibers. The fibers bind to the Coxsackie virus B Ad cell surface receptor (CAR) and Pb to integrins. Here we describe a novel property of the Ad2 Pb. Pb was found to leave the infected cell and, upon exit, it attached to the surrounding noninfected cells forming a radial gradient with highest Pb levels on cells adjacent to the infected cell. The producer cells remained intact until at least 30 h post infection. At this point, Pb was not recovered from the extracellular medium, suggesting that its cell-cell spread might not involve free Pb. When viral particles were released at late stages of infection, soluble Pb was found in the extracellular medium and it randomly bound to noninfected cells. Nonlytic export of Pb occurred upon transient transfection with plasmid DNA, but plasmid-encoded fiber was not exported, indicating that cell-cell spread of Pb is autonomous of infection. Pb export was not affected by Brefeldin A-induced disruption of the Golgi apparatus, suggesting that it occurred via a nonclassical mechanism. Interestingly, the coexpression of Pb and fiber leads to both Pb and fiber export, termed 'protein abduction'. We suggest that fiber abduction might support viral dissemination in infected tissues by interfering with tissue integrity. PMID:12753648

  11. Non-Classical Order in Sphere Forming ABAC Tetrablock Copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingwen; Sides, Scott; Bates, Frank

    2013-03-01

    AB diblock and ABC triblock copolymers have been studied thoroughly. ABAC tetrablock copolymers, representing the simplest variation from ABC triblock by breaking the molecular symmetry via inserting some of the A block in between B and C blocks, have been studied systematically in this research. The model system is poly(styrene-b-isoprene-b-styrene-b-ethylene oxide) (SISO) tetrablock terpolymers and the resulting morphologies were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, gel permeation chromatography, small-angle X-ray scattering, transmission electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and dynamic mechanical spectroscopy. Two novel phases are first discovered in a single component block copolymers: hexagonally ordered spherical phase and tentatively identified dodecagonal quasicrystalline (QC) phase. In particular, the discovery of QC phase bridges the world of soft matters to that of metals. These unusual sets of morphologies will be discussed in the context of segregation under the constraints associated with the tetrablock molecular architecture. Theoretical calculations based on the assumption of Gaussian chain statistics provide valuable insights into the molecular configurations associated with these morphologies. the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Science and Engineering, under contract number DEAC05-00OR22725 with UT-Battelle LLC at Oak Ridge National Lab.

  12. Engineering Non-Classical Light with Non-Linear Microwaveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimsmo, Arne; Clerk, Aashish; Blais, Alexandre

    The quest for ever increasing fidelity and scalability in measurement of superconducting qubits to be used for fault-tolerant quantum computing has recently led to the development of near quantum-limited broadband phase preserving amplifiers in the microwave regime. These devices are, however, more than just amplifiers: They are sources of high-quality, broadband two-mode squeezed light. We show how bottom-up engineering of Josephson junction embedded waveguides can be used to design novel squeezing spectra. Furthermore, the entanglement in the two-mode squeezed output field can be imprinted onto quantum systems coupled to the device's output. These broadband microwave amplifiers constitute a realization of non-linear waveguide QED, a very interesting playground for non-equilibrium many-body physics.

  13. Classical vs. non-classical pathways of mineral formation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Yoreo, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Recent chemical analyses, microscopy studies and computer simulations suggest many minerals nucleate through aggregation of pre-nucleation clusters and grow by particle-mediated processes that involve amorphous or disordered precursors. Still other analyses, both experimental and computational, conclude that even simple mineral systems like calcium carbonate form via a barrier-free process of liquid-liquid separation, which is followed by dehydration of the ion-rich phase to form the solid products. However, careful measurements of calcite nucleation rates on a variety of ionized surfaces give results that are in complete agreement with the expectations of classical nucleation theory, in which clusters growing through ion-by-ion addition overcome a free energy barrier through the natural microscopic density fluctuations of the system. Here the challenge of integrating these seemingly disparate observations and analyses into a coherent picture of mineral formation is addressed by considering the energy barriers to calcite formation predicted by the classical theory and the changes in those barriers brought about by the introduction of interfaces and clusters, both stable and metastable. Results from a suite of in situ TEM, AFM, and optical experiments combined with simulations are used to illustrate the conclusions. The analyses show that the expected barrier to homogeneous calcite nucleation is prohibitive even at concentrations exceeding the solubility limit of amorphous calcium carbonate. However, as demonstrated by experiments on self-assembled monolayers, the introduction of surfaces that moderately decrease the interfacial energy associated with the forming nucleus can reduce the magnitude of the barrier to a level that is easily surmounted under typical laboratory conditions. In the absence of such surfaces, experiments that proceed by continually increasing supersaturation with time can easily by-pass direct nucleation of calcite and open up pathways through all other solid phases, as well as dense liquid phases associated with a spinodal. Simulations predict that this phase boundary lies within the region of the calcium carbonate - water phase diagram accessible at room temperature. AFM and TEM analyses of other mineral systems, particularly calcium phosphate, suggest cluster aggregation can play important roles both in modifying barriers and in biasing pathways towards or away from amorphous phases. Most importantly, analysis of the energetic changes shows that barriers are only reduced if the clusters are metastable relative to the free ions and that the reduction is naturally accompanied by a bias towards formation of amorphous precursors. Finally, results from in situ TEM observations of nanoparticle interactions are used to understand the mechanisms controlling particle-mediated growth following formation of primary nuclei of either crystalline phases or disordered precursors. Measurements of the particle speeds and accelerations are used to estimate the magnitude of the attractive potential that drives particle-particle aggregation.

  14. UO2 oxidative corrosion by non-classical diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Stubbs, Joanne; Chaka, Anne M.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Biwer, Craig A.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Bargar, John R.; Eng, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Using x-ray scattering, spectroscopy, and computational methods, we show that oxidation of the UO2 (111) surface results in a self-organized arrangement of oxygen interstitials with three-layer periodicity, producing a nanoscale oscillatory oxidation front with uranium in three oxidation states: IV, V, and VI. This complex diffusion profile is driven by the transfer of the lowest energy U5f electrons from multiple U atoms into the O2p band. Our results contrast with all previous bulk structural oxidation models and the simple exponential oxidation front expected from classical diffusion.

  15. Evaluating Education and Science in the KSC Visitor Complex Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2000-01-01

    The continuing development of exhibits at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex is an excellent opportunity for NASA personnel to promote science and provide insight into NASA programs and projects for the approximately 3 million visitors that come to KSC annually. Stated goals for the Visitor Complex, in fact, emphasize science awareness and recommend broadening the appeal of the displays and exhibits for all age groups. To this end, this summer project seeks to evaluate the science content of planned exhibits/displays in relation to these developing opportunities and identify specific areas for enhancement of existing or planned exhibits and displays. To help expand the educational and science content within the developing exhibits at the Visitor Complex, this project was structured to implement the goals of the Visitor Center Director. To accomplish this, the exhibits and displays planned for completion within the year underwent review and evaluation for science content and educational direction. Planning emphasis for the individual displays was directed at combining the elements of effective education with fundamental scientific integrity, within an appealing format.

  16. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... engineering design data in explanation and support of the diagrams and the proposed project, setting forth: (i... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exhibits. 156.5 Section 156.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  17. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... pertinent Federal and State laws. (c) Exhibit C. A general map showing the applicant's overall electric system and a detailed map highlighting the location of the facilities or the proposed facilities to be used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map...

  18. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pertinent Federal and State laws. (c) Exhibit C. A general map showing the applicant's overall electric system and a detailed map highlighting the location of the facilities or the proposed facilities to be used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map...

  19. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... computation of interest coverage Actual for the year ended mm-dd-yy OMB control No. 1902-0043, pro forma for the year ended mm-dd-yy Net income Add: Interest on Long-Term Debt, Interest on Short-Term Debt,...

  20. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Exhibits. 156.5 Section 156.5 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF... outlet connections at each compressor station. (iv) Pressures and volumes of gas at each intake...

  1. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  2. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  3. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  4. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (8) As Exhibit 8, a copy of applicant's most recent year-end general balance sheet certified by... general balance sheet as of a date no less recent than the end of the third month preceding the date of the filing of the application. The unaudited balance sheet shall be presented in account form...

  5. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... (8) As Exhibit 8, a copy of applicant's most recent year-end general balance sheet certified by... general balance sheet as of a date no less recent than the end of the third month preceding the date of the filing of the application. The unaudited balance sheet shall be presented in account form...

  6. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE INTERSTATE ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION FACILITIES §...

  7. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... favorably only when not in conflict with recruiting requirements. (i) Requests for exhibits must be... among the Armed Forces, or with other agencies of the Federal Government. (i) All Navy activities will... concerned, via the chain of command. (3) The official OASD(PA) Request Form for Armed Forces...

  8. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  9. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  10. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  11. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities in the United States and Canada or Mexico; (5) Exhibit E. If the proposal is to import or export... Seismic Risk Map of the United States, or where there is a risk of surface faulting or ground liquefaction... the Seismic Review of LNG Facilities,” NBSIR 84-2833. This document may be obtained from the...

  12. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... such enterprises or operations, a detailed explanation of each such relationship, including the... relationship. (5) Exhibit F—Location of facilities. A geographical map of suitable scale and detail showing all...—Construction, operation, and management. A concise statement setting forth arrangements for...

  13. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... explanation of each such relationship, including the percentage of voting strength represented by such... detailed explanation of each such relationship. (5) Exhibit E—Other pending applications and filings. A... abandoned. This map, or an additional map, shall clearly show the relationship of the new facilities to...

  14. 10 CFR 205.303 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...; Applications; Administrative Procedures and Sanctions Application for Authorization to Transmit Electric Energy... used for the generation and transmission of the electric energy to be exported. The detailed map shall... or fixing of rates for the purchase, sale or transmission of electric energy. (f) Exhibit F....

  15. 24 CFR 180.645 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exhibits. 180.645 Section 180.645... OPPORTUNITY CONSOLIDATED HUD HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CIVIL RIGHTS MATTERS Procedures at Hearing § 180.645... evidence could not reasonably be anticipated at that time. (c) Authenticity. The authenticity of...

  16. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  17. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  18. 18 CFR 157.14 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Act (42 U.S.C. 7101-7352); E.O. 12009, 3 CFR 142) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 157.14, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the...) Exhibit G—Flow diagrams showing daily design capacity and reflecting operation with and without...

  19. The role of exhibits in teacher workshops at science museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Fred D.

    ...?" questions that reinforced ideas by hypothesis testing through predicting. And they supported creating disequilibrium by presenting perplexing phenomena, provoking participants to ask and want to answer "Why did that happen?" questions. Exhibit qualities that make them particularly effective at supporting conceptual change are discussed and illustrated by examples from the cases. Recommendations for using science museum exhibits in teacher workshops are offered.

  20. MarsQuest: A National Traveling Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1998-09-01

    With the successful landing of Mars Pathfinder and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor, a new decade of Mars exploration has commenced. MarsQuest, a 5000 square foot traveling exhibition, is being developed to further bring the excitement and discoveries of this "Decade of Mars Exploration" to the public. MarsQuest is partially funded by the Informal Science Education Program of the National Science Foundation and NASA's Office of Space Science. The Space Science Institute (SSI) in Boulder, CO, is leading the project. Scientific and educational advisors from many different universities and government laboratories, most of whom are directly involved in the active and planned Mars missions, will ensure the scientific accuracy, timeliness, and relevance of the key concepts presented in the exhibition and accompanying programs. The traveling exhibit is the primary element of the MarsQuest project. The exhibition experience, carefully keyed to current events in Mars exploration, will transport visitors to the surface of the Red Planet via large murals, dioramas, and numerous interactive displays. There they will have the opportunity to share in the spirit and thrill of exploration, and come to appreciate the similarities and differences between Earth and Mars. A planetarium show, geared to the goals of the MarsQuest project, will be an important sensory addition to the traveling exhibit. The planetarium/star-theater venue presents a unique environment where audience members can literally be surrounded by Mars images. Education and outreach programs comprise the remainder of the MarsQuest project. The goal of these is to make scientific concepts and scientific and engineering processes understandable to students via Mars-inspired curricula. MarsQuest will open in late-1999, traveling to about nine sites throughout the United States and reaching an estimated two to three million children and adults during its planned three-year tour. Mars - coming soon to a museum near

  1. A Preliminary Evaluation of the "Birds in Canada" Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clowes, Marya; Wolff, Lee

    This study of the Birds in Canada exhibit (National Museum of Natural Sciences) examines the effectiveness of traditional and modern displays and the visitors' use of identification labels, text, map, and film. Over 700 museum visitors comprised the random sample. Evaluation methods included observation, interview, and cognitive testing, using…

  2. A phenomenological investigation of science center exhibition developers' expertise development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Denise L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the exhibition developer role in the context of United States (U.S.) science centers, and more specifically, to investigate the way science center exhibition developers build their professional expertise. This research investigated how successfully practicing exhibition developers described their current practices, how they learned to be exhibition developers, and what factors were the most important to the developers in building their professional expertise. Qualitative data was gathered from 10 currently practicing exhibition developers from three science centers: the Exploratorium, San Francisco, California; the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois; and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. In-depth, semistructured interviews were used to collect the data. The study embraced aspects of the phenomenological tradition and sought to derive a holistic understanding of the position and how expertise was built for it. The data were methodically coded and organized into themes prior to analysis. The data analysis found that the position consisted of numerous and varied activities, but the developers' primary roles were advocating for the visitor, storytelling, and mediating information and ideas. They conducted these activities in the context of a team and relied on an established exhibition planning process to guide their work. Developers described a process of learning exhibition development that was experiential in nature. Learning through daily practice was key, though they also consulted with mentors and relied on visitor studies to gauge the effectiveness of their work. They were adept at integrating prior knowledge gained from many aspects of their lives into their practice. The developers described several internal factors that contributed to their expertise development including the desire to help others, a natural curiosity about the world, a commitment to learning, and the ability to accept critique. They

  3. Multimodal audio guide for museums and exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbensleben, Sandra; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2006-02-01

    In our paper we introduce a new Audio Guide concept for exploring buildings, realms and exhibitions. Actual proposed solutions work in most cases with pre-defined devices, which users have to buy or borrow. These systems often go along with complex technical installations and require a great degree of user training for device handling. Furthermore, the activation of audio commentary related to the exhibition objects is typically based on additional components like infrared, radio frequency or GPS technology. Beside the necessity of installation of specific devices for user location, these approaches often only support automatic activation with no or limited user interaction. Therefore, elaboration of alternative concepts appears worthwhile. Motivated by these aspects, we introduce a new concept based on usage of the visitor's own mobile smart phone. The advantages in our approach are twofold: firstly the Audio Guide can be used in various places without any purchase and extensive installation of additional components in or around the exhibition object. Secondly, the visitors can experience the exhibition on individual tours only by uploading the Audio Guide at a single point of entry, the Audio Guide Service Counter, and keeping it on her or his personal device. Furthermore, since the user usually is quite familiar with the interface of her or his phone and can thus interact with the application device easily. Our technical concept makes use of two general ideas for location detection and activation. Firstly, we suggest an enhanced interactive number based activation by exploiting the visual capabilities of modern smart phones and secondly we outline an active digital audio watermarking approach, where information about objects are transmitted via an analog audio channel.

  4. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  5. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  6. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  7. Mono-anionic Phosphopeptides Produced by Unexpected Histidine Alkylation Exhibit High Plk1 Polo-box Domain-binding Affinities and Enhanced Antiproliferative Effects in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wen-Jian; Park, Jung-Eun; Lim, Dan; Lai, Christopher C.; Kelley, James A.; Park, Suk-Youl; Lee, Ki-Won; Yaffe, Michael B.; Lee, Kyung S.; Burke, Terrence R.

    2016-01-01

    Binding of polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) polo-box domains (PBDs) to phosphothreonine (pThr)/phosphoserine (pSer)-containing sequences is critical for the proper function of Plk1. Although high-affinity synthetic pThr-containing peptides provide starting points for developing PBD-directed inhibitors, to date the efficacy of such peptides in whole cell assays has been poor. This potentially reflects limited cell membrane permeability arising, in part, from the di-anionic nature of the phosphoryl group or its mimetics. In our current paper we report the unanticipated on-resin N(τ)-alkylation of histidine residues already bearing a N(π)- alkyl group. This resulted in cationic imidazolium-containing pThr peptides, several of which exhibit single-digit nanomolar PBD-binding affinities in extracellular assays and improved antimitotic efficacies in intact cells. We enhanced the cellular efficacies of these peptides further by applying bio-reversible pivaloyloxymethyl (POM) phosphoryl protection. New structural insights presented in our current study, including the potential utility of intramolecular charge masking, may be useful for the further development of PBD-binding peptides and peptide mimetics. PMID:25283071

  8. Phloretin exhibits an anticancer effect and enhances the anticancer ability of cisplatin on non-small cell lung cancer cell lines by regulating expression of apoptotic pathways and matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lijie; Wang, Ruixuan; Nan, Yandong; Li, Wangping; Wang, Qingwei; Jin, Faguang

    2016-02-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for 80-85% of all lung cancer cases and the prognosis of NSCLC patients is unsatisfactory since 5-year survival rate of NSCLC is still as low as 11%. Natural compounds derived from plants with few or no side effects have been recognized as alternative or auxiliary cure for cancer patients. Phloretin is such an agent possessing various pharmacological activities; however, there is scarce information on its anticancer effects on NSCLC. It was evaluated and confirmed, in the present study, that phloretin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in A549, Calu-1, H838 and H520 cells in a dose-dependent manner, phloretin also suppressed the invasion and migration of NSCLC cells. We further confirmed that phloretin dose-dependently suppressed the expression of Bcl-2, increased the protein expression of cleaved-caspase-3 and -9, and deregulated the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and -9 on gene and protein levels. Besides, evaluations revealed that phloretin enhanced the anticancer effects of cisplatin on inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis in NSCLC cells. Moreover, phloretin facilitated the effects of cisplatin on deregulation of Bcl-2, MMP-2 and -9, and upregulation of cleaved-caspase-3 and -9. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that phloretin possessed anticancer effects and enhanced the anticancer effects of cisplatin on NSCLC cell lines by suppressing proliferation, inducing apoptosis and inhibiting invasion and migration of the cells through regulating apoptotic pathways and MMPs. PMID:26692364

  9. One exhibition, many goals. Combining scientific research and risk communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2015-04-01

    How effective is visual communication to increase awareness of natural hazards and risks? To answer this research question, we developed a research design that was at the same time an experimental setting and an actual communication effort. Throughout the full length of the 2-years project held in the Ubaye valley (southeastern France), we collaborated with local and regional stakeholders (politicians and technicians). During a consultation phase, the communication context was determined, the audience of the project was defined and finally the testing activity-communication effort was determined. We were offered the opportunity to design an exhibition for the local public library. In a consultation phase that corresponded to the design of the exhibition, the stakeholders contributed to its content as well as helping with the funding of the exhibition. Finally, during the experimentation phase, the stakeholders participated in advertising the activity, gathering of participants and designing the scientific survey. In order to assess the effects of the exhibition on risk awareness, several groups of children, teenagers and adults were submitted to a research design, consisting of 1) a pre-test, 2) the visit of the exhibition and 3) a post-test similar to the pre-test. In addition, the children answered a second post-test 3 months after the visit. Close ended questions addressed the awareness indicators mentioned in the literature, i.e. worry level, previous experiences with natural hazards events, exposure to awareness raising, ability to mitigate/respond/prepare, attitude to risk, and demographics. In addition, the post-test included several satisfaction questions concerning the visual tools displayed in the exhibition. A statistical analysis of the changes between the pre- and post- tests (paired t-test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test and bootstrapping) allowed to verify whether the exhibition had an impact on risk awareness or not. In order to deduce which variable

  10. Contrast in Metal-Ligand Effects on PtnM Electrocatalysts with M Equal Ru vs Mo and Sn As Exhibited by in Situ XANES and EXAFS Measurements in Methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, F.; Mukerjee, S; Ramaker, D

    2010-01-01

    In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements, at the Pt L{sub 3} edge (XANES and EXAFS), were carried out on carbon-supported Pt{sub n}Mo and PtSn electrocatalysts in an electrochemical cell in 1 M HClO{sub 4} with 0.3 M methanol. The CO, OH, and H relative adsorbate coverages on Pt are determined as a function of the applied potential via the {Delta}XANES technique and compared with comparable data previously reported for Pt{sub n}Ru. The more reactive Sn and Mo atoms on the Pt surface form the oxide over the potentials of interest, while Ru has variable oxide content depending on Ru island size and potential. The strength of the electronic ligand effect appears to increase in the order Ru < MoO{sub n} < SnO{sub n} < RuO{sub n}, where the Pt-CO bond strength is found to decrease and the Pt-OH bond strength increase with ligand effect. In the Sn and Mo bimetallics, the ligand effect is found to be sufficiently strong to allow CO replacement by H{sub 2} at low potentials. These widely different ligand effects may provide a straightforward explanation for the previously observed anode behavior in fuel cells: Pt{sub n}Mo better in reformate but Pt{sub n}Ru better in methanol.

  11. pH-sensitive polymeric cisplatin-ion complex with styrene-maleic acid copolymer exhibits tumor-selective drug delivery and antitumor activity as a result of the enhanced permeability and retention effect.

    PubMed

    Saisyo, Atsuyuki; Nakamura, Hideaki; Fang, Jun; Tsukigawa, Kenji; Greish, Khaled; Furukawa, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is widely used to treat various cancers. However, its distribution to normal tissues causes serious adverse effects. For this study, we synthesized a complex of styrene-maleic acid copolymer (SMA) and CDDP (SMA-CDDP), which formed polymeric micelles, to achieve tumor-selective drug delivery based on the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. SMA-CDDP is obtained by regulating the pH of the reaction solution of SMA and CDDP. The mean SMA-CDDP particle size was 102.5 nm in PBS according to electrophoretic light scattering, and the CDDP content was 20.1% (w/w). The release rate of free CDDP derivatives from the SMA-CDDP complex at physiological pH was quite slow (0.75%/day), whereas it was much faster at pH 5.5 (4.4%/day). SMA-CDDP thus had weaker in vitro toxicity at pH 7.4 but higher cytotoxicity at pH 5.5. In vivo pharmacokinetic studies showed a 5-fold higher tumor concentration of SMA-CDDP than of free CDDP. SMA-CDDP had more effective antitumor potential but lower toxicity than did free CDDP in mice after i.v. administration. Administration of parental free CDDP at 4 mg/kg×3 caused a weight loss of more than 5%; SMA-CDDP at 60 mg/kg (CDDP equivalent)×3 caused no significant weight change but markedly suppressed S-180 tumor growth. These findings together suggested using micelles of the SMA-CDDP complex as a cancer chemotherapeutic agent because of beneficial properties-tumor-selective accumulation and relatively rapid drug release at the acidic pH of the tumor-which resulted in superior antitumor effects and fewer side effects compared with free CDDP. PMID:26674841

  12. Shape-Memory PVDF Exhibiting Switchable Piezoelectricity.

    PubMed

    Hoeher, Robin; Raidt, Thomas; Novak, Nikola; Katzenberg, Frank; Tiller, Joerg C

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a material is designed which combines the properties of shape-memory and electroactive polymers. This is achieved by covalent cross-linking of polyvinylidene fluoride. The resulting polymer network exhibits excellent shape-memory properties with a storable strain of 200%, and fixity as well as recovery values of 100%. Programming upon rolling induces the transformation from the nonelectroactive α-phase to the piezoelectric β-phase. The highest β-phase content is found to be 83% for a programming strain of 200% affording a d33 value of -30 pm V(-1). This is in good accordance with literature known values for piezoelectric properties. Thermal triggering this material does not only result in a shape change but also renders the material nonelectroactive. PMID:26332996

  13. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    ScienceCinema

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2014-07-22

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  14. Nanoporous frameworks exhibiting multiple stimuli responsiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Pintu K.; Olsen, Gregory L.; Kiss, Vladimir; Klajn, Rafal

    2014-04-01

    Nanoporous frameworks are polymeric materials built from rigid molecules, which give rise to their nanoporous structures with applications in gas sorption and storage, catalysis and others. Conceptually new applications could emerge, should these beneficial properties be manipulated by external stimuli in a reversible manner. One approach to render nanoporous frameworks responsive to external signals would be to immobilize molecular switches within their nanopores. Although the majority of molecular switches require conformational freedom to isomerize, and switching in the solid state is prohibited, the nanopores may provide enough room for the switches to efficiently isomerize. Here we describe two families of nanoporous materials incorporating the spiropyran molecular switch. These materials exhibit a variety of interesting properties, including reversible photochromism and acidochromism under solvent-free conditions, light-controlled capture and release of metal ions, as well reversible chromism induced by solvation/desolvation.

  15. New Monolayered Materials Exhibiting Unusual Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Martin, Ivar; Littlewood, Peter B.

    Computationally based approaches are allowing to progress in the discovery and design of nano-scaled materials. Here we propose a series of new mono-layered compounds with exotic properties. By means of density functional theory calculations we demonstrate that the pentagonal arrangement of SiC2 yields an inverted distribution of the p-bands which leads to an unusual electronic behaviour of the material under strain [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (33), pp 19469]. A different pentagonal arrangement of C atoms enables the formation of Dirac cones which, unlike graphene, exhibit a strain-mediated tunable band gap. This work is supported by DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2013-10-03

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  17. Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Inoue, Yuka; Takiguchi, Takahiro; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors' needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors' understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors' interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer's hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

  18. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  19. Extract from Ceratonia siliqua Exhibits Depigmentation Properties.

    PubMed

    Lall, Namrita; Kishore, Navneet; Momtaz, Saeideh; Hussein, Ahmed; Naidoo, Sanushka; Nqephe, Mabatho; Crampton, Bridget

    2015-11-01

    Skin hyper-pigmentation is a condition initiated by the overproduction of melanin existing in the melanocytes. Melanin pigment is responsible for the colour of skin in humans. It is formed through a series of oxidative reactions involving the amino acid tyrosine in the presence of the key enzyme tyrosinase. In continuation with our efforts to identify tyrosinase inhibitors from plants sources, the methanol extract from leaf, bark and fruit of Ceratonia siliqua were screened for tyrosinase inhibition and diphenolase activity. The bark extract exhibited significant inhibition on mushroom tyrosinase using L-tyrosine as a substrate and showed diphenolase activity. The extract further significantly lowered tyrosinase mRNA levels in B16-F10 mouse melanocytes. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of six compounds. Compounds (-)-epicatechin-3-O-gallate, 1,2,3,6-tetra-O-galloyl-ß-D-glucose and gallocatechin-3-O-gallate showed tyrosinase inhibitions with the IC50 values of 27.52, 83.30 and 28.30 µg/mL, respectively. These compounds also exhibited L-DOPA activities with IC50 values of >200, 150 and 200 µg/mL, respectively. A clinical study was conducted using 20 volunteers in a patch testing trial for irritancy potential and skin depigmentation. The clinical results showed the sample to be non-irritant with irritancy potential of -34.21 and depigmentation trial showed an improvement in the even skin tone of UV induced pigmentation at 3% after 28 days of application. PMID:26201055

  20. Quiescent Fibroblasts Exhibit High Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Bennett, Bryson D.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Raitman, Irene; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2010-01-01

    Many cells in mammals exist in the state of quiescence, which is characterized by reversible exit from the cell cycle. Quiescent cells are widely reported to exhibit reduced size, nucleotide synthesis, and metabolic activity. Much lower glycolytic rates have been reported in quiescent compared with proliferating lymphocytes. In contrast, we show here that primary human fibroblasts continue to exhibit high metabolic rates when induced into quiescence via contact inhibition. By monitoring isotope labeling through metabolic pathways and quantitatively identifying fluxes from the data, we show that contact-inhibited fibroblasts utilize glucose in all branches of central carbon metabolism at rates similar to those of proliferating cells, with greater overflow flux from the pentose phosphate pathway back to glycolysis. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway resulted in apoptosis preferentially in quiescent fibroblasts. By feeding the cells labeled glutamine, we also detected a “backwards” flux in the tricarboxylic acid cycle from α-ketoglutarate to citrate that was enhanced in contact-inhibited fibroblasts; this flux likely contributes to shuttling of NADPH from the mitochondrion to cytosol for redox defense or fatty acid synthesis. The high metabolic activity of the fibroblasts was directed in part toward breakdown and resynthesis of protein and lipid, and in part toward excretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, reduced metabolic activity is not a hallmark of the quiescent state. Quiescent fibroblasts, relieved of the biosynthetic requirements associated with generating progeny, direct their metabolic activity to preservation of self integrity and alternative functions beneficial to the organism as a whole. PMID:21049082

  1. HIV-Infected Individuals with Low CD4/CD8 Ratio despite Effective Antiretroviral Therapy Exhibit Altered T Cell Subsets, Heightened CD8+ T Cell Activation, and Increased Risk of Non-AIDS Morbidity and Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Sainz, Talia; Lee, Sulggi A.; Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Shacklett, Barbara L.; Ferre, April L.; Hayes, Timothy L.; Somsouk, Ma; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Lederman, Michael M.; Hatano, Hiroyu; Jain, Vivek; Huang, Yong; Hecht, Frederick M.; Martin, Jeffrey N.; McCune, Joseph M.; Moreno, Santiago; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    A low CD4/CD8 ratio in elderly HIV-uninfected adults is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. A subset of HIV-infected adults receiving effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) fails to normalize this ratio, even after they achieve normal CD4+ T cell counts. The immunologic and clinical characteristics of this clinical phenotype remain undefined. Using data from four distinct clinical cohorts and three clinical trials, we show that a low CD4/CD8 ratio in HIV-infected adults during otherwise effective ART (after CD4 count recovery above 500 cells/mm3) is associated with a number of immunological abnormalities, including a skewed T cell phenotype from naïve toward terminally differentiated CD8+ T cells, higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation (HLADR+CD38+) and senescence (CD28− and CD57+CD28−), and higher kynurenine/tryptophan ratio. Changes in the peripheral CD4/CD8 ratio are also reflective of changes in gut mucosa, but not in lymph nodes. In a longitudinal study, individuals who initiated ART within six months of infection had greater CD4/CD8 ratio increase compared to later initiators (>2 years). After controlling for age, gender, ART duration, nadir and CD4 count, the CD4/CD8 ratio predicted increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Hence, a persistently low CD4/CD8 ratio during otherwise effective ART is associated with increased innate and adaptive immune activation, an immunosenescent phenotype, and higher risk of morbidity/mortality. This ratio may prove useful in monitoring response to ART and could identify a unique subset of individuals needed of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:24831517

  2. Houttuynia cordata Thunb. volatile oil exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in vivo and inhibited nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor-α production in LPS-stimulated mouse peritoneal macrophages in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Weifeng; Fan, Ting; Zhang, Yanmin; Fan, Te; Zhou, Ping; Niu, Xiaofeng; He, Langchong

    2013-11-01

    Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HC) is a medicinal herb that generally used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating allergic inflammation. The present study investigated the inhibitory effect of the volatile oil from HC Thunb. on animal models of inflammation and the production of inflammatory mediators in vivo and in vitro. In vivo, xylene-induced mouse ear edema, formaldehyde-induced paw edema and carrageenan-induced mice paw edema were significantly decreased by HC volatile oil. HC volatile oil showed pronounced inhibition of prostaglandin (PG) E2 and malondialdehyde production in the edematous exudates. In vitro exposure of mouse resident peritoneal macrophages to 1, 10, 100 and 1000 µg/mL of HC volatile oil significantly suppressed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated production of NO and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a dose-dependent manner. Exposure to HC volatile oil had no effect on cell viability and systemic toxicity. Furthermore, HC volatile oil inhibited the production of NO and TNF-α by down-regulating LPS-stimulated iNOS and TNF-α mRNA expression. Western blot analysis showed that HC volatile oil attenuated LPS-stimulated synthesis of iNOS and TNF-α protein in the macrophages, in parallel. These findings add a novel aspect to the biological profile of HC and clarify its anti-inflammatory mechanism. PMID:23280586

  3. Effects of Subscale Size and Shape on Global Energy Dissipation in a Multiscale Model of a Fiber-Reinforced Composite Exhibiting Post-Peak Strain Softening Using Abaqus and FEAMAC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pineda, Evan, J.; Bednarcyk, Brett, A.; Arnold, Steven, M.

    2012-01-01

    A mesh objective crack band model is implemented in the generalized method of cells (GMC) micromechanics model to predict failure of a composite repeating unit cell (RUC). The micromechanics calculations are achieved using the MAC/GMC core engine within the ImMAC suite of micromechanics codes, developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The microscale RUC is linked to a macroscale Abaqus/Standard finite element model using the FEAMAC multiscale framework (included in the ImMAC suite). The effects of the relationship between the characteristic length of the finite element and the size of the microscale RUC on the total energy dissipation of the multiscale model are investigated. A simple 2-D composite square subjected to uniaxial tension is used to demonstrate the effects of scaling the dimensions of the RUC such that the length of the sides of the RUC are equal to the characteristic length of the finite element. These results are compared to simulations where the size of the RUC is fixed, independent of the element size. Simulations are carried out for a variety of mesh densities and element shapes, including square and triangular. Results indicate that a consistent size and shape must be used to yield preserve energy dissipation across the scales.

  4. 7-Methoxy-(9H-β-Carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-Propenoic Acid, a β-Carboline Alkaloid From Eurycoma longifolia, Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Effects by Activating the Nrf2/Heme Oxygenase-1 Pathway.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai Dang; Choo, Young-Yeon; Nguyen, Tien Dat; Nguyen, Hoai Nam; Chau, Van Minh; Lee, Jeong-Hyung

    2016-03-01

    Eurycoma longifolia is an herbal medicinal plant popularly used in Southeast Asian countries. In the present study, we show that 7-methoxy-(9H-β-carbolin-1-il)-(E)-1-propenoic acid (7-MCPA), a β-carboline alkaloid isolated from E. longifolia, exerted anti-inflammatory effects by activating the nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) pathway. 7-MCPA inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 ), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in RAW264.7 cells and rescued C57BL/6 mice from LPS-induced lethality in vivo. LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and IL-6 was also significantly suppressed by treatment of 7-MCPA in RAW264.7 cells. 7-MCPA induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and increased transcription of its target genes, such as HO-1. Treating RAW264.7 cells with 7-MCPA increased the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the phosphorylation level of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK); however, co-treatment with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) blocked 7-MCPA-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation. Moreover, NAC or SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) blocked 7-MCPA-induced nuclear translocation of Nrf2, suggesting that 7-MCPA activated Nrf2 via a ROS-dependent p38 pathway. 7-MCPA induced HO-1 protein and mRNA expression and knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA or SB203580 blocked 7-MCPA-mediated induction of HO-1 expression. Inhibiting Nrf2 or HO-1 abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of 7-MCPA in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. We also demonstrated that 7-MCPA suppressed LPS-induced nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation. These results provide the first evidence that 7-MCPA exerts its anti-inflammatory effect by modulating the Nrf2 and NF-κB pathways and may be a potential Nrf2 activator to prevent or treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26291957

  5. Virtual Exhibition and Fruition of Archaeological Finds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Garagnani, S.

    2011-09-01

    During the last two decades, since digital technologies have become more sophisticated in acquiring real data and building faithful copies of them, their improvements have suggested interesting applications in the field of valorisation of Historical, Cultural and Artistic Heritage, with significant consequences in the share and widespread of knowledge. But although several technologies and methodologies for 3d digitization have recently been developed and improved, the lack of a standard procedure and the costs connected to their use still doesn't encourage the systematic digital acquisition of wide collections and heritage. The aim of this paper is to show the state of the art of a project whose aim is to provide a methodology and a procedure to create digital reproductions of artefacts for Institutions called to preserve, manage and enhance the fruition of archaeological finds inside museums or through digital exhibitions. Our project's aim is to find the most suitable procedure to digitally acquire archaeo logical artefacts that usually have small dimensions and have very complex and detailed surfaces. Within our methodology, particular attention has been paid to the use of widely shared and open-source visualization systems that enhance the involvement of the user by emphasizing three-dimensional characteristics of artefacts through virtual reality.

  6. Octaphlorethol A, a marine algae product, exhibits antidiabetic effects in type 2 diabetic mice by activating AMP-activated protein kinase and upregulating the expression of glucose transporter 4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Seok-Chun; Kang, Min-Cheol; Lee, Dae Ho; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-05-01

    Octaphlorethol A (OPA), a type of phlorotannin isolated from Ishige foliacea has been shown to have antidiabetic activities. However, the mechanism of action of OPA in type 2 diabetes has not been investigated extensively. Here, we investigated the antidiabetic effects and mechanism of OPA in C57BL/KsJ-db/db mice, a model of type 2 diabetes. Levels of postprandial blood glucose were significantly lower in OPAtreated db/db mice than in control db/db mice. In addition, the OPA supplements significantly improved fasting blood glucose level and impaired glucose tolerance compared to control db/db mice. OPA also significantly decreased the level of serum insulin, augmented the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), and increased the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein in skeletal muscle. In addition, it significantly suppressed the increases in hepatic mRNA expression level of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase), gluconeogenesis-related enzymes. Therefore, the mechanisms of OPA may involve suppression of gluconeogenesis by inhibiting PEPCK and G6Pase activity in the liver and affecting GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle through activation of AMPK. These findings provide a new insight into the antidiabetic clinical applications of OPA and demonstrate the potential of OPA as a new drug candidate for type 2 diabetes. PMID:26939912

  7. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  8. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C—Provisions Exhibit... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  9. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  10. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  11. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Exhibit A—Budget Summary Exhibit B—Standard Grant and Cooperative Agreement Cover Page Exhibit C... Cooperative Agreements between NASA and the Commercial Space Centers Exhibit F—NASA 1674 Letter of Delegation... Reports Note: Exhibits are available at NASA Headquarters, Code HC, Washington, D.C. 20546....

  12. Rg1 exhibits neuroprotective effects by inhibiting the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase apoptotic pathway in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jun-Shan; Lin, Hang; Ye, Jian-Xin; Lin, Min; Cui, Xiao-Ping

    2015-09-01

    The neuroprotective agents currently used to treat Alzheimer's disease (AD) often only target one aspect of the disease process. Therefore, identifying effective drug targets associated with the pathogenesis of AD is critical for the production of novel AD therapeutic strategies. The present study aimed to investigate the underlying mechanisms of the neuroprotective effects of Rg1 on a rat model of AD. A double transgenic β‑amyloid (Aβ) precursor protein/PS1 rat model was established, which co‑expressed mutations associated with AD. Aβ plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) were detected by immunohistochemistry. The detection of the protein expression levels of caspase‑3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl‑transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining were used to determine the level of apoptosis in the brain tissue. The expression levels of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress biomarker, glucose‑regulated protein 78 (Grp78), and the mitochondrial apoptosis biomarkers, B‑cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl‑2) and Bcl‑2‑associated X protein (Bax), were analyzed by western blotting. Furthermore, the expression of the proteins associated with the ER stress unfolded protein response (UPR) was determined, in order to examine the levels of ER stress. The mRNA expression of downstream genes of UPR were also detected by reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction. The protein expression levels of the apoptosis‑associated phosphorylated‑c‑Jun N‑terminal protein kinase (p‑JNK), caspase‑12 and cAMP response element‑binding transcription factor homologous protein were determined by western blotting. The results of the present study indicated that the accumulation of NFTs and Aβ plaques was significantly decreased in the Rg1‑treated AD rats, compared with untreated AD rats. The expression of caspase‑3 and the number of TUNEL‑positive cells were also significantly decreased in the Rg1‑treated rats, as compared with the AD rats

  13. Marine bacteria exhibit a bipolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Sul, Woo Jun; Oliver, Thomas A; Ducklow, Hugh W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2013-02-01

    The microbial cosmopolitan dispersion hypothesis often invoked to explain distribution patterns driven by high connectivity of oceanographic water masses and widespread dispersal ability has never been rigorously tested. By using a global marine bacterial dataset and iterative matrix randomization simulation, we show that marine bacteria exhibit a significantly greater dispersal limitation than predicted by our null model using the "everything is everywhere" tenet with no dispersal limitation scenario. Specifically, marine bacteria displayed bipolar distributions (i.e., species occurring exclusively at both poles and nowhere else) significantly less often than in the null model. Furthermore, we observed fewer taxa present in both hemispheres but more taxa present only in a single hemisphere than expected under the null model. Each of these trends diverged further from the null expectation as the compared habitats became more geographically distant but more environmentally similar. Our meta-analysis supported a latitudinal gradient in bacterial diversity with higher richness at lower latitudes, but decreased richness toward the poles. Bacteria in the tropics also demonstrated narrower latitudinal ranges at lower latitudes and relatively larger ranges in higher latitudes, conforming to the controversial macroecological pattern of the "Rapoport rule." Collectively, our findings suggest that bacteria follow biogeographic patterns more typical of macroscopic organisms, and that dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, likely plays an important role. Distributions of microbes that deliver critical ecosystem services, particularly those in polar regions, may be vulnerable to the same impacts that environmental stressors, climate warming, and degradation in habitat quality are having on biodiversity in animal and plant species. PMID:23324742

  14. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  15. Rats exhibit reference-dependent choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Mehwish; Jang, Hyeran; Kralik, Jerald D; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-07-01

    Human preferences depend on whether a chosen outcome appears to be a loss or a gain compared with what had been expected, i.e., in comparison to a reference point. Because reference dependence has such a strong influence on human decision-making, it is important to uncover its origins, which will in turn help delineate the underlying mechanisms. It remains unknown whether rats use reference points in decision-making, and yet, the study of rats could help address the question of whether reference dependence is evolutionarily conserved among mammals and could provide a nonhuman animal model to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this important cognitive process. The aim of the current study was to determine whether rats show reference-dependent choice behavior. We developed a novel paradigm by modifying the "T" maze by installing "pockets" to the left and right of the "T" stem that held reward pellets so rats would potentially develop reference values for each option prior to choice. We found that the rats were indeed sensitive to the way alternatives were presented. That is, they exhibited reference-dependent choice behavior by avoiding the choice option framed as a loss (e.g., having four reward pellets in the pocket, but receiving only one), at least under conditions with certain outcomes and clear differences between the reference and outcome quantities. Despite the small number of rats in this study, this species-level capacity suggests that reference dependence in general and loss aversion in particular may be conserved traits that evolved at or before the emergence of mammals. PMID:24657593

  16. Environmental enrichment for a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit.

    PubMed

    Clark, Fay E; Melfi, Vicky A

    2012-01-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is an integral aspect of modern zoo animal management but, empirical evaluation of it is biased toward species housed in single-species groups. Nocturnal houses, where several nocturnal species are housed together, are particularly overlooked. This study investigated whether three species (nine-banded armadillos, Dasypus novemcinctus; Senegal bush babies, Galago senegalensis; two-toed sloths, Choloepus didactylus) in the nocturnal house at Paignton Zoo Environmental Park, UK could be enriched using food-based and sensory EE. Subjects were an adult male and female of each species. EE was deemed effective if it promoted target species-typical behaviors, behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones. Results from generalized linear mixed models demonstrated that food-based EE elicited the most positive behavioral effects across species. One set of food-based EEs (Kong®, termite mound and hanging food) presented together was associated with a significant increase in species-typical behaviors, increased behavioral diversity, and increased use of enriched exhibit zones in armadillos and bush babies. Although one type of sensory EE (scented pine cones) increased overall exhibit use in all species, the other (rainforest sounds) was linked to a significant decrease in species-typical behavior in bush babies and sloths. There were no intra or interspecies conflicts over EE, and commensalism occurred between armadillos and bush babies. Our data demonstrate that simple food-based and sensory EE can promote positive behavioral changes in a mixed-species nocturnal mammal exhibit. We suggest that both food and sensory EE presented concurrently will maximize opportunities for naturalistic activity in all species. PMID:21387395

  17. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  18. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  19. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  20. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  1. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  2. Proglumide exhibits delta opioid agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, A; Stokes, K B; Rhoads, D L; Way, E L

    1987-01-01

    Recently, it was reported that proglumide, a cholecystokinin (CCK) antagonist, potentiates the analgetic effects of morphine and endogenous opioid peptides and reverses morphine tolerance by antagonizing the CCK system in the central nervous system of the rat. In order to provide additional insight into the mode of action of this agent, we assessed the effect of proglumide in the isolated guinea pig ileum and the mouse, rat and rabbit vas deferens. Furthermore, we studied the in vitro binding affinity of this substance to mouse brain synaptosomes. Our results show that proglumide inhibits, dose dependently, the electrically stimulated twitches in the mouse vas deferens and guinea pig ileum, but not in the rat or rabbit vas deferens. The inhibitory action of proglumide on the mouse vas deferens, but not on the guinea pig ileum, is antagonized by naloxone and by the selective delta-antagonist, ICI 174,864, in a competitive fashion. Other CCK antagonists were found to be devoid of such activity on the mouse vas deferens. In vitro binding studies showed that proglumide displaces D-ala-D-[leucine]5-enkephalin (DADLE), a delta agonist, but not ethylketocyclazocine (EKC), a preferentially selective kappa agonist. The effect of proglumide appeared to be elicited presynaptically since it did not alter the norepinephrine-induced contractions of the mouse vas deferens. Our results suggest that proglumide might exert its opiate-like effects by activation of delta-opioid receptors. PMID:3030338

  3. RFI simulation definition study, exhibit D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Comparative analyses of experimental and predicted effects of the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment on the Shuttle/TDRSS S-band links were performed. Specifications are defined ad ESTL test requirements are presented. Procedures for using the RFI test generator in the ESTL S-band link tests are presented and performance predictions for these links in the RFI environment are provided.

  4. Classroom Use of Martial Arts Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Shane Garrett; Denn, Grant R.

    2006-10-01

    Martial arts are becoming increasingly popular, and many of the techniques used by martial artists can provide effective demonstrations to showcase basic physics concepts. Many students have martial arts experience by the time they reach the senior level of high school or college. In one conceptual physics course, seven students out of 40 had studied some form of martial arts. Teachers can use experienced students as a resource and exploit the popularity of martial arts to demonstrate some basic points in Newtonian mechanics via martial arts demonstrations. This interactive mode of learning, we have found, is very popular and highly motivational for the students. In this paper we provide some of the possible examples of effective classroom demonstrations; there are many additional examples that your students may want to introduce.

  5. Naturally segregating loci exhibit epistasis for fitness

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The extent to which gene interaction or epistasis contributes to fitness variation within populations remains poorly understood, despite its importance to a myriad of evolutionary questions. Here, we report a multi-year field study estimating fitness of Mimulus guttatus genetic lines in which pairs of naturally segregating loci exist in an otherwise uniform background. An allele at QTL x5b—a locus originally mapped for its effect on flower size—positively affects survival if combined with one genotype at quantitative trait locus x10a (aa) but has negative effects when combined with the other genotypes (Aa and AA). The viability differences between genotypes parallel phenotypic differences for the time and node at which a plant flowers. Viability is negatively correlated with fecundity across genotypes, indicating antagonistic pleiotropy for fitness components. This trade-off reduces the genetic variance for total fitness relative to the individual fitness components and thus may serve to maintain variation. Additionally, we find that the effects of each locus and their interaction often vary with the environment. PMID:26246336

  6. Monocyte Subpopulations from Pre-Eclamptic Patients Are Abnormally Skewed and Exhibit Exaggerated Responses to Toll-Like Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Al-ofi, Ebtisam

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of pregnancy-associated mortality and morbidity is pre-eclampsia (PE). Although information regarding the etiology of this disease is scant, its pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal placentation, endothelial dysfunction as well as an exaggerated inflammatory response. Clinical evidence also indicates that the abundance of many immune cells at the feto-maternal interface and in the circulation of PE patients is abnormal, when compared with normal pregnant (NP) controls. In addition, the phenotype and function of some of these cells is altered. To further characterize the systemic effects of PE on circulating cells, we analyzed monocytic subpopulations in NP and PE patients by flow cytometry. We found that non-classical CD14lowCD16+ monocytes are significantly increased in women with PE and they display irregular expression of several chemokine receptors and antigen presentation molecules. The most striking phenotypic difference among the cell surface molecules was the marked upregulation of TLR4 expression, where both CD14highCD16+ and CD14lowCD16+ monocytes demonstrated higher levels than their NP counterparts. Stimulation of PE monocytes with TLR ligands resulted in profound secretion of various cytokines in comparison with NP controls. These data suggest that PE monocytes are hyper-responsive to TLR ligands and this may contribute to exacerbation of the disease. PMID:22848746

  7. Monocyte subpopulations from pre-eclamptic patients are abnormally skewed and exhibit exaggerated responses to Toll-like receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Al-ofi, Ebtisam; Coffelt, Seth B; Anumba, Dilly O

    2012-01-01

    The leading cause of pregnancy-associated mortality and morbidity is pre-eclampsia (PE). Although information regarding the etiology of this disease is scant, its pathophysiology is characterized by abnormal placentation, endothelial dysfunction as well as an exaggerated inflammatory response. Clinical evidence also indicates that the abundance of many immune cells at the feto-maternal interface and in the circulation of PE patients is abnormal, when compared with normal pregnant (NP) controls. In addition, the phenotype and function of some of these cells is altered. To further characterize the systemic effects of PE on circulating cells, we analyzed monocytic subpopulations in NP and PE patients by flow cytometry. We found that non-classical CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes are significantly increased in women with PE and they display irregular expression of several chemokine receptors and antigen presentation molecules. The most striking phenotypic difference among the cell surface molecules was the marked upregulation of TLR4 expression, where both CD14(high)CD16(+) and CD14(low)CD16(+) monocytes demonstrated higher levels than their NP counterparts. Stimulation of PE monocytes with TLR ligands resulted in profound secretion of various cytokines in comparison with NP controls. These data suggest that PE monocytes are hyper-responsive to TLR ligands and this may contribute to exacerbation of the disease. PMID:22848746

  8. 29 CFR 2204.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 2204.202 Section 2204.202 Labor... COMMISSION Information Required From Applicants § 2204.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant as of the date specified by § 2204.105(c). The exhibit...

  9. 29 CFR 2204.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 2204.202 Section 2204.202 Labor... COMMISSION Information Required From Applicants § 2204.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant as of the date specified by § 2204.105(c). The exhibit...

  10. Temporary and Travelling Exhibitions. Museums and Monuments, X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daifuku, Hiroshi; And Others

    The permanent exhibition, the most typical form of museum exhibition, has failed to attract repeated visitation, since visitors quickly become familiar with the objects shown. The temporary exhibition evolved as a result for the need of repeated visitation. The temporary exhibition, set up for a period of one to six months, introduces fresh…

  11. Mammalian meiotic silencing exhibits sexually dimorphic features.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, J M; Mahadevaiah, S K; ElInati, E; Tóth, A; Turner, James

    2016-06-01

    During mammalian meiotic prophase I, surveillance mechanisms exist to ensure that germ cells with defective synapsis or recombination are eliminated, thereby preventing the generation of aneuploid gametes and embryos. Meiosis in females is more error-prone than in males, and this is in part because the prophase I surveillance mechanisms are less efficient in females. A mechanistic understanding of this sexual dimorphism is currently lacking. In both sexes, asynapsed chromosomes are transcriptionally inactivated by ATR-dependent phosphorylation of histone H2AFX. This process, termed meiotic silencing, has been proposed to perform an important prophase I surveillance role. While the transcriptional effects of meiotic silencing at individual genes are well described in the male germ line, analogous studies in the female germ line have not been performed. Here we apply single- and multigene RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (RNA FISH) to oocytes from chromosomally abnormal mouse models to uncover potential sex differences in the silencing response. Notably, we find that meiotic silencing in females is less efficient than in males. Within individual oocytes, genes located on the same asynapsed chromosome are silenced to differing extents, thereby generating mosaicism in gene expression profiles across oocyte populations. Analysis of sex-reversed XY female mice reveals that the sexual dimorphism in silencing is determined by gonadal sex rather than sex chromosome constitution. We propose that sex differences in meiotic silencing impact on the sexually dimorphic prophase I response to asynapsis. PMID:26712235

  12. Electroactive Polymer Nanoparticles Exhibiting Photothermal Properties.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Travis; Rodier, Bradley; Iszard, Zachary; Kilian, Alissa; Pattani, Varun; Walsh, Kyle; Weber, Katharina; Tunnell, James; Betancourt, Tania; Irvin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    A method for the synthesis of electroactive polymers is demonstrated, starting with the synthesis of extended conjugation monomers using a three-step process that finishes with Negishi coupling. Negishi coupling is a cross-coupling process in which a chemical precursor is first lithiated, followed by transmetallation with ZnCl2. The resultant organozinc compound can be coupled to a dibrominated aromatic precursor to give the conjugated monomer. Polymer films can be prepared via electropolymerization of the monomer and characterized using cyclic voltammetry and ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-Vis-NIR) spectroscopy. Nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared via emulsion polymerization of the monomer using a two-surfactant system to yield an aqueous dispersion of the polymer NPs. The NPs are characterized using dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, and UV-Vis-NIR-spectroscopy. Cytocompatibility of NPs is investigated using the cell viability assay. Finally, the NP suspensions are irradiated with a NIR laser to determine their effectiveness as potential materials for photothermal therapy (PTT). PMID:26780244

  13. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone. PMID:25974581

  14. Circularly confined microswimmers exhibit multiple global patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Alan Cheng Hou; Kanso, Eva

    2015-04-01

    Geometric confinement plays an important role in the dynamics of natural and synthetic microswimmers from bacterial cells to self-propelled particles in high-throughput microfluidic devices. However, little is known about the effects of geometric confinement on the emergent global patterns in such self-propelled systems. Recent experiments on bacterial cells report that, depending on the cell concentration, cells either spontaneously organize into vortical motion in thin cylindrical and spherical droplets or aggregate at the inner boundary of the droplets. Our goal in this paper is to investigate, in the context of an idealized physical model, the interplay between geometric confinement and level of flagellar activity on the emergent collective patterns. We show that decreasing flagellar activity induces a hydrodynamically triggered transition in confined microswimmers from swirling to global circulation (vortex) to boundary aggregation and clustering. These results highlight that the complex interplay between confinement, flagellar activity, and hydrodynamic flows in concentrated suspensions of microswimmers could lead to a plethora of global patterns that are difficult to predict from geometric consideration alone.

  15. Peer review and competition in the Art Exhibition Game.

    PubMed

    Balietti, Stefano; Goldstone, Robert L; Helbing, Dirk

    2016-07-26

    To investigate the effect of competitive incentives under peer review, we designed a novel experimental setup called the Art Exhibition Game. We present experimental evidence of how competition introduces both positive and negative effects when creative artifacts are evaluated and selected by peer review. Competition proved to be a double-edged sword: on the one hand, it fosters innovation and product diversity, but on the other hand, it also leads to more unfair reviews and to a lower level of agreement between reviewers. Moreover, an external validation of the quality of peer reviews during the laboratory experiment, based on 23,627 online evaluations on Amazon Mechanical Turk, shows that competition does not significantly increase the level of creativity. Furthermore, the higher rejection rate under competitive conditions does not improve the average quality of published contributions, because more high-quality work is also rejected. Overall, our results could explain why many ground-breaking studies in science end up in lower-tier journals. Differences and similarities between the Art Exhibition Game and scholarly peer review are discussed and the implications for the design of new incentive systems for scientists are explained. PMID:27402744

  16. Peer review and competition in the Art Exhibition Game

    PubMed Central

    Goldstone, Robert L.; Helbing, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of competitive incentives under peer review, we designed a novel experimental setup called the Art Exhibition Game. We present experimental evidence of how competition introduces both positive and negative effects when creative artifacts are evaluated and selected by peer review. Competition proved to be a double-edged sword: on the one hand, it fosters innovation and product diversity, but on the other hand, it also leads to more unfair reviews and to a lower level of agreement between reviewers. Moreover, an external validation of the quality of peer reviews during the laboratory experiment, based on 23,627 online evaluations on Amazon Mechanical Turk, shows that competition does not significantly increase the level of creativity. Furthermore, the higher rejection rate under competitive conditions does not improve the average quality of published contributions, because more high-quality work is also rejected. Overall, our results could explain why many ground-breaking studies in science end up in lower-tier journals. Differences and similarities between the Art Exhibition Game and scholarly peer review are discussed and the implications for the design of new incentive systems for scientists are explained. PMID:27402744

  17. Liposomal nanoparticles encapsulating iloprost exhibit enhanced vasodilation in pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Pritesh P; Leber, Regina; Nagaraj, Chandran; Leitinger, Gerd; Lehofer, Bernhard; Olschewski, Horst; Olschewski, Andrea; Prassl, Ruth; Marsh, Leigh M

    2014-01-01

    Prostacyclin analogues are standard therapeutic options for vasoconstrictive diseases, including pulmonary hypertension and Raynaud’s phenomenon. Although effective, these treatment strategies are expensive and have several side effects. To improve drug efficiency, we tested liposomal nanoparticles as carrier systems. In this study, we synthesized liposomal nanoparticles tailored for the prostacyclin analogue iloprost and evaluated their pharmacologic efficacy on mouse intrapulmonary arteries, using a wire myograph. The use of cationic lipids, stearylamine, or 1,2-di-(9Z-octadecenoyl)-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) in liposomes promoted iloprost encapsulation to at least 50%. The addition of cholesterol modestly reduced iloprost encapsulation. The liposomal nanoparticle formulations were tested for toxicity and pharmacologic efficacy in vivo and ex vivo, respectively. The liposomes did not affect the viability of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Compared with an equivalent concentration of free iloprost, four out of the six polymer-coated liposomal formulations exhibited significantly enhanced vasodilation of mouse pulmonary arteries. Iloprost that was encapsulated in liposomes containing the polymer polyethylene glycol exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation of arteries. Strikingly, half the concentration of iloprost in liposomes elicited similar pharmacologic efficacy as nonencapsulated iloprost. Cationic liposomes can encapsulate iloprost with high efficacy and can serve as potential iloprost carriers to improve its therapeutic efficacy. PMID:25045260

  18. Visitor Understanding of Interactive Exhibits: A Study of Family Groups in a Public Aquarium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Kodi R.; Wandersee, James H.

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of five interactive exhibits in the New Orleans Aquarium of the Americas. The specific research questions were: Which interactive displays in the "Living in Water" exhibits are most memorable to families?; What aspects of these displays seem to increase learning in families?; and What…

  19. African Past: Migrant Present. A Guide to the Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Mary Arnold; Roark-Calnek, Sue

    This exhibit guide describes an exhibition of African folk arts produced by seasonal migrant farmworkers in western New York State. Workers come from the American South, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. The exhibition pieces were collected through the BOCES Geneseo Migrant Center's Folk Arts Program and Creative Artists Migrant Program Services…

  20. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Strategic Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Chern Li

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The study examined exhibitions from different types of cultural agencies and asked questions about whether, for instance, the exhibitions are part of the…

  1. 49 CFR 826.22 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 826.22 Section 826.22... Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  2. 14 CFR 1262.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Net worth exhibit. 1262.202 Section 1262.202... PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 1262.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defiined in § 1262.104(f) when...

  3. 10 CFR 12.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 12.202 Section 12.202 Energy NUCLEAR... Required From Applicants § 12.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant, except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  4. 19 CFR 212.11 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 212.11 Section 212.11 Customs... IMPLEMENTATION OF THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 212.11 Net worth exhibit... with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates...

  5. 17 CFR 201.42 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 201.42... Regulations Pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act § 201.42 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant... a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  6. 49 CFR 6.19 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.19 Section 6.19... PROCEEDINGS Information Required from Applicants § 6.19 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in this part) when...

  7. 39 CFR 960.10 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 960.10 Section 960.10 Postal... JUSTICE ACT IN POSTAL SERVICE PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 960.10 Net worth exhibit... with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates...

  8. 31 CFR 6.9 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.9 Section 6.9... EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 6.9 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  9. 7 CFR 1.191 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1.191 Section 1.191 Agriculture... § 1.191 Net worth exhibit. (a) An applicant, except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association, must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  10. 10 CFR 12.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 12.202 Section 12.202 Energy NUCLEAR... Required From Applicants § 12.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant, except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  11. 49 CFR 826.22 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 826.22 Section 826.22... Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  12. 7 CFR 1.191 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1.191 Section 1.191 Agriculture... § 1.191 Net worth exhibit. (a) An applicant, except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association, must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  13. 17 CFR 148.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 148.12... Required from Applicants § 148.12 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  14. 17 CFR 148.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 148.12... Required from Applicants § 148.12 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  15. 14 CFR 1262.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1262.202 Section 1262... AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 1262.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant... detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defiined in §...

  16. 10 CFR 1023.311 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1023.311 Section 1023.311 Energy... Access to Justice Act Information Required from Applicants § 1023.311 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  17. 17 CFR 201.42 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 201.42... Regulations Pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act § 201.42 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant... a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  18. 49 CFR 1016.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1016.202 Section 1016.202... BY PARTIES TO BOARD ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 1016.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  19. 5 CFR 2610.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 2610.202 Section 2610... THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 2610.202 Net worth exhibit. (a... with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates...

  20. 31 CFR 6.9 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.9 Section 6.9... EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 6.9 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  1. 49 CFR 6.19 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.19 Section 6.19... PROCEEDINGS Information Required from Applicants § 6.19 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in this part) when...

  2. 10 CFR 1023.311 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1023.311 Section 1023.311 Energy... Access to Justice Act Information Required from Applicants § 1023.311 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  3. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items...

  4. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items...

  5. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items...

  6. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items...

  7. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for international exhibitions. 1160.4... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for an international exhibition made under these regulations shall cover: (a) Eligible items...

  8. A Major Children's Educational Art Exhibit: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenk, George W.; Shrock, Sharon A.

    Results of a case study of an exhibit of art and artifacts designed for children are presented. The focus of the study was to apply the principles of instructional-message design to the evaluation of the exhibit. The exhibit, "Art Inside Out: Exploring Art and Culture through Time," was displayed at the Art Institute of Chicago. Textual elements,…

  9. Bougainvillea spectabilis Exhibits Antihyperglycemic and Antioxidant Activities in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Pratibha; Mahajan, Sunil; Kulshrestha, Archana; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Sharma, Bechan; Goswamy, H M; Prasad, G B K S

    2016-07-01

    The study investigates the effects of aqueous extract of Bougainvillea spectabilis leaves on blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile, oxidative stress, and on DNA damage, if any, as well as on liver and kidney functions in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in Wistar rats. Daily administration of the aqueous extract of B spectabilis leaves for 28 days resulted in significant reduction in hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia as evident from restoration of relevant biochemical markers following extract administration. The extract also exhibited significant antioxidant activity as evidenced from the enzymatic and nonenzymatic responses and DNA damage markers. The extract restored kidney and liver functions to normal and proved to be nontoxic. A marked improvement in the histological changes of tissues was also observed. The present study documented antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidative potentials of the aqueous extract of B spectabilis leaves without any toxicity in streptozotocin-treated Wistar rats. PMID:26187284

  10. [Energy education exhibits for Insights El Paso Science Museum

    SciTech Connect

    Shubinski, R.

    1998-05-27

    The grant in question, DE-FG03-94ER75954, was awarded to Insights El Paso Science Museum to build key exhibits. These exhibits helped the Museum fulfill its mission to ``promote curiosity and stimulate interest by exploratory, entertaining, exciting, and participatory learning in a broad range of scientific disciplines to persons of all ages regionally and internationally.`` There are several current Board of Directors members who also were Board members during the grant period and who helped construct some of the exhibits. Through speaking with them and reviewing minutes of Board meetings during 1994, it has been determined that seven of the ten proposed exhibits were constructed, with an eighth exhibit constructed as an alternative. Photos of seven of the exhibits and preliminary sketches of some are attached. Following is a list of the constructed exhibits: Hot or Cold, Give and Take, Conduction, Convection, Sources of Energy, Wind Generator, Solar Tracker, and Perpetual Motion.

  11. Pigeons exhibit contextual cueing to both simple and complex backgrounds.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Edward A; Teng, Yuejia; Castro, Leyre

    2014-05-01

    Repeated pairings of a particular visual context with a specific location of a target stimulus facilitate target search in humans. We explored an animal model of this contextual cueing effect using a novel Cueing-Miscueing design. Pigeons had to peck a target which could appear in one of four possible locations on four possible color backgrounds or four possible color photographs of real-world scenes. On 80% of the trials, each of the contexts was uniquely paired with one of the target locations; on the other 20% of the trials, each of the contexts was randomly paired with the remaining target locations. Pigeons came to exhibit robust contextual cueing when the context preceded the target by 2s, with reaction times to the target being shorter on correctly-cued trials than on incorrectly-cued trials. Contextual cueing proved to be more robust with photographic backgrounds than with uniformly colored backgrounds. In addition, during the context-target delay, pigeons predominately pecked toward the location of the upcoming target, suggesting that attentional guidance contributes to contextual cueing. These findings confirm the effectiveness of animal models of contextual cueing and underscore the important part played by associative learning in producing the effect. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: SQAB 2013: Contextual Con. PMID:24491468

  12. Image quality improvement for a 3D structure exhibiting multiple 2D patterns and its implementation.

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Ryuji; Nakayama, Hirotaka; Shiraki, Atsushi; Kakue, Takashi; Shimobaba, Tomoyoshi; Ito, Tomoyoshi

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) structure designed by our proposed algorithm can simultaneously exhibit multiple two-dimensional patterns. The 3D structure provides multiple patterns having directional characteristics by distributing the effects of the artefacts. In this study, we proposed an iterative algorithm to improve the image quality of the exhibited patterns and have verified the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm using numerical simulations. Moreover, we fabricated different 3D glass structures (an octagonal prism, a cube and a sphere) using the proposed algorithm. All 3D structures exhibit four patterns, and different patterns can be observed depending on the viewing direction. PMID:27137021

  13. Evolutionary Dynamics of Influenza A Viruses in US Exhibition Swine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Martha I; Wentworth, David E; Das, Suman R; Sreevatsan, Srinand; Killian, Mary L; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Slemons, Richard D; Bowman, Andrew S

    2016-01-15

    The role of exhibition swine in influenza A virus transmission was recently demonstrated by >300 infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant viruses among individuals who attended agricultural fairs. Through active influenza A virus surveillance in US exhibition swine and whole-genome sequencing of 380 isolates, we demonstrate that exhibition swine are actively involved in the evolution of influenza A viruses, including zoonotic strains. First, frequent introduction of influenza A viruses from commercial swine populations provides new genetic diversity in exhibition pigs each year locally. Second, genomic reassortment between viruses cocirculating in exhibition swine increases viral diversity. Third, viral migration between exhibition swine in neighboring states demonstrates that movements of exhibition pigs contributes to the spread of genetic diversity. The unexpected frequency of viral exchange between commercial and exhibition swine raises questions about the understudied interface between these populations. Overall, the complexity of viral evolution in exhibition swine indicates that novel viruses are likely to continually reemerge, presenting threats to humans. PMID:26243317

  14. 18. INTERIOR OF CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE, MILESTONE GALLERY EXHIBITION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE, MILESTONE GALLERY EXHIBITION OF THE SIXTEENTH STREET CHURCH, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  15. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an…

  16. Modelling the Future: Exhibitions and the Materiality of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The role of World Exhibitions in the 19th and early 20th centuries was to confirm a relation between the nation state and modernity. As a display about industries, inventions and identities, the Exhibition, in a sense, put entire nations into an elevated, viewable space. It is a significant element in modernity as comparisons can be made, progress…

  17. A Critical Appraisal of State Level Science Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Baiju K.

    2007-01-01

    Science exhibitions are really great opportunities to students as well as teachers to disseminate knowledge that they have, and to experience a variety of new inventions and innovations that also need wide dissemination. The great significance of exhibition is that it fosters acquisition of different process skills leading to the development of…

  18. 22 CFR Exhibit B to Part 204 - Assignment

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assignment B Exhibit B to Part 204 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT HOUSING GUARANTY STANDARD TERMS AND CONDITIONS Pt. 204, Exh. B Exhibit B to Part 204—Assignment The undersigned, being the registered owner of a Note in...

  19. 17 CFR 229.1016 - (Item 1016) Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1016) Exhibits. File as an exhibit to the schedule: (a) Any disclosure materials furnished to security...-9 Disclosure Material X X X Loan Agreement X X Report, Opinion or Appraisal X Contracts, Arrangements or Understandings X X X Statement re: Appraisal Rights X Oral Solicitation Materials X X......

  20. 17 CFR 229.1016 - (Item 1016) Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 1016) Exhibits. File as an exhibit to the schedule: (a) Any disclosure materials furnished to security...-9 Disclosure Material X X X Loan Agreement X X Report, Opinion or Appraisal X Contracts, Arrangements or Understandings X X X Statement re: Appraisal Rights X Oral Solicitation Materials X X......