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Sample records for exocrine pancreas innocent

  1. CARCINOMA OF THE EXOCRINE PANCREAS IN MEDAKA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Eight cases of acinar cell carcinoma of the exocrine pancreas were diagnosed in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) from a pool of approximately 10,000 specimens used in a variety of carcinogenesis bioassays. hree cases occurred in specimens from control groups and one case in a sp...

  2. Regeneration and Repair of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murtaugh, L. Charles; Keefe, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by inflammatory injury to the exocrine pancreas, from which both humans and animal models appear to recover via regeneration of digestive enzyme-producing acinar cells. This regenerative process involves transient phases of inflammation, metaplasia and redifferentiation, driven by cell-cell interactions between acinar cells, leukocytes and resident fibroblasts. The NFκB signaling pathway is a critical determinant of pancreatic inflammation and metaplasia, whereas a number of developmental signals and transcription factors are devoted to promoting acinar redifferentiation after injury. Imbalances between these pro-inflammatory and pro-differentiation pathways contribute to chronic pancreatitis, characterized by persistent inflammation, fibrosis and acinar dedifferentiation. Loss of acinar cell differentiation also drives pancreatic cancer initiation, providing a mechanistic link between pancreatitis and cancer risk. Unraveling the molecular bases of exocrine regeneration may identify new therapeutic targets for treatment and prevention of both of these deadly diseases. PMID:25386992

  3. Regeneration and repair of the exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Murtaugh, L Charles; Keefe, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatitis is caused by inflammatory injury to the exocrine pancreas, from which both humans and animal models appear to recover via regeneration of digestive enzyme-producing acinar cells. This regenerative process involves transient phases of inflammation, metaplasia, and redifferentiation, driven by cell-cell interactions between acinar cells, leukocytes, and resident fibroblasts. The NFκB signaling pathway is a critical determinant of pancreatic inflammation and metaplasia, whereas a number of developmental signals and transcription factors are devoted to promoting acinar redifferentiation after injury. Imbalances between these proinflammatory and prodifferentiation pathways contribute to chronic pancreatitis, characterized by persistent inflammation, fibrosis, and acinar dedifferentiation. Loss of acinar cell differentiation also drives pancreatic cancer initiation, providing a mechanistic link between pancreatitis and cancer risk. Unraveling the molecular bases of exocrine regeneration may identify new therapeutic targets for treatment and prevention of both of these deadly diseases. PMID:25386992

  4. ULTRASTRUCTURE OF NORMAL AND NEOPLASTIC EXOCRINE PANCREAS IN THE MUMMICHOG, FUNDULUS HETEROLCLITUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ultrastructure of normal exocrine pancreas and exocrine pancreatic neoplasms in Fundulus heteroclitus from a creosote-contaminated environment in the Elizabeth River, Virginia, is described. he normal exocrine pancreas in this species was an anastomosing tubular rather than a...

  5. Exocrine Pancreas in Cats With Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Ferro, S; Lunardi, F; Zanetti, R; Heller, R S; Coppola, L M; Guscetti, F; Osto, M; Lutz, T A; Cavicchioli, L; Reusch, C E

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatitis has been described in cats with diabetes mellitus, although the number of studies currently available is very limited. In addition, ketoacidosis has been hypothesized to be associated with pancreatitis in diabetic cats. The aims of the present study were to investigate whether diabetic cats have pancreatitis and to determine if pancreatitis is more frequent with ketoacidosis. Samples of pancreas were collected postmortem from 37 diabetic cats, including 15 with ketoacidosis, and 20 control cats matched for age, sex, breed, and body weight. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, double-labeled for insulin/CD3, insulin/CD20, insulin/myeloperoxidase, insulin/PCNA, and glucagon/Ki67, and single-labeled for Iba1. A previously proposed semiquantitative score was used to characterize pancreatitis, along with counts of inflammatory cells. Scores of pancreatitis and the number of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes in the exocrine pancreas did not differ between diabetic and control cats or between diabetic cats with and without ketoacidosis. Of note, PCNA-positive acinar cells were increased (P = .002) in diabetic cats, particularly near islets (P < .001). Ki67-positive acinar cells were increased only near islets (P = .038). Ketoacidosis was not linked to proliferation. The results suggest that histopathologic evidence of pancreatitis may not be more frequent in diabetic cats and that ketoacidosis may not be associated with it at the time of death. Augmented PCNA-positive acinar cells might indicate increased proliferation due to chronic pancreatitis. The reason behind the prevalent proliferation of acinar cells surrounding pancreatic islets deserves further investigation. PMID:26319779

  6. Exocrine drainage in vascularized pancreas transplantation in the new millennium

    PubMed Central

    El-Hennawy, Hany; Stratta, Robert J; Smith, Fowler

    2016-01-01

    The history of vascularized pancreas transplantation largely parallels developments in immunosuppression and technical refinements in transplant surgery. From the late-1980s to 1995, most pancreas transplants were whole organ pancreatic grafts with insulin delivery to the iliac vein and diversion of the pancreatic ductal secretions to the urinary bladder (systemic-bladder technique). The advent of bladder drainage revolutionized the safety and improved the success of pancreas transplantation. However, starting in 1995, a seismic change occurred from bladder to bowel exocrine drainage coincident with improvements in immunosuppression, preservation techniques, diagnostic monitoring, general medical care, and the success and frequency of enteric conversion. In the new millennium, pancreas transplants are performed predominantly as pancreatico-duodenal grafts with enteric diversion of the pancreatic ductal secretions coupled with iliac vein provision of insulin (systemic-enteric technique) although the systemic-bladder technique endures as a preferred alternative in selected cases. In the early 1990s, a novel technique of venous drainage into the superior mesenteric vein combined with bowel exocrine diversion (portal-enteric technique) was designed and subsequently refined over the next ≥ 20 years to re-create the natural physiology of the pancreas with first-pass hepatic processing of insulin. Enteric drainage usually refers to jejunal or ileal diversion of the exocrine secretions either with a primary enteric anastomosis or with an additional Roux limb. The portal-enteric technique has spawned a number of newer and revisited techniques of enteric exocrine drainage including duodenal or gastric diversion. Reports in the literature suggest no differences in pancreas transplant outcomes irrespective of type of either venous or exocrine diversion. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on exocrine drainage in the new millennium (the purported

  7. Abnormalities of the Exocrine Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Rodriguez-Calvo, Teresa; Battaglia, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is considered a pancreatic beta cell-specific disease that results in absolute insulin deficiency. Nevertheless, clinical studies from 1940 onwards showed that patients with T1D had an abnormal exocrine pancreas due to the presence of subclinical exocrine insufficiency and acinar atrophy. Exocrine abnormalities are an important, and mostly neglected, characteristic associated with T1D. It is however still unclear whether the exocrine dysfunction in T1D is a primary damage caused by the same pathogenic event that led to beta cell destruction or secondary to beta cell loss. In this review, we collect evidence supporting the hypothesis that T1D is a combined endocrine-exocrine disease in which the loss of functional beta cell mass is most clinically apparent. PMID:26318606

  8. Cystic Neoplasms of the Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ribaux, C.; Schnyder, P.

    1990-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are rare and their diagnosis and treatment can be difficult. This report details 7 patients who had histologically proven serous cystadenoma4, mucinous cystadenoma2 and cystadeno carcinoma1. Computed tomography and sonography allowed excellent preoperative assessment but to attempt a distinction between the histological variants may be hazardous. Two tumours were only autopsy findings and 5 patients underwent laparotomy. It is confirmed that potentially malignant mucinous cystadenomas and cytadenocarcinomas should be resected whenever possible; serous cystadenomas are always benign and should therefore be resected only when the diagnosis is doubtful or if they cause symptoms. PMID:2278913

  9. Making β(-like)-cells from exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Staels, W; De Groef, S; Bussche, L; Leuckx, G; Van de Casteele, M; De Leu, N; Baeyens, L; Heremans, Y; Heimberg, H

    2016-09-01

    Creating an abundant source of β(-like)-cells has been a major goal in diabetes research for many decades. The concept of cell plasticity has inspired many strategies towards regenerative medicine, but its successes have been limited until very recently. Today, most cell types in the pancreas are considered candidates for the generation of β(-like)-cells through transdifferentiation. While β(-like)-cells that are in vitro differentiated from human embryonic stem cells are already being grafted in patients, β(-like)-cells generated by transdifferentiation are not yet ready for clinical application. These cells would however offer several advantages over the current β(-like)-cells generated by directed differentiation, especially concerning safety issues. In addition, perfect control of the transdifferentiation efficiency would through targeted drug delivery support a non-invasive cell therapy for diabetes. Lastly, focusing on the exocrine pancreas as prime candidate makes sense in view of their abundance and high plasticity. Keeping these hopeful perspectives in mind, it is worth to continue focused research on the mechanisms that control transdifferentiation from pancreas exocrine to β-cells. PMID:27615144

  10. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly, these processes have been viewed separately. In β cells, stimulation of P2Y1 receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y1 receptors, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in β cells (P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2X subtypes and A1 receptors) and in glucagon-secreting α cells (P2X7, A2 receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y11, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl− and K+ channels and intracellular Ca2+ signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary to consider the full complement of purinergic receptors on different cells as well as the structural and functional relation between various cells within the whole organ. In addition to the possible physiological function of purinergic receptors, this review analyses whether the receptors could be potential therapeutic targets for drug design aimed at treatment of pancreatic diseases. PMID:18368520

  11. Postnatal development of the exocrine pancreas in suckling goat kids.

    PubMed

    Lopez, V; Martínez-Victoria, E; Yago, M D; Lupiani, M J; Mañas, M

    1997-04-01

    A total of 25 preruminant Granadina breed goats were used. They were bottle-fed goat milk ad libitum from postnatal day 3 to 28. Until the age of 3 d, kids were fed colostrum. Body weight, pancreas weight, total protein concentration, enzyme activities in pancreatic tissue and hormone concentrations (cortisol, gastrin, T3 and T4) were determined at 3, 7, 14, 21 and 28 d of age. Our results show that the rates of pancreatic synthesis and secretion of chymotrypsin are well developed at birth in the kid, and may compensate for possible deficiencies in gastric and/or enterocytes intracellular proteolysis. In week 4, there was a marked increase in amylase activity, change that can be attributed to the beginning of the transitional period known as weaning. The significant increase in circulating concentration of cortisol during week 4 suggests the involvement of corticosteroid as a mediator of pancreatic development at weaning. Changes in blood levels of this hormone are believed to be important in the expression of amylase in the neonatal period. However, T3-T4 blood levels remained unchanged from d 3 to 28, suggesting that, in the kid, these hormones appear to have no clear influence upon the postnatal development of the exocrine pancreas. PMID:9255407

  12. AN EMBRYONIC CHICK PANCREAS ORGAN CULTURE MODEL: CHARACTERIZATION AND NEURAL CONTROL OF EXOCRINE RELEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    An embryonic chick (Gallus domesticus) whole-organ pancreas culture system was developed for use as an in vitro model to study cholinergic regulation of exocrine pancreatic function. The culture system was examined for characteristic exocrine function and viability by measuring e...

  13. Analyses of pancreas development by generation of gfp transgenic zebrafish using an exocrine pancreas-specific elastaseA gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Haiyan; Korzh, Svitlana; Li Zhen; Mudumana, Sudha Puttur; Korzh, Vladimir; Jiang Yunjin; Lin Shuo; Gong Zhiyuan . E-mail: dbsgzy@nus.edu.sg

    2006-05-15

    In contrast to what we know on development of endocrine pancreas, the formation of exocrine pancreas remains poorly understood. To create an animal model that allows observation of exocrine cell differentiation, proliferation, and morphogenesis in living animals, we used the zebrafish elastaseA (elaA) regulatory sequence to develop transgenic zebrafish that display highly specific exocrine pancreas expression of GFP in both larvae and adult. By following GFP expression, we found that the pancreas in early development was a relatively compact organ and later extended posterior along the intestine. By transferring the elaA:gfp transgene into slow muscle omitted mutant that is deficient in receiving Hedgehog signals, we further showed that Hedgehog signaling is required for exocrine morphogenesis but not for cell differentiation. We also applied the morpholino knockdown and toxin-mediated cell ablation approaches to this transgenic line. We showed that the development of exocrine pancreas is Islet-1 dependent. Injection of the diphtheria toxin A (DTA) construct under the elastaseA promoter resulted in selective ablation of exocrine cells while the endocrine cells and other endodermal derivatives (liver and intestine) were not affected. Thus, our works demonstrated the new transgenic line provided a useful experimental tool in analyzing exocrine pancreas development.

  14. Aroclor 1254 causes atrophy of exocrine pancreas in mice and the mechanism involved.

    PubMed

    Lin, Moudan; Wu, Tian; Sun, Lingbin; Lin, Jackie Jin; Zuo, Zhenghong; Wang, Chonggang

    2016-06-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic pollutants that have been linked to pancreatic disease. However, their role in affecting the exocrine function of pancreas and the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In the present study, male C57 mice were treated with Aroclor 1254, a commercially available PCBs mixture, at a dosage of 0.5, 5, 50, or 500 μg kg(-1) every 3 days by oral gavage. Decrease in pancreas/soma index and acinar atrophy were observed in the mice after exposure for 50 days. Aroclor 1254 exposure significantly decreased the PCNA-positive cells in the pancreatic acini in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, western blot analysis showed that PCNA expression was decreased in pancreas in the presence of Aroclor 1254, which suggests that Aroclor 1254 suppresses cell proliferation. TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells as well as the expression of Bcl2, BclXL, BAX, and Bad of exocrine pancreas did not show significant changes in the treated mice, indicating that Aroclor 1254 has no effect on apoptosis. We also found that phosphorylation of ERK1/2, P90RSK1 and Bad was increased in the treated groups; this compensatory activation of phosphorylation in ERK1/2-P90RSK1-Bad signaling cascade could protect cell from apoptosis to maintain the cell numbers and function of exocrine pancreas. Moreover, we found that the expression of Kras and TNFα was increased in the pancreas, indicating that Aroclor 1254 exposure could result in increased risk of inflammation and carcinoma. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 671-678, 2016. PMID:25409620

  15. Light and Electron Microscopic Studies on Prenatal Differentiation of Exocrine Pancreas in Buffalo

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Divya; Uppal, Varinder; Bansal, Neelam; Gupta, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The study was conducted on pancreas of 24 buffalo fetuses collected from abattoir and Veterinary clinics, GADVASU, Ludhiana. The buffalo fetuses were divided into three groups after measuring their CVRL, namely, group I (CVRL between 0 and 20 cm), group II (CVRL above 20 cm and up to 40 cm), and group III (CVRL above 40 cm) and their approximate age was calculated. The tissues were processed for light and ultrastructural studies. In group I, at 1.2 cm CVRL (34 days), the pancreas comprised tubules and solid nest of undifferentiated epithelial cells. At 7.5 cm CVRL (63 days) acinar cells with zymogen granules were observed. These acinar cells varied in shape from columnar to pyramidal. At 12.8 cm CVRL (86 days), parenchyma began to organize into lobes and lobules. The centroacinar cells were observed at 12.8 cm CVRL (86 days). In group II, at 28.3 cm CVRL (137 days), there was extensive branching of tubules that resulted in highly branched ductal tree connecting exocrine secretary units to the duct system. The interlobular and intralobular ducts were well observed at this age yet the intercalated ducts were not completely developed. In group III, exocrine pancreas showed a massive growth at 48 cm CVRL (182 days) with distinct pancreatic lobes and lobules. At 54 cm CVRL (195 days), well developed pancreatic architecture was seen with the presence of extensive development of exocrine part organized in lobes and lobules with interlobular and intralobular ducts whereas the intercalated ducts were observed in 80 cm CVRL (254 days). PMID:26981314

  16. Organogenesis of exocrine pancreas in sharpsnout sea bream (Diplodus puntazzo) larvae: characterization of trypsin expression.

    PubMed

    Kamaci, H Okan; Suzer, Cüneyt; Coban, Deniz; Saka, Sahin; Firat, Kürşat

    2010-12-01

    The ontogeny and differentiation stages of digestive systems related with trypsin expression in larvae of sharpsnout sea bream, Diplodus puntazzo, were investigated from hatching to 40 DAH (days after hatching), and total lengths and weights of larvae were determined. Histologic and enzymatic techniques were used to explain the functional development of the pancreas including trypsin activity. The pancreas was identified as a compact structure located in the region slightly posterior to the liver. At 3 DAH, first anus and then mouth opened. Incipient pancreas secretion polyhedral cells could be first observed as zymogen granules. During larval metamorphosis, the pancreas became diffuse, spreading throughout the mesentery in proximity to the stomach, the anterior intestine and the pyloric caeca. The specific activity of trypsin (42.54±6.8 mU/mg protein(-1)) was found as early as after hatching at larvae size of 2.87±0.34 mm at 0 DAH. Activity further increased until 10 DAH, especially after exogenous feeding. The highest trypsin activity was detected at 25 DAH as 119.26±11.6 mU/mg protein(-1). It is concluded that exocrine pancreas organogenesis is the main critical step in the development of digestive system that results in zymogen granules accumulation and increased trypsin activity. PMID:20077135

  17. Early indicators of exocrine pancreas carcinogenesis produced by non-genotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    Woutersen, R A; van Garderen-Hoetmer, A; Lamers, C B; Scherer, E

    1991-06-01

    In the past 40 years the incidence of pancreatic cancer in many Western countries had increased. Since no single factor responsible for the development of pancreatic cancer has been identified, it is believed that non-genotoxic factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of this highly fatal form of cancer. Focal abnormalities of acinar cells, referred to as atypical acinar cell foci or nodules, occur spontaneously in rats and some other species. Their incidence increases with age from zero at birth to about 75% in 2-year-old rats. These spontaneous lesions have a phenotype that cannot be distinguished from the putative, atypical preneoplastic, acinar cell foci induced in rat pancreas by the carcinogen azaserine. Unsaturated fat (corn oil) has been found to increase the incidence of atypical acinar cell nodules and adenomas in the pancreas of non-carcinogen-treated rats without influencing the weight of the pancreas. Furthermore, unsaturated fat has a specific promoting effect on the growth potential of atypical acinar cell foci and nodules induced in rat pancreas by azaserine, resulting in an increase in the number and size of these lesions. Rats fed raw soya flour or trypsin inhibitors develop an enlarged pancreas as a result of hypertrophy and hyperplasia. They also develop acidophilic atypical acinar cell foci and nodules, adenomas and adenocarcinomas after being fed full-fat raw soya flour for 2 years. It may be concluded from the observations in rat pancreas that non-genotoxic compounds or conditions that enhance pancreatic growth may be classified as non-genotoxic pancreatic tumour promoters. The observations with corn oil, however, indicate that there may be non-genotoxic compounds that specifically enhance growth of spontaneous initiated atypical acinar cell foci without causing hyperplasia of the pancreas. The possible mechanisms whereby unsaturated fat and trypsin inhibitors exert their effects on exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis are

  18. Neurogenin 3 Expressing Cells in the Human Exocrine Pancreas Have the Capacity for Endocrine Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Danielle L.; O’Driscoll, Marci; Sheets, Timothy P.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Oberholzer, Jose; McGarrigle, James J.; Shamblott, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (NGN3) is necessary and sufficient for endocrine differentiation during pancreatic development and is expressed by a population of progenitor cells that give rise exclusively to hormone-secreting cells within islets. NGN3 protein can be detected in the adult rodent pancreas only following certain types of injury, when it is transiently expressed by exocrine cells undergoing reprogramming to an endocrine cell fate. Here, NGN3 protein can be detected in 2% of acinar and duct cells in living biopsies of histologically normal adult human pancreata and 10% in cadaveric biopsies of organ donor pancreata. The percentage and total number of NGN3+ cells increase during culture without evidence of proliferation or selective cell death. Isolation of highly purified and viable NGN3+ cell populations can be achieved based on coexpression of the cell surface glycoprotein CD133. Transcriptome and targeted expression analyses of isolated CD133+ / NGN3+ cells indicate that they are distinct from surrounding exocrine tissue with respect to expression phenotype and Notch signaling activity, but retain high level mRNA expression of genes indicative of acinar and duct cell function. NGN3+ cells have an mRNA expression profile that resembles that of mouse early endocrine progenitor cells. During in vitro differentiation, NGN3+ cells express genes in a pattern characteristic of endocrine development and result in cells that resemble beta cells on the basis of coexpression of insulin C-peptide, chromogranin A and pancreatic and duodenal homeobox 1. NGN3 expression in the adult human exocrine pancreas marks a dedifferentiating cell population with the capacity to take on an endocrine cell fate. These cells represent a potential source for the treatment of diabetes either through ex vivo manipulation, or in vivo by targeting mechanisms controlling their population size and endocrine cell fate commitment. PMID:26288179

  19. The gastrin-releasing peptide analog bombesin preserves exocrine and endocrine pancreas morphology and function during parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph F; Neuman, Joshua C; Brill, Allison L; Brar, Harpreet K; Thompson, Mary F; Cadena, Mark T; Connors, Kelsey M; Busch, Rebecca A; Heneghan, Aaron F; Cham, Candace M; Jones, Elaina K; Kibbe, Carly R; Davis, Dawn B; Groblewski, Guy E; Kudsk, Kenneth A; Kimple, Michelle E

    2015-09-15

    Stimulation of digestive organs by enteric peptides is lost during total parental nutrition (PN). Here we examine the role of the enteric peptide bombesin (BBS) in stimulation of the exocrine and endocrine pancreas during PN. BBS protects against exocrine pancreas atrophy and dysfunction caused by PN. BBS also augments circulating insulin levels, suggesting an endocrine pancreas phenotype. While no significant changes in gross endocrine pancreas morphology were observed, pancreatic islets isolated from BBS-treated PN mice showed a significantly enhanced insulin secretion response to the glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonist exendin-4, correlating with enhanced GLP-1 receptor expression. BBS itself had no effect on islet function, as reflected in low expression of BBS receptors in islet samples. Intestinal BBS receptor expression was enhanced in PN with BBS, and circulating active GLP-1 levels were significantly enhanced in BBS-treated PN mice. We hypothesized that BBS preserved islet function indirectly, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. We confirmed the ability of BBS to directly stimulate intestinal enteroid cells to express the GLP-1 precursor preproglucagon. In conclusion, BBS preserves the exocrine and endocrine pancreas functions during PN; however, the endocrine stimulation is likely indirect, through the enteroendocrine cell-pancreas axis. PMID:26185331

  20. Generation of Functional Beta-Like Cells from Human Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maria J.; Muir, Kenneth R.; Docherty, Hilary M.; McGowan, Neil W. A.; Forbes, Shareen; Heremans, Yves; Heimberg, Harry; Casey, John; Docherty, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor mediated lineage reprogramming of human pancreatic exocrine tissue could conceivably provide an unlimited supply of islets for transplantation in the treatment of diabetes. Exocrine tissue can be efficiently reprogrammed to islet-like cells using a cocktail of transcription factors: Pdx1, Ngn3, MafA and Pax4 in combination with growth factors. We show here that overexpression of exogenous Pax4 in combination with suppression of the endogenous transcription factor ARX considerably enhances the production of functional insulin-secreting β-like cells with concomitant suppression of α-cells. The efficiency was further increased by culture on laminin-coated plates in media containing low glucose concentrations. Immunocytochemistry revealed that reprogrammed cultures were composed of ~45% islet-like clusters comprising >80% monohormonal insulin+ cells. The resultant β-like cells expressed insulin protein levels at ~15–30% of that in adult human islets, efficiently processed proinsulin and packaged insulin into secretory granules, exhibited glucose responsive insulin secretion, and had an immediate and prolonged effect in normalising blood glucose levels upon transplantation into diabetic mice. We estimate that approximately 3 billion of these cells would have an immediate therapeutic effect following engraftment in type 1 diabetes patients and that one pancreas would provide sufficient tissue for numerous transplants. PMID:27243814

  1. Possible site of calcium regulation in rat exocrine pancreas cells: an X-ray microanalytical study

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, N.

    1988-03-01

    We analysed four subcellular compartments in rat exocrine pancreas cells, zymogen granules, cytoplasm surrounding the zymogen granules, mitochondria and cytoplasm in the basal part of the cells for sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium content, using ultrathin frozen-dried cryosections. The highest concentrations of calcium were measured in the zymogen granules and the surrounding apical part of the cell containing Golgi apparatus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum and condensing vacuoles. Calcium concentrations in the basal part of the cells (mostly rough endoplasmic reticulum) were 60% lower than in the apical part of the cells. The lowest calcium concentrations were measured in mitochondria. The results suggest that other subcellular compartments than the rough endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria might be involved in the intracellular Ca2+ regulation.

  2. Lnx2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for exocrine cell differentiation in the early zebrafish pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Won, Minho; Ro, Hyunju; Dawid, Igor B.

    2015-01-01

    The gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ligand of Numb protein-X (Lnx)2a is expressed in the ventral-anterior pancreatic bud of zebrafish embryos in addition to its expression in the brain. Knockdown of Lnx2a by using an exon 2/intron 2 splice morpholino resulted in specific inhibition of the differentiation of ventral bud derived exocrine cell types, with little effect on endocrine cell types. A frame shifting null mutation in lnx2a did not mimic this phenotype, but a mutation that removed the exon 2 splice donor site did. We found that Lnx2b functions in a redundant manner with its paralog Lnx2a. Inhibition of lnx2a exon 2/3 splicing causes exon 2 skipping and leads to the production of an N-truncated protein that acts as an interfering molecule. Thus, the phenotype characterized by inhibition of exocrine cell differentiation requires inactivation of both Lnx2a and Lnx2b. Human LNX1 is known to destabilize Numb, and we show that inhibition of Numb expression rescues the Lnx2a/b-deficient phenotype. Further, Lnx2a/b inhibition leads to a reduction in the number of Notch active cells in the pancreas. We suggest that Lnx2a/b function to fine tune the regulation of Notch through Numb in the differentiation of cell types in the early zebrafish pancreas. Further, the complex relationships among genotype, phenotype, and morpholino effect in this case may be instructive in the ongoing consideration of morpholino use. PMID:26392552

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived from Human Exocrine Pancreas Spontaneously Express Pancreas Progenitor-Cell Markers in a Cell-Passage-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Song; Lee, Chanmi; Oh, Jooyun

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, and most connective tissues have been recognized as promising sources for cell-based therapies. MSCs have also been detected in human pancreatic tissue, including endocrine and exocrine cells. These adult human pancreas-derived MSCs have generated a great deal of interest owing to their potential use in the differentiation of insulin-producing cells for diabetes treatment. In the present study, we isolated MSCs from the adult human exocrine pancreas to determine whether isolated MSCs have the potential to differentiate into pancreatic endocrine cells and, therefore, whether they can be used in stem cell-based therapies. Pancreatic tissue was digested by collagenase and an enriched exocrine-cell fraction was obtained by density-gradient separation. Crude exocrine cells were methodically cultured in suspension and then in adherent culture. We expanded the human pancreatic exocrine-derived MSCs (hpMSCs) by cell passaging in culture and confirmed by flow cytometry that >90% expressed human classic surface markers of MSCs. Interestingly, these cells expressed pancreatic transcription factors, such as Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA, similar to pancreatic progenitor cells. These results indicated that hpMSCs can be used for the differentiation of pancreatic endocrine cells and may be used in type 1 diabetes treatment.

  4. Is there adaptation of the exocrine pancreas in wild animal? The case of the Roe Deer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physiology of the exocrine pancreas has been well studied in domestic and in laboratory animals as well as in humans. However, it remains quite unknown in wildlife mammals. Roe deer and cattle (including calf) belong to different families but have a common ancestor. This work aimed to evaluate in the Roe deer, the adaptation to diet of the exocrine pancreatic functions and regulations related to animal evolution and domestication. Results Forty bovine were distributed into 2 groups of animals either fed exclusively with a milk formula (monogastric) or fed a dry feed which allowed for rumen function to develop, they were slaughtered at 150 days of age. The 35 Roe deer were wild animals living in the temperate broadleaf and mixed forests, shot during the hunting season and classified in two groups adult and young. Immediately after death, the pancreas was removed for tissue sample collection and then analyzed. When expressed in relation to body weight, pancreas, pancreatic protein weights and enzyme activities measured were higher in Roe deer than in calf. The 1st original feature is that in Roe deer, the very high content in pancreatic enzymes seems to be related to specific digestive products observed (proline-rich proteins largely secreted in saliva) which bind tannins, reducing their deleterious effects on protein digestion. The high chymotrypsin and elastase II quantities could allow recycling of proline-rich proteins. In contrast, domestication and rearing cattle resulted in simplified diet with well digestible components. The 2nd feature is that in wild animal, both receptor subtypes of the CCK/gastrin family peptides were present in the pancreas as in calf, although CCK-2 receptor subtype was previously identified in higher mammals. Conclusions Bovine species could have lost some digestive capabilities (no ingestion of great amounts of tannin-rich plants, capabilities to secrete high amounts of proline-rich proteins) compared with Roe deer

  5. Importance of endogenous prostaglandins for the toxicity of cyclosporin A to rat endocrine and exocrine pancreas?

    PubMed Central

    Rünzi, M; Peskar, B M; von Schönfeld, J; Müller, M K

    1992-01-01

    Previous work has shown that cyclosporin A is toxic to the endocrine and exocrine pancreas. The aim of this study was to examine whether endogenous eicosanoids play a role in controlling cyclosporin A induced toxicity. Rats were treated for eight days with indomethacin (2 mg/kg, twice daily) in addition to cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg daily). Effects of drug treatments on exocrine (as assessed by amylase and protein secretion into the pancreatic juice) and endocrine (as assessed by the glucose dependent insulin release) pancreatic functions, and pancreatic formation of prostaglandins and thromboxane were evaluated. Treatment with cyclosporin A in the doses used did not inhibit eicosanoid formation by the pancreatic tissue ex vivo. Indomethacin caused significant inhibition of pancreatic formation of prostaglandin E2, 6k prostaglandin F1 alpha and thromboxane B2. Combined treatment with indomethacin and cyclosporin A (5 or 10 mg/kg) augmented cyclosporin A induced pancreatic toxicity with further impairment of insulin release, amylase secretion, and pancreatic juice protein content, but did not result in more pronounced inhibition of pancreatic eicosanoid formation. The increased toxicity of the combined treatment was, however, associated with raised cyclosporin A whole blood concentrations. The data suggest that the potentiation of pancreatic toxicity of cyclosporin A observed during coadministration of indomethacin is not the result of suppression of endogenous pancreatic eicosanoid biosynthesis, but more likely results from altered cyclosporin A pharmacokinetic which may be caused by an interference of indomethacin with the hepatic cytochrome P-450 dependent monooxygenase involved in cyclosporin A metabolism. The possibility that coadministration of non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs aggravates toxic effects in cyclosporin A treated patients should be considered. PMID:1280611

  6. Decreased insulin secretion and glucose clearance in exocrine pancreas-insufficient pigs.

    PubMed

    Lozinska, Liudmyla; Weström, Björn; Prykhodko, Olena; Lindqvist, Andreas; Wierup, Nils; Ahrén, Bo; Szwiec, Katarzyna; Pierzynowski, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    The effect of exocrine pancreatic function on the glucose-mediated insulin response and glucose utilization were studied in an exocrine pancreas-insufficient (EPI) pig model. Five 10-week-old EPI pigs after pancreatic duct ligation and 6 age-matched, non-operated control pigs were used in the study. Blood glucose, plasma insulin and C-peptide concentrations were monitored during meal (MGTT), oral (OGTT) and intravenous (IVGTT) glucose tolerance tests. Upon post-mortem examination, the pancreatic remnants of the EPI pigs showed acinar fibrotic atrophy but normal islets and β-cell morphology. The EPI pigs displayed increased fasting glucose concentrations compared with control animals (6.4 ± 0.4 versus 4.8 ± 0.1 mmol l(-1) , P < 0.0001) but unchanged insulin concentrations (2.4 ± 0.6 versus 2.1 ± 0.2 pmol l(-1) ). During the OGTT and IVGTT, the EPI pigs showed slower, impaired glucose utilization, with the disruption of a well-timed insulin response. Plasma C-peptide concentrations confirmed the delayed insulin response during the IVGTT in EPI pigs. Oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation (PES) of EPI pigs improved glucose clearance during IVGTT [AUC(glucose) 1295 ± 70 mmol l(-1) × (120 min) in EPI versus 1044 ± 32 mmol l(-1) × (120 min) in EPI + PES, P < 0.0001] without reinforcing the release of insulin [AUC(C-peptide) 14.4 ± 3.8 nmol l(-1) × (120 min) in EPI versus 6.4 ± 1.3 nmol l(-1) × (120 min) in EPI + PES, P < 0.002]. The results suggest the existence of an acino-insular axis regulatory communication. The presence of pancreatic enzymes in the gut facilitates glucose utilization in an insulin-independent manner, indicating the existence of a gut-derived pancreatic enzyme-dependent mechanism involved in peripheral glucose utilization. PMID:26663041

  7. Distribution of neuropeptides in endocrine and exocrine pancreas of long-legged buzzard (Buteo rufinus): an immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Bayrakdar, Ali; Yaman, Mine; Atalar, Omer; Gencer Tarakci, Berrin; Ceribasi, Songul

    2011-01-17

    This study aimed to determine the existence and distribution of certain neuropeptides in endocrine and exocrine pancreas of the long-legged buzzard by using immunohistochemical methods. SOM-14-, NPY- and CGRP-IR endocrine cells were determined in both central and peripheral regions in A-islets within the pancreas, while SP-IR endocrine cells were found only in the central region, and CCK-8- and galanin-IR endocrine cells were only detected in peripheral region. On the other hand, in B-islets; SP-, NPY- and CGRP-IRendocrine cells were determined in both central and peripheral regions, while SOM-14- CCK-8- and galanin-IRendocrine cells were found only in the peripheral region. In addition; SOM-14-, NPY-, CGRP-, CCK-8- and galanin-IR cells were also observed in exocrine pancreas. This distribution pattern in the pancreas of the long-legged buzzard demonstrates that neuropeptides perform their probable affects through endocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. In conclusion, the existence and distribution of neuropeptides in the pancreas of long-legged buzzard have been introduced in this study for the first time and this bird species has also been found to differ from other types of avian species. PMID:20959123

  8. Development of the islets, exocrine pancreas, and related ducts in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (Pisces: Cichlidae).

    PubMed

    Morrison, Carol M; Pohajdak, Bill; Tam, Janet; Wright, James R

    2004-09-01

    Pancreatic development and the relationship of the islets with the pancreatic, hepatic, and bile ducts were studied in the Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, from hatching to the onset of maturity at 7 months. The number of islets formed during development was counted, using either serial sections or dithizone staining of isolated islets. There was a general increase in islet number with both age and size. Tilapia housed in individual tanks grew more quickly and had more islets than siblings of the same age left in crowded conditions. The pancreas is a compact organ in early development, and at 1 day posthatch (dph) a single principal islet, positive for all hormones tested (insulin, SST-14, SST-28, glucagon, and PYY), is partially surrounded by exocrine pancreas. However, the exocrine pancreas becomes more disseminated in older fish, following blood vessels along the mesenteries and entering the liver to form a hepatopancreas. The epithelium of the pancreatic duct system from the intercalated ducts to the main duct entering the duodenum was positive for glucagon and SST-14 in 8 and 16 dph tilapia. Individual insulin-immunopositive cells were found in one specimen. At this early stage in development, therefore, the pancreatic duct epithelial cells appear to be pluripotent and may give rise to the small islets found near the pancreatic ducts in 16-37 dph tilapia. Glucagon, SST-14, and some PPY-positive enteroendocrine cells were present in the intestine of the 8 dph larva and in the first part of the intestine of the 16 dph juvenile. Glucagon and SST-14-positive inclusions were found in the apical cytoplasm of the mid-gut epithelium of the 16 dph tilapia. These hormones may have been absorbed from the gut lumen, since they are produced in both the pancreatic ducts and the enteroendocrine cells. At least three hepatic ducts join the cystic duct to form the bile duct, which runs alongside the pancreatic duct to the duodenum. PMID:15281064

  9. Secretion and fluid transport mechanisms in the mammary gland: comparisons with the exocrine pancreas and the salivary gland.

    PubMed

    McManaman, James L; Reyland, Mary E; Thrower, Edwin C

    2006-10-01

    Milk is a complex fluid composed of proteins, sugars, lipids and minerals, in addition to a wide variety of bioactive molecules including vitamins, trace elements and growth factors. The composition of these components reflects the integrated activities of distinct synthetic, secretion and transport processes found in mammary epithelial cells, and mirrors the differing nutritional and developmental requirements of mammalian neonates. Five general pathways have been described for secretion of milk components. With the exception of lipids, which are secreted a unique pathway, milk components are thought to be secreted by adaptations of pathways found in other secretory organs. However little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that constitute these pathways or the physiological mechanisms by which they are regulated. Comparisons of current secretion and transport models in the mammary gland, exocrine pancreas and salivary gland indicate that significant differences exist between the mammary gland and other exocrine organs in how proteins and lipids are packaged and secreted, and how fluid is transported. PMID:17136613

  10. Clear cell carcinoma of exocrine pancreas: a rare tumor with an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Biswajit; New, Norman E; Wedgwood, Kevin R

    2005-03-01

    Metastatic clear cell carcinomas are relatively common from primary tumors arising in the kidney, female genital tract, adrenal cortex, and lung, but they rarely occur from primary tumors of the pancreas. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic tumor with marked clear cell changes in a 46-year-old white man presenting with a pseudocyst of the pancreas. At laparotomy, there was a hard area in the head of the pancreas and another hard nodule was present in the omentum. The histologic and immunohistochemical test of the excised omental nodule exhibited features consistent with clear cell carcinoma from pancreatic primary. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic clear cell pancreatic tumor with such an unusual presentation. PMID:15714142

  11. Identification of a vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-like membrane protein in zymogen granules of the rat exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Braun, J E; Fritz, B A; Wong, S M; Lowe, A W

    1994-02-18

    Zymogen granules of the exocrine pancreas are the secretory organelles responsible for the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. Several proteins are associated with or are integral components of the lipid bilayer that forms the zymogen granule membrane. These proteins likely represent important components in the regulated secretion of digestive enzymes. VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins)/synaptobrevins are a family of 18-kDa integral membrane proteins originally characterized in synaptic vesicles. Polyclonal antisera raised against either a VAMP/glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein or rat brain synaptic vesicles, detected an 18-kDa immunoreactive protein in zymogen granule membranes that co-migrates electrophorectically with rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP. Rat brain synaptic vesicle VAMP was detected by both antisera. Botulinum-B toxin treatment of zymogen granule membranes did not result in cleavage of zymogen granule membrane VAMP, indicating that exocrine pancreatic VAMP is either VAMP1 or a novel VAMP-isoform. Immunofluorescent studies demonstrated that exocrine pancreatic VAMP localized with GP2, a zymogen granule membrane protein, to the apical region of pancreatic acinar cells. No significant labeling was observed in basolateral regions of pancreatic acinar cells. These results establish the presence of a VAMP protein in the zymogen granule of the rat pancreas and suggest that VAMPs have a role in exocrine secretion. PMID:8106518

  12. [Function and morphology of intraperitoneal segmental pancreas allotransplants with cyclosporin monotherapy in the dog--a comparison of 4 drainage procedures of exocrine secretions].

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, J; Hesse, U J; Holland, M; Arnold, G; Hübinger, A

    1988-01-01

    Dogs which had received cyclosporine A for immunosuppression were investigated to elucidate functionality and morphological alterations in pancreas allografts, with enteral, vesical, peritoneal or occluded exocrine drainage. None of the animals with enteral drainage survived the first four postoperative weeks, with lethal infections being responsible for allograft failure. Full functionality three months from transplantation was recorded from three of seven transplants with ductal occlusion and unobstructed drainage into the abdominal cavity. Ductal occlusion was repeatedly accompanied by pancreatitis and pseudo-cysts. Fibrotisation of the organ and loss of endocrine islets of pancreas were recordable from these cases just as from grafts with unobstructed drainage into the abdominal cavity. Drainage of exocrine secretion into the bladder yielded good success in one of seven animals and was morphologically and functionally characterised primarily by occlusive metaplastic ossification along the transition to the anastomosis. PMID:2464880

  13. In vivo spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography imaging of a far red fluorescent protein expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Schmitner, Nicole; Sandrian, Michelle G.; Zabihian, Behrooz; Hermann, Boris; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescent proteins brought a revolution in life sciences and biological research in that they make a powerful tool for researchers to study not only the structural and morphological information, but also dynamic and functional information in living cells and organisms. While green fluorescent proteins (GFP) have become a common labeling tool, red-shifted or even near infrared fluorescent proteins are becoming the research focus due to the fact that longer excitation wavelengths are more suitable for deep tissue imaging. In this study, E2-Crimson, a far red fluorescent protein whose excitation wavelength is 611 nm, was genetically expressed in the exocrine pancreas of adult zebrafish. Using spectroscopic all optical detection photoacoustic tomography, we mapped the distribution of E2-Crimson in 3D after imaging the transgenic zebrafish in vivo using two different wavelengths. With complementary morphological information provided by imaging the same fish using a spectral domain optical coherence tomography system, the E2-Crimson distribution acquired from spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography was confirmed in 2D by epifluorescence microscopy and in 3D by histology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time a far red fluorescent protein is imaged in vivo by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Due to the regeneration feature of zebrafish pancreas, this work preludes the longitudinal studies of animal models of diseases such as pancreatitis by spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography. Since the effective penetration depth of photoacoustic tomography is beyond the transport mean free path length, other E2-Crimson labeled inner organs will also be able to be studied dynamically using spectroscopic photoacoustic tomography.

  14. Surgical Injury to the Mouse Pancreas through Ligation of the Pancreatic Duct as a Model for Endocrine and Exocrine Reprogramming and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Leuckx, Gunter; Van Gassen, Naomi; Staels, Willem; Cai, Ying; Yuchi, Yixing; Coppens, Violette; De Leu, Nico; Heremans, Yves; Baeyens, Luc; Van de Casteele, Mark; Heimberg, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of pancreatic beta cells in vivo or ex vivo, or generation of beta cells by differentiation from an embryonic or adult stem cell, can provide new expandable sources of beta cells to alleviate the donor scarcity in human islet transplantation as therapy for diabetes. Although recent advances have been made towards this aim, mechanisms that regulate beta cell expansion and differentiation from a stem/progenitor cell remain to be characterized. Here, we describe a protocol for an injury model in the adult mouse pancreas that can function as a tool to study mechanisms of tissue remodeling and beta cell proliferation and differentiation. Partial duct ligation (PDL) is an experimentally induced injury of the rodent pancreas involving surgical ligation of the main pancreatic duct resulting in an obstruction of drainage of exocrine products out of the tail region of the pancreas. The inflicted damage induces acinar atrophy, immune cell infiltration and severe tissue remodeling. We have previously reported the activation of Neurogenin (Ngn) 3 expressing endogenous progenitor-like cells and an increase in beta cell proliferation after PDL. Therefore, PDL provides a basis to study signals involved in beta cell dynamics and the properties of an endocrine progenitor in adult pancreas. Since, it still remains largely unclear, which factors and pathways contribute to beta cell neogenesis and proliferation in PDL, a standardized protocol for PDL will allow for comparison across laboratories. PMID:26273954

  15. Splenic vein thrombosis is associated with an increase in pancreas-specific complications and reduced survival in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic exocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Dedania, Nishi; Agrawal, Nidhi; Winter, Jordan M; Koniaris, Leonidas G; Rosato, Ernest L; Sauter, Patricia K; Leiby, Ben; Pequignot, Edward; Yeo, Charles J; Lavu, Harish

    2013-08-01

    Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) is the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of pancreatic exocrine cancer localized to the body and tail of the pancreas. Splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) can occur in patients with malignant pancreatic exocrine tumors secondary to direct tumor invasion or compression of the splenic vein by mass effect. This study examines the effect of preoperative SVT on postoperative outcomes. In this retrospective cohort study, we queried our pancreatic surgery database to identify patients who underwent DPS from October 2005 to June 2011. These cases were evaluated for evidence of preoperative SVT on clinical records and cross-sectional imaging (CT,MRI, endoscopic US). Outcomes for patients with and without SVT were compared. From an overall cohort of 285 consecutive patients who underwent DPS during the study period, data were evaluated for 70 subjects who underwent surgery for pancreatic exocrine cancer (27 with SVT, 43 without SVT). The preoperative demographics and co-morbidities were similar between the groups, except the average age was higher for those without SVT (p<0.05). The median estimated blood loss was significantly higher in the SVT group (675 versus 250 ml, p=<0.001).While the overall morbidity rates were similar between the two groups (48 % SVT versus 56% no SVT, p=NS), the group with SVT had a significantly higher rate of pancreas-specific complications, including pancreatic fistula (33 versus 7 %,p<0.01) and delayed gastric emptying (15 versus 0%, p<0.02). Hospital readmission rates were similar between the groups(30 versus 28 %, p=NS). Patients without SVT had a trend toward longer median survival (40 versus 20.8 months),although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.1). DPS for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma can be performed safely in patients with SVT, but with higher intraoperative blood loss, increased pancreas-specific complications, and a trend towards lower long-term survival rates

  16. Overview of Exocrine Pancreatic Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Pandiri, Arun R

    2014-01-01

    Exocrine pancreas is a source of several enzymes that are essential for the digestive process. The exocrine pancreatic secretion is tightly regulated by the neuroendocrine system. The endocrine pancreas is tightly integrated anatomically and physiologically with the exocrine pancreas and modulates its function. Compound-induced pancreatitis is not a common event in toxicology or drug development but it becomes a significant liability when encountered. Understanding the species-specific differences in physiology is essential to understand the underlying pathobiology of pancreatic disease in animal models and its relevance to human disease. This review will mainly focus on understanding the morphology and physiology of the pancreas, unique islet-exocrine interactions, and pancreatitis. PMID:24190915

  17. Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Prentice, M A; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2016-01-01

    Even though pancreas transplant numbers have steadily declined over the past decade, new listings increased in 2014 compared with the previous year, notably for pancreas transplant alone (PTA) and simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant. The number of new PTAs also increased over the past two years. Whether this is a sustainable trend remains to be seen. Significant events in 2014 included implementation of a new pancreas allocation system and development of a proposed uniform definition of pancreas graft failure. Meanwhile, overall pancreas transplant rates and outcomes continued to improve. Substantial decline in pancreas after kidney transplants remains a serious concern. SRTR has not published pancreas graft failure data in the program-specific reports for the past two years. While this will not change in the near future, the acceptance of a uniform definition of graft failure is a crucial first step toward resuming graft failure reporting. Continued improvements and innovation, both surgical and immunological, will be critical to keep pancreas transplant as a viable option for treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. As alternative therapies for diabetes such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas are evolving, improved outcomes with minimizations of complications are more important than ever. PMID:26755263

  18. Evidence that the (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding protein in pancreas is localized in exocrine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.; Richardson, S.B.; Altszuler, N.; Lane, B.

    1985-06-01

    Extracts of rat pancreas contain significant amounts of an (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding protein. The amount of steroid-binding activity that could be measured varied considerably depending on the tonicity of the homogenizing medium. High speed supernatants of homogenates initially prepared in isotonic buffer contained about 10% of the binding activity as homogenates prepared in hypotonic buffer. Extraction with hypotonic buffer of pellets obtained by the isotonic procedure yielded most of the remaining (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity. In an attempt to avoid errors resulting from incomplete homogenization and to detect possible changes in intracellular distribution of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity, pancreata were initially homogenized in isotonic buffer and centrifuged at high speed (100,000 X g; 1 hr). The pellet was then extracted with hypotonic buffer and centrifuged again at high speed, and both supernatants were analyzed for (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding and amylase activities. Two or 14 days after treatment of male rats with streptozotocin, no apparent decline or redistribution of (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity to the cytosol was noted despite extensive alteration of beta-islet cells, as determined by electron microscopic examination of sections of these pancreata and significant loss of insulin, as measured by RIA. Amylase activity was unaffected 2 days after streptozotocin treatment, but was depressed to about 1% of control levels at 14 days. Administration of insulin to the latter group of animals resulted in return of amylase to normal levels and a modest increase (approximately 50%) in (/sup 3/H)estradiol-binding activity.

  19. The effects of 13 wk of liraglutide treatment on endocrine and exocrine pancreas in male and female ZDF rats: a quantitative and qualitative analysis revealing no evidence of drug-induced pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Vrang, Niels; Jelsing, Jacob; Simonsen, Lotte; Jensen, Andres Eskjær; Thorup, Inger; Søeborg, Henrik; Knudsen, Lotte Bjerre

    2012-07-15

    A possible association between glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs and incidences of pancreatitis has been suggested based on clinical studies. In male and female diabetic Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, we investigated the effects of continuous administration of liraglutide and exenatide on biochemical [lipase, pancreatic amylase (P-amylase)] and histopathological markers of pancreatitis. Male and female ZDF rats were dosed for 13 wk with liraglutide (0.4 or 1.0 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) sc once daily) or exenatide (0.25 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) sc, Alzet osmotic minipumps). P-amylase and lipase plasma activity were measured, and an extended histopathological and stereological (specific cell mass and proliferation rate) evaluation of the exocrine and the endocrine pancreas was performed. Expectedly, liraglutide and exenatide lowered blood glucose and Hb A(1c) in male and female ZDF rats, whereas β-cell mass and proliferation rate were increased with greatly improved blood glucose control. Whereas neither analog affected lipase activity, small increases in P-amylase activity were observed in animals treated with liraglutide and exenatide. However, concurrent or permanent increases in lipase and P-amylase activity were never observed. Triglycerides were lowered by both GLP-1 analogs. The qualitative histopathological findings did not reveal adverse effects of liraglutide. The findings were mainly minimal in severity and focal in distribution. Similarly, the quantitative stereological analyses revealed no effects of liraglutide or exenatide on overall pancreas weight or exocrine and duct cell mass or proliferation. The present study demonstrates that, in overtly diabetic male and female ZDF rats, prolonged exposure to GLP-1 receptor agonists does not affect biochemical or histopathological markers of pancreatitis, and whereas both exenatide and liraglutide increase β-cell mass, they have no effect on the exocrine pancreas. However, clinical outcome studies and studies

  20. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in dogs].

    PubMed

    van Noort, R

    1990-07-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is the most common cause of maldigestion in dogs. This is usually caused by irreversible atrophy of the pancreas which subsequently requires life-long substitution therapy. The pathophysiology, symptoms and diagnosis are briefly reviewed in the present paper. The Trypsin-like-immunoreactivity test is recommended for establishing the diagnosis. Finally, treatment and possible causes of the failure of therapy are discussed. PMID:2196714

  1. Protein tyrosine phosphatase κ and SHP-1 are involved in the regulation of cell-cell contacts at adherens junctions in the exocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Schnekenburger, J; Mayerle, J; Krüger, B; Buchwalow, I; Weiss, F U; Albrecht, E; Samoilova, V E; Domschke, W; Lerch, M M

    2005-01-01

    Background: We have previously shown that cell contacts between pancreatic acinar cells dissociate early in pancreatitis and that this is a prerequisite for the development of pancreatic oedema. Here we studied the underlying mechanism. Methods: Employing experimental caerulein induced pancreatitis in vivo and isolated pancreatic acini ex vivo, in conjunction with protein chemistry, morphology, and electron microscopy, we determined whether cell contact regulation in the pancreas requires or involves: (1) changes in cadherin-catenin protein expression, (2) tyrosine phosphorylation of adhesion proteins, or (3) alterations in the actin cytoskeleton. Results: During initial cell-cell contact dissociation at adherens junctions, expression of adhesion proteins remained stable. At time points of dissociated adherens junctions, the cadherin-catenin complex was found to be tyrosine phosphorylated and internalised. The receptor type protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)κ was constitutively associated with the cadherin-catenin complex at intact cell contacts whereas following the dissociation of adherens junctions, the internalised components of the cadherin-catenin complex were tyrosine phosphorylated and associated with the cytosolic PTP SHP-1. In isolated acini, inhibition of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphatases alone was sufficient to induce dissociation of adherens junctions analogous to that found with supramaximal caerulein stimulation. Dissociation of actin microfilaments had no effect on adherens junction integrity. Conclusions: These data identify tyrosine phosphorylation as the key regulator for cell contacts at adherens junctions and suggest a definitive role for the protein tyrosine phosphatases PTPκ and SHP-1 in the regulation, maintenance, and restitution of cell adhesions in a complex epithelial organ such as the pancreas. PMID:15987791

  2. Pancreatic exocrine response to parenteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Bivins, B A; Bell, R M; Rapp, R P; Toedebusch, W H

    1984-01-01

    Animal experimental data concerning pancreatic exocrine secretory response to parenteral nutrition is contradictory. We have studied the pancreatic exocrine output in a patient with a pure pancreatic fistula. In this patient, parenteral nutrition with hypertonic glucose, amino acids and fat emulsion was not associated with increases in fistula volume or protein output. Enteral protein and fat in this patient caused rapid increases in both fistula volume and protein output. This study supports the use of parenteral nutrition as a means of maintaining the pancreas at rest. PMID:6321813

  3. Deconstructing Pancreas Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Cecil M.; Goodyer, William R.

    2012-01-01

    The relentless nature and increasing prevalence of human pancreatic diseases, in particular, diabetes mellitus and adenocarcinoma, has motivated further understanding of pancreas organogenesis. The pancreas is a multifunctional organ whose epithelial cells govern a diversity of physiologically vital endocrine and exocrine functions. The mechanisms governing the birth, differentiation, morphogenesis, growth, maturation, and maintenance of the endocrine and exocrine components in the pancreas have been discovered recently with increasing tempo. This includes recent studies unveiling mechanisms permitting unexpected flexibility in the developmental potential of immature and mature pancreatic cell subsets, including the ability to interconvert fates. In this article, we describe how classical cell biology, genetic analysis, lineage tracing, and embryological investigations are being complemented by powerful modern methods including epigenetic analysis, time-lapse imaging, and flow cytometry-based cell purification to dissect fundamental processes of pancreas development. PMID:22587935

  4. Reprogramming of human pancreatic exocrine cells to β-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Lemper, M; Leuckx, G; Heremans, Y; German, M S; Heimberg, H; Bouwens, L; Baeyens, L

    2015-01-01

    Rodent acinar cells exhibit a remarkable plasticity as they can transdifferentiate to duct-, hepatocyte- and islet β-like cells. We evaluated whether exocrine cells from adult human pancreas can similarly respond to proendocrine stimuli. Exocrine cells from adult human pancreas were transduced directly with lentiviruses expressing activated MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) and cultured as monolayers or as 3D structures. Expression of STAT3 and MAPK in human exocrine cells activated expression of the proendocrine factor neurogenin 3 in 50% to 80% of transduced exocrine cells. However, the number of insulin-positive cells increased only in the exocrine cells grown initially in suspension before 3D culture. Lineage tracing identified human acinar cells as the source of Ngn3- and insulin-expressing cells. Long-term engraftment into immunocompromised mice increased the efficiency of reprogramming to insulin-positive cells. Our data demonstrate that exocrine cells from human pancreas can be reprogrammed to transplantable insulin-producing cells that acquire functionality. Given the large number of exocrine cells in a donor pancreas, this approach presents a novel strategy to expand cell therapy in type 1 diabetes. PMID:25476775

  5. Tale of an Innocent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Nicky

    2006-01-01

    The British novelist Nicky Singer talks about becoming a writer, the role of editors and about who decides what can--and what cannot--be published on either side of the Atlantic. Her three novels explore territory which can make publishers nervous: "Feather Boy" (initiation rites and domestic violence), "Doll" (self-harm) and "The Innocent's…

  6. Why Confessions Trump Innocence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassin, Saul M.

    2012-01-01

    As illustrated by the story of Amanda Knox and many others wrongfully convicted, false confessions often trump factual innocence. Focusing on consequences, recent research suggests that confessions are powerfully persuasive as a matter of logic and common sense; that many false confessions contain richly detailed narratives and accurate crime…

  7. [The pancreas and alcohol].

    PubMed

    Singer, M V

    1985-07-20

    The action of acute and chronic administration of ethanol on pancreatic exocrine secretion in humans and several animal species is reviewed. If the data concerning the secretory action of ethanol on the pancreas are to the property assessed, several experimental variables have to be considered. Acute intravenous administration of ethanol inhibits basal and hormonally stimulated pancreatic secretion of bicarbonate and protein in nonalcoholic humans and most species of animals tested. Oral or intraduodenal ethanol causes moderate stimulation of pancreatic bicarbonate and enzyme secretion. Since anticholinergic agents and truncal vagotomy diminish the ethanol-induced inhibition of pancreatic secretion in the intact animal, it is possible that the action of ethanol on the pancreas is at least partly mediated by inhibitory cholinergic mechanisms. The action of ethanol on the pancreas may also be mediated by release of gastrointestinal hormones. Intravenous and oral administration of ethanol releases gastrin in dogs but not in humans. Pancreatic polypeptide is unlikely to be the hormonal mediator of the ethanol-induced inhibition of exocrine pancreatic secretion in humans and dogs, since ethanol does not release pancreatic polypeptide. The main secretory changes induced by chronic alcoholism in humans and dogs are increased basal secretion of pancreatic enzymes and decreased basal bicarbonate output, and these secretory changes may favour the occurrence of protein precipitates which are believed to be the first lesion of chronic pancreatitis in man. A decrease in the concentration of "pancreatic stone protein" in pancreatic juice may favour the development of protein precipitates in chronic alcoholic patients. PMID:3901251

  8. Imaging of Pancreas Transplantation and Its Complications.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Ryan B; Moshiri, Mariam; Osman, Sherif; Menias, Christine O; Katz, Douglas S

    2016-03-01

    Whole pancreas transplantation is an effective treatment for obtaining euglycemic status in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, and is usually performed concurrent with renal transplantation in the affected patient. This article discusses complex surgical anatomical details of pancreas transplantation including surgical options for endocrine and exocrine drainage pathways. It then describes several possible complications related to surgical factors in the immediate post operative period followed by other complications related to systemic issues, vasculature, and the pancreatic parenchyma. PMID:26896223

  9. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreas from a donor into a person with diabetes. Pancreas transplants give the person a chance to ... used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas does not make enough, or sometimes ...

  10. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas is a gland behind your stomach and in front of your spine. It produces the juices that ... hormones that help control blood sugar levels. A pancreas transplant is surgery to place a healthy pancreas ...

  11. Pancreas transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver cells, where it can be used as fuel. In people with type 1 diabetes , the pancreas ... and kidney for the rest of your life. Alternative Names Transplant - pancreas; Transplantation - pancreas Images Endocrine glands ...

  12. Impaired growth of pancreatic exocrine cells in transgenic mice expressing human activin {beta}E subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Osamu . E-mail: ohashim@vmas.kitasato-u.ac.jp; Ushiro, Yuuki; Sekiyama, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Osamu; Yoshioka, Kazuki; Mutoh, Ken-Ichiro; Hasegawa, Yoshihisa

    2006-03-10

    Activins, TGF-{beta} superfamily members, have multiple functions in a variety of cells and tissues. Recently, additional activin {beta} subunit genes, {beta}C and {beta}E, have been identified. To explore the role of activin E, we created transgenic mice overexpressing human activin {beta}E subunit. There were pronounced differences in the pancreata of the transgenic animals as compared with their wild-type counterparts. Pancreatic weight, expressed relative to total body weight, was significantly reduced. Histologically, adipose replacement of acini in the exocrine pancreas was observed. There was a significant decrease in the number of PCNA-positive cells in the acinar cells, indicating reduced proliferation in the exocrine pancreas of the transgenic mice. However, quantitative pancreatic morphometry showed that the total number and mass of the islets of the transgenic mice were comparable with those of the nontransgenic control mice. Our findings suggest a role for activin E in regulating the proliferation of pancreatic exocrine cells.

  13. Tests of pancreatic exocrine function - clinical significance in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders.

    PubMed

    Keller, Jutta; Aghdassi, Ali Alexander; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia V; Layer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The pancreas functions as the main factory for digestive enzymes and therefore enables food utilisation. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, partial or complete loss of digestive enzyme synthesis, occurs primarily in disorders directly affecting pancreatic tissue integrity. However, other disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, such as coeliac disease, inflammatory bowel disease, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome or gastric resection can either mimic or cause pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. The overt clinical symptoms of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency are steatorrhoea and maldigestion, which frequently become apparent in advanced stages. Several direct and indirect function tests are available for assessment of pancreatic function but until today diagnosis of excretory insufficiency is difficult as in mild impairment clinically available function tests show limitations of diagnostic accuracy. This review focuses on diagnosis of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in pancreatic and non-pancreatic disorders. PMID:19505669

  14. Annular pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  15. Pancreas Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Pancreas Transplantation Some patients with type 1 diabetes have ... weigh the potential benefits and risks. Benefits of Pancreas Transplants You may be able to maintain a ...

  16. Polycystic Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Sonavane, Amey D; Amarapurkar, Deepak N; Amarapurkar, Anjali D

    2016-04-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  17. Polycystic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Amarapurkar, Deepak N.; Amarapurkar, Anjali D.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic disease of the pancreas is a very rare entity with very few cases reported in the literature. We report a symptomatic case of polycystic pancreas associated with pheochromocytoma that was treated surgically. PMID:27144204

  18. What Is the Pancreas?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pancreas Function of the Pancreas What is the pancreas? The pancreas is a long flattened gland located ... controller of blood sugar levels. Where is the pancreas? The pancreas is located deep in the abdomen. ...

  19. Effects of Ca2+ on phosphoinositide breakdown in exocrine pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C W; Merritt, J E; Putney, J W; Rubin, R P

    1986-01-01

    Recent studies have established that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [I(1,4,5)P3] provides the link between receptor-regulated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis and mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Here, we report the effects of Ca2+ on inositol trisphosphate (IP3) formation from phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP2) catalysed by phospholipase C in intact and electrically permeabilized rat pancreatic acinar cells. In permeabilized cells, the Ca2+-mobilizing agonist caerulein stimulated [3H]IP3 formation when the free [Ca2+] was buffered at 140 nM, the cytosolic free [Ca2+] of unstimulated pancreatic acinar cells. When the free [Ca2+] was reduced to less than 10 nM, caerulein did not stimulate [3H]IP3 formation. Ca2+ in the physiological range stimulated [3H]IP3 formation and reduced the amount of [3H]PIP2 in permeabilized cells. The effects of Ca2+ and the receptor agonist caerulein were additive, but we have not established whether this reflects independent effects on the same or different enzymes. The effect of Ca2+ on [3H]IP3 formation by permeabilized cells was unaffected by inhibitors of the cyclo-oxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways of arachidonic acid metabolism; nor were the effects of Ca2+ mimicked by addition of arachidonic acid. These results suggest that the effects of Ca2+ on phospholipase C activity are not a secondary consequence of Ca2+ activation of phospholipase A2. Changes in free [Ca2+] (less than 10 nM-1.2 mM) did not affect the metabolism of exogenous [3H]I(1,4,5)P3 by permeabilized cells. In permeabilized cells, breakdown of exogenous [3H]IP3 to [3H]IP2 (inositol bisphosphate), and formation of [3H]IP3 in response to receptor agonists were equally inhibited by 2,3-bisphosphoglyceric acid. This suggests that the [3H]IP2 formed in response to receptor agonists is entirely derived from [3H]IP3. In intact cells, [3H]IP3 formation was stimulated when ionomycin was used to increase the cytosolic free [Ca2+]. However, a maximal concentration of caerulein elicited ten times as much IP3 formation as did the highest physiologically relevant [Ca2+]. We conclude that the major effect of receptor agonists on IP3 formation does not require an elevation of cytosolic free [Ca2+], although the increase in free [Ca2+] that normally follows IP3 formation may itself have a small stimulatory effect on phospholipase C. PMID:3026361

  20. [Effectiveness of panzytrat--modern physiological enzyme preparation in complex therapy of pancreatic exocrine secretory insufficiency in cholelithiasis].

    PubMed

    Petukhov, V A; Mironov, A V; Semenov, Zh S; Ustinov, F S

    2009-01-01

    In the article the analysis of the survey with 102 patients with gallstone disease involved, 68 of whom underwent cholecystectomy and 34 were treated conservatively, is made. The content of fecal elastase 1 in stool was estimated for diagnostics of exocrine enzyme insufficiency of pancreas by immune-enzyme analysis. It was stated that 90% of patients possess secondary exocrine insufficiency of pancreas in case of gallstone disease. It is the result of complex metabolic liver abnormalities, portal and mesenterial haemodynamics, dysbiosis of large intestine which are the components of a syndrom of maldigestion and appear during gallstone disease progressing long time before hospitalization. Cholecystectomy doesn't eliminate enzyme insufficiency of pancreas. The effectiveness of using new physiological enzymatic drug Panzytrat in a complex therapy of a syndrom of maldigestion in case of gallstone disease is shown. PMID:19551960

  1. Pancreas divisum

    MedlinePlus

    ... to form the pancreas. Each part has a tube, called a duct. When the parts join together, a final duct, called the pancreatic duct, is formed. Fluid and digestive juices (enzymes) produced by the pancreas normally flow through this duct. If the ducts do not ...

  2. Cellular expression of Noc2, a Rab effector protein, in endocrine and exocrine tissues in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Teramae, Hiroki; Fujimoto, Wakako; Seino, Susumu; Iwanaga, Toshihiko

    2007-01-01

    Noc2 is a Rab effector which participates in regulated exocytosis. It is expressed abundantly in endocrine cells but at low levels in exocrine tissues. Noc2-deficient mice, however, exhibit marked accumulation of secretory granules in exocrine cells rather than endocrine cells. In the present study, we investigated localization of Noc2 immunohistochemically in various endocrine and exocrine tissues in normal mice. Western blotting detected a Noc2-immunoreactive band of 38 kDa in isolated pancreatic islets, the adrenal gland, pituitary gland, and thyroid gland. Immunostaining for Noc2 labeled endocrine cells in the adrenal medulla and adenohypophysis, pancreatic islet cells, thyroid parafollicular cells, and gut endocrine cells, supporting the notion that Noc2 is a Rab effector protein shared by amine/peptide-secreting endocrine cells. Besides endocrine tissues, granular ducts in salivary glands contained Noc2. Although immunostaining failed to detect Noc2 in acinar cells of all exocrine glands examined, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis detected the mRNA expression in exocrine pancreas. Ultrastructurally, Noc2 immunoreactivity was associated with the limiting membrane of granules in both pancreatic endocrine and salivary duct exocrine cells. The cellular and subcellular localizations of Noc2 should yield key information on its functional significance as well as account for the phenotype in Noc2-deficient mice. PMID:16835753

  3. The epistemic innocence of psychedelic states.

    PubMed

    Letheby, Chris

    2016-01-01

    One recent development in epistemology, the philosophical study of knowledge, is the notion of 'epistemic innocence' introduced by Bortolotti and colleagues. This concept expresses the idea that certain suboptimal cognitive processes may nonetheless have epistemic (knowledge-related) benefits. The idea that delusion or confabulation may have psychological benefits is familiar enough. What is novel and interesting is the idea that such conditions may also yield significant and otherwise unavailable epistemic benefits. I apply the notion of epistemic innocence to research on the transformative potential of psychedelic drugs. The popular epithet 'hallucinogen' exemplifies a view of these substances as fundamentally epistemically detrimental. I argue that the picture is more complicated and that some psychedelic states can be epistemically innocent. This conclusion is highly relevant to policy debates about psychedelic therapy. Moreover, analysing the case of psychedelics can shed further light on the concept of epistemic innocence itself. PMID:26675408

  4. Change of Both Endocrine and Exocrine Insufficiencies After Acute Pancreatitis in Non-Diabetic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Te-Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Hsieh, Su-Hua; Lai, Feipei; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common pancreatic disease and consists of an acute inflammation of the pancreas. AP can contribute to endocrine and exocrine insufficiencies in survivors as a result of the key role of the pancreas in both glucose metabolism and nutritional digestion. The aim of this population-based study was to determine the endocrine or exocrine insufficiencies in patients after initial AP with biliary or alcohol-associated causes. We conducted a nationwide cohort study using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database collected between 2001 and 2010. A total of 12,284 patients with AP were identified. Alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.894; 95% CI, 1.520–2.268; P < 0.001) and ≥2 admissions for AP (odds ratio, 1.937; 95% CI, 1.483–2.391; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus after AP. Further, only alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.215; 95% CI, 1.133–1.297; P < 0.001) was significantly associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after AP. Additionally, alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.804; 95% CI, 1.345–2.263; P < 0.001) and ≥2 readmissions for AP (odds ratio, 3.190; 95% CI, 2.317–4.063; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with both exocrine and endocrine insufficiencies after AP. Our data showed that alcohol-associated AP, rather than a biliary cause, contributed to a higher extent to exocrine or endocrine insufficiencies. Furthermore, recurrent AP also led to endocrine insufficiency. PMID:26166112

  5. Hippo Signaling Regulates Pancreas Development through Inactivation of Yap

    PubMed Central

    Day, Caroline E.; Boerner, Brian P.; Johnson, Randy L.; Sarvetnick, Nora E.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian pancreas is required for normal metabolism, with defects in this vital organ commonly observed in cancer and diabetes. Development must therefore be tightly controlled in order to produce a pancreas of correct size, cell type composition, and physiologic function. Through negative regulation of Yap-dependent proliferation, the Hippo kinase cascade is a critical regulator of organ growth. To investigate the role of Hippo signaling in pancreas biology, we deleted Hippo pathway components in the developing mouse pancreas. Unexpectedly, the pancreas from Hippo-deficient offspring was reduced in size, with defects evident throughout the organ. Increases in the dephosphorylated nuclear form of Yap are apparent throughout the exocrine compartment and correlate with increases in levels of cell proliferation. However, the mutant exocrine tissue displays extensive disorganization leading to pancreatitis-like autodigestion. Interestingly, our results suggest that Hippo signaling does not directly regulate the pancreas endocrine compartment as Yap expression is lost following endocrine specification through a Hippo-independent mechanism. Altogether, our results demonstrate that Hippo signaling plays a crucial role in pancreas development and provide novel routes to a better understanding of pathological conditions that affect this organ. PMID:23071096

  6. Artifical Pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, Jiangfeng

    2013-03-01

    In 2006, JDRF launched the Artificial Pancreas Project (APP) to accelerate the development of a commercially-viable artificial pancreas system to closely mimic the biological function of the pancreas individuals with insulin-dependent diabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes. By automating detection of blood sugar levels and delivery of insulin in response to those levels, an artificial pancreas has the potential to transform the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. The 6-step APP development pathway serves as JDRF's APP strategic funding plan and defines the priorities of product research and development. Each step in the plan represents incremental advances in automation beginning with devices that shut off insulin delivery to prevent episodes of low blood sugar and progressing ultimately to a fully automated ``closed loop'' system that maintains blood glucose at a target level without the need to bolus for meals or adjust for exercise.

  7. Organ Facts: Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home / Before The Transplant / Organ Facts / Pancreas Organ Facts Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver ... Receiving "the call" About the Operation Heart Lung Heart/Lung Kidney Pancreas Kidney/Pancreas Liver Intestine Pancreas Facts The pancreas is a five to six inch ...

  8. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in a yellow-naped Amazon (Amazona ochrocephala) with pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ritchey, J W; Degernes, L A; Brown, T T

    1997-01-01

    This report describes exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in a yellow-naped Amazon (Amazona ochrocephala) with complete effacement of the pancreas by a pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The bird presented with a 3-month history of weight loss and voluminous, foul-smelling droppings. Clinically, routine hematologic findings were normal and fecal tests were performed to evaluate exocrine pancreatic function. The fecal function tests were positive for neutral and split fats and negative for trypsin. Oral administration of corn oil did not result in elevation of blood triglyceride levels. Two days later, the triglyceride tolerance test was repeated using corn oil mixed with pancreatic enzymes. This time, there was a 70% elevation of blood triglyceride levels. Because of a poor prognosis, the bird was euthanatized. At necropsy, the pancreas was diffusely enlarged, white, nodular, and firm. The liver contained multiple, 1-2-mm-diameter, randomly located, tan nodules. Microscopically, the pancreas was effaced by numerous lobules of neoplastic ductular structures surrounded by abundant fibrous connective tissue. In the liver, the hepatic parenchyma was replaced by multiple, well-demarcated, nonencapsulated foci of neoplastic tissue similar to that in the pancreas. PMID:9150549

  9. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Goess, Ruediger; Ceyhan, Güralp O; Friess, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is an often-underestimated complication following pancreatic surgery. After recent advances in managing acute postoperative complications the focus of current research is now shifting onto the long-term complications following pancreatectomy. Weight loss and steatorrhea as typical symptoms have high influence on the quality of life in the postoperative period. Malnutrition-related symptoms occur late and are often misinterpreted. Enzyme replacement therapy is more or less the only possible treatment option, even though not many controlled trials have been performed in this field. In this review we summarized the pathophysiology, diagnosis, risk factors and treatment options of exocrine insufficiency and focus mainly on patients with pancreaticoduodenectomy (classical Whipple), pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (ppWhipple) or distal pancreatectomy. Incidence of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after surgery depends mainly on the initial diagnosis, the preoperative exocrine function and is associated with the extent of parenchyma resection. Diagnosing exocrine failure after surgery can be difficult and specific function tests are commonly not routinely performed. Starting and monitoring of enzyme replacement treatment is more based on clinical symptoms, than on objective markers. To improve the performance status of postsurgical patients it is important to consider pancreatic exocrine function as one aspect of quality of life. Further clinical trials should be initiated to gain more specific knowledge about the influence of the different pancreatic resections on pancreatic exocrine function to initialize proper treatment even before major clinical symptoms occur. PMID:27058237

  10. Gravity in mammalian organ development: differentiation of cultured lung and pancreas rudiments during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.; Hardman, P.; Paulsen, A.

    1994-01-01

    Organ culture of embryonic mouse lung and pancreas rudiments has been used to investigate development and differentiation, and to assess the effects of microgravity on culture differentiation, during orbital spaceflight of the shuttle Endeavour (mission STS-54). Lung rudiments continue to grow and branch during spaceflight, an initial result that should allow future detailed study of lung morphogenesis in microgravity. Cultured embryonic pancreas undergoes characteristic exocrine acinar tissue and endocrine islet tissue differentiation during spaceflight, and in ground controls. The rudiments developing in the microgravity environment of spaceflight appear to grow larger than their ground counterparts, and they may have differentiated more rapidly than controls, as judged by exocrine zymogen granule presence.

  11. Alford pleas in the age of innocence.

    PubMed

    Redlich, Allison D; Ozdoğru, Asil Ali

    2009-01-01

    In 1970, the Supreme Court handed down a decision in North Carolina v. Alford that has since allowed defendants who do not wish to risk their fates at trial to plead guilty while simultaneously asserting their innocence. Although "Alford pleas" have remained unexamined by researchers, the increasing number of identified wrongful convictions of those factually innocent highlights the need for an in-depth examination of them. In the present study, using the Department of Justice 2004 State Survey of Inmates in Correctional Facilities dataset, we examined the likelihood of entering Alford pleas over traditional guilty, no contest, and not guilty pleas for those convicted of murder/manslaughter. Although we generally found few differences between the three guilty plea types, interesting differences between Alford and not guilty pleas emerged. Implications for actual innocence are discussed. PMID:19405036

  12. Implication of epigenetics in pancreas development and disease.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Evans; Haumaitre, Cécile

    2015-12-01

    Pancreas development is controlled by a complex interaction of signaling pathways and transcription factor networks that determine pancreatic specification and differentiation of exocrine and endocrine cells. Epigenetics adds a new layer of gene regulation. DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs recently appeared as important epigenetic factors regulating pancreas development. In this review, we report recent findings obtained by analyses in model organisms as well as genome-wide approaches that demonstrate the role of these epigenetic regulators in the control of exocrine and endocrine cell differentiation, identity, function, proliferation and regeneration. We also highlight how altered epigenetic processes contribute to pancreatic disorders: diabetes and pancreatic cancer. Uncovering these epigenetic events can help to better understand these diseases, provide novel therapeutical targets for their treatment, and improve cell-based therapies for diabetes. PMID:26696517

  13. Noc2 is essential in normal regulation of exocytosis in endocrine and exocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Masanari; Miki, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tadao; Kawaguchi, Miho; Shinozaki, Hidehiro; Nio, Junko; Saraya, Atsunori; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miyazaki, Masaru; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Seino, Susumu

    2004-01-01

    Rab3 is a subfamily of the small GTP-binding protein Rab family and plays an important role in exocytosis. Several potential effectors of Rab3, including rabphilin3 and Rims (Rim1 and Rim2), have been isolated and characterized. Noc2 was identified originally in endocrine pancreas as a molecule homologous to rabphilin3, but its role in exocytosis is unclear. To clarify the physiological function of Noc2 directly, we have generated Noc2 knockout (Noc2-/-) mice. Glucose intolerance with impaired insulin secretion was induced in vivo by acute stress in Noc2-/- mice, but not in wild-type (Noc2+/+) mice. Ca2+-triggered insulin secretion from pancreatic isles of Noc2-/- mice was markedly impaired, but was completely restored by treatment with pertussis toxin, which inhibits inhibitory G protein Gi/o signaling. In addition, the inhibitory effect of clonidine, an α2-adrenoreceptor agonist, on insulin secretion was significantly greater in Noc2-/- islets than in Noc2+/+ islets. Impaired Ca2+-triggered insulin secretion was rescued by adenovirus gene transfer of wild-type Noc2 but not by that of mutant Noc2, which does not bind to Rab3. Accordingly, Noc2 positively regulates insulin secretion from endocrine pancreas by inhibiting Gi/o signaling, and the interaction of Noc2 and Rab3 is required for the effect. Interestingly, we also found a marked accumulation of secretory granules in various exocrine cells of Noc2-/- mice, especially in exocrine pancreas with no amylase response to stimuli. Thus, Noc2, a critical effector of Rab3, is essential in normal regulation of exocytosis in both endocrine and exocrine cells. PMID:15159548

  14. Noc2 is essential in normal regulation of exocytosis in endocrine and exocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masanari; Miki, Takashi; Shibasaki, Tadao; Kawaguchi, Miho; Shinozaki, Hidehiro; Nio, Junko; Saraya, Atsunori; Koseki, Haruhiko; Miyazaki, Masaru; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Seino, Susumu

    2004-06-01

    Rab3 is a subfamily of the small GTP-binding protein Rab family and plays an important role in exocytosis. Several potential effectors of Rab3, including rabphilin3 and Rims (Rim1 and Rim2), have been isolated and characterized. Noc2 was identified originally in endocrine pancreas as a molecule homologous to rabphilin3, but its role in exocytosis is unclear. To clarify the physiological function of Noc2 directly, we have generated Noc2 knockout (Noc2(-/-)) mice. Glucose intolerance with impaired insulin secretion was induced in vivo by acute stress in Noc2(-/-) mice, but not in wild-type (Noc2(+/+)) mice. Ca(2+)-triggered insulin secretion from pancreatic isles of Noc2(-/-) mice was markedly impaired, but was completely restored by treatment with pertussis toxin, which inhibits inhibitory G protein Gi/o signaling. In addition, the inhibitory effect of clonidine, an alpha(2)-adrenoreceptor agonist, on insulin secretion was significantly greater in Noc2(-/-) islets than in Noc2(+/+) islets. Impaired Ca(2+)-triggered insulin secretion was rescued by adenovirus gene transfer of wild-type Noc2 but not by that of mutant Noc2, which does not bind to Rab3. Accordingly, Noc2 positively regulates insulin secretion from endocrine pancreas by inhibiting Gi/o signaling, and the interaction of Noc2 and Rab3 is required for the effect. Interestingly, we also found a marked accumulation of secretory granules in various exocrine cells of Noc2(-/-) mice, especially in exocrine pancreas with no amylase response to stimuli. Thus, Noc2, a critical effector of Rab3, is essential in normal regulation of exocytosis in both endocrine and exocrine cells. PMID:15159548

  15. Normal Pancreas Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Pancreas Anatomy Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1586x1534 View Download Large: 3172x3068 View Download Title: Pancreas Anatomy Description: Anatomy of the pancreas; drawing shows ...

  16. Aryne Compatible Solvents are not Always Innocent.

    PubMed

    Suh, Sung-Eun; Chenoweth, David M

    2016-08-19

    Arynes are important and versatile intermediates in a variety of transformations. Commonly used solvents for aryne chemistry include acetonitrile and dichloromethane. Although rarely reported, the reactive nature of aryne intermediates makes them prone to side reactions, which sometimes involve solvent participation. Acetonitrile and dichloromethane are not always innocent solvents and can participate in aryne-based reactions. These results are presented in the context of ongoing mechanistic investigations of the triple aryne-tetrazine reaction. PMID:27486792

  17. CERCLA's innocent landowner defense -- Consultants beware

    SciTech Connect

    Nijman, J.T. )

    1994-05-01

    Consultant liability is an area of the innocent landowner defense under CERCLA that is not often discussed. The only reasonable way to protect consultants hired by innocent purchasers'' is for Congress or state legislatures to establish standardized, regulated audit guidelines. However, even standardized guidelines do not protect consultants completely, because standards cannot specify all activity necessary to perform a particular task. Each project has unique circumstances, and standards arguably can become per se determinants of liability. CERCLA provides three defenses to its basic strict, joint and several liability provisions -- an act of God, an act of war, and an act or omission of a third party not in a contractual relationship with the current owner. Congress amended the third-party not in a contractual relationship with the current owner. Congress amended the third-party defense in SARA by redefining contractual relationship'' to exclude from liability owners who acquired the real property following disposal or placement of hazardous material, and established satisfactorily that the owner at the time of purchase neither knew nor had reason to know hazardous substances were disposed on the property -- the innocent landowner defense.

  18. Use of the Electronic Medical Record to Assess Pancreas Size in Type 1 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Virostko, John; Hilmes, Melissa; Eitel, Kelsey; Moore, Daniel J.; Powers, Alvin C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims This study harnessed the electronic medical record to assess pancreas volume in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and matched controls to determine whether pancreas volume is altered in T1D and identify covariates that influence pancreas volume. Methods This study included 25 patients with T1D and 25 age-, sex-, and weight-matched controls from the Vanderbilt University Medical Center enterprise data warehouse. Measurements of pancreas volume were made from medical imaging studies using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT). Results Patients with T1D had a pancreas volume 47% smaller than matched controls (41.16 ml vs. 77.77 ml, P < 0.0001) as well as pancreas volume normalized by subject body weight, body mass index, or body surface area (all P < 0.0001). Pancreatic volume was smaller with a longer duration of T1D across the patient population (N = 25, P = 0.04). Additionally, four individual patients receiving multiple imaging scans displayed progressive declines in pancreas volume over time (~ 6% of volume/year), whereas five controls scanned a year apart did not exhibit a decline in pancreas size (P = 0.03). The pancreas was uniformly smaller on the right and left side of the abdomen. Conclusions Pancreas volume declines with disease duration in patients with T1D, suggesting a protracted pathological process that may include the exocrine pancreas. PMID:27391588

  19. The epistemic innocence of motivated delusions.

    PubMed

    Bortolotti, Lisa

    2015-05-01

    Delusions are defined as irrational beliefs that compromise good functioning. However, in the empirical literature, delusions have been found to have some psychological benefits. One proposal is that some delusions defuse negative emotions and protect one from low self-esteem by allowing motivational influences on belief formation. In this paper I focus on delusions that have been construed as playing a defensive function (motivated delusions) and argue that some of their psychological benefits can convert into epistemic ones. Notwithstanding their epistemic costs, motivated delusions also have potential epistemic benefits for agents who have faced adversities, undergone physical or psychological trauma, or are subject to negative emotions and low self-esteem. To account for the epistemic status of motivated delusions, costly and beneficial at the same time, I introduce the notion of epistemic innocence. A delusion is epistemically innocent when adopting it delivers a significant epistemic benefit, and the benefit could not be attained if the delusion were not adopted. The analysis leads to a novel account of the status of delusions by inviting a reflection on the relationship between psychological and epistemic benefits. PMID:25459652

  20. Getting a New Pancreas: Facts about Pancreas Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2003 December 2006 March 2012 Getting A New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, ... the views of the Society. _________________________________________________________________ Getting a New Pancreas Facts About Pancreas Transplants When you get a ...

  1. An Apparent Deficiency of Lymphatic Capillaries in the Islets of Langerhans in the Human Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Korsgren, Erik; Korsgren, Olle

    2016-04-01

    The lymphatic system is crucial for efficient immune surveillance and for the maintenance of a physiological pressure in the interstitial space. Even so, almost no information is available concerning the lymph drainage of the islets of Langerhans in the human pancreas. Immunohistochemical staining allowed us to distinguish lymphatic capillaries from blood capillaries. Almost no lymphatic capillaries were found within the islets in pancreatic biopsy specimens from subjects without diabetes or from subjects with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Lymphatic capillaries were, however, found at the islet-exocrine interface, frequently located along blood capillaries and other fibrotic structures within or close to the islet capsule. Lymphatic capillaries were regularly found in the exocrine pancreas, with small lymphatic vessels located close to and around acini. Larger collecting lymphatic vessels were located in fibrotic septa between the exocrine lobules and adjacent to the ductal system of the pancreas. In summary, we report a pronounced deficiency of lymphatic capillaries in human islets, a finding with implications for immune surveillance and the regulation of interstitial fluid transport in the endocrine pancreas as well as for the pathophysiology of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:26822093

  2. Functional studies of the parotid and pancreas glands in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Charchaflie, R. J.; Fernandez, L. Bustos; Perec, C. J.; Gonzalez, E.; Marzi, A.

    1974-01-01

    Functional studies of the pancreas and parotid glands are reported in 17 patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The exocrine function of the pancreas was studied by measuring amylase concentration after stimulation with the endogenous secretin-pancreozymine test (ESP). Under these conditions, the pancreatic amylase concentration in ALS patients was found to be markedly decreased by about 45% when compared with those of healthy control subjects. Different conclusions in the literature about a possible impairment of the exocrine pancreas in ALS patients induced us to study the function of the parotid gland, which has close structural, functional, and physiopathological relationship with the pancreas. Flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of parotid saliva were measured after indirect stimulation (intraoral citric acid) and direct stimulation (pilocarpine). After indirect stimulation, both parotid flow rate and bicarbonate concentration from ALS patients were found to be decreased by about 66% and 70% respectively, when compared with controls. On the other hand, direct stimulation with pilocarpine in ALS patients elicited normal responses in both flow rate and bicarbonate concentration of saliva. It is concluded that the pancreatic and parotid deficiencies observed in ALS patients do not indicate primary disease of these exocrine glands. This interpretation is further emphasized by the results obtained by a sweat test, plasma osmolarity, and sialographic studies. The possibility that the gland impairments observed might be due to modifications of the neuroendocrine mechanisms regulating their secretory activity is suggested. PMID:4852110

  3. Pancreas transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100129.htm Pancreas transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... to slide 6 out of 6 Overview The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It ...

  4. Annular pancreas (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Annular pancreas is an abnormal ring or collar of pancreatic tissue that encircles the duodenum (the part of the ... intestine that connects to stomach). This portion of pancreas can constrict the duodenum and block or impair ...

  5. Pancreas transplant - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The pancreas resides in the back of the abdomen. It functions to produce digestive enzymes which are delivered to ... of the most important hormones produced by the pancreas is insulin. Insulin is produced by specialized cells ...

  6. Innocent until Primed: Mock Jurors' Racially Biased Response to the Presumption of Innocence

    PubMed Central

    Young, Danielle M.; Levinson, Justin D.; Sinnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Research has shown that crime concepts can activate attentional bias to Black faces. This study investigates the possibility that some legal concepts hold similar implicit racial cues. Presumption of innocence instructions, a core legal principle specifically designed to eliminate bias, may instead serve as an implicit racial cue resulting in attentional bias. Methodology/Principal findings The experiment was conducted in a courtroom with participants seated in the jury box. Participants first watched a video of a federal judge reading jury instructions that contained presumption of innocence instructions, or matched length alternative instructions. Immediately following this video a dot-probe task was administered to assess the priming effect of the jury instructions. Presumption of innocence instructions, but not the alternative instructions, led to significantly faster response times to Black faces when compared with White faces. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that the core principle designed to ensure fairness in the legal system actually primes attention for Black faces, indicating that this supposedly fundamental protection could trigger racial stereotypes. PMID:24643050

  7. Pancreas transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Meirelles, Roberto Ferreira; Salvalaggio, Paolo; Pacheco-Silva, Alvaro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vascularized pancreas transplantation is the only treatment that establishes normal glucose levels and normalizes glycosylated hemoglobin levels in type 1 diabetic patients. The first vascularized pancreas transplant was performed by William Kelly and Richard Lillehei, to treat a type 1 diabetes patient, in December 1966. In Brazil, Edison Teixeira performed the first isolated segmental pancreas transplant in 1968. Until the 1980s, pancreas transplants were restricted to a few centers of the United States and Europe. The introduction of tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil in 1994, led to a significant outcome improvement and consequently, an increase in pancreas transplants in several countries. According to the International Pancreas Transplant Registry, until December 31st, 2010, more than 35 thousand pancreas transplants had been performed. The one-year survival of patients and pancreatic grafts exceeds 95 and 83%, respectively. The better survival of pancreatic (86%) and renal (93%) grafts in the first year after transplantation is in the simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplant group of patients. Immunological loss in the first year after transplant for simultaneous pancreas-kidney, pancreas after kidney, and pancreas alone are 1.8, 3.7, and 6%, respectively. Pancreas transplant has 10 to 20% surgical complications requiring laparotomy. Besides enhancing quality of life, pancreatic transplant increases survival of uremic diabetic patient as compared to uremic diabetic patients on dialysis or with kidney transplantation alone. PMID:26154551

  8. Pancreas preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Iwanaga, Yasuhiro; Sutherland, David E.R.; Harmon, James V.; Papas, Klearchos K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of review To summarize advances and limitations in pancreas procurement and preservation for pancreas and islet transplantation, and review advances in islet protection and preservation. Recent findings Pancreases procured after cardiac death, with in-situ regional organ cooling, have been successfully used for islet transplantation. Colloid-free Celsior and histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate preservation solutions are comparable to University of Wisconsin solution when used for cold storage before pancreas transplantation. Colloid-free preservation solutions are inferior to University of Wisconsin solution for pancreas preservation prior to islet isolation and transplantation. Clinical reports on pancreas and islet transplants suggest that the two-layer method may not offer significant benefits over cold storage with the University of Wisconsin solution: improved oxygenation may depend on the graft size; benefits in experimental models may not translate to human organs. Improvements in islet yield and quality occurred from pancreases treated with inhibitors of stress-induced apoptosis during procurement, storage, isolation or culture. Pancreas perfusion may be desirable before islet isolation and transplantation and may improve islet yields and quality. Methods for real-time, noninvasive assessment of pancreas quality during preservation have been implemented and objective islet potency assays have been developed and validated. These innovations should contribute to objective evaluation and establishment of improved pancreas preservation and islet isolation strategies. Summary Cold storage may be adequate for preservation before pancreas transplants, but insufficient when pancreases are processed for islets or when expanded donors are used. Supplementation of cold storage solutions with cytoprotective agents and perfusion may improve pancreas and islet transplant outcomes. PMID:18685343

  9. Change of Both Endocrine and Exocrine Insufficiencies After Acute Pancreatitis in Non-Diabetic Patients: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Te-Wei; Wu, Jin-Ming; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Yang, Ching-Yao; Lai, Hong-Shiee; Hsieh, Su-Hua; Lai, Feipei; Tien, Yu-Wen

    2015-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is the most common pancreatic disease and consists of an acute inflammation of the pancreas. AP can contribute to endocrine and exocrine insufficiencies in survivors as a result of the key role of the pancreas in both glucose metabolism and nutritional digestion. The aim of this population-based study was to determine the endocrine or exocrine insufficiencies in patients after initial AP with biliary or alcohol-associated causes.We conducted a nationwide cohort study using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database collected between 2001 and 2010. A total of 12,284 patients with AP were identified.Alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.894; 95% CI, 1.520-2.268; P < 0.001) and ≥2 admissions for AP (odds ratio, 1.937; 95% CI, 1.483-2.391; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with newly diagnosed diabetes mellitus after AP. Further, only alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.215; 95% CI, 1.133-1.297; P < 0.001) was significantly associated with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after AP. Additionally, alcohol-associated AP (odds ratio, 1.804; 95% CI, 1.345-2.263; P < 0.001) and ≥2 readmissions for AP (odds ratio, 3.190; 95% CI, 2.317-4.063; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with both exocrine and endocrine insufficiencies after AP.Our data showed that alcohol-associated AP, rather than a biliary cause, contributed to a higher extent to exocrine or endocrine insufficiencies. Furthermore, recurrent AP also led to endocrine insufficiency. PMID:26166112

  10. Is pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in celiac disease related to structural alterations in pancreatic parenchyma?

    PubMed Central

    Rana, Surinder S.; Dambalkar, Arvind; Chhabra, Puneet; Sharma, Ravi; Nada, Ritambhra; Sharma, Vishal; Rana, Satyavati; Bhasin, Deepak K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) has been reported in a number of patients with celiac disease (CD), it is not clear if this is primarily a functional or a structural defect. We studied pancreatic structural abnormalities by endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) in adult CD patients with EPI. Methods Pancreatic exocrine function was prospectively assessed in 36 recently diagnosed CD patients (mean age: 29.8 years) by measuring fecal elastase. Pancreatic structural changes were assessed in CD patients with EPI by EUS and elastography. Exocrine functions were reassessed after 3 months of gluten-free diet. Results Of the 36 CD patients included, 30 (83%) had anemia, 21 (58%) diarrhea, and 7 (19%) hypothyroidism. Ten (28%) patients had EPI with mean elastase levels of 141.6 μg/g of stool, of whom only one had a history of recurrent acute pancreatitis while the rest 9 patients had no history of acute or chronic pancreatitis. Of these 10 patients, 8 (80%) had diarrhea, 8 (80%) anemia, and 2 (20%) hypothyroidism. EUS was done in 8 patients which showed: normal pancreas in 5 (50%), hyperechoic strands in 3 (30%), and hyperechoic foci without shadowing in 2 (20%) patients. None had lobularity or parenchymal calcification. All patients except the patient with recurrent pancreatitis had normal strain ratio. Follow-up fecal elastase was within normal range in 6 of 7 (86%) patients. Conclusion EPI, assessed by fecal elastase levels in adult CD patients, possibly does not relate to structural alterations in the pancreatic parenchyma and may be reversible by following a gluten-free diet. PMID:27366039

  11. Polyamine biosynthesis is critical for growth and differentiation of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Mastracci, Teresa L.; Robertson, Morgan A.; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Anderson, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    The pancreas, in most studied vertebrates, is a compound organ with both exocrine and endocrine functions. The exocrine compartment makes and secretes digestive enzymes, while the endocrine compartment, organized into islets of Langerhans, produces hormones that regulate blood glucose. High concentrations of polyamines, which are aliphatic amines, are reported in exocrine and endocrine cells, with insulin-producing β cells showing the highest concentrations. We utilized zebrafish as a model organism, together with pharmacological inhibition or genetic manipulation, to determine how polyamine biosynthesis functions in pancreatic organogenesis. We identified that inhibition of polyamine biosynthesis reduces exocrine pancreas and β cell mass, and that these reductions are at the level of differentiation. Moreover, we demonstrate that inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, phenocopies inhibition or knockdown of the enzyme deoxyhypusine synthase (DHS). These data identify that the pancreatic requirement for polyamine biosynthesis is largely mediated through a requirement for spermidine for the downstream posttranslational modification of eIF5A by its enzymatic activator DHS, which in turn impacts mRNA translation. Altogether, we have uncovered a role for polyamine biosynthesis in pancreatic organogenesis and identified that it may be possible to exploit polyamine biosynthesis to manipulate pancreatic cell differentiation. PMID:26299433

  12. Reporter islets in the eye reveal the plasticity of the endocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ilegems, Erwin; Dicker, Andrea; Speier, Stephan; Sharma, Aarti; Bahow, Alan; Edlund, Patrick Karlsson; Leibiger, Ingo B.; Berggren, Per-Olof

    2013-01-01

    The islets of Langerhans constitute the endocrine part of the pancreas and are responsible for maintenance of blood glucose homeostasis. They are deeply embedded in the exocrine pancreas, limiting their accessibility for functional studies. Understanding regulation of function and survival and assessing the clinical outcomes of individual treatment strategies for diabetes requires a monitoring system that continuously reports on the endocrine pancreas. We describe the application of a natural body window that successfully reports on the properties of in situ pancreatic islets. As proof of principle, we transplanted “reporter islets” into the anterior chamber of the eye of leptin-deficient mice. These islets displayed obesity-induced growth and vascularization patterns that were reversed by leptin treatment. Hence, reporter islets serve as optically accessible indicators of islet function in the pancreas, and also reflect the efficacy of specific treatment regimens aimed at regulating islet plasticity in vivo. PMID:24248353

  13. An immunohistochemical study of the endocrine pancreas in raptors.

    PubMed

    Palmieri, C; Shivaprasad, H L

    2014-12-01

    The cytoarchitecture of the endocrine pancreas of 10 raptors (golden eagles, peregrine falcons, Saker falcon, turkey vultures, red-tailed hawk and unspecified falcon) was examined by immunohistochemistry. Three islet types were identified: type A mixed islets composed mainly by glucagon (A)-secreting cells, type B mixed islets with predominantly insulin (B)-secreting cell component and type M mixed islets (type M) consisting of variable number of glucagon-, insulin- and somatostatin (D)-secreting cells. The latter were further characterized into Type I, II or III according to the cell distribution of the three cell types. A and D cells were also randomly scattered within the exocrine pancreas. The results of this study suggest that the classical concept in birds of a segregation of A and B cells in well-defined and distinct islets is not applicable in raptors, reflecting an evolutionary adaptation to different dietary habits and variation in developmental mechanisms. PMID:25468799

  14. Ontogeny, postnatal development and ageing of endocrine pancreas in Bubalus bubalis

    PubMed Central

    LUCINI, C.; CASTALDO, L.; LAI, O.; DE VICO, G.

    1998-01-01

    The ontogenesis, postnatal development and ageing of the endocrine pancreas in mammals have not been extensively studied. In order to improve understanding of this organ, we studied the buffalo pancreas during fetal and postnatal development. Glucagon, insulin and somatostatin immunoreactive cells (i.c.) were first seen in 2-mo-old embryos. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP) i.c. were observed during the 3rd month of gestation. The early embryo pancreas was almost totally composed of endocrine tissue. The endocrine portion only slightly increased in mass with animal growth, whereas the exocrine portion noticeably increased in mass during the late fetal and postnatal periods. In adults, therefore, the exocrine portion was more evident than the endocrine portion. Three types of islet were observed in fetal and young buffalos: small, large and PP-islets. The small islets were composed of insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and PP i.c. The large islets were primarily composed of insulin i.c. and a few glucagon, somatostatin and PP i.c. The PP islets were mostly composed of PP i.c. with a few somatostatin, insulin and glucagon i.c. The number of large islets greatly diminished by adulthood. Glucagon, insulin, somatostatin and PP i.c. were also seen scattered in the exocrine parenchyma and along the duct epithelium. In the duct epithelium, these cells were either single or grouped, and they sometimes formed a protrusion projecting towards the connective tissue. These morphological features were primarily observed in fetuses and young buffalos. PMID:9688507

  15. Cryosurgery: ultrastructural changes in pancreas tissue after low temperature exposure.

    PubMed

    Korpan, N N

    2007-04-01

    A number of theoretical and experimental studies, both in vitro and in vivo, have been performed to explain the action of low temperatures on tissue. It is now evident that the thermal parameters used in the past for freezing during cryosurgery were not precise; this may have resulted in the failure of treatment. For the first time, this report describes the early ultrastructural features of pancreatic parenchyma after low temperature exposure, i.e., cryosurgery, in vivo. We demonstrate the effect of freeze-thawing processes using temperatures of various intensities. The cryosurgical response of pancreas parenchyma, i.e., ultrastructural cellular changes in pancreas tissue, was investigated. The electronic microscopic analysis showed that, after local cryodestruction at temperatures of -80 degrees C and -180 degrees C, similar processes occurred within the pancreas tissue in the early postcryosurgical phase -- immediately and up to 24 hours after low temperature exposure on tissue. The exocrine pancreatic cells in the center of the cryozone changed upon thawing. Ultrastructural changes in the exocrine pancreatic cells, where the first signs of dystrophic processes had been noticed, were increased. These ultrastructural changes in the pancreatic cells provide a platform to better understand the mechanisms of damage and the pathogenesis of frostbite after cryosurgery. The properties of the pancreas parenchyma response after low temperature exposure provide important insights into the mechanisms of damage and the cryogenic lesion immediately after thawing in cryosurgery. Our new insights prove on the cell level that suddenly and progressively damaged pancreatic cells in the postcryosurgical zone lead to aseptic cryonecrosis and then to aseptic cryoapoptosis of vital normal tissue. The vascular capillary changes and circulatory stagnation demonstrate the anti-angiogenesis mechanism, which, together with cryoaponecrosis and cryoapoptosis, are some of the main mechanisms

  16. Body image and the innocent eye.

    PubMed

    Sirridge, M; Welch, K

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the development, content, teaching experience, and impact of the course "The body image in medicine and the arts" which is offered annually in a one-month format for medical students and other upper division students at the University of Missouri-Kansas City (UMKC). Literature, photography, art, anthropology, art history, cultural studies, feminism, modernism, and medicine are all employed in the course as a way of encouraging students to consider the broader cultural interpretations of the human body. Any medical humanities instructor wishing to explore new ideas and themes related to teaching students about past and present body image issues and their impact on contemporary biomedical culture can gain insight through an overview of this course. The purpose of the course is to allow medical students a forum for talking more personally and metaphorically about the body as a cultural concept. The teaching faculty involved in this course believe that the majority of students who participate in this class complete it more acutely aware than before of the fact that no single human being, even a "good, caring" doctor, can see with an "innocent eye". The accomplishment of this goal alone justifies faculty participation in the course. PMID:23671049

  17. Pheromones and exocrine glands in Isoptera.

    PubMed

    Costa-Leonardo, Ana Maria; Haifig, Ives

    2010-01-01

    Termites are eusocial insects that have a peculiar and intriguing system of communication using pheromones. The termite pheromones are composed of a blend of chemical substances and they coordinate different social interactions or activities, including foraging, building, mating, defense, and nestmate recognition. Some of these sociochemicals are volatile, spreading in the air, and others are contact pheromones, which are transmitted by trophallaxis and grooming. Among the termite semiochemicals, the most known are alarm, trail, sex pheromones, and hydrocarbons responsible for the recognition of nestmates. The sources of the pheromones are exocrine glands located all over the termite body. The principal exocrine structures considered pheromone-producing glands in Isoptera are the frontal, mandibular, salivary or labial, sternal, and tergal glands. The frontal gland is the source of alarm pheromone and defensive chemicals, but the mandibular secretions have been little studied and their function is not well established in Isoptera. The secretion of salivary glands involves numerous chemical compounds, some of them without pheromonal function. The worker saliva contains a phagostimulating pheromone and probably a building pheromone, while the salivary reservoir of some soldiers contains defensive chemicals. The sternal gland is the only source of trail-following pheromone, whereas sex pheromones are secreted by two glandular sources, the sternal and tergal glands. To date, the termite semiochemicals have indicated that few molecules are involved in their chemical communication, that is, the same compound may be secreted by different glands, different castes and species, and for different functions, depending on the concentration. In addition to the pheromonal parsimony, recent studies also indicate the occurrence of a synergic effect among the compounds involved in the chemical communication of Isoptera. PMID:20831960

  18. Why people waive their Miranda rights: the power of innocence.

    PubMed

    Kassin, Saul M; Norwick, Rebecca J

    2004-04-01

    In a laboratory experiment, 72 participants who were guilty or innocent of a mock theft were apprehended for investigation. Motivated to avoid prosecution and trial, they were confronted by a neutral, sympathetic, or hostile male "detective" who sought a waiver of their Miranda rights. Later, 72 other participants watched videotapes of these sessions and answered questions about the detective and suspect. Strikingly, results showed that although the detective's demeanor had no effect, participants who were truly innocent were significantly more likely to sign a waiver than those who were guilty. Naively believing in the power of their innocence to set them free, most waived their rights even in the hostile detective condition, where the risk of interrogation was apparent. The conceptual and policy implications of these results are discussed. PMID:15141779

  19. Exocrine and endocrine modulation in common gastric carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Colarossi, Cristina; Del Col, Laura; Perin, Tiziana; Talamini, Renato; Sigon, Roberto; Cannizzaro, Renato; Aiello, Eleonora; Buonadonna, Angela; Italia, Fabrizio; Massi, Daniela; Carbone, Antonino; Memeo, Lorenzo

    2012-05-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic implications of endocrine differentiation were evaluated in 103 common gastric adenocarcinomas and undifferentiated carcinomas. Maturely differentiated exocrine and endocrine phenotypes were evaluated by using gastric exocrine and endocrine markers along with intestinal exocrine and endocrine markers. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 66 tumors (64%) were positive for generic endocrine markers such as chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin. The 14 patients with more than 20% tumor cells positive for at least 1 endocrine marker experienced a poorer prognosis than patients with no (n = 37) or 1% to 20% (n = 52) positivity. The 16 carcinomas expressing the maturely differentiated exocrine gastric phenotype significantly correlated with poorer outcome compared with carcinomas with mature exocrine intestinal (n = 22) or mixed/gastrointestinal (n = 64) phenotypes. Among tumors expressing chromogranin A and/or synaptophysin, the maturely differentiated endocrine gastric phenotype (n = 26) was a negative prognostic factor compared with mature endocrine intestinal (n = 21) and mixed/gastrointestinal (n = 5) phenotypes. Endocrine differentiation and maturely exocrine/endocrine gastric phenotypes are associated with an unfavorable prognosis and may identify subsets of patients for tailored therapy. PMID:22523208

  20. Secretin is not necessary for exocrine pancreatic development and growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sans, Maria Dolors; Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Ernst, Stephen A.; D'Alecy, Louis G.; Nishijima, Ichiko

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive exocrine pancreatic growth is mediated primarily by dietary protein and the gastrointestinal hormone cholecystokinin (CCK). Feeding trypsin inhibitors such as camostat (FOY-305) is known to induce CCK release and stimulate pancreatic growth. However, camostat has also been reported to stimulate secretin release and, because secretin often potentiates the action of CCK, it could participate in the growth response. Our aim was to test the role of secretin in pancreatic development and adaptive growth through the use of C57BL/6 mice with genetic deletion of secretin or secretin receptor. The lack of secretin in the intestine or the secretin receptor in the pancreas was confirmed by RT-PCR. Other related components, such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC1 and VPAC2), were not affected. Secretin increased cAMP levels in acini from wild-type (WT) mice but had no effect on acini from secretin receptor-deleted mice, whereas VIP and forskolin still induced a normal response. Secretin in vivo failed to induce fluid secretion in receptor-deficient mice. The pancreas of secretin or secretin receptor-deficient mice was of normal size and histology, indicating that secretin is not necessary for normal pancreatic differentiation or maintenance. When WT mice were fed 0.1% camostat in powdered chow, the pancreas doubled in size in 1 wk, accompanied by parallel increases in protein and DNA. Camostat-fed littermate secretin and secretin receptor-deficient mice had similar pancreatic mass to WT mice. These results indicate that secretin is not required for normal pancreatic development or adaptive growth mediated by CCK. PMID:21852360

  1. Assessment of pancreas cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanoss, C. J.

    1978-01-01

    Pancreatic islets were obtained from guinea pig pancreas by the collagenase method and kept alive in tissue culture prior to further studies. Pancreas cell morphology was studied by standard histochemical techniques using light microscopy. Preparative vertical electrophoresis-levitation of dispersed fetal guinea pig pancreas cells was conducted in phosphate buffer containing a heavy water (D20) gradient which does not cause clumping of cells or alter the osmolarity of the buffers. The faster migrating fractions tended to be enriched in beta-cell content. Alpha and delta cells were found to some degree in most fractions. A histogram showing the cell count distribution is included.

  2. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Clodi, Martin; Zlamal-Fortunat, Sandra; Hammer, Heinz F

    2016-04-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) in diabetic patients is frequent. Studies based on fecal elastase-1 measurement give prevalence rates of 10‒30 % of severe and 22‒56 % of moderate EPI in type 1 and rates of 5‒46 % in type 2 diabetic patients. Nevertheless, not all patients report typical symptoms like diarrhea, steatorrhea and weight loss. For noninvasive testing the determination of fecal elastase-1 has the highest sensitivity and specificity. This test should be performed at least in all symptomatic patients. As differential diagnosis celiac disease (with a prevalence of about 3-5 % of type 1 diabetic patients), autonomic neuropathy, but also diseases like irritable bowel syndrome and gastrointestinal tumors have to be taken into account. Patients with symptoms and a fecal elastase-1 < 100 µg/g should be treated with pancreatic enzymes in adequate daily doses administered at main meals. Treatment improves symptoms significantly, supply with fat soluble vitamins is normalised, risk for osteoporosis is reduced. However, improvement of glucose metabolism has not been demonstrated consistently. A pancreatogenic diabetes, also termed as type 3c diabetes, has not necessarily to be treated with insulin, often-at least initially-treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs is sufficient. PMID:27052236

  3. 33 CFR 151.2020 - Vessels in innocent passage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Vessels in innocent passage. 151.2020 Section 151.2020 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) POLLUTION VESSELS CARRYING OIL, NOXIOUS LIQUID SUBSTANCES, GARBAGE, MUNICIPAL OR COMMERCIAL...

  4. The Power of Innocence: From Politeness to Politics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baddeley, Simon; James, Kim

    1991-01-01

    Etiquette serves as a defense of the social order while hiding that purpose from its beneficiaries. Although people believe their manners guarantee integrity, politically "innocent" powerful people are often unintentionally offensive to people of a different class, ethnicity, or gender. (SK)

  5. Visualizing the Politics of Innocence in the Age of AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Claudia; Walsh, Shannon; Larkin, June

    2004-01-01

    We are concerned with the ways in which social constructions of age can contribute to reducing or exacerbating the vulnerability of young people, and for this reason we refer to the issue as one of "the politics of innocence". The focus of this paper is on gender, youth and HIV prevention/AIDS awareness in the context of South Africa and…

  6. Preschoolers' Understanding of Lies and Innocent and Negligent Mistakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegal, Michael; Peterson, Candida C.

    1998-01-01

    Examined preschoolers' ability to distinguish innocent and negligent mistakes from lies. Found that, when asked to identify a mistake or lie about a food's contact with contaminants and identify a bystander's reaction, children distinguished mistakes from lies; they could also discriminate between lies and both negligent mistakes that generate…

  7. Innocent heart murmurs in children. Taking a diagnostic approach.

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, N. R.

    1995-01-01

    Nearly all pediatric murmurs are heard in normal hearts and are not due to cardiac disorders. These murmurs usually can be classified by distinctive features and distinguished from organic murmurs by skillful clinical examination. This article reviews the various types of innocent heart murmurs in children, discusses their differential diagnoses, and suggests an approach to sorting out pediatric murmurs. PMID:8520239

  8. Organ Facts: Kidney / Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the kidneys is to remove waste from the body through the production of urine. They also help to regulate blood pressure, blood volume and the chemical (electrolyte) composition of the blood. The pancreas is a five ...

  9. Cystic Lymphangioma of Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Bihari, Chhagan; Rastogi, Archana; Rajesh, S; Arora, Ankur; Arora, Asit; Kumar, Nikhil

    2016-03-01

    Lymphangiomas are benign hamartomatous malformations which can arise either from congenitally sequestered lymphatic channels or due to acquired obstruction caused by fibrosis of lymph channels. They are common in the pediatric age group in the soft tissue of neck and the axilla. Abdominal lymphangiomas are rare; even rarer is the primary involvement of pancreas. It occurs more frequently in females and is often located in the distal pancreas. The authors report the case of cystic lymphangioma of pancreas in a 26-year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of upper abdominal pain that was treated with laparoscopic cyst excision. Although exceptionally rare, lymphangioma of the pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic cystic lesions, especially in young women. PMID:27065694

  10. Tissue-specific deletion of c-Jun in the pancreas has limited effects on pancreas formation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Miyatsuka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ayako; Toyoda, Shuichi; Kato, Ken; Shiraiwa, Toshihiko; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu; Hori, Masatsugu; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Kaneto, Hideaki

    2007-11-30

    It is well known that activating protein-1 (AP-1) is involved in a variety of cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and oncogenesis. AP-1 is a dimer complex consisting of different subunits, and c-Jun is known to be one of its major components. In addition, it has been shown that mice lacking c-Jun are embryonic lethal and that c-Jun is essential for liver and heart development. However, the role of c-Jun in the pancreas is not well known. The aim of this study was to examine the possible role of c-Jun in the pancreas. First, c-Jun was strongly expressed in pancreatic duct-like structures at an embryonic stage, while a lower level of expression was observed in some part of the adult pancreas, implying that c-Jun might play a role during pancreas development. Second, to address this point, we generated pancreas-specific c-Jun knock-out mice (Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} mice) by crossing Ptf1a-Cre knock-in mice with c-Jun floxed mice. Ptf1a is a pancreatic transcription factor and its expression is confined to pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, which give rise to all three types of pancreatic tissue: endocrine, exocrine, and duct. Contrary to our expectation, however, there was no morphological difference in the pancreas between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. In addition, there was no difference in body weight, pancreas weight, and the expression of various pancreas-related factors (insulin, glucagon, cytokeratin, and amylase) between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose tolerance between Ptf1a-Cre; c-Jun{sup flox/flox} and control mice. Taken together, although we cannot exclude the possibility that c-Jun ablation is compensated by some unknown factors, c-Jun appears to be dispensable for pancreas development at least after ptf1a gene promoter is activated.

  11. Cyclosporine pharmacokinetics in pancreas transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Munda, R; Schroeder, T J; Pedersen, S A; Clardy, C W; Wadhwa, N K; Myre, S A; Stephens, G W; Pesce, A J; Alexander, J W; First, M R

    1988-04-01

    Ten CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on five pancreas transplant recipients to determine proper doses and dosing intervals. These cadaver pancreas transplants were performed with exocrine ductal drainage into the urinary tract through a bladder anastomosis in four cases and into the bowel in one case. Four CsA pharmacokinetic studies were performed on diabetic renal transplant recipients and an additional six studies were performed while with pancreas transplant patients taking metoclopramide in an effort to enhance absorption of CsA. Mean CsA dose was 3.7 mg/kg/dose (range 2.1 to 7.5 mg/kg/dose). All patients but one were on twice daily dosing intervals yielding an average daily dose of 7.4 mg/kg/d. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were used. The adequacy of a 1-, 2-, or 3-exponential model was determined by breakpoint analysis of the log concentration v time curve using the F statistic. The terminal rate constant was calculated by nonlinear regression analysis. The AUC and AUMC were calculated by the trapezoidal method with exponential extrapolation and these were used to calculate the MRT and Vdss. The unknown fractional absorption, F, was used to correct the oral data. The average CsA concentration maximum (Cmax) was 528 ng/mL with an average time to maximum concentration (Tmax) of 4.7 hours, a mean residence time of 7.75 hours, with a Vdss/%F of 9.61 L/kg in the pancreas transplant recipients. Additional studies of six patients receiving metoclopramide with CsA revealed an average Cmax of 723 ng/mL, an average Tmax of 2.3 hours, an average MRT of 6.08 hours, and an average Vdss/%F of 5.7% L/kg. These results indicate that coexistent gastroparesis in diabetic recipients of either pancreatic or renal transplants may result in reduced bioavailability of CsA. PMID:3284095

  12. Pancreas and cyst segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, Konstantin; Gutenko, Ievgeniia; Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    Accurate segmentation of abdominal organs from medical images is an essential part of surgical planning and computer-aided disease diagnosis. Many existing algorithms are specialized for the segmentation of healthy organs. Cystic pancreas segmentation is especially challenging due to its low contrast boundaries, variability in shape, location and the stage of the pancreatic cancer. We present a semi-automatic segmentation algorithm for pancreata with cysts. In contrast to existing automatic segmentation approaches for healthy pancreas segmentation which are amenable to atlas/statistical shape approaches, a pancreas with cysts can have even higher variability with respect to the shape of the pancreas due to the size and shape of the cyst(s). Hence, fine results are better attained with semi-automatic steerable approaches. We use a novel combination of random walker and region growing approaches to delineate the boundaries of the pancreas and cysts with respective best Dice coefficients of 85.1% and 86.7%, and respective best volumetric overlap errors of 26.0% and 23.5%. Results show that the proposed algorithm for pancreas and pancreatic cyst segmentation is accurate and stable.

  13. MFng Is Dispensable for Mouse Pancreas Development and Function▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, Per; Bergqvist, Ingela; Norlin, Stefan; Edlund, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Notch signaling regulates pancreatic cell differentiation, and mutations of various Notch signaling components result in perturbed pancreas development. Members of the Fringe family of β1,3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases, Manic Fringe (MFng), Lunatic Fringe (LFng), and Radical Fringe (RFng), modulate Notch signaling, and MFng has been suggested to regulate pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. We have characterized the expression of the three mouse Fringe genes in the developing mouse pancreas between embryonic days 9 and 14 and show that the expression of MFng colocalized with the proendocrine transcription factor Ngn3. In contrast, the expression of LFng colocalized with the exocrine marker Ptf1a, whereas RFng was not expressed. Moreover, we show that expression of MFng is lost in Ngn3 mutant mice, providing evidence that MFng is genetically downstream of Ngn3. Gain- and loss-of-function analyses of MFng by the generation of mice that overexpress MFng in early pancreatic progenitor cells and mice with a targeted deletion of MFng provide, however, evidence that MFng is dispensable for pancreas development and function, since no pancreatic defects in these mice were observed. PMID:19223466

  14. Epidemiology of pancreas cancer in Los Angeles

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, T.M.; Paganini-Hill, A.

    1981-03-15

    The characteristics of the 3614 Los Angeles County residents in whom cancer of the exocrine pancreas was diagnosed during the period 1972-1977 were compared with those of all county residents and patients in whom any cancer was diagnosed during the same period. Seventy-nine percent of the diagnoses had been pathologically verified. This disease still preferentially afflicts the old, the black, and men, although the differences in risk with factors other than age are modest. The disease is not evenly distributed by social class, or over time, although it is not clear that the observed differences reflect etiology. The distributions with respect to important categories of occupation and industry, religion, marital status, geography of residence, and birthplace were rather uniform. Although there is no obvious explanation for any of several unexpected minor inequities in the pattern of incidence, there is no compelling evidence to support any specific environmental cause. There is substantial evidence which is inconsistent with those environmental hypotheses that have been proposed previously.

  15. Portal Annular Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Harnoss, Jonathan M.; Harnoss, Julian C.; Diener, Markus K.; Contin, Pietro; Ulrich, Alexis B.; Büchler, Markus W.; Schmitz-Winnenthal, Friedrich H.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is an asymptomatic congenital pancreas anomaly, in which portal and/or mesenteric veins are encased by pancreas tissue. The aim of the study was to determine the role of PAP in pancreatic surgery as well as its management and potential complication, specifically, postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF). On the basis of a case report, the MEDLINE and ISI Web of Science databases were systematically reviewed up to September 2012. All articles describing a case of PAP were considered. In summary, 21 studies with 59 cases were included. The overall prevalence of PAP was 2.4% and the patients' mean (SD) age was 55.9 (16.2) years. The POPF rate in patients with PAP (12 pancreaticoduodenectomies and 3 distal pancreatectomies) was 46.7% (in accordance with the definition of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery). Portal annular pancreas is a quite unattended pancreatic variant with high prevalence and therefore still remains a clinical challenge to avoid postoperative complications. To decrease the risk for POPF, attentive preoperative diagnostics should also focus on PAP. In pancreaticoduodenectomy, a shift of the resection plane to the pancreas tail should be considered; in extensive pancreatectomy, coverage of the pancreatic remnant by the falciform ligament could be a treatment option. PMID:25207658

  16. Calcium and magnesium in exocrine secretion--an X-ray microanalytical study

    SciTech Connect

    Roomans, G.M.; Barnard, T.

    1982-01-01

    Calcium and magnesium distribution in mammalian exocrine glands under resting, stimulated and pathological conditions was investigated by X-ray microanalysis of thick and ultrathin cryosections. Ultrathin sections were cut from tissue frozen in the presence of a polymer cryoprotectant, dextran. The effect of this treatment on isolated rabbit pancreas. Dextran caused a disturbance in water and ion transport, partly due to an osmotic effect and the impermeability of the pancreatic epithelium to dextran; this does, however, not necessarily invalidate intracellular measurements on frozen-dried sections. Cholinergic stimulation of the rat pancreas caused a change of Ca distribution from the basal to the apical part of the cell; this may be a component of the secretory Ca flux. Kinetic considerations make a significant Ca movement via the ER-Golgi endomembrane space less likely. The mitochondrial Ca concentration is low, and not significantly changed by cholinergic stimulation. X-ray microanalysis was carried out on submandibular glands of rats after chronic treatment with reserpin and/or isoproterenol (an animal model for cystic fibrosis, CF). The acinar cells had elevated Mg and Ca and lowered K concentrations. Analysis of ultrathin cryosections showed high levels of Ca and Mg in secretory granules, mucus globules and the ER. Ca and Mg in the ER may be transported intracellularly with secretory proteins to secretion granules or mucus globules. The decrease in cell K may be due to efflux of K caused by elevated cytoplasmic Ca levels. A similar decrease in cell K was caused by incubation of rat salivary glands with diluted serum from CF patients, a treatment which has been reported to mimic the effect of a rise in cytoplasmic Ca.

  17. Exocrine Glands of Schwarziana quadripunctata (Hymenoptera, Apinae, Meliponini).

    PubMed

    Cruz-Landim, C; Reginato, R D

    2001-08-01

    This article 'describes the location, anatomy, histology and ontogeny of adult Schwarziana quadripunctata exocrine glands. These glands appear either as individualized organs (salivary gland system and Dufour gland) or as epidermis differentiation (tegumentary glands). Variations in the occurrence and degree of development among colony components with regard to their degree of maturity are also described. PMID:11706578

  18. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY POECILIA RETICULATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy Poecilia reticulata following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac 1-1 for 2 h and then tr...

  19. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC CARCINOGENESIS IN THE GUPPY (POECILIA RETICULATA).

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exocrine pancreatic neoplasms developed in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) following exposure to the direct acting carcinogen, methylazoxymethanol acetate (MAM-Ac). Fish 6- to 10-days old were exposed to nominal, nontoxic concentrations of 4 and 10 mg MAM-Ac/L for 2 hr and then t...

  20. Endocrine and exocrine function of the bovine testis. Chapter 2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter is devoted to the endocrine and exocrine function of the normal bovine male testes. The discussion begins with a historical review of the literature dating back to Aristotle’s (300 BC) initial description of the anatomy of the mammalian testes. The first microscopic examination of the t...

  1. Association of DLA-DQB1 alleles with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in Pembroke Welsh Corgis.

    PubMed

    Evans, J M; Tsai, K L; Starr-Moss, A N; Steiner, J M; Clark, L A

    2015-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a digestive disorder resulting from the insufficient secretion of enzymes from the pancreas. In dogs, this condition is often attributed to pancreatic acinar atrophy, wherein the enzyme-producing acinar cells are believed to be destroyed through an autoimmune process. Although EPI affects many diverse breeds, to date, molecular studies have been limited to the German Shepherd dog. A recent study of major histocompatibility genes in diseased and healthy German Shepherd dogs identified both risk and protective haplotypes. Herein, we genotyped DLA-DQB1 in Pembroke Welsh Corgis to determine whether dog leukocyte antigen alleles contribute to the pathogenesis of EPI across dog breeds. We evaluated 14 affected and 43 control Pembroke Welsh Corgis, which were selected based on an age of onset similar to German Shepherd dogs. We identified one protective allele (odds ratio = 0.13, P-value = 0.044) and one risk allele (odds ratio = 3.8, P-value = 0.047). As in German Shepherd dogs, the risk allele is a duplication of DLA-DQB1 (alleles DQB1*013:03 and 017:01); however, Pembroke Welsh Corgis have acquired a single polymorphism on DQB1*017:01. Thus, the DLA-DQB1 duplication is a risk allele for EPI in at least two breeds. PMID:26095904

  2. X-ray microanalysis of exocrine glands in animal models for cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, R.M.R.; Roomans, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    Elemental distribution and ultrastructure of the submandibular gland, the parotid gland and the pancreas were investigated in three suggested animal models of the disease cystic fibrosis: the chronically reserpinized rat, the chronically isoproterenol-treated rat, and the chronically pilocarpine-treated rat. To elucidate the cellular mechanism underlying the effects of these treatments, chronic effects of specific alpha - and beta -adrenergic agonists, as well as acute effects of reserpine and various agonists were also investigated. Reserpine, isoproterenol, and pilocarpine cause an increase in the calcium concentration in submandibular gland acinar cells, due to an increased calcium content of the intracellular mucus. In the parotid gland, reserpine and isoproterenol cause a decrease of the calcium concentration in acinar cells, due to a lower calcium content of the zymogen granules. In the submandibular gland, a decreased cellular Na concentration was noted after chronic treatment with isoproterenol or pilocarpine, and after a single dose of reserpine or isoproterenol. Ultrastructural changes in the exocrine glands investigated included excessive accumulation of intracellular secretory material and formation of abnormal uncondensed secretion granules. A common pattern in the animal models appears to be (1) inhibition of secretion resulting in intracellular accumulation of secretory material, (2) synthesis of secretory macromolecules with altered cation-binding properties.

  3. National Pancreas Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... NPF raises and directs funds to support exemplary research projects in the field of pancreas disease Fellows Symposium A three-day symposium pairing together world class physicians and scientists with medical fellows. ... Research Grant Application Research History Grant Review Committee ...

  4. ALDH1B1 is a potential stem / progenitor marker for multiple pancreas progenitor pools

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, Marilia; Serafimidis, Ioannis; Arnes, Luis; Sussel, Lori; Singh, Surendra; Vasiliou, Vasilis; Gavalas, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Aldehyde Dehydrogenase (ALDH) genes are increasingly associated with stem / progenitor cell status but their role in the maintenance of pluripotency remains uncertain. In a screen conducted for downstream Ngn3 target genes using ES derived pancreas progenitors we identified Aldh1b1, encoding a mitochondrial enzyme, as one of the genes strongly up regulated in response to Ngn3 expression. We found both by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence using a specific antibody that ALDH1B1 is exclusively expressed in the emerging pancreatic buds of the early embryo (9.5 dpc) in a Pdx1 dependent manner. Around the time of secondary transition, ALDH1B1 expression was restricted in the tip tripotent progenitors of the branching epithelium and in a subset of the trunk epithelium. Expression in the latter was Ngn3 dependent. Subsequently, ALDH1B1 expression persisted only in the tip cells that become restricted to the exocrine lineage and declined rapidly as these cells mature. In the adult pancreas we identified rare ALDH1B1+ cells that become abundant following pancreas injury in either the caerulein or streptozotocin paradigms. Blocking ALDH catalytic activity in pancreas embryonic explants resulted in reduced size of the explants and accelerated differentiation suggesting for the first time that ALDH activity may be necessary in the developing pancreas for the maintenance and expansion of progenitor pools. PMID:23142317

  5. ECM signaling regulates collective cellular dynamics to control pancreas branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hung Ping; Panlasigui, Devin; Cirulli, Vincenzo; Sander, Maike

    2015-01-01

    Summary During pancreas development, epithelial buds undergo branching morphogenesis to form an exocrine and endocrine gland. Proper morphogenesis is necessary for correct lineage allocation of pancreatic progenitors; however, the cellular events underlying pancreas morphogenesis are unknown. Here, we employed time-lapse microscopy and fluorescent labeling of cells to analyze cell behaviors associated with pancreas morphogenesis. We observed that outer bud cells adjacent to the basement membrane are pleomorphic and rearrange frequently; as well, they largely remain in the outer cell compartment even after mitosis. These cell behaviors and pancreas branching depend on cell contacts with the basement membrane, which induce actomyosin cytoskeleton remodeling via integrin-mediated activation of FAK/Src signaling. We show that integrin signaling reduces E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion in outer cells, and provide genetic evidence that this regulation is necessary for initiation of branching. Our study suggests that regulation of cell motility and adhesion by local niche cues initiates pancreas branching morphogenesis. PMID:26748698

  6. Ectopic Ptf1a expression in murine ESCs potentiates endocrine differentiation and models pancreas development in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gopika; Vincent, Robert K.; Odorico, Jon S.

    2014-01-01

    Besides its role in exocrine differentiation, pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) is required for pancreas specification from the foregut endoderm and ultimately for endocrine cell formation. Examining the early role of PTF1a in pancreas development has been challenging due to limiting amounts of embryonic tissue material for study. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) which can be differentiated in vitro, and without limit to the amount of experimental material, can serve as a model system to study these early developmental events. To this end, we derived and characterized a mouse ESC line with tetracycline-inducible expression of PTF1a (tet-Ptf1a mESCs). We found that transient ectopic expression of PTF1a initiated the pancreatic program in differentiating ESCs causing cells to activate PDX1 expression in bud-like structures resembling pancreatic primordia in vivo. These bud-like structures also expressed progenitor markers characteristic of a developing pancreatic epithelium. The epithelium differentiated to generate a wave of NGN3+ endocrine progenitors, and further formed cells of all three pancreatic lineages. Notably, the insulin+ cells in the cultures were monohormonal, and expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. PTF1a-induced cultures differentiated into significantly more endocrine and exocrine cells and the ratio of endocrine-to-exocrine cell differentiation could be regulated by retinoic acid and nicotinamide signaling. Moreover, induced cultures treated with RA and Nic exhibited a modest glucose response. Thus, this tet-Ptf1a ESC-based in vitro system is a valuable new tool for interrogating the role of PTF1a in pancreas development and in directing differentiation of ESCs to endocrine cells. PMID:24375815

  7. Retinoids in the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Pierre-Jacques; Wongsiriroj, Nuttaporn

    2016-01-01

    Retinoids (vitamin A and its natural and synthetic analogs) are required by most tissues for maintaining the normal health of the tissue. This is certainly true for the pancreas. The recent literature is convincing that retinoids are needed by the adult to assure normal pancreatic endocrine functions, especially those of the α- and β-cells. It is also well established that retinoids are required to insure normal pancreas development in utero, including the development of the endocrine pancreas. The actions of retinoids for maintaining normal pancreatic islet functions has drawn considerable research interest from investigators interested in understanding and treating metabolic disease. Pancreatic retinoids are also of interest to investigators studying the origins of pancreatic disease, including the development of pancreatic fibrosis and its sequelae. This research interest is focused on pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) which store retinoids and possess the metabolic machinery needed to metabolize retinoids. The literature on pancreatic disease and retinoids suggests that there is an association between impairments in pancreatic retinoid storage and metabolism and the development of pancreatic disease. These topics will be considered in this review. PMID:26904552

  8. Structural similarities and differences between the human and the mouse pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Dolenšek, Jurij; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Stožer, Andraž

    2015-01-01

    Mice remain the most studied animal model in pancreas research. Since the findings of this research are typically extrapolated to humans, it is important to understand both similarities and differences between the 2 species. Beside the apparent difference in size and macroscopic organization of the organ in the 2 species, there are a number of less evident and only recently described differences in organization of the acinar and ductal exocrine tissue, as well as in the distribution, composition, and architecture of the endocrine islets of Langerhans. Furthermore, the differences in arterial, venous, and lymphatic vessels, as well as innervation are potentially important. In this article, the structure of the human and the mouse pancreas, together with the similarities and differences between them are reviewed in detail in the light of conceivable repercussions for basic research and clinical application. PMID:26030186

  9. Double papillary fibroelastoma: beautiful, innocent flowers in the left heart.

    PubMed

    Floria, Mariana; Gerard, Marina; Louagie, Yves; Weynand, Birgit; Schroeder, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Papillary fibroelastoma is a rare, benign tumor, and multiple papillary fibroelastomas are even more uncommon. In an asymptomatic patient scheduled for carotid endarterectomy, transthoracic echocardiography discovered a fibroelastoma on the mitral valve. Then, transesophageal echocardiography showed another fibroelastoma on the aortic valve. Because he also needed a right coronary artery bypass, the patient underwent surgical excision of both masses. Fibroelastomas are not always as innocent as they seem, and surgical excision is necessary because of their potential for systemic or coronary embolization. Transoesophageal echocardiography may improve the diagnosis of multiple papillary fibroelastomas. PMID:24796685

  10. Noc-king out exocrine and endocrine secretion.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Waselle, Laurent; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-10-01

    The Rab GTPase effector Noc2 was brought into the limelight by a recent publication that demonstrated its requirements at different stages of regulated exocytosis. Noc2 knockout resulted in distinct abnormalities in endocrine and exocrine cells, ranging from the accumulation of secretory granules of increased size to impairments in the regulated release of their secretory products. Explanations for these defects are beginning to emerge and they promise to reveal some of the most jealously kept secrets of regulated exocytosis. PMID:15450973

  11. White Innocence and Mexican Americans as Perpetrators in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orozco, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This essay discusses white innocence as a mechanism that may contribute to perceptions of Mexican Americans as perpetrators. These perceptions are crucial to ways teachers and administrators respond to student actions as the initial steps in the school-to-prison pipeline. Specifically, this work reviews the rhetoric of white innocence in a high…

  12. Brilliance of a Fire: Innocence, Experience and the Theory of Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    This essay offers an extensive rehabilitation and reappraisal of the concept of childhood innocence as a means of testing the boundaries of some prevailing constructions of childhood. It excavates in detail some of the lost histories of innocence in order to show that these are more diverse and more complex than established and pejorative…

  13. Role of Connexins and Pannexins in the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Cigliola, Valentina; Allagnat, Florent; Berchtold, Lukas Adrian; Lamprianou, Smaragda; Haefliger, Jacques-Antoine; Meda, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    The pancreas produces enzymes with a digestive function and hormones with a metabolic function, which are produced by distinct cell types of acini and islets, respectively. Within these units, secretory cells coordinate their functioning by exchanging information via signals that flow in the intercellular spaces and are generated either at distance (several neural and hormonal inputs) or nearby the pancreatic cells themselves (inputs mediated by membrane ionic-specific channels and by ionic- and metabolite-permeant pannexin channels and connexin "hemichannels"). Pancreatic secretory cells further interact via the extracellular matrix of the pancreas (inputs mediated by integrins) and directly with neighboring cells, by mechanisms that do not require extracellular mediators (inputs mediated by gap and tight junction channels). Here, we review the expression and function of the connexins and pannexins that are expressed by the main secretory cells of the exocrine and endocrine pancreatic cells. Available data show that the patterns of expression of these proteins differ in acini and islets, supporting distinct functions in the physiological secretion of pancreatic enzymes and hormones. Circumstantial evidence further suggests that alterations in the signaling provided by these proteins are involved in pancreatic diseases. PMID:26465951

  14. Endothelium-derived essential signals involved in pancreas organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Talavera-Adame, Dodanim; Dafoe, Donald C

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are essential for pancreas differentiation, endocrine specification, and endocrine function. They are also involved in the physiopathology of type 1 and type 2 diabetes. During embryogenesis, aortic ECs provide specific factors that maintain the expression of key genes for pancreas development such as pancreatic and duodenal homeobox-1. Other unknown factors are also important for pancreatic endocrine specification and formation of insulin-producing beta cells. Endocrine precursors proliferate interspersed with ductal cells and exocrine precursors and, at some point of development, these endocrine precursors migrate to pancreatic mesenchyme and start forming the islets of Langerhans. By the end of the gestation and close to birth, these islets contain immature beta cells with the capacity to express vascular endothelial growth factor and therefore to recruit ECs from the surrounding microenvironment. ECs in turn produce factors that are essential to maintain insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. Once assembled, a cross talk between endocrine cells and ECs maintain the integrity of islets toward an adequate function during the whole life of the adult individual. This review will focus in the EC role in the differentiation and maturation of pancreatic beta cells during embryogenesis as well as the current knowledge about the involvement of endothelium to derive pancreatic beta cells in vitro from mouse or human pluripotent stem cells. PMID:25992319

  15. The essence of innocence: consequences of dehumanizing Black children.

    PubMed

    Goff, Phillip Atiba; Jackson, Matthew Christian; Di Leone, Brooke Allison Lewis; Culotta, Carmen Marie; DiTomasso, Natalie Ann

    2014-04-01

    The social category "children" defines a group of individuals who are perceived to be distinct, with essential characteristics including innocence and the need for protection (Haslam, Rothschild, & Ernst, 2000). The present research examined whether Black boys are given the protections of childhood equally to their peers. We tested 3 hypotheses: (a) that Black boys are seen as less "childlike" than their White peers, (b) that the characteristics associated with childhood will be applied less when thinking specifically about Black boys relative to White boys, and (c) that these trends would be exacerbated in contexts where Black males are dehumanized by associating them (implicitly) with apes (Goff, Eberhardt, Williams, & Jackson, 2008). We expected, derivative of these 3 principal hypotheses, that individuals would perceive Black boys as being more responsible for their actions and as being more appropriate targets for police violence. We find support for these hypotheses across 4 studies using laboratory, field, and translational (mixed laboratory/field) methods. We find converging evidence that Black boys are seen as older and less innocent and that they prompt a less essential conception of childhood than do their White same-age peers. Further, our findings demonstrate that the Black/ape association predicted actual racial disparities in police violence toward children. These data represent the first attitude/behavior matching of its kind in a policing context. Taken together, this research suggests that dehumanization is a uniquely dangerous intergroup attitude, that intergroup perception of children is underexplored, and that both topics should be research priorities. PMID:24564373

  16. The types of endocrine cells in the pancreas of Sunda porcupine (Hystrix javanica)

    PubMed Central

    Budipitojo, Teguh; Fibrianto, Yuda Heru; Mulyani, Guntari Titik

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To identify the types of endocrine cells in the pancreas of the Sunda porcupine (Hystrix javanica) and its immunolocalization. Materials and Methods: Five adult H. javanica were used without sexual distinction. The presences of endocrine cells (glucagon, insulin, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide [PP]) in pancreatic tissues were detected using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex method. Results: The fusiform, round, and oval form endocrine cells were detected in the islets of Langerhans and exocrine parts. Most of the insulin cells were found in the central area, glucagon cells were identified in the central and peripheral areas, and somatostatin and PP cells were detected in the mantle area of the islets of Langerhans. Glucagon and somatostatin cells were also detected in smaller numbers of peripheral parts of the islet. In all of the islet parts, glucagon endocrine cells were most prevalent cell type and then, somatostatin, insulin, and PP. In the exocrine parts, PP, somatostatin, glucagon, and insulin endocrine cells were found in the inter-acinus part with moderate, moderate, a few and rare numbers, in that order. In the pancreatic duct, glucagon and somatostatin cells were found between epithelial cells in rare numbers. Conclusion: The pancreas of Sunda porcupine (H. javanica) contains four types of major pancreatic endocrine cells with approximately similar distribution patterns to the other rodents, except for abundant glucagon cells in the peripheral area of the islets of Langerhans. PMID:27397977

  17. β-Cell regeneration through the transdifferentiation of pancreatic cells: Pancreatic progenitor cells in the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo-Sup; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-05-01

    Pancreatic progenitor cell research has been in the spotlight, as these cells have the potential to replace pancreatic β-cells for the treatment of type 1 and 2 diabetic patients with the absence or reduction of pancreatic β-cells. During the past few decades, the successful treatment of diabetes through transplantation of the whole pancreas or isolated islets has nearly been achieved. However, novel sources of pancreatic islets or insulin-producing cells are required to provide sufficient amounts of donor tissues. To overcome this limitation, the use of pancreatic progenitor cells is gaining more attention. In particular, pancreatic exocrine cells, such as duct epithelial cells and acinar cells, are attractive candidates for β-cell regeneration because of their differentiation potential and pancreatic lineage characteristics. It has been assumed that β-cell neogenesis from pancreatic progenitor cells could occur in pancreatic ducts in the postnatal stage. Several studies have shown that insulin-producing cells can arise in the duct tissue of the adult pancreas. Acinar cells also might have the potential to differentiate into insulin-producing cells. The present review summarizes recent progress in research on the transdifferentiation of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, especially duct and acinar cells. PMID:27330712

  18. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes. PMID:26395141

  19. Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas: Molecular characterization of 23 patients along with a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Borazanci, Erkut; Millis, Sherri Z; Korn, Ron; Han, Haiyong; Whatcott, Clifford J; Gatalica, Zoran; Barrett, Michael T; Cridebring, Derek; Von Hoff, Daniel D

    2015-01-01

    Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCP) is a rare entity. Like adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, overall survival is poor. Characteristics of ASCP include central tumor necrosis, along with osteoclasts and hypercalcemia. Various theories exist as to why this histological subtype exists, as normal pancreas tissue has no benign squamous epithelium. Due to the rarity of this disease, limited molecular analysis has been performed, and those reports indicate unique molecular features of ASCP. In this paper, we characterize 23 patients diagnosed with ASCP through molecular profiling using immunohistochemistry staining, fluorescent in situ hybridization, chromogenic in situ hybridization, and gene sequencing, Additionally, we provide a comprehensive literature review of what is known to date of ASCP. Molecular characterization revealed overexpression in MRP1 (80%), MGMT (79%), TOP2A (75), RRM1 (42%), TOPO1 (42%), PTEN (45%), CMET (40%), and C-KIT (10%) among others. One hundred percent of samples tested were positive for KRAS mutations. This analysis shows heretofore unsuspected leads to be considered for treatments of this rare type of exocrine pancreas cancer. Molecular profiling may be appropriate to provide maximum information regarding the patient’s tumor. Further work should be pursued to better characterize this disease. PMID:26380056

  20. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hruban, Ralph H.; Fukushima, Noriyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Summary In contrast to the relatively uniform pathology and the unyielding dismal outcome associated with infiltrating ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas, cystic lesions have a broad spectrum of gross and microscopic pathologies, and a range of clinical outcomes. The common cystic lesions of the pancreas are reviewed with emphasis on practical tips for distinguishing between the main entities. PMID:20953247

  1. Characterization of integrin expression in islets isolated from hamster, canine, porcine, and human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wang, R N; Paraskevas, S; Rosenberg, L

    1999-04-01

    The reasons for the failure of clinical islet transplantation remain obscure. Islet isolation, however, exposes the islet to variety of cellular stresses, including disruption of the cell-matrix relationship, an event associated with apoptosis. The cell-matrix relationship is characterized by an interaction between cell surface integrin receptors and matrix molecules of the surrounding basement membrane (BM). The purpose of this study was to characterize integrin expression and the distribution of the peri-insular BM in human, porcine, canine, and hamster pancreas, and after routine islet isolation. Whereas islets in the porcine pancreas do not have a demonstrable BM, islets in the human, canine, and hamster pancreas have an almost continuous BM with very little direct exocrine to endocrine cell-cell contact. After islet isolation, the BM was destroyed, only to be reestablished during the period of culture. In the pancreas of all four species, integrin alpha3 was expressed only on islet cells, and integrin alpha5 was present on islet cells as well as on acinar, centroacinar, and duct cells. Integrin alphaV was detected only in human and canine pancreas. Integrin beta1 was demonstrated only in the human pancreas. In isolated islets, integrin alpha3, alpha5, and alphaV expression decreased during the culture period and the intensity of the staining was observed to be coincident with the distribution of the BM. In summary, this is the first report of integrin expression in hamster, canine, porcine, and human islets. After islet isolation, the altered islet cell-matrix relationship is reflected both in the decrease in integrin expression and in the destruction of the peri-insular BM. These profound changes will need to be considered as the process of islet isolation for transplantation is refined. (J Histochem Cytochem 47:499-506, 1999) PMID:10082751

  2. Clinical experience in pancreas transplantation in Lyon: long-term survival of duct injected pancreatic grafts.

    PubMed

    Melandri, M; Lefrancois, N; La Rocca, E; Martin, X; Sanseverino, R; Camozzi, L; Faure, J L; Secchi, A; Gelet, A; Bottani, G

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-seven pancreatic grafts in 92 insulin-dependent diabetic patients were performed during the last 11 years. Eighty-three of these grafts were carried out after neoprene duct injection, the other patients underwent pancreato-duodenal transplantation. In 80 cases, a double pancreas and kidney graft was performed. Five different immunosuppressive protocols were subsequently applied. Actuarial survival of patients and pancreata was 75.1% and 47%, after one year and 54.6% and 22.1%, respectively, 4 years after transplantation. Slightly better results were observed in double pancreas and kidney transplantation. The survival of both patients and pancreas improved when the most recent immunosuppressive protocols including cyclosporin A and only small doses of steroids were applied. The main causes of loss of the pancreatic graft were rejection, vascular thrombosis and death of the patient with functioning organ. Metabolic studies showed good insulin secretion with normal or impaired glucose tolerance as well as good short and half-term glycemic control. Whole pancreas grafts with enteric diversion yielded prompter and higher insulin secretion but the incidence of surgical complications was increased. In comparison to the data recorded at 6 months after pancreas transplantation, 5 patients of our series with still functioning organ showed an equally satisfactory and unchanged glycemic control after more than 4 years from surgery. In these patients, the previously high insulinemic values decreased to normal levels. However, 3 of these patients showed a decrease in post-prandial peaks as confirmed also by OGTT. However, mean blood glucose level was not altered. In our series the suppression of exocrine pancreatic secretion by neoprene duct injection did not appear to represent a relevant cause of decrease in endocrine function. The results obtained do not yet allow us to draw definite conclusions as to the efficacy of pancreas transplantation in the treatment of

  3. Positron emission tomography ligand [11C]5-hydroxy-tryptophan can be used as a surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Olof; Espes, Daniel; Selvaraju, Ram K; Jansson, Emma; Antoni, Gunnar; Sörensen, Jens; Lubberink, Mark; Biglarnia, Ali-Reza; Eriksson, Jan W; Sundin, Anders; Ahlström, Håkan; Eriksson, Barbro; Johansson, Lars; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Korsgren, Olle

    2014-10-01

    In humans, a well-developed serotonin system is localized to the pancreatic islets while being absent in exocrine pancreas. Assessment of pancreatic serotonin biosynthesis could therefore be used to estimate the human endocrine pancreas. Proof of concept was tested in a prospective clinical trial by comparisons of type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients, with extensive reduction of β-cells, with healthy volunteers (HVs). C-peptide-negative (i.e., insulin-deficient) T1D subjects (n = 10) and HVs (n = 9) underwent dynamic positron emission tomography with the radiolabeled serotonin precursor [(11)C]5-hydroxy-tryptophan ([(11)C]5-HTP). A significant accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP was obtained in the pancreas of the HVs, with large interindividual variation. A substantial and highly significant reduction (66%) in the pancreatic uptake of [(11)C]5-HTP in T1D subjects was observed, and this was most evident in the corpus and caudal regions of the pancreas where β-cells normally are the major constituent of the islets. [(11)C]5-HTP retention in the pancreas was reduced in T1D compared with nondiabetic subjects. Accumulation of [(11)C]5-HTP in the pancreas of both HVs and subjects with T1D was in agreement with previously reported morphological observations on the β-cell volume, implying that [(11)C]5-HTP retention is a useful noninvasive surrogate marker for the human endocrine pancreas. PMID:24848067

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (cAPK) regulatory subunits are packaged and secreted by many exocrine and endocrine cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mednieks, M.I.; Hand, A.R.

    1986-05-01

    Regulatory (R) subunits of cAPK were identified by us as components of rat and human saliva by photoaffinity labeling with (/sup 32/P)-8-azido cyclic AMP. Photoaffinity labeling of purified rat parotid granule contents and immunogold labeling of thin sections with monoclonal antibodies showed the presence of R subunits in granules. The authors now report that cAPK R subunits are present in secretory granules and are apparently secreted by many exocrine and endocrine cell types. Labeling of thin sections of rat tissues with antibody to R subunits and protein A-gold shows gold particles over secretory granules of endocrine cells of the pituitary, pancreas and intestine. Zymogen granules of exocrine pancreatic acinar cells, the dense cores of secretory granules of seminal vesicle epithelial cells and secretory product in the seminal vesicle lumina were prominently labeled with gold. Photoaffinity labeling shows that pancreatic secretions and seminal vesicle contents have cAPK components. Phosphorylative modification of cellular proteins by cAMP controls hormonally stimulated protein secretion by many cell types. Although no catalytic activity was detected, identification of R subunits in granules and as secretory products indicates that they may have multiple roles in cellular mechanisms of action of cyclic AMP-mediated events in secretory cells.

  5. Prox1-Heterozygosis Sensitizes the Pancreas to Oncogenic Kras-Induced Neoplastic Transformation12

    PubMed Central

    Drosos, Yiannis; Neale, Geoffrey; Ye, Jianming; Paul, Leena; Kuliyev, Emin; Maitra, Anirban; Means, Anna L; Washington, M Kay; Rehg, Jerold; Finkelstein, David B; Sosa-Pineda, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The current paradigm of pancreatic neoplastic transformation proposes an initial step whereby acinar cells convert into acinar-to-ductal metaplasias, followed by progression of these lesions into neoplasias under sustained oncogenic activity and inflammation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms driving these processes is crucial to the early diagnostic and prevention of pancreatic cancer. Emerging evidence indicates that transcription factors that control exocrine pancreatic development could have either, protective or facilitating roles in the formation of preneoplasias and neoplasias in the pancreas. We previously identified that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is a novel regulator of mouse exocrine pancreas development. Here we investigated whether Prox1 function participates in early neoplastic transformation using in vivo, in vitro and in silico approaches. We found that Prox1 expression is transiently re-activated in acinar cells undergoing dedifferentiation and acinar-to-ductal metaplastic conversion. In contrast, Prox1 expression is largely absent in neoplasias and tumors in the pancreas of mice and humans. We also uncovered that Prox1-heterozygosis markedly increases the formation of acinar-to-ductal-metaplasias and early neoplasias, and enhances features associated with inflammation, in mouse pancreatic tissues expressing oncogenic Kras. Furthermore, we discovered that Prox1-heterozygosis increases tissue damage and delays recovery from inflammation in pancreata of mice injected with caerulein. These results are the first demonstration that Prox1 activity protects pancreatic cells from acute tissue damage and early neoplastic transformation. Additional data in our study indicate that this novel role of Prox1 involves suppression of pathways associated with inflammatory responses and cell invasiveness. PMID:26992918

  6. Effects of coping and cooperative instructions on guilty and informed innocents' physiological responses to concealed information.

    PubMed

    Zvi, Liza; Nachson, Israel; Elaad, Eitan

    2012-05-01

    Previous research on the Concealed Information Test indicates that knowledge of the critical information of a given event is sufficient for the elicitation of strong physiological reactions, thus facilitating detection by the test. Other factors that affect the test's efficacy are deceptive verbal responses to the test's questions and motivation of guilty examinees to avoid detection. In the present study effects of coping and cooperative instructions - delivered to guilty and innocent participants - on detection were examined. In a mock-theft experiment guilty participants who actually committed a mock-crime, and informed innocent participants who handled the critical items of the crime in an innocent context, were instructed to adopt either a coping or a cooperative attitude toward the polygraph test. Results indicated that both, guilt and coping behavior, were associated with enhanced physiological responses to the critical information, whereas innocence and cooperative behavior attenuated physiological responses. Theoretical and applied implications of the results are discussed. PMID:22330977

  7. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates the action of cyclic AMP-dependent secretagogues in mouse pancreatic exocrine cells via protein kinase A pathway activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Maria E; D’Alecy, Louis; Lentz, Stephen I; Tang, Tong; Williams, John A

    2013-01-01

    Both secretin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) receptors are responsible for the activation of adenylyl cyclases (ACs), which increase intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels in the exocrine pancreas. There are nine membrane-associated isoforms, each with its own pattern of expression and regulation. In this study we sought to establish which AC isoforms play a regulatory role in pancreatic exocrine cells. Using RT-PCR, AC3, AC4, AC6, AC7 and AC9 were found to be expressed in the pancreas. AC3, AC4, AC6 and AC9 were expressed in both pancreatic acini and ducts, whereas AC7 was expressed only in pancreatic ducts. Based on known regulation by intracellular signals, selective inhibitors and stimulators were used to suggest which isoforms play an important role in the induction of cAMP formation. AC6 appeared to be an important isoform because protein kinase A (PKA), PKC and calcium all inhibited VIP-induced cAMP formation, whereas calcineurin or calmodulin did not modify the response to VIP. Mice with genetically deleted AC6 were studied and showed reduced cAMP formation and PKA activation in both isolated pancreatic acini and duct fragments. The absence of AC6 reduced cAMP-dependent secretagogue-stimulated amylase secretion, and abolished fluid secretion in both in vivo and isolated duct fragments. In conclusion, several AC isoforms are expressed in pancreatic acini and ducts. AC6 mediates a significant part of pancreatic amylase and fluid secretion in response to secretin, VIP and forskolin through cAMP/PKA pathway activation. PMID:23753526

  8. Common Disorders of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disease becomes more chronic, patients can develop malnutrition and weight loss. If the pancreas becomes destroyed ... with these disorders may have chronic pain, diarrhea, malnutrition, or diabetes. Treatment focuses on pain control and ...

  9. Allograft pancreas: pale acinar nodules.

    PubMed

    Troxell, Megan L; Drachenberg, Cinthia

    2016-08-01

    Microscopic pale-staining acinar nodules were characterized in native pancreas in the 1980s under a variety of names but have been infrequently reported since. We retrospectively studied the frequency and characteristics of pale acinar nodules in allograft pancreas biopsies, as compared to a sampling of native pancreas specimens at our center. Pale acinar nodules were present in 13% (9/69) of allograft biopsies from 22% (7/32) of transplant patients, and 23% (5/22) of native pancreas surgical specimens, although more nodules per pancreas area were present in allograft needle biopsies. Acinar nodules had size of 100 to 700 μm, were periodic acid-Schiff pale, were synaptophysin negative, stained more weakly with keratin CAM 5.2 compared to surrounding parenchyma, and had a low proliferative rate. Ultrastructural evaluation revealed paucity of zymogen granules with dilated cistern-like structures. In our experience, pale acinar nodules have similar features in allograft and native pancreas specimens, yet remain of uncertain etiology and significance. PMID:27063474

  10. Pancreas Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Guney, Michelle A.; Gannon, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by decreased function of insulin-producing insulin β cells and insufficient insulin output resulting from an absolute (Type 1) or relative (Type 2) inadequate functional β cell mass. Both forms of the disease would greatly benefit from treatment strategies that could enhance β cell regeneration and/or function. Successful and reliable methods of generatingβ cells or whole islets from progenitor cells in vivo or in vitro could lead to restoration of β cell mass in individuals with Type 1 diabetes and enhanced β cell compensation in Type 2 patients. A thorough understanding of the normal developmental processes that occur during pancreatic organogenesis, e.g., transcription factors, cell signaling molecules, and cell-cell interactions that regulate endocrine differentiation from the embryonic pancreatic epithelium, is required in order to successfully reach these goals. This review summarizes our current understanding of pancreas development, with particular emphasis on factors intrinsic or extrinsic to the pancreatic epithelium that are involved in regulating the development and differentiation of the various pancreatic cell types. We also discuss the recent progress in generating insulin-producing cells from progenitor sources. PMID:19750517

  11. [Intraoperative pancreas puncture cytology].

    PubMed

    Eggert, A; Lattmann, E; Kopf, R; Pfeiffer, M; Klöppel, G

    1984-01-01

    In the case of 10 to 15% of surgical patients with a pancreatic disorder an intraoperative diagnosis had to be made when a preoperative diagnosis had not yielded a definite result. Fine needle aspiration biopsy ( FNAB ) of the pancreas provided the basis for intraoperative differentiation of malignant and benign pancreatic processes. 244 pancreatic biopsies were carried out in 100 patients. It was possible to make a statement in 99% of the cases, with 65 malignant and 35 benign changes. In 83% the cytological diagnosis was correct; the method yielded incorrect-negative results in 7% of the cases. In 9% the presence of tumour cells was only suspected. There were no incorrect positive cancer diagnoses. FNAB caused no postoperative complications. Intraoperative bleeding after FBAB had to be stopped with a suture in one case. Transitory, asymptomatic hyperamylasemy must be expected in 25% of the patients after FNAB . This diagnostic technique is recommended in preference to the histological tissue removal methods because of its low risk factor. At least 2 biopsies of the suspect area with 2 smears are required, as a training in this diagnostic technique. PMID:6730761

  12. [Change in pancreatic exocrine function in acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Iu A

    1979-10-01

    In order to study changes in the functional state of the pancreas 1572 investigations of the blood and urine amylase, atoxylresistant lipase of the blood serum before operation were performed in different postoperative periods in 131 patients with acute appendicitis. The enzyme activity was established to increase, especially in destructive forms of appendicitis and in elderly patients. PMID:505800

  13. Pancreas Transplantation From Living Donors: A Single Center Experience of 20 Cases.

    PubMed

    Choi, J Y; Jung, J H; Kwon, H; Shin, S; Kim, Y H; Han, D J

    2016-08-01

    Living donor pancreas transplantation (LDPT) has several advantages over deceased donor pancreas transplantation (DDPT), including better HLA matching, shorter ischemic time, and shorter waiting time. It remains an attractive option for diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with end stage renal disease. We reviewed 20 cases of LDPT performed in Asan Medical Center between October 1992 and March 2015. Six cases (30%) were pancreas transplantation alone (PTA), and the rest (70%) were simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplantation (SPK). Relations of donor and recipient were parents in 7 (35%), siblings in 6 (30%), spouse in 6 (30%), and cousin in 1 (5%). Graft survival in SPK at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 91.7%, 83.3%, 83.3%, and 83.3%, respectively, and that in PTA recipients was 50%, 33.3%, 16.7%, and 16.7%, respectively (p = 0.005). Causes of graft failure in SPK were thrombosis (one case), and rejection (one case), whereas those in PTA were noncompliance (two cases), thrombosis (one case), reflux pancreatitis (one case), and chronic rejection (one case). In terms of pancreas exocrine drainage, two grafts (25%) maintained their function in bladder drainage, while all grafts maintained in enteric drainage p < 0.05). Seven (35%) donors experienced minor pancreatic juice leakage and one underwent reoperation due to postoperative hematoma. Most donors maintained normoglycemia and normal renal function. However, two donors developed DM (at 1 and 90 months postdonation), and were treated with oral hypoglycemic agents. Graft survival in PTA recipients was poorer than in SPK due to poor compliance and bladder drainage-related problems. The surgical and metabolic complication rates of donors can be minimized by applying strict donor criteria. Therefore, LDPT with enteric drainage is an acceptable treatment for SPK. PMID:26833623

  14. Innocent Bystanders and Smoking Guns: Dwarf Carbon Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    As far as we know, most carbon throughout the Universe is created and dispersed by AGB stars. So it was at first surprising to find that the carbon stars most prevalent in the Galaxy are in fact dwarfs. We suspect that dC stars are most likely innocent bystanders in post-mass transfer binaries, and may be predominantly metal-poor. Among 1200 C stars found in the SDSS (Green 2013), we confirm 724 dCs, of which a dozen are DA/dC stars in composite spectrum binaries, quadrupling the total sample of these "smoking guns" for AGB binary mass transfer. The dCs likely span absolute magnitudes M_i from about 6.5 to 10.5. G-type dC stars with weak CN and relatively blue colors are probably the most massive dCs still cool enough to show C_2 bands. Eleven very red C stars with strong red CN bands appear to be N-type AGB stars at large Galactocentric distances, one likely a new discovery in the dIrr galaxy Le A. Two such stars within 30arcmin of each other may trace a previously unidentified dwarf galaxy or tidal stream at ~40 kpc. We describe follow-up projects to study the spatial, kinematic, and binary properties of these C-enriched dwarfs.

  15. Characteristics and Outcomes of Adenosquamous Carcinoma of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Christine G.; Zuluaga Toro, Tania; Chan, Ellie; Feely, Michael M.; Trevino, Jose G.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: Adenosquamous carcinoma of the pancreas (ASCAP) is a rare histologic type of pancreatic carcinoma that constitutes 1% to 4% of all pancreatic exocrine malignancies. It has a clinical presentation similar to that of adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (ACP), but may have a worse overall prognosis, with most patients surviving for less than 2 years. METHODS: This was an institutional, retrospective, cohort analysis of 237 patients who underwent resection of pancreatic cancer with curative intent. RESULTS: Of the 237 cases examined, we identified 7 (2.9%) with histologically confirmed ASCAP. Demographics, comorbidities, risk factors, presenting symptoms, survival data, tumor characteristics, and types of treatment for each patient were included in the analysis. Risk factors for development of ASCAP were not conclusive. Although human papilloma virus (HPV) has been implicated in other squamous cell cancers, in our cohort, its involvement in ASCAP was 0%. Presurgical fine-needle aspiration failed to identify the invasive squamous cell component in all cases. In this cohort analysis, overall survival ranged from 3 to 25 months, with 2 patients surviving more than 20 months after surgical resection. With a median follow-up of 2.9 years, our data demonstrate a trend to worse median overall survival for ASCAP than for ACP (8.2 vs. 20.4 months; P = .23), with a limited number of long-term survivors. CONCLUSIONS: Although recommended, adjuvant treatment was inconsistently provided for patients in this ASCAP cohort. Published data show variability in overall survival, but our findings support that surgical resection is one of the few options for control of this rare, poorly understood pancreatic malignancy. Further research is necessary to define risk factors and adjuvant and neoadjuvant treatments, to help improve patient outcomes. PMID:23936547

  16. Ethanol diversely alters palmitate, stearate and oleate metabolism in the liver and pancreas of rats using the deuterium oxide single tracer

    PubMed Central

    Boros, Laszlo G.; Deng, Qinggao; Pandol, Stephen J.; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Go, Vay Liang W.; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine tissue specific effects of alcohol on fatty acid synthesis and distribution as related to functional changes in triglyceride transport and membrane formation. Methods Tissue fatty acid profile, and de novo lipogenesis were determined in adult male Wistar rats after 5 weeks of ethanol feeding using deuterated water and GC/MS. Liver and pancreas fatty acid profiles and new synthesis fractions were compared with those from control rats on an isocaloric diet. Results Fatty acid ratios in the liver indicated that there was an over two-fold accumulation of stearate to that of palmitate, with an apparent decrease in oleate content. On the other hand, in the pancreas there was a 17% decrease in the stearate to palmitate ratio, while oleate to palmitate ratio was increased by 30%. The fractions of deuterium labeled palmitate and stearate were substantially reduced in the liver and pancreas of the alcohol treated animals. Deuterium labeling of oleate was reduced in the liver but not in the pancreas consistent with the oleate/stearate ratios in these tissues. Conclusions Long-term alcohol exposure results in opposite effects on the desaturase activity in the liver and pancreas limiting fatty acid transport in the liver but promoting the exocrine function of the pancreas. PMID:19248221

  17. Differential ability of Ptf1a and Ptf1a-VP16 to convert stomach, duodenum and liver to pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Jarikji, Zeina H.; Vanamala, Sandeep; Beck, Caroline W.; Wright, Chris V.E.; Leach, Steven D.; Horb, Marko E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Determining the functional attributes of pancreatic transcription factors is essential to understand how the pancreas is specified distinct from other endodermal organs, such as liver, stomach and duodenum, and to direct the differentiation of other cell types into pancreas. Previously, we demonstrated that Pdx1-VP16 was sufficient to convert liver to pancreas. In this paper we characterize the functional ability of another pancreatic transcription factor, Ptf1a, in promoting ectopic pancreatic fates at early stages throughout the endoderm and later in during organogenesis. Using the transthyretin promoter to drive expression in the early liver region/bud of transgenic Xenopus tadpoles, we find that Ptf1a-VP16 is able to convert liver to pancreas. Overexpression of the unmodified Ptf1a on the other hand, has no effect in liver, but is able to convert stomach and duodenum to pancreas. When overexpressed at earlier embryonic stages throughout the endoderm, Ptf1a activity is similarly limited, whereas Ptf1a-VP16 has increased activity. Interestingly, in all instances we find that Ptf1a-VP16 is only capable of promoting acinar cell fates, whereas Ptf1a promotes both acinar and endocrine fates. Lastly, we demonstrate that, similar to mouse and zebrafish, Xenopus Ptf1a is essential for the initial specification of both endocrine and exocrine cells during normal pancreas development. PMID:17320068

  18. [Neuroendocrine system of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract: origin and development].

    PubMed

    Díaz Pérez, José Angel

    2009-04-01

    Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NETs) originate from the neuroendocrine cells through the gastrointestinal tract and endocrine pancreas. The embryologic development of the pancreas is a complex process that begins with the "stem cell" that come from the endodermus. These cells go through two phases: in the first transition the "stem cell" differentiates in exocrine and endocrine cells. This process is regulated by transcription factors such as Pdx1 ("insulin promoter factor 1"), Hlxb6 and SOX9. In the second transition the neuroendocrine cell differentiates in the 5 cell types (alpha, beta, delta, PP y epsilon.). This process is regulated through the balance between factors favoring differentiation (mainly neurogenin 3) and inhibitor factors which depend on Notch signals. The existence of a third transition in postnatal pancreas is hypothesized. The "stem cell" from pancreatic ducts would become adult beta cells, through autoduplication and neogenesis. In the small gut of the adult the stem cell are placed in the intestinal crypts and develop to villi in secretor lines (enterocytes, globet and Paneths cells) or neuroendocrine cells from which at least 10 cell types depend. This process is regulated by transcription factors: Math1, neurogenina 3 and NeuroD. PMID:19627763

  19. Immunocytochemical localization of progesterone receptors in endocrine cells of the human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Doglioni, C.; Gambacorta, M.; Zamboni, G.; Coggi, G.; Viale, G.

    1990-01-01

    Progesterone receptors (PgR) have been immunocytochemically localized in the nuclei of several (40% to 75%) endocrine cells of the human pancreas and in a more variable number of neoplastic cells of 7 of 18 endocrine pancreatic tumors. Conversely the exocrine epithelial cells of the pancreas did not exhibit any PgR immunoreactivity in normal as well as in different pathologic conditions, including pancreatic adenocarcinomas. Estrogen receptors were not detected in any of the pancreatic samples investigated. Double immunocytochemical experiments have documented that PgR immunoreactivity in normal Langerhans islets is a consistent feature of most (75%) glucagon-producing A cells, of approximately 5% to 20% of insulin-producing B cells, and of a variable percentage of pancreatic polypeptide (PP)-producing cells, ranging from 5% to 70%. These figures were not affected by the sex, age, or underlying disease of the patients. The reported findings corroborate previous clinical and experimental evidence indicating that sex steroid hormones may have some regulatory effects on the functional activity of the endocrine pancreas. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2240168

  20. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Amira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the increase. The [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited in the presence of NG-monomethyl L-arginine or 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), and diaminofluorescein-2/diaminofluorescein-2 triazole (DAF-2/DAF-2T) fluorometry demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) was also produced by H2S in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 64.8 μM, indicating that NO was involved in the H2S effect. The H2S-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by pretreatment with U73122, xestospongin C, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, KT5823, and GP2A, indicating that phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), protein kinase G (PKG), and Gq-protein play roles as intermediate components in the H2S-triggered intracellular signaling. Innovation: To our knowledge, our study is the first one highlighting the effect of H2S on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic acinar cells. Moreover, a novel cascade was presumed to function via the synergistic interaction between H2S and NO. Conclusion: We conclude that H2S affects [Ca2+]i homeostasis that is mediated by H2S-evoked NO production via an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-PKG-Gq-protein-PLC-IP3 pathway to induce Ca2+ release, and this pathway is identical to the one we recently proposed for a sole effect of NO and the two gaseous molecules synergistically function to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 747–758. PMID:24138560

  1. Cytosolic Ca2+ and Ca2+-activated Cl− current dynamics: insights from two functionally distinct mouse exocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Giovannucci, David R; Bruce, Jason I. E; Straub, Stephen V; Arreola, Jorge; Sneyd, James; Shuttleworth, Trevor J; Yule, David I

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics of Ca2+ release and Ca2+-activated Cl− currents in two related, but functionally distinct exocrine cells, were studied to gain insight into how the molecular specialization of Ca2+ signalling machinery are utilized to produce different physiological endpoints: in this case, fluid or exocytotic secretion. Digital imaging and patch-clamp methods were used to monitor the temporal and spatial properties of changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) and Cl− currents following the controlled photolytic release of caged-InsP3 or caged-Ca2+. In parotid and pancreatic acinar cells, changes in [Ca2+]c and activation of a Ca2+-activated Cl− current occurred with close temporal coincidence. In parotid, a rapid global Ca2+ signal was invariably induced, even with low-level photolytic release of threshold amounts of InsP3. In pancreas, threshold stimulation generated an apically delimited [Ca2+]c signal, while a stronger stimulus induced a global [Ca2+]c signal which exhibited characteristics of a propagating wave. InsP3 was more effective in parotid, where [Ca2+]c signals initiated with shorter latency and exhibited a faster time-to-peak than in pancreas. The increased potency of InsP3 in parotid probably results from a four-fold higher number of InsP3 receptors as measured by radiolabelled InsP3 binding and western blot analysis. The Ca2+ sensitivity of the Cl− channels in parotid and pancreas was determined from the [Ca2+]-current relationship measured during a dynamic ‘Ca2+ ramp’ produced by the continuous, low-level photolysis of caged-Ca2+. In addition to a greater number of InsP3 receptors, the Cl− current density of parotid acinar cells was more than four-fold greater than that of pancreatic cells. Whereas activation of the current was tightly coupled to increases in Ca2+ in both cell types, local Ca2+ clearance was found to contribute substantially to the deactivation of the current in parotid. These data reveal specializations of

  2. Clinical imaging of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    May, G.; Gardiner, R.

    1987-01-01

    Featuring more than 300 high-quality radiographs and scan images, clinical imaging of the pancreas systematically reviews all appropriate imaging modalities for diagnosing and evaluating a variety of commonly encountered pancreatic disorders. After presenting a succinct overview of pancreatic embryology, anatomy, and physiology, the authors establish the clinical indications-including postoperative patient evaluation-for radiologic examination of the pancreas. The diagnostic capabilities and limitations of currently available imaging techniques for the pancreas are thoroughly assessed, with carefully selected illustrations depicting the types of images and data obtained using these different techniques. The review of acute and chronic pancreatitis considers the clinical features and possible complications of their variant forms and offers guidance in selecting appropriate imaging studies.

  3. Gemcitabine and AMG 479 in Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Advanced Solid Tumors; Cancer; Cancer of Pancreas; Cancer of the Pancreas; Metastases; Metastatic Cancer; Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer; Pancreas Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Bone Metastases; Endocrine Cancer; Oncology; Oncology Patients; Solid Tumors; Advanced Malignancy

  4. Juvenile Diabetes Mellitus and Concurrent Exocrine Pancreatic Insufficiency in a Labrador Retriever: Long-Term Management.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maria Saiz; Herrería-Bustillo, Vicente; Utset, Artur Font; Martínez, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    A 3 mo old, female, entire Labrador retriever presented with vomiting, diarrhea, polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and stunted growth. Diagnostics revealed the presence of juvenile diabetes mellitus and concurrent exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Pancreatic histopathology showed severe pancreatic atrophy. Successful treatment was achieved with a combination of insulin and pancreatic enzymes. This report describes successful long-term treatment of juvenile diabetes mellitus and concurrent exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in a dog. PMID:26535463

  5. Additional Resection of the Pancreas Body Prevents Postoperative Pancreas Fistula in Patients with Portal Annular Pancreas Who Undergo Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Jun; Mano, Yohei; Harada, Noboru; Uchiyama, Hideaki; Yoshizumi, Tomoharu; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shirabe, Ken; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2012-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas (PAP) is a rare variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body and surrounds the portal vein or superior mesenteric vein. Upon pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), when the pancreas is cut at the neck, two cut surfaces are created. Thus, the cut surface of the pancreas becomes larger than usual and the dorsal cut surface is behind the portal vein, therefore pancreatic fistula after PD has been reported frequently. We planned subtotal stomach-preserving PD in a 45-year-old woman with underlying insulinoma of the pancreas head. When the pancreas head was dissected, the uncinate process was extended and fused to the dorsal surface of the pancreas body. Additional resection of the pancreas body 1 cm distal to the pancreas tail to the left side of the original resection line was performed. The new cut surface became one and pancreaticojejunostomy was performed as usual. No postoperative complications such as pancreatic fistula occurred. Additional resection of the pancreas body may be a standardized procedure in patients with PAP in cases of pancreas cut surface reconstruction. PMID:22532811

  6. Lymphoepithelial Cyst of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Prabhu; Fletcher, Natalie; Kyriakides, Charis; Mears, Lisa; Kocher, Hemant M.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cyst (LEC) of the pancreas is an extremely rare, benign pancreatic cystic lesion that is difficult to differentiate preoperatively from other cystic pancreatic lesions. LEC may have malignant potential. Here, we describe a case of LEC of the pancreas – initially suspected to be a mucinous cyst neoplasm – in an elderly man presenting with abdominal pain, who went on to have a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. We also review the relevant literature and discuss implications for the diagnosis and management of this rare lesion. PMID:27403123

  7. Immunohistochemical expression of rabphilin -3A-like (Noc2) in normal and tumor tissues of human endocrine pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, C; Katkoori, VR; Jhala, NC; Grizzle, WE; Manne, U

    2009-01-01

    Involvement of rabphilin-3A-like (RPH3AL), or Noc2, the potential effector of Ras-associated binding proteins Rab3A and Rab27A in the regulation of exocytotic processes in the endocrine pancreas has been demonstrated in experimental models. Noc2 expression together with other regulatory molecules of the exocytotic machinery in human tissues, however, has not been studied. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of the key molecules of the exocytotic machinery, Noc2, Rab3A, Rab27A, and RIM2, together with the characteristic islet cell hormones, insulin and glucagon in normal and endocrine tumor tissues of human pancreas. Normal pancreatic islets were stained for all of these proteins and showed strong cytoplasmic localization. A similar pattern of strong cytoplasmic expression of these proteins was observed in the majority of endocrine tumors. By contrast, the exocrine portions of normal appearing pancreas completely lacked Rab27A staining and showed decreased expression of the proteins, Noc2, Rab3A, and RIM2. The staining pattern of Noc2 and Rab27A was similar to the staining pattern of glucagon-producing cells within the islets. The concomitant expression of Noc2 with these molecules suggests that Noc2 may serve as an effector for Rab3A and Rab27A and that it is involved in the regulation of exocytosis of the endocrine pancreas in humans. PMID:19212825

  8. Immunohistochemical expression of rabphilin-3A-like (Noc2) in normal and tumor tissues of human endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, C; Katkoori, V R; Jhala, N C; Grizzle, W E; Manne, U

    2009-04-01

    Involvement of rabphilin-3A-like (RPH3AL), or Noc2, the potential effector of Ras-associated binding proteins Rab3A and Rab27A in the regulation of exocytotic processes in the endocrine pancreas has been demonstrated in experimental models. Noc2 expression together with other regulatory molecules of the exocytotic machinery in human tissues, however, has not been studied. We evaluated immunohistochemical expression of the key molecules of the exocytotic machinery, Noc2, Rab3A, Rab27A, and RIM2, together with the characteristic islet cell hormones, insulin and glucagon in normal and endocrine tumor tissues of human pancreas. Normal pancreatic islets were stained for all of these proteins and showed strong cytoplasmic localization. A similar pattern of strong cytoplasmic expression of these proteins was observed in the majority of endocrine tumors. By contrast, the exocrine portions of normal appearing pancreas completely lacked Rab27A staining and showed decreased expression of the proteins, Noc2, Rab3A, and RIM2. The staining pattern of Noc2 and Rab27A was similar to the staining pattern of glucagon-producing cells within the islets. The concomitant expression of Noc2 with these molecules suggests that Noc2 may serve as an effector for Rab3A and Rab27A and that it is involved in the regulation of exocytosis of the endocrine pancreas in humans. PMID:19212825

  9. Thirty-day outcomes underestimate endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic resection

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pei-Wen; Dinh, Kate H.; Sullivan, Mary; Wassef, Wahid Y.; Zivny, Jaroslav; Whalen, Giles F.; LaFemina, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Background Long-term incidence of endocrine and exocrine insufficiency after pancreatectomy is poorly described. We analyze the long-term risks of pancreatic insufficiency after pancreatectomy. Methods Subjects who underwent pancreatectomy from 2002 to 2012 were identified from a prospective database (n = 227). Subjects who underwent total pancreatectomy or pancreatitis surgery were excluded. New post-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiency was defined as the need for new pharmacologic intervention within 1000 days from resection. Results 28 (16%) of 178 subjects without pre-existing endocrine insufficiency developed post-operative endocrine insufficiency: 7 (25%) did so within 30 days, 8 (29%) between 30 and 90 days, and 13 (46%) after 90 days. 94 (43%) of 214 subjects without pre-operative exocrine insufficiency developed exocrine insufficiency: 20 (21%) did so within 30 days, 29 (31%) between 30 and 90 days, and 45 (48%) after 90 days. Adjuvant radiation was associated with new endocrine insufficiency. On multivariate regression, pancreaticoduodenectomy and chemotherapy were associated with a greater risk of exocrine insufficiency. Conclusion Reporting 30-day functional outcomes for pancreatic resection is insufficient, as nearly 45% of subjects who develop disease do so after 90 days. Reporting of at least 90-day outcomes may more reliably assess risk for post-operative endocrine and exocrine insufficiency. PMID:27037206

  10. Diabetes and Pancreas: Why So Difficult? Potential Mechanisms of Elevated Serum Pancreatic Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Matteucci, Elena; Giampietro, Ottavio

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been associated with a higher risk of exocrine pancreas disorders despite inconsistencies among studies, presumably due to the presence of several (often unmeasured) confounding factors. As a direct consequence of this uncertainty, the relationship between anti-diabetic therapies and pancreatic adverse reactions is difficult to evaluate and remains far from being clarified. Indeed, the on going debate on the safety of incretin-based therapies does not lie in any definite conclusion. Serum level of amylases and lipase reflects the balance between production from different tissues and clearance, but it may be also influenced by numerous molecular, cellular, and systems mechanisms. The present review tries to provide an overview of potential biochemical pathways that may underlie pancreatic hyperenzymemia in health and diabetes mellitus. PMID:26639098

  11. Derivation of ductlike cell lines from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma of the rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, O. S.; Faris, R. A.; Bell, R. H.; Kuhlmann, E. T.; Longnecker, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two cell lines were derived from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma that had been established from a primary carcinoma of the pancreas in an azaserine-treated Lewis rat. The cultured tumor cells initially produced amylase, but production of exocrine enzymes ceased after 1-2 weeks in culture. The cultured cells were tumorigenic in Lewis rats, and one line produced solid tumors composed of ductlike structures surrounded by dense fibrous tissue. The second cell line produced partially solid and partially cystic tumors with a mixed phenotype of squamous, mucinous, and glandular areas when it grew in vivo following regrafting. Both cell lines lost structural and immunohistochemical acinar cell markers while acquiring duct cell markers during culture and regrafting. These studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that ductlike carcinomas can arise from neoplastic pancreatic acinar cells in rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8391218

  12. What difference exists in the pancreas of mammals with sanguivorous diet? A morphological, stereological and immunohistochemical study of the pancreatic islets of the hematophagous bat Diphylla ecaudata.

    PubMed

    Machado-Santos, Clarice; Aquino, Júlio César Fraulob; Mikalauka, Jefferson Simanas; Abidu-Figueiredo, Marcelo; Mendes, Rosa Maria Marcos; Sales, Armando

    2013-05-10

    Diphylla ecaudata is a vampire bat that mainly feeds on the blood of birds. This highly specialized diet - hematophagy - is accompanied by a series of morphological changes in the gastro-entero-pancreatic system, since the distribution and relative proportions of different pancreatic endocrine cell types can vary between species due to different physiological conditions and eating habits. The aim of this study was to examine for the first time the pancreas of the vampire bat D. ecaudata using morphological, stereological and immunohistochemical techniques. The pancreas of the D. ecaudata has an exocrine acinar portion in which the highest concentration of pancreatic islets is scattered. These pancreatic islets have irregular size and a mean diameter of 56.94 μm. The total number of islets in the pancreas was 23,900, with a volumetric density of 4.1%. Insulin-immunoreactive (IR) cells were located in the central pancreatic islet region and had the largest density (54.8%). Glucagon-IR cells were located mainly in the peripheral mantle region (16.2%), along with somatostatin-IR (SS) cells (14.3%). Cells immunoreactive to insulin, glucagon and somatostatin were also observed to have spread in isolated places in the exocrine pancreas. In the connective tissue near the pancreatic ducts, a high concentration was identified of insulin-IR cells and a low concentration of glucagon-IR and somatostatin-IR cells. These results indicate that although the pancreas of D. ecaudata has morphological similarities with that of other mammals, it has a differentiated islet structure, because there were a large number of islets and different volumetric densities of α, β and δ cells. PMID:23500834

  13. Perioperative Computed Tomography Assessments of the Pancreas Predict Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease After Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ohgi, Katsuhisa; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Ashida, Ryo; Ito, Takaaki; Sugiura, Teiichi; Aramaki, Takeshi; Uesaka, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) has become a clinically important issue. Although pancreatic exocrine insufficiency has been reported to be a main cause of NAFLD after PD, a clinically practical examination to assess the pancreatic exocrine function has not been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate risk factors for NAFLD after PD with a focus on perioperative computed tomography (CT) assessments of the pancreas. A retrospective review of 245 patients followed for more than 6 months after PD was conducted. We evaluated several pancreatic CT parameters, including the pancreatic parenchymal thickness, pancreatic duct-to-parenchymal ratio, pancreatic attenuation, and remnant pancreatic volume (RPV) on pre- and/or postoperative CT around 6 months after surgery. The variables, including the pancreatic CT parameters, were compared between the groups with and without NAFLD after PD. The incidence of NAFLD after PD was 19.2%. A multivariate analysis identified 5 independent risk factors for NAFLD after PD: a female gender (odds ratio [OR] 5.66, P < 0.001), RPV < 12 mL (OR 4.73, P = 0.001), preoperative pancreatic attenuation of <30 Hounsfield units (OR 4.50, P = 0.002), dissection of the right-sided nerve plexus around the superior mesenteric artery (OR 3.02, P = 0.017) and a preoperative serum carbohydrate antigen 19–9 level of ≥70 U/mL (OR 2.58, P = 0.029). Our results showed that 2 pancreatic CT parameters, the degree of preoperative pancreatic attenuation and RPV, significantly influence the development of NAFLD after PD. Perioperative CT assessments of the pancreas may be helpful for predicting NAFLD after PD. PMID:26871772

  14. Nom1 Mediates Pancreas Development by Regulating Ribosome Biogenesis in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei; Chen, Zelin; Zhang, Yihan; Yan, Ruibin; Yan, Guanrong; Li, Song; Zhong, Hanbing; Lin, Shuo

    2014-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is an important biological process for proper cellular function and development. Defects leading to improper ribosome biogenesis can cause diseases such as Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome. Nucleolar proteins are a large family of proteins and are involved in many cellular processes, including the regulation of ribosome biogenesis. Through a forward genetic screen and positional cloning, we identified and characterized a zebrafish line carrying mutation in nucleolar protein with MIF4G domain 1 (nom1), which encodes a conserved nulceolar protein with a role in pre-rRNA processing. Zebrafish nom1 mutants exhibit major defects in endoderm development, especially in exocrine pancreas. Further studies revealed that impaired proliferation of ptf1a-expressing pancreatic progenitor cells mainly contributed to the phenotype. RNA-seq and molecular analysis showed that ribosome biogenesis and pre-mRNA splicing were both affected in the mutant embryos. Several defects of ribosome assembly have been shown to have a p53-dependent mechanism. In the nom1 mutant, loss of p53 did not rescue the pancreatic defect, suggesting a p53-independent role. Further studies indicate that protein phosphatase 1 alpha, an interacting protein to Nom1, could partially rescue the pancreatic defect in nom1 morphants if a human nucleolar localization signal sequence was artificially added. This suggests that targeting Pp1α into the nucleolus by Nom1 is important for pancreatic proliferation. Altogether, our studies revealed a new mechanism involving Nom1 in controlling vertebrate exocrine pancreas formation. PMID:24967912

  15. Cholecystokinin receptors: Biochemical demonstration and autoradiographical localization in rat brain and pancreas using (/sup 3/H) cholecystokinin8 as radioligand

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dijk, A.; Richards, J.G.; Trzeciak, A.; Gillessen, D.; Moehler, H.

    1984-04-01

    Since cholecystokinin8 (CCK8) seems to be the physiological ligand of CCK receptors in the brain, it would be the most suitable probe for the characterization of CCK receptors in radioligand binding studies. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 was synthetized with a specific radioactivity sufficient for the detection of high affinity binding sites. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binds saturably and reversibly to distinct sites in rat brain and pancreas with nanomolar affinity. While the C-terminal tetrapeptide of CCK is the minimal structure required for nanomolar affinity in the brain, the entire octapeptide sequence is required for binding affinity in pancreas. Desulfated CCK8 and several gastrin-I peptides, which are likewise unsulfated, show virtually no affinity to the binding sites in pancreas but high affinity in cerebral cortex. The ligand specificity of the CCK peptides corresponds to their electrophysiological potency in the brain and their stimulation of secretion in pancreas, respectively. Autoradiographically, high densities of (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binding sites were found in cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb, medium levels in nucleus accumbens, hippocampus, dentate gyrus, and striatum with virtually no labeling in cerebellum. This pattern is similar to the distribution of CCK-like immunoreactivity in the brain. In pancreas, equally high levels of (/sup 3/H)CCK8 labeling were found in the exocrine and endocrine region. (/sup 3/H)CCK8 binding sites differ from those identified previously with (/sup 125/I)Bolton-Hunter-CCK33 by their sensitivity to guanyl nucleotides in the brain, their ion dependency in the brain, and pancreas, and their different autoradiographical localization in some parts of the brain. The distribution of CCK binding sites labeled with (/sup 3/H)CCK8 appears to correlate better with the CCK immunoreactivity than those labeled with (/sup 125/I)Bolton-Hunter-CCK33. Thus, (/sup 3/H)CCK8 appears to be the radioligand of choice for the investigation of CCK receptors.

  16. Purification and Characterization of a Population of EGFP-Expressing Cells from the Developing Pancreas of a Neurogenin3/EGFP Transgenic Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Barrow, J; Bernardo, A S; Hay, C W; Blaylock, M; Duncan, L; MacKenzie, A; McCreath, K; Kind, A J; Schnieke, A E; Colman, A; Hart, A W

    2005-01-01

    Neurogenin 3 (ngn3) is a basic helix loop helix transcription factor that is transiently expressed in the developing mouse pancreas with peak expression around E15. In mice lacking the ngn3 gene the endocrine cells of the pancreas fail to develop suggesting that the ngn3-positive cell may represent a progenitor cell for the endocrine pancreas. In order to purify and characterize this cell in detail we have generated a transgenic mouse, in which the ngn3 promoter drives expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). In the E15.5 embryo EGFP was expressed in the dorsal and ventral pancreas, the duodenum, and lower intestine as well as in the brain. This pattern of expression was in keeping with the known expression profile of the endogenous ngn3 gene. Within the pancreas EGFP was localized in close proximity to cells that stained positive for ngn3, insulin, and glucagon, but was absent from regions of the pancreas that stained positive for amylase. EGFP was also present in the pancreas at E18.5, although there was no detectable expression of ngn3. At this stage EGFP did not colocalize with any of the hormones or exocrine markers. EGFP+ cells were FACS purified (96%) from the E15 pancreas yielding ∼ 10,000 cells or 1.6% of the total pancreatic cells from one litter. RT/PCR analysis confirmed that the purified cells expressed EGFP, ngn3, insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. The ability to purify ngn3+ cells provides an invaluable source of material for charactering in detail their properties. PMID:19521525

  17. Morphology of the pancreas of some species belonging to the genera Phelsuma and Gecko (family Gekkonidae): evidence of apoptotic process during the seasonal cycle.

    PubMed

    Buono, S; Odierna, G; Putti, R

    2006-10-01

    In this study we investigated comparative morphology of the endocrine pancreas of several species belonging to the family Gekkonidae and apoptotic processes of the pancreas which may be correlated to the seasonal cycle. The following species of the family Gekkonidae were studied: Phelsuma lineata, P. madagascariensis, P. dubia, P. abotti, Gekko gecko, G. vittatus, and Geckonia chazaliae. In all these species the pancreas consisted of large and medium islets as well as endocrine cells which were scattered throughout the acinar cells. Exocrine parenchyma consisted of tubuli-acini. Four mayor cell types were identified in the endocrine pancreas, using immunocytochemistry: glucagon-immunoreactive (A) cells, insulin-immunoreactive (B) cells, somatostatin-immunoreactive (D) cells, and pancreatic polypeptide immunoreactive (PP) cells. In the endocrine pancreas the amount of A cells and B cells was either equal or a prevalence of A cells was observed. In the wet season the pancreatic morphology presented normal features with very rare apoptotic cells. The animals belonging to the genus Phelsuma taken in the dry season (July) showed numerous vacuolated, Caspase 3, 9 and 11-immunoreactive acinar and some endocrine cells containing picnotic nuclei which were positive to tunel reaction. The animals belonging to the genus Gekko taken at the end of the dry season (October) exhibited strongly vacuolated, Caspase 3, 9 and 11-immunoreactive endocrine and some acinar cells containing nuclei which were positive to tunel reaction. These apoptosis events could be a reaction in response to stress mechanisms, such as a starvation period during the dry season. PMID:16763810

  18. 33 CFR 151.2015 - Is a vessel in innocent passage exempt from the mandatory requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Is a vessel in innocent passage exempt from the mandatory requirements? 151.2015 Section 151.2015 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... SUBSTANCES, GARBAGE, MUNICIPAL OR COMMERCIAL WASTE, AND BALLAST WATER Ballast Water Management for Control...

  19. Redefining the Legacy of Mina Shaughnessy: A Critique of the Politics of Linguistic Innocence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lu, Min-zhan

    1991-01-01

    Argues that Mina Shaughnessy's view of language as a politically innocent vehicle of meaning overlooks basic writers' need to confront the dissonance they experience between academic and other discourses. Suggests educators need to abandon the limitations of the essentialist view of language informing their pedagogy. (KEH)

  20. Too Late for Luck: A Comparison of Post-Furman Exonerations and Executions of the Innocent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmon, Talia Roitberg; Lofquist, William S.

    2005-01-01

    This study is a quantitative analysis designed to compare two groups of factually innocent capital defendants: those who were exonerated and those who were executed. There are a total of 97 cases in the sample, including 81 exonerations and 16 executions. The primary objective of the authors is to identify factors that may predict case outcomes…

  1. The penology of racial innocence: the erasure of racism in the study and practice of punishment.

    PubMed

    Murakawa, Naomi; Beckett, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    In post–civil rights America, the ascendance of “law-and-order” politics and “postracial” ideology have given rise to what we call the penology of racial innocence. The penology of racial innocence is a framework for assessing the role of race in penal policies and institutions, one that begins with the presumption that criminal justice is innocent of racial power until proven otherwise. Countervailing sociolegal changes render this framework particularly problematic. On the one hand, the definition of racism has contracted in antidiscrimination law and in many social scientific studies of criminal justice, so that racism is defined narrowly as intentional and causally discrete harm. On the other hand, criminal justice institutions have expanded to affect historically unprecedented numbers of people of color, with penal policies broadening in ways that render the identification of racial intent and causation especially difficult. Analyses employing the penology of racial innocence examine the ever-expanding criminal justice system with limited definitions of racism, ultimately contributing to the erasure of racial power. Both racism and criminal justice operate in systemic and serpentine ways; our conceptual tools and methods, therefore, need to be equally systemic and capacious. PMID:21132957

  2. Guilty Knowledge versus Innocent Associations: Effects of Trait Anxiety and Stimulus Context on Skin Conductance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesen, Martin; Rollison, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    Simulated lie detection procedure investigated skin conductance responsivity among self-reported skin responders. Subjects grouped by trait anxiety engaged in mock crime providing "guilty knowledge" or in neutral activity providing "innocent associations" and were interrogated using Lykken's Guilty Knowledge technique. Substantial relationship was…

  3. Lost Innocent and Sacrificial Delegate: The JonBenet Ramsey Murder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conrad, Joann

    1999-01-01

    Analyzes murder case of 6-year-old JonBenet Ramsey as emblematic of American cultural fascination with images of the innocence of children and the perfect family, and of a change in cultural self-awareness as these images prove illusionary. Considers the role of mass media in marketing a cultural fascination with sexualized images of children and…

  4. Literature and the Teaching of Culture: The Example of Roger Ikor's "Le Tourniquet des innocents."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Richard G.

    1983-01-01

    Roger Ikor's 1972 novel "Le Tourniquet des innocents" is proposed for advanced university-level French culture courses, illustrating how the study of a contemporary novel can be integrated into cultural education. Classroom activities suggested include text analyses, study of cultural themes, and preparation of a lexicon featuring cultural…

  5. Responding to "Innocent" Racism: Educating Teachers in Politically Reflexive and Dialogic Engagement in Local Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pirbhai-Illich, Fatima; Austin, Theresa; Paugh, Patricia; Farino, Yvonne

    2011-01-01

    This article develops the construct of "innocent racism" and argues for keeping questions of race central in teacher education. The authors report three cases in which they, teacher educators working within a school/university alliance, identified and addressed racism in their courses. We situate our analyses within antiracist research informed by…

  6. VAMP8/Endobrevin as a General Vesicular SNARE for Regulated Exocytosis of the Exocrine System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cheng-Chun; Shi, Hong; Guo, Ke; Ng, Chee Peng; Li, Jie; Qi Gan, Bin; Chien Liew, Hwee; Leinonen, Jukka; Rajaniemi, Hannu; Hong Zhou, Zhi; Zeng, Qi

    2007-01-01

    The molecular mechanism governing the regulated secretion of most exocrine tissues remains elusive, although VAMP8/endobrevin has recently been shown to be the major vesicular SNARE (v-SNARE) of zymogen granules of pancreatic exocrine acinar cells. In this article, we have characterized the role of VAMP8 in the entire exocrine system. Immunohistochemical studies showed that VAMP8 is expressed in all examined exocrine tissues such as salivary glands, lacrimal (tear) glands, sweat glands, sebaceous glands, mammary glands, and the prostate. Severe anomalies were observed in the salivary and lacrimal glands of VAMP8-null mice. Mutant salivary glands accumulated amylase and carbonic anhydrase VI. Electron microscopy revealed an accumulation of secretory granules in the acinar cells of mutant parotid and lacrimal glands. Pilocarpine-stimulated secretion of saliva proteins was compromised in the absence of VAMP8. Protein aggregates were observed in mutant lacrimal glands. VAMP8 may interact with syntaxin 4 and SNAP-23. These results suggest that VAMP8 may act as a v-SNARE for regulated secretion of the entire exocrine system. PMID:17215514

  7. Pancreas donation for islet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frutos, M A; Ruiz, P; Mansilla, J J

    2005-04-01

    Islet transplantation, though still in the experimental phase, is a therapeutic option that has opened new expectations for the control of diabetes mellitus. Initial results are encouraging for the significant advantages compared with whole pancreas transplantation for selected patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, with or without kidney failure. However, the success of transplantation, both at centers with more experience and others with less, is limited by the difficulty in obtaining a suitable number of donors and by laboratory isolation techniques. Significant advances require changes in donor selection, perfusion, oxygenation, and transfer of the pancreas, and in the process of isolation, purification, and culture in the laboratory. Of the 32 pancreases sent to the islet isolation laboratory from different hospitals in Andalusia, a viable percentage of islets was finally available in 19. However, in only 4 (18%) procedures were the preparations considered optimal for implantation in 2 recipients. PMID:15866673

  8. Wearable and implantable pancreas substitutes.

    PubMed

    Ricotti, Leonardo; Assaf, Tareq; Dario, Paolo; Menciassi, Arianna

    2013-03-01

    A lifelong-implanted and completely automated artificial or bioartificial pancreas (BAP) is the holy grail for type 1 diabetes treatment, and could be a definitive solution even for other severe pathologies, such as pancreatitis and pancreas cancer. Technology has made several important steps forward in the last years, providing new hope for the realization of such devices, whose feasibility is strictly connected to advances in glucose sensor technology, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal insulin pump development, the design of closed-loop control algorithms for mechatronic pancreases, as well as cell and tissue engineering and cell encapsulation for biohybrid pancreases. Furthermore, smart integration of the mentioned components and biocompatibility issues must be addressed, bearing in mind that, for mechatronic pancreases, it is most important to consider how to recharge implanted batteries and refill implanted insulin reservoirs without requiring periodic surgical interventions. This review describes recent advancements in technologies and concepts related to artificial and bioartificial pancreases, and assesses how far we are from a lifelong-implanted and self-working pancreas substitute that can fully restore the quality of life of a diabetic (or other type of) patient. PMID:22990986

  9. Queen Specific Exocrine Glands in Legionary Ants and Their Possible Function in Sexual Selection

    PubMed Central

    Hölldobler, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The colonies of army ants and some other legionary ant species have single, permanently wingless queens with massive post petioles and large gasters. Such highly modified queens are called dichthadiigynes. This paper presents the unusually rich exocrine gland endowment of dichthadiigynes, which is not found in queens of other ant species. It has been suggested these kinds of glands produce secretions that attract and maintain worker retinues around queens, especially during migration. However, large worker retinues also occur in non-legionary species whose queens do not have such an exuberance of exocrine glands. We argue and present evidence in support of our previously proposed hypothesis that the enormous outfit of exocrine glands found in dichthadiigynes is due to sexual selection mediated by workers as the main selecting agents. PMID:26986740

  10. Queen Specific Exocrine Glands in Legionary Ants and Their Possible Function in Sexual Selection.

    PubMed

    Hölldobler, Bert

    2016-01-01

    The colonies of army ants and some other legionary ant species have single, permanently wingless queens with massive post petioles and large gasters. Such highly modified queens are called dichthadiigynes. This paper presents the unusually rich exocrine gland endowment of dichthadiigynes, which is not found in queens of other ant species. It has been suggested these kinds of glands produce secretions that attract and maintain worker retinues around queens, especially during migration. However, large worker retinues also occur in non-legionary species whose queens do not have such an exuberance of exocrine glands. We argue and present evidence in support of our previously proposed hypothesis that the enormous outfit of exocrine glands found in dichthadiigynes is due to sexual selection mediated by workers as the main selecting agents. PMID:26986740

  11. Monitoring of canine pancreas allograft function with measurements of urinary amylase.

    PubMed

    Ekberg, H; Deane, S A; Allen, R D; Hawthorne, W J; Williamson, P; Grierson, J M; Stewart, G J; Little, J M

    1988-07-01

    A canine model of whole pancreas transplantation with pancreaticocystostomy was studied for predictability of graft rejection using urinary amylase (UA) monitoring. Six pancreatectomized dogs were transplanted without immunosuppression and with acute rejection occurring at a median of 9.5 days (range 7-12 days). A differential loss of allograft exocrine and endocrine function was demonstrated, with a gradual decrease in UA after transplantation but maintenance of fasting blood glucose levels (FBGL) till the day before complete loss of graft structure. Another 13 dogs treated with cyclosporin (25 mg/kg per day) had prolonged graft survival (P less than 0.01) with an actuarial median survival of 91 days (range 8-159 days). Five allografts were lost because of rejection and eight dogs died with functioning grafts. Fasting spot levels of UA less than 5000 iu/l or less than 10,000 iu/l had a positive predictivity of graft failure of 71% or 31%, respectively. Falls of UA levels of greater than 75% in 24 h and 48 h were seen equally in both rejecting and functioning allografts. This study confirmed the role of UA as an earlier marker of rejection than FBGL. The clinical role of UA will be important, but its use as a predictor of pancreas rejection may be dependent on a fall to a predetermined level rather than the rate of fall. PMID:2473736

  12. Application of Rotating Wall Vessel (RWV) Cell Culture for Pancreas Islet Cell Transplantation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutzky, Lynne P.

    1998-01-01

    Type I insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both pediatric and adult populations, despite significant advances in medical management. While insulin therapy treats symptoms of acute diabetes, it fails to prevent chronic complications such as microvascular disease, blindness, neuropathy, and chronic renal failure. Strict control of blood glucose concentrations delays but does not prevent the onset and progression of secondary complications. Although, whole pancreas transplantation restores physiological blood glucose levels, a continuous process of allograft rejection causes vascular and exocrine-related complications. Recent advances in methods for isolation and purification of pancreatic islets make transplantation of islet allografts an attractive alternative to whole pancreas transplantation. However, immunosuppressive drugs are necessary to prevent rejection of islet allografts and many of these drugs are known to be toxic to the islets. Since auto-transplants of isolated islets following total pancreatectomy survive and function in vivo, it is apparent that a major obstacle to successful clinical islet transplantation is the immunogenicity of the islet allografts.

  13. Clonal identification of multipotent precursors from adult mouse pancreas that generate neural and pancreatic lineages.

    PubMed

    Seaberg, Raewyn M; Smukler, Simon R; Kieffer, Timothy J; Enikolopov, Grigori; Asghar, Zeenat; Wheeler, Michael B; Korbutt, Gregory; van der Kooy, Derek

    2004-09-01

    The clonal isolation of putative adult pancreatic precursors has been an elusive goal of researchers seeking to develop cell replacement strategies for diabetes. We report the clonal identification of multipotent precursor cells from the adult mouse pancreas. The application of a serum-free, colony-forming assay to pancreatic cells enabled the identification of precursors from pancreatic islet and ductal populations. These cells proliferate in vitro to form clonal colonies that coexpress neural and pancreatic precursor markers. Upon differentiation, individual clonal colonies produce distinct populations of neurons and glial cells, pancreatic endocrine beta-, alpha- and delta-cells, and pancreatic exocrine and stellate cells. Moreover, the newly generated beta-like cells demonstrate glucose-dependent Ca(2+) responsiveness and insulin release. Pancreas colonies do not express markers of embryonic stem cells, nor genes suggestive of mesodermal or neural crest origins. These cells represent a previously unidentified adult intrinsic pancreatic precursor population and are a promising candidate for cell-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:15322557

  14. ATP release, generation and hydrolysis in exocrine pancreatic duct cells.

    PubMed

    Kowal, J M; Yegutkin, G G; Novak, I

    2015-12-01

    -inactivating and nucleotide-phosphorylating ecto-enzymes. We suggest that extracellular ATP homeostasis in pancreatic ducts may be important in pancreas physiology and potentially in pancreas pathophysiology. PMID:26431833

  15. Exocrine pancreatic response to intraduodenal fatty acids and fats in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Navas, J M; Calvo, J J; López, M A; De Dios, I

    1993-05-01

    1. The exocrine pancreatic secretion in rabbits after intraduodenal perfusion of, respectively, a short-chain fatty acid (propionate), a long-chain fatty acid (oleate) and a neutral fat (intralipid) has been studied. 2. Only the neutral fat and the long-chain fatty acid stimulated the hydroelectrolyte fraction of exocrine pancreatic secretion in a dose-related fashion, but this response was not mediated by secretin release. 3. Acinar secretion was more effectively stimulated after propionate perfusion than by oleate and this was governed by different mechanisms. 4. Neutral fat, without predigestion, stimulated the pancreatic enzyme secretion in the rabbit. PMID:8099868

  16. Differences in the readiness of guilty and informed innocent examinees to cooperate on the Guilty Action Test.

    PubMed

    Elaad, Eitan

    2014-01-01

    A mock crime experiment was designed in which 100 participants were randomly assigned to five conditions: four experimental conditions in a 2 × 2 factorial design (two guilt conditions-guilty or informed innocents, crossed with two incentive level conditions-with or without a promised reward for proving innocence), and one control condition of uninformed innocents. Along with the common dependent polygraph measures, attitudes towards cooperating with the test were assessed. Results indicated that the informed innocents preferred to cooperate whereas guilty participants preferred to try and obstruct the test. These tendencies were amplified among participants who were promised a reward. The cooperative choice attenuated electrodermal responses to the critical items. Respiration measures were sensitive to the incentive level manipulation. Implications of the results for future research and for actual detection of information tests were discussed. PMID:24020868

  17. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Derek T; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick; Kudva, Yogish C

    2015-09-01

    Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  18. Cybersecurity in Artificial Pancreas Experiments

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Derek T.; Maraka, Spyridoula; Basu, Ananda; Keith-Hynes, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Medical devices have transformed modern health care, and ongoing experimental medical technology trials (such as the artificial pancreas) have the potential to significantly improve the treatment of several chronic conditions, including diabetes mellitus. However, we suggest that, to date, the essential concept of cybersecurity has not been adequately addressed in this field. This article discusses several key issues of cybersecurity in medical devices and proposes some solutions. In addition, it outlines the current requirements and efforts of regulatory agencies to increase awareness of this topic and to improve cybersecurity. PMID:25923544

  19. Design of a bioartificial pancreas+

    PubMed Central

    Opara, Emmanuel C.; Mirmalek-Sani, Sayed-Hadi; Khanna, Omaditya; Moya, Monica L; Brey, Eric M.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In Type 1 diabetes, the β-cells that secrete insulin have been destroyed such that daily exogenous insulin administration is required for the control of blood sugar in individuals afflicted with the disease. Following the development of reliable techniques for the isolation of islets from the human pancreas, islet transplantation has emerged as a therapeutic option, albeit, for only a few selected patients largely because there are not enough islets for the millions of patients requiring the treatment, and there is also the need to use immunosuppressive drugs to prevent transplant rejection. In 1980, the concept of islet immunoisolation by microencapsulation was introduced as a technique to overcome these two major barriers to islet transplantation. Microencapsulation of islets and transplantation in the peritoneal cavity was then described as a bioartificial pancreas. However, it is difficult to retrieve encapsulated islets transplanted in the peritoneal cavity, thus making it difficult to meet all the criteria for a bioartificial pancreas. A new design of a bioartificial pancreas comprising islets co-encapsulated with angiogenic protein in perm-selective multilayer alginate-poly-L-ornithine-alginate (APA) microcapsules and transplanted in an omentum pouch is described in this paper. Materials & Methods The multilayer APA microcapsules are made with ultrapure alginate using poly-L-ornithine as a semi-permeable membrane separating the two alginate layers. The inner alginate layer is used to encapsulate the islets and the outer layer is used to encapsulate angiogenic protein, which would induce neovascularization around the graft within the omentum pouch. Results In in vitro studies, we found that both the wild-type and the heparin binding-growth associated molecule (HBGAM)-FGF-1 chimera can be encapsulated and released in a controlled and sustained manner from the outer alginate layer with a mean diameter in the range of 113–164 microns when 1

  20. Serotonin promotes acinar dedifferentiation following pancreatitis-induced regeneration in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Saponara, Enrica; Grabliauskaite, Kamile; Bombardo, Marta; Buzzi, Raphael; Silva, Alberto B; Malagola, Ermanno; Tian, Yinghua; Hehl, Adrian B; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seleznik, Gitta M; Zabel, Anja; Reding, Theresia; Sonda, Sabrina; Graf, Rolf

    2015-12-01

    The exocrine pancreas exhibits a distinctive capacity for tissue regeneration and renewal following injury. This regenerative ability has important implications for a variety of disorders, including pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, diseases associated with high morbidity and mortality. Thus, understanding its underlying mechanisms may help in developing therapeutic interventions. Serotonin has been recognized as a potent mitogen for a variety of cells and tissues. Here we investigated whether serotonin exerts a mitogenic effect in pancreatic acinar cells in three regenerative models, inflammatory tissue injury following pancreatitis, tissue loss following partial pancreatectomy, and thyroid hormone-stimulated acinar proliferation. Genetic and pharmacological techniques were used to modulate serotonin levels in vivo. Acinar dedifferentiation and cell cycle progression during the regenerative phase were investigated over the course of 2 weeks. By comparing acinar proliferation in the different murine models of regeneration, we found that serotonin did not affect the clonal regeneration of mature acinar cells. Serotonin was, however, required for acinar dedifferentiation following inflammation-mediated tissue injury. Specifically, lack of serotonin resulted in delayed up-regulation of progenitor genes and delayed the formation of acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and defective acinar cell proliferation. We identified serotonin-dependent acinar secretion as a key step in progenitor-based regeneration, as it promoted acinar cell dedifferentiation and the recruitment of type 2 macrophages. Finally, we identified a regulatory Hes1-Ptfa axis in the uninjured adult pancreas, activated by zymogen secretion. Our findings indicated that serotonin plays a critical role in the regeneration of the adult pancreas following pancreatitis by promoting the dedifferentiation of acinar cells. PMID:26235267

  1. ESPGHAN and NASPGHAN Report on the Assessment of Exocrine Pancreatic Function and Pancreatitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Christopher J; Chen, Kathy; Horvath, Karoly; Hughes, David; Lowe, Mark E; Mehta, Devendra; Orabi, Abrahim I; Screws, Jeremy; Thomson, Mike; Van Biervliet, Stephanie; Verkade, Henkjan J; Husain, Sohail Z; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this clinical report is to discuss several recent advances in assessing exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and pancreatitis in children, to review the array of pancreatic function tests, to provide an update on the inherited causes of EPI, with special emphasis on newly available genetic testing, and to review newer methods for evaluating pancreatitis. PMID:25915425

  2. EXOCRINE PANCREATIC NEOPLASMS IN THE MUMMICHOG (FUNDULUS HETEROCLITUS) FROM A CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A high prevalence of exocrine pancreatic neoplasms occurred in mummichog, Fundulus heteroclitus, from a creosote-contaminated site in the Elizabeth River, Virginia. otal of 20 neoplasms occurred in a group of about 1 100 fish evaluated histologically. f 240 adult fish collected d...

  3. Common spectrum of polypeptides occurs in secretion granule membranes of different exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R.S.; Cameron, P.L.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    A highly purified membrane preparation from rat parotid secretion granules has been used as a comparative probe to examine the extent of compositional overlap in granule membranes of three other exocrine secretory tissues - pancreatic, lacrimal, and submandibular - from several standpoints. First, indirect immunofluorescent studies using a polyclonal polyspecific anti-parotid granule membrane antiserum has indicated a selective staining of granule membrane profiles in all acinar cells of all tissues. Second, highly purified granule membrane subfractions have been isolated from each exocrine tissue; comparative two-dimensional (isoelectric focusing; SDS) PAGE of radioiodinated granule membranes has identified 10-15 polypeptides of identical pI and apparent molecular mass. These species are likely to be integral membrane components since they are not extracted by either saponin-sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate (pH 11.5) treatments, and they do not have counterparts in the granule content. Finally, the identity among selected parotid and pancreatic radioiodinated granule membrane polypeptides has been documented using two-dimensional peptide mapping of chymotryptic and tryptic digests. These findings clearly indicate that exocrine secretory granules, irrespective of the nature of stored secretion, comprise a type of vesicular carrier with a common (and probably refined) membrane composition. Conceivably, the polypeptides identified carry out general functions related to exocrine secretion.

  4. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of the “precision-medicine” paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  5. Molecular therapeutics in pancreas cancer.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Vignesh; Weekes, Colin D

    2016-04-15

    The emergence of the "precision-medicine" paradigm in oncology has ushered in tremendous improvements in patient outcomes in a wide variety of malignancies. However, pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has remained an obstinate challenge to the oncology community and continues to be associated with a dismal prognosis with 5-year survival rates consistently less than 5%. Cytotoxic chemotherapy with gemcitabine-based regimens has been the cornerstone of treatment in PDAC especially because most patients present with inoperable disease. But in recent years remarkable basic science research has improved our understanding of the molecular and genetic basis of PDAC. Whole genomic analysis has exemplified the genetic heterogeneity of pancreas cancer and has led to ingenious efforts to target oncogenes and their downstream signaling cascades. Novel stromal depletion strategies have been devised based on our enhanced recognition of the complex architecture of the tumor stroma and the various mechanisms in the tumor microenvironment that sustain tumorigenesis. Immunotherapy using vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has also risen to the forefront of therapeutic strategies against PDAC. Furthermore, adoptive T cell transfer and strategies to target epigenetic regulators are being explored with enthusiasm. This review will focus on the recent advances in molecularly targeted therapies in PDAC and offer future perspectives to tackle this lethal disease. PMID:27096032

  6. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in a patient with cervical cancer: relation of E-cadherin/β-catenin adhesion complex in their carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vijay, Adarsh; Ram, Lakshmi; Mathew, Renol Koshy; Chawdhery, Muhammad Zafar

    2015-01-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT) of the pancreas is one of the most uncommon histotypes of all exocrine pancreatic neoplasms. Disorganization of E-cadherin and β-catenin mutations, two key components of the Wnt signal transduction pathway, has been implicated in the development of SPT, but not other pancreatic tumors. Loss of E-cadherin/β-catenin proteins and tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin/β-catenin have been postulated in cervical carcinogenesis and cancer invasion. A 38-year-old married woman, who had undergone brachytherapy, radiotherapy and chemotherapy for cervical cancer in Philippines in 2011, was admitted to our hospital after follow-up CT scan of abdomen in 2012 revealed a lesion in the tail of pancreas. The patient underwent distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy. The pathological diagnosis was SPT of pancreas. We suspect that the concurrent SPT pancreas and cervical cancer in this woman were triggered by a primary insult, a process in which E-cadherin/β-catenin/Wnt-signaling pathway played important roles. PMID:25848087

  7. Possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly

    PubMed Central

    Kin, Tatsuya; Korbutt, Gregory S.; Shapiro, A.M. James

    2012-01-01

    We report on the incidental observation of ectopic pancreas in a donor for islet cell transplantation. The donor’s clinical and imaging presentation was definitive for holoprosencephaly. This case report discusses a possible link between ectopic pancreas and holoprosencephaly. PMID:22688061

  8. Pancreas Transplantation: An Alarming Crisis in Confidence.

    PubMed

    Stratta, R J; Gruessner, A C; Odorico, J S; Fridell, J A; Gruessner, R W G

    2016-09-01

    In the past decade, the annual number of pancreas transplantations performed in the United States has steadily declined. From 2004 to 2011, the overall number of simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplantations in the United States declined by 10%, whereas the decreases in pancreas after kidney (PAK) and pancreas transplant alone (PTA) procedures were 55% and 34%, respectively. Paradoxically, this has occurred in the setting of improvements in graft and patient survival outcomes and transplanting higher-risk patients. Only 11 centers in the United States currently perform ≥20 pancreas transplantations per year, and most centers perform <5 pancreas transplantations annually; many do not perform PAKs or PTAs. This national trend in decreasing numbers of pancreas transplantations is related to a number of factors including lack of a primary referral source, improvements in diabetes care and management, changing donor and recipient considerations, inadequate training opportunities, and increasing risk aversion because of regulatory scrutiny. A national initiative is needed to "reinvigorate" SPK and PAK procedures as preferred transplantation options for appropriately selected uremic patients taking insulin regardless of C-peptide levels or "type" of diabetes. Moreover, many patients may benefit from PTAs because all categories of pancreas transplantation are not only life enhancing but also life extending procedures. PMID:27232750

  9. The innocent landowner defense under CERCLA should be transferable to subsequent purchasers

    SciTech Connect

    Spertus, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    Under CERCLA, landowners are held strictly liable for cleaning up hazardous substances on their property. Purchasers who acquire title to contaminated property become liable for cleanup costs by virtue of their status as the current owner. Although liability under the Act is strict, joint, and several, a few limited defenses enable some landowners to avoid liability altogether. One such defense, known as the innocent landowner defense, is the subject of this article.

  10. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Andrew R; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision. PMID:26628714

  11. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Andrew R.; Newman, Elliot; Hajdu, Cristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFTs) are rare mesenchymal neoplasms of fibroblastic origin. Most commonly they affect the pleura but they been described in other viscera. SFT of the pancreas is extremely rare, and only eight cases have been reported to date. We perform a literature review and report a ninth case. The patient is a 54-year-old African-American female who presented with several months of abdominal pain. Abdominal radiography demonstrated a lesion in the head of the pancreas, and she underwent a Whipple operation. Pathology demonstrated SFT of the pancreas. She is alive and well 1 year post-operatively. SFT of the pancreas predominately affects middle-aged women. These tumors are difficult to distinguish radiologically from neuroendocrine tumors. While SFT of the pancreas tend to have an indolent course, there is the potential for malignancy. We recommend complete surgical excision. PMID:26628714

  12. Glucagon in the Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  13. Robotic surgery of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Daniel; Morris-Stiff, Gareth; Falk, Gavin A; El-Hayek, Kevin; Chalikonda, Sricharan; Walsh, R Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery is one of the most challenging and complex fields in general surgery. While minimally invasive surgery has become the standard of care for many intra-abdominal pathologies the overwhelming majority of pancreatic surgery is performed in an open fashion. This is attributed to the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas, its intimate relationship to major vasculature and the complexity of reconstruction in the case of pancreatoduodenectomy. Herein, we describe the application of robotic technology to minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. The unique capabilities of the robotic platform have made the minimally invasive approach feasible and safe with equivalent if not better outcomes (e.g., decreased length of stay, less surgical site infections) to conventional open surgery. However, it is unclear whether the robotic approach is truly superior to traditional laparoscopy; this is a key point given the substantial costs associated with procuring and maintaining robotic capabilities. PMID:25356035

  14. Impact of high dietary zinc on zinc accumulation, enzyme activity and proteomic profiles in the pancreas of piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R; Martin, L; Schunter, N; Villodre Tudela, C; Weise, C; Klopfleisch, R; Zentek, J; Einspanier, R; Bondzio, A

    2015-04-01

    The exocrine pancreas plays an important role in zinc homeostasis. Feeding very high (2000-3000mgzinc/kg diet) levels of zinc oxide to piglets for short periods is a common practice in the swine industry to improve performance and prevent diseases. The impact on pancreatic function and possible side effects during long-term feeding of high dietary zinc levels are still poorly understood. A total of 54 weaned piglets were either fed with low (57mg/kg, LZn), normal (164mg/kg, NZn) or high (2425mg/kg, HZn) zinc concentration in the diets. After 4 weeks of feeding, ten piglets per treatment were euthanized and pancreas samples were taken. Tissue zinc concentration and metallothionein abundance was greater with HZn compared with NZn and LZn (P<0.05). Similarly, activity of α-amylase, lipase, trypsin and chymotrypsin was higher with HZn as compared with NZn and LZn diets (P<0.05), whereas elastase activity was unchanged. Total trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity of pancreas tissue was higher with HZn diets compared with the other treatments (P<0.05). Pancreatic protein profiles of NZn and HZn fed piglets were obtained by 2D-DIGE technique and revealed 15 differentially expressed proteins out of 2100 detected spots (P<0.05). The differentially expressed proteins aldose reductase, eukaryotic elongation factor II and peroxiredoxin III were confirmed by immunoblotting. Identified proteins include zinc finger-containing transcription factors and proteins mainly associated with oxidative stress response and signal transduction in HZn compared with NZn pigs. Histologic examination however showed no morphologic changes. The results suggest that long-term supply of very high dietary zinc increases zinc and metallothionein concentration, and digestive enzyme activity, but also triggers oxidative stress reactions in the pancreas of young pigs. The data provide new insights into pancreatic function under outbalanced zinc homeostasis. PMID:25744507

  15. [Surgical treatment of benign, premalignant and low-risk tumors of the pancreas : Standard resection or parenchyma preserving, local extirpation].

    PubMed

    Beger, H G

    2016-07-01

    Cystic neoplasms and neuroendocrine adenomas of the pancreas are detected increasingly more frequently and in up to 50 % as asymptomatic tumors. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, mucinous cystic neoplasms and solid pseudopapillary neoplasms are considered to be premalignant lesions with different rates of malignant transformation. The most frequent neuroendocrine adenomas are insulinomas. Neuroendocrine adenomas are considered to be potentially malignant, inherent to the lesion and development is unpredictable. Standard surgical treatment for pancreatic tumors are the Kausch-Whipple resection, left hemipancreatectomy and total pancreatectomy depending on the location; however, the application of standard surgical procedures, which are usually multiorgan resections for benign, premalignant and low-risk cancers of the pancreas have to be balanced against the risk for early postoperative morbidity, hospital mortality of 1.5-7 % and loss of endocrine and exocrine pancreatic functions in 12-30 %. Tumor enucleation, pancreatic middle segment resection and duodenum-preserving total pancreatic head (DPPHR-T/S) resection are parenchyma-preserving, local resection procedures, which are associated with a low early postoperative rate of severe complications, hospital mortality up to 1.3 % and maintenance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic functions in more than 90 %. Tumor enucleation bears the risk of pancreatic fistulas (<33 %) and a limitation is proximity to the pancreatic main duct. The main risk for pancreatic middle segment resection is early postoperative pancreatic fistulas (up to 40 %), early postoperative intra-abdominal hemorrhage and a reintervention frequency up to 15 %. The DPPHR-T/S resection is applied for cystic neoplastic lesions in 90 %, severe postoperative complications are below 15 % and the 90-day hospital mortality is 0.5 %. Pancreatic fistulas are observed in less than 20 % with a recurrence rate of <1 %. These

  16. What You Need to Know about Cancer of the Pancreas

    MedlinePlus

    ... You Need To Know About™ Cancer of the Pancreas This booklet is about cancer of the pancreas, also called pancreatic cancer. There are two main ... care. This booklet covers: The anatomy of the pancreas and basics about cancer of the pancreas Treatments ...

  17. How Innocent are Potentially Redox Non-Innocent Ligands? Electronic Structure and Metal Oxidation States in Iron-PNN Complexes as a Representative Case Study.

    PubMed

    Butschke, Burkhard; Fillman, Kathlyn L; Bendikov, Tatyana; Shimon, Linda J W; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Leitus, Gregory; Gorelsky, Serge I; Neidig, Michael L; Milstein, David

    2015-05-18

    Herein we present a series of new α-iminopyridine-based iron-PNN pincer complexes [FeBr2LPNN] (1), [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), [Fe(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (3), [Fe(F)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (4), and [Fe(H)(CO)2LPNN](BF4) (5) with formal oxidation states ranging from Fe(0) to Fe(II) (LPNN = 2-[(di-tert-butylphosphino)methyl]-6-[1-(2,4,6-mesitylimino)ethyl]pyridine). The complexes were characterized by a variety of methods including (1)H, (13)C, (15)N, and (31)P NMR, IR, Mössbauer, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy, SQUID magnetometry, and X-ray crystallography, focusing on the assignment of the metal oxidation states. Ligand structural features suggest that the α-iminopyridine ligand behaves as a redox non-innocent ligand in some of these complexes, particularly in [Fe(CO)2LPNN] (2), in which it appears to adopt the monoanionic form. In addition, the NMR spectroscopic features ((13)C, (15)N) indicate the accumulation of charge density on parts of the ligand for 2. However, a combination of spectroscopic measurements that more directly probe the iron oxidation state (e.g., XPS), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and electronic absorption studies combined with time-dependent DFT calculations support the description of the metal atom in 2 as Fe(0). We conclude from our studies that ligand structural features, while useful in many assignments of ligand redox non-innocence, may not always accurately reflect the ligand charge state and, hence, the metal oxidation state. For complex 2, the ligand structural changes are interpreted in terms of strong back-donation from the metal center to the ligand as opposed to electron transfer. PMID:25918944

  18. Murine nonvolatile pheromones: isolation of exocrine-gland secreting Peptide 1.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Hiroko; Touhara, Kazushige

    2013-01-01

    Our search for a substance recognized by the vomeronasal neurons revealed that the extra-orbital lacrimal gland (ELG) isolated from adult male mice produced the male-specific peptide pheromone exocrine gland-secreting peptide 1 (ESP1). The following protocol reveals how ESP1 may be extracted from the ELG, purified using anion-exchange and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and analyzed by mass spectrometry. This protocol has been specifically designed for the purification of ESP1, but may be modified to isolate a variety of peptides from the exocrine glands. Peptides purified in this manner may help further define the molecular mechanisms underlying pheromone communication in the vomeronasal system. PMID:24014353

  19. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yuepeng; Bai, Yongyu; Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  20. Reduced Pancreatic Exocrine Function and Organellar Disarray in a Canine Model of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Bhugul, Pravin Avinash; Huang, Xince; Liu, Lewei; Pan, Liangliang; Ni, Haizhen; Chen, Bicheng; Sun, Hongwei; Zhang, Qiyu; Hehir, Michael; Zhou, Mengtao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pancreatic exocrine function in a canine model and to analyze the changes in organelles of pancreatic acinar cells during the early stage of acute pancreatitis (AP). AP was induced by retrograde injection of 5% sodium taurocholate (0.5 ml/kg) into the main pancreatic duct of dogs. The induction of AP resulted in serum hyperamylasemia and a marked reduction of amylase activity in the pancreatic fluid (PF). The pancreatic exocrine function was markedly decreased in subjects with AP compared with the control group. After the induction of AP, histological examination showed acinar cell edema, cytoplasmic vacuolization, fibroblasts infiltration, and inflammatory cell infiltration in the interstitium. Electron micrographs after the induction of AP revealed that most of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were dilated and that some of the ribosomes were no longer located on the RER. The mitochondria were swollen, with shortened and broken cristae. The present study demonstrated, in a canine model, a reduced volume of PF secretion with decreased enzyme secretion during the early stage of AP. Injury of mitochondria and dilatation and degranulation of RER may be responsible for the reduced exocrine function in AP. Furthermore, the present model and results may be useful for researching novel therapeutic measures in AP. PMID:26895040

  1. Cystic lesions of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K.

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  2. Cystic lesions of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Karoumpalis, Ioannis; Christodoulou, Dimitrios K

    2016-01-01

    Different types of benign or malignant cystic lesions can be observed in the pancreas. Pancreatic cystic lesions are classified under pathology terms into simple retention cysts, pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms. Mucinous cystic neoplasm is a frequent type of cystic neoplasm and has a malignant potential. Serous cystadenoma follows in frequency and is usually benign. Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are the most commonly resected cystic pancreatic neoplasms characterized by dilated segments of the main pancreatic duct and/or side branches, the wall of which is covered by mucus secreting cells. These neoplasms can occupy the pancreatic head or any part of the organ. Solid pseudopapillary tumor is rare, has a low tendency for malignancy, and is usually located in the pancreatic body or tail. Endoscopic ultrasound with the use of fine-needle aspiration and cytology permits discrimination of those lesions. In this review, the main characteristics of those lesions are presented, as well as recommendations regarding their follow up and management according to recent guidelines. PMID:27065727

  3. Pancreas Transplantation: Past, Present, Future.

    PubMed

    Dholakia, Shamik; Mittal, Shruti; Quiroga, Isabel; Gilbert, James; Sharples, Edward J; Ploeg, Rutger J; Friend, Peter J

    2016-07-01

    Diabetes is the pandemic disease of the modern era, with 10% of these patients having type 1 diabetes mellitus. Despite the prevalence, morbidities, and associated financial burden, treatment options have not changed since the introduction of injectable insulin. To date, over 40,000 pancreas transplants have been performed globally. It remains the only known method for restoring glycemic control and thus curing type 1 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this review is to bring pancreatic transplantation out of the specialist realm, informing practitioners about this important procedure, so that they feel better equipped to refer suitable patients for transplantation and manage, counsel, and support when encountering them within their own specialty. This study was a narrative review conducted in October 2015, with OVID interface searching EMBASE and MEDLINE databases, using Timeframe: Inception to October 2015. Articles were assessed for clinical relevance and most up-to-date content, with articles written in English as the only inclusion criterion. Other sources used included conference proceedings/presentations and unpublished data from our institution (Oxford Transplant Centre). Pancreatic transplantation is growing and has quickly become the gold standard of care for patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and renal failure. Significant improvements in quality of life and life expectancy make pancreatic transplant a viable and economically feasible intervention. It remains the most effective method of establishing and maintaining euglycemia, halting and potentially reversing complications associated with diabetes. PMID:26965300

  4. Catalysis by aluminum(III) complexes of non-innocent ligands.

    PubMed

    Berben, Louise A

    2015-02-01

    Non-Innocent ligand complexes of aluminum are described in this Concept article, beginning with a discussion of their synthesis, and then structural and electronic characterization. The main focus concerns the ability of the ligands in these complexes to mediate proton transfer reactions. As examples, aluminum-ligand cooperation in the activation of polar bonds is described, as is the importance of hydrogen bonding to stabilization of a transition state for β-hydride abstraction. Taken together these reactions enable catalytic processes such as the dehydrogenation of formic acid. PMID:25429760

  5. The protection of innocent suspects: a comment on Palmatier and Rovner (2015).

    PubMed

    Vrij, Aldert

    2015-01-01

    Palmatier and Rovner (2015) should be applauded for their efforts to examine whether CQT and CIT polygraph testing methods can be reconciled by common theory. They (understandably) focus on liars in their article, however, liars are only part of the equation. Lie detection tests also involve truth tellers, and the ways in which truth tellers are protected against a false accusation is where the CQT and CIT differ. This important point is not addressed by Palmatier and Rovner (2015), but the concern expressed by CQT opponents that innocent suspects are not well protected in a CQT test needs to be addressed head on by CQT supporters. PMID:25224520

  6. Blaming for a better future: future orientation and associated intolerance of personal uncertainty lead to harsher reactions toward innocent victims.

    PubMed

    Bal, Michèlle; van den Bos, Kees

    2012-07-01

    People are often encouraged to focus on the future and strive for long-term goals. This noted, the authors argue that this future orientation is associated with intolerance of personal uncertainty, as people usually cannot be certain that their efforts will pay off. To be able to tolerate personal uncertainty, people adhere strongly to the belief in a just world, paradoxically resulting in harsher reactions toward innocent victims. In three experiments, the authors show that a future orientation indeed leads to more negative evaluations of an innocent victim (Study 1), enhances intolerance of personal uncertainty (Study 2), and that experiencing personal uncertainty leads to more negative evaluations of a victim (Study 3). So, while a future orientation enables people to strive for long-term goals, it also leads them to be harsher toward innocent victims. One underlying mechanism causing these reactions is intolerance of personal uncertainty, associated with a future orientation. PMID:22492551

  7. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  8. Results of Pancreas Transplantation Alone with Special Attention to Native Kidney Function and Proteinuria in Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Boggi, Ugo; Vistoli, Fabio; Amorese, Gabriella; Giannarelli, Rosa; Coppelli, Alberto; Mariotti, Rita; Rondinini, Lorenzo; Barsotti, Massimiliamo; Piaggesi, Alberto; Tedeschi, Anna; Signori, Stefano; De Lio, Nelide; Occhipinti, Margherita; Mangione, Emanuela; Cantarovich, Diego; Del Prato, Stefano; Mosca, Franco; Marchetti, Piero

    2011-01-01

    We report on our single-center experience with pancreas transplantation alone (PTA) in 71 patients with type 1 diabetes, and a 4-year follow-up. Portal insulin delivery was used in 73.2% of cases and enteric drainage of exocrine secretion in 100%. Immunosuppression consisted of basiliximab (76%), or thymoglobulin (24%), followed by mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and low-dose steroids. Actuarial patient and pancreas survival at 4 years were 98.4% and 76.7%, respectively. Relaparatomy was needed in 18.3% of patients. Restored endogenous insulin secretion resulted in sustained normalization of fasting plasma glucose levels and HbA1c concentration in all technically successful transplantations. Protenuria (24-hour) improved significantly after PTA. Renal function declined only in recipients with pretransplant glomerular filtration rate (GFR) greater than 90 ml/min, possibly as a result of correction of hyperfiltration following normalization of glucose metabolism. Further improvements were recorded in several cardiovascular risk factors, retinopathy, and neuropathy. We conclude that PTA was an effective and reasonably safe procedure in this single-center experience. PMID:22189549

  9. Interleukin-6 inhibits apoptosis of exocrine gland tissues under inflammatory conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Jin, Jun-O; Patel, Ekta S; Yu, Qing

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-6 is a multi-functional cytokine that can either promote or suppress tissue inflammation depending on the specific disease context. IL-6 is elevated in the exocrine glands and serum of patients with Sjögren's syndrome (SS), but the specific role of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of this disease has not been defined. In this study, we showed that IL-6 expression levels were increased with age in C56BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice, a primary SS model, and higher than the control C57BL/6 mice. To assess the role of IL-6 during the immunological phase of SS development, a neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody was administered into 16 week-old female C56BL/6.NOD-Aec1Aec2 mice, 3 times weekly for a consecutive 8 weeks. Neutralization of endogenous IL-6 throughout the immunological phase of SS development led to increased apoptosis, caspase-3 activation, leukocytic infiltration, and IFN-γ- and TNF-α production in the salivary gland. To further determine the effect of IL-6 on the apoptosis of exocrine gland cells, recombinant human IL-6 or the neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibody was injected into female C57BL/6 mice that received concurrent injection of anti-CD3 antibody to induce the apoptosis of exocrine gland tissues. Neutralization of IL-6 enhanced, whereas administration of IL-6 inhibited apoptosis and caspase-3 activation in salivary and lacrimal glands in this model. The apoptosis-suppressing effect of IL-6 was associated with up-regulation of Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 in both glands. Moreover, IL-6 treatment induced activation of STAT3 and up-regulated Bcl-xL and Mcl-1 gene expression in a human salivary gland epithelial cell line. In conclusion, IL-6 inhibits the apoptosis of exocrine gland tissues and exerts a tissue-protective effect under inflammatory conditions including SS. These findings suggest the possibility of using this property of IL-6 to preserve exocrine gland tissue integrity and function under autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. PMID:26255211

  10. Characterization of human brain nicotinamide 5'-mononucleotide adenylyltransferase-2 and expression in human pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Yalowitz, Joel A; Xiao, Suhong; Biju, Mangatt P; Antony, Aśok C; Cummings, Oscar W; Deeg, Mark A; Jayaram, Hiremagalur N

    2004-01-01

    NMNAT (nicotinamide 5'-mononucleotide adenylyltransferase; EC 2.7.7.1) catalyses the transfer of the adenylyl group from ATP to NMN to form NAD. We have cloned a novel human NMNAT cDNA, designated hNMNAT-2, from human brain. The cDNA contains a 924 bp open reading frame that encodes a 307 amino acid peptide that was expressed as a histidine-patch-containing thioredoxin fusion protein. Expressed hNMNAT-2 shared only 35% amino acid sequence homology with the human NMNAT enzyme (hNMNAT-1), but possessed enzymic activity comparable with hNMNAT-1. Using human genomic databases, hNMNAT-2 was localized to chromosome 1q25 within a 171 kb gene, whereas hNMNAT-1 is on chromosome 1p32-35. Northern blot analysis revealed highly restricted expression of hNMNAT-2 to brain, heart and muscle tissues, which contrasts with the wide tissue expression of hNMNAT-1; different regions of the brain exhibited differential expression of hNMNAT-2. Substitution mutations of either of two invariant residues, His-24 or Trp-92, abolished enzyme activity. Anti-peptide antibody to a unique epitope within hNMNAT-2 was produced, and immunohistochemical analysis of sections of normal adult human pancreas revealed that hNMNAT-2 protein was markedly expressed in the islets of Langerhans. However, the pancreatic exocrine cells exhibited weak expression of hNMNAT-2 protein. Sections of pancreas from insulinoma patients showed strong expression of hNMNAT-2 protein in the insulin-producing tumour cells, whereas acinar cells exhibited relatively low expression of hNMNAT-2 protein. These data suggest that the unique tissue-expression patterns of hNMNAT-2 reflect distinct functions for the isoforms in the regulation of NAD metabolism. PMID:14516279

  11. Acute pancreatitis decreases the sensitivity of pancreas-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus neurones to group II metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists in rats

    PubMed Central

    Babic, Tanja; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that pancreatic exocrine secretions (PES) are modulated by dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones, whose activity is finely tuned by GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) decrease synaptic transmission to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones and increase PES. In the present study, we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches aimed at characterising the effects of caerulein-induced acute pancreatitis (AP) on the vagal neurocircuitry modulating pancreatic functions. In control rats, microinjection of bicuculline into the DMV increased PES, whereas microinjections of kynurenic acid had no effect. Conversely, in AP rats, microinjection of bicuculline had no effect, whereas kynurenic acid decreased PES. DMV microinjections of the group II mGluR agonist APDC and whole cell recordings of excitatory currents in identified pancreas-projecting DMV neurones showed a reduced functional response in AP rats compared to controls. Moreover, these changes persisted up to 3 weeks following the induction of AP. These data demonstrate that AP increases the excitatory input to pancreas-projecting DMV neurones by decreasing the response of excitatory synaptic terminals to group II mGluR agonist. PMID:24445314

  12. Melatonin, endocrine pancreas and diabetes.

    PubMed

    Peschke, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    Melatonin influences insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro. (i) The effects are MT(1)-and MT(2)-receptor-mediated. (ii) They are specific, high-affinity, pertussis-toxin-sensitive, G(i)-protein-coupled, leading to inhibition of the cAMP-pathway and decrease of insulin release. [Correction added after online publication 4 December 2007: in the preceding sentence, 'increase of insulin release' was changed to 'decrease of insulin release'.] Furthermore, melatonin inhibits the cGMP-pathway, possibly mediated by MT(2) receptors. In this way, melatonin likely inhibits insulin release. A third system, the IP(3)-pathway, is mediated by G(q)-proteins, phospholipase C and IP(3), which mobilize Ca(2+) from intracellular stores, with a resultant increase in insulin. (iii) Insulin secretion in vivo, as well as from isolated islets, exhibits a circadian rhythm. This rhythm, which is apparently generated within the islets, is influenced by melatonin, which induces a phase shift in insulin secretion. (iv) Observation of the circadian expression of clock genes in the pancreas could possibly be an indication of the generation of circadian rhythms in the pancreatic islets themselves. (v) Melatonin influences diabetes and associated metabolic disturbances. The diabetogens, alloxan and streptozotocin, lead to selective destruction of beta-cells through their accumulation in these cells, where they induce the generation of ROS. Beta-cells are very susceptible to oxidative stress because they possess only low-antioxidative capacity. Results suggest that melatonin in pharmacological doses provides protection against ROS. (vi) Finally, melatonin levels in plasma, as well as the arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase (AANAT) activity, are lower in diabetic than in nondiabetic rats and humans. In contrast, in the pineal gland, the AANAT mRNA is increased and the insulin receptor mRNA is decreased, which indicates a close interrelationship between insulin and melatonin. PMID:18078445

  13. A novel method for discrimination between innocent and pathological heart murmurs.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, Arash; Borga, Magnus; Sjöberg, Birgitta Janerot; Ask, Per

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a novel method for discrimination between innocent and pathological murmurs using the growing time support vector machine (GTSVM). The proposed method is tailored for characterizing innocent murmurs (IM) by putting more emphasis on the early parts of the signal as IMs are often heard in early systolic phase. Individuals with mild to severe aortic stenosis (AS) and IM are the two groups subjected to analysis, taking the normal individuals with no murmur (NM) as the control group. The AS is selected due to the similarity of its murmur to IM, particularly in mild cases. To investigate the effect of the growing time windows, the performance of the GTSVM is compared to that of a conventional support vector machine (SVM), using repeated random sub-sampling method. The mean value of the classification rate/sensitivity is found to be 88%/86% for the GTSVM and 84%/83% for the SVM. The statistical evaluations show that the GTSVM significantly improves performance of the classification as compared to the SVM. PMID:26003286

  14. Progressive Metaplastic and Dysplastic Changes in Mouse Pancreas Induced by Cyclooxygenase-2 Overexpression1

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Jennifer KL; Klein, Russell D; McArthur, Mark J; Conti, Claudio J; Kiguchi, Kaoru; Kawamoto, Toru; Riggs, Penny K; Pavone, Amy I; Sawicki, Janet; Fischer, Susan M

    2008-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) overexpression is an established factor linking chronic inflammation with metaplastic and neoplastic change in various tissues. We generated transgenic mice (BK5.COX-2) in which elevation of COX-2 and its effectors trigger a metaplasia-dysplasia sequence in exocrine pancreas. Histologic evaluation revealed a chronic pancreatitis-like state characterized by acinar-to-ductal metaplasia and a well-vascularized fibroinflammatory stroma that develops by 3 months. By 6 to 8 months, strongly dysplastic features suggestive of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma emerge in the metaplastic ducts. Increased proliferation, cellular atypia, and loss of normal cell/tissue organization are typical features in transgenic pancreata. Alterations in biomarkers associated with human inflammatory and neoplastic pancreatic disease were detected using immunohistochemistry. The abnormal pancreatic phenotype can be completely prevented by maintaining mice on a diet containing celecoxib, a well-characterized COX-2 inhibitor. Despite the high degree of atypia, only limited evidence of invasion to adjacent tissues was observed, with no evidence of distant metastases. However, cell lines derived from spontaneous lesions are aggressively tumorigenic when injected into syngeneic or nude mice. The progressive nature of the metaplastic/dysplastic changes observed in this model make it a valuable tool for examining the transition from chronic inflammation to neoplasia. PMID:18670639

  15. Mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with neuroendocrine predominance.

    PubMed

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Garcon, Marie Carmel; Syrigos, Kostas N; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  16. Mixed Acinar-Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Pancreas with Neuroendocrine Predominance

    PubMed Central

    Ogbonna, Onyekachi Henry; Syrigos, Kostas N.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2013-01-01

    Background. Pancreatic tumors are rare and could arise from either the exocrine (ductal and acinar cells) or the endocrine (neuroendocrine cells) components of the pancreas. In some instances, the occurrence of pancreatic tumors comprising both acinar cells and neuroendocrine cells, with neuroendocrine cells making up more than 30% of the tumor, has been identified. This unique entity has been referred to as mixed acinar-neuroendocrine carcinoma (MANEC). Only about 20 such cases have been reported in the literature. Case Report. We report an interesting case of MANEC with neuroendocrine cell predominance in a woman presenting with epigastric pain secondary to a pancreatic mass with acinar and endocrine differentiation. She underwent surgical resection of the tumor and was offered adjuvant treatment chemotherapy with carboplatin, etoposide, and radiotherapy for positive tumor resection margins. Conclusions. Given the paucity of the cases of MANEC, continuous reporting of these cases when identified should be encouraged to aid oncologists in understanding the disease and help establish standardized management. PMID:24348574

  17. Pluripotency of adult stem cells derived from human and rat pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruse, C.; Birth, M.; Rohwedel, J.; Assmuth, K.; Goepel, A.; Wedel, T.

    Adult stem cells are undifferentiated cells found within fully developed tissues or organs of an adult individuum. Until recently, these cells have been considered to bear less self-renewal ability and differentiation potency compared to embryonic stem cells. In recent studies an undifferentiated cell type was found in primary cultures of isolated acini from exocrine pancreas termed pancreatic stellate cells. Here we show that pancreatic stellate-like cells have the capacity of extended self-renewal and are able to differentiate spontaneously into cell types of all three germ layers expressing markers for smooth muscle cells, neurons, glial cells, epithelial cells, chondrocytes and secretory cells (insulin, amylase). Differentiation and subsequent formation of three-dimensional cellular aggregates (organoid bodies) were induced by merely culturing pancreatic stellate-like cells in hanging drops. These cells were developed into stable, long-term, in vitro cultures of both primary undifferentiated cell lines as well as organoid cultures. Thus, evidence is given that cell lineages of endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal origin arise spontaneously from a single adult undifferentiated cell type. Based on the present findings it is assumed that pancreatic stellate-like cells are a new class of lineage uncommitted pluripotent adult stem cells with a remarkable self-renewal ability and differentiation potency. The data emphasize the versatility of adult stem cells and may lead to a reappraisal of their use for the treatment of inherited disorders or acquired degenerative diseases.

  18. Severe pancreas hypoplasia and multicystic renal dysplasia in two human fetuses carrying novel HNF1beta/MODY5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Haumaitre, Cécile; Fabre, Mélanie; Cormier, Sarah; Baumann, Clarisse; Delezoide, Anne-Lise; Cereghini, Silvia

    2006-08-01

    Heterozygous mutations in the HNF1beta/vHNF1/TCF2 gene cause maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY5), associated with severe renal disease and abnormal genital tract. Here, we characterize two fetuses, a 27-week male and a 31.5-week female, carrying novel mutations in exons 2 and 7 of HNF1beta, respectively. Although these mutations were predicted to have different functional consequences, both fetuses displayed highly similar phenotypes. They presented one of the most severe phenotypes described in HNF1beta carriers: bilateral enlarged polycystic kidneys, severe pancreas hypoplasia and abnormal genital tract. Consistent with this, we detected high levels of HNF1beta transcripts in 8-week human embryos in the mesonephros and metanephric kidney and in the epithelium of pancreas. Renal histology and immunohistochemistry analyses of mutant fetuses revealed cysts derived from all nephron segments with multilayered epithelia and dysplastic regions, accompanied by a marked increase in the expression of beta-catenin and E-cadherin. A significant proportion of cysts still expressed the cystic renal disease proteins, polycystin-1, polycystin-2, fibrocystin and uromodulin, implying that cyst formation may result from a deregulation of cell-cell adhesion and/or the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway. Both fetuses exhibited a severe pancreatic hypoplasia with underdeveloped and disorganized acini, together with an absence of ventral pancreatic-derived tissue. beta-catenin and E-cadherin were strongly downregulated in the exocrine and endocrine compartments, and the islets lacked the transporter essential for glucose-sensing GLUT2, indicating a beta-cell maturation defect. This study provides evidence of differential gene-dosage requirements for HNF1beta in normal human kidney and pancreas differentiation and increases our understanding of the etiology of MODY5 disorder. PMID:16801329

  19. Karyotypic abnormalities in tumours of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Bardi, G.; Johansson, B.; Pandis, N.; Mandahl, N.; Bak-Jensen, E.; Andrén-Sandberg, A.; Mitelman, F.; Heim, S.

    1993-01-01

    Short-term cultures from 20 pancreatic tumours, three endocrine and 17 exocrine, were cytogenetically analysed. All three endocrine tumours had a normal chromosome complement. Clonal chromosome aberrations were detected in 13 of the 17 exocrine tumours: simple karyotypic changes were found in five carcinomas and numerous numerical and/or structural changes in eight. When the present findings and those previously reported by our group were viewed in conjunction, the most common numerical imbalances among the 22 karyotypically abnormal pancreatic carcinomas thus available for evaluation turned out to be, in order of falling frequency, -18, -Y, +20, +7, +11 and -12. Imbalances brought about by structural changes most frequently affected chromosomes 1 (losses in 1p but especially gains of 1q), 8 (in particular 8q gains but also 8p losses), and 17 (mostly 17q gain but also loss of 17p). Chromosomal bands 1p32, 1q10, 6q21, 7p22, 8p21, 8q11, 14p11, 15q10-11, and 17q11 were the most common breakpoint sites affected by the structural rearrangements. Abnormal karyotypes were detected more frequently in poorly differentiated and anaplastic carcinomas than in moderately and well differentiated tumours. Images Figure 1 PMID:8494707

  20. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-12-26

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  1. Three-dimensional pancreas organogenesis models.

    PubMed

    Grapin-Botton, A

    2016-09-01

    A rediscovery of three-dimensional culture has led to the development of organ biogenesis, homeostasis and disease models applicable to human tissues. The so-called organoids that have recently flourished serve as valuable models bridging between cell lines or primary cells grown on the bottom of culture plates and experiments performed in vivo. Though not recapitulating all aspects of organ physiology, the miniature organs generated in a dish are useful models emerging for the pancreas, starting from embryonic progenitors, adult cells, tumour cells and stem cells. This review focusses on the currently available systems and their relevance to the study of the pancreas, of β-cells and of several pancreatic diseases including diabetes. We discuss the expected future developments for studying human pancreas development and function, for developing diabetes models and for producing therapeutic cells. PMID:27615129

  2. Intraductal Oncocytic Papillary Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kallen, Michael E; Naini, Bita V

    2016-09-01

    Intraductal oncocytic papillary neoplasms (IOPNs) are cystic neoplasms with intraductal growth and complex papillae composed of oncocytic cells. IOPNs have been reported both in the pancreas and biliary tree, and are most likely closely related in these 2 locations. In the pancreas, these rare tumors are now considered 1 of the 4 histologic subtypes of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). Significant differences in histology, immunophenotype, and molecular genetics have been reported between IOPNs and other IPMN subtypes. However, there are limited data regarding the clinical behavior and prognosis of IOPNs in comparison to other subtypes of IPMN. We review features of pancreatic IOPNs and discuss the differential diagnosis of other intraductal lesions in the pancreas. PMID:27575268

  3. Multipotent pancreas progenitors: Inconclusive but pivotal topic

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Fang-Xu; Morahan, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of multipotent pancreas progenitors (MPP) should have a significant impact not only on the ontology of the pancreas, but also for the translational research of glucose-responding endocrine β-cells. Deficiency of the latter may lead to the pandemic type 1 or type 2 diabetes mellitus, a metabolic disorder. An ideal treatment of which would potentially be the replacement of destroyed or failed β-cells, by restoring function of endogenous pancreatic endocrine cells or by transplantation of donor islets or in vitro generated insulin-secreting cells. Thus, considerable research efforts have been devoted to identify MPP candidates in the pre- and post-natal pancreas for the endogenous neogenesis or regeneration of endocrine insulin-secreting cells. In order to advance this inconclusive but critical field, we here review the emerging concepts, recent literature and newest developments of potential MPP and propose measures that would assist its forward progression. PMID:26730269

  4. Progenitor cells in the adult pancreas.

    PubMed

    Holland, Andrew M; Góñez, L Jorge; Harrison, Leonard C

    2004-01-01

    The beta-cell mass in the adult pancreas possesses the ability to undergo limited regeneration following injury. Identifying the progenitor cells involved in this process and understanding the mechanisms leading to their maturation will open new avenues for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. However, despite steady advances in determining the molecular basis of early pancreatic development, the identification of pancreatic stem cells or beta-cell progenitors and the molecular mechanisms underlying beta-cell regeneration remain unclear. Recent advances in the directed differentiation of embryonic and adult stem cells has heightened interest in the possible application of stem cell therapy in the treatment of type 1 diabetes. Drawing on the expanding knowledge of pancreas development, beta-cell regeneration and stem cell research, this review focuses on progenitor cells in the adult pancreas as a potential source of beta-cells. PMID:14737742

  5. Conservative Pancreas Graft Preservation at the Extreme.

    PubMed

    Laurence, Jerome Martin; Sapisochin, Gonzalo; Selzner, Markus; Norgate, Andrea; Kumar, Deepali; McGilvary, Ian D; Preig, Paul D; Schiff, Jeffrey; Cattral, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Because of the value some patients place in remaining insulin-independent after pancreas transplantation, they may be reluctant to undergo graft pancreatectomy, even in the face of extreme complications, such as graft thrombosis and duodenal segment leak. Partly, for this reason, a variety of complex salvage techniques have been described to save the graft in such circumstances. We report a case of a series of extreme complications related to a leak from the duodenal segment after a simultaneous pancreas and kidney transplant. These included infected thrombosis of the inferior vena cava associated with a graft venous thrombosis and a retroperitoneal fistula. The patient retained graft function with insulin independence and repeatedly declined graft pancreatectomy against the advice of the transplant team. Conservative treatment with percutaneous drainage, antibiotics, and anticoagulation was eventually successful. This outcome is unique in our experience and may be instructive to teams caring for pancreas transplant recipients. PMID:27500244

  6. An Investigative Study of Pancreatic Exocrine Biomarkers, Histology, and Histomorphometry in Male Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) Rats Given Dulaglutide by Subcutaneous Injection Twice Weekly for 13 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Usborne, Amy; Byrd, Richard A; Meehan, James; Blackbourne, Jamie L; Sullivan, John; Poitout-Belissent, Florence; Prefontaine, Annick; Martin, Jennifer A; Vahle, John L

    2015-12-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist therapy has been implicated as a possible risk factor for acute pancreatitis in patients with type 2 diabetes. Dulaglutide is a long-acting GLP-1 receptor agonist in development for treatment of type 2 diabetes. The effects of dulaglutide were evaluated in male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats to examine whether dulaglutide may induce or modulate pancreatitis. Rats were randomized to dose groups receiving twice-weekly subcutaneously administered dulaglutide 0.5, 1.5, and 5.0 mg/kg/dose (corresponding human plasma exposures following twice-weekly dosing are 3-, 8-, and 30-fold, respectively) for 13 weeks or to vehicle control. Following termination, serially trimmed sections of pancreases were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or co-stained with an epithelial marker and a marker of either proliferation or apoptosis. Efficacious reductions in glucose and hemoglobin A1c occurred at all dulaglutide doses. Lipase activity was unaffected, and there were modest increases in total and pancreatic amylase activities at all doses without individual microscopic inflammatory correlates. Microscopic dulaglutide-related pancreatic changes included increased interlobular ductal epithelium without ductal cell proliferation (≥0.5 mg/kg), increased acinar atrophy with/without inflammation (≥1.5 mg/kg), and increased incidence/severity of neutrophilic acinar pancreatic inflammation (5.0 mg/kg). In summary, dulaglutide treatment was associated with mild alterations in ductal epithelium and modest exacerbation of spontaneous lesions of the exocrine pancreas typically found in the ZDF rat model. PMID:26269615

  7. Calcium-dependent photodynamic action of di- and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine on normal and tumour-derived rat pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    al-Laith, M.; Matthews, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Important differences exist in the responses to photodynamic agents of normal and tumour-derived pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study amylase release has been used to assess the mechanisms by which the photodynamic drugs tetra- and disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4, A1PcS2) act on pancreatic cells via energy and calcium-dependent activation and transduction pathways. The photodynamic release of amylase was found to be energy dependent and inhibited by the chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium but not by the removal of extracellular calcium. In contrast to their effects on normal acinar cells, the photodynamic action of A1PcS4 and A1PcS2 was to inhibit amylase secretion from pancreatoma AR4-2J cells. Removal of extracellular calcium reversed this inhibitory effect on AR4-2J cells and produced a significant increase in amylase release, but chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium did not affect the inhibitory photodynamic action of the phthalocyanines on amylase release from the tumour cells. Overall, these results demonstrate further important distinctions between the photodynamic action of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines on normal versus tumour exocrine cells of the pancreas and indicate that calcium plays an important role in photodynamic drug action, since these agents affected intracellular calcium mobilisation at some distal point in the membrane signal transduction pathway for regulated secretion. Furthermore, the photodynamic inhibition of constitutive secretion in tumour cells may involve a calcium-dependent membrane target site or modulation of membrane calcium channels by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:7524603

  8. [Ectopic pancreas imitating gastric neoplasm -- a case report].

    PubMed

    Buczek, Tomasz; Puzdrowski, Witold; Lenekowski, Radosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare developmental disorder. Usually is asymptomatic. Most frequently is diagnosed in its gastric location accidentally during endoscopy. A patient with ectopic pancreas was described manifesting as a gastric tumor arousing oncological concern. PMID:24455840

  9. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, diabetes mellitus and serum nutritional markers after acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Tepes, Bojan; Makuc, Jana; Rudolf, Sasa; Zaletel, Jelka; Vidmar, Tjasa; Seruga, Maja; Birsa, Bostjan

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To investigate impairment and clinical significance of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function in patients after acute pancreatitis (AP). METHODS: Patients with AP were invited to participate in the study. Severity of AP was determined by the Atlanta classification and definitions revised in 2012. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) was diagnosed by the concentration of fecal elastase-1. An additional work-up, including laboratory testing of serum nutritional markers for determination of malnutrition, was offered to all patients with low levels of fecal elastase-1 FE. Hemoglobin A1c or oral glucose tolerance tests were also performed in patients without prior diabetes mellitus, and type 3c diabetes mellitus (T3cDM) was diagnosed according to American Diabetes Association criteria. RESULTS: One hundred patients were included in the study: 75% (75/100) of patients had one attack of AP and 25% (25/100) had two or more attacks. The most common etiology was alcohol. Mild, moderately severe and severe AP were present in 67, 15 and 18% of patients, respectively. The mean time from attack of AP to inclusion in the study was 2.7 years. PEI was diagnosed in 21% (21/100) of patients and T3cDM in 14% (14/100) of patients. In all patients with PEI, at least one serologic nutritional marker was below the lower limit of normal. T3cDM was more frequently present in patients with severe AP (P = 0.031), but was also present in some patients with mild and moderately severe AP. PEI was present in all degrees of severity of AP. There were no statistically significantly differences according to gender, etiology and number of AP attacks. CONCLUSION: As exocrine and endocrine pancreatic insufficiency can develop after AP, routine follow-up of patients is necessary, for which serum nutritional panel measurements can be useful. PMID:25561813

  10. Quantitative assessment of fat absorption and its diagnostic value in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Simpson, J W; Doxey, D L

    1983-09-01

    A new method of quantifying fat absorption based on the estimation of serum triglyceride levels is described. When long chain triglyceride (LCT) was fed to normal dogs a significant elevation of serum triglyceride concentration was recorded which was not observed in dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. When the test was repeated on the dogs with pancreatic insufficiency using the LCT together with lipase the serum triglyceride concentration increased, suggesting the failure in the initial test was caused by a deficiency in pancreatic lipase. Feeding medium chain triglyceride (MCT) did not raise the serum triglyceride levels in normal dogs. PMID:6635347

  11. OPTN/SRTR 2013 Annual Data Report: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Kandaswamy, R; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Carrico, R J; Tyler, K H; Israni, A K; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2015-01-01

    Pancreas listings and transplants decreased during the past decade, most notably pancreas after kidney transplants. Center-reported outcomes of pancreas transplant across all groups, short-term and long-term, improved during the same period. Changes to the pancreas allocation system creating an efficient, uniform national system will be implemented in late 2014. Pancreas-alone and simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) candidates will form a single match-run list with priority to most SPK candidates ahead of kidney-alone candidates to decrease waiting times for SPK candidates, given their higher waitlist mortality compared with nondiabetic kidney transplant candidates. The changes are expected to eliminate local variability, providing more consistent pancreas allocation nationwide. Outcomes after pancreas transplant are challenging to interpret due to lack of a uniform definition of graft failure. Consequently, SRTR has not published data on pancreas graft failure for the past 2 years. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Pancreas Transplantation Committee is working on a definition that could provide greater validity for future outcomes analyses. Challenges in pancreas transplantation include high risk of technical failures, rejection (early and late), and surgical complications. Continued outcome improvement and innovation has never been more critical, as alternatives such as islet transplant and artificial pancreas move closer to clinical application. PMID:25626343

  12. Expression and Localization of microRNAs in Perinatal Rat Pancreas: Role of miR-21 in Regulation of Cholesterol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gaarn, Louise W.; Bagge, Annika; Pedersen, Lykke; Dahmcke, Christina M.; Nielsen, Jens H.; Dalgaard, Louise T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression of pancreatic microRNAs (miRNAs) during the period of perinatal beta-cell expansion and maturation in rats, determine the localization of these miRNAs and perform a pathway analysis with predicted target mRNAs expressed in perinatal pancreas. Research Design and Methods RNA was extracted from whole pancreas at embryonic day 20 (E20), on the day of birth (P0) and two days after birth (P2) and hybridized to miRNA microarrays. Differentially expressed miRNAs were verified by northern blotting and their pancreatic localization determined by in situ hybridization. Pathway analysis was done using regulated sets of mRNAs predicted as targets of the miRNAs. Possible target genes were tested using reporter-gene analysis in INS-1E cells. Results Nine miRNAs were differentially expressed perinatally, seven were confirmed to be regulated at the level of the mature miRNA. The localization studies showed endocrine localization of six of these miRNAs (miR-21, -23a, -29a, -125b-5p, -376b-3p and -451), and all were expressed in exocrine cells at one time point at least. Pathways involving metabolic processes, terpenoid and sterol metabolism were selectively affected by concomitant regulation by miRNAs and mRNAs, and Srebf1 was validated as a target of miR-21. Conclusions The findings suggest that miRNAs are involved in the functional maturation of pancreatic exocrine and endocrine tissue following birth. Pathway analysis of target genes identify changes in sterol metabolism around birth as being selectively affected by differential miRNA expression during this period. PMID:22022489

  13. Remote effect of kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury on pancreas: role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Abogresha, Noha M.; Abdelaziz, Eman Z.; Khalil, Waleed F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have demonstrated remote effects of renal ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury on some organs such as brain, liver, and lungs. Oxidative stress is reported to be the cornerstone in such ischemic conditions. Associated apoptosis is also reported in remote lung, liver and myocardial injury after acute kidney injury. So, we postulated that renal IR may affect the pancreas by its remote effect. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial mediated apoptosis may play a crucial role in this injury. We investigated the effects of kidney IR on pancreatic exocrine and endocrine functions, antioxidant enzyme activity, and apoptosis. Material and methods The protective effect of vitamin C was also investigated. The animals were submitted to non-traumatic bilateral renal IR, sham operation or treatment with vitamin C after IR. Rats were sacrificed on the 1st, 3rd, and 7th days of the experiment to evaluate the parameters of oxidative stress (catalase, lipid peroxidase, reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase), pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function (amylase, insulin and fasting blood glucose), renal functions (serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen), cellular injury and apoptotic markers (Bcl-2, Bax and caspase-3). Results Kidney I/R significantly increased the renal and pancreatic functions at 1, 3 and 7 days, while fasting insulin was significantly increased at day 3 after ischemia. Moreover, I/R significantly increased the studied oxidative stress markers and decreased the antioxidant capacity in pancreatic tissues. In addition, renal I/R induced numerous histopatological lesions in pancreatic tissues and increased the apoptosis-related genes. Treating the rats with vitamin C (100 mg/kg) significantly restored the renal and pancreatic functions, improved the pancreatic antioxidant capacity and protected the pancreatic tissues from apoptotic necrosis. Conclusions The results suggested that bilateral renal ischemia for 45 min caused significant

  14. Malignant Fibrous Histiocytoma of The Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Garvey, J. F. W.; Ng, A.; England, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    A case of fibrous histiocytoma of low grade malignancy arising from the uncinate lobe of the pancreas is reported. This is an unusual site for these extremely rare tumours. Survival up to 4 years has been achieved in our patient following surgical resection. PMID:2562132

  15. Pancreas After Islet Transplantation: A First Report of the International Pancreas Transplant Registry.

    PubMed

    Gruessner, R W G; Gruessner, A C

    2016-02-01

    Pancreas after islet (PAI) transplantation is a treatment option for patients seeking insulin independence through a whole-organ transplant after a failed cellular transplant. This report from the International Pancreas Transplant Registry (IPTR) and the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) studied PAI transplant outcomes over a 10-year time period. Forty recipients of a failed alloislet transplant subsequently underwent pancreas transplant alone (50%), pancreas after previous kidney transplant (22.5%), or simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK) transplant (27.5%). Graft and patient survival rates were not statistically significantly different compared with matched primary pancreas transplants. Regardless of the recipient category, overall 1- and 5-year PAI patient survival rates for all 40 cases were 97% and 83%, respectively; graft survival rates were 84% and 65%, respectively. A failed previous islet transplant had no negative impact on kidney graft survival in the SPK category: It was the same as for primary SPK transplants. According to this IPTR/UNOS analysis, a PAI transplant is a safe procedure with low recipient mortality, high graft-function rates in both the short and long term and excellent kidney graft outcomes. Patients with a failed islet transplant should know about this alternative in their quest for insulin independence through transplantation. PMID:26436323

  16. Acinar phenotype is preserved in human exocrine pancreas cells cultured at low temperature: implications for lineage-tracing of β-cell neogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mfopou, Josué K; Houbracken, Isabelle; Wauters, Elke; Mathijs, Iris; Song, Imane; Himpe, Eddy; Baldan, Jonathan; Heimberg, Harry; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-06-01

    The regenerative medicine field is expanding with great successes in laboratory and preclinical settings. Pancreatic acinar cells in diabetic mice were recently converted into β-cells by treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This suggests that human acinar cells might become a cornerstone for diabetes cell therapy in the future, if they can also be converted into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. Presently, studying pancreatic acinar cell biology in vitro is limited by their high plasticity, as they rapidly lose their phenotype and spontaneously transdifferentiate to a duct-like phenotype in culture. We questioned whether human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype could be preserved in vitro by physico-chemical manipulations and whether this could be valuable in the study of β-cell neogenesis. We found that culture at low temperature (4°C) resulted in the maintenance of morphological and molecular acinar cell characteristics. Specifically, chilled acinar cells did not form the spherical clusters observed in controls (culture at 37°C), and they maintained high levels of acinar-specific transcripts and proteins. Five-day chilled acinar cells still transdifferentiated into duct-like cells upon transfer to 37°C. Moreover, adenoviral-mediated gene transfer evidenced an active Amylase promoter in the 7-day chilled acinar cells, and transduction performed in chilled conditions improved acinar cell labelling. Together, our findings indicate the maintenance of human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype at low temperature and the possibility to efficiently label acinar cells, which opens new perspectives for the study of human acinar-to-β-cell transdifferentiation. PMID:26987985

  17. Acinar phenotype is preserved in human exocrine pancreas cells cultured at low temperature: implications for lineage-tracing of β-cell neogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mfopou, Josué K.; Houbracken, Isabelle; Wauters, Elke; Mathijs, Iris; Song, Imane; Himpe, Eddy; Baldan, Jonathan; Heimberg, Harry; Bouwens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    The regenerative medicine field is expanding with great successes in laboratory and preclinical settings. Pancreatic acinar cells in diabetic mice were recently converted into β-cells by treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This suggests that human acinar cells might become a cornerstone for diabetes cell therapy in the future, if they can also be converted into glucose-responsive insulin-producing cells. Presently, studying pancreatic acinar cell biology in vitro is limited by their high plasticity, as they rapidly lose their phenotype and spontaneously transdifferentiate to a duct-like phenotype in culture. We questioned whether human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype could be preserved in vitro by physico-chemical manipulations and whether this could be valuable in the study of β-cell neogenesis. We found that culture at low temperature (4°C) resulted in the maintenance of morphological and molecular acinar cell characteristics. Specifically, chilled acinar cells did not form the spherical clusters observed in controls (culture at 37°C), and they maintained high levels of acinar-specific transcripts and proteins. Five-day chilled acinar cells still transdifferentiated into duct-like cells upon transfer to 37°C. Moreover, adenoviral-mediated gene transfer evidenced an active Amylase promoter in the 7-day chilled acinar cells, and transduction performed in chilled conditions improved acinar cell labelling. Together, our findings indicate the maintenance of human pancreatic acinar cell phenotype at low temperature and the possibility to efficiently label acinar cells, which opens new perspectives for the study of human acinar-to-β-cell transdifferentiation. PMID:26987985

  18. The clypeal gland: a new exocrine gland in termite imagoes (Isoptera: Serritermitidae, Rhinotermitidae, Termitidae).

    PubMed

    Křížková, Barbora; Bourguignon, Thomas; Vytisková, Blahoslava; Sobotník, Jan

    2014-11-01

    Social insects possess a rich set of exocrine organs producing diverse pheromones and defensive compounds. This is especially true for termite imagoes, which are equipped with several glands producing, among others, sex pheromones and defensive compounds protecting imagoes during the dispersal flight and colony foundation. Here, we describe the clypeal gland, a new termite exocrine organ occurring in the labro-clypeal region of imagoes of most Rhinotermitidae, Serritermitidae and Termitidae species. The clypeal gland of Coptotermes testaceus consists of class 1 (modified epidermal cell) and class 3 (bicellular gland unit) secretory cells. Ultrastructural features suggest that the gland secretes volatile compounds and proteins, probably after starting the reproduction. One peculiar feature of the gland is the presence of multiple secretory canals in a single canal cell, a feature never observed before in other insect glands. Although the function of the gland remains unknown, we hypothesize that it could produce secretion signalling the presence of functional reproductives or their need to be fed. PMID:25280798

  19. Elevated levels of an exocrine pancreatic secretory protein in Alzheimer disease brain.

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, M; de la Monte, S M; Gross, J; Wands, J R

    1989-01-01

    We identified by a monoclonal antibody-based immunoradiometric assay high concentrations of an exocrine pancreatic protein called pancreatic thread protein (PTP) in several areas of Alzheimer disease (AD) brain. The saline-extractable soluble immunoreactivity shares at least three epitopes in common with the native pancreatic form of the protein; the Mr varies from approximately 17,000 to 20,000. Quantitative measurements of PTP immunoreactivity in various regions of several AD brains revealed levels varying from 12 to 295 ng/g of tissue (mean, 116 ng/g) compared with 1-11 ng/g of tissue (mean, 5 ng/g) found in comparable areas of control brains. Immunocytochemistry performed with the anti-PTP monoclonal antibodies demonstrate PTP immunoreactivity within large pyramidal neurons--many of which contain neurofibrillary tangles in both AD and Down syndrome. Less accumulation was observed in astrocytes, and some PTP immunoreactivity was found extracellularly. The highest number of labeled cells in AD and Down syndrome was seen in the hippocampal formation. Fewer positive-staining cells were noted in normal and disease control brains. We conclude, therefore, that an exocrine pancreatic protein is present in the central nervous system of normal individuals at low levels; in AD brain concentrations of this protein are much higher. Images PMID:2463628

  20. Role of cholecystokinin in pancreatic exocrine response to intraluminal amino acids and fat.

    PubMed

    Stubbs, R S; Stabile, B E

    1985-03-01

    Controversy continues over the relative contributions made by hormonal and neural mechanisms in the exocrine pancreatic response to ingested food. The recent description of the drug proglumide as a specific, competitive cholecystokinin (CCK)/gastrin receptor antagonist has permitted reevaluation of the role of CCK in this process. In chronic pancreatic fistula dogs, dose-response studies were performed to determine the effect of proglumide on the pancreatic responses to octapeptide of CCK (CCK-OP), intravenous bethanechol, intraduodenal amino acids, and intraduodenal fat. Pancreatic volume, protein, and bicarbonate outputs to all doses of CCK-OP were inhibited significantly (P less than 0.05) in a competitive manner, consistent with the proposed mode of action of proglumide. In contrast, proglumide caused only minor and insignificant inhibition of the output responses to intravenous bethanechol. Virtually complete inhibition to all doses of intraduodenal amino acids and fat was observed with proglumide administration. If indeed proglumide is a specific CCK receptor antagonist, these results support the hypothesis that CCK is the major mediator of the intestinal phase of exocrine pancreatic secretion. PMID:2858160

  1. Exocrine and endocrine functional reserve in the course of chronic pancreatitis as studied by maximal stimulation tests.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, G; Bovo, P; Zamboni, M; Bosello, O; Filippini, M; Riela, A; Brocco, G; Rossi, L; Pelle, C; Chiavenato, A

    1992-01-01

    Thirty patients suffering from chronic alcoholic pancreatitis (18 calcified) were entered into a study of exocrine and endocrine pancreatic function based on two maximal stimulation tests, namely the secretin-cerulein test and the glucagon test with serum assays of C peptide. The glucagon test was also performed in 19 control subjects. In addition, 10 chronic pancreatitis patients and nine controls were subjected to an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with serum insulin determinations. C peptide basal values were decreased only in patients with severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (P less than 0.001), while delta C peptide values were also reduced in patients with moderate exocrine insufficiency (P less than 0.001). Lipase output correlated very well with delta C peptide values (P less than 0.001). While serum insulin levels during OGTT and C peptide basal values showed no significant differences between the chronic pancreatitis and control groups, delta C peptide values were significantly reduced in chronic pancreatitis patients (P less than 0.02). Both endocrine and exocrine function are impaired in chronic pancreatitis, as demonstrated by maximal tests, even in early stages of the disease. PMID:1728534

  2. Blame Conformity: Innocent Bystanders Can Be Blamed for a Crime as a Result of Misinformation from a Young, but Not Elderly, Adult Co-Witness

    PubMed Central

    Thorley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether or not exposing an eyewitness to a co-witness statement that incorrectly blames an innocent bystander for a crime can increase the likelihood of the eyewitness subsequently blaming the innocent bystander for the crime. It also examined whether or not the perceived age of the co-witness influences this effect. Participant eyewitnesses first watched a video of a crime featuring a perpetrator and an innocent bystander. They then read one of six bogus co-witness statements about the crime. All were presented as having been written by a female co-witness and they differed in terms of her age (young adult or elderly) and who she blamed for the crime (the perpetrator, the innocent bystander, or nobody). One week later the participants were asked who committed the crime. When the young adult co-witness had blamed the innocent bystander just over 40% of participants subsequently did the same. Few participants (less than 8%) in the other conditions subsequently blamed the innocent bystander. The elderly co-witness was also rated as less credible, less competent, and less accurate than the younger co-witness suggesting eyewitnesses were less likely to be influenced by her incorrect statement as they perceived her to be a less reliable source of information. The applied implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26230523

  3. Blame Conformity: Innocent Bystanders Can Be Blamed for a Crime as a Result of Misinformation from a Young, but Not Elderly, Adult Co-Witness.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study examined whether or not exposing an eyewitness to a co-witness statement that incorrectly blames an innocent bystander for a crime can increase the likelihood of the eyewitness subsequently blaming the innocent bystander for the crime. It also examined whether or not the perceived age of the co-witness influences this effect. Participant eyewitnesses first watched a video of a crime featuring a perpetrator and an innocent bystander. They then read one of six bogus co-witness statements about the crime. All were presented as having been written by a female co-witness and they differed in terms of her age (young adult or elderly) and who she blamed for the crime (the perpetrator, the innocent bystander, or nobody). One week later the participants were asked who committed the crime. When the young adult co-witness had blamed the innocent bystander just over 40% of participants subsequently did the same. Few participants (less than 8%) in the other conditions subsequently blamed the innocent bystander. The elderly co-witness was also rated as less credible, less competent, and less accurate than the younger co-witness suggesting eyewitnesses were less likely to be influenced by her incorrect statement as they perceived her to be a less reliable source of information. The applied implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:26230523

  4. 13C labelled cholesteryl octanoate breath test for assessing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ventrucci, M; Cipolla, A; Ubalducci, G; Roda, A; Roda, E

    1998-01-01

    Background—A non-invasive test for assessment of fat digestion has been developed based on the intraluminal hydrolysis of cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate by pancreatic esterase. 
Aims—To determine the diagnostic performance of this breath test in the assessment of exocrine pancreatic function. 
Methods—The test was performed in 20 healthy controls, 22 patients with chronic pancreatic disease (CPD), four with biliopancreatic diversion (BPD), and 32 with non-pancreatic digestive diseases (NPD); results were compared with those of other tubeless tests (faecal chymotrypsin and fluorescein dilaurate test). 
Results—Hourly recoveries of 13CO2 were significantly lower in CPD when compared with healthy controls or NPD. In patients with CPD with mild to moderate insufficiency, the curve of 13CO2 recovery was similar to that of healthy controls, while in those with severe insufficiency it was flat. In three patients with CPD with severe steatorrhoea, a repeat test after pancreatic enzyme supplementation showed a significant rise in 13CO2 recovery. The four BPD patients had low and delayed 13CO2 recovery. Only eight of the 32 patients with NPD had abnormal breath test results. There was a significant correlation between the results of the breath test and those of faecal chymotrypsin, the fluorescein dilaurate test, and faecal fat measurements. For the diagnosis of pancreatic disease using the three hour cumulative 13CO2 recovery test, the sensitivity was 68.2% and specificity 75.0%; values were similar to those of the other two tubeless pancreatic function tests. In seven healthy controls, nine patients with CPD, and nine with NPD a second breath test was performed using Na-[1-13C]octanoate and a pancreatic function index was calculated as the ratio of 13C recovery obtained in the two tests: at three hours this index was abnormal in eight patients with CPD and in three with NPD. 
Conclusion—The cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate breath test can be useful for the

  5. Diazepam binding inhibitor and the endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ostenson, C G; Ahrén, B; Johansson, O; Karlsson, S; Hilliges, M; Efendic, S

    1991-12-01

    Regulation of blood glucose homeostasis is complex. Its major hormonal regulators include insulin, glucagon and somatostatin from the endocrine pancreas. Secretion of these hormones is controlled predominantly by the supply of nutrients in the circulation but also by nerve signals and other peptides. Thus, it is likely that peptides, released from cells of the gut or endocrine pancreas or from peptidergic nerves, affect glucose homeostasis by modulating the secretion of insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. When searching for novel gut peptides with such effects, diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI) was isolated from the porcine small intestine. By immunocytochemistry, DBI has been demonstrated to occur not only in the gut but also in endocrine cells of the pancreatic islets, namely in the somatostatin-producing D-cells in pig and man, and in the glucagon-producing A-cells in rat. Porcine DBI (pDBI; 10(-8)-10(-7) M) has been shown to suppress glucose-stimulated release of insulin from both isolated islets and perfused pancreas of the rat. Furthermore, secretion of insulin stimulated by either the sulfonylurea glibenclamide or the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), was inhibited by the peptide. In contrast, arginine-induced release of insulin was unaffected by pDBI. Moreover, pDBI decreased arginine-induced release of glucagon from the perfused rat pancreas, whereas release of somatostatin was unchanged. Notably, rat DBI, structurally identical with rat acyl-CoA-binding protein, has also been demonstrated to inhibit glucose-stimulated release of insulin in the rat, both in vivo and in vitro. Long-term exposure of cultured fetal rat islets to pDBI (10(-8) M) significantly decreased the synthesis of DNA in islet cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1780037

  6. Imaging of the pancreas: Recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Vikas; Bano, Shahina

    2011-01-01

    A wide spectrum of anomalies of pancreas and the pancreatic duct system are commonly encountered at radiological evaluation. Diagnosing pancreatic lesions generally requires a multimodality approach. This review highlights the new advances in pancreatic imaging and their applications in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic pathologies. The mainstay techniques include computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), endoscopic ultrasound (EUS), radionuclide imaging (RNI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). PMID:21847450

  7. Bringing the Artificial Pancreas Home: Telemedicine Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Lanzola, Giordano; Capozzi, Davide; Serina, Nadia; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    The design and implementation of telemedicine systems able to support the artificial pancreas need careful choices to cope with technological requirements while preserving performance and decision support capabilities. This article addresses the issue of designing a general architecture for the telemedicine components of an artificial pancreas and illustrates a viable solution that is able to deal with different use cases and is amenable to support mobile-health implementations. The goal is to enforce interoperability among the components of the architecture and guarantee maximum flexibility for the ensuing implementations. Thus, the design stresses modularity and separation of concerns along with adoption of clearly defined protocols for interconnecting the necessary components. This accounts for the implementation of integrated telemedicine systems suitable as short-term monitoring devices for supporting validation of closed-loop algorithms as well as devices meant to provide a lifelong tighter control on the patient state once the artificial pancreas has become the preferred treatment for patients with diabetes. PMID:22226255

  8. The Pancreatic Duct Ligated (Mini)pig as a Model for Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Man.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Peter Colin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Kamphues, Josef; Möeler, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Modern therapy of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI) using pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT) has largely been very effective and has greatly helped in improving the nutritional status of patients with PEI and in increasing the life expectancy in cystic fibrosis. It is believed that the use of predictable large animal models could play an important role in assessing and developing new therapies. This article reviews the pancreatic duct ligated (adult) minipig as a chronic model of total PEI, with a detailed look at the influence of PEI and response to PERT on prececal compared to fecal digestibility, to directly investigate effects on protein and starch digestion and absorption. In addition, the piglet with PEI is reviewed as a model for PEI in young patients with the aim of further improving the therapy and nutritional status of young patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:27623555

  9. Occurrence and structural organization of the exocrine glands in the legs of ants.

    PubMed

    Billen, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Apart from their obvious locomotory function and hence the presence of muscle fibres, ant legs are also endowed with an astonishing variety of exocrine glands. This paper reviews the presence and structural variety of the 20 different glands that have so far been found in the legs of ants. Four of these glands are described for the first time in this paper. Glands have been described in the three leg pairs, although considerable differences may exist. Glands occur in the various leg segments. A number of glands, especially those located in the hindlegs, may have a function in the production of trail pheromones. Other possible functions that have been reported deal with antenna cleaning, production of lubricant substances and sex pheromones. PMID:18775512

  10. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition.

    PubMed

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I; Ramírez-Tortosa, M Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J; Quiles, José L

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  11. Recent advances in transport of water-soluble vitamins in organs of the digestive system: a focus on the colon and the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of water-soluble vitamin (WSV) transport in the large intestine and pancreas, two important organs of the digestive system that have only recently received their fair share of attention. WSV, a group of structurally unrelated compounds, are essential for normal cell function and development and, thus, for overall health and survival of the organism. Humans cannot synthesize WSV endogenously; rather, WSV are obtained from exogenous sources via intestinal absorption. The intestine is exposed to two sources of WSV: a dietary source and a bacterial source (i.e., WSV generated by the large intestinal microbiota). Contribution of the latter source to human nutrition/health has been a subject of debate and doubt, mostly based on the absence of specialized systems for efficient uptake of WSV in the large intestine. However, recent studies utilizing a variety of human and animal colon preparations clearly demonstrate that such systems do exist in the large intestine. This has provided strong support for the idea that the microbiota-generated WSV are of nutritional value to the host, and especially to the nutritional needs of the local colonocytes and their health. In the pancreas, WSV are essential for normal metabolic activities of all its cell types and for its exocrine and endocrine functions. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in the uptake of WSV and the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on the uptake processes. PMID:23989008

  12. Sunflower Oil but Not Fish Oil Resembles Positive Effects of Virgin Olive Oil on Aged Pancreas after Life-Long Coenzyme Q Addition

    PubMed Central

    González-Alonso, Adrián; Ramírez-Tortosa, César L.; Varela-López, Alfonso; Roche, Enrique; Arribas, María I.; Ramírez-Tortosa, M. Carmen; Giampieri, Francesca; Ochoa, Julio J.; Quiles, José L.

    2015-01-01

    An adequate pancreatic structure is necessary for optimal organ function. Structural changes are critical in the development of age-related pancreatic disorders. In this context, it has been reported that different pancreatic compartments from rats were affected according to the fat composition consumed. Since there is a close relationship between mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging, an experimental approach has been developed to gain more insight into this process in the pancreas. A low dosage of coenzyme Q was administered life-long in rats in order to try to prevent pancreatic aging-related alterations associated to some dietary fat sources. According to that, three groups of rats were fed normocaloric diets containing Coenzyme Q (CoQ) for two years, where virgin olive, sunflower, or fish oil was included as unique fat source. Pancreatic samples for microscopy and blood samples were collected at the moment of euthanasia. The main finding is that CoQ supplementation gives different results according to fat used in diet. When sunflower oil was the main fat in the diet, CoQ supplementation seems to improve endocrine pancreas structure and in particular β-cell mass resembling positive effects of virgin olive oil. Conversely, CoQ intake does not seem to improve the structural alterations of exocrine compartment previously observed in fish oil fed rats. Therefore CoQ may improve pancreatic alterations associated to the chronic intake of some dietary fat sources. PMID:26426013

  13. Recent advances in transport of water-soluble vitamins in organs of the digestive system: a focus on the colon and the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Said, Hamid M

    2013-11-01

    This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and regulation of water-soluble vitamin (WSV) transport in the large intestine and pancreas, two important organs of the digestive system that have only recently received their fair share of attention. WSV, a group of structurally unrelated compounds, are essential for normal cell function and development and, thus, for overall health and survival of the organism. Humans cannot synthesize WSV endogenously; rather, WSV are obtained from exogenous sources via intestinal absorption. The intestine is exposed to two sources of WSV: a dietary source and a bacterial source (i.e., WSV generated by the large intestinal microbiota). Contribution of the latter source to human nutrition/health has been a subject of debate and doubt, mostly based on the absence of specialized systems for efficient uptake of WSV in the large intestine. However, recent studies utilizing a variety of human and animal colon preparations clearly demonstrate that such systems do exist in the large intestine. This has provided strong support for the idea that the microbiota-generated WSV are of nutritional value to the host, and especially to the nutritional needs of the local colonocytes and their health. In the pancreas, WSV are essential for normal metabolic activities of all its cell types and for its exocrine and endocrine functions. Significant progress has also been made in understanding the mechanisms involved in the uptake of WSV and the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on the uptake processes. PMID:23989008

  14. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas. PMID:27232353

  15. Early Gastric Cancer Just above a Heterotopic Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Murabayashi, Toji; Kawaguchi, Shinya; Okuda, Naoko; Oyamada, Jun; Yabana, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    We report the first case of early gastric cancer just above a heterotopic pancreas for which the differential diagnosis was carcinoma arising from heterotopic pancreas. Routine upper gastrointestinal endoscopy in an 83-year-old man with sigmoid colon cancer revealed a gastric cancer in the lesser curvature of the antrum. Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) for evaluating the depth of tumor invasion revealed a hypoechoic mass in the submucosal layer. The depth of tumor invasion was diagnosed as muscularis propria. Distal gastrectomy and sigmoidectomy were performed. Histologically, the resected specimen of the stomach unexpectedly revealed a heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. They were not linked, and the heterotopic pancreas had no dysplasia. The gastric cancer had slightly invaded the submucosa. The hypoechoic mass on EUS was not the invasive tumor but the heterotopic pancreas. The preoperative staging of the gastric cancer on EUS was confounded by the presence of the heterotopic pancreas just below the gastric cancer. PMID:27482189

  16. Histomorphology of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) pancreas and association of increasing islet β-cell size with chronic hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Colegrove, Kathleen M; Venn-Watson, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic states mimicking prediabetes, including hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, elevated glucose, and fatty liver disease. Little is known, however, about dolphin pancreatic histomorphology. Distribution and area of islets, α, β, and δ cells were evaluated in pancreatic tissue from 22 dolphins (mean age 25.7years, range 0-51). Associations of these measurements were evaluated by sex, age, percent high glucose and lipids during the last year of life, and presence or absence of fatty liver disease and islet cell vacuolation. The most common pancreatic lesions identified were exocrine pancreas fibrosis (63.6%) and mild islet cell vacuolation (47.4%); there was no evidence of insulitis or amyloid deposition, changes commonly associated with type 2 diabetes. Dolphin islet architecture appears to be most similar to the pig, where α and β cells are localized to the central or periphery of the islet, respectively, or are well dispersed throughout the islet. Unlike pigs, large islets (greater than 10,000μm(2)) were common in dolphins, similar to that found in humans. A positive linear association was identified between dolphin age and islet area average, supporting a compensatory response similar to other species. The strongest finding in this study was a positive linear association between islet size, specifically β-cells, and percent blood samples with high cholesterol (greater than 280mg/dl, R(2)=0.57). This study is the most comprehensive assessment of the dolphin pancreas to date and may help direct future studies, including associations between chronic hypercholesterolemia and β-cell size. PMID:25745813

  17. Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus in Chronic Pancreatitis: Recommendations from PancreasFest 2012

    PubMed Central

    Rickels, Michael R.; Bellin, Melena; Toledo, Frederico G.S.; Robertson, R. Paul; Andersen, Dana K.; Chari, Suresh T.; Brand, Randall; Frulloni, Luca; Anderson, Michelle A.; Whitcomb, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Description Diabetes and glucose intolerance are common complications of chronic pancreatitis, yet clinical guidance on their detection, classification, and management is lacking. Methods A working group reviewed the medical problems, diagnostic methods, and treatment options for chronic pancreatitis-associated diabetes for a consensus meeting at PancreasFest 2012. Results Guidance Statement 1.1 Diabetes mellitus is common in chronic pancreatitis. While any patient with chronic pancreatitis should be monitored for development of diabetes, those with long-standing duration of disease, prior partial pancreatectomy, and early onset of calcific disease may be at higher risk. Those patients developing diabetes mellitus are likely to have co-existing pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Guidance Statement 1.2 Diabetes occurring secondary to chronic pancreatitis should be recognized as pancreatogenic diabetes (type 3c diabetes). Guidance Statement 2.1 The initial evaluation should include fasting glucose and HbA1c. These tests should be repeated annually. Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c requires further evaluation. Guidance Statement 2.2 Impairment in either fasting glucose or HbA1c should be further evaluated by a standard 75 gram oral glucose tolerance test. Guidance Statement 2.3 An absent pancreatic polypeptide response to mixed-nutrient ingestion is a specific indicator of type 3c diabetes. Guidance Statement 2.4 Assessment of pancreatic endocrine reserve, and importantly that of functional beta-cell mass, should be performed as part of the evaluation and follow-up for total pancreatectomy with islet autotransplantation (TPIAT). Guidance Statement 3 Patients with pancreatic diabetes shall be treated with specifically tailored medical nutrition and pharmacologic therapies. Conclusions Physicians should evaluate and treat glucose intolerance in patients with pancreatitis. PMID:23890130

  18. Assessment of Islet Function Following Islet and Pancreas Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dy, Emily C.; Harlan, David M.; Rother, Kristina I.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreas and islet transplant recipients are monitored using various metabolic and imaging methods. The inaccessibility of the transplanted whole pancreas and of the isolated islets poses specific problems (eg, all assessment techniques are indirect). Although successful pancreas transplantation typically restores normal glucose homeostasis, islet transplantation into the liver does not completely normalize islet hormone secretion and glucose metabolism. Development of better testing strategies, such as direct islet imaging, will significantly advance the field. PMID:16879785

  19. Pancreaticoduodenectomy for metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Sara; Martín-Fernández, José; Lasa, Inmaculada; Busteros, Ignacio; García-Moreno, Francisca

    2010-09-01

    Metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the pancreas is rare. A 46-year-old woman was diagnosed with uterine leiomyosarcoma and underwent surgery. Thereafter, recurrences in the lung and subsequently in the pancreas were diagnosed. These lesions were resected and diagnosed as metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma. We report a rare case of uterine leiomyosarcoma with metastasis to the lung and pancreas, both of which were resected using aggressive surgery. PMID:20851807

  20. OPTN/SRTR 2012 Annual Data Report: pancreas.

    PubMed

    Israni, A K; Skeans, M A; Gustafson, S K; Schnitzler, M A; Wainright, J L; Carrico, R J; Tyler, K H; Kades, L A; Kandaswamy, R; Snyder, J J; Kasiske, B L

    2014-01-01

    The number of pancreas transplants has decreased over the past decade, most notably numbers of pancreas after kidney (pak) and pancreas transplant alone (pta) procedures. This decrease may be mitigated in the future when changes to national pancreas allocation policy approved by the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network Board of Directors in 2010 are implemented. The new policy will combine waiting lists for pak, pta, and simultaneous pancreas-kidney (spk) transplants), and give equal priority to candidates for all three procedures. This policy change may also eliminate geographic variation in waiting times caused by geographic differences in allocation policy. Deceased donor pancreas donation rates have been declining since 2005, and the donation rate remains low. The outcomes of pancreas grafts are difficult to describe due to lack of a uniform definition of graft failure in the transplant community. However long-term survival is better for spk versus pak and pta transplants. This may represent the difficulty of detecting rejection in the absence of a simultaneously transplanted kidney. The challenges of pancreas transplant are reflected in high rates of rehospitalization, most occurring within the first 6 months posttransplant. Pancreas transplant is associated with higher incidence of rejection compared with kidney transplant. PMID:24373167

  1. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP.

    PubMed

    Lath, Chinar O; Agrawal, Dilpesh S; Timins, Michael E; Wein, Melissa M

    2015-12-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  2. Cystic lesions of the pancreas: challenging issues in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyoung-Chul; Kim, Myung-Hwan; Hwang, Chang Yun; Lee, Tae Yoon; Lee, Sang Soo; Seo, Dong-Wan; Lee, Sung Koo

    2008-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are being recognized with increasing frequency and have become a common finding in clinical practice. Cystic lesions of the pancreas display a wide spectrum of histopathology and biologic behavior. Differentiating among lesions and choosing an optimal therapy is challenging, and evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis, management, and follow-up for cystic lesions of the pancreas are needed. This review describes the epidemiology and typical features of cystic lesions of the pancreas, including a summary of commonly used descriptive terms, as well as the primary issues in the differential diagnosis and management of these lesions. PMID:18076739

  3. Portal annular pancreas: the pancreatic duct ring sign on MRCP

    PubMed Central

    Lath, Chinar O.; Agrawal, Dilpesh S.; Timins, Michael E.; Wein, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Portal annular pancreas is a rare pancreatic variant in which the uncinate process of the pancreas extends and fuses to the dorsal surface of the body of the pancreas by surrounding the portal vein. It is asymptomatic, but it can be mistaken for a pancreatic head mass on imaging and could also have serious consequences during pancreatic surgery, if unrecognized. We report this case of a 53-year-old female patient who was diagnosed to have portal annular pancreas on the basis of an unusual course (ring appearance) of the main pancreatic duct on magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography, not described earlier in the radiology literature. PMID:26649117

  4. Sources of beta cells inside the pancreas.

    PubMed

    De Groef, Sofie; Staels, Willem; Van Gassen, Naomi; Lemper, Marie; Yuchi, Yixing; Sojoodi, Mozhdeh; Bussche, Leen; Heremans, Yves; Leuckx, Gunter; De Leu, Nico; Van de Casteele, Mark; Baeyens, Luc; Heimberg, Harry

    2016-09-01

    The generation of beta(-like) cells to compensate for their absolute or relative shortage in type 1 and type 2 diabetes is an obvious therapeutic strategy. Patients first received grafts of donor islet cells over 25 years ago, but this procedure has not become routine in clinical practice because of a donor cell shortage and (auto)immune problems. Transplantation of differentiated embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells may overcome some but not all the current limitations. Reprogramming exocrine cells towards functional beta(-like) cells would offer an alternative abundant and autologous source of beta(-like) cells. This review focuses on work by our research group towards achieving such a source of cells. It summarises a presentation given at the 'Can we make a better beta cell?' symposium at the 2015 annual meeting of the EASD. It is accompanied by two other reviews on topics from this symposium (by Amin Ardestani and Kathrin Maedler, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3892-9 , and by Heiko Lickert and colleagues, DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3949-9 ) and a commentary by the Session Chair, Shanta Persaud (DOI: 10.1007/s00125-016-3870-2 ). PMID:27053238

  5. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R.; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W.; Pandiri, Arun R.; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:26973378

  6. Nonproliferative and Proliferative Lesions of the Gastrointestinal Tract, Pancreas and Salivary Glands of the Rat and Mouse.

    PubMed

    Nolte, Thomas; Brander-Weber, Patricia; Dangler, Charles; Deschl, Ulrich; Elwell, Michael R; Greaves, Peter; Hailey, Richard; Leach, Michael W; Pandiri, Arun R; Rogers, Arlin; Shackelford, Cynthia C; Spencer, Andrew; Tanaka, Takuji; Ward, Jerrold M

    2016-01-01

    The INHAND (International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria for Lesions in Rats and Mice) project is a joint initiative of the Societies of Toxicologic Pathology from Europe (ESTP), Great Britain (BSTP), Japan (JSTP), and North America (STP) to develop an internationally accepted nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for nonproliferative and proliferative lesions in laboratory animals. The purpose of this publication is to provide a standardized nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for classifying lesions in the digestive system including the salivary glands and the exocrine pancreas of laboratory rats and mice. Most lesions are illustrated by color photomicrographs. The standardized nomenclature, the diagnostic criteria, and the photomicrographs are also available electronically on the Internet (http://www.goreni.org/). Sources of material included histopathology databases from government, academia, and industrial laboratories throughout the world. Content includes spontaneous and age related lesions as well as lesions induced by exposure to test items. Relevant infectious and parasitic lesions are included as well. A widely accepted and utilized international harmonization of nomenclature and diagnostic criteria for the digestive system will decrease misunderstandings among regulatory and scientific research organizations in different countries and provide a common language to increase and enrich international exchanges of information among toxicologists and pathologists. PMID:26973378

  7. Computational Characterization of Redox Non-Innocence in Cobalt-Bis(Diaryldithiolene)-Catalyzed Proton Reduction.

    PubMed

    Panetier, Julien A; Letko, Christopher S; Tilley, T Don; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2016-01-12

    Localized orbital bonding analysis (LOBA) was employed to probe the oxidation state in cobalt-bis(diaryldithiolene)-catalyzed proton reduction in nonaqueous media. LOBA calculations provide both the oxidation state and chemically intuitive views of bonding in cobalt-bis(diaryldithiolene) species and therefore allow characterization of the role of the redox non-innocent dithiolene ligand. LOBA results show that the reduction of the monoanion species [1Br](-) is metal-centered and gives a cobalt(II) ion species, [1Br](2-), coordinated to two dianionic ene-1,2-dithiolates. This electronic configuration is in agreement with the solution magnetic moment observed for the analogous salt [1F](2-) (μeff = 2.39 μB). Protonation of [1Br](2-) yields the cobalt(III)-hydride [1Br(CoH)](-) species in which the Co-H bond is computed to be highly covalent (Löwdin populations close to 0.50 on cobalt and hydrogen atoms). Further reduction of [1Br(CoH)](-) forms a more basic cobalt(II)-H intermediate [1Br(CoH)](2-) (S = 0) from which protonation at sulfur gives a S-H bond syn to the Co-H bond. Formation of a cobalt-dihydrogen [1Br(CoH2)](-) intermediate is calculated to occur via a homocoupling (H(•) + H(•) → H2) step with a free energy of activation of 5.9 kcal/mol in solution (via C-PCM approach). PMID:26598074

  8. A new type of exocrine gland and its function in mass recruitment in the ant Cylindromyrmex whymperi (Formicidae, Cerapachyinae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gobin, Bruno; Rüppell, Olav; Hartmann, Annegret; Jungnickel, Harald; Morgan, David; Billen, Johan

    2001-08-01

    Workers of the ant Cylindromyrmex whymperi display mass trail recruitment. Bioassays show that the trail pheromone originates from a unique gland between abdominal sternites 6 and 7. The gland has a hitherto unknown structural organization. Upon leaving the secretory cell, the duct cell widens to form a sclerotized pear-shaped reservoir chamber, lined with multiple duct cells. Each duct thus forms a miniature reservoir for the secretions of each single secretory cell, a novel structural arrangement in exocrine glands of social Hymenoptera.

  9. Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013.

    PubMed

    Hovorka, R

    2015-08-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  10. Design Considerations for Artificial Pancreas Pivotal Studies.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steven J; Beck, Roy W

    2016-07-01

    The development of artificial pancreas systems has evolved to the point that pivotal studies designed to assess efficacy and safety are in progress or soon to be initiated. These pivotal studies are intended to provide the necessary data to gain clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, coverage by payers, and adoption by patients and clinicians. Although there will not be one design that is appropriate for every system, there are certain aspects of protocol design that will be considerations in all pivotal studies designed to assess efficacy and safety. One key aspect of study design is the intervention to be used by the control group. A case can be made that the control group should use the currently available best technology, which is sensor-augmented pump therapy. However, an equally, if not more, compelling case can be made that the control intervention should be usual care. In this Perspective, we elaborate on this issue and provide a pragmatic approach to the design of clinical trials of artificial pancreas systems. PMID:27330125

  11. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    CARLOTTO, Jorge Roberto Marcante; TORREZ, Franz Robert Apodaca; GONZALEZ, Adriano Miziara; LINHARES, Marcelo Moura; TRIVIÑO, Tarcisio; HERANI-FILHO, Benedito; GOLDENBERG, Alberto; LOPES-FILHO, Gaspar de Jesus; LOBO, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. Aim: To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. Methods: A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Results: Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. PMID:27438034

  12. Ectopic Pancreas in the Wall of the Small Intestine.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Jose Salvador; Stauffer, John A

    2016-07-01

    Ectopic pancreas is an uncommon and benign finding. However, these lesions can cause symptoms including abdominal pain and often require removal. We present the case of a 27-year-old patient with long-standing vague abdominal symptoms eventually found to have ectopic pancreas tissue in the proximal jejunum. PMID:26892166

  13. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Pancreas: Mystery and Facts.

    PubMed

    Raghavapuram, Saikiran; Vaid, Arjun; Rego, Rayburn F

    2015-08-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the pancreas is very rare as pancreas does not have any squamous cells. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature so far. We describe such a case where in the patient presented with painless jaundice. CT and EUS confirmed the pancreatic mass biopsy of which showed squamous cell cancer. PMID:26376556

  14. Cholesteryl octanoate breath test. Preliminary studies on a new noninvasive test of human pancreatic exocrine function.

    PubMed

    Cole, S G; Rossi, S; Stern, A; Hofmann, A F

    1987-12-01

    A new breath test for noninvasive assessment of pancreatic exocrine function in humans was developed. The test is based on the hydrolysis of cholesteryl-[1-14C]octanoate by pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase (cholesterol esterase) with subsequent absorption and hepatic metabolism of the liberated octanoate to 14CO2. The rate at which 14CO2 appears in breath appeared to be proportional to the rate of hydrolysis. The substrate is administered as a gum acacia stabilized emulsion of vegetable oil (18 g) containing cholesteryl octanoate (2 g; 4.4 microCi) dispersed in a 500-ml isotonic meal. Tests were performed in 6 healthy volunteers and 11 patients with pancreatic disease with varying degrees of steatorrhea. In healthy subjects, 14CO2 output was rapid with peak output occurring at 60-90 min in all subjects; cumulative output in 4 h averaged 30%. Duplicate studies indicated that the time-course of 14CO2 recovery was reproducible. The pattern of 14CO2 output in patients with pancreatic disease varied widely. Patients without steatorrhea (fecal fat less than or equal to 7 g/day) or with mild steatorrhea (fecal fat 7-11 g/day) had normal or near normal patterns of 14CO2 output, whereas patients with moderate or severe steatorrhea (fecal fat greater than 11 g/day) expired 14CO2 at a rate one-third to one-tenth that of the healthy volunteers. Addition of pancreatic enzyme supplementation to the test meal increased 14CO2 output in 6 of 6 patients with moderate or severe steatorrhea, suggesting that the activity of pancreatic carboxyl ester lipase was rate limiting in these patients. In an additional study in a healthy volunteer, 14CO2 and 13CO2 were measured simultaneously in breath after ingestion of a test meal containing cholesteryl-[1-13C]octanoate and 14C-octanoate. 14CO2 was expired more rapidly than 13CO2, suggesting that hydrolysis of the substrate may also be rate limiting in healthy volunteers. These studies indicate that severe pancreatic exocrine dysfunction can

  15. Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with ductal obliteration of the distal pancreas in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed Central

    Kerremans, R P; Penninckx, F M; De Groote, J; Fevery, J

    1987-01-01

    Subtotal resection of the head of the pancreas combined with duct obliteration of the distal pancreas by prolamine was performed in 12 selected patients who had chronic alcohol-induced pancreatitis with most destruction in the proximal pancreas. The main indication for operation was intractable pain. There was no postoperative mortality but morbidity was high when no pancreaticojejunostomy was constructed. After a follow-up period of 32 months, lasting pain relief was obtained in 10 patients; pseudocyst formation occurred in three patients; calcification of the distal pancreas, absent before operation, was demonstrated in four of six patients; six of 11 nondiabetic patients became hyperglycemic either abruptly (1 patient) or progressively (5 patients); quality of life improved in most patients. This procedure preserves the stomach, duodenum, spleen, distal pancreas and common bile duct if possible. However, pancreatic ductal obliteration with prolamine does not prevent relapses of chronic pancreatitis. PMID:3827358

  16. Bacterial overgrowth in the duodenum of dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Williams, D A; Batt, R M; McLean, L

    1987-07-15

    Bacterial overgrowth (greater than 10(5) colony-forming units/ml duodenal juice) in the duodenum was demonstrated in 8 of 11 dogs with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In 4 of these 8 dogs, the overgrowth included large numbers (greater than 10(4) colony-forming units/ml) of obligate anaerobic bacteria and was associated with decreased activities of several brush border marker enzymes and, in 2 dogs, with partial villous atrophy in the jejunum. Changes in the jejunal mucosa of the remaining dogs (with either no overgrowth or overgrowth of aerobic bacteria alone) were characterized by increased activities of some brush border disaccharides and of lysosomal hydrolases. One dog was euthanatized without treatment, at the owner's request. The response of 4 of the remaining 10 dogs treated with enzyme replacement alone was poor or suboptimal, and all of these 4 dogs had bacterial overgrowth. One of these dogs had an excellent clinical response when also given oxytetracycline orally for 14 days, but the other 3 dogs did not improve further in response to the same treatment. It was concluded that bacterial overgrowth in the duodenum is common in dogs with EPI and that, when such overgrowth includes large numbers of obligate anaerobes, there may be associated biochemical and morphologic abnormalities in jejunal mucosa. Functional disturbances related to abnormal intestinal microflora may be responsible for the failure of some dogs with EPI to respond fully to oral pancreatic enzyme supplementation without antibiotic therapy. PMID:3610795

  17. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions. PMID:26064101

  18. Protein-losing enteropathy in a dog with lymphangiectasia, lymphoplasmacytic enteritis and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Alarcón, C A; Beristaín-Ruiz, D M; Pérez-Casio, F; Rivera, R; Ochoa, G; Martín-Orozco, U

    2012-01-01

    This is a report of seven-year-old male Akita mixed dog, with protein-losing enteropathy (PLE). He had a history of chronic vomiting and diarrhea with anorexia/hyporexia. Previously he suffered acute abdomen about eight months prior to this visit. Our dog showed uncommon combination of diseases that could cause PLE since it was affected by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), intestinal lymphangiectasia (IL), and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). The dog had most of the abnormalities found in IL, as well as hypoalbuminemia, hyperglobulinemia, lymphopenia, hypocalcemia, and hypercholesterolemia. During endoscopy exam, we found changes characteristic of IL such as irregular small white spots. We took biopsies from stomach, duodenum, and cecum. These biopsies showed infiltration by lymphocytes and plasmatic cells in the lamina propria also, the duodenal biopsies showed moderate dilation of the lymphatic vessels. The patient had 2.1 µg/mL of TLI, this result was compatible with EPI. We assume that the first pathology in this animal was IBD, which caused chronic pancreatitis (CP) that in turn progressed to EPI. It is also possible that IL was secondary to IBD. We have reported for the first time the correlation of IBD and EPI in dogs. This should change our approach to treating chronic diarrhea in dogs. Therefore, we propose that dogs diagnosed with EPI should also be subjected to endoscopy and intestinal biopsy. Similarly, to rule out secondary EPI, TLI should be measured routinely in dogs with IBD. PMID:23106499

  19. VIP and its homologous increase vascular conductance in certain endocrine and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, L.J.; Connors, J.M.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-04-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and related structural homologues on tissue vascular conductances were investigated in anesthetized male rats. VIP, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), secretin, growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), or saline was infused intravenously over 4 min. Tissue blood flows were measured during this time by use of {sup 141}Ce-labeled microspheres. Circulating thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) levels were determined before and at 20 min and 2 h after treatment. Marked increases in thyroid, pancreatic, and salivary gland vascular Cs occurred during peptide infusion with the order of potency correlating with the degree of structural homology to VIP. PHI and secretin produced maximal increases in vascular Cs, which were the same as those obtained with VIP. Circulating TSH, T{sub 3}, and T{sub 4} levels were not different from values in saline-infused rats after peptide treatments that caused striking increases in thyroid vascular C. These observations indicate that the vascular beds of certain endocrine and exocrine glands are responsive to the vasodilatory action of VIP and related homologues with the order of potency corresponding to the degree of structural homology to VIP. These results are also consistent with the proposal that structural homologues of VIP act at the same vascular receptor as VIP. Alternative, the involvement of different vascular receptors, acting through the same mechanism at a level beyond the receptor site, cannot be excluded.

  20. Starch Origin and Thermal Processing Affect Starch Digestion in a Minipig Model of Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Mößeler, Anne; Vagt, Sandra; Beyerbach, Martin; Kamphues, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Although steatorrhea is the most obvious symptom of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), enzymatic digestion of protein and starch is also impaired. Low praecaecal digestibility of starch causes a forced microbial fermentation accounting for energy losses and meteorism. To optimise dietetic measures, knowledge of praecaecal digestibility of starch is needed but such information from PEI patients is rare. Minipigs fitted with an ileocaecal fistula with (n = 3) or without (n = 3) pancreatic duct ligation (PL) were used to estimate the rate of praecaecal disappearance (pcD) of starch. Different botanical sources of starch (rice, amaranth, potato, and pea) were fed either raw or cooked. In the controls (C), there was an almost complete pcD (>92%) except for potato starch (61.5%) which was significantly lower. In PL pcD of raw starch was significantly lower for all sources of starch except for amaranth (87.9%). Thermal processing increased pcD in PL, reaching values of C for starch from rice, potato, and pea. This study clearly underlines the need for precise specification of starch used for patients with specific dietetic needs like PEI. Data should be generated in suitable animal models or patients as tests in healthy individuals would not have given similar conclusions. PMID:26064101

  1. Cystadenomas and Cystadenocarcinomas of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Le Borgne, Joël; de Calan, Loïc; Partensky, Christian

    1999-01-01

    Objective To review the features of patients with benign and malignant cystadenomas of the pancreas, focusing on preoperative diagnostic accuracy and long-term outcome, especially for nonoperated serous cystadenomas and resected cystadenocarcinomas. Summary Background Data Serous cystadenomas (SCAs) are benign tumors. Mucinous cystic neoplasms should be resected because of the risk of malignant progression. A correct preoperative diagnosis of tumor type is based on morphologic criteria. Despite the high quality of recent imaging procedures, the diagnosis frequently remains uncertain. Invasive investigations such as endosonography and diagnostic aspiration of cystic fluid may be helpful, but their assessment is limited to small series. The management of typical SCA may require resection or observation. Survival after pancreatic resection seems better for cystadenocarcinomas (MCACs) than for ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas. Methods Three hundred ninety-eight cases of cystadenomas of the pancreas were collected between 1984 and 1996 in 73 institutions of the French Surgical Association. Clinical presentation, radiologic evaluation, and surgical procedures were analyzed for 144 operated SCAs, 150 mucinous cystadenomas (MCAs), and 78 MCACs. The outcome of 372 operated patients and 26 nonoperated patients with SCA was analyzed. Results Cystadenomas represented 76% of all primary pancreatic cystic tumors (398/522). An asymptomatic tumor was discovered in 32% of patients with SCA, 26% of those with MCA, and 13% of those with MCAC. The tumor was located in the head or uncinate process of the pancreas in 38% of those with SCA, 27% of those with MCA, and 49% of those with MCAC. A communication between the cyst and pancreatic duct was discovered in 0.6% of those with SCA, 6% of those with MCA, and 10% of those with MCAC. The main investigations were ultrasonography and computed tomography (94% for SCA, MCA, and MCAC), endosonography (34%, 28%, and 22% for SCA, MCA, and

  2. Premalignant cystic neoplasms of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Dudeja, Vikas; Allen, Peter J

    2015-02-01

    Due to increasing utilization of cross-sectional imaging, asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are frequently being diagnosed. Many of these cysts have premalignant potential and offer a unique opportunity for cancer prevention. Mucinous cystic neoplasm and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm are the major premalignant cystic neoplasms of pancreas. The prediction of the risk of malignancy (incidental and future risk of malignant transformation) and balancing the risks of watchful waiting with that of operative management with associated mortality and morbidity is the key to the management of these lesions. We review the literature that has contributed to the development of our approach to the management of these cystic neoplasms. We provide an overview of the key features used in diagnosis and in predicting malignancy. Particular attention is given to the natural history and management decision making. PMID:25726053

  3. MD-Logic Artificial Pancreas System

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Eran; Nimri, Revital; Miller, Shahar; Grunberg, Eli A.; Phillip, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Current state-of-the-art artificial pancreas systems are either based on traditional linear control theory or rely on mathematical models of glucose-insulin dynamics. Blood glucose control using these methods is limited due to the complexity of the biological system. The aim of this study was to describe the principles and clinical performance of the novel MD-Logic Artificial Pancreas (MDLAP) System. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The MDLAP applies fuzzy logic theory to imitate lines of reasoning of diabetes caregivers. It uses a combination of control-to-range and control-to-target strategies to automatically regulate individual glucose levels. Feasibility clinical studies were conducted in seven adults with type 1 diabetes (aged 19–30 years, mean diabetes duration 10 ± 4 years, mean A1C 6.6 ± 0.7%). All underwent 14 full, closed-loop control sessions of 8 h (fasting and meal challenge conditions) and 24 h. RESULTS The mean peak postprandial (overall sessions) glucose level was 224 ± 22 mg/dl. Postprandial glucose levels returned to <180 mg/dl within 2.6 ± 0.6 h and remained stable in the normal range for at least 1 h. During 24-h closed-loop control, 73% of the sensor values ranged between 70 and 180 mg/dl, 27% were >180 mg/dl, and none were <70 mg/dl. There were no events of symptomatic hypoglycemia during any of the trials. CONCLUSIONS The MDLAP system is a promising tool for individualized glucose control in patients with type 1 diabetes. It is designed to minimize high glucose peaks while preventing hypoglycemia. Further studies are planned in the broad population under daily-life conditions. PMID:20150292

  4. A morphometric study of human pancreas in Nepalese people.

    PubMed

    Basnet, K S; Thapa, T P; Upreti, R P; Dangol, P M S; Shrestha, R N; Dhungel, S

    2011-06-01

    Considering the seriousness of pancreatic diseases and the utmost importance of its correct diagnosis and treatment, a morphometric study of pancreas among Nepalese population has emerged as a demand of present time. This study was carried out to establish a normal dimension of pancreas which could be a guideline for the correct diagnosis, treatment and research on various diseases related to it. Thus, a descriptive type of study was done within a period of eight years of time (2004-2011) on 40 pancreases of both sexes and different age groups, collected from embalmed cadavers from four medical colleges of Kathmandu, Nepal. The obtained specimens of pancreas were classified according to the age and sex. Simultaneously, the weight and length were measured. The data was statistically analyzed and compared, which revealed that the mean size of pancreas was significantly larger in below forty years of age group. Although, there was no significant difference in the size of pancreas between male and female, the pancreas of male subjects was found larger. Thus, the result of the present study not only provides standard dimension of pancreas in Nepalese peoples but also reveals that it is larger in younger people and males. PMID:22364088

  5. Electrocatalytic Reduction of CO2 by Group 6 M(CO)6 Species without "Non-Innocent" Ligands.

    PubMed

    Grice, Kyle A; Saucedo, Cesar

    2016-06-20

    To understand the electrocatalytic CO2 reduction of metal carbonyl complexes without "non-innocent" ligands, the electrochemical responses of group 6 M(CO)6 (M = Cr, Mo, or W) and group 7 M2(CO)10 (M = Mn or Re) complexes were examined under Ar and CO2 at a glassy carbon electrode. All of the complexes showed changes in their cyclic voltammograms under CO2. The group 6 hexacarbonyl species show a significant increase in current under CO2 during metal-based reduction, corresponding to catalytic reduction of CO2. Bulk electrolysis experiments with Mo(CO)6 showed that CO was the primary product. The group 7 dimers showed very little change during metal-based reduction, but return oxidation responses disappeared, indicative of a chemical reaction after exposure to CO2 without catalysis. Addition of H2O, a proton source, to the solutions under CO2 decreased the catalytic current of the group 6 carbonyls and had no effect on the responses of the group 7 carbonyls. The group 6 M(CO)6 species are notable in that that they are effective catalysts without the need for an added "non-innocent" ligand such as 2,2'-bipyridine. PMID:27227447

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound in the diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Rajesh; Manrai, Manish; Thandassery, Ragesh Babu; Alfadda, Abdulrahman A

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has become an important component in the diagnosis and treatment of carcinoma pancreas. With the advent of advanced imaging techniques and tissue acquisition methods the role of EUS is becoming increasingly important. Small pancreatic tumors can be reliably diagnosed with EUS. EUS guided fine needle aspiration establishes diagnosis in some cases. EUS plays an important role in staging of carcinoma pancreas and in some important therapeutic methods that include celiac plexus neurolysis, EUS guided biliary drainage and drug delivery. In this review we attempt to review the role of EUS in diagnosis and management of carcinoma pancreas. PMID:26839647

  7. The Cyan Fluorescent Protein (CFP) Transgenic Mouse as a Model for Imaging Pancreatic Exocrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Hop S Tran; Kimura, Hiroaki; Kaushal, Sharmeela; Snyder, Cynthia S; Reynoso, Jose; Hoffman, Robert M; Bouvet, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Context The use of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging has opened many new areas of research. Among the important advances in the field have been the development of transgenic mice expressing various fluorescent proteins. Objective To report whole-body and organ-specific fluorescence imaging to characterize the transgenic cyan fluorescent protein mouse. Design Mice were imaged using two devices. Brightfield images were obtained with the OV100 Small Animal Imaging System (Olympus Corp., Tokyo, Japan). Fluorescence imaging was performed under the cyan fluorescent protein filter using the iBox Small Animal Imaging System (UVP, Upland, CA, USA). Intervention All animals were sacrificed immediately before imaging. They were imaged before and throughout multiple steps of a complete necropsy. Harvested organs were also imaged with both devices. Selected organs were then frozen and processed for histology, fluorescence microscopy, and H&E staining. Fluorescence microscopy was performed with an Olympus IMT-2 inverted fluorescence microscope. Main outcome measure Determination of fluorescence intensity of different organs. Results Surprisingly, we found that there is differential enhancement of fluorescence among organs; most notably, the pancreas stands out from the rest of the gastrointestinal tract, displaying the strongest fluorescence of all organs in the mouse. Fluorescence microscopy demonstrated that the cyan fluorescent protein fluorescence resided in the acinar cells of the pancreas and not the islet cells. Conclusions The cyan fluorescent protein mouse should lead to a deeper understanding of pancreatic function and pathology, including cancer. PMID:19287108

  8. Experimental analysis of the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic porcine pancreas and preliminary case study on the human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Wex, C; Fröhlich, M; Brandstädter, K; Bruns, C; Stoll, A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the mechanical properties of the pancreas. Up to now, the mechanical properties of the pancreas are not sufficiently characterized. The possibility of intraoperative mechanical testing of pathological pancreata will allow the classification of pancreatic diseases in the future. The application of mechanical parameters instead of the intraoperative frozen section analysis shortens waiting times in the operating room. This study proves the general applicability of shear rheology for the determination of the mechanical properties of pancreas and the assessment of graft quality for transplantation. Porcine and human pancreas samples were examined ex vivo and a nonlinear viscoelastic behavior was observed. Pancreas was found to be more viscous than liver but both abdominal organs showed a similar flow behavior. The shear deformation dependence of healthy human pancreas was similar to porcine pancreas. An increase in the post-mortem time led to an increase in the complex modulus for a post-mortem time up to 8.5 days. Histological investigations showed that an increased amount of collagen coincides with the stiffening of the pancreatic tissue. PMID:25460416

  9. Monoclonal Antibodies as Probes for Unique Antigens in Secretory Cells of Mixed Exocrine Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basbaum, C. B.; Mann, J. K.; Chow, A. W.; Finkbeiner, W. E.

    1984-07-01

    In the past, it has been difficult to identify the secretory product and control mechanisms associated with individual cell types making up mixed exocrine organs. This report establishes the feasibility of using immunological methods to characterize both the biochemical constituents and regulatory mechanisms associated with secretory cells in the trachea. Monoclonal antibodies directed against components of tracheal mucus were produced by immunizing mice with dialyzed, desiccated secretions harvested from tracheal organ culture. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that of the total 337 hybridomas screened, 100 produced antibodies recognizing goblet cell granules; 64, gland cell granules; and 3, antigen confined to the ciliated apical surface of the epithelium. The tracheal goblet cell antibody described in this report was strongly cross-reactive with intestinal goblet cells, as well as with a subpopulation of submandibular gland cells, but not with cells of Brunner's glands or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The serous cell antibody was not cross-reactive with goblet, Brunner's gland, or submandibular cells, or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The antibody directed against the apical membrane of ciliated cells did not cross-react with gland or goblet cells or the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum. Monoclonal antibodies, therefore, represent probes by which products unique to specific cells or parts of cells in the trachea can be distinguished. The antibodies, when used in enzyme immunoassays, can be used to quantitatively monitor secretion by individual cell types under a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. They also provide the means for purification and characterization of cell-specific products by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  10. The effect of exocrine pancreatic function on chloramphenicol pharmacokinetics in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, C J; Reed, M D; Stern, R C; Aronoff, S C; Yamashita, T S; Blumer, J L

    1988-04-01

    The effect of exocrine pancreatic function on the pharmacokinetics of the choramphenicol oral capsule (CAP-base), chloramphenicol palmitate oral liquid (CAP-P), and chloramphenicol succinate intravenous (CAP-S) formulations was evaluated in 10 patients, aged 16-30 yr, with cystic fibrosis. Pancreatic insufficiency was assessed in each patient by measuring the absorption of p-amino-benzoic acid after oral administration of N-benzoyl-L-tyrosyl-p-aminobenzoic acid which requires chymotrypsin to cleave p-aminobenzoic from the parent molecule. In a controlled cross-over design, the overall biodisposition of each formulation was assessed in each patient with or without concurrent administration of oral pancreatic enzymes. The relative amounts of active chloramphenicol available in systemic circulation was CAP-base greater than CAP-S greater than CAP-P. Pancreatic enzyme replacement had little effect on the biodisposition parameters for the CAP-base and CAP-S formulation, but significantly increased the peak concentration and bioavailability of the CAP-P formulation. Although pancreatic enzyme replacement improved the absorption characteristics of the CAP-P formulation, absorption remained prolonged and unreliable. Serum concentration-time profiles for either CAP-base or CAP-S consistently exceeded the MIC of important nonpseudomonal pathogens. This finding was not observed after CAP-P administration independent of pancreatic enzyme replacement. The results of this study support the continued clinical use of either CAP-base or CAP-S, but the cautious use of CAP-P formulations in CF patients with concurrent pancreatic insufficiency. PMID:3374992

  11. Activation by ATP of a P2U 'nucleotide' receptor in an exocrine cell.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, S. C.; Shuttleworth, T. J.

    1995-01-01

    1. We employed the perforated patch whole-cell technique to investigate the effects of ATP and other related nucleotides on membrane conductances in avian exocrine salt gland cells. 2. ATP (10 microM-1 mM) evoked an increase in maxi-K+ and Cl- conductances with a reversal potential of -35 mV. At lower concentrations of ATP (< or = 100 microM) responses were generally oscillatory with a sustained response observed at higher concentrations (> or = 200 microM). 3. Both oscillatory and sustained responses were abolished by the removal of bath Ca2+. In cells preincubated in extracellular saline containing reduced Ca2+, the application of ATP resulted in a transient increase in current. 4. As increasing concentrations of ATP (and related nucleotides) evoked a graded sequence of events with little run-down we were able to establish a rank order of potency in single cells. The order of potency of ATP analogues and agonists of the various P2-receptor subtypes was UTP > ATP = 2-methylthio-ATP > ADP. Adenosine (1 microM-1 mM), AMP (1 microM-1 mM), alpha,beta-methylene-ATP (1 microM-1 mM) and beta,gamma-methylene-ATP (1 microM-1 mM) were without effect. 5. In conclusion, although unable to preclude a role for a P2Y-receptor, our results suggest that ATP binds to a P2U-receptor increasing [Ca2+]i and subsequently activating Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ and Cl- currents. PMID:7670734

  12. Screening and risk factors of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in critically ill adult patients receiving enteral nutrition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Malnutrition is a frequent problem associated with detrimental clinical outcomes in critically ill patients. To avoid malnutrition, most studies focus on the prevention of inadequate nutrition delivery, whereas little attention is paid to the potential role of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI). In this trial, we aim to evaluate the prevalence of EPI and identify its potential risk factors in critically ill adult patients without preexisting pancreatic diseases. Methods In this prospective cross-sectional study, we recruited 563 adult patients with critical illnesses. All details of the patients were documented, stool samples were collected three to five days following the initiation of enteral nutrition, and faecal elastase 1 (FE-1) concentrations were assayed using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. Blood samples were also taken to determine serum amylase and lipase activity. Results The percentages of recruited patients with EPI (FE-1 concentration <200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration <100 μg/g) were 52.2% and 18.3%, respectively. The incidences of steatorrhea were significantly different (P < 0.05) among the patients without EPI, with moderate EPI (FE-1 concentration = 100 to 200 μg/g) and severe EPI (FE-1 concentration < 100 μg/g). Both multivariate logistic regression analysis and z-tests indicated that the occurrence of EPI was closely associated with shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Conclusions More than 50% of critically ill adult patients without primary pancreatic diseases had EPI, and nearly one-fifth of them had severe EPI. The risk factors for EPI included shock, sepsis, diabetes, cardiac arrest, hyperlactacidemia, invasive mechanical ventilation and haemodialysis. Trial registration NCT01753024 PMID:23924602

  13. Relationships between leucine and the pancreatic exocrine function for improving starch digestibility in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Liu, K; Liu, Y; Liu, S M; Xu, M; Yu, Z P; Wang, X; Cao, Y C; Yao, J H

    2015-04-01

    Four Holstein heifers (215 ± 7 kg; means ± SD), fitted with one pancreatic pouch, duodenal re-entrant cannulas, and duodenal infusion catheters, were used in this experiment. In phase 1, the 24-h profile of pancreatic fluid was determined. Pancreatic fluid flow peaked 1h after feeding, but peaks of similar magnitude also occurred before the morning feed, necessitating 24-h collection of pancreatic fluid to estimate daily excretion. In phase 2, the effects of duodenal infusions of 0, 10, 20, or 30 g of leucine on pancreatic fluid flow were determined in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. The leucine was infused for 12h in 2,500 mL of the infusate, and samples of pancreatic fluid and jugular blood were collected in 1-h intervals from the beginning of the infusion for 36 h. The results showed that the secretion rate of pancreatic fluid (mL/h) was significantly higher in 10-g leucine group than the other groups (mL/h). Protein concentration (mg/mL) in pancreatic fluid was elevated proportional to the amount of leucine infused. Leucine infusions increased both the concentration (U/mL) and secretion rate (U/h) of α-amylase. Infusion of 10 g of leucine also increased the secretion rates (U/h) of trypsin, chymotrypsin, and lipase, but did not change their concentrations. No significant effects of leucine infusions on plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were found. The results indicate that leucine could act as a nutrient signal to stimulate α-amylase production and pancreatic exocrine function in dairy heifers. PMID:25648818

  14. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy for pancreatic exocrine insufficiency in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Trang, Tony; Chan, Johanna; Graham, David Y

    2014-01-01

    Restitution of normal fat absorption in exocrine pancreatic insufficiency remains an elusive goal. Although many patients achieve satisfactory clinical results with enzyme therapy, few experience normalization of fat absorption, and many, if not most, will require individualized therapy. Increasing the quantity of lipase administered rarely eliminates steatorrhea but increases the cost of therapy. Enteric coated enzyme microbead formulations tend to separate from nutrients in the stomach precluding coordinated emptying of enzymes and nutrients. Unprotected enzymes mix well and empty with nutrients but are inactivated at pH 4 or below. We describe approaches for improving the results of enzyme therapy including changing to, or adding, a different product, adding non-enteric coated enzymes, (e.g., giving unprotected enzymes at the start of the meal and acid-protected formulations later), use of antisecretory drugs and/or antacids, and changing the timing of enzyme administration. Because considerable lipid is emptied in the first postprandial hour, it is prudent to start therapy with enteric coated microbead prior to the meal so that some enzymes are available during that first hour. Patients with hyperacidity may benefit from adjuvant antisecretory therapy to reduce the duodenal acid load and possibly also sodium bicarbonate to prevent duodenal acidity. Comparative studies of clinical effectiveness of different formulations as well as the characteristics of dispersion, emptying, and dissolution of enteric-coated microspheres of different diameter and density are needed; many such studies have been completed but not yet made public. We discuss the history of pancreatic enzyme therapy and describe current use of modern preparations, approaches to overcoming unsatisfactory clinical responses, as well as studies needed to be able to provide reliably effective therapy. PMID:25206255

  15. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  16. Annular pancreas intra operatively discovered: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zeineb, Mzoughi; Sadri, Ben Abid; Nizar, Miloudi; Hassen, Hentati; Nafaa, Arfa; Taher, Khalfallah

    2011-01-01

    Annular pancreas is a rare congenital abnormality. This entity can rarely be symptomatic. Patients can present with gastrointestinal obstruction or acute pancreatitis. We report a case with a rich iconography, of an annular pancreas discovered intraoperatively. A 46-year-old woman was operated with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis with common bile duct stones. At operation, a strip of pancreatic tissue (2 cm) completely encircled the second duodenum. Open cholecytectomy with choledocotomy and stones extractionwas done. Postoperatively, she developed an acute pancreatitis. The post-operative cholangiography showed the annular duct surrounding the second duodenum. Annular pancreas is rare. Symptoms may occur in newborn children. In adults, annular pancreas discovering is radiological or intra operatively. PMID:24765382

  17. Proteomic analysis of pancreas derived from adult cloned pig

    SciTech Connect

    Chae, Jung-Il; Cho, Young Keun; Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Han, Yong-Mahn; Koo, Deog-Bon Lee, Kyung-Kwang

    2008-02-08

    The potential medical applications of animal cloning include xenotransplantation, but the complex molecular cascades that control porcine organ development are not fully understood. Still, it has become apparent that organs derived from cloned pigs may be suitable for transplantation into humans. In this study, we examined the pancreas of an adult cloned pig developed through somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and Western blotting. Proteomic analysis revealed 69 differentially regulated proteins, including such apoptosis-related species as annexins, lamins, and heat shock proteins, which were unanimously upregulated in the SCNT sample. Among the downregulated proteins in SCNT pancreas were peroxiredoxins and catalase. Western blot results indicate that several antioxidant enzymes and the anti-apoptotic protein were downregulated in SCNT pancreas, whereas several caspases were upregulated. Together, these data suggest that the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the pancreas of an adult cloned pig leads to apoptosis.

  18. Heterotopic Pancreas: A Rare Cause of Ileo-Ileal Intussusception

    PubMed Central

    Monier, Ahmed; Awad, Ahmed; Szmigielski, Wojciech; Muneer, Mohamed; Alrashid, Amal; Darweesh, Adham; Hassan, Heba

    2014-01-01

    Background Heterotopic pancreas is a rare developmental anomaly defined as pancreatic tissue found on ectopic sites without contiguity with the main pancreas. An isolated heterotopic pancreas as a cause of bowel intussusception is extremely rare. Case Report A case of 47-year old male with multiple episodes of melena, constipation and abdominal pain for one year duration is presented. CT eneterography revealed a large circumferential lesion involving the terminal ileum that acted as a leading point to an ileo-ileal intussusception. The resection of the lesion and related bowel segment was carried out. The histopathological examination confirmed the excised lesion as a heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Conclusions Though a rare entity, heterotopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bowel intussusception. PMID:25302087

  19. Combining gas phase electron capture and IRMPD action spectroscopy to probe the electronic structure of a metastable reduced organometallic complex containing a non-innocent ligand.

    PubMed

    Katari, Madanakrishna; Payen de la Garanderie, Eleonore; Nicol, Edith; Steinmetz, Vincent; van der Rest, Guillaume; Carmichael, Duncan; Frison, Gilles

    2015-10-21

    Combining electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry and infrared multiple photon dissociation action spectroscopy allows the formation, selection and characterisation of reduced metal complexes containing non-innocent ligands. Zinc complexes containing diazafluorenone ligands have been studied and the localisation of the single electron on the metal atom in the mono-ligated complex has been demonstrated. PMID:26051020

  20. Innocence, Protection and Failure: Bringing the Child Subject to the Centre of the Politics of the Family. A Response to Cristyn Davies and Kerry Robinson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Lucy

    2013-01-01

    In response to Davies and Robinson's article looking at how queer families are positioned and position themselves in relation to neoliberalism, this article brings the child to the centre of the debate to examine how reading the child subject in terms of discourses of innocence and protection might work to maintain the hegemony of the…

  1. Stem cells versus plasticity in liver and pancreas regeneration.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Janel L; Grompe, Markus; Sander, Maike

    2016-03-01

    Cell replacement in adult organs can be achieved through stem cell differentiation or the replication or transdifferentiation of existing cells. In the adult liver and pancreas, stem cells have been proposed to replace tissue cells, particularly following injury. Here we review how specialized cell types are produced in the adult liver and pancreas. Based on current evidence, we propose that the plasticity of differentiated cells, rather than stem cells, accounts for tissue repair in both organs. PMID:26911907

  2. Automatic segmentation of abdominal vessels for improved pancreas localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farag, Amal; Liu, Jiamin; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate automatic detection and segmentation of abdominal organs from CT images is important for quantitative and qualitative organ tissue analysis as well as computer-aided diagnosis. The large variability of organ locations, the spatial interaction between organs that appear similar in medical scans and orientation and size variations are among the major challenges making the task very difficult. The pancreas poses these challenges in addition to its flexibility which allows for the shape of the tissue to vastly change. Due to the close proximity of the pancreas to numerous surrounding organs within the abdominal cavity the organ shifts according to the conditions of the organs within the abdomen, as such the pancreas is constantly changing. Combining these challenges with typically found patient-to-patient variations and scanning conditions the pancreas becomes harder to localize. In this paper we focus on three abdominal vessels that almost always abut the pancreas tissue and as such useful landmarks to identify the relative location of the pancreas. The splenic and portal veins extend from the hila of the spleen and liver, respectively, travel through the abdominal cavity and join at a position close to the head of the pancreas known as the portal confluence. A third vein, the superior mesenteric vein, anastomoses with the other two veins at the portal confluence. An automatic segmentation framework for obtaining the splenic vein, portal confluence and superior mesenteric vein is proposed using 17 contrast enhanced computed-tomography datasets. The proposed method uses outputs from the multi-organ multi-atlas label fusion and Frangi vesselness filter to obtain automatic seed points for vessel tracking and generation of statistical models of the desired vessels. The approach shows ability to identify the vessels and improve localization of the pancreas within the abdomen.

  3. Endovascular Management of Acute Enteric Bleeding from Pancreas Transplant

    SciTech Connect

    Semiz-Oysu, Aslihan; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2007-04-15

    Arterioenteric fistula is a rare but serious complication of enteric drained pancreas transplant, which may lead to massive gastrointestinal bleeding. We present 3 patients with failed enteric drained pancreas transplants and massive gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to arterioenteric fistula. One patient was treated by embolization and the 2 others by stent graft placement. Bleeding was successfully controlled in all cases, at follow up of 5 days, 8 months, and 12 months, respectively. One patient died 24 days after embolization, of unknown causes.

  4. The use of continuous density gradients for the assessment of islet and exocrine tissue densities and islet purification.

    PubMed

    Robertson, G S; Chadwick, D R; Contractor, H; James, R F; Bell, P R; London, N J

    1993-01-01

    The purification of large numbers of human pancreatic islets remains one of the limiting factors in islet transplantation. This paper describes and validates a method for accurately and reproducibly determining the density of islets and exocrine tissue in pancreatic digest on the basis of their isopycnic distribution on linear continuous density gradients. The use of this data to analyse and compare the purity of a standard 60% islet yield is described. The results obtained using such gradients will enable factors responsible for the variation in yield between pancreases to be determined and optimized, improving the results and reliability of islet purification. PMID:8111080

  5. Radionuclide surveillance of the allografted pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    George, E.A.; Salimi, Z.; Carney, K.; Castaneda, M.; Garvin, P.J.

    1988-04-01

    To determine the value of scintigraphy to detect posttransplantation complications of the allografted pancreas, we retrospectively reviewed 209 scintigrams obtained with /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid (/sup 99m/Tc-SC) and /sup 99m/Tc-glucoheptonate (/sup 99m/Tc-GH). The scintigraphic studies were performed in 37 recipients of simultaneous renal and pancreatic allografts harvested from the same donor. /sup 99m/Tc-SC was used as an indicator of thrombotic vasculitis; pancreatic perfusion and blood-pool parameters were monitored with /sup 99m/Tc-GH. In 11 of the 37 recipients, scintigraphic abnormalities suggested posttransplantation infarction. Recurrent episodes of acute rejection of the pancreatic allograft, which always coincided with acute rejection of the renal allograft, were monitored in 24 recipients. Rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis was suggested in 12 of the 24 recipients and persisted in 10 recipients for several weeks after improvement of renal allograft rejection. Pancreatic atrophy was suggested scintigraphically in 16 of the 24 recipients with recurrent episodes of rejection. Spontaneous pancreatic-duct obstruction and obstructive pancreatitis were associated with a scintigraphic pattern similar to that of rejection-induced ischemic pancreatitis. We concluded that the specific radionuclides used in this series are useful for the surveillance and assessment of posttransplantation pancreatic infarction, acute rejection, pancreatitis, and atrophy

  6. Endocrine Cell Clustering During Human Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Ricordi, Camillo; Edlund, Helena; Diez, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of efficient, reproducible protocols for directed in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells into insulin-producing β cells will benefit greatly from increased knowledge regarding the spatiotemporal expression profile of key instructive factors involved in human endocrine cell generation. Human fetal pancreases 7 to 21 weeks of gestational age, were collected following consent immediately after pregnancy termination and processed for immunostaining, in situ hybridization, and real-time RT-PCR expression analyses. Islet-like structures appear from approximately week 12 and, unlike the mixed architecture observed in adult islets, fetal islets are initially formed predominantly by aggregated insulin- or glucagon-expressing cells. The period studied (7–22 weeks) coincides with a decrease in the proliferation and an increase in the differentiation of the progenitor cells, the initiation of NGN3 expression, and the appearance of differentiated endocrine cells. The present study provides a detailed characterization of islet formation and expression profiles of key intrinsic and extrinsic factors during human pancreas development. This information is beneficial for the development of efficient protocols that will allow guided in vitro differentiation of hES cells into insulin-producing cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:811–824, 2009) PMID:19365093

  7. High precision innovative micropump for artificial pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappel, E.; Mefti, S.; Lettieri, G.-L.; Proennecke, S.; Conan, C.

    2014-03-01

    The concept of artificial pancreas, which comprises an insulin pump, a continuous glucose meter and a control algorithm, is a major step forward in managing patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus. The stability of the control algorithm is based on short-term precision micropump to deliver rapid-acting insulin and to specific integrated sensors able to monitor any failure leading to a loss of accuracy. Debiotech's MEMS micropump, based on the membrane pump principle, is made of a stack of 3 silicon wafers. The pumping chamber comprises a pillar check-valve at the inlet, a pumping membrane which is actuated against stop limiters by a piezo cantilever, an anti-free-flow outlet valve and a pressure sensor. The micropump inlet is tightly connected to the insulin reservoir while the outlet is in direct communication with the patient skin via a cannula. To meet the requirement of a pump dedicated to closed-loop application for diabetes care, in addition to the well-controlled displacement of the pumping membrane, the high precision of the micropump is based on specific actuation profiles that balance effect of pump elasticity in low-consumption push-pull mode.

  8. Stromal reengineering to treat pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; DelGiorno, Kathleen E.; Greenberg, Philip D.; Hingorani, Sunil R.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma co-opts multiple cellular and extracellular mechanisms to create a complex cancer organ with an unusual proclivity for metastasis and resistance to therapy. Cell-autonomous events are essential for the initiation and maintenance of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but recent studies have implicated critical non-cell autonomous processes within the robust desmoplastic stroma that promote disease pathogenesis and resistance. Thus, non-malignant cells and associated factors are culprits in tumor growth, immunosuppression and invasion. However, even this increasing awareness of non-cell autonomous contributions to disease progression is tempered by the conflicting roles stromal elements can play. A greater understanding of stromal complexity and complicity has been aided in part by studies in highly faithful genetically engineered mouse models of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Insights gleaned from such studies are spurring the development of therapies designed to reengineer the pancreas cancer stroma and render it permissive to agents targeting cell-autonomous events or to reinstate immunosurveillance. Integrating conventional and immunological treatments in the context of stromal targeting may provide the key to a durable clinical impact on this formidable disease. PMID:24908682

  9. Microendoscopes for imaging of the pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Angelique L.; Rouse, Andrew R.; Kroto, Shona M.; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2004-07-01

    Patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer have a 5-year survival rate of only 3%. Endoscopic imaging of the pancreas is limited by the small size of the pancreatic duct, which has an average size of 3 mm. To improve imaging capabilities for the pancreatic duct, two small catheter-based imaging systems have been developed that will fit through the therapeutic channel of a clinical endoscope and into the pancreatic duct. One is a miniature endoscope designed to provide macro-imaging of tissue with both white light reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. The 1.75 mm diameter catheter consists of separate illumination and imaging channels. At a nominal focal distance of 10 mm, the field of view of the system is ~ 10 mm, and the corresponding in-plane resolution is 60 microns. To complement the broadfield view of the tissue, a confocal microendoscope with 2 micron lateral resolution over a field of view of 450 microns and 25 micron axial resolution has been developed. With an outer diameter of 3 mm, the catheter in this system will also fit through the therapeutic channel and into the pancreatic duct. Images of tissue with both the miniature endoscope and confocal microendoscope are presented.

  10. The Non-innocent Phenalenyl Unit: An Electronic Nest to Modulate the Catalytic Activity in Hydroamination Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Arup; Sen, Tamal K.; Ghorai, Pradip Kr; Mandal, Swadhin K.

    2013-01-01

    The phenalenyl unit has played intriguing role in different fields of research spanning from chemistry, material chemistry to device physics acting as key electronic reservoir which has not only led to the best organic single component conductor but also created the spin memory device of next generation. Now we show the non-innocent behaviour of phenalenyl unit in modulating the catalytic behaviour in a homogeneous organic transformation. The present study establishes that the cationic state of phenalenyl unit can act as an organic Lewis acceptor unit to influence the catalytic outcome of intermolecular hydroamination reaction of carbodiimides. For the present study, we utilized organoaluminum complexes of phenalenyl ligands in which the phenalenyl unit maintains the closed shell electronic state. The DFT calculation reveals that the energy of LUMO of the catalyst is mainly controlled by phenalenyl ligands which in turn determines the outcome of the catalysis. PMID:24084653

  11. {RuNO}(6)vs. co-ligand oxidation: two non-innocent groups in one ruthenium nitrosyl complex.

    PubMed

    McQuarters, Ashley B; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2014-10-01

    Recently, a new {RuNO}(6) complex, [Ru(L)(PPh3)(NO)(Cl)](2+) (where L = 1-phenyl-1-(pyridin-2-yl)-2-(pyridin-2-ylmethylene)hydrazine), was reported which exhibits a one-electron quasireversible oxidation. The oxidized product, [Ru(L)(PPh3)(NO)(Cl)](3+), was isolated and proposed to be a highly unusual {RuNO}(5) complex. In this paper, we investigate the electronic structure of both of these ruthenium complexes by DFT calculations and find that the oxidized species is best described as a {RuNO}(6) complex with a co-ligand radical. [Ru(L)(PPh3)(NO)(Cl)](2+) is therefore oxidized to [Ru(L(+˙))(PPh3)(NO)(Cl)](3+), i.e. this is an interesting example of a complex with two non-innocent ligands simultaneously bound to a ruthenium center. PMID:25118656

  12. Pancreas Transplantation—Registry Report and a Commentary

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, David E. R.; Kendall, David M.

    1985-01-01

    From December 1966 through December 1984, there were 561 pancreas transplants reported to the American College of Surgeons/National Institutes of Health Organ Transplant Registry, including 60 from 1966 through June 1977, 206 from July 1977 through December 1982 and 295 from January 1983 through December 1984. One-year graft function-survival rates (insulin-independent) in each of the three periods were 3%, 20% and 40%, and the corresponding patient survival rates were 40%, 72% and 77%. Currently 140 patients have functioning grafts, 76 for more than one year. Of the transplants since July 1977, one-year graft survival rates according to technique are 41% for enteric drainage (N = 155), 30% for polymer injection (N = 260) and 29% for urinary drainage (N = 47). Pancreas graft survival rates at one year according to whether or not the recipients have had a kidney transplant were 35% for recipients of simultaneous grafts (N = 281), 28% in recipients of a pancreas after a kidney (N = 112) and 26% in recipients of a pancreas only who did not have uremia (N = 106); corresponding patient survival rates were 69%, 83% and 83%. Overall, one-year pancreas graft survival rates according to whether the patients did or did not have end-stage diabetic nephropathy were 33% versus 25% and the corresponding patient survival rates were 73% versus 84% (P < .01). Patient survival rates were significantly higher in those without than in those with end-stage diabetic nephropathy. An analysis of technically successful grafts according to principal immunosuppressant showed one-year function rates of 46% in 258 cyclosporine-treated recipients and 26% in 143 azathioprine-treated recipients. Pancreas graft survival rates have progressively improved and the procedure has become safer with advances in surgical technique and immunosuppression. Pancreas transplantation is currently applicable to patients with diabetes mellitus whose complications are, or predictably will be, more serious than the

  13. Identification of the bHLH Factor Math6 as a Novel Component of the Embryonic Pancreas Transcriptional Network

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Francis C.; Sanchez, Lidia; Gomis, Ramon; German, Michael S.; Gasa, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Background Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors play important roles in differentiation processes during embryonic development of vertebrates. In the pancreas, the atonal-related bHLH gene Neurogenin3 (Neurog3) controls endocrine cell fate specification in uncommitted progenitor cells. Therefore, it is likely that Neurog3-regulated factors will have important functions during pancreatic endocrine cell differentiation. The gene for the atonal-related bHLH factor Math6 was recognized as a potential target of Neurog3 in a genomic scale profiling during endocrine differentiation. Herein we have explored the role of Math6 during endocrine pancreas development. Results We demonstrate that the Math6 gene is a direct target of Neurog3 in vitro and that, during mouse development, Math6 is expressed in both endocrine and exocrine pancreatic precursor cells. We have investigated the role of Math6 in endocrine differentiation by over-expressing this factor in pancreatic duct cells. Math6 possesses intrinsic transcriptional repressor activity and, in contrast to Neurog3 it does not induce the endocrine differentiation program; however, it can modulate some of the pro-endocrine functions of Neurog3 in this system. In addition, we show that Math6 is broadly expressed in mouse embryonic tissues and its expression is induced by tissue-specific bHLH genes other than Neurog3. Furthermore, inactivation of the Math6 gene in the mouse results in early embryonic lethality demonstrating an essential role of this factor in organismal development. Conclusions These data demonstrate that Math6 is a novel component of the pancreatic transcriptional network during embryonic development and suggest a potential role for Math6 as a modulator of the differentiation program initiated by the pro-endocrine factor Neurog3. Furthermore, our results demonstrate that Math6 is indispensable for early embryonic development and indicate a more widespread function for this factor in tissue

  14. Repurposed biological scaffolds: kidney to pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Willenberg, Bradley J; Oca-Cossio, Jose; Cai, Yunqing; Brown, Alicia R; Clapp, William L; Abrahamson, Dale R; Terada, Naohiro; Ellison, Gary W; Mathews, Clayton E; Batich, Christopher D; Ross, Edward A

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT. Advances in organ regeneration have been facilitated by gentle decellularization protocols that maintain distinct tissue compartments, and thereby allow seeding of blood vessels with endothelial lineages separate from populations of the parenchyma with tissue-specific cells. We hypothesized that a reconstituted vasculature could serve as a novel platform for perfusing cells derived from a different organ: thus discordance of origin between the vascular and functional cells, leading to a hybrid repurposed organ. The need for a highly vascular bed is highlighted by tissue engineering approaches that involve transplantation of just cells, as attempted for insulin production to treat human diabetes. Those pancreatic islet cells present unique challenges since large numbers are needed to allow the cell-to-cell signaling required for viability and proper function; however, increasing their number is limited by inadequate perfusion and hypoxia. As proof of principle of the repurposed organ methodology we harnessed the vasculature of a kidney scaffold while seeding the collecting system with insulin-producing cells. Pig kidneys were decellularized by sequential detergent, enzymatic and rinsing steps. Maintenance of distinct vascular and collecting system compartments was demonstrated by both fluorescent 10 micron polystyrene microspheres and cell distributions in tissue sections. Sterilized acellular scaffolds underwent seeding separately via the artery (fibroblasts or endothelioma cells) and retrograde (murine βTC-tet cells) up the ureter. After three-day bioreactor incubation, histology confirmed separation of cells in the vasculature from those in the collecting system. βTC-tet clusters survived in tubules, glomerular Bowman's space, demonstrated insulin immunolabeling, and thereby supported the feasibility of kidney-to-pancreas repurposing. PMID:26252820

  15. Endocrine Pancreas in Cats With Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Zini, E; Lunardi, F; Zanetti, R; Heller, R S; Coppola, L M; Ferro, S; Guscetti, F; Osto, M; Lutz, T A; Reusch, C E; Cavicchioli, L

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic amyloidosis and loss of α and β cells have been shown to occur in cats with diabetes mellitus, although the number of studies currently available is very limited. Furthermore, it is not known whether pancreatic islet inflammation is a common feature. The aims of the present study were to characterize islet lesions and to investigate whether diabetic cats have inflammation of the pancreatic islets. Samples of pancreas were collected postmortem from 37 diabetic and 20 control cats matched for age, sex, breed, and body weight. Histologic sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Congo red; double labeled for insulin/CD3, insulin/CD20, insulin/myeloperoxidase, insulin/proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and glucagon/Ki67; and single labeled for amylin and Iba1. Mean insulin-positive cross-sectional area was approximately 65% lower in diabetic than control cats (P = .009), while that of amylin and glucagon was similar. Surprisingly, amyloid deposition was similar between groups (P = .408). Proliferation of insulin- and glucagon-positive cells and the number of neutrophils, macrophages, and T (CD3) and B (CD20) lymphocytes in the islets did not differ. The presence of T and B lymphocytes combined tended to be more frequent in diabetic cats (n = 8 of 37; 21.6%) than control cats (n = 1 of 20; 5.0%). The results confirm previous observations that loss of β cells but not α cells occurs in diabetic cats. Islet amyloidosis was present in diabetic cats but was not greater than in controls. A subset of diabetic cats had lymphocytic infiltration of the islets, which might be associated with β-cell loss. PMID:26113611

  16. Elastography for the pancreas: Current status and future perspective

    PubMed Central

    Kawada, Natsuko; Tanaka, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Elastography for the pancreas can be performed by either ultrasound or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS). There are two types of pancreatic elastographies based on different principles, which are strain elastography and shear wave elastography. The stiffness of tissue is estimated by measuring the grade of strain generated by external pressure in the former, whereas it is estimated by measuring propagation speed of shear wave, the transverse wave, generated by acoustic radiation impulse (ARFI) in the latter. Strain elastography is difficult to perform when the probe, the pancreas and the aorta are not located in line. Accordingly, a fine elastogram can be easily obtained in the pancreatic body but not in the pancreatic head and tail. In contrast, shear wave elastography can be easily performed in the entire pancreas because ARFI can be emitted to wherever desired. However, shear wave elastography cannot be performed by EUS to date. Recently, clinical guidelines for elastography specialized in the pancreas were published from Japanese Society of Medical Ultrasonics. The guidelines show us technical knacks of performing elastography for the pancreas. PMID:27076756

  17. In vitro pancreas organogenesis from dispersed mouse embryonic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Greggio, Chiara; De Franceschi, Filippo; Figueiredo-Larsen, Manuel; Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells (1). The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development (2-4). These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  18. RNA Isolation from Mouse Pancreas: A Ribonuclease-rich Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo-Pouly, Ana Clara P.; Elgamal, Ola A.; Schmittgen, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Isolation of high-quality RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissue such as mouse pancreas presents a challenge. As a primary function of the pancreas is to aid in digestion, mouse pancreas may contain as much a 75 mg of ribonuclease. We report modifications of standard phenol/guanidine thiocyanate lysis reagent protocols to isolate RNA from mouse pancreas. Guanidine thiocyanate is a strong protein denaturant and will effectively disrupt the activity of ribonuclease under most conditions. However, critical modifications to standard protocols are necessary to successfully isolate RNA from ribonuclease-rich tissues. Key steps include a high lysis reagent to tissue ratio, removal of undigested tissue prior to phase separation and inclusion of a ribonuclease inhibitor to the RNA solution. Using these and other modifications, we routinely isolate RNA with RNA Integrity Number (RIN) greater than 7. The isolated RNA is of suitable quality for routine gene expression analysis. Adaptation of this protocol to isolate RNA from ribonuclease rich tissues besides the pancreas should be readily achievable. PMID:25145327

  19. GATA4 and GATA6 control mouse pancreas organogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Manuel; Delgado, Irene; Soria, Bernat; Martín, Francisco; Rojas, Anabel

    2012-01-01

    Recently, heterozygous mutations in GATA6 have been found in neonatal diabetic patients with failed pancreatic organogenesis. To investigate the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse pancreas organogenesis, we conditionally inactivated these genes within the pancreas. Single inactivation of either gene did not have a major impact on pancreas formation, indicating functional redundancy. However, double Gata4/Gata6 mutant mice failed to develop pancreata, died shortly after birth, and displayed hyperglycemia. Morphological defects in Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreata were apparent during embryonic development, and the epithelium failed to expand as a result of defects in cell proliferation and differentiation. The number of multipotent pancreatic progenitors, including PDX1+ cells, was reduced in the Gata4/Gata6 mutant pancreatic epithelium. Remarkably, deletion of only 1 Gata6 allele on a Gata4 conditional knockout background severely reduced pancreatic mass. In contrast, a single WT allele of Gata4 in Gata6 conditional knockout mice was sufficient for normal pancreatic development, indicating differential contributions of GATA factors to pancreas formation. Our results place GATA factors at the top of the transcriptional network hierarchy controlling pancreas organogenesis. PMID:23006330

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) Reirradiation for Recurrent Pancreas Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dagoglu, Nergiz; Callery, Mark; Moser, James; Tseng, Jennifer; Kent, Tara; Bullock, Andrea; Miksad, Rebecca; Mancias, Joseph D.; Mahadevan, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: After adjuvant or definitive radiation for pancreas cancer, there are limited conventional treatment options for recurrent pancreas cancer. We explored the role of (Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy) SBRT for reirradiation of recurrent pancreas Cancer. Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients reirradiated with SBRT for recurrent pancreas cancer. All patients were deemed unresectable and treated with systemic therapy. Fiducial gold markers were used. CT simulation was performed with oral and IV contrast and patients were treated with respiratory motion tracking in the CyberknifeTM system. Results: 30 patients (17 men and 13 women) with a median age of 67 years were included in the study. The median target volume was 41.29cc. The median prescription dose was 25Gy (24-36Gy) in a median of 5 fractions prescribed to a mean 78% isodose line. The median overall survival was 14 months. The 1 and 2 year local control was 78%. The worst toxicity included 3/30(10%) Grade III acute toxicity for pain, bleeding and vomiting. There was 2/30 (7%) Grade III long-term bowel obstructions. Conclusions: SBRT can be a useful and tolerable option for patients with recurrent pancreas cancer after prior radiation. PMID:26918041

  1. Pancreatic GIST with pancreas divisum: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Soufi, Mehdi; Bouziane, Mohammed; Massrouri, Rahal; Chad, Bouziane

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are uncommon intra-abdominal tumours. These tumours tend to arise with a higher frequency in the stomach and the small bowel. In fewer than 5% of cases, they originate primarily from extra-gastrointestinal tumours (EGISTs). Gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the pancreas is very rare. Only few cases have been published. We report the first case of stromal tumour of the pancreas with concomitant pancreas divisum. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 39-year-old male who presented with constipation and abdominal pain. A computerized tomography demonstrated a 9 cm pancreatic mass, without liver lesions. A Whipple procedure with segmental colectomy was performed with success. After 24 months follow up, the patient is doing well and disease-free. DISCUSSION Mesenchymal tumours of the pancreas are extremely rare, accounting for less than 1% of all pancreatic tumours. The endoscopic ultrasound is helpful for diagnosis. Surgical resection with negative pathologic margins remains the treatment of choice. CONCLUSION in our knowledge, this is the first case of pancreatic GIST with pancreas divisum. Although pancreatic GISTs are uncommon tumours, they must be considered in the differential diagnosis of solid pancreatic lesions. Even though the tumour can be evaluated as high risk, treatment must be aggressive in order to improve survival rate. PMID:23123418

  2. In Vitro Pancreas Organogenesis from Dispersed Mouse Embryonic Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Grapin-Botton, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The pancreas is an essential organ that regulates glucose homeostasis and secretes digestive enzymes. Research on pancreas embryogenesis has led to the development of protocols to produce pancreatic cells from stem cells 1. The whole embryonic organ can be cultured at multiple stages of development 2-4. These culture methods have been useful to test drugs and to image developmental processes. However the expansion of the organ is very limited and morphogenesis is not faithfully recapitulated since the organ flattens. We propose three-dimensional (3D) culture conditions that enable the efficient expansion of dissociated mouse embryonic pancreatic progenitors. By manipulating the composition of the culture medium it is possible to generate either hollow spheres, mainly composed of pancreatic progenitors expanding in their initial state, or, complex organoids which progress to more mature expanding progenitors and differentiate into endocrine, acinar and ductal cells and which spontaneously self-organize to resemble the embryonic pancreas. We show here that the in vitro process recapitulates many aspects of natural pancreas development. This culture system is suitable to investigate how cells cooperate to form an organ by reducing its initial complexity to few progenitors. It is a model that reproduces the 3D architecture of the pancreas and that is therefore useful to study morphogenesis, including polarization of epithelial structures and branching. It is also appropriate to assess the response to mechanical cues of the niche such as stiffness and the effects on cell´s tensegrity. PMID:25079453

  3. Ectopic Pancreas Imitating Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST) In The Stomach.

    PubMed

    Zińczuk, Justyna; Bandurski, Roman; Pryczynicz, Anna; Konarzewska-Duchnowska, Emilia; Kemona, Andrzej; Kędra, Bogusław

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic pancreas is a rare congenital disorder defined as pancreatic tissue lacking vascular or anatomic communication with the normal body of the pancreas. Most cases of ectopic pancreas are asymptomatic, but it may become clinically evident depending on the size, location and the pathological changes similar to those observed in case of the normal pancreas. It is often an incidental finding and can be located at different sites in the gastrointestinal tract. The most common locations are: the stomach, duodenum or the proximal part of small intestine. The risk of malignancy, bleeding and occlusion are the most serious complications. Despite the development in diagnostics, it still remains a challenge for the clinician to differentiate it from neoplasm. In this report, we described a case of 28-years old woman who presented recurrent epigastric pain. The upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed gastrointestinal stromal tumor on the border of the body and antrum of the back wall of great curvature of the stomach. The histopathological examination after surgery showed heterotopic pancreatic tissue. Ectopic pancreas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of gastric mass lesions. PMID:26172167

  4. Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells for Aberrant Class II Expression in Exocrine Glands from Estrogen-Deficient Mice of Healthy Background

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Rieko; Nagaoka, Ai; Ishimaru, Naozumi; Yamada, Akiko; Yoshida, Satoko; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been well documented that aberrant major histocompatibility complex class II molecules may contribute to the development of autoimmune disorders, the precise mechanisms responsible for their tissue-specific expression remain unknown. Here we show that estrogen deficiency induces aberrant class II major histocompatibility complex expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Relatively modest but functionally significant expression levels of major histocompatibility complex class II and class II transactivator molecules were observed in the exocrine glands of ovariectomized (Ovx) C57BL/6 (B6) mice, but were not seen in the exocrine glands of control B6 mice. We observed that the salivary dendritic cells adjacent to the apoptotic epithelial cells positive for terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling, were activated in Ovx mice, but were not activated in control mice. We obtained evidence that the salivary gland cells express both interferon regulatory factor-1 and class II transactivator type IV molecules in Ovx mice. Salivary gland cells from Ovx mice were also capable of inducing the activation of antigen-specific T cells from OT-II transgenic mice. These findings indicate that estrogen deficiency initiates class II transactivator type IV mRNA expression in exocrine glands via interactions between epithelial cells and plasmacytoid dendritic cells, suggesting that plasmacytoid dendritic cells play a pivotal role in gender-based autoimmune disorders in postmenopausal women. PMID:19359524

  5. Solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas: emphasis on differential diagnosis from aggressive tumors of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Fatma; Erinanç, Hilal; Savaş, Berna; Erden, Esra; Karayalçin, Kaan

    2006-09-01

    Solid pseudopapillary tumor is an unusual primary tumor of the pancreas with a low potential for malignancy and unknown cell origin, seen mostly in young women. Although it is discussed among pancreatic epithelial tumors, many cases do not express cytokeratin but show neuroendocrine differentiation. Three cases (2 female, 1 male, aged 24, 45 and 50 years, respectively) of solid pseudopapillary tumor localized in the pancreas are presented. All cases displayed a well-circumscribed tumor, with an average diameter of 6 cm and a red-brown colored, hemorrhagic, cystic cut surface. Microscopically they were encapsulated with large areas composed of thin papillary formations and solid areas focally. Tumor cells were dyscohesive with small, round- to-oval, central nuclei, and vacuolated, clear or eosinophilic cytoplasm without mitotic activity. NSE, vimentin, synaptophysin, ER, PR, Ki-67, S-100, Pan CK, a1-antitrypsin, a2-antichymotrypsin, and antibodies were used in the immunohistochemical study. Vimentin, synaptophysin, NSE, PR, and a1-antitrypsin showed expression in all cases, while Pan-CK was expressed in two cases. Ki-67 expression was below 1% in all cases. Morphologic features of solid pseudopapillary tumor may be confused with pancreatic endocrine neoplasm and ductal adenocarcinoma. All cases showed features of histiocytic and neuroendocrine differentiation. Epithelial differentiation was identified in two cases. We conclude that immunohistochemistry is incapable of giving additional information for the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary tumor due to different lines of differentiation of tumor cells. We believe that macroscopic and microscopic features (using hematoxylin and eosin stain) are more important for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of this tumor. PMID:16941259

  6. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Norman Oneil; al Qadhi, Hani; al Wahibi, Khalifa

    2015-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas are neoplasms that are characterized by ductal dilation, intraductal papillary growth, and thick mucus secretion. This relatively recently defined pathology is evolving in terms of its etiopathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis, management, and treatment guidelines. A PubMed database search was performed. All the relevant abstracts in English language were reviewed and the articles in which cases of IPMN could be identified were further scrutinized. Information of IPMN was derived, and duplication of information in several articles and those with areas of persisting uncertainties were excluded. The recent consensus guidelines were examined. The reported incidence of malignancy varies from 57% to 92% in the main duct-IPMN (MD-IPMN) and from 6% to 46% in the branch duct-IPMN (BD-IPMN). The features of high-risk malignant lesions that raise concern include obstructive jaundice in a patient with a cystic lesion in the pancreatic head, the findings on radiological imaging of a mass lesion of >30 mm, enhanced solid component, and the main pancreatic duct (MPD) of size ≥10 mm; while duct size 5-9 mm and cyst size <3 mm are considered as “worrisome features.” Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) are primary investigations in diagnosing and following up on these patients. The role of pancreatoscopy and the analysis of aspirated cystic fluid for cytology and DNA analysis is still to be established. In general, resection is recommended for most MD-IPMN, mixed variant, and symptomatic BD-IPMN. The 5-year survival of patients after surgical resection for noninvasive IPMN is reported to be at 77-100%, while for those with invasive carcinoma, it is significantly lower at 27-60%. The follow-up of these patients could vary from 6 months to 1 year and would depend on the risk stratification for invasive malignancy and the pathology of the resected specimen. The understanding of

  7. Pancreas procurement from multiorgan donors for islet trasplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ricordi, C.; Mazzeferro, V.; Casavilla, A.; Scotti, C.; Pinna, A.; Tzakis, A.; Starzl, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    The outcome of human islet isolation procedures can be significantly effected by the technique used for pancreas procurement. In fact, the final step of islet purification using discontinuous density gradients requires a significant difference between the density of the islets and the density of the non-endocrine component of the gland. Therefore, any procedure during multi-organ procurement that will result in edema or degranulation of the acinar tissue will result in failure of the islet purification step. In this report a technique for combined harvesting of liver and pancreas is presented. The use of this procedure can be of assistance to avoid damage to the pancreas that could result in a compromised islet purification for improper handling of the gland even before it arrives to the isolation facility. PMID:21572947

  8. Pancreas procurement from multiorgan donors for islet trasplantation.

    PubMed

    Ricordi, C; Mazzeferro, V; Casavilla, A; Scotti, C; Pinna, A; Tzakis, A; Starzl, T E

    1992-01-01

    The outcome of human islet isolation procedures can be significantly effected by the technique used for pancreas procurement. In fact, the final step of islet purification using discontinuous density gradients requires a significant difference between the density of the islets and the density of the non-endocrine component of the gland. Therefore, any procedure during multi-organ procurement that will result in edema or degranulation of the acinar tissue will result in failure of the islet purification step. In this report a technique for combined harvesting of liver and pancreas is presented. The use of this procedure can be of assistance to avoid damage to the pancreas that could result in a compromised islet purification for improper handling of the gland even before it arrives to the isolation facility. PMID:21572947

  9. The evolution of diabetic chronic complications after pancreas transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Sá, João R; Monteagudo, Patricia T; Rangel, Erika B; Melaragno, Cláudio S; Gonzalez, Adriano M; Linhares, Marcelo M; Salzedas, Alcides; Neves, Maria-Deolinda F; Stela, Camila; Medina-Pestana, José O

    2009-01-01

    Pancreas transplantation is an invasive procedure that can restore and maintain normoglycemic level very successfully and for a prolonged period in DM1 patients. The procedure elevates the morbimortality rates in the first few months following the surgery if compared to kidney transplants with living donors, but it offers a better quality of life to patients.Although controversial, several studies have shown the stabilization or the improvement of some of the chronic complications related to diabetes, as well as the extra number of years of life that patients submitted to a double pancreas-kidney transplantation may gain.Recent studies have demonstrated clashing outcomes regarding isolated pancreas transplantations, a fact which reinforces the need for a more discerning selection of patients for this procedure. PMID:19825148

  10. En-bloc liver-pancreas transplant in Iran.

    PubMed

    Nikeghbalian, Saman; Mehdi, Seyed Haider; Aliakbarian, Mohsen; Kazemi, Kourosh; Shamsaeefar, Alireza; Bahreini, Amin; Gholami, Siavash; Malekhosseini, Seyed Ali

    2014-09-01

    Liver transplant can be challenging in cirrhotic patients with diabetes mellitus. In chronic liver disease, the glucose metabolism is altered; uncontrolled diabetes negatively influences the outcome of liver transplantation and poses difficulty in the management of immediate post transplantation period. Simultaneous liver-pancreas transplantation is an option to prevent early complications due to diabetes and also to improve the quality of life after transplantation in patients with Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) and chronic liver disease. We report the first en-bloc liver-pancreas transplant done in the transplant history of Iran. We describe the technical details of the procedure as well as the short term outcome after transplantation. In this case report, we also discuss in some details, the surgical, medical and immunological advantages of combined liver-pancreas transplantation as opposed to separate implantation of both organs. PMID:25204483

  11. Turnover of pancreas phospholipids in rats fed inadequate dietary protein.

    PubMed

    Bhutani, V; Kumar, V; Misra, U K

    1986-01-01

    Effect of feeding rice diets with and without lysine and threonine supplementation has been studied on phospholipid turnover of rat pancreas and compared to rats fed casein diet at 20% protein level. Rice diet without amino acid supplementation significantly reduced the levels of pancreas PC, PE, PI, PS and Sph and increased that of total cholesterol and TG. Incorporation of palmitate-1-14C, labelled choline, labelled methionine and NaH2(32)PO4 into PC and of palmitate-1-14C into TG was significantly reduced in rats fed unsupplemented rice diet. Incorporation of NaH2(32)PO4 into pancreas PI, DPI, TPI, PA, LPA and into IP, IP2', IP3 and GPI was significantly reduced in rats fed unsupplemented rice diet. PMID:3781752

  12. Mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinoma of the nasal cavity: clinico-pathologic and molecular study of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Stefano; Furlan, Daniela; Franzi, Francesca; Battaglia, Paolo; Frattini, Milo; Zanellato, Elena; Marando, Alessandro; Sahnane, Nora; Turri-Zanoni, Mario; Castelnuovo, Paolo; Capella, Carlo

    2013-03-01

    Sinonasal intestinal-type adenocarcinomas (ITACs) are rare neoplasms histologically resembling intestinal adenocarcinomas. Although a neuroendocrine differentiation in ITACs has been described, true mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas, neoplasms in which each component represents at least 30 % of the lesion, are extremely rare and their molecular alterations are largely unknown. We describe herein the clinico-pathologic features, the methylation profile, chromosomal gains and losses, and mutation analysis of KRAS, BRAF and p53 in a nasal mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinoma resected in a 79-year-old man. The tumor was composed of an ITAC and a poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma. Both exocrine and neuroendocrine components were CK8, CK20, CDX2 and p53 positive, and CK7 and TTF1 negative. The neuroendocrine component also showed immunoreactivity for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, serotonin and glicentin. Gains and losses were found at following chromosome regions: 17p13 (TP53), 14q24 (MLH3), 19q13 (KLK3), 5q21 (APC), 7q21 (CDK6), 9q34 (DAPK1), 12p13 (TNFRSF 1A, CDKN1B), 13q12 (BRCA2), 17p13.3 (HIC1), 18q21 (BCL2), and 22q12 (TIMP3). Aberrant methylation was detected only in the neuroendocrine component and involved APC and DAPK1 genes. No mutation of KRAS (exons 2-4), BRAF (exon 15), and p53 (exons 4-10) was found in both components. The results suggest a monoclonal origin of the tumor from a pluripotent cell undergoing a biphenotypic differentiation and that the neuroendocrine differentiation may be from an exocrine to an endocrine pathway. We have also reviewed the literature on sinonasal mixed exocrine-neuroendocrine carcinomas to give to the reader a comprehensive overview of these very rare tumor types. PMID:22740238

  13. A Dinuclear Ruthenium-Based Water Oxidation Catalyst: Use of Non-Innocent Ligand Frameworks for Promoting Multi-Electron Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Tanja M; Kärkäs, Markus D; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Siegbahn, Per E M; Åkermark, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Insight into how H2O is oxidized to O2 is envisioned to facilitate the rational design of artificial water oxidation catalysts, which is a vital component in solar-to-fuel conversion schemes. Herein, we report on the mechanistic features associated with a dinuclear Ru-based water oxidation catalyst. The catalytic action of the designed Ru complex was studied by the combined use of high-resolution mass spectrometry, electrochemistry, and quantum chemical calculations. Based on the obtained results, it is suggested that the designed ligand scaffold in Ru complex 1 has a non-innocent behavior, in which metal–ligand cooperation is an important part during the four-electron oxidation of H2O. This feature is vital for the observed catalytic efficiency and highlights that the preparation of catalysts housing non-innocent molecular frameworks could be a general strategy for accessing efficient catalysts for activation of H2O. PMID:25925847

  14. Pancreas tumor model in rabbit imaged by perfusion CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunn, Jason; Tichauer, Kenneth; Moodie, Karen; Kane, Susan; Hoopes, Jack; Stewart, Errol E.; Hadway, Jennifer; Lee, Ting-Yim; Pereira, Stephen P.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2013-03-01

    The goal of this work was to develop and validate a pancreas tumor animal model to investigate the relationship between photodynamic therapy (PDT) effectiveness and photosensitizer drug delivery. More specifically, this work lays the foundation for investigating the utility of dynamic contrast enhanced blood perfusion imaging to be used to inform subsequent PDT. A VX2 carcinoma rabbit cell line was grown in the tail of the pancreas of three New Zealand White rabbits and approximately 3-4 weeks after implantation the rabbits were imaged on a CT scanner using a contrast enhanced perfusion protocol, providing parametric maps of blood flow, blood volume, mean transit time, and vascular permeability surface area product.

  15. Multidisciplinary approach to tumors of the pancreas and biliary tree.

    PubMed

    Brown, Kimberly M

    2009-02-01

    Tumors of the pancreas and biliary tree remain formidable challenges to patients and clinicians. These tumors elude early detection, rapidly spread locally and systemically, and frequently recur despite apparently complete resection. Cystic tumors of the pancreas, however, may represent a subset of patients who do not uniformly require aggressive resection, and a thoughtful, evidence-based approach to work-up allows for the rational application of surgical therapy. Increasing evidence supports treating patients who have pancreaticobiliary disease in a multidisciplinary setting. PMID:19186234

  16. Attempted suicide by insulin injection treated with artificial pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Gin, H; Larnaudie, B; Aubertin, J

    1983-01-01

    An elderly woman with longstanding insulin dependent diabetes tried to commit suicide by injecting 400 units of insulin subcutaneously (usual total daily dose 56 units). She was admitted to hospital within the hour and treated with the aid of an artificial pancreas. This avoided the usual difficulty of the physician having to cope with rapid and substantial fluctuations in blood glucose concentrations and 67 hours after the overdose insulin was reinstituted. Using an artificial pancreas in insulin overdose is an important advance in management and may avoid the need for surgical intervention such as excising the site of injection. Images p250-a PMID:6409269

  17. Exocrine and endocrine testicular function during the treatment of experimental orchitis and nonspecific orchoepididymitis by low-energy laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reznikov, Leonid L.; Pupkova, Ludmila S.; Bell, H.; Murzin, Alexander G.

    1995-05-01

    Investigations into the biological effects of low-energy laser radiation (LLR) are characterized by a score of challenges, which are due primarily to a cascade of laser-induced and sometimes antagonistic processes. To investigate these processes on various biologic levels, we analyzed local and general effects of LLR on the exocrine and endocrine functions of the accessory sex glands in experimentally induced orchitis and orchoepididymitis in rabbits, and in clinical studies on male patients. The results indicate that LLR may alter the inflammatory response, including the exudative reaction, macrophage migration, and fibroblast activity. Furthermore, LLR may result in changes in serum concentrations of LH, FSH, and ACTH, prolactin, testosterone, cortisol and aldosterone. Some of these changes may be at least partially responsible for the well-known anti-inflammatory effects of LLR.

  18. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency: accuracy and clinical value of the uniformly labelled 13C-Hiolein breath test.

    PubMed Central

    Lembcke, B; Braden, B; Caspary, W F

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The 13C-Hiolein breath test (98% [U-13C] labelled long chain triglyceride mixture (highly labelled triolein) was evaluated as a non-invasive, non-radioactive test for exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. Accuracy and clinical validity were examined with reference to both the secretin pancreozymin test and faecal fat analysis. METHODS: A secretin pancreozymin test and faecal fat analysis were performed in 46 patients, 30 with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and 16 with normal pancreatic function. In all of these patients and in seven healthy volunteers (controls), a 13C-Hiolein breath test was performed using 2 mg/kg [U-13C] labelled Hiolein with a standard risk snack (1.5 g/kg; 25% fat). 13CO2/12CO2 enrichment in the exhaled breath was measured by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. RESULTS: In patients with pancreatic steatorrhoea the 13CO2 response was below the 95% confidence interval of 13CO2 exhalation in the controls. These responses were also diminished (p < 0.001) compared with patients with impaired lipase output but normal fat excretion and with disease as well as healthy controls. There was a linear correlation between stimulated lipase output and the ratio of lipase output/13CO2 response (r = 0.95). Among the 40 patients in whom direct pancreatic function testing was clinically indicated, the sensitivity of the 13C-Hiolein test for detecting steatorrhoea was 91.7%, with a specificity of 85.7%. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with pancreatic disease the 13C-Hiolein breath test reflects impaired lipase output and indicates decompensated lipolysis. The 13C-Hiolein breath test is a convenient alternative to faecal fat analysis. PMID:9026480

  19. Ampullary carcinoma in a patient with agenesis of the dorsal pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jitendra H; Yadav, Amitabh; Nundy, Samiran

    2015-04-01

    The most common congenital anomaly of the pancreas is pancreatic divisum (Tadokoro et al. in Anat Res Int 2011:1-7, 2011). Agenesis of the dorsal pancreas is extremely rare (Schnedl et al. in World J Gastroenterol 15(3):376-377, 2009). We are reporting a case of agenesis of dorsal pancreas presented with ampullary carcinoma. PMID:25972636

  20. Multifocal Insulinoma in Pancreas and Effect of Intraoperative Ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Borazan, Ersin; Aytekin, Alper; Yilmaz, Latif; Elci, Muhsin; Karaca, Mehmet Salih; Kervancioglu, Selim; Balik, Ahmet Abdulhalik

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma is the most frequently seen functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. The incidence of multifocal insulinoma is lower than 10%. Its treatment is direct or laparoscopic excision. The present case was examined with the findings of hypoglycemia and hypercalcemia, and as there was high insulin and C-peptide levels the initial diagnosis was insulinoma. The case was investigated in terms of MEN 1. During preoperative screening for localization, there was one focus in the head of the pancreas in the abdominal tomography and two foci in endoscopic ultrasonography. No other focus was detected through intraoperative visual or manual palpation. However, five foci were detected during operation by intraoperative ultrasonography. The relation of masses with the main pancreatic canal was evaluated and they were excised by enucleation method. There was no recurrence during the postoperative 18-month follow-up of the patient. As a result, during treatment for insulinoma, it should be kept in mind that there might be multifocal foci. In all insulinomas, the whole pancreas should be evaluated with intraoperative ultrasonography because none of the current preoperative diagnostic methods are as sensitive as manual palpation of pancreas and intraoperative ultrasonography. The intraoperative detection of synchronous five foci in pancreas is quite a rare condition. PMID:26295000

  1. Compassion, guilt and innocence: An fMRI study of responses to victims who are responsible for their fate.

    PubMed

    Fehse, Kai; Silveira, Sarita; Elvers, Katrin; Blautzik, Janusch

    2015-01-01

    Compassion is a human feeling towards an individual who is suffering. However, the responses toward a victim are not always compassionate and may, for example, be moderated by the perceived responsibility of the victim. In the present study, we investigated the neural correlates of compassion and specifically differentiated the responses to other individuals' misfortunes depending on whether the victim was responsible for the event that occurred. In particular, we identified increased activation of the left insula, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and adjacent anterior cingulate cortex when the participants read sentences with innocent compared with responsible victims. The reverse contrast revealed increased activation of the bilateral temporoparietal junction, right precuneus, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Using a psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis, we demonstrated that in the responsible condition, right dlPFC activation was accompanied by decreased activation in the left insula, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and mPFC. This inverse effective connectivity illustrates the antagonism of the dlPFC and mPFC in compassion-related appraisal of external events. More specifically, our results imply that regulatory mechanisms of compassion are related to the perception of responsibility. PMID:25398075

  2. Immune checkpoint blockade in cancer treatment: a double-edged sword cross-targeting the host as an "innocent bystander".

    PubMed

    Gelao, Lucia; Criscitiello, Carmen; Esposito, Angela; Goldhirsch, Aron; Curigliano, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Targeted immune checkpoint blockade augments anti-tumor immunity and induces durable responses in patients with melanoma and other solid tumors. It also induces specific "immune-related adverse events" (irAEs). IrAEs mainly include gastrointestinal, dermatological, hepatic and endocrinological toxicities. Off-target effects that arise appear to account for much of the toxicity of the immune checkpoint blockade. These unique "innocent bystander" effects are likely a direct result of breaking immune tolerance upon immune check point blockade and require specific treatment guidelines that include symptomatic therapies or systemic corticosteroids. What do we need going forward to limit immune checkpoint blockade-induced toxicity? Most importantly, we need a better understanding of the roles played by these agents in normal tissues, so that we can begin to predict potentially problematic side effects on the basis of their selectivity profile. Second, we need to focus on the predictive factors of the response and toxicity of the host rather than serially focusing on individual agents. Third, rigorous biomarker-driven clinical trials are needed to further elucidate the mechanisms of both the benefit and toxicity. We will summarize the double-edged sword effect of immunotherapeutics in cancer treatment. PMID:24594636

  3. Deep convolutional networks for pancreas segmentation in CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Holger R.; Farag, Amal; Lu, Le; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Automatic organ segmentation is an important prerequisite for many computer-aided diagnosis systems. The high anatomical variability of organs in the abdomen, such as the pancreas, prevents many segmentation methods from achieving high accuracies when compared to state-of-the-art segmentation of organs like the liver, heart or kidneys. Recently, the availability of large annotated training sets and the accessibility of affordable parallel computing resources via GPUs have made it feasible for "deep learning" methods such as convolutional networks (ConvNets) to succeed in image classification tasks. These methods have the advantage that used classification features are trained directly from the imaging data. We present a fully-automated bottom-up method for pancreas segmentation in computed tomography (CT) images of the abdomen. The method is based on hierarchical coarse-to-fine classification of local image regions (superpixels). Superpixels are extracted from the abdominal region using Simple Linear Iterative Clustering (SLIC). An initial probability response map is generated, using patch-level confidences and a two-level cascade of random forest classifiers, from which superpixel regions with probabilities larger 0.5 are retained. These retained superpixels serve as a highly sensitive initial input of the pancreas and its surroundings to a ConvNet that samples a bounding box around each superpixel at different scales (and random non-rigid deformations at training time) in order to assign a more distinct probability of each superpixel region being pancreas or not. We evaluate our method on CT images of 82 patients (60 for training, 2 for validation, and 20 for testing). Using ConvNets we achieve maximum Dice scores of an average 68% +/- 10% (range, 43-80%) in testing. This shows promise for accurate pancreas segmentation, using a deep learning approach and compares favorably to state-of-the-art methods.

  4. Feasibility of automated pancreas segmentation based on dynamic MRI

    PubMed Central

    Gou, S; Wu, J; Liu, F; Lee, P; Rapacchi, S; Hu, P

    2014-01-01

    Objective: MRI-guided radiotherapy is particularly attractive for abdominal targets with low CT contrast. To fully utilize this modality for pancreas tracking, automated segmentation tools are needed. A hybrid gradient, region growth and shape constraint (hGReS) method to segment two-dimensional (2D) upper abdominal dynamic MRI (dMRI) is developed for this purpose. Methods: 2D coronal dynamic MR images of two healthy volunteers were acquired with a frame rate of 5 frames per second. The regions of interest (ROIs) included the liver, pancreas and stomach. The first frame was used as the source where the centres of the ROIs were manually annotated. These centre locations were propagated to the next dMRI frame. Four-neighborhood region transfer growth was performed from these initial seeds before refinement using shape constraints. Results from hGReS and two other automated segmentation methods using integrated edge detection and region growth (IER) and level set, respectively, were compared with manual contours using Dice's index (DI). Results: For the first patient, the hGReS resulted in the organ segmentation accuracy as a measure by the DI (0.77) for the pancreas, superior to the level set method (0.72) and IER (0.71). The hGReS was shown to be reproducible on the second subject, achieving a DI of 0.82, 0.92 and 0.93 for the pancreas, stomach and liver, respectively. Motion trajectories derived from the hGReS were highly correlated to respiratory motion. Conclusion: We have shown the feasibility of automated segmentation of the pancreas anatomy on dMRI. Advances in knowledge: Using the hybrid method improves segmentation robustness of low-contrast images. PMID:25270713

  5. A stubborn anemia caused by ectopic pancreas bleeding in the jejunum revealed by capsule endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qun-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic pancreas is extremely rare in clinical setting. Meanwhile, a stubborn anemia without obvious dark bloody stool due to ectopic pancreas diagnosed by capsule endoscopy has not been reported. We reported a case of an ectopic pancreas inducing obscure gastrointestinal bleeding in a 70-year-old woman presenting as stubborn anemia, which was diagnosed by capsule endoscopy. The patient recovered well after resection the lesion. Diagnosis of ectopic pancreas is extremely difficult with conventional techniques. Endoscopists should pay more attention to the ectopic pancreas as a rare differential consideration for occult intestinal bleeding. PMID:26682148

  6. Acinar Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas: Clinical and Cytomorphologic Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Toll, Adam D.; Hruban, Ralph H.

    2013-01-01

    Acinar cell carcinoma is a rare malignant epithelial neoplasm with predominantly exocrine acinar differentiation and is seen primarily in older men (mean age, 62 years). The presenting symptoms are usually non-specific, and jaundice is often not present. Symptoms relating to the overproduction and release of lipase into the circulation are present in 10-15% of patients. Characteristic cytomorphologic features include a population of cells with minimal pleomorphism, eccentrically placed nuclei with a single prominent nucleoli and moderate hyperchromasia. The cytoplasm is finely granular, and the background may contain granular debris secondary to cytolysis. A significant proportion of the cases also have a minor neuroendocrine component or scattered neuroendocrine cells. Approximately 50% of patients have metastatic disease at presentation, often restricted to the regional lymph nodes and liver. The prognosis is poor, only slightly better than that of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. PMID:23667367

  7. Type IV collagen is a tumour stroma-derived biomarker for pancreas cancer

    PubMed Central

    Öhlund, D; Lundin, C; Ardnor, B; Öman, M; Naredi, P; Sund, M

    2009-01-01

    Background: Pancreas cancer is a dreaded disease with high mortality, despite progress in surgical and oncological treatments in recent years. The field is hampered by a lack of good prognostic and predictive tumour biomarkers to be used during follow-up of patients. Methods: The circulating level of type IV collagen was measured by ELISA in pancreas cancer patients and controls. The expression pattern of type IV collagen in normal pancreas, pancreas cancer tissue and in pancreas cancer cell lines was studied by immunofluorescence and Western blot techniques. Results: Patients with pancreas cancer have significantly increased circulating levels of type IV collagen. In pancreas cancer tissue high levels of type IV collagen expression was found in close proximity to cancer cells in the tumour stroma. Furthermore, pancreas cancer cells were found to produce and secrete type IV collagen in vitro, which in part can explain the high type IV collagen expression observed in pancreas cancer tissue, and the increased circulating levels in pancreas cancer patients. Of clinical importance, our results show that the circulating level of type IV collagen after surgery is strongly related to prognosis in patients treated for pancreas cancer by pancreatico-duodenectomy with curative intent. Persisting high levels of circulating type IV collagen after surgery indicates a quick relapse in disease and poor survival. Conclusion: Our results most importantly show that stroma related substances can be evaluated as potential cancer biomarkers, and thereby underline the importance of the tumour microenvironment also in this context. PMID:19491897

  8. Endoscopic sphincterotomy in patients with stenosis of ampulla of Vater: Three-year follow-up of exocrine pancreatic function and clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Nils; Marzeion, Axel Michael; Bretzel, Reinhard Georg; Kloer, Hans Ulrich; Hardt, Philip Daniel

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate retrospectively the long-term effect of endoscopic sphincterotomy (ES) including exocrine pancreatic function in patients with stenosis of ampulla of Vater. METHODS: After diagnostic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and ES because of stenosis of the ampulla of Vater (SOD Type I), follow-up examinations were performed in 60 patients (mean follow-up time 37.7 mo). Patients were asked about clinical signs and symptoms at present and before intervention using a standard questionnaire. Before and after ES exocrine pancreatic function was assessed by determination of immunoreactive fecal elastase 1. Serum enzymes indicating cholestasis as well as serum lipase and amylase were measured. RESULTS: Eighty percent of patients reported an improvement in their general condition after ES. The fecal elastase 1 concentrations (FEC) in all patients increased significantly after ES. This effect was even more marked in patients with pathologically low concentrations (< 200 μg/g) of fecal elastase prior to ES. The levels of serum lipase and amylase as well as serum alcaline phosphatase (AP) and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase (GGT) decreased significantly after ES. CONCLUSION: The results of this study demonstrate that patients with stenosis of the ampulla of Vater can be successfully treated with endoscopic sphincterotomy. The positive effect is not only indicated by sustained improvement of clinical symptoms and cholestasis but also by improvement of exocrine pancreatic function. PMID:17352020

  9. Suppression of Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transitioning Enhances Ex Vivo Reprogramming of Human Exocrine Pancreatic Tissue Toward Functional Insulin-Producing β-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Maria João; Muir, Kenneth R.; Docherty, Hilary M.; Drummond, Robert; McGowan, Neil W.A.; Forbes, Shareen; Heremans, Yves; Houbracken, Isabelle; Ross, James A.; Forbes, Stuart J.; Ravassard, Philippe; Heimberg, Harry; Casey, John; Docherty, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Because of the lack of tissue available for islet transplantation, new sources of β-cells have been sought for the treatment of type 1 diabetes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the human exocrine-enriched fraction from the islet isolation procedure could be reprogrammed to provide additional islet tissue for transplantation. The exocrine-enriched cells rapidly dedifferentiated in culture and grew as a mesenchymal monolayer. Genetic lineage tracing confirmed that these mesenchymal cells arose, in part, through a process of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transitioning (EMT). A protocol was developed whereby transduction of these mesenchymal cells with adenoviruses containing Pdx1, Ngn3, MafA, and Pax4 generated a population of cells that were enriched in glucagon-secreting α-like cells. Transdifferentiation or reprogramming toward insulin-secreting β-cells was enhanced, however, when using unpassaged cells in combination with inhibition of EMT by inclusion of Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and transforming growth factor-β1 inhibitors. Resultant cells were able to secrete insulin in response to glucose and on transplantation were able to normalize blood glucose levels in streptozotocin diabetic NOD/SCID mice. In conclusion, reprogramming of human exocrine-enriched tissue can be best achieved using fresh material under conditions whereby EMT is inhibited, rather than allowing the culture to expand as a mesenchymal monolayer. PMID:23610058

  10. No longer an innocent bystander: epithelial toll-like receptor signaling in the development of mucosal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gribar, Steven C; Richardson, Ward M; Sodhi, Chhinder P; Hackam, David J

    2008-01-01

    Diseases of mucosal inflammation represent important causes of morbidity and mortality, and have led to intense research efforts to understand the factors that lead to their development. It is well accepted that a breakdown of the normally impermeant epithelial barrier of the intestine, the lung, and the kidney is associated with the development of inflammatory disease in these organs, yet significant controversy exists as to how this breakdown actually occurs, and how such a breakdown may lead to inflammation. In this regard, much work has focused upon the role of the epithelium as an "innocent bystander," a target of a leukocyte-mediated inflammatory cascade that leads to its destruction in the mucosal inflammatory process. However, recent evidence from a variety of laboratories indicates that the epithelium is not merely a passive component in the steps that lead to mucosal inflammation, but is a central participant in the process. In addressing this controversy, we and others have determined that epithelial cells express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system, and that activation of TLRs by endogenous and exogenous ligands may play a central role in determining the balance between a state of "mucosal homeostasis," as is required for optimal organ function, and "mucosal injury," leading to mucosal inflammation and barrier breakdown. In particular, activation of TLRs within intestinal epithelial cells leads to the development of cellular injury and impairment in mucosal repair in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation, while activation of TLRs in the lung and kidney may participate in the development of pneumonitis and nephritis respectively. Recent work in support of these concepts is extensively reviewed, while essential areas of further study that are required to determine the significance of epithelial TLR signaling during states of health and disease are outlined. PMID:18584047

  11. Elevated Erythropoietin and Multicystic Neoplasm of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M.; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  12. Elevated erythropoietin and multicystic neoplasm of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Nai, Qiang; Regeti, Kalyani; Arshed, Sabrina; Hossain, Mohammed Amzad; Zhang, Ping; Luo, Hongxiu; Singh, Shilpi; Mathew, Teena; Islam, Mohammed; Sen, Shuvendu; Yousif, Abdalla M; Duhl, Jozsef

    2015-01-01

    Cystic lesions of the pancreas are more frequently recognized due to the widespread use of improved imaging techniques. There are a variety of pancreatic cystic lesions with different clinical presentations and malignant potentials, and their management depends on the type of the cysts. Although the early recognition of a cystic neoplasm with malignant potential provides an opportunity of early surgical treatment, the precise diagnosis of the cystic neoplasm can be a challenge, largely due to the lack of reliable biomarkers of malignant transformation. We report a case of a large, multicystic neoplasm within the body and tail of the pancreas complicated by elevated erythropoietin, which is likely related to the malignant transformation of the pancreatic neoplasm. PMID:25873882

  13. Computed tomography of cystadenoma and cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Itai, Y.; Moss, A.A.; Ohtomo, K.

    1982-11-01

    Ten cases of cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas were examined by computed tomography (CT). All but one showed characteristic findings consisting of both cystic and solid components. Innumerable small cysts producing a honeycomb appearance were noticed in serous cystadenomas. A well-defined multilocular cystic mass containing thin, straight, and/or curvilinear septa or a unilocular cystic tumor with a papillary projection and locally thickened wall was present in mucinous cystadenomas. The CT findings in cystadenocarcinomas varied depending on the relative size of the cystic and solid portions and the grade of malignancy. CT was useful in detecting and diagnosing cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and differentiating benign serous cystadenomas from potentially malignant cystadenomas in typical cases. However, aspiration biopsy is recommended when findings are equivocal.

  14. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed. PMID:26825864

  15. Heterotopic Pancreas Presented as Duodenal Tumor with Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Heun; Nam, So Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Heterotopic pancreas (HP) is defined as pancreatic tissue lacking anatomic and vascular continuity with the main body of the pancreas. Most are asymptomatic, but can cause ulcer, bleeding, intussusception, and mechanical obstruction. Herein, we presented one case of HP presented as duodenal tumor causing duodenal obstruction. A 7-year-old girl visited the emergency room for abdominal pain with vomiting for 24 hours. Computed tomography and upper gastrointestinal series revealed a polypoid mass with short stalk in the 2nd portion of duodenum. We attempted an endoscopic removal. However, the lumen was nearly obstructed by the mass and the stalk was too broad and hard to excise. The mass was surgically removed via duodenotomy. It was confirmed as a HP with ductal and acini components (type 2 by Heinrich classification). Postoperatively, the patient has been well without any complication and recurrence. PMID:26770904

  16. Outcome Measures for Artificial Pancreas Clinical Trials: A Consensus Report.

    PubMed

    Maahs, David M; Buckingham, Bruce A; Castle, Jessica R; Cinar, Ali; Damiano, Edward R; Dassau, Eyal; DeVries, J Hans; Doyle, Francis J; Griffen, Steven C; Haidar, Ahmad; Heinemann, Lutz; Hovorka, Roman; Jones, Timothy W; Kollman, Craig; Kovatchev, Boris; Levy, Brian L; Nimri, Revital; O'Neal, David N; Philip, Moshe; Renard, Eric; Russell, Steven J; Weinzimer, Stuart A; Zisser, Howard; Lum, John W

    2016-07-01

    Research on and commercial development of the artificial pancreas (AP) continue to progress rapidly, and the AP promises to become a part of clinical care. In this report, members of the JDRF Artificial Pancreas Project Consortium in collaboration with the wider AP community 1) advocate for the use of continuous glucose monitoring glucose metrics as outcome measures in AP trials, in addition to HbA1c, and 2) identify a short set of basic, easily interpreted outcome measures to be reported in AP studies whenever feasible. Consensus on a broader range of measures remains challenging; therefore, reporting of additional metrics is encouraged as appropriate for individual AP studies or study groups. Greater consistency in reporting of basic outcome measures may facilitate the interpretation of study results by investigators, regulatory bodies, health care providers, payers, and patients themselves, thereby accelerating the widespread adoption of AP technology to improve the lives of people with type 1 diabetes. PMID:27330126

  17. Notochord repression of endodermal Sonic hedgehog permits pancreas development

    PubMed Central

    Hebrok, Matthias; Kim, Seung K.; Melton, Douglas A.

    1998-01-01

    Notochord signals to the endoderm are required for development of the chick dorsal pancreas. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) is normally absent from pancreatic endoderm, and we provide evidence that notochord, in contrast to its effects on adjacent neuroectoderm where SHH expression is induced, represses SHH expression in adjacent nascent pancreatic endoderm. We identify activin-βB and FGF2 as notochord factors that can repress endodermal SHH and thereby permit expression of pancreas genes including Pdx1 and insulin. Endoderm treatment with antibodies that block hedgehog activity also results in pancreatic gene expression. Prevention of SHH expression in prepancreatic dorsal endoderm by intercellular signals, like activin and FGF, may be critical for permitting early steps of chick pancreatic development. PMID:9620856

  18. Dynamic development of the pancreas from birth to adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Weir, Gordon C.

    2016-01-01

    After birth the endocrine pancreas continues its development, a complex process that involves both the maturation of islet cells and a marked expansion of their numbers. New beta cells are formed both by duplication of pre-existing cells and by new differentiation (neogenesis) across the first postnatal weeks, with the result of beta cells of different stages of maturation even after weaning. Improving our understanding of this period of beta cell expansion could provide valuable therapeutic insights. PMID:26998806

  19. Dynamic development of the pancreas from birth to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Bonner-Weir, Susan; Aguayo-Mazzucato, Cristina; Weir, Gordon C

    2016-05-01

    After birth the endocrine pancreas continues its development, a complex process that involves both the maturation of islet cells and a marked expansion of their numbers. New beta cells are formed both by duplication of pre-existing cells and by new differentiation (neogenesis) across the first postnatal weeks, with the result of beta cells of different stages of maturation even after weaning. Improving our understanding of this period of beta cell expansion could provide valuable therapeutic insights. PMID:26998806

  20. Monitoring Artificial Pancreas Trials Through Agent-based Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Scarpellini, Stefania; Di Palma, Federico; Toffanin, Chiara; Del Favero, Simone; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the availability and reliability of network connections lets envision systems supporting a continuous remote monitoring of clinical parameters useful either for overseeing chronic diseases or for following clinical trials involving outpatients. We report here the results achieved by a telemedicine infrastructure that has been linked to an artificial pancreas platform and used during a trial of the AP@home project, funded by the European Union. The telemedicine infrastructure is based on a multiagent paradigm and is able to deliver to the clinic any information concerning the patient status and the operation of the artificial pancreas. A web application has also been developed, so that the clinic staff and the researchers involved in the design of the blood glucose control algorithms are able to follow the ongoing experiments. Albeit the duration of the experiments in the trial discussed in the article was limited to only 2 days, the system proved to be successful for monitoring patients, in particular overnight when the patients are sleeping. Based on that outcome we can conclude that the infrastructure is suitable for the purpose of accomplishing an intelligent monitoring of an artificial pancreas either during longer trials or whenever that system will be used as a routine treatment. PMID:24876570

  1. Quercetin Aglycone Is Bioavailable in Murine Pancreas and Pancreatic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lifeng; Angst, Eliane; Park, Jenny L.; Moro, Aune; Dawson, David W.; Reber, Howard A.; Eibl, Guido; Hines, O. Joe; Go, Vay-Liang W.; Lu, Qing-Yi

    2010-01-01

    Quercetin is a potential chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent for pancreatic and other cancers. This study was to examine the distribution of quercetin in plasma, lung, liver, pancreas and pancreatic cancer xenografts in a murine in vivo model and the uptake of quercetin in pancreatic cancer MiaPaCa-2 cells in cellular in vitro model. Mice were randomly allocated to control diet, 0.2 and 1% quercetin diet groups utilizing the AIN93G-based diet (n=12 per group) for 6 weeks. In addition, 6 mice from each group were injected weekly with chemotherapeutic drug gemcitabine (120 mg/kg mouse, i.p.). MiaPaCa cells were collected from culture medium after cells were exposed to 30 µM of quercetin for 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hrs. Levels of quercetin and 3-O’-methyl-quercetin in mice tissues and MiaPaCa-2 cells were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography following enzymatic hydrolysis and then extraction. Our study showed that quercetin is accumulated in pancreatic cancer cells, and is absorbed in the circulating system, tumors and tissues of pancreas, liver and lung in vivo. A higher proportion of total quercetin found in tumors and pancreas are aglycones. Gemcitabine co-treatment with quercetin reduced absorption of quercetin in mice circulatory system and liver. Results from the study provide important information on the interpretation of chemo-therapeutic efficacy of quercetin. PMID:20499918

  2. Mallotus roxburghianus modulates antioxidant responses in pancreas of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Roy, V K; Chenkual, L; Gurusubramanian, G

    2016-03-01

    Mallotus roxburghianus has long been used by Mizo tribal people for the treatment of diabetes. Scientific validation at known doses may provide information about its safety and efficacy. Methanolic leaf extract of M. roxburghianus (MRME 100 and 400mg/kg) was tested in comparison with normal and alloxan diabetic rats for 28 days p.o. in terms of body and pancreatic weight, blood glucose level, antioxidant enzymes, expression of visfatin and PCNA, histopathology and histomorphometric measurements of pancreas. The results were evaluated statistically using ANOVA, correlation and regression and Principal component analysis (PCO). MRME (100 and 400mg/kg) treatment significantly (p<0.0001) decreased the body weight, blood glucose level, improved the mass and size of pancreas, elevated the levels of antioxidant enzymes and up regulate the expression of visfatin and PCNA. PCO analysis was good to fitness and prediction distinguishes the therapeutic effects of M. roxburghianus from the alloxan induced diabetic rats. MRME has significant role in protecting animals from alloxan-induced diabetic oxidative stress in pancreas and exhibited promising antihyperglycaemic and antioxidant activities along with significant reversal of disturbed antioxidant status and lipid peroxidative damage. Pancreatic architecture and physiology under diabetic oxidative stress have been significantly modulated by MRME and validated as a drug candidate for antidiabetic treatment. M. roxburghianus treatment restores the antioxidant enzyme system and rejuvenates the islets mass in alloxanized rat by accelerating visfatin and PCNA expression in pancreatic tissue. PMID:26764087

  3. Composite pheochromocytoma masquerading as solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of pancreas.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Geetanjali; Saran, Ravindra Kumar; Godhi, Satyajit; Srivastava, Siddharth; Saluja, Sundeep Singh; Mishra, Pramod Kumar

    2015-05-16

    Pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma form rare composite tumours of the adrenal medulla comprising less than 3% of all sympathoadrenal tumours. We present a case of intraoperatively detected adrenal medullary tumour of composite pheochromocytoma and ganglioneuroma diagnosed on histopathology, in a normotensive patient. A 50-year-old male with a past history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with abdominal pain and significant weight loss since one month. Ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography abdomen revealed a large lobulated lesion in the distal body and tail of pancreas suggestive of solid and papillary neoplasm of body and tail of pancreas. Intra-operatively, a 15 cm × 10 cm solid lesion with cystic areas was seen arising from the left lower pole of the adrenal gland pushing the pancreas which appeared unremarkable. In our case, exploratory laparotomy with tumour excision was done. Extensive sectioning and microscopic examination of this adrenal tumour confirmed a diagnosis of composite Pheochromocytoma with Ganglioneuroma on histopathology. Immunophenotyping with S-100 further supported the diagnosis. The goal of this report is to increase the awareness of this rare disease and to further identify its variable presentation. PMID:25984524

  4. Designing an artificial pancreas architecture: the AP@home experience.

    PubMed

    Lanzola, Giordano; Toffanin, Chiara; Di Palma, Federico; Del Favero, Simone; Magni, Lalo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    The latest achievements in sensor technologies for blood glucose level monitoring, pump miniaturization for insulin delivery, and the availability of portable computing devices are paving the way toward the artificial pancreas as a treatment for diabetes patients. This device encompasses a controller unit that oversees the administration of insulin micro-boluses and continuously drives the pump based on blood glucose readings acquired in real time. In order to foster the research on the artificial pancreas and prepare for its adoption as a therapy, the European Union in 2010 funded the AP@home project, following a series of efforts already ongoing in the USA. This paper, authored by members of the AP@home consortium, reports on the technical issues concerning the design and implementation of an architecture supporting the exploitation of an artificial pancreas platform. First a PC-based platform was developed by the authors to prove the effectiveness and reliability of the algorithms responsible for insulin administration. A mobile-based one was then adopted to improve the comfort for the patients. Both platforms were tested on real patients, and a description of the goals, the achievements, and the major shortcomings that emerged during those trials is also reported in the paper. PMID:25430423

  5. [A case of chronic pancreatitis occurring in gastric aberrant pancreas poorly distinguishable from gastric aberrant pancreas ductal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sayaka; Miyaoka, Youichi; Fujiwara, Aya; Tsukano, Kousuke; Kotani, Satoshi; Yamanouchi, Satoshi; Kusunoki, Ryusaku; Ito, Satoko; Fujishiro, Hirofumi; Kohge, Nariaki; Onuma, Hideyuki

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was referred to our hospital with abdominal pain. A gastric submucosal tumor (SMT) was diagnosed nine years previously, but the patient was lost to follow-up. Upon our evaluation, the SMT had enlarged, as demonstrated by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and abdominal computed tomography. Endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a hypoechoic and isoechoic mosaic mass, which primarily occupied the third and fourth layers of the gastric wall. Aspiration cytodiagnosis was performed, the results of which led to a suspicion of adenocarcinoma arising from gastric ectopic pancreas. Next, we conducted segmental gastrectomy. Pathological examination showed adiponecrosis, a pancreatic stone, chronic inflammatory cell infiltration, and fibrosis. Thus, the patient was diagnosed with chronic pancreatitis occurring in a gastric aberrant pancreas. PMID:26537325

  6. CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphisms in celiac patients with exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Licul, Vanja; Cizmarević, Nada Starcević; Ristić, Smiljana; Mikolasević, Ivana; Mijandrusić, Brankica Sincić

    2013-12-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a life-long gluten sensitive autoimmune disease of the small intestine affecting genetically susceptible individuals. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype contributes to the genetic risk for CD, but "non-HLA" genes also play a role. Clinical presentation could be classical, but majority of patients present with non-classical, atypical signs and symptoms. Endocrine and/or exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EXPI) is common in celiac patients. The aim of our study was to assess EXPI among our CD patients by measurement of faecal pancreatic elastase (FE1) and to find potential association of CTLA-4 +49 and TNF-alpha-308 gene polymorphism and EXPI. Eighty three patients entered the study. Tissue transglutaminase antibodies (anti-TTG), faecal elastase-1 (FE1) assays and genotyping for the CTLA-4 +49A/G and TNF-alpha308 were performed. Of 83 patients with CD EXPI had 13 (15.6 %). There was no statistically significant difference in frequency of polymorphisms for both genes (CTL-4 +49 i TNF-alpha-308) in the group with and without EXPI. In conclusion, EXPI is common in symptomatic CD patients, but further genetic studies with larger number of patients are needed. PMID:24611333

  7. [Tertiary syphilis of the pancreas and liver in 82-year-old patient: case study].

    PubMed

    Denisova, T L; Tiul'tiaeva, L A; Lipatova, T E; Bakulev, A L; Alipova, L N; Apanasevich, A V; Bezrodnaia, L A; Borisova, E A

    2013-01-01

    It has been described a clinical case of late diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver of elderly patients. Two years before that it was wrongly diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas with liver metastases, and the patient was operated on with the imposition of cholecystostomy. It was conducted appropriate therapy and reconstructive surgery after verification of the diagnosis of syphilis of the pancreas and liver. PMID:24772875

  8. An artificial pancreas for automated blood glucose control in patients with Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Signe; Boiroux, Dimitri; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Madsen, Henrik; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Automated glucose control in patients with Type 1 diabetes is much-coveted by patients, relatives and healthcare professionals. It is the expectation that a system for automated control, also know as an artificial pancreas, will improve glucose control, reduce the risk of diabetes complications and markedly improve patient quality of life. An artificial pancreas consists of portable devices for glucose sensing and insulin delivery which are controlled by an algorithm residing on a computer. The technology is still under development and currently no artificial pancreas is commercially available. This review gives an introduction to recent progress, challenges and future prospects within the field of artificial pancreas research. PMID:26001176

  9. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Katsourakis, Anastasios; Dimitriou, Ioannis; Noussios, Georgios; Chatzis, Iosiph; Chatzitheoclitos, Efthimios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  10. Solid Serous Adenoma of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Noussios, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report a case of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas which is the 16th case reported worldwide and the first ever reported in Greece. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypervascular mass in the tail of the pancreas of a 72-year-old female who presented with mild abdominal pain. Distal pancreatectomy was performed by laparotomy and histological and immunohistochemical examination revealed a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas. Preoperative diagnosis of a solid-type serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is difficult, and, due to its benign nature, simple excision of the tumor is the recommended treatment. PMID:27525151

  11. US Findings in Patients at Risk for Pancreas Transplant Failure.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Tara A; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Harbell, Jack; Kornak, John; Stock, Peter G; Feldstein, Vickie A

    2016-07-01

    Purpose To determine if ultrasonographic (US) findings, including Doppler US findings, are associated with subsequent pancreas transplant failure. Materials and Methods A cohort of adult patients who underwent pancreas transplantation at a tertiary institution over the course of 10 years (from 2003 to 2012) was retrospectively evaluated for failure, which was defined as return to insulin therapy or surgical graft removal. The institutional review board provided a waiver of informed consent. All US images obtained within the 1st postoperative year were reviewed for three findings: arterial flow (presence or absence of intraparenchymal forward diastole flow), splenic vein thrombus, and edema. These findings were correlated with pancreas graft failure within 1-year after surgery by using Cox proportional hazards models and hazard ratios. Results A total of 228 transplants were included (mean patient age, 41.6 years; range, 19-57 years; 122 men, 106 women). Absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow was identified in nine of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 45%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23, 68) and in 15 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 93% [193 of 208]; 95% CI: 89, 96). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 6.2 (95% CI: 3.1, 12.4). Splenic vein thrombus was identified in 10 of 20 failed transplants (sensitivity, 50%; 95% CI: 27, 73) and in 25 of 208 transplants that survived (specificity, 88% [183 of 208]; 95% CI: 83, 92). The Cox proportional hazard ratio was 4.2 (95% CI: 2.4, 7.4). Edema had the lowest specificity (Cox proportional hazard ratio, 2.0; 95% CI: 1.3, 2.9). In the multivariate analysis, only absent or reversed arterial diastolic flow remained significantly associated with transplant failure (adjusted hazard ratio, 3.6; 95% CI: 1.0, 12.8; P = .045). Conclusion Absent or reversed diastolic arterial Doppler flow has a stronger association with transplant failure than does splenic vein thrombus or edema. (©) RSNA, 2016. PMID:26807892

  12. Sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas: A mimicker of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scudiere, Jennifer R.; Shi, Chanjuan; Hruban, Ralph H.; Herman, Joseph; Fishman, Elliot K.; Schulick, Richard D.; Wolfgang, Christopher L.; Makary, Martin A.; Thornton, Katherine; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Horton, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    Sclerosing mesenteritis (SM), also known as mesenteric lipodystrophy, rarely involves the parenchyma of the pancreas. When sclerosing mesenteritis does involve the pancreas, it can mimic pancreatic carcinoma both clinically and radiographically with pain, obstructive jaundice, a mass lesion and even the appearance of vascular invasion. We report 6 patients with sclerosing mesenteritis involving the pancreas (mean age 43.2 years, 5 female), and review their clinical presentation, radiographic findings, pathology, and outcome. Five of these 6 patients were originally thought to have a primary pancreatic neoplasm. Initial presenting clinical information was available for each patient: all 6 reported abdominal or epigastric pain, 3 reported weight loss, and 2 reported one or more of the following: back pain, fever, abdominal bloating/distention, nausea with/without vomiting, and anorexia. The lesions formed masses with an infiltrative pattern, and all had three key histologic features: fibrosis, chronic inflammation, and fat necrosis—without a known etiology. The inflammatory infiltrate was composed of a mixture of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and scattered eosinophils. Of the five patients with post-treatment clinical information available, four had at least a partial response to treatment with steroids, tamoxifen, azathioprine, resection, or a combination of these, and 1 did not respond. A dramatic response to immunosuppressive therapy is illustrated by the case of a 46-year-old woman who presented with the presumptive diagnosis of an unresectable pancreatic cancer. Distinguishing sclerosing mesenteritis from pancreatic carcinoma is crucial to appropriate management, as patients with sclerosing mesenteritis may benefit from immunosuppressive therapy. PMID:20351487

  13. Automatic Data Processing to Achieve a Safe Telemedical Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hernando, M. Elena; García-Sáez, Gema; Martínez-Sarriegui, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Herrero, Agustín; Pérez-Gandía, Carmen; Rigla, Mercedes; de Leiva, Alberto; Capel, Ismael; Pons, Belén; Gómez, Enrique J.

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of telemedicine for diabetes care has evolved over time, proving that it contributes to patient self-monitoring, improves glycemic control, and provides analysis tools for decision support. The timely development of a safe and robust ambulatory artificial pancreas should rely on a telemedicine architecture complemented with automatic data analysis tools able to manage all the possible high-risk situations and to guarantee the patient's safety. Methods The Intelligent Control Assistant system (INCA) telemedical artificial pancreas architecture is based on a mobile personal assistant integrated into a telemedicine system. The INCA supports four control strategies and implements an automatic data processing system for risk management (ADP-RM) providing short-term and medium-term risk analyses. The system validation comprises data from 10 type 1 pump-treated diabetic patients who participated in two randomized crossover studies, and it also includes in silico simulation and retrospective data analysis. Results The ADP-RM short-term risk analysis prevents hypoglycemic events by interrupting insulin infusion. The pump interruption has been implemented in silico and tested for a closed-loop simulation over 30 hours. For medium-term risk management, analysis of capillary blood glucose notified the physician with a total of 62 alarms during a clinical experiment (56% for hyperglycemic events). The ADP-RM system is able to filter anomalous continuous glucose records and to detect abnormal administration of insulin doses with the pump. Conclusions Automatic data analysis procedures have been tested as an essential tool to achieve a safe ambulatory telemedical artificial pancreas, showing their ability to manage short-term and medium-term risk situations. PMID:20144417

  14. Agent-based model of macrophage action on endocrine pancreas.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ignacio V; Gómez, Enrique J; Hernando, M Elena; Villares, Ricardo; Mellado, Mario

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes an agent-based model of the action of macrophages on the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas. The aim of this model is to simulate the processes of beta cell proliferation and apoptosis and also the process of phagocytosis of cell debris by macrophages, all of which are related to the onset of the autoimmune response in type 1 diabetes. We have used data from the scientific literature to design the model. The results show that the model obtains good approximations to real processes and could be used to shed light on some open questions concerning such processes. PMID:23155767

  15. Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.C.; Lichtenstein, J.E.; Fishman, E.K.; Oertel, J.E.; Dachman, A.H.; Siegelman, S.S.

    1985-02-01

    Solid and papillary epithelial neoplasm of the pancreas is an uncommon low grade malignant tumor histologically distinct from the usual ductal adenocarcinoma and amenable to cure by surgical excision. It tends to occur in black women in their second or third decade of life and has often been misclassified as nonfunctional islet cell tumor or as cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. Twelve cases were reviewed. Sonography and CT of solid and pipillary epithelial neoplasms depict a well-demarcated mass that can be solid, mixed cystic and solid, or largely cystic. The radiologic appearance is dependent on the maintenance of the integrity of the neoplasm versus the extent of retrogressive changes that have occurred.

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of an abbreviated 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test for measurement of pancreatic exocrine function

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Viola; Wolfram, Kristina U; Rosien, Ulrich; Layer, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background A modified 13C-mixed triglyceride breath test (13C -MTGT) detects moderate pancreatic exocrine insufficiency noninvasively and reliably, but it requires prolonged breath sampling (6 hours (hr)). Objective We aimed to investigate whether 13C -MTGT can be abbreviated, to optimize clinical usability. Methods We analyzed the 13C-MTGT of 200 consecutive patients, retrospectively. Cumulative 1–5 hr 13C-exhalation values were compared with the standard parameter (6-hr cumulative 13C-exhalation). We determined the sensitivity and specificity of shortened breath sampling periods, by comparison with the normal values from 10 healthy volunteers, whom also underwent a secretin test to quantitate pancreatic secretion. Moreover, we evaluated the influence of gastric emptying (GE), using a 13C-octanoic acid breath test in a subset (N = 117). Results The 1–5 hr cumulative 13C-exhalation tests correlated highly and significantly with the standard parameter (p < 0.0001). Sensitivity for detection of impaired lipolysis was high (≥77%), but the specificity was low (≥38%) for the early measurements. Both parameters were high after 4 hrs (88% and 94%, respectively) and 5 hrs (98% and 91%, respectively). Multivariate linear correlation analysis confirmed that GE strongly influenced early postprandial 13C-exhalation during the 13C-MTGT. Conclusion Shortening of the 13C -MTGT from 6 to 4 hrs of duration was associated with similar diagnostic accuracy, yet increased clinical usability. The influence of GE on early postprandial results of the 13C-MTGT precluded further abbreviation of the test. PMID:25083286

  17. A blinded randomised controlled trial to determine the effect of enteric coating on enzyme treatment for canine exocrine pancreatic efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Enzyme treatment is the mainstay for management of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) in dogs. ‘Enteric-coated’ preparations have been developed to protect the enzyme from degradation in the stomach, but their efficacy has not been critically evaluated. The hypothesis of the current study was that enteric coating would have no effect on the efficacy of pancreatic enzyme treatment for dogs with EPI. Thirty-eight client-owned dogs with naturally occurring EPI were included in this multicentre, blinded, randomised controlled trial. Dogs received either an enteric-coated enzyme preparation (test treatment) or an identical preparation without the enteric coating (control treatment) over a period of 56 days. Results There were no significant differences in either signalment or cobalamin status (where cobalamin deficient or not) between the dogs on the test and control treatments. Body weight and body condition score increased in both groups during the trial (P<0.001) but the magnitude of increase was greater for the test treatment compared with the control treatment (P<0.001). By day 56, mean body weight increase was 17% (95% confidence interval 11-23%) in the test treatment group and 9% (95% confidence interval 4-15%) in the control treatment group. The dose of enzyme required increased over time (P<0.001) but there was no significant difference between treatments at any time point (P=0.225). Clinical disease severity score decreased over time for both groups (P=0.011) and no difference was noted between groups (P=0.869). No significant adverse effects were reported, for either treatment, for the duration of the trial. Conclusions Enteric coating a pancreatic enzyme treatment improves response in canine EPI. PMID:22839732

  18. An Innocent Giant

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Lakhan Singh; Dhingra, Mandeep; Raghubanshi, Gunjan; Thami, Gurvinder Pal

    2014-01-01

    A cutaneous horn (cornu cutaneum) is a protrusion from the skin composed of a cornified material. It may be associated with a benign, premalignant, or malignant lesion at the base, masking numerous dermatoses. In a 24-year-old female, a giant cutaneous horn arising from a seborrheic keratosis located on the leg is presented. This case has been reported to emphasize that a giant cutaneous horn may also occur in young patients, even in photoprotected areas, and are not always associated with malignancy. PMID:25484426

  19. Not Such Innocents Abroad?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaur, Georg; Watts, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Little research in economic education has dealt with MBA programs. The authors investigated student performance in a microeconomics/managerial economics course taught in a one-year MBA program at the German International School of Management and Administration in Hanover, Germany, during the 2002-5 academic years. After controlling for other…

  20. Roles of Commensal Microbiota in Pancreas Homeostasis and Pancreatic Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Leal-Lopes, Camila; Velloso, Fernando J.; Campopiano, Julia C.; Sogayar, Mari C.; Correa, Ricardo G.

    2015-01-01

    The pancreas plays a central role in metabolism, allowing ingested food to be converted and used as fuel by the cells throughout the body. On the other hand, the pancreas may be affected by devastating diseases, such as pancreatitis, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC), and diabetes mellitus (DM), which generally results in a wide metabolic imbalance. The causes for the development and progression of these diseases are still controversial; therefore it is essential to better understand the underlying mechanisms which compromise the pancreatic homeostasis. The interest in the study of the commensal microbiome increased extensively in recent years, when many discoveries have illustrated its central role in both human physiology and maintenance of homeostasis. Further understanding of the involvement of the microbiome during the development of pathological conditions is critical for the improvement of new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In the present review, we discuss recent findings on the behavior and functions played by the microbiota in major pancreatic diseases and provide further insights into its potential roles in the maintenance of pancreatic steady-state activities. PMID:26347203

  1. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2013: Artificial Pancreas Project at Cambridge 2013

    PubMed Central

    Hovorka, R.

    2015-01-01

    The development and clinical testing of closed-loop systems (the artificial pancreas) is underpinned by advances in continuous glucose monitoring and benefits from concerted academic and industry collaborative efforts. This review describes the progress of the Artificial Pancreas Project at the University of Cambridge from 2006 to 2014. Initial studies under controlled laboratory conditions, designed to collect representative safety and performance data, were followed by short to medium free-living unsupervised outpatient studies demonstrating the safety and efficacy of closed-loop insulin delivery using a model predictive control algorithm. Accompanying investigations included assessment of the psychosocial impact and key factors affecting glucose control such as insulin kinetics and glucose absorption. Translation to other disease conditions such as critical illness and Type 2 diabetes took place. It is concluded that innovation of iteratively enhanced closed-loop systems will provide tangible means to improve outcomes and quality of life in people with Type 1 diabetes and their families in the next decade. PMID:25819473

  2. Pancreas and Diabetes Mellitus: The Relationship between the Organ and the Disease.

    PubMed

    Menon, Saumya; Rajesh, Gopalakrishna; Balakrishnan, Vallath

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus has been a fascinating disease from the dawn of medical history. The first breakthrough in its treatment came in 1922, with the discovery of insulin which was extracted from the pancreas of a dog. Even earlier, a relationship between pancreas and diabetes mellitus had been suspected by medical scientists. However, the study of diabetes mellitus is much more than its relationship with the pancreas. On the other hand the pancreas has been known to be a very reclusive organ that is hidden away from physicians and surgeons for centuries. In recent times, it has become more accessible and has yielded some of its secrets. The relationship between the pancreas and diabetes mellitus is a story full of complexities and surprises. This article attempts to reveal some of the important events and persons in the story and the controversies surrounding them. PMID:27608692

  3. Methandiide as a non-innocent ligand in carbene complexes: from the electronic structure to bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julia; Modl, Tanja; Gessner, Viktoria H

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis of a ruthenium carbene complex based on a sulfonyl-substituted methandiide and its application in bond activation reactions and cooperative catalysis is reported. In the complex, the metal-carbon interaction can be tuned between a Ru-C single bond with additional electrostatic interactions and a Ru=C double bond, thus allowing the control of the stability and reactivity of the complex. Hence, activation of polar and non-polar bonds (O-H, H-H) as well as dehydrogenation reactions become possible. In these reactions the carbene acts as a non-innocent ligand supporting the bond activation as nucleophilic center in the 1,2-addition across the metal-carbon double bond. This metal-ligand cooperativity can be applied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation for the reduction of ketones. This concept opens new ways for the application of carbene complexes in catalysis. PMID:25047390

  4. SU-E-J-65: Motion Difference Between the Pancreas and Nearby Veins for Pancreas Motion Monitoring Using Ultrasound During Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Omari, E; Erickson, B; Li, X; Zhang, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: As it is generally difficult to outline the pancreas on an ultrasound b-mode image, visualized structures such as the portal or the splenic veins are assumed to have the same motion as the pancreas. These structures can be used as a surrogate for monitoring pancreas motion during radiation therapy (RT) delivery using ultrasound. To verify this assumption, we studied the motion difference between the head of the pancreas, the portal vein, the tail of the pancreas, and splenic vein. Methods: 4DCT data acquired during RT simulation were analyzed for a total of 5 randomly selected patients with pancreatic cancer. The data was sorted into 10 respiratory phases from 0% to 90% (0%: end of the inspiration, 50%: end of expiration) . The head of the pancreas (HP), tail of the pancreas (TP), portal vein (PV), and splenic vein (SV) were contoured on all 10 phases. The volume change and motion were measured in the left-right (LR), anterior-superior (AP), and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Results: The volume change for all patients/phases were: 1.2 ± 3% for HP, 0.78 ± 1.6% for PV, 2.5 ± 2.9% for TP, and 0.53 ± 2.1% for SV. Motion for each structure was estimated from the centroid displacements due to the uniformity of the structures and the small volume change. The measured motion between HP and PV was: LR: 0.1 ± 0.17 mm, AP: 0.04 ± 0.1 mm, SI: 0.17 ± 0.16 mm and between TP and the PV was: LR: 0.05 ± 0.3 mm, AP: 0.1 ± 0.4 mm, SI: 0.01 ± 0.022 mm. Conclusion: There are small motion differences between the portal vein and the head of the pancreas, and the splenic vein and the tail of the pancreas. This suggests the feasibility of utilizing these features for monitoring the pancreas motion during radiation therapy.

  5. Quantitative characterization of the protein contents of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell by soft x-ray microscopy and advanced digital imaging methods

    SciTech Connect

    Loo Jr., Billy W.

    2000-06-09

    The study of the exocrine pancreatic acinar cell has been central to the development of models of many cellular processes, especially of protein transport and secretion. Traditional methods used to examine this system have provided a wealth of qualitative information from which mechanistic models have been inferred. However they have lacked the ability to make quantitative measurements, particularly of the distribution of protein in the cell, information critical for grounding of models in terms of magnitude and relative significance. This dissertation describes the development and application of new tools that were used to measure the protein content of the major intracellular compartments in the acinar cell, particularly the zymogen granule. Soft x-ray microscopy permits image formation with high resolution and contrast determined by the underlying protein content of tissue rather than staining avidity. A sample preparation method compatible with x-ray microscopy was developed and its properties evaluated. Automatic computerized methods were developed to acquire, calibrate, and analyze large volumes of x-ray microscopic images of exocrine pancreatic tissue sections. Statistics were compiled on the protein density of several organelles, and on the protein density, size, and spatial distribution of tens of thousands of zymogen granules. The results of these measurements, and how they compare to predictions of different models of protein transport, are discussed.

  6. 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase activity in canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Hernandez, G.; Lopez-Solache, I.; Rendon, J.L.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Diaz-Zagoya, J.C.

    1988-04-15

    The mitochondrial fraction of the dog pancreas showed NAD(H)-dependent enzyme activity of 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The enzyme catalyzes oxidoreduction between androstenedione and testosterone. The apparent Km value of the enzyme for androstenedione was 9.5 +/- 0.9 microM, the apparent Vmax was determined as 0.4 nmol mg-1 min-1, and the optimal pH was 6.5. In phosphate buffer, pH 7.0, maximal rate of androstenedione reduction was observed at 37 degrees C. The oxidation of testosterone by the enzyme proceeded at the same rate as the reduction of the androstenedione at a pH of 6.8-7.0. The apparent Km value and the optimal pH of the enzyme for testosterone were 3.5 +/- 0.5 microM and 7.5, respectively.

  7. The Human Endocrine Pancreas: New Insights on Replacement and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Bendala, Juan; Lanzoni, Giacomo; Klein, Dagmar; Álvarez-Cubela, Silvia; Pastori, Ricardo L

    2016-03-01

    Islet transplantation is an effective cell therapy for type 1 diabetes (T1D) but its clinical application is limited due to shortage of donors. After a decade-long period of exploration of potential alternative cell sources, the field has only recently zeroed in on two of them as the most likely to replace islets. These are pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) (through directed differentiation) and pancreatic non-endocrine cells (through directed differentiation or reprogramming). Here we review progress in both areas, including the initiation of Phase I/II clinical trials using human embryonic stem cell (hESc)-derived progenitors, advances in hESc differentiation in vitro, novel insights on the developmental plasticity of the pancreas, and groundbreaking new approaches to induce β cell conversion from the non-endocrine compartment without genetic manipulation. PMID:26774512

  8. Arteriovenous malformation of the pancreas: a case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Nobuyasu; Haga, Junichirou; Azami, Ayaka; Todate, Yukitoshi; Waragai, Mitsuru; Sato, Atai; Takano, Yoshinao; Kawakura, Kenji; Imai, Shigeki; Sakuma, Hideo; Teranishi, Yasushi

    2016-12-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the pancreas is uncommon in the gastrointestinal tract. We present a case of AVM of the pancreatic head in a 59-year-old male. He was admitted to a hospital with hematemesis and tarry stool and referred to our hospital in March 2014 on the diagnosis of pancreatic artery pseudoaneurysm. A computed tomography scan showed the presence of irregular dilated and/or stenotic vessels with meandering in the pancreatic head. Magnetic resonance imaging showed strong enhancement of the conglomeration in the pancreatic head. Selective angiography showed the proliferation of a vascular network in the pancreatic head and an early visualization of the portal vein at the arterial phase. The patient qualified for surgery with a preoperative diagnosis of AVM of the pancreatic head. We performed pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy. The histological results confirmed the presence of irregular dilated tortuous arteries and veins in the pancreatic head. Surgical treatment may represent definitive management of symptomatic AVM. PMID:26943682

  9. Glucagon in the artificial pancreas: supply and marketing challenges.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Dick

    2015-01-01

    The use of glucagon, in conjunction with insulin, in a dual chamber pump (artificial pancreas, AP) is a working goal for multiple companies and researchers. However, capital investment to create, operate, and maintain facilities with sufficient scale to produce enough glucagon to treat millions of patients, at a level of profit that makes it feasible, will be substantial. It can be assumed that the marketplace will expect the daily cost of glucagon (to the consumer) to be similar to the daily cost of insulin. After one subtracts wholesaler and pharmacy markup, there may be very few dollars remaining for the drug company to cover profit, capital expenditures, marketing, burden, and other costs. Without the potential for adequate margins, manufacturers may not be willing to take the risk. Assuming that the projections discussed in this article are in the right ballpark, advance planning for the supply for glucagon needs to start today and not wait for the AP to come to market. PMID:25139825

  10. Maternal obesity alters endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in offspring pancreas.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Jumpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Carter, Rebeca; Kapur, Sabrina R; Pombo, Joaquim; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) is increasing in parallel with obesity rates. Stress-related alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), are associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate ER imbalance in the pancreas of a mice model of adult and perinatal diet-induced obesity. Twenty female C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control (Con) or obesogenic (Ob) diets prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. Their offspring were weaned onto Con or Ob diets up to 6 months post-partum. Then, after sacrifice, plasma biochemical analyses, gene expression, and protein concentrations were measured in pancreata. Offspring of Ob-fed mice had significantly increased body weight (p < 0.001) and plasma leptin (p < 0.001) and decreased insulin (p < 0.01) levels. Maternal obesogenic diet decreased the total and phosphorylated Eif2α and increased spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Pancreatic gene expression of downstream regulators of UPR (EDEM, homocysteine-responsive endoplasmic reticulum-resident (HERP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy-related proteins (LC3BI/LC3BII) were differently disrupted by obesogenic feeding in both mothers and offspring (from p < 0.1 to p < 0.001). Maternal obesity and Ob feeding in their offspring alter UPR in NAFPD, with involvement of proapoptotic and autophagy-related markers. Upstream and downstream regulators of PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6 pathways were affected differently following the obesogenic insults. PMID:26979740

  11. CLINICAL PROGRAMS OF STEM CELL THERAPIES FOR LIVER AND PANCREAS

    PubMed Central

    Lanzoni, Giacomo; Oikawa, Tsunekazu; Wang, Yunfang; Cui, Cai-Bin; Carpino, Guido; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Gerber, David; Gabriel, Mara; Dominguez-Bendala, Juan; Furth, Mark E.; Gaudio, Eugenio; Alvaro, Domenico; Inverardi, Luca; Reid, Lola M.

    2013-01-01

    Regenerative medicine is transitioning into clinical programs utilizing stem/progenitor cell therapies for repair of damaged organs. We summarize those for liver and pancreas, organs that share endodermal stem cell populations, biliary tree stem cells (hBTSCs), located in peribiliary glands: they are precursors to hepatic stem/progenitors in canals of Hering and to committed progenitors in pancreatic duct glands. They give rise to maturational lineages along a radial axis within bile duct walls and a proximal-to-distal axis starting at the duodenum and ending with mature cells in the liver or pancreas. Clinical trials have been ongoing for years assessing effects of fetal-liver-derived hepatic stem/progenitors transplanted into the hepatic artery of patients with various liver diseases. Immunosuppression was not required. Control subjects, those given standard of care for a given condition, all died within a year or deteriorated in their liver functions. Subjects transplanted with 100–150 million hepatic stem/progenitor cells had improved liver functions and survival extending for several years. Full evaluations of safety and efficacy of transplants are still in progress. Determined stem cell therapies for diabetes utilizing hBTSCs remain to be explored but are likely to occur following ongoing preclinical studies. In addition, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are being used for patients with chronic liver conditions or with diabetes. MSCs have demonstrated significant effects through paracrine signaling of trophic and immune-modulatory factors, and there is limited evidence for inefficient lineage restriction into mature parenchymal or islet cells. HSCs’ effects are primarily via modulation of immune mechanisms. PMID:23873634

  12. Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate for pancreas allograft preservation: the Indiana University experience.

    PubMed

    Fridell, J A; Mangus, R S; Powelson, J A

    2010-05-01

    Histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate solution (HTK) has been scrutinized for use in pancreas transplantation. A recent case series and a United Network for Organ Sharing data base review have suggested an increased incidence of allograft pancreatitis and graft loss with HTK compared to the University of Wisconsin solution (UW). Conversely, a recent randomized, controlled study failed to show any significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation. This study was a retrospective review of all pancreas transplants performed at Indiana University between 2003 and 2009 comparing preservation with HTK or UW. Data included recipient and donor demographics, 7-day, 90-day and 1-year graft survival, peak 30-day serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c and C-peptide levels. Of the 308 pancreas transplants, 84% used HTK and 16% UW. There were more SPK compared to pancreas after kidney and pancreas transplant alone in the HTK group. Donor and recipient demographics were similar. There was no significant difference in 7-day, 90-day or 1-year graft survival, 30-day peak serum amylase and lipase, HbA1c or C-peptide. No clinically significant difference between HTK and UW for pancreas allograft preservation was identified. Specifically, in the context of low-to-moderate flush volume and short cold ischemia time (

  13. Histopathological effects of intraoperative radiotherapy on pancreas and adjacent tissues: a postmortem analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Hoekstra, H.J.; Restrepo, C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Sindelar, W.F.

    1988-02-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) has been utilized in the treatment of resectable and unresectable pancreatic carcinoma at the National Cancer Institute. Detailed autopsy analyses of the radiation effects on the pancreas and adjacent tissues were performed on 13 patients dying at various times following therapy. IORT can induce a progressive retroperitoneal fibrosis and fibrosis of the porta hepatis in patients with resectable pancreatic carcinoma. In unresectable pancreatic carcinoma, the major expression of intraoperative irradiation with external beam irradiation is a progressive fibrosis of the pancreas with vascular sclerosis, nerve degeneration, atrophy of acinar cells, and atypical changes in the ducts of the pancreas, as well as degenerative changes of the pancreatic tumor.

  14. Cytology Specimen Management, Triage and Standardized Reporting of Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies of the Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Won Jae; Bishop Pitman, Martha

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in pancreas cytology specimen sampling methods have enabled a specific cytologic diagnosis in most cases. Proper triage and processing of the cytologic specimen is pivotal in making a diagnosis due to the need for ancillary testing in addition to cytological evaluation, which is especially true in the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts. Newly proposed terminology for pancreaticobiliary cytology offers a standardized language for reporting that aims to improve communication among patient caregivers and provide for increased flexibility in patient management. This review focuses on these updates in pancreas cytology for the optimal evaluation of solid and cystic lesions of the pancreas. PMID:26265683

  15. Serous Microcystic Adenocarcinoma of Pancreas Infiltrating Into Spleen: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramu, Sathyalakshmi; Mishra, Nidhi; Adaikalam, Mary Lilly Susai; Venkatesan, Ramya

    2015-01-01

    Cystic tumours of pancreas account for 5-10% of all pancreatic neoplasms and serous tumours represent 1% among those tumours. Most of the serous tumours are benign and very rarely they infiltrate adjacent organs like liver and spleen. Herewith we present a rare case report of serous cystadenocarcinoma of pancreas in a 65-year-old woman. The tumour involved the body and tail of pancreas and contiguously invaded the spleen. The histopathology of tumour was similar to serous cystadenoma with mild nuclear hyperchromasia and atypia. The spleen showed tumour infiltration as microcysts diffusely infitrating the red pulp. PMID:26500911

  16. The pattern of the arterial supply of the pancreas in anthropoid apes, catarrhine monkeys and platyrrhine monkeys.

    PubMed

    Shawuti, Alimujiang; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Saito, Toshiyuki; Itoh, Masahiro

    2009-11-01

    To get the full understanding of the arterial distribution to the pancreas, the analysis of the distribution of the variety of monkey species would be helpful. In this study, we studied the layout of the pancreatic artery in anthropoids (1 gorilla, 3 chimpanzees and 2 white-handed gibbons), in catarrhine monkeys (1 hamadryas baboon, 2 anubid baboons, 10 savannah monkeys) and in platyrrhine monkeys (6 squirrel monkeys). The pancreas of the monkeys was supplied by the arteries originating from the celiac trunk and/or superior mesenteric artery. There were three patterns in the arterial distribution; (1) the celiac artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (2) the superior mesenteric artery supplied the major area of the pancreas. (3) the celiac artery supplied the whole pancreas. The pattern of the arterial distribution to the monkey pancreas had a wide variety. The result would be helpful for the elucidation of the development of the vascular distribution in the pancreas. PMID:20166548

  17. A 3D map of the islet routes throughout the healthy human pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Gagniuc, Paul A.; Gubceac, Elvira; Mardare, Liliana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona; Militaru, Manuella

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans are fundamental in understanding diabetes. A healthy human pancreas from a donor has been used to asses various islet parameters and their three-dimensional distribution. Here we show that islets are spread gradually from the head up to the tail section of the pancreas in the form of contracted or dilated islet routes. We also report a particular anatomical structure, namely the cluster of islets. Our observations revealed a total of 11 islet clusters which comprise of small islets that surround large blood vessels. Additional observations in the peripancreatic adipose tissue have shown lymphoid-like nodes and blood vessels captured in a local inflammatory process. Our observations are based on regional slice maps of the pancreas, comprising of 5,423 islets. We also devised an index of sphericity which briefly indicates various islet shapes that are dominant throughout the pancreas. PMID:26417671

  18. Simultaneous Extensive Intraductal Papillary Neoplasm of the Bile Duct and Pancreas: A Very Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Luvira, Vor; Pugkhem, Ake; Tipwaratorn, Theerawee; Chamgramol, Yaovalux; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Bhudhisawasdi, Vajarabhongsa

    2016-01-01

    Intraductal papillary neoplasm of the bile duct (IPNB) is a specific type of bile duct tumor. It has been proposed that it could be the biliary counterpart of the intraductal papillary neoplasm of the pancreas (IPMN-P). This hypothesis is supported by the presence of simultaneous intraductal tumors of both the bile duct and pancreas. There have been five reports of patients with simultaneous IPNB and IPMN-P. In all of these cases, biliary involvement was limited to the intrahepatic and perihilar bile duct, which had characteristics similar to IPMN-P and usually had slow progression in nature. Herein, we present the first case of extensive intraductal neoplasm involving the extrahepatic bile duct, intrahepatic bile duct, and entire length of the pancreas with a poor outcome, even after being treated aggressively with radical surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, we summarize previous case reports of simultaneous intraductal lesions of the bile duct and pancreas. PMID:26925284

  19. On the diabetic menu: Zebrafish as a model for pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Kinkel, Mary D.; Prince, Victoria E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Development of the vertebrate pancreas is a complex stepwise process comprising regionalization, cell differentiation, and morphogenesis. Studies in zebrafish are contributing to an emerging picture of pancreas development in which extrinsic signaling molecules influence intrinsic transcriptional programs to allow ultimate differentiation of specific pancreatic cell types. Zebrafish experiments have revealed roles for several signaling molecules in aspects of this process; for example our own work has shown that Retinoic Acid signals specify the pre-pancreatic endoderm. Time-lapse imaging of live zebrafish embryos has started to provide detailed information about early pancreas morphogenesis. In addition to modeling embryonic development, the zebrafish has recently begun to be used as a model for pancreas regeneration studies. Here we review the significant progress in these areas and consider the future potential of zebrafish as a diabetes research model. PMID:19204986

  20. Shear mechanical properties of the porcine pancreas: experiment and analytical modelling.

    PubMed

    Nicolle, S; Noguer, L; Palierne, J-F

    2013-10-01

    We provide the first account of the shear mechanical properties of porcine pancreas using a rheometer both in linear oscillatory tests and in constant strain-rate tests reaching the non-linear sub-failure regime. Our results show that pancreas has a low and weakly frequency-dependent dynamic modulus and experiences a noticeable strain-hardening beyond 20% strain. In both linear and non-linear regime, the viscoelastic behaviour of porcine pancreas follows a four-parameter bi-power model that has been validated on kidney, liver and spleen. Among the four solid organs of the abdomen, pancreas proves to be the most compliant and the most viscous one. PMID:23820244

  1. A 3D map of the islet routes throughout the healthy human pancreas.

    PubMed

    Ionescu-Tirgoviste, Constantin; Gagniuc, Paul A; Gubceac, Elvira; Mardare, Liliana; Popescu, Irinel; Dima, Simona; Militaru, Manuella

    2015-01-01

    Islets of Langerhans are fundamental in understanding diabetes. A healthy human pancreas from a donor has been used to asses various islet parameters and their three-dimensional distribution. Here we show that islets are spread gradually from the head up to the tail section of the pancreas in the form of contracted or dilated islet routes. We also report a particular anatomical structure, namely the cluster of islets. Our observations revealed a total of 11 islet clusters which comprise of small islets that surround large blood vessels. Additional observations in the peripancreatic adipose tissue have shown lymphoid-like nodes and blood vessels captured in a local inflammatory process. Our observations are based on regional slice maps of the pancreas, comprising of 5,423 islets. We also devised an index of sphericity which briefly indicates various islet shapes that are dominant throughout the pancreas. PMID:26417671

  2. Infectious complications following 72 consecutive enteric-drained pancreas transplants.

    PubMed

    Berger, N; Wirmsberger, R; Kafka, R; Margreiter, C; Ebenbichler, C; Stelzmueller, I; Margreiter, R; Steurer, W; Mark, W; Bonatti, H

    2006-07-01

    New immunosuppressive protocols and advanced surgical technique resulted in an improved outcome of pancreatic transplantation (PTx) with infection remaining the most common complication. Seventy-two enteric-drained whole PTxs performed at the Innsbruck University Hospital between September 2002 and October 2004 were retrospectively analyzed. Prophylactic immunosuppression consisted of either the standard protocol consisting of single bolus antithymocyteglobulin (ATG) (Thymoglobulin, Sangstat or ATG Fresenius) induction (9 mg/kg), tacrolimus (TAC), mycophenylate mofetil (MMF) and steroids (38 patients) or a 4-day course of ATG (4 mg/kg) tacrolimus and steroids with MMF (n = 19), or Sirolimus (n = 15). Perioperative antimicrobial prophylaxis consisted of Piperacillin/Tazobactam (4.5 g q 8 h) in combination with ciprofloxacin (200 mg q 12 h) and fluconazole (400 mg daily). Ganciclovir was used for cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis if donor was positive and recipient-negative. Patient, pancreas, and kidney graft survival at 1 year were 97.2%, 88.8%, and 93%, respectively, with no difference between the groups. All retransplants (n = 8) and single transplants (n = 8) as well as all type II diabetics and nine of 11 patients older 55 years received standard immunosuppression (IS). The rejection rate was 14% and infection rate 46% with no difference in terms of incidence or type according to the three groups. Severe infectious complications included intra-abdominal infection (n = 12), wound infection (n = 7), sepsis (n = 13), respiratory tract infection (n = 4), urinary tract infection (n = 12), herpes simplex/human herpes virus 6 infection (n = 5), CMV infection/disease (n = 7), post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD, n = 3), invasive filamentous fungal infection (n = 4), Clostridial/Rotavirus colitis (n = 1), and endocarditis (n = 1). All four patients in this series died of infectious complications (invasive aspergillosis n = 2) (one with Candida glabrata

  3. Degradation of zinc metallothionein after intravenous zinc administration in chicken liver and pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.H.; McCormick, C.C. )

    1991-03-15

    Previous results from the authors' laboratory have indicated that metallothionein (MT) mRNA levels following oral or parenteral zinc do not correspond to the accumulation of protein in liver and pancreas. Since the degradation of MT may influence the ultimate accumulation of MT in various tissues, the present study was conducted to investigate the rate of zinc MT degradation in liver and pancreas. Four-week-old male chicks were given intravenous zinc injections as zinc acetate. At various times, liver and pancreas were excised and homogenized. The cytosolic zinc MT was determined by gel filtration chromatography. To confirm relative tissue differences in the concentration of MT, G-75 fractions containing zinc MT from liver and pancreas cytosol were concentrated by ultrafiltration. Equal amounts of concentrate were subjected to PAGE and silver stain enhancement analysis. The results of PAGE verified that indeed the pancreas possesses over 2x higher MT than liver. Zinc MT degradation analysis was conducted beginning 24 hours following zinc administration. Since MT mRNA levels were minimal in both tissues after this time, changes in the concentration of MT were considered to reflect primarily degradation. The half-life of zinc MT for pancreas and liver was calculated to be 3.2 days and 2.0 days, respectively. Degradation rates of zinc MT in liver and pancreas were 0.0149 {plus minus} .005 h{sup {minus}1} and 0.0085 {plus minus} .004 h{sup {minus}1}, respectively. These data suggest that the rate of degradation of zinc MT in liver and pancreas accounts, in part, for the observed differences in MT concentration.

  4. Lessons From Pancreas Transplantation in Type 1 Diabetes: Recurrence of Islet Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Burke, George W; Vendrame, Francesco; Virdi, Sahil K; Ciancio, G; Chen, Linda; Ruiz, Phillip; Messinger, Shari; Reijonen, Helena K; Pugliese, Alberto

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes recurrence (T1DR) affecting pancreas transplants was first reported in recipients of living-related pancreas grafts from twins or HLA identical siblings; given HLA identity, recipients received no or minimal immunosuppression. This observation provided critical evidence that type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease. However, T1DR is traditionally considered very rare in immunosuppressed recipients of pancreas grafts from organ donors, representing the majority of recipients, and immunological graft failures are ascribed to chronic rejection. We have been performing simultaneous pancreas-kidney (SPK) transplants for over 25 years and find that 6-8 % of our recipients develop T1DR, with symptoms usually becoming manifest on extended follow-up. T1DR is typically characterized by (1) variable degree of insulitis and loss of insulin staining, on pancreas transplant biopsy (with most often absent), minimal to moderate and rarely severe pancreas, and/or kidney transplant rejection; (2) the conversion of T1D-associated autoantibodies (to the autoantigens GAD65, IA-2, and ZnT8), preceding hyperglycemia by a variable length of time; and (3) the presence of autoreactive T cells in the peripheral blood, pancreas transplant, and/or peripancreatic transplant lymph nodes. There is no therapeutic regimen that so far has controlled the progression of islet autoimmunity, even when additional immunosuppression was added to the ongoing chronic regimens; we hope that further studies and, in particular, in-depth analysis of pancreas transplant biopsies with recurrent diabetes will help identify more effective therapeutic approaches. PMID:26547222

  5. Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Pancreas: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Uirá; Goldoni, Marcos; Unterleider, Michelle; Diedrich, João; Balbinot, Diogo; Rodrigues, Pablo; Monteiro, Rodolfo; Gomes, Daniel; Sampaio, José; Fontes, Paulo; Waechter, Fábio

    2015-01-01

    Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs) are presented as rare malignant neoplasms. In unusual cases, those neoplasms may arise in solid organs containing neuroendocrine cells, such as the pancreas. Herein the case of a 28-year-old patient that underwent gastroduodenopancreatectomy after the diagnosis of a huge mass (PNET) located in both head and body of the pancreas is reported. This is the 19th case of pancreatic PNET reported in literature. PMID:26101685

  6. Oxidative stress associated with pathological changes in the pancreas of cattle naturally infected by Eurytrema coelomaticum.

    PubMed

    Schwertz, Claiton I; Gabriel, Mateus E; Henker, Luan C; Bottari, Nathieli B; Carmo, Guilherme do; Guarda, Naiara Dos S; Moresco, Rafael N; Machado, Gustavo; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Stedille, Fernanda A; Baska, Piotr; Mattei, Vanessa; da Silva, Aleksandro S; Mendes, Ricardo E

    2016-06-15

    Although Eurytrema coelomaticum is considered a parasite with low pathogenicity, it may be associated with mortality and loss of productive performance in animals due to chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the occurrence of oxidative stress caused by E. coelomaticum in naturally infected cattle, correlating the biochemical findings with the parasite load and histopathological changes. For this study, blood and pancreas samples from 51 cattle were collected, and levels of the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were measured in the serum and pancreas, and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was measured in total blood. Parasite burden was determined opening the pancreatic ducts, and then fragments of pancreas were collected and fixed in 10% buffered formalin and routinely processed for histopathology. From the 51 collected pancreas, 33 (63.5%) were parasitized. The average parasite burden per pancreas was 532 (12-2,578). TBARS and FRAP showed higher levels in serum and pancreas of infected animals (p<0.05), with a positive correlation between the histopathological changes and the number of parasites. SOD level in blood was 42% higher in parasitized group compared with control group (p<0.05), as well as AOPP in serum. Based on these results, we concluded that in natural infection by E. coelomaticum in cattle, oxidative stress occurs, characterized by the occurrence of protein oxidation, lipid peroxidation and activation of antioxidant system. PMID:27198785

  7. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of Pancreas; A Case Series and Review Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mirminachi, Babak; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Sharifi, Amir Houshang; Nikfam, Sepideh; Nikmanesh, Arash; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Information regarding solid pseudopapillary neoplasm (SPN) of the pancreas is limited in Iran. We aimed to review the clinicocytopathological features and follow-up of patients with SPN of pancreas who were diagnosed in a single center in Iran. METHODS Seven patients with SPN of the pancreas were diagnosed during January 2010 to March 2015 at the Digestive Disease Research Institute of Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The patients were reviewed prospectively. RESULTS Six out of the 7 patients were female and the mean age of all the patients was 29.4 years ranging from 15 to 61 years. The most common clinical presentation was nonspecific abdominal pain (N=6). The tumors were located mostly in head and neck of the pancreas. SPN was diagnosed in all patients by fine needle aspiration through endosonography (EUS-FNA). All patients underwent surgery. Histological findings of surgical tissues were consistent with EUS-FNA. The postoperative follow-up period of about 14 months was uneventful. CONCLUSION SPN of the pancreas is a rare pancreatic tumor which affects primarily young women. EUS-guided FNA could play an important role in preoperative diagnosis of SPN of the pancreas. PMID:27252816

  8. Model-based pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images.

    PubMed

    Hammon, Matthias; Cavallaro, Alexander; Erdt, Marius; Dankerl, Peter; Kirschner, Matthias; Drechsler, Klaus; Wesarg, Stefan; Uder, Michael; Janka, Rolf

    2013-12-01

    This study aims to automatically detect and segment the pancreas in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) images. The institutional review board of the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg approved this study and waived the need for informed consent. Discriminative learning is used to build a pancreas tissue classifier incorporating spatial relationships between the pancreas and surrounding organs and vessels. Furthermore, discrete cosine and wavelet transforms are used to build texture features to describe local tissue appearance. Classification is used to guide a constrained statistical shape model to fit the data. The algorithm to detect and segment the pancreas was evaluated on 40 consecutive CT data that were acquired in the portal venous contrast agent phase. Manual segmentation of the pancreas was carried out by experienced radiologists and served as reference standard. Threefold cross validation was performed. The algorithm-based detection and segmentation yielded an average surface distance of 1.7 mm and an average overlap of 61.2 % compared with the reference standard. The overall runtime of the system was 20.4 min. The presented novel approach enables automatic pancreas segmentation in portal venous phase contrast-enhanced CT images which are included in almost every clinical routine abdominal CT examination. Reliable pancreatic segmentation is crucial for computer-aided detection systems and an organ-specific decision support. PMID:23471751

  9. Sorting of a HaloTag protein that has only a signal peptide sequence into exocrine secretory granules without protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Yokoyama, Megumi; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu

    2013-11-15

    The mechanism involved in the sorting and accumulation of secretory cargo proteins, such as amylase, into secretory granules of exocrine cells remains to be solved. To clarify that sorting mechanism, we expressed a reporter protein HaloTag fused with partial sequences of salivary amylase protein in primary cultured parotid acinar cells. We found that a HaloTag protein fused with only the signal peptide sequence (Met(1)-Ala(25)) of amylase, termed SS25H, colocalized well with endogenous amylase, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Percoll-density gradient centrifugation of secretory granule fractions shows that the distributions of amylase and SS25H were similar. These results suggest that SS25H is transported to secretory granules and is not discriminated from endogenous amylase by the machinery that functions to remove proteins other than granule cargo from immature granules. Another reporter protein, DsRed2, that has the same signal peptide sequence also colocalized with amylase, suggesting that the sorting to secretory granules is not dependent on a characteristic of the HaloTag protein. Whereas Blue Native PAGE demonstrates that endogenous amylase forms a high-molecular-weight complex, SS25H does not participate in the complex and does not form self-aggregates. Nevertheless, SS25H was released from cells by the addition of a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, which also induces amylase secretion. These results indicate that addition of the signal peptide sequence, which is necessary for the translocation in the endoplasmic reticulum, is sufficient for the transportation and storage of cargo proteins in secretory granules of exocrine cells. PMID:24029466

  10. Reprogramming of Pancreatic Exocrine Cells AR42J Into Insulin-producing Cells Using mRNAs for Pdx1, Ngn3, and MafA Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Koblas, Tomas; Leontovyc, Ivan; Loukotova, Sarka; Kosinova, Lucie; Saudek, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of pancreatic nonendocrine cells into insulin-producing β-cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of insulin-dependent diabetes. However, its clinical application is limited by the potential for insertional mutagenesis associated with the viral vectors currently used for cell reprogramming. With the aim of developing a nonintegrative reprogramming strategy for derivation of insulin-producing cells, here, we evaluated a new approach utilizing synthetic messenger RNAs encoding reprogramming transcription factors. Administration of synthetic mRNAs encoding three key transcription regulators of β-cell differentiation-Pdx1, Neurogenin3, and MafA-efficiently reprogrammed the pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells. In addition to the insulin genes expression, the synthetic mRNAs also induced the expressions of genes important for proper pancreatic β-cell function, including Sur1, Kir6.2, Pcsk1, and Pcsk2. Pretreating cells with the chromatin-modifying agent 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine further enhanced reprogramming efficiency, increasing the proportion of insulin-producing cells from 3.5 ± 0.9 to 14.3 ± 1.9% (n = 4). Moreover, 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine pretreatment enabled the reprogrammed cells to respond to glucose challenge with increased insulin secretion. In conclusion, our results support that the reprogramming of pancreatic exocrine cells into insulin-producing cells, induced by synthetic mRNAs encoding pancreatic transcription factors, represents a promising approach for cell-based diabetes therapy. PMID:27187823

  11. Centroacinar Cells Are Progenitors That Contribute to Endocrine Pancreas Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Delaspre, Fabien; Beer, Rebecca L; Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangliang; Gee, Stephen; Vitery, Maria del Carmen; Wheelan, Sarah J; Parsons, Michael J

    2015-10-01

    Diabetes is associated with a paucity of insulin-producing β-cells. With the goal of finding therapeutic routes to treat diabetes, we aim to find molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in β-cell neogenesis and regeneration. To facilitate discovery of such mechanisms, we use a vertebrate organism where pancreatic cells readily regenerate. The larval zebrafish pancreas contains Notch-responsive progenitors that during development give rise to adult ductal, endocrine, and centroacinar cells (CACs). Adult CACs are also Notch responsive and are morphologically similar to their larval predecessors. To test our hypothesis that adult CACs are also progenitors, we took two complementary approaches: 1) We established the transcriptome for adult CACs. Using gene ontology, transgenic lines, and in situ hybridization, we found that the CAC transcriptome is enriched for progenitor markers. 2) Using lineage tracing, we demonstrated that CACs do form new endocrine cells after β-cell ablation or partial pancreatectomy. We concluded that CACs and their larval predecessors are the same cell type and represent an opportune model to study both β-cell neogenesis and β-cell regeneration. Furthermore, we show that in cftr loss-of-function mutants, there is a deficiency of larval CACs, providing a possible explanation for pancreatic complications associated with cystic fibrosis. PMID:26153247

  12. Molecular pathology of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Paini, Marina; Crippa, Stefano; Partelli, Stefano; Scopelliti, Filippo; Tamburrino, Domenico; Baldoni, Andrea; Falconi, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Since the first description of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) of the pancreas in the eighties, their identification has dramatically increased in the last decades, hand to hand with the improvements in diagnostic imaging and sampling techniques for the study of pancreatic diseases. However, the heterogeneity of IPMNs and their malignant potential make difficult the management of these lesions. The objective of this review is to identify the molecular characteristics of IPMNs in order to recognize potential markers for the discrimination of more aggressive IPMNs requiring surgical resection from benign IPMNs that could be observed. We briefly summarize recent research findings on the genetics and epigenetics of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, identifying some genes, molecular mechanisms and cellular signaling pathways correlated to the pathogenesis of IPMNs and their progression to malignancy. The knowledge of molecular biology of IPMNs has impressively developed over the last few years. A great amount of genes functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes have been identified, in pancreatic juice or in blood or in the samples from the pancreatic resections, but further researches are required to use these informations for clinical intent, in order to better define the natural history of these diseases and to improve their management. PMID:25110429

  13. Susceptibility of the pancreas to ischemic injury in shock.

    PubMed Central

    Warshaw, A L; O'Hara, P J

    1978-01-01

    The pancreas, like the kidney, is highly vulnerable to ischemic necrosis. This form of pancreatic injury may express itself as prolonged hyperamylasemia with only minimal signs or symptoms of inflammation, or may produce severe pancreatitis followed by abscesses and death. Autopsy examination of patients dying after oligemic shock showed a 9% incidence of major pancreatic injury if there was not concomitant acute renal tubular necrosis (ATN), but a 50% incidence in those with ATN. Similarly, among patients dying after non-oligemic shock, 12% of those without ATN had major pancreatic injury but 35% with ATN also had pancreatic ischemic injury. Among 13 selected patients examined prospectively after being in shock, pancreatic injury was indicated by hyperamylasemia, hyperlipasemia, elevated amylase/creatinine clearance ratio, and elevated circulating isoamylases specifically of pancreatic origin. Four of the 13 had clinical manifestations of pancreatitis. Not only must shock be added to this list of causes of pancreatitis, but pancreatic ischemia due to hypoperfusion may also be the critical factor which causes the progression from edema to necrosis in other forms of pancreatitis, including those associated with alcohol and biliary disease. PMID:686887

  14. Impact of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation: patients’ perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Isla Pera, P; Moncho Vasallo, J; Guasch Andreu, O; Ricart Brulles, MJ; Torras Rabasa, A

    2012-01-01

    Background: Few qualitative studies of simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK Tx) have been published. The aims of this study were to explore from the perspective of patients, the experience of living with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM), suffering from complications, and undergoing SPK Tx with good outcome; and to determine the impact of SPK Tx on patients and their social and cultural environment. Methods: We performed a focused ethnographic study. Twenty patients were interviewed. Data were analyzed using content analysis and constant comparison following the method proposed by Miles and Huberman. Results: A functioning SPK Tx allowed renal replacement therapy and insulin to be discontinued. To describe their new situation, patients used words and phrases such as “miracle”, “being reborn” or “coming back to life”. Although the complications of T1DM, its surgery and treatment, and associated psychological problems did not disappear after SPK Tx, these were minimized when compared with the pretransplantation situation. Conclusion: For patients, SPK Tx represents a recovery of their health and autonomy despite remaining problems associated with the complications of T1DM and SPK Tx. The understanding of patients’ existential framework and their experience of disease are key factors for planning new intervention and improvement strategies. PMID:22936846

  15. Diet and other risk factors for cancer of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Gold, E B; Gordis, L; Diener, M D; Seltser, R; Boitnott, J K; Bynum, T E; Hutcheon, D F

    1985-01-15

    The findings of a case - control study of cancer of the pancreas, which was conducted in the Baltimore metropolitan area, are reported. Two hundred one patients with pancreatic cancer were matched on age (+/- 5 years), race, and sex to hospital and non-hospital controls, the latter selected by random-digit-dialing (RDD). All subjects were interviewed regarding diet, beverage consumption, occupational and environmental exposures, and medical and surgical history. Significantly decreased risks were associated with consumption of raw fruits and vegetables and diet soda, and significantly increased risks were associated with consumption of white bread when cases were compared with hospital and RDD controls. A significantly reduced risk was associated with consumption of wine when cases were compared to RDD controls. Risk ratios for consumption of coffee were not significantly different from one, although there appeared to be a dose - response relationship in women. A moderate but statistically nonsignificant increase in relative odds was found for cigarette smoking, and cessation of smoking was associated with a marked reduction in risk. No significant associations were found with particular occupational exposures. Tonsillectomy was associated with a significantly reduced risk, a finding that has been observed for other cancers as well. The current evidence indicates that pancreatic cancer is likely to result from a complex interaction of factors and suggests that the study of its etiology requires a multidisciplinary approach involving both laboratory and epidemiologic components. PMID:3965101

  16. Combined modality treatment of localized unresectable adenocarcinoma of the pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Mohiuddin, M.; Cantor, R.J.; Biermann, W.; Weiss, S.M.; Barbot, D.; Rosato, F.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since 1978, 86 patients with unresectable localized adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been treated with a combined modality program using radioactive iodine 125-Implantation, external beam radiation, and systemic chemotherapy. Three treatment approaches were used with sequential modifications of the technique based on the course of disease and patterns of failure. Group 1 was comprised of 13 patients treated with a combination of implantation followed by a planned external radiation dose of 5000 to 6000 cGy delivered in 6 weeks. Group 2 included patients treated as in Group 1 followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. The most recent group of 54 patients, Group 3, has been treated since 1981 with implantation into the tumor of radioactive Iodine 125 seeds (12000 cGy minimal peripheral dose), perioperative chemotherapy (5-FU, Mito-C), and external beam irradiation (5000-5500 cGy) followed by further chemotherapy. Incidence of perioperative mortality has been reduced from 31% (10/32) in Groups 1 and 2 to 7% (4/54) in Group 3. Clinical local control of tumor has been excellent in all three groups (84%). Analysis of the Group 3 results indicate that the problem of distant metastasis, in spite of adjuvant chemotherapy, still remains overwhelming (64%)--especially to the liver--and requires development of more effective regimens. Median survival in the three groups of patients is 5.5, 11.3, and 12.5 months. The 2-year survival is 0, 15, and 22%, retrospectively in the three groups.

  17. Emergency pancreatoduodenectomy for complex injuries of the pancreas and duodenum

    PubMed Central

    Krige, Jake E; Nicol, Andrew J; Navsaria, Pradeep H

    2014-01-01

    Background This single-centre study evaluated the outcome of a pancreatoduodenectomy for Grade 5 injuries of the pancreas and duodenum. Methods Prospectively recorded data of patients who underwent a pancreatoduodenectomy for trauma at a Level I Trauma Centre during a 22-year period were analysed. Results Nineteen (17 men and 2 women, median age 28 years, range 14–53 years) out of 426 patients with pancreatic injuries underwent a pancreatoduodenectomy (gunshot n = 12, blunt trauma n = 6 and stab wound n = 1). Nine patients had associated inferior vena cava (IVC) or portal vein (PV) injuries. Five patients had initial damage control procedures and underwent a definitive operation at a median of 15 h (range 11–92) later. Twelve had a pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy (PPPD) and 7 a standard Whipple. Three patients with APACHE II scores of 15, 18, 18 died post-operatively of multi-organ failure. All 16 survivors had Dindo-Clavien grade I (n = 1), grade II (n = 7), grade IIIa (n = 2), grade IVa (n = 6) post-operative complications. Factors complicating surgery were shock on admission, number of associated injuries, coagulopathy, hypothermia, gross bowel oedema and traumatic pancreatitis. Conclusions A pancreatoduodenectomy is a life-saving procedure in a small cohort of stable patients with non-reconstructable pancreatic head injuries. Damage control before a pancreatoduodenectomy will salvage a proportion of the most severely injured patients who have multiple injuries. PMID:24841125

  18. A generic telemedicine infrastructure for monitoring an artificial pancreas trial.

    PubMed

    Capozzi, Davide; Lanzola, Giordano

    2013-06-01

    Telemedicine systems are seen as a possible solution for the remote monitoring of physiological parameters and can be particularly useful for chronic patients treated at home. Implementing those systems however has always required spending a great effort on the underlying infrastructure instead of focusing on the application cores as perceived by their users. This paper proposes an abstract unifying infrastructure for telemedicine services which is loosely based on the multi-agent paradigm. It provides the capability of transferring to the clinic any remotely acquired information, and possibly sending back updates to the patient. The infrastructure is a layered one, with the bottom layer acting at the data level and implemented in terms of a software library targeting a wide set of hardware devices. On top of this infrastructure several services can be written shaping the functionality of the telemedicine application while at the highest level, adhering to a simple agent model, it is possible to reuse those functional components porting the application to different platforms. The infrastructure has been successfully used for implementing a telemonitoring service for a randomized controlled study aimed at testing the effectiveness of the artificial pancreas as a treatment within the AP@home project funded by the European Union. PMID:23415079

  19. Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm of the Pancreas: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) is a cystic tumor of the pancreas. The etiology is unknown, but increasing evidence suggests the involvement of several tumorigenesis pathways, including an association with hereditary syndromes. IPMN occurs more commonly in men, with the mean age at diagnosis between 64 and 67 years old. At the time of diagnosis, it may be benign, with or without dysplasia, or frankly malignant with an invasive carcinoma. Tumors arising from the main pancreatic duct are termed main-duct IPMNs, those involving the branch ducts, branch-duct IPMNs. In general, small branch-duct IPMNs are benign, particularly in asymptomatic patients, and can be safely followed. In contrast, main-duct tumors should be surgically resected and examined carefully for an invasive component. In the absence of invasion, patient's survival is excellent, from 94 to 100%. For patients with an IPMN-associated invasive carcinoma, the prognosis overall is better than those with a de novo pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, with a 5-year survival of 40% to 60% in some series. However, no survival advantage can be demonstrated if the invasive component in an IPMN patient is that of the conventional tubular type (versus mucinous carcinoma). Several histomorphologic variants are recognized, although the clinical significance of this “subtyping” is not well defined. PMID:24278753

  20. Donor risk indices in pancreas allocation in the Eurotransplant region.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Wouter H; de Vries, Erwin; de Boer, Jan; Putter, Hein; Schareck, Wolfgang; Samuel, Undine; Braat, Andries E

    2016-08-01

    Pancreas donor selection and recognition are important to cope with increasing organ shortage. We aim to show that the PDRI is more useful than the P-PASS to predict acceptance and should thus be preferred over P-PASS. Eurotransplant donors from 2004 until 2014 were included in this study. PDRI logistical factors were set to reference to purely reflect donor quality (PDRI donor ). PDRI and P-PASS association with allocation outcome was studied using area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC). Regional differences in donor quality were also investigated. Of the 10 444 pancreata that were reported, 6090 (58.3%) were accepted and 2947 (28.2%) were transplanted. We found that P-PASS was inferior to PDRIdonor in its ability to predict organ reporting, acceptance, and transplantation: AUC 0.63, 0.67 and 0.73 for P-PASS vs. 0.78, 0.79 and 0.84 for PDRIdonor , respectively. Furthermore, there were significant differences in donor quality among different Eurotransplant countries, both in reported donors and in transplanted organs. PDRI is a powerful predictor of allocation outcome and should be preferred over P-PASS. Proper donor selection and recognition, and possibly a more liberal approach toward inferior quality donors, may increase donation and transplant rates. PMID:27188797

  1. [A solid variant of a serous cystadenocarcinoma of the pancreas].

    PubMed

    Brandone, Nicolas; Poizat, Flora; Thomassin-Piana, Jeanne; Turrini, Olivier; Popovici, Cornel; Terris, Benoît

    2016-04-01

    Cystic pancreatic neoplasms concern 1 to 2 % of the pancreatic tumours. The serous ones are considered benign tumours but since 1989, several pancreatic serous cystadenocarcinomas (SCAC) cases have been reported. We report the case of a SCAC with a particular pattern. An 80-year-old female patient presented a 4-cm tumour in the neck of the pancreas associated with liver lesions evoking, on imagery exams, focal nodular hyperplasia nests. A cephalic duodenopancreatectomy and a resection of the liver lesions were carried out. The gross exam showed a tumour with a pattern mostly solid and an area made of cysts. The microscopic exam displayed two patterns: the solid one, predominant, made of mild atypical clear cells, and the cystic one. The liver lesions revealed solid pattern similar to the pancreatic tumour one. The tumoral cells were cytokeratin 7, AE1/AE3 and inhibin positives. The Periodic-acid Schiff showed cytoplasmic granulations, which were digested after diasatasis. Only the presence of metastases allows distinguishing a pancreatic serous cystadenoma from a SCAC. To date, thirty cases of pancreatic SCAC have been reported. Immunohistochemistry cannot confirm the malignancy nature of the lesion but it needs to be done in order to cross out the differential diagnosis, that is pancreatic metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Nevertheless, it remains a pathology with good prognosis. Only two cases have been reported but ours case a predominant solid pattern. PMID:26995101

  2. Molecular analysis of mucinous nonneoplastic cyst of the pancreas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Finkelstein, Sydney D; Feng, Gong; Keswani, Rajesh N; Lin, Xiaoqi

    2016-09-01

    Although a mucinous nonneoplastic cyst (MNNC) of the pancreas is defined as a benign nonneoplastic lesion with no malignant potential, its histogenesis and etiology are still uncertain. To explore the origin and development of MNNC, we searched for neoplasia-associated mutational change in oncogene and tumor suppressor genes. Specifically, we analyzed KRAS oncogene mutations by polymerase chain reaction/dideoxy DNA (Sanger) sequencing and tumor suppression gene deletion by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) using polymerase chain reaction/capillary gel electrophoresis for a panel of 16 polymorphic microsatellite repeat markers targeting common tumor suppression gene loci at 1p, 3p, 5q, 9p, 10q, 17p, 17q, 18q, 21q, and 22q on DNA isolated from the cystic lining epithelium microdissected from 15 surgically diagnosed MNNCs by microdissection of unstained histologic sections of fixed resection specimens. DNA mutations were demonstrated in 4 of 15 cases: 1 with KRAS mutation at codon 12 glycine (G) substitution by aspartic acid (D) (G12D), 1 with KRAS mutation at 12 glycine (G) substitution by arginine (R) (G12R), 1 with LOH at 10q (PTEN), and 1 with LOH at 17q (RNF43). Therefore, although the genomic mutation rate detected in MNNC is relatively low, our results indicate that MNNCs may acquire genetic alteration similar to low-grade pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia, furthering debate of the true nature of these lesions. PMID:27246174

  3. Coming of age: the artificial pancreas for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thabit, Hood; Hovorka, Roman

    2016-09-01

    The artificial pancreas (closed-loop system) addresses the unmet clinical need for improved glucose control whilst reducing the burden of diabetes self-care in type 1 diabetes. Glucose-responsive insulin delivery above and below a preset insulin amount informed by sensor glucose readings differentiates closed-loop systems from conventional, threshold-suspend and predictive-suspend insulin pump therapy. Insulin requirements in type 1 diabetes can vary between one-third-threefold on a daily basis. Closed-loop systems accommodate these variations and mitigate the risk of hypoglycaemia associated with tight glucose control. In this review we focus on the progress being made in the development and evaluation of closed-loop systems in outpatient settings. Randomised transitional studies have shown feasibility and efficacy of closed-loop systems under supervision or remote monitoring. Closed-loop application during free-living, unsupervised conditions by children, adolescents and adults compared with sensor-augmented pumps have shown improved glucose outcomes, reduced hypoglycaemia and positive user acceptance. Innovative approaches to enhance closed-loop performance are discussed and we also present the outlook and strategies used to ease clinical adoption of closed-loop systems. PMID:27364997

  4. Patients' Perception and Future Acceptance of an Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    van Bon, Arianne C.; Kohinor, Miriam J. E.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; von Basum, Golo; DeVries, J. Hans

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known of patient acceptance of an artificial pancreas (AP). The purpose of this study was to investigate future acceptance of an AP and its determinants. Methods Patients with type 1 diabetes treated with insulin pump therapy were interviewed using questions based on the technology acceptance model and completed the diabetes treatment and satisfaction questionnaire (DTSQ). Results Twenty-two adults with type 1 diabetes participated. Half of the patients were followed in a university hospital, and the others were under treatment in an affiliated teaching hospital. Half of the patients were male. The mean DTSQ score was 29 (range 23–33). The AP was perceived as likely to be useful. Perceived advantages were a stable glucose regulation, less need for self-monitoring of blood glucose, relief of daily concerns, and time saving. Participants were confident in their capability to use the system. Although many participants (58%) had been reluctant to start continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, the majority (79%) felt they would have no barriers to start using the AP. Trust in the AP was related to the quality of glucose control it would provide. Almost everyone expressed the intention to use the new system when available, even if it would initially not cover 24/24 hours. Conclusion The overall attitude on the AP was positive. Intention to use was dependent on trust in the AP, which was related to the quality of glucose control provided by the AP. PMID:20513325

  5. Extracorporeal machine perfusion of the pancreas: technical aspects and its clinical implications--a systematic review of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Kean Guan; Wee, Mau Nam; Chung, Wen Yuan; Kumar, Rohan; Mees, Soeren Torge; Dennison, Ashley; Maddern, Guy; Trochsler, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Pancreas or pancreatic islet transplantation is an important treatment option for insulin-dependent diabetes and its complications. However, as the pancreas is particularly susceptible to ischaemic-reperfusion injury, the criteria for pancreas and islet donation are especially strict. With a chronic shortage of donors, one critical challenge is to maximise organ availability and expand the donor pool. To achieve that, continuous improvement in organ preservation is required, with the aims of reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury, prolong preservation time and improve graft function. Static cold storage, the only method used in clinical pancreas and islet cell transplant currently, has likely reached its plateau. Machine perfusion, hypothermic or normothermic, could hold the key to improving donor pancreas quality as well as quantity available for transplant. This article reviews the literature on experimental models of pancreas machine perfusion, examines the benefits of machine perfusion, the technical aspects and their clinical implications. PMID:26253243

  6. Perception Is Reality: quality metrics in pancreas surgery – a Central Pancreas Consortium (CPC) analysis of 1399 patients

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Daniel E.; Martin, Grace; Kooby, David A.; Merchant, Nipun B.; Squires, Malcolm H.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Weber, Sharon M.; Winslow, Emily R.; Cho, Clifford S.; Bentrem, David J.; Kim, Hong Jin; Scoggins, Charles R.; Martin, Robert C.; Parikh, Alexander A.; Hawkins, William G.; Ahmad, Syed A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Several groups have defined pancreatic surgery quality metrics that identify centers delivering quality care. Although these metrics are perceived to be associated with good outcomes, their relationship with actual outcomes has not been established. Methods A national cadre of pancreatic surgeons was surveyed regarding perceived quality metrics, which were evaluated against the Central Pancreas Consortium (CPC) database to determine actual performance and relationships with long-term outcomes. Results The most important metrics were perceived to be participation in clinical trials, appropriate clinical staging, perioperative mortality, and documentation of receipt of adjuvant therapy. Subsequent analysis of 1399 patients in the CPC dataset demonstrated that a R0 retroperitoneal and neck margin was obtained in 79% (n = 1109) and 91.4% (n = 1278) of cases, respectively. 74% of patients (n = 1041) had >10 lymph nodes harvested, and LN positivity was 65% (n = 903). 76% (n = 960) of eligible patients (surgery first approach) received adjuvant therapy within 60 days of surgery. Multivariate analysis demonstrated margin status, identification of >10 lymph nodes, nodal status, tumor grade and delivery of adjuvant therapy within 60 days to be associated with improved overall survival. Conclusions These analyses demonstrate that systematic monitoring of surgeons' perceived quality metrics provides critical prognostic information, which is associated with patient survival. PMID:27154811

  7. Oxygen Activation by Co(II) and a Redox Non-Innocent Ligand: Spectroscopic Characterization of a Radical-Co(II)-Superoxide Complex with Divergent Catalytic Reactivity.

    PubMed

    Corcos, Amanda R; Villanueva, Omar; Walroth, Richard C; Sharma, Savita K; Bacsa, John; Lancaster, Kyle M; MacBeth, Cora E; Berry, John F

    2016-02-17

    Bimetallic (Et4N)2[Co2(L)2], (Et4N)2[1] (where (L)(3-) = (N(o-PhNC(O)(i)Pr)2)(3-)) reacts with 2 equiv of O2 to form the monometallic species (Et4N)[Co(L)O2], (Et4N)[3]. A crystallographically characterized analog (Et4N)2[Co(L)CN], (Et4N)2[2], gives insight into the structure of [3](1-). Magnetic measurements indicate [2](2-) to be an unusual high-spin Co(II)-cyano species (S = 3/2), while IR, EXAFS, and EPR spectroscopies indicate [3](1-) to be an end-on superoxide complex with an S = 1/2 ground state. By X-ray spectroscopy and calculations, [3](1-) features a high-spin Co(II) center; the net S = 1/2 spin state arises after the Co electrons couple to both the O2(•-) and the aminyl radical on redox non-innocent (L(•))(2-). Dianion [1](2-) shows both nucleophilic and electrophilic catalytic reactivity upon activation of O2 due to the presence of both a high-energy, filled O2(-) π* orbital and an empty low-lying O2(-) π* orbital in [3](1-). PMID:26799113

  8. Preparation of Er(3+):Y3Al5O12/KNbO3 composite and application in innocent treatment of ketamine by using sonocatalytic decomposition method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Wei, Chunsheng; Huang, Yingying; Li, Guanshu; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jun; Song, Youtao

    2016-11-01

    A novel sonocatalyst, Er(3+):Y3Al5O12/KNbO3 composite, was synthesized, and then, characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). In order to evaluate the sonocatalytic activity of prepared Er(3+):Y3Al5O12/KNbO3 composite, the sonocatalytic degradation of ketamine, a kind of narcotic drug, was studied. In addition, some influencing factors such as mass ratio, heat-treated temperature and heat-treated time on the sonocatalytic activity of prepared Er(3+):Y3Al5O12/KNbO3 powders and ultrasonic irradiation time on the sonocatalytic degradation of ketamine were examined by using GC-MS machine. The experimental results showed that the Er(3+):Y3Al5O12/KNbO3 composite is a good sonocatalyst in the field of ultrasonic chemistry and the sonocatalytic degradation was an effective method for the innocent treatment of ketamine. PMID:27334305

  9. Pheochromocytoma of the pancreas: A report of three cases and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Ding, Hui; Cai, Min; He, Yan-An; Cai, Yu; Zeng, Yong; Tian, Bo-Le

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is primarily derived from the adrenal medulla. The majority of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma cases occur in the superior para-aortic region and para-adrenal area. However, pheochromocytoma originating from the pancreas is rare. The present study reports the cases of three patients who had no history of hypertension but were post-operatively diagnosed with pheochromocytoma located in the pancreas. Of the three patients, two were admitted to hospital due to abdominal pain, and imaging examinations revealed a soft-tissue lesion in the head of pancreas. Local resection of the pancreatic tumor was successfully performed and a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma derived from the pancreas was subsequently made by pathologists. The third patient was admitted to hospital for surgical treatment due to the identification of a continuously growing lesion in the tail of pancreas during physical examinations. Distal resection of the pancreas was stopped during surgery when the patient's blood pressure and heart rate suddenly increased to 180/110 mmHg and 140 beats/min, respectively. Due to a marked rise in noradrenaline and adrenaline levels in the blood subsequent to surgery, the patient was diagnosed with pancreatic pheochromocytoma. The present study additionally reviewed the associated literature concerning pheochromocytoma in order to improve the understanding of this rare clinical phenomenon. The aim of the present study is to highlight to surgeons that although patients may not present with typical clinical manifestations due to the non-functional status of the tumor, undiagnosed pheochromocytoma of the pancreas should be considered when surgeons observe an unexpected hypertensive crisis during pancreatic tumor surgery.

  10. Islet isolation from human pancreas with extended cold ischemia time.

    PubMed

    Kühtreiber, W M; Ho, L T; Kamireddy, A; Yacoub, J A W; Scharp, D W

    2010-01-01

    The general consensus among transplant centers is that a cold ischemia time (CIT) beyond 8 hours results in reduced yields and quality of human islets. We sought to optimize the isolation process and enzymes for pancreata with extended CIT. We processed 16 extended CIT pancreata (13.2 +/- 0.7 hours). Donors averaged 50.8 +/- 2.6 (standard error of the mean) years old with a body mass index of 28.6 +/- 1.5. Glands were shipped in cold organ preservation solution without oxygenated perfluorocarbon. Isolations were performed under a protocol optimized for digestion with the new cGMP collagenase from Roche. Purification used continuous Euroficoll/University of Wisconsin gradients. Islets were cultured in two types of Prodo cGMP islet culture media and/or in Miami 1A media. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assays were performed after 8 to 16 days of culture. Prepurification yield averaged 415 +/- 41 KIEQ postpurification, 359 +/- 29 KIEQ (purification loss 13.5%); and postculture 317 +/- 27 KIEQ (culture loss 11.7%). Our process liberated an average of 4278 IEQ/g of pancreas (97 +/- 5 g). Most islets were recovered in the purest fraction (purity 79.7% +/- 1.9%). Culture loss in our enhanced culture media was 11.7%. After 2 to 3 days in culture, viability was 92% +/- 1%. Islets exhibited compactness and dithizone staining. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion assays performed after 3 to 23 days in our PIM(R) media resulted in a stimulation index of 6.8 +/- 1.7 (G50 to G350). We concluded that our human islet isolation process permitted the recovery of large numbers of high-quality human islets from extended CIT pancreata and that our cGMP islet culture media was superior to the current standard CMRL-based media. PMID:20692399

  11. AP@home: The Artificial Pancreas Is Now at Home.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, Lutz; Benesch, Carsten; DeVries, J Hans

    2016-07-01

    In the past years the development of an artificial pancreas (AP) has made great progress and many activities are ongoing in this area of research. The major step forward made in the last years was moving the evaluation of AP systems from highly controlled experimental conditions to daily life conditions at the home of patients with diabetes; this was also the aim of the European Union-funded AP@home project. Over a time period of 5 years a series of clinical studies were performed that culminated in 2 "final studies" during which an AP system was used by patients in their home environment for 2 or 3 months without supervision by a physician, living their normal lives. Two different versions of the AP system developed within this project were evaluated. A significant improvement in glycated hemoglobin was observed during closed-loop conditions despite the fact that during the control period the patients used the best currently available therapeutic option. In addition, a "single-port AP system" was developed within the project that combines continuous glucose monitoring and insulin infusion at a single tissue site. By using such a combined device the patients not only have to carry one less device around, the number of access points through the skin is also reduced from 2 to 1. In summary, close cooperation of 12 European partners, both academic centers and industry, enabled the development and evaluation of AP systems under daily life conditions. The next step is to develop these into products in cooperation with commercial partners. PMID:26888971

  12. GoCARB in the Context of an Artificial Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Agianniotis, Aristotelis; Anthimopoulos, Marios; Daskalaki, Elena; Drapela, Aurélie; Stettler, Christoph; Diem, Peter; Mougiakakou, Stavroula

    2015-01-01

    Background: In an artificial pancreas (AP), the meals are either manually announced or detected and their size estimated from the blood glucose level. Both methods have limitations, which result in suboptimal postprandial glucose control. The GoCARB system is designed to provide the carbohydrate content of meals and is presented within the AP framework. Method: The combined use of GoCARB with a control algorithm is assessed in a series of 12 computer simulations. The simulations are defined according to the type of the control (open or closed loop), the use or not-use of GoCARB and the diabetics’ skills in carbohydrate estimation. Results: For bad estimators without GoCARB, the percentage of the time spent in target range (70-180 mg/dl) during the postprandial period is 22.5% and 66.2% for open and closed loop, respectively. When the GoCARB is used, the corresponding percentages are 99.7% and 99.8%. In case of open loop, the time spent in severe hypoglycemic events (<50 mg/dl) is 33.6% without the GoCARB and is reduced to 0.0% when the GoCARB is used. In case of closed loop, the corresponding percentage is 1.4% without the GoCARB and is reduced to 0.0% with the GoCARB. Conclusion: The use of GoCARB improves the control of postprandial response and glucose profiles especially in the case of open loop. However, the most efficient regulation is achieved by the combined use of the control algorithm and the GoCARB. PMID:25904142

  13. Transactivation of pancreas-specific gene sequences in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K J; Samuelson, L C; Howard, G; Meisler, M H; Darlington, G J

    1991-01-01

    Enhancer/promoter elements from two pancreas-specific genes, those encoding amylase and elastase, were ligated to the bacterial GPT gene. The resulting construct can be used to select for expression of gene products which activate these pancreas-specific promoters in hybrid cells. The selectable GPT construct was stably transferred into several cell lines either directly or by cotransfection with pSV2Neo. GPT was expressed when transferred to pancreatic cell lines but not when transferred to GPT-fibroblast (L) cells or hepatoma cells. When the transformed L cells and hepatoma cells were fused with pancreatic cell lines, GPT was activated in the hybrid cells. Endogenous pancreas-specific genes from the L-cell and hepatoma parents were also activated in the hybrids. In addition, a pancreas-specific nuclear protein, PTF1, was produced in pancreatic and hybrid cells, correlating with GPT expression. The transformed L cells and hepatoma cells thus contained a nonexpressed construct which could be activated in trans by factors present in pancreatic cells. The hepatoma hybrid also continued to produce albumin, demonstrating the coexpression of liver and pancreas-specific genes in the hybrid-cell population. Cell lines carrying the amylase/elastase/GPT construct may be useful as a selection system for cloning of pancreatic transcription activators. Images PMID:1715019

  14. VARIABILITY IN THE ULTRASONOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE PANCREAS IN HEALTHY DOGS COMPARED TO DOGS WITH HYPERADRENOCORTICISM.

    PubMed

    Granger, L Abbigail; Hilferty, Michael; Francis, Taylor; Steiner, Jörg M; Gaschen, Lorrie

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotally, an unusually hyperechoic pancreas can be found in seemingly healthy dogs on ultrasound examination and the prevalence and clinical significance of this finding is unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in healthy dogs and correlate these findings to weight, age, and body condition score (BCS). An additional objective was to describe the prevalence of a hyperechoic and/or heterogenous pancreas in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism and compare this to the healthy dogs. Pancreata of 74 healthy dogs were evaluated prospectively and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were graded. Each dog's age, BCS, and weight were recorded. Dogs were screened for health by physical examination, serum chemistry panel, urine specific gravity, and a canine pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity assay. Pancreatic images for 92 dogs having hyperadrenocorticism were also reviewed and pancreatic echogenicity and echotexture were recorded. The prevalence of pancreatic hyperechogenicity in normal dogs was 7% (5 of 74) and heterogeneity was 40% (30 of 74). No correlation existed between pancreatic echogenicity and weight, age, or BCS (P > 0.1 for all sets). A statistically significant increase in the proportion of dogs having a hyperechoic pancreas was found in the hyperadrenocorticism sample of dogs (40%, 37 of 92, P < 0.0001). The underlying cause of pancreatic variability in the few healthy dogs and in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is unknown and the varying appearance of the pancreas in these samples confounds interpretation of diseases such as chronic pancreatitis. PMID:25850824

  15. Solid cystic pseudopapillary tumor of pancreas with splenic metastasis: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Yagmur, Yusuf; Yigit, Ebral; Gumus, Serdar; Babur, Mehmet; Can, Mehmet Ali

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Solid-cystic pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas is rare and most commonly seen in young women. We present a young women with solid-cystic pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas and discuss the literature. Presentation of case Thirty nine years old female patient with a mass about 12 cm in the pancreas with splenic invasion seen in our clinic. After having CT and PET-CT view, patient underwent surgery. Distal pancreatectomy with mass excision and splenectomy was performed. Microscopic examination result was solid cystic pseudopapillary tumor with spleen invasion. Discussion Solid-cystic pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas has cystic solid pseudopapillary structures. Prognosis of tumor is better than other pancreatic tumor. Complete resection of tumor with splenic inclusion is surgical treatment. Conclusion In case of large slow growing pancreatic tumor with splenic metastasis, solid-cystic pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas should be considered in the diagnosis. Complete surgical resection is associated with long-term survival even in the presence of metastatic disease. Close follow-up is necessary after surgery. PMID:26225837

  16. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas with similar genetic alterations to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsuo; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Fukuya, Akira; Kitamura, Shinji; Okamoto, Koichi; Kimura, Masako; Muguruma, Naoki; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Shimada, Mitsuo; Yoneda, Akiko; Bando, Yoshimi; Takishita, Makoto; Takayama, Tetsuji

    2016-08-01

    Neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) of the pancreas is very rare, and its origin is not fully elucidated. Here, we present a case of a small-size NEC of the pancreas that is genetically similar to invasive ductal adenocarcinoma (IDA). A 65-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to obstructive jaundice and found to have a 12-mm solid tumor in the pancreas head. The tumor exhibited low vascularity on enhanced computed tomography, and endoscopic retrograde pancreatographic imaging revealed an irregular obstruction in a branch duct of the pancreas. The patient was thereby diagnosed with a pancreatic ductal cancer, and stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with regional lymph node resection was performed. Histochemical analysis of the resected tumor showed that the neoplastic cells with scanty cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei strongly expressed chromogranin A and synaptophysin. The Ki-67 index was 40 % in the most proliferative tumor regions, and the tumor was diagnosed as a NEC of the pancreas. However, in the analysis of genetic alterations of the tumor tissue, the neoplastic cells showed altered KRAS, TP53, and SMAD4/DPC4, suggesting that the NEC in our case is genetically related to IDA. Our data suggest that poorly differentiated IDAs may transform into NECs. PMID:27262570

  17. Novel Methods of Insulin Replacement: The Artificial Pancreas and Encapsulated Islets.

    PubMed

    Malek, Rana; Davis, Stephen N

    2016-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes represents 5-10% of patients with diabetes worldwide. The importance of tight glycemic control has been demonstrated definitively in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial but is often elusive for patients because of the associated risk of hypoglycemia. Care for these patients requires coordination amongst a variety of health professionals including primary care providers, endocrinologists, nephrologists, ophthalmologists, pharmacists, podiatrists and others. The 21(st) century is witnessing emerging and exciting treatment options for this disease. Previous attempts at curative therapy have included pancreas or islet transplantation, but limitations of organ availability and the risk associated with immunosuppression have resulted in renewed efforts for novel methods of insulin replacement. Advancement in technology has resulted in several versions of an artificial pancreas-technology that uses a continuous glucose monitor to sense the blood sugar, transmit those numbers to a control algorithm that then doses insulin ± glucagon in response to changes in blood sugar. Free living experiments with two versions of the artificial pancreas have recently been published. A quest for a bioartificial pancreas has been ongoing as well. In this system, islets (porcine, human, or embryonic stem cell derived) are encapsulated in a biocompatible device that is either a macrocapsule or a microcapsule. The benefits of this system allows for replacement therapy without immunosuppression. Human trials with encapsulation are currently ongoing. This review will provide a detailed review of artificial and bioartificial pancreas systems with a focus on human trials. PMID:26638972

  18. Mucus retention in heterotopic pancreas of the gastric antrum. A lesion mimicking mucinous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nopajaroonsri, C

    1994-09-01

    This report describes mucus retention developing in heterotopic pancreas of the gastric antrum. This unusual complication of heterotopic pancreas was seen in a 54-year-old black man who presented with postprandial nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Gastroscopy revealed a 2-cm pyloric polyp, which was seen to intermittently obstruct the pylorus. Exploratory laparotomy confirmed an intramural mass in the antrum with serosal thickening and nodules. Frozen-section examination of the serosal nodule revealed a pool of mucus containing epithelial clusters and chronic inflammatory cells with no verifiable pancreatic tissue. These findings suggested the possibility of a mucinous carcinoma involving the serosa. Following gastrectomy, however, heterotopic pancreatic tissue was identified in the outer muscular propria extending to the mucosa of the antrum with no evidence of carcinoma. This heterotopic pancreatic tissue showed ductal obstruction and mucus retention. As a result, some ducts were ruptured and transformed into small nodules of mucus lakes with clusters of residual ductal epithelium. We therefore concluded that the mucous extravasation nodules on the antral serosa represented a benign lesion resulting from mucus retention in the heterotopic pancreas. In contrast to mucinous carcinoma, these benign mucous extravasation nodules were closely associated with the heterotopic pancreas, and showed significant inflammation and fibrosis but no overt epithelial anaplasia. The significance of the mucous extravasation nodule in the heterotopic pancreas is its potential confusion with mucinous carcinoma. PMID:8067516

  19. An Activated Immune and Inflammatory Response Targets the Pancreas of Newborn Pigs with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Sinkora, Marek; Meyerholz, David K.; Welsh, Michael J.; McCray, Jr., Paul B.; Butler, John; Uc, Aliye

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims: In cystic fibrosis (CF), pancreatic disease begins in utero and progresses over time to complete destruction of the organ. Although inflammatory cells have been detected in the pancreas of humans and pigs with CF, their subtypes have not been characterized. Methods: Using four-color flow cytometry, we analyzed the surface antigens of leukocytes in pancreas, blood, and mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) of newborn pigs with CF (CFTR–/– and CFTRΔF508/ΔF508) and in those without CF (CFTR+/–, CFTR+/ΔF508, CFTR+/+). Pancreatic histopathology was examined with HE stain. Results: CF pig pancreas had patchy distribution of inflammatory cells with neutrophils/macrophages in dilated acini, and lymphocytes in the interstitium compared to non-CF. B cells, effector (MHC-II+) and cytotoxic (CD2+CD8+) γδ T cells, activated (MHC-II+ and/or CD25+) and effector (CD4+CD8+) αβ T helper cells, effector natural killer cells (MHC-II+CD3−CD8+), and monocytes/macrophages and neutrophils were increased in the CF pig pancreas compared to pigs without CF. Blood and MLN leukocyte populations were not different between CF and non-CF pigs. Conclusions: We discovered an activated immune response that was specific to the pancreas of newborn CF pigs; inflammation was not systemic. The presence of both innate and adaptive immune cells suggests that the disease process is complex and extensive. PMID:22057257

  20. A comparison study of rat pancreas preservation using perfluorochemical and fluorocarbon-emulsion as preservation medium.

    PubMed

    Urushihara, T; Sumimoto, K; Ikeda, M; Yamanaka, K; Hong, H Q; Ito, H; Fukuda, Y; Dohi, K

    1992-01-01

    We reported previously the successful 72-hour cold rat pancreas preservation by using Perfluorochemical (PFC). The present study is to determine whether Fluorocarbon (FC) emulsion is as effective as PFC for long-term rat pancreas preservation. Lewis rat pancreases were stored in FC emulsion (4 degrees C) saturated by continuous supply of oxygen:carbon dioxide (95%:5%) (Group I) or by 100% pure nitrogen (Group II), or in PFC (4 degrees C) saturated by continuous supply of oxygen:carbon dioxide (95%:5%) (Group III) or nitrogen (Group IV) for 24 h and 48 h. Heterotopic pancreas transplantation into isogeneic diabetic rats were performed following preservation. Functional graft success rates following 24 h and 48 h cold storage were 71% (5/7) and 0% (0/5) in Group I, 71% (5/7) and 0% (0/5) in Group II, 100% (5/5) and 80% (4/5) in Group III, and 80% (4/5) and 0% (0/5) in Group IV, respectively. These results showed that, as an artificial blood substitute, the PFC with simple oxygen bubbling for 48-hour preservation of rat pancreas was much effective than FC emulsion, but not effective when saturated with nitrogen. We concluded that the PFC with saturated oxygen can obtain long-term successful preservation of rat pancreas. The direct oxygenation of the graft tissues is thought to play an important role in organ preservation. PMID:1391537

  1. Detection of circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patients with pancreatic cystic lesions.

    PubMed

    Rhim, Andrew D; Thege, Fredrik I; Santana, Steven M; Lannin, Timothy B; Saha, Trisha N; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R; Kochman, Michael L; Ginsberg, Gregory G; Lieb, John G; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J; Stanger, Ben Z

    2014-03-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We recently showed in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation. To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced differential immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells in patient blood samples. We captured more than 3 circulating pancreas epithelial cells/mL in 7 of 21 (33%) patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors are detected, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  2. Cavernous hemangioma of adult pancreas: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Henkes, David; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic hemangioma is a rare type of benign vascular tumor. Low clinical suspicion and inability of current cross sectional imaging techniques to differentiate it from other pancreatic lesions, contribute to the difficulty in making the correct diagnosis. Without a definitive diagnosis, and due to concern for malignancy, in many instances, surgery is performed. We report a case of pancreas cavernous hemangioma in an 18-year-old female. The patient presented with three-month history of epigastric pain. Physical examination and routine blood tests were normal. Abdominal Computed Tomography scan revealed a 5 cm × 6 cm complex non-enhancing cystic mass in the head of pancreas. Magnetic resonance imaging, endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) and EUS guided fine needle aspiration cytology were non-diagnostic. Because of uncontrolled symptoms, the patient underwent surgical resection. Histopathology and Immunohistochemical staining confirmed the diagnosis of cavernous hemangioma of pancreas. PMID:26361427

  3. Symptomatic lymphoepithelial cyst of the pancreas: successful treatment without pancreatic resection.

    PubMed

    Ruggero, John M; Prakash, Shivana N

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoepithelial cysts (LECs) of the pancreas are rare benign lesions with unknown pathogenesis. LECs are true cysts that mimic pseudocysts and cystic neoplasms making diagnosis challenging. We report a case of a symptomatic LEC of the pancreas in a 67-year-old man who had severe epigastric pain. Workup including computed tomography and endoscopic ultrasound were non-diagnostic. The patient underwent attempted surgical resection; however, the mass was unresectable. The mass was enucleated and drained, and pathology returned LEC. The patient underwent a normal postoperative course and remained symptom free. Most LECs are diagnosed after an extensive pancreatic resection for suspicious cystic masses. The aim of this report is to show that operative management of LECs should not be limited to pancreatic resections. Excision and enucleation of LEC of the pancreas is a better alternative than an extensive pancreatic resection. Preoperative diagnosis of LECs appears to be the limiting factor. PMID:27141046

  4. Pancreas-Targeted NIR Fluorophores for Dual-Channel Image-Guided Abdominal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Hideyuki; Hyun, Hoon; Vargas, Christina; Gravier, Julien; Park, GwangLi; Gioux, Sylvain; Frangioni, John V.; Henary, Maged; Choi, Hak Soo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Pancreas-related complications are some of the most serious ones in abdominal surgery. The goal of this study was to develop and validate novel near-infrared (NIR) fluorophores that would enable real-time pancreas imaging to avoid the intraoperative pancreatic injury. Design: After initial screening of a large NIR fluorophore library, the performance of 3 selected pancreas-targeted 700 nm NIR fluorophores, T700-H, T700-F, and MB, were quantified in mice, rats, and pigs. Dose ranging using 25 and 100 nmol, and 2.5 µmol of T700-F, and its imaging kinetics over a 4 h period were tested in each species. Three different 800 nm NIR fluorophores were employed for dual-channel FLARE™ imaging in pigs: 2 μmol of ZW800-1 for vessels and kidney, 1 μmol of ZW800-3C for lymph nodes, and 2 μmol of ESNF31 for adrenal glands. Results: T700-F demonstrated the highest signal to background ratio (SBR), with peak SBR at 4 h postinjection in mice. In pigs, T700-F produced an SBR ≥ 2 against muscle, spleen, and lymph nodes for up to 8 h after a single intravenous injection. The combination of T700-F with each 800 nm NIR fluorophore provided simultaneous dual-channel intraoperative imaging of pancreas with surrounding organs in real time. Conclusion: Pancreas-targeted NIR fluorophores combined with the FLARE dual-channel imaging system enable the real-time intraoperative pancreas imaging which helps surgeons perform safer and more curative abdominal surgeries. PMID:25553094

  5. Opposite Expression of SPARC between the Liver and Pancreas in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Aseer, Kanikkai Raja; Kim, Sang Woo; Choi, Myung-Sook; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-01-01

    Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC) is a matricellular protein that regulates several cellular events, including inflammation and tissue remodelling. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific expression of SPARC in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes, and found that SPARC was significantly up-regulated in the liver while down-regulated in the pancreas of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Chronic inflammation occurred in the diabetic pancreas accompanied by up-regulation of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPβ) and its targets (TNFα, Il6, CRP, and Fn1) as well as myeloperoxidase (Mpo) and C-X-C chemokine receptor type 2 (Cxcr2). Diabetic liver showed significant up-regulation of Tgfb1 as well as moderately less up-regulated TNFα and reduced Fn1, resulting in elevated fibrogenesis. PARP-1 was not up-regulated during CD95-mediated apoptosis, resulting in restoration of high ATP levels in the diabetic liver. On the contrary, CD95-dependent apoptosis was not observed in the diabetic pancreas due to up-regulation of PARP-1 and ATP depletion, resulting in necrosis. The cytoprotective machinery was damaged by pancreatic inflammation, whereas adequate antioxidant capacity indicates low oxidative stress in the diabetic liver. High and low cellular insulin content was found in the diabetic liver and pancreas, respectively. Furthermore, we identified six novel interacting partner proteins of SPARC by co-immunoprecipitation in the diabetic liver and pancreas, and their interactions with SPARC were predicted by bioinformatics tools. Taken together, opposite expression of SPARC in the diabetic liver and pancreas may be related to inflammation and immune cell infiltration, degrees of apoptosis and fibrosis, cytoprotective machinery, and cellular insulin levels. PMID:26110898

  6. Intraoperative Localization of Insulinoma and Normal Pancreas using Invisible Near-Infrared Fluorescent Light

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Joshua; Choi, Hak Soo; Gibbs-Strauss, Summer L.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Colson, Yolonda L.; Frangioni, John V.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas, such as insulinoma, are difficult to localize and complete resection is essential for cure. Our hypothesis is that a near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore exhibiting uptake in insulinoma could provide high sensitivity detection intraoperatively. Methods: The optical properties of methylene blue (MB) were measured in vitro in 100% serum at 37°C, and in vivo after tissue uptake. MB was injected as a rapid intravenous bolus at doses ranging from 0.25 to 2 mg/kg into wildtype rats and pigs, and into insulinoma-bearing transgenic mice. The FLARE™ imaging system was used to acquire color video and NIR fluorescence images simultaneously, and in real-time. The signal-to-background ratios (SBR) of tissues and tumors were quantified using FLARE™ software. Results: When appropriately diluted, MB exhibits moderate NIR fluorescence emission peaking at 688 nm. At doses ≥ 1 mg/kg, certain normal tissues, such as pancreas, accumulate MB and remain NIR fluorescent for up to 1 hr with an SBR ≥ 1.6. MB spectral properties are maintained after uptake into tissue. Interestingly, insulinoma exhibits even higher uptake for MB than normal pancreas, resulting in insulinoma-to-pancreas ratios of 3.7 and insulinoma-to-muscle ratios of 16.2. MB permitted high-sensitivity, real-time localization of primary, multi-centric, and metastatic insulinoma, and permitted differentiation among tumor, normal pancreas, and other abdominal structures. Conclusion: A single intravenous injection of a clinically available, commonly used NIR fluorophore provides prolonged intraoperative localization of normal pancreas and insulinoma using invisible NIR fluorescent light. PMID:20033320

  7. Treatment, Outcomes, and Clinical Trial Participation in Elderly Patients With Metastatic Pancreas Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daneng; Capanu, Marinela; Yu, Kenneth H.; Lowery, Maeve A.; Kelsen, David P.; O’Reilly, Eileen M.

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the treatment patterns and outcomes of elderly patients with metastatic pancreas cancer remain limited. Therefore, an analysis of systemic therapy use, clinical trial participation, and outcomes in elderly patients with metastatic pancreas cancer was performed at our institution. Elderly patients who received systemic therapy had a longer survival compared with those who did not. However, therapeutic clinical trial participation was low and should be encouraged Background Pancreas adenocarcinoma has a median age at diagnosis of 71 years. Limited studies have focused on the treatment of elderly patients with pancreas cancer. Patients and Methods An analysis of systemic therapy use, clinical trial participation, and overall outcomes of 237 patients with metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma ≥ 75 years of age evaluated at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 2005 and 2013 was undertaken. Results Median overall survival was 7 months for the entire study population. A total of 197 (83%) patients received systemic therapy, which was significantly associated with longer overall survival (P < .01). No significant difference was detected in survival between age groups 75 to 79, 80 to 84, and ≥ 85 years of age among those who received systemic therapy (P = .49). Seventy-seven (32%) patients participated in a clinical trial of whom 13 (5%) patients were enrolled in a therapeutic trial, including no patients aged ≥ 85 years. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that presence of liver metastases (P < .001), performance status (P < .001), and number of systemic agents (P < .001) were significantly associated with survival. Conclusion Receipt of systemic therapy was associated with longer survival in elderly patients ≥ 75 years of age with metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma. Therapeutic clinical trial participation among these patients was low and future development of prognostic models for appropriate patient selection is warranted. PMID:26072442

  8. Successful Pancreas Transplantation From a Deceased Donor Intoxicated With Oral Antidiabetic Agent: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Villar, C; Conget, I; Ferrer-Fàbrega, J; Paredes, D; Ruíz, A; Roque, R; Rull, R; López-Boado, M; Ricart, M J; Garcia, R; Adalia, R

    2015-10-01

    Simultaneous kidney pancreas transplantation (SKP) is a common procedure for the patient with long-term type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM) with terminal renal failure. It is unusual to consider the pancreas from a deceased donor who died after an acute intoxication with oral antidiabetic agent (OAA), which would suggest an abnormal functionality of the organ and preclude the potential use of the graft. We present a case of a successful pancreatic transplantation from a donor who died of acute cerebral edema secondary to severe hypoglycemia induced by OAA acute intoxication. PMID:26518941

  9. Pancreas cancer, tobacco smoking and consumption of alcoholic beverages: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Partanen, T J; Vainio, H U; Ojajärvi, I A; Kauppinen, T P

    1997-06-01

    A population-based case-control study investigated pancreas cancer in relation to consumption of alcoholic beverages, tobacco smoking and pancreatitis, utilizing historical proxy data for 662 decedent Finnish pancreas cancer cases and 1770 cancer controls. Tobacco smoking increased the risk, with an attributable case fraction of 0.27. The data are consistent with a joint effect of early and late stage carcinogens in tobacco smoke. Consumption of distilled beverages did not increase risk, but heavy drinking of wine or beer did. History of pancreatitis was a strong risk factor. PMID:9177454

  10. Primary Small Cell Carcinoma of the Pancreas Presenting With Likely Paraneoplastic Features

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Mark; Kumar, Prashant; Gray, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Primary small cell carcinoma of the pancreas (SCCP) is a rare malignancy, and has been associated with paraneoplastic features in only 2 reported cases. We report a rare and fatal case of SCCP with likely paraneoplastic features in a previously well 67-year-old woman presenting with abdominal pain. She was found to have abnormal biochemical markers (hyperkalaemia and hyponatraemia) with a normal abdominal CT. Emergency laparotomy identified a mass at the head of the pancreas and liver metastases, she died soon after, and diagnosis was confirmed post-mortem. PMID:27144201

  11. Vaccination against pancreas disease in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., reduces shedding of salmonid alphavirus.

    PubMed

    Skjold, Pål; Sommerset, Ingunn; Frost, Petter; Villoing, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Salmon pancreas disease virus, often referred to as salmonid alphavirus (SAV), causes pancreas disease (PD) in European salmonids. SAV transmits horizontally from fish shedding virus into the water and ocean currents are believed to be a main contributor of viral spread between marine farms. Vaccination against PD is previously shown to reduce mortality and severity of clinical PD. In this study, we demonstrate that vaccination against PD significantly reduces viral shedding from infected individuals. The results suggest that PD vaccination can be an important tool to reduce the infection pressure, a known key risk for PD outbreaks at neighbouring farms. PMID:27496170

  12. Epigenetic modifications and long non-coding RNAs influence pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Arnes, Luis; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β-cells within the pancreatic islet of Langerhans are responsible for maintaining glucose homeostasis; the loss or malfunction of β-cells results in diabetes mellitus. Recent advances in cell purification strategies and sequencing technologies as well as novel molecular tools have revealed that epigenetic modifications and long non-coding RNAs represent an integral part of the transcriptional mechanisms regulating pancreas development and β-cell function. Importantly, these findings have uncovered a new layer of gene regulation in the pancreas that can be exploited to enhance the restoration and/or repair of β-cells to treat diabetes. PMID:25812926

  13. Isolated metastasis of uterine leiomyosarcoma to the pancreas: Report of a case and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Ozturk, Safak; Unver, Mutlu; Ozturk, Burcin Kibar; Bozbıyık, Osman; Erol, Varlık; Kebabcı, Eyup; Olmez, Mustafa; Zalluhoglu, Nihat; Bayol, Umit

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Metastatic tumors of the pancreas are uncommon and rarely detectable clinically. Metastases to the pancreas are rare. We present a patient with pancreatic metastases from a leiomyosarcoma of the uterus and review the literature about the clinical features of pancreatic metastasis and its surgical management. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 40-year-old woman, who underwent hysterectomy, left oophorectomy, omentectomy and lymp node dissection for leiomyosarcoma of the uterus. At the follow up, the patient complained of non-specific abdominal discomfort. Preoperative diagnosis were pancreatic pseudocyst, cystadenoma or cystadenocarcinoma. At laparotomy, a cystic mass was found in the tail of the pancreas which was invased to the transverse colon mesenterium and the spleen. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy and transverse colon resection was performed. Histologically, the tumor was evaluated as poorly differentiated leiomyosarcoma. DISCUSSION Metastatic lesions of the pancreas are uncommon and less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies. However a few cases of leiomyosarcoma with metastases to the pancreas have been reported in the literature. Before deciding that the lesion in the pancreas was metastasis, primary leiomyosarcoma of the pancreas had to be ruled out. Histologically, leiomyosarcoma of the pancreas contains interlacing spindle cells with varying degrees of atypia and pleomorphism. The surgical approach to the pancreatic metastases must be aimed complete excision of the tumor with a wide negative margin of clear tissue and maximum preservation of pancreatic remnant if possible. CONCLUSION In the absence of widespread metastatic disease, aggressive surgical approach with negative margins must be aimed. PMID:24858977

  14. Biomarker validation for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms of the pancreas | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): A critical component to successful cancer screening is the identification of a lesion for which intervention will result in prolonged survival or cure.The five-year survival of patients with resected stage IA pancreas cancer (the earliest identifiable lesion and |

  15. Progress of artificial pancreas devices toward clinical use: the first outpatient studies

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This article describes recent progress in the automated control of glycemia in type 1 diabetes with artificial pancreas devices that combine continuous glucose monitoring with automated decision-making and insulin delivery. Recent findings After a gestation period of closely supervised feasibility studies in research centers, the last 2 years have seen publication of studies testing these devices in outpatient environments, and many more such studies are ongoing. The most basic form of automation, suspension of insulin delivery for actual or predicted hypoglycemia, has been shown to be effective and well tolerated, and a first-generation device has actually reached the market. Artificial pancreas devices that actively dose insulin fall into two categories, those that dose insulin alone and those that also use glucagon to prevent and treat hypoglycemia (bihormonal artificial pancreas). Initial outpatient clinical trials have shown that both strategies can improve glycemic management in comparison with patient-controlled insulin pump therapy, but only the bihormonal strategy has been tested without restrictions on exercise. Summary Artificial pancreas technology has the potential to reduce acute and chronic complications of diabetes and mitigate the burden of diabetes self-management. Successful outpatient studies bring these technologies one step closer to availability for patients. PMID:25692927

  16. Duodenal plasmacytoma: a rare extramedullary localization simulating carcinoma of the head of the pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Schoretsanitis, G.; Livingstone, J. I.; el-Japour, J. N.; Watkins, N.; Wastell, C.

    1994-01-01

    Plasmacytomas occurring in extramedullary sites are rare tumours, particularly so when located in the gastrointestinal tract. We report the case of a solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma arising in the duodenum and simulating a carcinoma of the head of the pancreas. Diagnostic and treatment options are discussed. Images Figure 1 PMID:8016015

  17. Ontogeny of Neuro-Insular Complexes and Islets Innervation in the Human Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Proshchina, Alexandra E.; Krivova, Yulia S.; Barabanov, Valeriy M.; Saveliev, Sergey V.

    2014-01-01

    The ontogeny of the neuro-insular complexes (NIC) and the islets innervation in human pancreas has not been studied in detail. Our aim was to describe the developmental dynamics and distribution of the nervous system structures in the endocrine part of human pancreas. We used double-staining with antibodies specific to pan-neural markers [neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and S100 protein] and to hormones of pancreatic endocrine cells. NSE and S100-positive nerves and ganglia were identified in the human fetal pancreas from gestation week (gw) 10 onward. Later the density of S100 and NSE-positive fibers increased. In adults, this network was sparse. The islets innervation started to form from gw 14. NSE-containing endocrine cells were identified from gw 12 onward. Additionally, S100-positive cells were detected both in the periphery and within some of the islets starting at gw 14. The analysis of islets innervation has shown that the fetal pancreas contained NIC and the number of these complexes was reduced in adults. The highest density of NIC is detected during middle and late fetal periods, when the mosaic islets, typical for adults, form. The close integration between the developing pancreatic islets and the nervous system structures may play an important role not only in the hormone secretion, but also in the islets morphogenesis. PMID:24795697

  18. Experimental islet isolation in porcine pancreas with new enzyme Liberase PI.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C; Han, D J; Kang, C H; We, Y M; Back, J H; Kim, Y H; Lim, D G

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the results of 20 consecutive porcine islet isolations using a new enzyme Liberase PI. Twenty pancreata were procured for islet isolation, which was performed using modified Ricordi's method with Liberase PI. Quantitation of islet viability staining, insulin stimulation assay, intracellular insulin content/DNA, and in vivo transplantability into diabetic nude mice were examined for quality control. The results were compared between a high-yield group (>2500 IEQ/g pancreas) and a low-yield group (<2500 IEQ/g pancreas). Sufficient amount of purified islets (3000 IEQ/g pancreas) were obtained using the new brand enzyme Liberase PI. These islets showed good quality in structure and functions, which were demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo standard assays. Isolation index (IEQ/number) of the low-yield group was lower than that of high-yield group (0.75 vs 0.86), which means more fragmentation of islets in the low-yield group. There were no differences in function between the two groups. In conclusion, we obtained sufficient numbers of viable, functional islets from porcine pancreas using a new brand enzyme Liberase PI and low-temperature isolation technique. However, overdigestion of islets during the isolation remains to be overcome. Advance in porcine islet isolation technique will in the future make the porcine islet xenotransplantation a reality for the cure of diabetes mellitus. PMID:15518798

  19. Embolization of an Insulinoma of the Pancreas with Trisacryl Gelatin Microspheres as Definitive Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Rott, Gernot Biggemann, Martin; Pfohl, Martin

    2008-05-15

    Insulinomas are rare, mostly benign neuroendocrine tumors, originating in 99% of cases from the pancreas, that synthesize and secrete insulin, causing symptomatic hypoglycemia. Today the treatment of choice is surgical removal. We present the case of an 84-year-old woman with a symptomatic insulinoma who refused surgery and was treated with arterial embolization using trisacryl gelatin microspheres as definitive treatment.

  20. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas: One Case with a Metastatic Evolution in a Caucasian Woman

    PubMed Central

    Lestelle, Valentin; de Coster, Claire; Sarran, Anthony; Poizat, Flora; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a Caucasian woman, operated on for a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in 2009, who recurred 4 years later with multiple liver metastases requiring liver resection. This disease is infrequent, particularly among the Caucasian population, and metastatic evolution is very rare. PMID:26557078

  1. Solid Pseudopapillary Tumor of the Pancreas: One Case with a Metastatic Evolution in a Caucasian Woman.

    PubMed

    Lestelle, Valentin; de Coster, Claire; Sarran, Anthony; Poizat, Flora; Delpero, Jean-Robert; Raoul, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a Caucasian woman, operated on for a solid pseudopapillary tumor of the pancreas in 2009, who recurred 4 years later with multiple liver metastases requiring liver resection. This disease is infrequent, particularly among the Caucasian population, and metastatic evolution is very rare. PMID:26557078

  2. Intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas for complex pancreatogenous hypoglycemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhiying; Tan, Haidong; Sun, Yongliang; Si, Shuang; Xu, Li; Liu, Xiaolei; Liu, Liguo; Zhou, Wenying; Huang, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Intraoperative localization and confirmation of complete resection of the hypersecreting tissue are the 2 main challenges in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Here, we report our experience with intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas in the management of pancreatogenous hypoglycemia. Clinical courses of 2 patients with biochemical evidence of a pancreatogenous hypoglycemia were studied. The preoperative diagnosis was multiple endocrine neoplasia 1 (MEN-1) and nesidioblastosis, respectively. Rapid intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas was used to localize and confirm complete excision of the hypersecreting tissue. Hypoglycemia was successfully treated in both the patients. In the MEN-1 patient, 2 small tumors in the head of pancreas were not resected, as they were deemed noninsulin secreting by intraoperative portal vein insulin assay, thus avoiding a total pancreatectomy. In the patient with nesidioblastosis, using intraoperative portal vein insulin assay combined with occlusion of the pancreas, an appropriate amount of pancreatic tissue was resected thereby avoiding recurrence and diabetes. This technique may be of particular value in patients with complex conditions such as MEN-1 and nesidioblastosis, to localize and achieve complete resection of hypersecreting pancreatic tissue. PMID:27367988

  3. Solid tumors of the pancreas can put on a mask through cystic change

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Solid pancreatic tumors such as pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), solid pseudopapillary tumor (SPT), and pancreatic endocrine tumor (PET) may occasionally manifest as cystic lesions. In this study, we have put together our accumulated experience with cystic manifestations of various solid tumors of the pancreas. Methods From 2000 to 2006, 376 patients with pancreatic solid tumor resections were reviewed. Ten (2.66%) of these tumors appeared on radiological imaging studies as cystic lesions. We performed a retrospective review of medical records and pathologic findings of these 10 cases. Results Of the ten cases in which solid tumors of the pancreas manifested as cystic lesions, six were PDAC with cystic degeneration, two were SPT undergone complete cystic change, one was cystic PET, and one was a cystic schwannoma. The mean tumor size of the cystic portion in PDAC was 7.3 cm, and three patients were diagnosed as 'pseudocyst' with or without cancer. Two SPT were found incidentally in young women and were diagnosed as other cystic neoplasms. One cystic endocrine tumor was preoperatively suspected as intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm or mucinous cystic neoplasm. Conclusions Cystic changes of pancreas solid tumors are extremely rare. However, the possibility of cystic manifestation of pancreas solid tumors should be kept in mind. PMID:21771323

  4. Studies on the absence of photodynamic mechanism in the normal pancreas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mang, Thomas S.; Wieman, Thomas J.; Crean, David H.

    1991-06-01

    Extraction procedures to quantitate porfimer sodium concentration in tissues were correlated with fluorescence measurements made in vivo, on hamster and rat normal pancreas and intra-pancreatic tumors. The uptake of photosensitizer has been shown to be high in both normal and malignant pancreatic tissues, in both animal models studied. Photobleaching of the drug, as evidenced by both techniques within the pancreatic tumor, occurs in a typical manner during PDT, with resultant tissue destruction. In contrast, when the normal pancreas is exposed to PDT, a negligible photobleaching effect, as well as a lack of tissue response, is observed. The lack of observable response is corroborated by a lack of measurable physiological response. Both serum amylase and serum glucose show acute changes up to 12 hours post treatment but quickly return to normal. HPLC analysis shows that the drug extracted from both the normal pancreas and intrapancreatic tumor is essentially the same as that extracted from other tissues and similar to that which has been injected into the animal. Fluorescence microscopy has shown that at time points between 12-120 hours the drug is associated with lymphatic channels. This would not, however, necessarily preclude normal tissue destruction. Similar results have been found with other photosensitizers. Understanding the lack of response in the pancreas may lead to a deeper understanding of the diseased state which is normally refractory to all therapy as well as understanding the fundamental concepts of the mechanisms of PDT.

  5. Effect of maternal undernutrition on human foetal pancreas morphology in second trimester of pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P. Uday; Ramalaxmi, B.A.; Venkiah, K.; Sesikeran, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Maternal undernutrition and hyperglycaemia during pregnancy, as well as foetal undernutrition affecting the development of foetal endocrine pancreas structure and function, especially that of β-cells is well known. This study was undertaken to look into the changes in pancreatic islets morphology of aborted normal human foetuses (16-20 wk old) of undernourished and adequately nourished mothers. Methods: Foetuses were collected over a 24 month period from medically terminated pregnancies of six undernourished mothers (BMI <18.5 kg/m2) and eight adequately nourished mothers (BMI >18.5 kg/m2). The sections were stained with haematoxylin & eosin as well as Masson trichrome for morphometric estimates such as islet count, area, volume, etc. and immunohistochemistry analysis of β-cells for insulin presence was done. Results: Significant correlations between maternal and foetal parameters were seen. However, there were no statistically significant differences in the number, size or density and beta cell counts of the pancreas among foetal pancreas of mothers with BMI <18.5 and >18.5 kg/m2. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings indicate that nutritional status of the mother may not have profound influence on the morphology of beta cells of foetal pancreas in second trimester of pregnancy. Further studies need to be done to confirm these findings. PMID:23563373

  6. p120 catenin is required for normal tubulogenesis but not epithelial integrity in developing mouse pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Hendley, Audrey M.; Provost, Elayne; Bailey, Jennifer M.; Wang, Yue J.; Cleveland, Megan H.; Blake, Danielle; Bittman, Ross W.; Roeser, Jeffrey C.; Maitra, Anirban; Reynolds, Albert B.; Leach, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular protein p120 catenin aids in maintenance of cell-cell adhesion by regulating E-cadherin stability in epithelial cells. In an effort to understand the biology of p120 catenin in pancreas development, we ablated p120 catenin in mouse pancreatic progenitor cells, which resulted in deletion of p120 catenin in all epithelial lineages of the developing mouse pancreas: islet, acinar, centroacinar, and ductal. Loss of p120 catenin resulted in formation of dilated epithelial tubules, expansion of ductal epithelia, loss of acinar cells, and the induction of pancreatic inflammation. Aberrant branching morphogenesis and tubulogenesis were also observed. Throughout development, the phenotype became more severe, ultimately resulting in an abnormal pancreas comprised primarily of duct-like epithelium expressing early progenitor markers. In pancreatic tissue lacking p120 catenin, overall epithelial architecture remained intact; however, actin cytoskeleton organization was disrupted, an observation associated with increased cytoplasmic PKCζ. Although we observed reduced expression of adherens junction proteins E-cadherin, β-catenin, and α-catenin, p120 catenin family members p0071, ARVCF, and δ-catenin remained present at cell membranes in homozygous p120f/f pancreases, potentially providing stability for maintenance of epithelial integrity during development. Adult mice homozygous for deletion of p120 catenin displayed dilated main pancreatic ducts, chronic pancreatitis, acinar to ductal metaplasia (ADM), and mucinous metaplasia that resembles PanIN1a. Taken together, our data demonstrate an essential role for p120 catenin in pancreas development. PMID:25523391

  7. Prostaglandin E2 Regulates Liver versus Pancreas Cell Fate Decisions and Endodermal Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Nissim, Sahar; Sherwood, Richard I.; Wucherpfennig, Julia; Saunders, Diane; Harris, James M.; Esain, Virginie; Carroll, Kelli J.; Frechette, Gregory M.; Kim, Andrew J.; Hwang, Katie L.; Cutting, Claire C.; Elledge, Susanna; North, Trista E.; Goessling, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The liver and pancreas arise from common endodermal progenitors. How these distinct cell fates are specified is poorly understood. Here, we describe prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) as a regulator of endodermal fate specification during development. Modulating PGE2 activity has opposing effects on liver-versus-pancreas specification in zebrafish embryos as well as mouse endodermal progenitors. The PGE2 synthetic enzyme cox2a and receptor ep2a are patterned such that cells closest to PGE2 synthesis acquire a liver fate whereas more distant cells acquire a pancreas fate. PGE2 interacts with the bmp2b pathway to regulate fate specification. At later stages of development, PGE2 acting via the ep4a receptor promotes outgrowth of both the liver and pancreas. PGE2 remains important for adult organ growth, as it modulates liver regeneration. This work provides in vivo evidence that PGE2 may act as a morphogen to regulate cell fate decisions and outgrowth of the embryonic endodermal anlagen. PMID:24530296

  8. Mucinous cyst exhibiting severe dysplasia in gastric heterotopic pancreas associated with gastrointestinal stromal tumour.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Antony; Storey, David; Lee, Cheok Soon; Murali, Rajmohan

    2007-11-21

    Heterotopic pancreatic tissue within the stomach is rare and dysplasia within heterotopic pancreatic tissue is very rare. We present the first report of a patient with concurrent occurrence of heterotopic pancreas in the stomach with a gastrointestinal stromal tumour. PMID:17963310

  9. A registry analysis of damage to the deceased donor pancreas during procurement.

    PubMed

    Ausania, F; Drage, M; Manas, D; Callaghan, C J

    2015-11-01

    Surgical injury to the pancreas is thought to occur commonly during procurement. The UK Transplant Registry was analyzed to determine the frequency of pancreatic injuries, identify factors associated with damage, and assess the impact of injuries on graft survival. Twelve hundred ninety-six pancreata were procured from donation after brain death donors, with 314 (19.5%) from donation after circulatory death donors. More than 50% of recovered pancreata had at least one injury, most commonly a short portal vein (21.5%). Liver donation, procurement team origin, hepatic artery (HA) arising from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), and increasing donor BMI were associated with increased rates of pancreas damage on univariate analyses; on multivariate analysis only the presence of an HA from the SMA remained significant (p = 0.02). Six hundred forty solid organ pancreas transplants were performed; 238 had some form of damage. Overall, there was no difference in graft survival between damaged and undamaged organs (p = 0.28); however, graft loss was significantly more frequent in pancreata with arterial damage (p = 0.04) and in those with parenchymal damage (p = 0.05). Damage to the pancreas during organ recovery is more common than other organs, and meticulous surgical technique and awareness of damage risk factors are essential to reduce rates of procurement-related injuries. PMID:26484838

  10. In vivo imaging of VMAT2 in pancreas using a 18F epoxide derivative of tetrabenazine

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Hank F.; Lieberman, Brian P.; Zhuang, Zhi-Ping; Oya, Shunichi; Kung, Mei-Ping; Choi, Seok Rye; Poessl, Karl; Blankemeyer, Eric; Hou, Catherine; Skovronsky, Daniel; Kilbourn, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Development of imaging agents for pancreatic beta cell mass may provide tools for studying insulin-secreting beta cells and their relationship with diabetes mellitus. In this paper a new imaging agent, [18F](+)-2-oxiranyl-3-isobutyl-9-(3-fluoropropoxy)-10-methoxy-2,3,4,6,7,11b-hexahydro-1H-pyrido[2,1-a]isoquinoline [18F](+)4, which displays properties targeting vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) binding sites of beta cells in the pancreas, was evaluated as a PET (positron emission tomography) agent for estimating beta cell mass in vivo. The hydrolyzable epoxide group of (+)4 may provide a mechanism for shifting biodistribution from liver to kidney thus, reducing the background signal. Methods Both 18F and 19F labeled (+) and (−) isomers of 4 were synthesized and evaluated. Organ distribution was carried out in normal rats. Uptake of [18F](+)4 in pancreas of normal rats was measured and correlated with blocking studies using competing drugs, (+)dihydrotetrabenazine, (+)-DTBZ or 9-fluoropropyl-(+)dihydro tetrabenazine (FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2). Results In vitro binding study of VMAT2 using rat brain striatum showed a Ki value of 0.08 and 0.15 nM for the (+)4 and (±)4, respectively. The in vivo biodistribution of [18F](+)4 in rats showed the highest uptake in the pancreas (2.68 %ID/g at 60 min post-injection). In vivo competition experiments with cold FP-(+)-DTBZ, (+)2, (3.5 mg/kg, 5 min iv pretreatment) led to a significant reduction of pancreas uptake (85 % blockade at 60 min). The inactive isomer [18F](−)4 showed significantly lower pancreas uptake (0.22 %ID/g at 30 min post-injection). Animal PET imaging studies of [18F](+)4 in normal rats demonstrated an avid pancreatic uptake in rats. Conclusion The preliminary results suggest that the epoxide, [18F](+)4, is highly selective in binding to VMAT2 and it has an excellent uptake in the pancreas of rats. The liver uptake was significantly reduced through the use of the epoxide group. Therefore, it

  11. Targeting notch pathway enhances rapamycin antitumor activity in pancreas cancers through PTEN phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pancreas cancer is one of most aggressive human cancers with the survival rate for patients with metastatic pancreas cancer at 5-6 months. The poor survival demonstrates a clear need for better target identification, drug development and new therapeutic strategies. Recent discoveries have shown that the role for Notch pathway is important in both development and cancer. Its contribution to oncogenesis also involves crosstalks with other growth factor pathways, such as Akt and its modulator, PTEN. The mounting evidence supporting a role for Notch in cancer promotion and survival suggests that targeting this pathway alone or in combination with other therapeutics represents a promising therapeutic strategy. Results Using a pancreas cancer tissue microarray, we noted that Jagged1, Notch3 and Notch4 are overexpressed in pancreas tumors (26%, 84% and 31% respectively), whereas Notch1 is expressed in blood vessels. While there was no correlation between Notch receptor expression and survival, stage or tumor grade, Notch3 was associated with Jagged1 and EGFR expression, suggesting a unique relationship between Notch3 and Jagged1. Inhibition of the Notch pathway genetically and with gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI) resulted in tumor suppression and enhanced cell death. The observed anti-tumor activity appeared to be through Akt and modulation of PTEN phosphorylation. We discovered that transcriptional regulation of RhoA by Notch is important for PTEN phosphorylation. Finally, the mTOR inhibitor Rapamycin enhanced the effect of GSI on RhoA expression, resulting in down regulation of phospho-Akt and increased in vitro tumor cytotoxity. Conclusions Notch pathway plays an important role in maintaining pancreas tumor phenotype. Targeting this pathway represents a reasonable strategy for the treatment of pancreas cancers. Notch modulates the Akt pathway through regulation of PTEN phosphorylation, an observation that has not been made previously. Furthermore, we

  12. Pancreas segmentation from 3D abdominal CT images using patient-specific weighted subspatial probabilistic atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasawa, Kenichi; Oda, Masahiro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Nimura, Yukitaka; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Rueckert, Daniel; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal organ segmentations from CT volumes are now widely used in the computer-aided diagnosis and surgery assistance systems. Among abdominal organs, the pancreas is especially difficult to segment because of its large individual differences of the shape and position. In this paper, we propose a new pancreas segmentation method from 3D abdominal CT volumes using patient-specific weighted-subspatial probabilistic atlases. First of all, we perform normalization of organ shapes in training volumes and an input volume. We extract the Volume Of Interest (VOI) of the pancreas from the training volumes and an input volume. We divide each training VOI and input VOI into some cubic regions. We use a nonrigid registration method to register these cubic regions of the training VOI to corresponding regions of the input VOI. Based on the registration results, we calculate similarities between each cubic region of the training VOI and corresponding region of the input VOI. We select cubic regions of training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region. We subspatially construct probabilistic atlases weighted by the similarities in each cubic region. After integrating these probabilistic atlases in cubic regions into one, we perform a rough-to-precise segmentation of the pancreas using the atlas. The results of the experiments showed that utilization of the training volumes having the top N similarities in each cubic region led good results of the pancreas segmentation. The Jaccard Index and the average surface distance of the result were 58.9% and 2.04mm on average, respectively.

  13. 75 FR 75176 - Gastrointestinal Drugs Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... specialized proteins called enzymes. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is a decreased ability to digest food due to deficient enzyme production by the pancreas. FDA intends to make background material...

  14. HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ Matching in Pancreas Transplantation: Effect on Graft Rejection and Survival.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, E N; Dunn, T B; Mauer, D; Noreen, H; Sutherland, D E R; Kandaswamy, R; Finger, E B

    2016-08-01

    To enhance selection of appropriate deceased donors for pancreas transplants, we sought to determine whether HLA matching improved posttransplantation outcomes. In this single-center study of 1219 pancreas transplants, we correlated posttransplantation outcomes with HLA-A, -B, -C, -DR, and -DQ matches and mismatches. Rejection was linearly correlated with the number of mismatches. The individual number of HLA mismatches reached significance at four or more with a 2.3- to 2.9-fold increase in rejection. The effect was most predominant with HLA-B (1.8-fold with one mismatch and 2.0-fold with two mismatches) and -DR (1.9-fold with two mismatches) loci, whereas HLA-A, -C, and -DQ matches or mismatches did not independently predict acute rejection. The affect was strongest in solitary pancreas transplants, with little impact for simultaneous pancreas and kidney (SPK). In contrast, HLA matching did not affect graft or patient survival rates but was associated with a reduced risk of opportunistic infection. Avoidance of acute rejection saved an estimated $32 000 for solitary pancreas recipients and $52 000 for SPK recipients in hospital costs. Our data do not support the use of HLA matching for predicting pancreas graft survival but do support its significance for the reduction of acute rejection, particularly for solitary pancreas recipients. PMID:26814363

  15. Complete rupture of the pancreas after a kick into the abdomen during a football match

    PubMed Central

    Papalampros, Alexandros; Fard-Aghaie, Mohammad; Maghsoudi, Tina; Oldhafer, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic injury is uncommon, accounting for less than 7% of penetrating and 5% of blunt abdominal trauma. Blunt isolated pancreatic trauma in football has been rarely described in the literature and its diagnosis, detection and treatment still remains a challenge. We report a case of a young adult with an isolated complete rupture of the pancreatic body due to a blunt abdominal trauma during a football game. In order to preserve the pancreas and therefore retain function, we performed a terminolateral pancreaticojejunostomy. The postoperative course of the patient was uneventful. The diagnosis of isolated injuries of the pancreas in blunt abdominal trauma can be difficult and challenging and due to the nature of the game physicians should be highly alerted when dealing with football players sustaining abdominal trauma. PMID:24891482

  16. Detection of Circulating Pancreas Epithelial Cells in Patients with Pancreatic Cystic Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rhim, Andrew D.; Thege, Fredrik I.; Santana, Steven M.; Lannin, Timothy B.; Saha, Trisha N.; Tsai, Shannon; Maggs, Lara R.; Kochman, Michael L.; Ginsberg, Gregory G.; Lieb, John G.; Chandrasekhara, Vinay; Drebin, Jeffrey A.; Ahmad, Nuzhat; Yang, Yu-Xiao; Kirby, Brian J.; Stanger, Ben Z.

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous dissemination is thought to be a late event in cancer progression. We showed recently that pancreas cells can be detected in the bloodstream before tumor formation, in a genetic model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). To confirm these findings in humans, we used microfluidic geometrically enhanced immunocapture to detect circulating pancreas epithelial cells (CECs) in patient blood samples. We captured >3 CECs/ml in 7 of 21 (33%) of patients with cystic lesions and no clinical diagnosis of cancer (Sendai criteria negative), 8 of 11 (73%) with PDAC, and in 0 of 19 patients without cysts or cancer (controls). These findings indicate that cancer cells are present in the circulation of patients before tumors develop, which might be used in risk assessment. PMID:24333829

  17. Experimental ablation of the pancreas with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Biao; Li, Yu-Yuan; Jia, Lin; Nie, Yu-Qiang; Du, Hong; Jiang, Shu-Man

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility and safety of high intensity focused ultrasound's (HIFU) in pancreatic diseases. Twelve pigs were divided into three groups. The pancreases of pigs in Group A were ablated directly with HIFU, but those in Group B and C ablated by extracorporeal HIFU. The pigs in Group C were sacrificed at day 7 after HIFU. Serological parameters were determined pre-operation and post-operation. The entire pancreas was removed for histological examination. Each animal tolerate the HIFU ablation well. The complete necrosis was observed in targeted regions. The margins of the necrotic regions were clearly delineated from the surrounding normal tissues. Infiltration of inflammatory cells and phorocytosis on the boundary were found in group C. Blood and urine amylase levels were relatively steady after HIFU. No acute pancreatitis or severe complications occurred. In conclusion, HIFU ablation on the pancreas was safe and effective in experimental pigs. PMID:21197259

  18. Pancreas-Specific Delivery of β-Cell Proliferating Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xueshi; Jin, Qihui; Va, Porino; Li, Chun; Shen, Weijun; Laffitte, Bryan; Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-06-01

    Our research groups recently described a series of small-molecule inducers of β-cell proliferation that could be used to increase β-cell mass. To mitigate the risk of nonspecific proliferation of other cell types, we devised a delivery strategy built on the tissue specificity observed in the experimental β-cell imaging agent (+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ). The β-cell proliferator agent aminopyrazine (AP) was covalently linked with (+)-DTBZ to afford conjugates that retain both the proliferation activity and binding affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). In vivo mouse tissue distribution studies of a prototypical AP-DTBZ conjugate showed 15-fold pancreas exposure over plasma. Tissue-to-plasma ratios in liver and kidneys were two- and five-fold, respectively. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced delivery of β-cell-proliferating molecules to the pancreas by leveraging the intrinsic tissue specificity of a β-cell imaging agent. PMID:27095073

  19. Adjuvant therapy for pancreas cancer in an era of value based cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Daniel H.; Williams, Terence M.; Goldstein, Daniel A.; El-Rayes, Bassel; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios

    2016-01-01

    In resected pancreas cancer, adjuvant therapy improves outcomes and is considered the standard of care for patients who recover sufficiently post operatively. Chemotherapy or combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy (chemoradiation; CRT) are strategies used in the adjuvant setting. However, there is a lack of evidence to suggest whether the addition of RT to chemotherapy translates to an improvement in clinical outcomes. This is true even when accounting for the subset of patients with a higher risk for recurrence, such as those with R1 and lymph node positive disease. When considering the direct and indirect costs, impact on quality of life and questionable added clinical benefit, the true “net health benefit” from added RT to chemotherapy becomes more uncertain. Future directions, including the utilization of modern RT, integration of novel therapies, and intensifying chemotherapy regimens may improve outcomes in resected pancreas cancer. PMID:26620819

  20. Fault Detection and Safety in Closed-Loop Artificial Pancreas Systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion pumps and continuous glucose monitors enable individuals with type 1 diabetes to achieve tighter blood glucose control and are critical components in a closed-loop artificial pancreas. Insulin infusion sets can fail and continuous glucose monitor sensor signals can suffer from a variety of anomalies, including signal dropout and pressure-induced sensor attenuations. In addition to hardware-based failures, software and human-induced errors can cause safety-related problems. Techniques for fault detection, safety analyses, and remote monitoring techniques that have been applied in other industries and applications, such as chemical process plants and commercial aircraft, are discussed and placed in the context of a closed-loop artificial pancreas. PMID:25049365