Science.gov

Sample records for exon1 n-terminus triggers

  1. Polyglutamine disruption of the huntingtin exon1 N-terminus triggers a complex aggregation mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ashwani K.; Jayaraman, Murali; Mishra, Rakesh; Thakur, Monika; Chellgren, Veronique M.; Byeon, In-Ja; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Kodali, Ravindra; Creamer, Trevor P.; Conway, James F.; M.Gronenborn, Angela; Wetzel, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Simple polyglutamine (polyQ) peptides aggregate in vitro via a nucleated growth pathway directly yielding amyloid-like aggregates. We show here that the 17 amino acid flanking sequence (httNT) N-terminal to the polyQ in the toxic huntingtin exon1 fragment imparts onto this peptide a complex alternative aggregation mechanism. In isolation the httNT peptide is a compact coil that resists aggregation. When polyQ is fused to this sequence, it induces in httNT, in a repeat-length dependent fashion, a more extended conformation that greatly enhances its aggregation into globular oligomers with httNT cores and exposed polyQ. In a second step, a new, amyloid-like aggregate is formed with a core composed of both httNT and polyQ. The results indicate unprecedented complexity in how primary sequence controls aggregation within a substantially disordered peptide, and have implications for the molecular mechanism of Huntington's disease. PMID:19270701

  2. Phosphorylation of SDT repeats in the MDC1 N terminus triggers retention of NBS1 at the DNA damage–modified chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Melander, Fredrik; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Falck, Jacob; Bartek, Jiri; Mailand, Niels; Lukas, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) trigger accumulation of the MRE11–RAD50–Nijmegen breakage syndrome 1 (NBS1 [MRN]) complex, whose retention on the DSB-flanking chromatin facilitates survival. Chromatin retention of MRN requires the MDC1 adaptor protein, but the mechanism behind the MRN–MDC1 interaction is unknown. We show that the NBS1 subunit of MRN interacts with the MDC1 N terminus enriched in Ser-Asp-Thr (SDT) repeats. This interaction was constitutive and mediated by binding between the phosphorylated SDT repeats of MDC1 and the phosphate-binding forkhead-associated domain of NBS1. Phosphorylation of the SDT repeats by casein kinase 2 (CK2) was sufficient to trigger MDC1–NBS1 interaction in vitro, and MDC1 associated with CK2 activity in cells. Inhibition of CK2 reduced SDT phosphorylation in vivo, and disruption of the SDT-associated phosphoacceptor sites prevented the retention of NBS1 at DSBs. Together, these data suggest that phosphorylation of the SDT repeats in the MDC1 N terminus functions to recruit NBS1 and, thereby, increases the local concentration of MRN at the sites of chromosomal breakage. PMID:18411307

  3. Aberrant splicing of HTT generates the pathogenic exon 1 protein in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Sathasivam, Kirupa; Neueder, Andreas; Gipson, Theresa A; Landles, Christian; Benjamin, Agnesska C; Bondulich, Marie K; Smith, Donna L; Faull, Richard L M; Roos, Raymund A C; Howland, David; Detloff, Peter J; Housman, David E; Bates, Gillian P

    2013-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is a devastating, late-onset, inherited neurodegenerative disorder that manifests with personality changes, movement disorders, and cognitive decline. It is caused by a CAG repeat expansion in exon 1 of the HTT gene that translates to a polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein (HTT). The formation of HTT fragments has been implicated as an essential step in the molecular pathogenesis of HD and several proteases that cleave HTT have been identified. However, the importance of smaller N-terminal fragments has been highlighted by their presence in HD postmortem brains and by the fact that nuclear inclusions are only detected by antibodies to the N terminus of HTT. Despite an intense research effort, the precise length of these fragments and the mechanism by which they are generated remains unknown. Here we show that CAG repeat length-dependent aberrant splicing of exon 1 HTT results in a short polyadenylated mRNA that is translated into an exon 1 HTT protein. Given that mutant exon 1 HTT proteins have consistently been shown to be highly pathogenic in HD mouse models, the aberrant splicing of HTT mRNA provides a mechanistic basis for the molecular pathogenesis of HD. RNA-targeted therapeutic strategies designed to lower the levels of HTT are under development. Many of these approaches would not prevent the production of exon 1 HTT and should be reviewed in light of our findings. PMID:23341618

  4. Novel P2 promoter-derived HNF4{alpha} isoforms with different N-terminus generated by alternate exon insertion

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Jianmin; Levitsky, Lynne L.; Rhoads, David B.

    2009-04-15

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha} (HNF4{alpha}) is a critical transcription factor for pancreas and liver development and functions in islet {beta} cells to maintain glucose homeostasis. Mutations in the human HNF4A gene lead to maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY1) and polymorphisms are associated with increased risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Expression of six HNF4{alpha} variants, three each from two developmentally regulated promoters, has been firmly established. We have now detected a new set of HNF4{alpha} variants designated HNF4{alpha}10-12 expressed from distal promoter P2. These variants, generated by inclusion of previously undetected exon 1E (human = 222 nt, rodent = 136 nt) following exon 1D have an altered N-terminus but identical remaining reading frame. HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 are expressed in pancreatic islets (and liver) and exhibit transactivation potentials similar to the corresponding {alpha}7-{alpha}9 isoforms. DNA-binding analyses implied much higher protein levels of HNF4{alpha}10-{alpha}12 in liver than expected from the RT-PCR data. Our results provide evidence for a more complex expression pattern of HNF4{alpha} than previously appreciated. We recommend inclusion of exon 1E and nearby DNA sequences in screening for HNF4{alpha} mutations and polymorphisms in genetic analyses of MODY1 and T2DM.

  5. Novel Archaeal Adhesion Pilins with a Conserved N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Esquivel, Rianne N.; Xu, Rachel

    2013-01-01

    Type IV pili play important roles in a wide array of processes, including surface adhesion and twitching motility. Although archaeal genomes encode a diverse set of type IV pilus subunits, the functions for most remain unknown. We have now characterized six Haloferax volcanii pilins, PilA[1-6], each containing an identical 30-amino-acid N-terminal hydrophobic motif that is part of a larger highly conserved domain of unknown function (Duf1628). Deletion mutants lacking up to five of the six pilin genes display no significant adhesion defects; however, H. volcanii lacking all six pilins (ΔpilA[1-6]) does not adhere to glass or plastic. Consistent with these results, the expression of any one of these pilins in trans is sufficient to produce functional pili in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain. PilA1His and PilA2His only partially rescue this phenotype, whereas ΔpilA[1-6] strains expressing PilA3His or PilA4His adhere even more strongly than the parental strain. Most surprisingly, expressing either PilA5His or PilA6His in the ΔpilA[1-6] strain results in microcolony formation. A hybrid protein in which the conserved N terminus of the mature PilA1His is replaced with the corresponding N domain of FlgA1 is processed by the prepilin peptidase, but it does not assemble functional pili, leading us to conclude that Duf1628 can be annotated as the N terminus of archaeal PilA adhesion pilins. Finally, the pilin prediction program, FlaFind, which was trained primarily on archaeal flagellin sequences, was successfully refined to more accurately predict pilins based on the in vivo verification of PilA[1-6]. PMID:23794623

  6. Phosphorylation and Ionic Strength Alter the LRAP-HAP Interface in the N-terminus

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Junxia; Xu, Yimin; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2013-04-02

    strength when phosphorylated. These observations suggest that ionic strength and dephosphorylation may provide switching mechanisms to trigger a change in the function of the N-terminus. This research was supported by NIH-NIDCR Grant DE-015347. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a facility operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Solid Phase Formylation of N-Terminus Peptides.

    PubMed

    Tornesello, Anna Lucia; Sanseverino, Marina; Buonaguro, Franco Maria

    2016-01-01

    Formylation of amino groups is a critical reaction involved in several biological processes including post-translational modification of histones. The addition of a formyl group (CHO) to the N-terminal end of a peptide chain generates biologically active molecules. N-formyl-peptides can be produced by different methods. We performed the N-formylation of two chemotactic hexapetides, Met1-Leu2-Lys3-Leu4-Ile5-Val6 and Met1-Met2-Tyr3-Ala4-Leu5-Phe6, carrying out the reaction directly on peptidyl-resin following pre-activation of formic acid with N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimmide (DCC) in liquid phase. The overnight incubation at 4 °C resulted in a significant increase in production yields of formylated peptides compared to the reaction performed at room temperature. The method is consistently effective, rapid, and inexpensive. Moreover, the synthetic strategy can be applied for the formylation of all primary amines at N-terminus of peptide chains or amino groups of lysine side-chains in solid phase. PMID:27271589

  8. Acetylation within the First 17 Residues of Huntingtin Exon 1 Alters Aggregation and Lipid Binding.

    PubMed

    Chaibva, Maxmore; Jawahery, Sudi; Pilkington, Albert W; Arndt, James R; Sarver, Olivia; Valentine, Stephen; Matysiak, Silvina; Legleiter, Justin

    2016-07-26

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) domain near the N-terminus of the huntingtin (htt) protein. Expanded polyQ leads to htt aggregation. The first 17 amino acids (Nt(17)) in htt comprise a lipid-binding domain that undergoes a number of posttranslational modifications that can modulate htt toxicity and subcellular localization. As there are three lysines within Nt(17), we evaluated the impact of lysine acetylation on htt aggregation in solution and on model lipid bilayers. Acetylation of htt-exon1(51Q) and synthetic truncated htt-exon 1 mimicking peptides (Nt(17)-Q35-P10-KK) was achieved using a selective covalent label, sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHSA). With this treatment, all three lysine residues (K6, K9, and K15) in Nt(17) were significantly acetylated. N-terminal htt acetylation retarded fibril formation in solution and promoted the formation of larger globular aggregates. Acetylated htt also bound lipid membranes and disrupted the lipid bilayer morphology less aggressively compared with the wild-type. Computational studies provided mechanistic insights into how acetylation alters the interaction of Nt(17) with lipid membranes. Our results highlight that N-terminal acetylation influences the aggregation of htt and its interaction with lipid bilayers. PMID:27463137

  9. N-terminus regulation of VMAT2 mediates methamphetamine stimulated efflux

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Brian; Ruoho, Arnold E.

    2014-01-01

    The 20 amino acid N-terminus of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) was examined as a regulator of VMAT2 function. Removal of the first 16 or 19 amino acids of the N-terminus resulted in a molecule with reduced ability to sequester [3H]-5HT. A GST-construct of the N-terminus underwent phosphorylation in the presence of PKC at serines 15 and 18. These putative phosphorylation sites were examined for effects on function. Phospho-mimetic substitution of serines 15 and 18 with aspartate in the full-length VMAT2 resulted in reduced [3H]-5HT sequestration and reduced methamphetamine-stimulated efflux of preloaded [3H]-5HT. In contrast, mutation of serines 15 and 18 to alanines maintained intact net substrate sequestration but eliminated methamphetamine-stimulated efflux of pre-accumulated [3H]-5HT. In summary, these data suggest a model in which the VMAT2 N-terminus regulates monoamine sequestration. PMID:24321511

  10. The N-terminus of TDP-43 promotes its oligomerization and enhances DNA binding affinity

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chung-ke; Wu, Tzong-Huah; Wu, Chu-Ya; Chiang, Ming-hui; Toh, Elsie Khai-Woon; Hsu, Yin-Chih; Lin, Ku-Feng; Liao, Yu-heng; Huang, Tai-huang; Huang, Joseph Jen-Tse

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The N-terminus of TDP-43 contains an independently folded structural domain (NTD). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural domains of TDP-43 are arranged in a beads-on-a-string fashion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD promotes TDP-43 oligomerization in a concentration-dependent manner. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The NTD may assist nucleic acid-binding activity of TDP-43. -- Abstract: TDP-43 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein associated with different neurodegenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD-U). Here, the structural and physical properties of the N-terminus on TDP-43 have been carefully characterized through a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence anisotropy studies. We demonstrate for the first time the importance of the N-terminus in promoting TDP-43 oligomerization and enhancing its DNA-binding affinity. An unidentified structural domain in the N-terminus is also disclosed. Our findings provide insights into the N-terminal domain function of TDP-43.

  11. Identification of Novel Potentially Toxic Oligomers Formed in Vitro from Mammalian-derived Expanded huntingtin Exon-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, Leslie G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Feng, Xia; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Miller, Jason; Yang, Guocheng; Ratovitski, Tamara; Delannoy, Michael; Muchowski, Paul J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Legleiter, Justin; Ross, Christopher A.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that arises from an expanded polyglutamine region in the N terminus of the HD gene product, huntingtin. Protein inclusions comprised of N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are a characteristic feature of disease, though are likely to play a protective role rather than a causative one in neurodegeneration. Soluble oligomeric assemblies of huntingtin formed early in the aggregation process are candidate toxic species in HD. In the present study, we established an in vitro system to generate recombinant huntingtin in mammalian cells. Using both denaturing and native gel analysis, we have identified novel oligomeric forms of mammalian-derived expanded huntingtin exon-1 N-terminal fragment. These species are transient and were not previously detected using bacterially expressed exon-1 protein. Importantly, these species are recognized by 3B5H10, an antibody that recognizes a two-stranded hairpin conformation of expanded polyglutamine believed to be associated with a toxic form of huntingtin. Interestingly, comparable oligomeric species were not observed for expanded huntingtin shortstop, a 117-amino acid fragment of huntingtin shown previously in mammalian cell lines and transgenic mice, and here in primary cortical neurons, to be non-toxic. Further, we demonstrate that expanded huntingtin shortstop has a reduced ability to form amyloid-like fibrils characteristic of the aggregation pathway for toxic expanded polyglutamine proteins. Taken together, these data provide a possible candidate toxic species in HD. In addition, these studies demonstrate the fundamental differences in early aggregation events between mutant huntingtin exon-1 and shortstop proteins that may underlie the differences in toxicity. PMID:22433867

  12. Structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus: implications for predisposition to Lynch syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Kerr, Iain D.; Min, Jinrong

    2015-07-28

    The crystal structure of the human MLH1 N-terminus is reported at 2.30 Å resolution. The overall structure is described along with an analysis of two clinically important mutations. Mismatch repair prevents the accumulation of erroneous insertions/deletions and non-Watson–Crick base pairs in the genome. Pathogenic mutations in the MLH1 gene are associated with a predisposition to Lynch and Turcot’s syndromes. Although genetic testing for these mutations is available, robust classification of variants requires strong clinical and functional support. Here, the first structure of the N-terminus of human MLH1, determined by X-ray crystallography, is described. The structure shares a high degree of similarity with previously determined prokaryotic MLH1 homologs; however, this structure affords a more accurate platform for the classification of MLH1 variants.

  13. Cadherin adhesion depends on a salt bridge at the N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Oliver J; Corps, Elaine M; Kilshaw, Peter J

    2005-09-15

    There is now considerable evidence that cell adhesion by cadherins requires a strand exchange process in which the second amino acid at the N-terminus of the cadherin molecule, Trp2, docks into a hydrophobic pocket in the domain fold of the opposing cadherin. Here we show that strand exchange depends on a salt bridge formed between the N-terminal amino group of one cadherin molecule and the acidic side chain of Glu89 of the other. Prevention of this bond in N-cadherin by introducing the mutation Glu89Ala or by extending the N-terminus with additional amino acids strongly inhibited strand exchange. But when the two modifications were present in opposing cadherin molecules respectively, they acted in a complementary manner, lowering activation energy for strand exchange and greatly increasing the strength of the adhesive interaction. N-cadherin that retained an uncleaved prodomain or lacked Trp2 adhered strongly to the Glu89Ala mutant but not to wild-type molecules. Similarly, N-cadherin in which the hydrophobic acceptor pocket was blocked by an isoleucine side chain adhered to a partner that had an extended N-terminus. We explain these results in terms of the free energy changes that accompany strand exchange. Our findings provide new insight into the mechanism of adhesion and demonstrate the feasibility of greatly increasing cadherin affinity. PMID:16118243

  14. Monoclonal antibodies against the muscle-specific N-terminus of dystrophin: Characterization of dystrophin in a muscular dystrophy patient with a frameshift deletion of Exons 3-7

    SciTech Connect

    Thanh, L. T.; Man, N. thi; Morris, G.E. ); Love, D.R.; Davies, K.E. ); Helliwell, T.R. )

    1993-07-01

    The first three exons of the human muscle dystrophin gene were expressed as a [beta]-galactosidase fusion protein. 1-his protein was then used to prepare two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which react with native dystrophin on frozen muscle sections and with denatured dystrophin on western blots but which do not cross-react with the distrophin-related protein, utrophin. Both mAbs recognized dystrophin in muscular dystrophy (MD) patients with deletions of exon 3, and further mapping with 11 overlapping synthetic peptides showed that they both recognize an epitope encoded by the muscle-specific exon 1. Neither mAb recognizes the brain dystrophin isoform, confirming the prediction from mRNA data that this has a different N-terminus. One Becker MD patient with a frameshift deletion of exons 3-7 is shown to produce dystrophin which reacts with the N-terminal mAbs, as well as with mAbs which bind on the C-terminal side of the deletion. The data suggest that transcription begins at the normal muscle dystrophin promoter and that the normal reading frame is restored after the deletion. A number of mechanisms have been proposed for restoration of the reading frame after deletion of exons 3-7, but those which predict dystrophin with an abnormal N-terminus do not appear to be major mechanisms in this patient. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence and Src regulator.

    PubMed

    Dunajová, Lucia; Cash, Emily; Markus, Robert; Rochette, Sophie; Townley, Amelia R; Wheatley, Sally P

    2016-07-15

    Survivin (also known as BIRC5) is a cancer-associated protein that exists in several locations in the cell. Its cytoplasmic residence in interphase cells is governed by CRM1 (also known as XPO1)-mediated nuclear exportation, and its localisation during mitosis to the centromeres and midzone microtubules is that of a canonical chromosomal passenger protein. In addition to these well-established locations, survivin is also a mitochondrial protein, but how it gets there and its function therein is presently unclear. Here, we show that the first ten amino acids at the N-terminus of survivin are sufficient to target GFP to the mitochondria in vivo, and ectopic expression of this decapeptide decreases cell adhesion and accelerates proliferation. The data support a signalling mechanism in which this decapeptide regulates the tyrosine kinase Src, leading to reduced focal adhesion plaques and disruption of F-actin organisation. This strongly suggests that the N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence that regulates Src, and that survivin acts in concert with Src to promote tumorigenesis. PMID:27246243

  16. A molecular genetic dissection of the evolutionarily conserved N terminus of yeast Rad52.

    PubMed Central

    Mortensen, Uffe H; Erdeniz, Naz; Feng, Qi; Rothstein, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    Rad52 is a DNA-binding protein that stimulates the annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA. Only the N terminus of Rad52 is evolutionarily conserved; it contains the core activity of the protein, including its DNA-binding activity. To identify amino acid residues that are important for Rad52 function(s), we systematically replaced 76 of 165 amino acid residues in the N terminus with alanine. These substitutions were examined for their effects on the repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA damage and on both interchromosomal and direct repeat heteroallelic recombination. This analysis identified five regions that are required for efficient gamma-ray damage repair or mitotic recombination. Two regions, I and II, also contain the classic mutations, rad52-2 and rad52-1, respectively. Interestingly, four of the five regions contain mutations that impair the ability to repair gamma-ray-induced DNA damage yet still allow mitotic recombinants to be produced at rates that are similar to or higher than those obtained with wild-type strains. In addition, a new class of separation-of-function mutation that is only partially deficient in the repair of gamma-ray damage, but exhibits decreased mitotic recombination similar to rad52 null strains, was identified. These results suggest that Rad52 protein acts differently on lesions that occur spontaneously during the cell cycle than on those induced by gamma-irradiation. PMID:12072453

  17. The N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence and Src regulator

    PubMed Central

    Dunajová, Lucia; Cash, Emily; Markus, Robert; Rochette, Sophie; Townley, Amelia R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Survivin (also known as BIRC5) is a cancer-associated protein that exists in several locations in the cell. Its cytoplasmic residence in interphase cells is governed by CRM1 (also known as XPO1)-mediated nuclear exportation, and its localisation during mitosis to the centromeres and midzone microtubules is that of a canonical chromosomal passenger protein. In addition to these well-established locations, survivin is also a mitochondrial protein, but how it gets there and its function therein is presently unclear. Here, we show that the first ten amino acids at the N-terminus of survivin are sufficient to target GFP to the mitochondria in vivo, and ectopic expression of this decapeptide decreases cell adhesion and accelerates proliferation. The data support a signalling mechanism in which this decapeptide regulates the tyrosine kinase Src, leading to reduced focal adhesion plaques and disruption of F-actin organisation. This strongly suggests that the N-terminus of survivin is a mitochondrial-targeting sequence that regulates Src, and that survivin acts in concert with Src to promote tumorigenesis. PMID:27246243

  18. An N-terminal nuclear export signal regulates trafficking and aggregation of Huntingtin (Htt) protein exon 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhiqiang; Li, Aimin; Holmes, Brandon B; Marasa, Jayne C; Diamond, Marc I

    2013-03-01

    Huntington disease is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative condition caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of the huntingtin protein (Htt). The first 17 amino acids (N17) of Htt play a key role in regulating its toxicity and aggregation. Both nuclear export and cytoplasm retention functions have been ascribed to N17. We have determined that N17 acts as a nuclear export sequence (NES) within Htt exon and when fused to yellow fluorescent protein. We have defined amino acids within N17 that constitute the nuclear export sequence (NES). Mutation of any of the conserved residues increases nuclear accumulation of Htt exon 1. Nuclear export of Htt is sensitive to leptomycin B and is reduced by knockdown of exportin 1. In HEK293 cells, NES mutations decrease overall Htt aggregation but increase the fraction of cells with nuclear inclusions. In primary cultured neurons, NES mutations increase nuclear accumulation and increase overall aggregation. This work defines a bona fide nuclear export sequence within N17 and links it to effects on protein aggregation. This may help explain the important role of N17 in controlling Htt toxicity. PMID:23319588

  19. Mutational analysis of the N terminus of the protein of maize transposable element Ac.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M G; Starlinger, P

    1990-01-01

    Mutations of transposable element Ac were tested for their capability to excise themselves from their location autonomously, to be excised by an active Ac, or to act in trans in the excision of an Ac delta element. Removal of 101 amino acids from the N terminus of the Ac protein does not decrease excision. A cis-acting site between base pairs 186 and 207 is important for excision by the wild-type protein but is not necessary for excision by the truncated protein. Improvement of the sequence context of the first AUG does not have a significant effect. Mutations in a small open reading frame of Ac encoding a 102-amino acid protein do not visibly alter excision frequency. Images PMID:2166942

  20. An autophosphorylating but not transphosphorylating activity is associated with the unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 ribonucleotide reductase large subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Conner, J; Cooper, J; Furlong, J; Clements, J B

    1992-01-01

    We report on a protein kinase function encoded by the unique N terminus of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (R1). R1 expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited autophosphorylation activity in a reaction which depended on the presence of the unique N terminus. When the N terminus was separately expressed in E. coli and partially purified, a similar autophosphorylation reaction was observed. Importantly, transphosphorylation of histones and of proteins in HSV-1-infected cell extracts was also observed with purified R1 and with truncated R1 mutants in which most of the N terminus was deleted. Ion-exchange chromatography was used to separate the autophosphorylating activity of the N terminus from the transphosphorylating activity of an E. coli contaminant protein kinase. We propose a putative function for this activity of the HSV-1 R1 N terminus during the immediate-early phase of virus replication. Images PMID:1331536

  1. N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding and actin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ritu; Riento, Kirsi; Keep, Nicholas; Morris, Jonathan D H; Ridley, Anne J

    2008-04-15

    ROCK-I (Rho-associated kinase 1) is a serine/threonine kinase that can be activated by RhoA and inhibited by RhoE. ROCK-I has an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil region and a RhoA-binding domain near the C-terminus. We have previously shown that RhoE binds to the N-terminal 420 amino acids of ROCK-I, which includes the kinase domain as well as N-terminal and C-terminal extensions. In the present study, we show that N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding. The central coiled-coil domain can also dimerize ROCK-I in cells, but this is insufficient in the absence of the N-terminus to allow RhoE binding. The kinase activity of ROCK-I(1-420) is required for dimerization and RhoE binding; however, inclusion of part of the coiled-coil domain compensates for lack of kinase activity, allowing RhoE to bind. N-terminus-mediated dimerization is also required for ROCK-I to induce the formation of stellate actin stress fibres in cells. These results indicate that dimerization via the N-terminus is critical for ROCK-I function in cells and for its regulation by RhoE. PMID:18215121

  2. Effects of N-terminus modifications on the conformation and permeation activities of the synthetic peptide L1A.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Luciana Puia Moro; de Araujo, Alexandre Suman; Juliano, Maria Aparecida; Casella, Tiago; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; Ruggiero Neto, João

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the N-terminus modification of the L1A, a synthetic octadecapeptide, on its helical content, affinity and lytic action in model membranes and on its hemolytic and antibacterial activities. L1A and its acetylated analog displayed a selective antibacterial activity to Gram-negative bacteria without being hemolytic. The covalently linked 2-aminobezoic acid to the N-terminus impaired the antibacterial efficacy and increased hemolysis. Despite their lower net charge (+2), N-terminus modifications resulted in enhanced affinity and improved lytic efficiency in anionic vesicles. The analogs also showed higher helical content and consequently higher amphipathicity in these vesicles. The conformational analysis by molecular dynamics simulations in 30 % of TFE/water showed that the hydrophobic faces of the peptides are in close contact with CF3 groups of TFE while the hydrophilic faces with water molecules. Due to the loss of the amino charge, the N-termini of the analogs are buried in TFE molecules. The analysis of the pair distribution functions, obtained for the center of mass of the charged groups, has evidenced that the state of the N-terminus has influenced the possibility of different ion-pairing. The higher complexity of the bacterial cells compared with anionic vesicles hampers to establish correlations structure-function for the analogs. PMID:26920749

  3. Differences in activity of actinoporins are related with the hydrophobicity of their N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; Rodríguez-Vera, Wendy; Pedrera, Lohans; Valiente, Pedro A; Cabezas, Sheila; Lanio, María E; García-Sáez, Ana J; Alvarez, Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Actinoporins are pore-forming toxins (PFT) produced by sea anemones with molecular mass around 20 kDa and high affinity for sphingomyelin. The most studied atinoporins are sticholysins I and II (StI/StII) from Stichodactyla helianthus, equinatoxin II (EqtII) from Actinia equina, and fragaceatoxin C (FraC) from Actinia fragacea. Their N-terminal sequences encompassing residues 1-30 seem to be the best candidates for pore formation. This segment comprises an amphipathic α-helix preceded by a more or less hydrophobic segment, depending on the toxin, of around 10 amino acid residues. Although it is clear that the N-terminal is the most variable sequence in this protein family, the role of their hydrophobic segment in not fully understood. Here we show a comparison of StI, StII, EqtII, and FraC activities with that of their respective N-terminal synthetic peptides. The hemolytic and permeabilizing activity of the peptides reproduce qualitatively the behavior of their respective parental proteins and are particularly related to the hydrophobicity of the corresponding 1-10 segment. Furthermore, the dendrogram analysis of actinoporins' N-terminal sequence allows relating differences in alignment with differences in activity among the four toxins. We have also evaluated the penetration depth of the N-terminal segment of StI and StII by using Trp-containing peptide-analogs. Our data suggest that the N-terminus of StII is more deeply buried into the hydrophobic core of the bilayer than that of StI. We hypothesize that the highest activity of StII could be ascribed to a larger hydrophobic continuum, an uninterrupted sequence of non-charged mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues, of its N-terminus promoting a highest ability to partially insert in the membrane core. Moreover, as we show for four related peptides that a higher hydrophobicity contributes to increase the activity, we reinforce the notion that this property must be taken into account to design new potent

  4. Structural and dynamic evolution of the amphipathic N-terminus diversifies enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xukai; Chen, Guanjun; Wang, Lushan

    2016-08-21

    Understanding the molecular mechanism underlying protein thermostability is central to the process of efficiently engineering thermostable cellulases, which can provide potential advantages in accelerating the conversion of biomass into clean biofuels. Here, we explored the general factors that diversify enzyme thermostability in the glycoside hydrolase family 12 (GH12) using comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations coupled to a bioinformatics approach. The results indicated that protein stability is not equally distributed over the whole structure: the N-terminus is the most thermal-sensitive region of the enzymes with a β-sandwich architecture and it tends to lose its secondary structure during the course of protein unfolding. Furthermore, we found that the total interaction energy within the N-terminus is appreciably correlated with enzyme thermostability. Interestingly, the internal interactions within the N-terminus are organized in a special amphipathic pattern in which a hydrophobic packing cluster and a hydrogen bonding cluster lie at the two ends of the N-terminus. Finally, bioinformatics analysis demonstrated that the amphipathic pattern is highly conserved in GH12 and besides that, the evolution of the amino acids in the N-terminal region is an inherent mechanism underlying the diversity of enzyme thermostability. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the N-terminus is generally the structure that determines enzyme thermostability in GH12, and thereby it is also an ideal engineering target. The dynameomics study of a protein family can give a general view of protein functions, which will offer a wide range of applications in future protein engineering. PMID:27425569

  5. Specificity studies on enteropeptidase substrates related to the N-terminus of trypsinogen.

    PubMed Central

    Jenö, P; Green, J R; Lentze, M J

    1987-01-01

    The specificity of the synthetic substrate Gly-[L-Asp]4-L-Lys 2-naphthylamide originally developed for the assay of enteropeptidase (EC 3.4.21.9), was investigated with partially purified aminopeptidase. Our results indicate that, not only enteropeptidase, but also the concerted action of the aminopeptidases of the rat small intestine, can rapidly release 2-naphthylamine from the substrate. A previously undescribed, highly active, dipeptidylaminopeptidase, which hydrolyses a Gly-Asp dipeptide from the N-terminus of the substrate, was detected in rat small intestine. The resulting [L-Asp]3-L-Lys 2-naphthylamide fragment is then degraded by a combination of aminopeptidase A and N to yield free 2-naphthylamine. Thus the present substrate cannot be regarded as being specific for enteropeptidase, and its use leads to an over-estimation of enteropeptidase activity in homogenates and extracts of intestinal tissue. In order to prevent this non-specific hydrolysis by aminopeptidases, stereoisomeric substrates with the sequence L-Ala-D-Asp-[L-Asp]3-L-Lys methyl ester, D-Ala-[L-Asp]4-L-Lys methyl ester and L-Ala-[Asp]4-L-Lys methyl ester were synthesized and tested as alternative substrates by their ability to inhibit the enteropeptidase-catalysed activation of trypsinogen. PMID:3297038

  6. IUGR increases chromatin-remodeling factor Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter in newborn male rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xingrao; McKnight, Robert A; Gracey Maniar, Lia E; Sun, Ying; Callaway, Christopher W; Majnik, Amber; Lane, Robert H; Cohen, Susan S

    2015-07-15

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) increases the risk for neurodevelopment delay and neuroendocrine reprogramming in both humans and rats. Neuroendocrine reprogramming involves the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene that is epigenetically regulated in the hippocampus. Using a well-characterized rodent model, we have previously shown that IUGR increases GR exon 1.7 mRNA variant and total GR expressions in male rat pup hippocampus. Epigenetic regulation of GR transcription may involve chromatin remodeling of the GR gene. A key chromatin remodeler is Brahma-related gene-1(Brg1), a member of the ATP-dependent SWItch/Sucrose NonFermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeling complex. Brg1 regulates gene expression by affecting nucleosome repositioning and recruiting transcriptional components to target promoters. We hypothesized that IUGR would increase hippocampal Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter, as well as alter nucleosome positioning over GR promoters in newborn male pups. Further, we hypothesized that IUGR would lead to accumulation of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and RNA pol II at GR exon 1.7 promoter. Indeed, we found that IUGR increased Brg1 expression and binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter. We also found that increased Brg1 binding to GR exon 1.7 promoter was associated with accumulation of Sp1 and RNA pol II carboxy terminal domain pSer-5 (a marker of active transcription). Furthermore, the transcription start site of GR exon 1.7 was located within a nucleosome-depleted region. We speculate that changes in hippocampal Brg1 expression mediate GR expression and subsequently trigger neuroendocrine reprogramming in male IUGR rats. PMID:25972460

  7. Structural studies of the tethered N-terminus of the Alzheimer's disease amyloid-β peptide.

    PubMed

    Nisbet, Rebecca M; Nuttall, Stewart D; Robert, Remy; Caine, Joanne M; Dolezal, Olan; Hattarki, Meghan; Pearce, Lesley A; Davydova, Natalia; Masters, Colin L; Varghese, Jose N; Streltsov, Victor A

    2013-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease is the most common form of dementia in humans and is related to the accumulation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and its interaction with metals (Cu, Fe, and Zn) in the brain. Crystallographic structural information about Aβ peptide deposits and the details of the metal-binding site is limited owing to the heterogeneous nature of aggregation states formed by the peptide. Here, we present a crystal structure of Aβ residues 1-16 fused to the N-terminus of the Escherichia coli immunity protein Im7, and stabilized with the fragment antigen binding fragment of the anti-Aβ N-terminal antibody WO2. The structure demonstrates that Aβ residues 10-16, which are not in complex with the antibody, adopt a mixture of local polyproline II-helix and turn type conformations, enhancing cooperativity between the two adjacent histidine residues His13 and His14. Furthermore, this relatively rigid region of Aβ (residues, 10-16) appear as an almost independent unit available for trapping metal ions and provides a rationale for the His13-metal-His14 coordination in the Aβ1-16 fragment implicated in Aβ metal binding. This novel structure, therefore, has the potential to provide a foundation for investigating the effect of metal ion binding to Aβ and illustrates a potential target for the development of future Alzheimer's disease therapeutics aimed at stabilizing the N-terminal monomer structure, in particular residues His13 and His14, and preventing Aβ metal-binding-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23609990

  8. Localization of the Intracellular Activity Domain of Pasteurella multocida Toxin to the N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Brenda A.; Ponferrada, Virgilio G.; Vallance, Jefferson E.; Ho, Mengfei

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) directly causes transient activation of Gqα protein that is coupled to phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase Cβ1 in Xenopus oocytes (B. A. Wilson, X. Zhu, M. Ho, and L. Lu, J. Biol. Chem. 272:1268–1275, 1997). We found that antibodies directed against an N-terminal peptide of PMT inhibited the toxin-induced response in Xenopus oocytes, but antibodies against a C-terminal peptide did not. To test whether the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N terminus, we conducted a deletion mutational analysis of the PMT protein, using the Xenopus oocyte system as a means of screening for toxin activity. Using PCR and conventional cloning techniques, we cloned from a toxinogenic strain of P. multocida the entire toxA gene, encoding the 1,285-amino-acid PMT protein, and expressed the recombinant toxin as a His-tagged fusion protein in Escherichia coli. We subsequently generated a series of N-terminal and C-terminal deletion mutants and expressed the His-tagged PMT fragments in E. coli. These proteins were screened for cytotoxic activity on cultured Vero cells and for intracellular activity in the Xenopus oocyte system. Only the full-length protein without the His tag exhibited activity on Vero cells. The full-length PMT and N-terminal fragments containing the first 500 residues elicited responses in oocytes, but the C-terminal 780 amino acid fragment did not. Our results confirm that the intracellular activity domain of PMT is localized to the N-terminal 500 amino acids of the protein and that the C terminus is required for entry into cells. PMID:9864199

  9. Deconstructing honeybee vitellogenin: novel 40 kDa fragment assigned to its N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Halskau, Øyvind; Skjaerven, Lars; Smedal, Bente; Amdam, Gro V.

    2011-01-01

    Vitellogenin, an egg-yolk protein precursor common to oviparous animals, is found abundantly in honeybee workers – a caste of helpers that do not usually lay eggs. Instead, honeybee vitellogenin (180 kDa) participates in processes other than reproduction: it influences hormone signaling, food-related behavior, immunity, stress resistance and longevity. The molecular basis of these functions is largely unknown. Here, we establish and compare the molecular properties of vitellogenin from honeybee hemolymph (blood) and abdominal fat body, two compartments that are linked to vitellogenin functions. Our results reveal a novel 40 kDa vitellogenin fragment in abdominal fat body tissue, the main site for vitellogenin synthesis and storage. Using MALDI-TOF combined with MS/MS mass-spectroscopy, we assign the 40 kDa fragment to the N terminus of vitellogenin, whereas a previously observed 150 kDa fragment corresponded to the remainder of the protein. We show that both protein units are N glycosylated and phosphorylated. Focusing on the novel 40 kDa fragment, we present a homology model based on the structure of lamprey lipovitellin that includes a conserved β-barrel-like shape, with a lipophilic cavity in the interior and two insect-specific loops that have not been described before. Our data indicate that the honeybee fat body vitellogenin experiences cleavage unlike hemolymph vitellogenin, a pattern that can suggest a tissue-specific role. Our experiments advance the molecular understanding of vitellogenin, of which the multiple physiological and behavioral effects in honeybees are well established. PMID:21270306

  10. N-terminus-modified Hec1 suppresses tumour growth by interfering with kinetochore-microtubule dynamics.

    PubMed

    Orticello, M; Fiore, M; Totta, P; Desideri, M; Barisic, M; Passeri, D; Lenzi, J; Rosa, A; Orlandi, A; Maiato, H; Del Bufalo, D; Degrassi, F

    2015-06-01

    Mitotic proteins are attractive targets to develop molecular cancer therapeutics due to the intimate interdependence between cell proliferation and mitosis. In this work, we have explored the therapeutic potential of the kinetochore (KT) protein Hec1 (Highly Expressed in Cancer protein 1) as a molecular target to produce massive chromosome missegregation and cell death in cancer cells. Hec1 is a constituent of the Ndc80 complex, which mediates KT-microtubule (MT) attachments at mitosis and is upregulated in various cancer types. We expressed Hec1 fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) at its N-terminus MT-interaction domain in HeLa cells and showed that expression of this modified Hec1, which localized at KTs, blocked cell proliferation and promoted apoptosis in tumour cells. EGFP-Hec1 was extremely potent in tumour cell killing and more efficient than siRNA-induced Hec1 depletion. In striking contrast, normal cells showed no apparent cell proliferation defects or cell death following EGFP-Hec1 expression. Live-cell imaging demonstrated that cancer cell death was associated with massive chromosome missegregation within multipolar spindles after a prolonged mitotic arrest. Moreover, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to increase KT-MT attachment stability, providing a molecular explanation for the abnormal spindle architecture and the cytotoxic activity of this modified protein. Consistent with cell culture data, EGFP-Hec1 expression was found to strongly inhibit tumour growth in a mouse xenograft model by disrupting mitosis and inducing multipolar spindles. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that stimulation of massive chromosome segregation defects can be used as an anti-cancer strategy through the activation of mitotic catastrophe after a multipolar mitosis. Importantly, this study represents a clear proof of concept that targeting KT proteins required for proper KT-MT attachment dynamics constitutes a powerful approach in cancer therapy. PMID

  11. The N-terminus of VDAC: Structure, mutational analysis, and a potential role in regulating barrel shape.

    PubMed

    Shuvo, Sabbir R; Ferens, Fraser G; Court, Deborah A

    2016-06-01

    A novel feature of the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC, mitochondrial porin), is the barrel, comprising an odd number of β-strands and closed by parallel strands. Recent research has focused on the N-terminal segment, which in the available structures, resides in the lumen and is not part of the barrel. In this review, the structural data obtained from vertebrate VDAC are integrated with those from VDAC in artificial bilayers, emphasizing the array of native and tagged versions of VDAC used. The data are discussed with respect to a recent gating model (Zachariae et al. (2012) Structure 20:1-10), in which the N-terminus acts not as a gate on a stable barrel, but rather stabilizes the barrel, preventing its shift into a partially collapsed, low-conductance, closed state. Additionally, the role of the N-terminus in VDAC oligomerization, apoptosis through interactions with hexokinase and its interaction with ATP are discussed briefly. PMID:26997586

  12. The dual functions of the extreme N-terminus of TDP-43 in regulating its biological activity and inclusion formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Jie; Caulfield, Thomas; Xu, Ya-Fei; Gendron, Tania F; Hubbard, Jaime; Stetler, Caroline; Sasaguri, Hiroki; Whitelaw, Ena C; Cai, Shuyi; Lee, Wing Cheung; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2013-08-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is the principal component of ubiquitinated inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the most common pathological subtype of frontotemporal dementia-frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP). To date, the C-terminus of TDP-43, which is aggregation-prone and contains almost all ALS-associated mutations, has garnered much attention while the functions of the N-terminus of TDP-43 remain largely unknown. To bridge this gap in our knowledge, we utilized novel cell culture and computer-assisted models to evaluate which region(s) of TDP-43 regulate its folding, self-interaction, biological activity and aggregation. We determined that the extreme N-terminus of TDP-43, specifically the first 10 residues, regulates folding of TDP-43 monomers necessary for proper homodimerization and TDP-43-regulated splicing. Despite such beneficial functions, we discovered an interesting dichotomy: full-length TDP-43 aggregation, which is believed to be a pathogenic process, also requires the extreme N-terminus of TDP-43. As such, we provide new insight into the structural basis for TDP-43 function and aggregation, and we suggest that stabilization of TDP-43 homodimers, the physiologically active form of TDP-43, may be a promising therapeutic strategy for ALS and FTLD-TDP. PMID:23575225

  13. The N-terminus of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) nonstructural protein 2 modulates viral genome RNA replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wu, Rui; Zheng, Fengwei; Zhao, Cheng; Pan, Zishu

    2015-12-01

    Pestivirus nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) is a multifunctional, hydrophobic protein with an important but poorly understood role in viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. In the present study, based on sequence analysis, we mutated several representative conserved residues within the N-terminus of NS2 of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) and investigated how these mutations affected viral RNA replication and infectious virus production. Our results demonstrated that the mutation of two aspartic acids, NS2/D60A or NS2/D60K and NS2/D78K, in the N-terminus of NS2 abolished infectious virus production and that the substitution of arginine for alanine at position 100 (NS2/R100A) resulted in significantly decreased viral titer. The serial passage of cells containing viral genomic RNA molecules generated the revertants NS2/A60D, NS2/K60D and NS2/K78D, leading to the recovery of infectious virus. In the context of the NS2/R100A mutant, the NS2/I90L mutation compensated for infectious virus production. The regulatory roles of the indicated amino acid residues were identified to occur at the viral RNA replication level. These results revealed a novel function for the NS2 N-terminus of CSFV in modulating viral RNA replication. PMID:26232654

  14. Spontaneous Inward Opening of the Dopamine Transporter Is Triggered by PIP2-Regulated Dynamics of the N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the dynamic mechanism of concerted motions in a full-length molecular model of the human dopamine transporter (hDAT), a member of the neurotransmitter/sodium symporter (NSS) family, involved in state-to-state transitions underlying function. The findings result from an analysis of unbiased atomistic molecular dynamics simulation trajectories (totaling >14 μs) of the hDAT molecule immersed in lipid membrane environments with or without phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) lipids. The N-terminal region of hDAT (N-term) is shown to have an essential mechanistic role in correlated rearrangements of specific structural motifs relevant to state-to-state transitions in the hDAT. The mechanism involves PIP2-mediated electrostatic interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loops of the transporter molecule. Quantitative analyses of collective motions in the trajectories reveal that these interactions correlate with the inward-opening dynamics of hDAT and are allosterically coupled to the known functional sites of the transporter. The observed large-scale motions are enabled by specific reconfiguration of the network of ionic interactions at the intracellular end of the protein. The isomerization to the inward-facing state in hDAT is accompanied by concomitant movements in the extracellular vestibule and results in the release of an Na+ ion from the Na2 site and destabilization of the substrate dopamine in the primary substrate binding S1 site. The dynamic mechanism emerging from the findings highlights the involvement of the PIP2-regulated interactions between the N-term and the intracellular loop 4 in the functionally relevant conformational transitions that are also similar to those found to underlie state-to-state transitions in the leucine transporter (LeuT), a prototypical bacterial homologue of the NSS. PMID:26255829

  15. A Functional Dissection of PTEN N-Terminus: Implications in PTEN Subcellular Targeting and Tumor Suppressor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Anabel; Rodríguez-Escudero, Isabel; Stumpf, Miriam; Molina, María; Cid, Víctor J.; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is exerted through alternative plasma membrane, cytoplasmic, and nuclear subcellular locations. The N-terminal region of PTEN is important for the control of PTEN subcellular localization and function. It contains both an active nuclear localization signal (NLS) and an overlapping PIP2-binding motif (PBM) involved in plasma membrane targeting. We report a comprehensive mutational and functional analysis of the PTEN N-terminus, including a panel of tumor-related mutations at this region. Nuclear/cytoplasmic partitioning in mammalian cells and PIP3 phosphatase assays in reconstituted S. cerevisiae defined categories of PTEN N-terminal mutations with distinct PIP3 phosphatase and nuclear accumulation properties. Noticeably, most tumor-related mutations that lost PIP3 phosphatase activity also displayed impaired nuclear localization. Cell proliferation and soft-agar colony formation analysis in mammalian cells of mutations with distinctive nuclear accumulation and catalytic activity patterns suggested a contribution of both properties to PTEN tumor suppressor activity. Our functional dissection of the PTEN N-terminus provides the basis for a systematic analysis of tumor-related and experimentally engineered PTEN mutations. PMID:25875300

  16. The role of N-terminus of Plasmodium falciparum ORC1 in telomeric localization and var gene silencing

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Abhijit S.; Srivastava, Sandeep; Herrmann, Susann; Gupta, Ashish; Mitra, Pallabi; Gilberger, Tim Wolf; Dhar, Suman Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum origin recognition complex 1 (ORC1) protein has been implicated in DNA replication and silencing var gene family. However, the mechanism and the domain structure of ORC1 related to the regulation of var gene family are unknown. Here we show that the unique N-terminus of PfORC1 (PfORC1N1–238) is targeted to the nuclear periphery in vivo and this region binds to the telomeric DNA in vitro due to the presence of a leucine heptad repeats. Like PfORC1N1–238, endogenous full length ORC1, was found to be associated with sub telomeric repeat regions and promoters of various var genes. Additionally, binding and propagation of ORC1 to telomeric and subtelomeric regions was severely compromised in PfSir2 deficient parasites suggesting the dependence of endogenous ORC1 on Sir2 for var gene regulation. This feature is not previously described for Plasmodium ORC1 and contrary to yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae where ORC function as a landing pad for Sir proteins. Interestingly, the overexpression of ORC1N1–238 compromises the binding of Sir2 at the subtelomeric loci and var gene promoters consistent with de-repression of some var genes. These results establish role of the N-terminus of PfORC1 in heterochromatin formation and regulation of var gene expression in co-ordination with Sir2 in P. falciparum. PMID:22379140

  17. A model for the function of the bisphosphorylated heart-specific troponin-I N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Jaquet, K; Lohmann, K; Czisch, M; Holak, T; Gulati, J; Jaquet, R

    1998-08-01

    Bisphosphorylation of two adjacently located serine residues in the heart-specific N-terminus of the cTnl subunit reduces calcium affinity of the cTnC subunit. An interaction of the phosphorylation region of cTnI with acidic residues of another cTn subunit has been proposed formerly based on 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data. A possible candidate is cTnC. Thus, an interaction model of cTnC with the bisphosphorylated cTnI N-terminus has been built using a homology model of hcTnC based on the crystal structure of tusTnC and the structure of the phosphorylation region of cTnI determined by 2D NMR. By computational search, five cluster of acidic residues of cTnC might interact with the cTnI phosphorylation region. Three sites could be excluded by 31P-NMR experiments. The two remaining sites are located in the N-terminal helix of cTnC and between calcium binding sites III and IV. Reorientation of the arginine and phosphoserine sidechains within the phosphorylation region as proposed by refined docking could explain the formerly measured changes in pKaapp values. Thus, local pKa changes might lead to the reduction of calcium affinity observed upon cTnI bisphosphorylation. PMID:9742449

  18. N-terminus conservation in the anchor polypeptide of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic alga. [Nostoc; Porphydium cruentum

    SciTech Connect

    Gantt, E.; Lipschultz, C.A.; Cunningham, F.X. Jr.; Mimuro, M.

    1987-04-01

    Energy flow between the extrinsic phycobilisomes and the photosystems within thylakoids, is probably mediated by a blue anchor polypeptide. Polypeptides in the 94 kD range, purified by LiDS-PAGE from phycobilisomes of Nostoc and Porphyrdium cruentum, crossreacted with anti-Nostoc-94 (although weakly with the latter). Though rich in ASP and GLU, the polypeptides were very hydrophobic, and low in MET, CYS, and HIS. Partial sequence of the N-terminus shows considerable homology 1 - 5 - 10 - 15 - 20 N: (S)-V-K-A-S-G-G-S-S-V-A-(R)-P-Q-L-Y-Q-(G)-L-(A)-V- P: V-()-K-A-S-G-G-S-P-V-V-K-P-Q-L-Y-(K)-()-A-(S)- between the species. There is a lack of homology when compared with ..cap alpha.. and ..beta.. polypeptides of allophycocyanin with rod linkers of phycobilisomes and other phycobiliproteins. Polypeptides of 94 and 92 kD from thylakoids of Nostoc, also immunoreactive with anti-94, were blocked at the N-terminus.

  19. Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure decreases the circulating concentrations of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor prohormone.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Salmon, J S

    1990-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation with positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) decreases urine output and urinary sodium excretion. The influence of PEEP during controlled mechanical ventilation on the circulating concentrations of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) prohormone which both contain natriuretic and diuretic peptides was investigated in 7 patients with acute respiratory failure. The 98 amino acid (aa) N-terminus, the midportion of the N-terminus consisting of aa 31-67 of the 126 aa ANF prohormone (i.e., pro ANF 31-67) and the C-terminus (aa 99-126; ANF) were found to be significantly (p less than 0.05; ANOVA) elevated compared to 54 healthy volunteers during acute respiratory failure prior to institution of PEEP. With institution of 10 cm of H2O of PEEP all 7 patients had a significant (p less than 0.05) decrease in the circulating concentrations of pro ANFs 1-98, 31-67 and ANF. These findings suggest that the increased thoracic pressure secondary to PEEP which reduces venous return and lowers atrial filling pressure results in a decreased release of the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone. This decrease in the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone appears to represent a physiologic mechanism for restoration of intravascular volume, secondary to decreased sodium excretion. PMID:2151585

  20. The N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein Suppresses mRNA and Protein Expression in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Patrick; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the structure and function of the 250-kDa L protein of hantaviruses, although it plays a central role in virus genome transcription and replication. When attempting to study Andes virus (ANDV) L protein in mammalian cells, we encountered difficulties. Even in a strong overexpression system, ANDV L protein could not be detected by immunoblotting. Deletion analysis revealed that the 534 N-terminal amino acid residues determine the low-expression phenotype. Inhibition of translation due to RNA secondary structures around the start codon, rapid proteasomal degradation, and reduced half-life time were excluded. However, ANDV L protein expression could be rescued upon mutation of the catalytic PD-E-K motif and further conserved residues of the putative endonuclease at the N terminus of the protein. In addition, wild-type ANDV L rather than expressible L mutants suppressed the level of L mRNA, as well as reporter mRNAs. Wild-type L protein also reduced the synthesis of cellular proteins in the high-molecular-weight range. Using expressible ANDV L mutants as a tool for localization studies, we show that L protein colocalizes with ANDV N and NSs but not Gc protein. A fraction of L protein also colocalized with the cellular processing (P) body component DCP1a. Overall, these data suggest that ANDV L protein possesses a highly active endonuclease at the N terminus suppressing the level of its own as well as heterologous mRNAs upon recombinant expression in mammalian cells. PMID:23576516

  1. Phosphorylation and cellular function of the human Rpa2 N-terminus in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L; Wilson, Timothy M; Liu, Shengqin; Herauf, Anna; Steffes, Jenna; Mueller, Erica N; Oakley, Gregory G; Haring, Stuart J

    2015-02-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for proper cell growth. This occurs through accurate DNA replication and repair of DNA lesions. A key factor involved in both DNA replication and the DNA damage response is the heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Although the RPA complex appears to be structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes, the primary amino acid sequence of each subunit can vary considerably. Examination of sequence differences along with the functional interchangeability of orthologous RPA subunits or regions could provide insight into important regions and their functions. This might also allow for study in simpler systems. We determined that substitution of yeast Replication Factor A (RFA) with human RPA does not support yeast cell viability. Exchange of a single yeast RFA subunit with the corresponding human RPA subunit does not function due to lack of inter-species subunit interactions. Substitution of yeast Rfa2 with domains/regions of human Rpa2 important for Rpa2 function (i.e., the N-terminus and the loop 3-4 region) supports viability in yeast cells, and hybrid proteins containing human Rpa2 N-terminal phospho-mutations result in similar DNA damage phenotypes to analogous yeast Rfa2 N-terminal phospho-mutants. Finally, the human Rpa2 N-terminus (NT) fused to yeast Rfa2 is phosphorylated in a manner similar to human Rpa2 in human cells, indicating that conserved kinases recognize the human domain in yeast. The implication is that budding yeast represents a potential model system for studying not only human Rpa2 N-terminal phosphorylation, but also phosphorylation of Rpa2 N-termini from other eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25499885

  2. The N Terminus and C Terminus of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 ICP4 Cooperate To Activate Viral Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Lauren M.; Lester, Jonathan T.; Sivrich, Frances L.

    2012-01-01

    Infected cell polypeptide 4 (ICP4) activates transcription from most viral promoters. Two transactivation domains, one N-terminal and one C terminal, are largely responsible for the activation functions of ICP4. A mutant ICP4 molecule lacking the C-terminal activation domain (n208) efficiently activates many early genes, whereas late genes are poorly activated, and virus growth is severely impaired. The regions within the N terminus of ICP4 (amino acids 1 to 210) that contribute to activation were investigated by analysis of deletion mutants in the presence or absence of the C-terminal activation domain. The mutants were assessed for their abilities to support viral replication and to regulate gene expression. Several deletions in regions conserved in other alphaherpesviruses resulted in impaired activation and viral growth, without affecting DNA binding. The single small deletion that had the greatest effect on activation in the absence of the C terminus corresponded to a highly conserved stretch of amino acids between 81 and 96, rendering the molecule nonfunctional. However, when the C terminus was present, the same deletion had a minimal effect on activity. The amino terminus of ICP4 was predicted to be relatively disordered compared to the DNA-binding domain and the C-terminal 500 amino acids. Moreover, the amino terminus appears to be in a relatively extended conformation as determined by the hydrodynamic properties of several mutants. The data support a model where the amino terminus is an extended and possibly flexible region of the protein, allowing it to efficiently interact with multiple transcription factors at a distance from where it is bound to DNA, thereby enabling ICP4 to function as a general activator of polymerase II transcription. The C terminus of ICP4 can compensate for some of the mutations in the N terminus, suggesting that it either specifies redundant interactions or enables the amino terminus to function more efficiently. PMID:22496239

  3. Phosphorylation and Cellular Function of the Human Rpa2 N-Terminus in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ghospurkar, Padmaja L.; Wilson, Timothy M.; Liu, Shengqin; Herauf, Anna; Steffes, Jenna; Mueller, Erica N.; Oakley, Gregory G.; Haring, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for proper cell growth. This occurs through accurate DNA replication and repair of DNA lesions. A key factor involved in both DNA replication and the DNA damage response is the heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA). Although the RPA complex appears to be structurally conserved throughout eukaryotes, the primary amino acid sequence of each subunit can vary considerably. Examination of sequence differences along with the functional interchangeability of orthologous RPA subunits or regions could provide insight into important regions and their functions. This might also allow for study in simpler systems. We determined that substitution of yeast Replication Factor A (RFA) with human RPA does not support yeast cell viability. Exchange of a single yeast RFA subunit with the corresponding human RPA subunit does not function due to lack of inter-species subunit interactions. Substitution of yeast Rfa2 with domains/regions of human Rpa2 important for Rpa2 function (i.e., the N-terminus and the loop 3–4 region) supports viability in yeast cells, and hybrid proteins containing human Rpa2 N-terminal phospho-mutations result in similar DNA damage phenotypes to analogous yeast Rfa2 N-terminal phospho-mutants. Finally, the human Rpa2 N-terminus (NT) fused to yeast Rfa2 is phosphorylated in a manner similar to human Rpa2 in human cells, indicating that conserved kinases recognize the human domain in yeast. The implication is that budding yeast represents a potential model system for studying not only human Rpa2 N-terminal phosphorylation, but also phosphorylation of Rpa2 N-termini from other eukaryotic organisms. PMID:25499885

  4. The N-terminus of Prp1 (Prp6/U5-102 K) is essential for spliceosome activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lützelberger, Martin; Bottner, Claudia A.; Schwelnus, Wiebke; Zock-Emmenthal, Susanne; Razanau, Aleh; Käufer, Norbert F.

    2010-01-01

    The spliceosomal protein Prp1 (Prp6/U5-102 K) is necessary for the integrity of pre-catalytic spliceosomal complexes. We have identified a novel regulatory function for Prp1. Expression of mutations in the N-terminus of Prp1 leads to the accumulation of pre-catalytic spliceosomal complexes containing the five snRNAs U1, U2, U5 and U4/U6 and pre-mRNAs. The mutations in the N-terminus, which prevent splicing to occur, include in vitro and in vivo identified phosphorylation sites of Prp4 kinase. These sites are highly conserved in the human ortholog U5-102 K. The results presented here demonstrate that structural integrity of the N-terminus is required to mediate a splicing event, but is not necessary for the assembly of spliceosomes. PMID:20007600

  5. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H; Greenamyre, J Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington's disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6-9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction profile

  6. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington’s disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6–9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction

  7. Huntingtin exon 1 fibrils feature an interdigitated β-hairpin–based polyglutamine core

    PubMed Central

    Hoop, Cody L.; Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Kar, Karunakar; Magyarfalvi, Gábor; Lamley, Jonathan M.; Boatz, Jennifer C.; Mandal, Abhishek; Lewandowski, Józef R.; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Polyglutamine expansion within the exon1 of huntingtin leads to protein misfolding, aggregation, and cytotoxicity in Huntington’s disease. This incurable neurodegenerative disease is the most prevalent member of a family of CAG repeat expansion disorders. Although mature exon1 fibrils are viable candidates for the toxic species, their molecular structure and how they form have remained poorly understood. Using advanced magic angle spinning solid-state NMR, we directly probe the structure of the rigid core that is at the heart of huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine aggregates, via measurements of long-range intramolecular and intermolecular contacts, backbone and side-chain torsion angles, relaxation measurements, and calculations of chemical shifts. These experiments reveal the presence of β-hairpin–containing β-sheets that are connected through interdigitating extended side chains. Despite dramatic differences in aggregation behavior, huntingtin exon1 fibrils and other polyglutamine-based aggregates contain identical β-strand–based cores. Prior structural models, derived from X-ray fiber diffraction and computational analyses, are shown to be inconsistent with the solid-state NMR results. Internally, the polyglutamine amyloid fibrils are coassembled from differently structured monomers, which we describe as a type of “intrinsic” polymorphism. A stochastic polyglutamine-specific aggregation mechanism is introduced to explain this phenomenon. We show that the aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 proceeds via an intramolecular collapse of the expanded polyglutamine domain and discuss the implications of this observation for our understanding of its misfolding and aggregation mechanisms. PMID:26831073

  8. A d-Amino Acid at the N-Terminus of a Protein Abrogates Its Degradation by the N-End Rule Pathway

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes have evolved the ubiquitin (Ub)/proteasome system to degrade polypeptides. The Ub/proteasome system is one way that cells regulate cytosolic protein and amino acids levels through the recognition and ubiquitination of a protein’s N-terminus via E1, E2, and E3 enzymes. The process by which the N-terminus stimulates intracellular protein degradation is referred to as the N-end rule. Characterization of the N-end rule has been limited to only the natural l-amino acids. Using a cytosolic delivery platform derived from anthrax lethal toxin, we probed the stability of mixed chirality proteins, containing one d-amino acid on the N-terminus of otherwise all l-proteins. In all cases, we observed that one N-terminal d-amino acid stabilized the cargo protein to proteasomal degradation with respect to the N-end rule. We found that since the mixed chirality proteins were not polyubiquitinated, they evaded N-end-mediated proteasomal degradation. Evidently, a subtle change on the N-terminus of a natural protein can enhance its intracellular lifetime. PMID:26807441

  9. The N-Terminus of the Floral Arabidopsis TGA Transcription Factor PERIANTHIA Mediates Redox-Sensitive DNA-Binding

    PubMed Central

    Gutsche, Nora; Zachgo, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis TGA transcription factor (TF) PERIANTHIA (PAN) regulates the formation of the floral organ primordia as revealed by the pan mutant forming an abnormal pentamerous arrangement of the outer three floral whorls. The Arabidopsis TGA bZIP TF family comprises 10 members, of which PAN and TGA9/10 control flower developmental processes and TGA1/2/5/6 participate in stress-responses. For the TGA1 protein it was shown that several cysteines can be redox-dependently modified. TGA proteins interact in the nucleus with land plant-specific glutaredoxins, which may alter their activities posttranslationally. Here, we investigated the DNA-binding of PAN to the AAGAAT motif under different redox-conditions. The AAGAAT motif is localized in the second intron of the floral homeotic regulator AGAMOUS (AG), which controls stamen and carpel development as well as floral determinacy. Whereas PAN protein binds to this regulatory cis-element under reducing conditions, the interaction is strongly reduced under oxidizing conditions in EMSA studies. The redox-sensitive DNA-binding is mediated via a special PAN N-terminus, which is not present in other Arabidopsis TGA TFs and comprises five cysteines. Two N-terminal PAN cysteines, Cys68 and Cys87, were shown to form a disulfide bridge and Cys340, localized in a C-terminal putative transactivation domain, can be S-glutathionylated. Comparative land plant analyses revealed that the AAGAAT motif exists in asterid and rosid plant species. TGA TFs with N-terminal extensions of variable length were identified in all analyzed seed plants. However, a PAN-like N-terminus exists only in the rosids and exclusively Brassicaceae homologs comprise four to five of the PAN N-terminal cysteines. Redox-dependent modifications of TGA cysteines are known to regulate the activity of stress-related TGA TFs. Here, we show that the N-terminal PAN cysteines participate in a redox-dependent control of the PAN interaction with a highly conserved

  10. The characterization of a novel S100A1 binding site in the N-terminus of TRPM1.

    PubMed

    Jirku, Michaela; Lansky, Zdenek; Bednarova, Lucie; Sulc, Miroslav; Monincova, Lenka; Majer, Pavel; Vyklicky, Ladislav; Vondrasek, Jiri; Teisinger, Jan; Bousova, Kristyna

    2016-09-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin-1 channel (TRPM1) is an important mediator of calcium influx into the cell that is expressed in melanoma and ON-bipolar cells. Similar to other members of the TRP channel family, the intracellular N- and C- terminal domains of TRPM1 are expected to play important roles in the modulation of TRPM1 receptor function. Among the most commonly occurring modulators of TRP channels are the cytoplasmically expressed calcium binding proteins calmodulin and S100 calcium-binding protein A1 (S100A1), but the interaction of TRPM1 with S100A1 has not been described yet. Here, using a combination of biophysical and bioinformatics methods, we have determined that the N-terminal L242-E344 region of TRPM1 is a S100A1 binding domain. We show that formation of the TRPM1/S100A1 complex is calcium-dependent. Moreover, our structural model of the complex explained data obtained from fluorescence spectroscopy measurements revealing that the complex formation is facilitated through interactions of clusters positively charged (K271A, R273A, R274A) and hydrophobic (L263A, V270A, L276A) residues at the N-terminus of TRPM1. Taken together, our data suggest a molecular mechanism for the potential regulation of TRPM1 by S100A1. PMID:27435061

  11. The biliverdin chromophore binds covalently to a conserved cysteine residue in the N-terminus of Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1.

    PubMed

    Lamparter, Tilman; Carrascal, Montserrat; Michael, Norbert; Martinez, Enriqueta; Rottwinkel, Gregor; Abian, Joaquin

    2004-03-30

    Phytochromes are widely distributed biliprotein photoreceptors. Typically, the chromophore becomes covalently linked to the protein during an autocatalytic lyase reaction. Plant and cyanobacterial phytochromes incorporate bilins with a ring A ethylidene side chain, whereas other bacterial phytochromes utilize biliverdin as chromophore, which has a vinyl ring A side chain. For Agrobacterium phytochrome Agp1, site-directed mutagenesis provided evidence that biliverdin is bound to cysteine 20. This cysteine is highly conserved within bacterial homologues, but its role as attachment site has as yet not been proven. We therefore performed mass spectrometry studies on proteolytic holopeptide fragments. For that purpose, an Agp1 expression vector was re-engineered to produce a protein with an N-terminal affinity tag. Following proteolysis, the chromophore co-purified with a ca. 5 kDa fragment during affinity chromatography, showing that the attachment site is located close to the N-terminus. Mass spectrometry analyses performed with the purified chromopeptide confirmed the role of the cysteine 20 as biliverdin attachment site. We also analyzed the role of the highly conserved histidine 250 by site-directed mutagenesis. The homologous amino acid plays an important but yet undefined role in plant phytochromes and has been proposed as chromophore attachment site of Deinococcus phytochrome. We found that in Agp1, this amino acid is dispensable for covalent attachment, but required for tight chromophore-protein interaction. PMID:15035636

  12. Regulation of Estrogen Receptor α N-Terminus Conformation and Function by Peptidyl Prolyl Isomerase Pin1

    PubMed Central

    Rajbhandari, Prashant; Finn, Greg; Solodin, Natalia M.; Singarapu, Kiran K.; Sahu, Sarata C.; Markley, John L.; Kadunc, Kelley J.; Ellison-Zelski, Stephanie J.; Kariagina, Anastasia; Haslam, Sandra Z.; Lu, Kun Ping

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα), a key driver of growth in the majority of breast cancers, contains an unstructured transactivation domain (AF1) in its N terminus that is a convergence point for growth factor and hormonal activation. This domain is controlled by phosphorylation, but how phosphorylation impacts AF1 structure and function is unclear. We found that serine 118 (S118) phosphorylation of the ERα AF1 region in response to estrogen (agonist), tamoxifen (antagonist), and growth factors results in recruitment of the peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1. Phosphorylation of S118 is critical for Pin1 binding, and mutation of S118 to alanine prevents this association. Importantly, Pin1 isomerizes the serine118-proline119 bond from a cis to trans isomer, with a concomitant increase in AF1 transcriptional activity. Pin1 overexpression promotes ligand-independent and tamoxifen-inducible activity of ERα and growth of tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells. Pin1 expression correlates with proliferation in ERα-positive rat mammary tumors. These results establish phosphorylation-coupled proline isomerization as a mechanism modulating AF1 functional activity and provide insight into the role of a conformational switch in the functional regulation of the intrinsically disordered transactivation domain of ERα. PMID:22064478

  13. Native N-terminus nitrophorin 2 from the kissing bug: similarities to and differences from NP2(D1A).

    PubMed

    Berry, Robert E; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Shokhireva, Tatiana K; Garrett, Sarah A; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F Ann

    2012-09-01

    The first amino acid of mature native nitrophorin 2 is aspartic acid, and when expressed in E. coli, the wild-type gene of the mature protein retains the methionine-0, which is produced by translation of the start codon. This form of NP2, (M0)NP2, has been found to have different properties from its D1A mutant, for which the Met0 is cleaved by the methionine aminopeptidase of E. coli (R. E. Berry, T. K. Shokhireva, I. Filippov, M. N. Shokhirev, H. Zhang, F. A. Walker, Biochemistry 2007, 46, 6830). Native N-terminus nitrophorin 2 ((ΔM0)NP2) has been prepared by employing periplasmic expression of NP2 in E. coli using the pelB leader sequence from Erwinia carotovora, which is present in the pET-26b expression plasmid (Novagen). This paper details the similarities and differences between the three different N-terminal forms of nitrophorin 2, (M0)NP2, NP2(D1A), and (ΔM0)NP2. It is found that the NMR spectra of high- and low-spin (ΔM0)NP2 are essentially identical to those of NP2(D1A), but the rate and equilibrium constants for histamine and NO dissociation/association of the two are different. PMID:22976966

  14. A homozygous deletion of exon 1 in WISP3 causes progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia in two siblings

    PubMed Central

    Neerinckx, Barbara; Thues, Cedric; Wouters, Carine; Lechner, Sarah; Westhovens, Rene; Van Esch, Hilde

    2015-01-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare autosomal recessive disease that causes progressive joint stiffness and pain. It is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the WISP3 gene. We describe two sisters suffering from PPD in whom molecular genetic analysis revealed a homozygous deletion of exon 1 and of the 5′UTR of the WISP3 gene. This is the first time that a gross deletion has been described as the causal mutation in PPD. PMID:27081554

  15. Posttranslational modification at the N terminus of the human adenovirus type 12 E1A 235R tumor antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Lucher, L A; Brackmann, K H; Symington, J S; Green, M

    1986-01-01

    The adenovirus E1A transforming region, which encodes immortalization, partial cell transformation, and gene activation functions, expresses two early mRNAs, 13S and 12S. Multiple-T antigen species with different electrophoretic mobilities are formed from each mRNA, presumably by unknown posttranslational modifications. The adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) 13S and 12S mRNAs encode E1A T antigens of 266 and 235 amino acid residues (266R and 235R), respectively. To study possible posttranslational processing at the N and C termini and to distinguish between the Ad12 266R and 235R T antigens, we prepared antibodies targeted to synthetic peptides encoded at the common C (peptide 204) and N (peptide 202) termini of the 266R and 235R T antigens and at the unique internal domain of the 266R T antigen (peptide 206). The specificity of each anti-peptide antibody was confirmed by immunoprecipitation of the 266R and 235R T antigens produced in Escherichia coli. Immunoprecipitation analysis of the E1A T antigens synthesized in Ad12-infected KB cells revealed the following. Antibody to the common C terminus recognized three T antigens with apparent Mrs of 43,000, 42,000, and 39,000 (43K, 42K, and 39K). All three forms were phosphorylated and were present in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The 43K and 42K T antigens were rapidly synthesized during a 10-min pulse with [35S]methionine in Ad12-infected cells. The 43K T antigen had a half-life of 20 min, the 42K T antigen had a longer half-life of about 40 min, and the 39K T antigen became the predominant E1A T antigen. Antibodies to the unique region immunoprecipitated the 43K T antigen but not the 42K and 39K T antigens. Antibody to the N terminus immunoprecipitated the 43K and 42K T antigens but not the 39K T antigen, suggesting that the 39K T antigen possessed a modified N terminus. Partial N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis showed that the 43K and 42K T antigens contain methionine at residues 1 and 5, as predicted from the

  16. Computational modeling of the N-terminus of the human dopamine transporter and its interaction with PIP2 -containing membranes.

    PubMed

    Khelashvili, George; Doktorova, Milka; Sahai, Michelle A; Johner, Niklaus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-05-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane protein belonging to the family of neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSS). Members of the NSS are responsible for the clearance of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft, and for their translocation back into the presynaptic nerve terminal. The DAT contains long intracellular N- and C-terminal domains that are strongly implicated in the transporter function. The N-terminus (N-term), in particular, regulates the reverse transport (efflux) of the substrate through DAT. Currently, the molecular mechanisms of the efflux remain elusive in large part due to lack of structural information on the N-terminal segment. Here we report a computational model of the N-term of the human DAT (hDAT), obtained through an ab initio structure prediction, in combination with extensive atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the context of a lipid membrane. Our analysis reveals that whereas the N-term is a highly dynamic domain, it contains secondary structure elements that remain stable in the long MD trajectories of interactions with the bilayer (totaling >2.2 μs). Combining MD simulations with continuum mean-field modeling we found that the N-term engages with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions with the charged lipids PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Biphosphate) or PS (phosphatidylserine) that are present in these bilayers. We identify specific motifs along the N-term implicated in such interactions and show that differential modes of N-term/membrane association result in differential positioning of the structured segments on the membrane surface. These results will inform future structure-based studies that will elucidate the mechanistic role of the N-term in DAT function. PMID:25739722

  17. Crystal structures of tubulin acetyltransferase reveal a conserved catalytic core and the plasticity of the essential N terminus.

    PubMed

    Kormendi, Vasilisa; Szyk, Agnieszka; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Roll-Mecak, Antonina

    2012-12-01

    Tubulin acetyltransferase (TAT) acetylates Lys-40 of α-tubulin in the microtubule lumen. TAT is inefficient, and its activity is enhanced when tubulin is incorporated in microtubules. Acetylation is associated with stable microtubules and regulates the binding of microtubule motors and associated proteins. TAT is important in neuronal polarity and mechanosensation, and decreased tubulin acetylation levels are associated with axonal transport defects and neurodegeneration. We present the first structure of TAT in complex with acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) at 2.7 Å resolution. The structure reveals a conserved stable catalytic core shared with other GCN5 superfamily acetyltransferases consisting of a central β-sheet flanked by α-helices and a C-terminal β-hairpin unique to TAT. Structure-guided mutagenesis establishes the molecular determinants for Ac-CoA and tubulin substrate recognition. The wild-type TAT construct is a monomer in solution. We identify a metastable interface between the conserved core and N-terminal domain that modulates the oligomerization of TAT in solution and is essential for activity. The 2.45 Å resolution structure of an inactive TAT construct with an active site point mutation near this interface reveals a domain-swapped dimer in which the functionally essential N terminus shows evidence of marked structural plasticity. The sequence segment corresponding to this structurally plastic region in TAT has been implicated in substrate recognition in other GCN5 superfamily acetyltransferases. Our structures provide a rational platform for the mechanistic dissection of TAT activity and the design of TAT inhibitors with therapeutic potential in neuronal regeneration. PMID:23105108

  18. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-06-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1-200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure-function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  19. Atomic Structure and Biochemical Characterization of an RNA Endonuclease in the N Terminus of Andes Virus L Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-García, Yaiza; Reguera, Juan; Busch, Carola; Witte, Gregor; Sánchez-Ramos, Oliberto; Betzel, Christian; Cusack, Stephen; Günther, Stephan; Reindl, Sophia

    2016-01-01

    Andes virus (ANDV) is a human-pathogenic hantavirus. Hantaviruses presumably initiate their mRNA synthesis by using cap structures derived from host cell mRNAs, a mechanism called cap-snatching. A signature for a cap-snatching endonuclease is present in the N terminus of hantavirus L proteins. In this study, we aimed to solve the atomic structure of the ANDV endonuclease and characterize its biochemical features. However, the wild-type protein was refractory to expression in Escherichia coli, presumably due to toxic enzyme activity. To circumvent this problem, we introduced attenuating mutations in the domain that were previously shown to enhance L protein expression in mammalian cells. Using this approach, 13 mutant proteins encompassing ANDV L protein residues 1–200 were successfully expressed and purified. Protein stability and nuclease activity of the mutants was analyzed and the crystal structure of one mutant was solved to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Shape in solution was determined by small angle X-ray scattering. The ANDV endonuclease showed structural similarities to related enzymes of orthobunya-, arena-, and orthomyxoviruses, but also differences such as elongated shape and positively charged patches surrounding the active site. The enzyme was dependent on manganese, which is bound to the active site, most efficiently cleaved single-stranded RNA substrates, did not cleave DNA, and could be inhibited by known endonuclease inhibitors. The atomic structure in conjunction with stability and activity data for the 13 mutant enzymes facilitated inference of structure–function relationships in the protein. In conclusion, we solved the structure of a hantavirus cap-snatching endonuclease, elucidated its catalytic properties, and present a highly active mutant form, which allows for inhibitor screening. PMID:27300328

  20. Differential activation of yeast adenylyl cyclase by Ras1 and Ras2 depends on the conserved N terminus.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, N; Segal, M; Marbach, I; Levitzki, A

    1995-11-21

    Although both Ras1 and Ras2 activate adenylyl cyclase in yeast, a number of differences can be observed regarding their function in the cAMP pathway. To explore the relative contribution of conserved and variable domains in determining these differences, chimeric RAS1-RAS2 or RAS2-RAS1 genes were constructed by swapping the sequences encoding the variable C-terminal domains. These constructs were expressed in a cdc25ts ras1 ras2 strain. Biochemical data show that the difference in efficacy of adenylyl cyclase activation between the two Ras proteins resides in the highly conserved N-terminal domain. This finding is supported by the observation that Ras2 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras2 has been deleted, is a more potent activator of the yeast adenylyl cyclase than Ras1 delta, in which the C-terminal domain of Ras1 has been deleted. These observations suggest that amino acid residues other than the highly conserved residues of the effector domain within the N terminus may determine the efficiency of functional interaction with adenylyl cyclase. Similar levels of intracellular cAMP were found in Ras1, Ras1-Ras2, Ras1 delta, Ras2, and Ras2-Ras1 strains throughout the growth curve. This was found to result from the higher expression of Ras1 and Ras1-Ras2, which compensate for their lower efficacy in activating adenylyl cyclase. These results suggest that the difference between the Ras1 and the Ras2 phenotype is not due to their different efficacy in activating the cAMP pathway and that the divergent C-terminal domains are responsible for these differences, through interaction with other regulatory elements. PMID:7479926

  1. Effects of residue 5-point mutation and N-terminus hydrophobic residues on temporin-SHc physicochemical and biological properties.

    PubMed

    Abbassi, Feten; Piesse, Christophe; Foulon, Thierry; Nicolas, Pierre; Ladram, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Temporin-SHc (FLSHIAGFLSNLFamide) first isolated from skin extraction of the Tunisian frog Pelophylax saharica, which shows potent antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria and is highly active against yeasts and fungi without hemolytic activity at antimicrobial concentrations. The peptide adopts well-defined α-helical conformation when bound to SDS micelles. In this study, we explored the effects of residue at position 5 and the N-terminus hydrophobic character on the hydrophilic/polar face of temp-SHc, on its biological activities (antimicrobial and hemolytic) and biophysical properties (hydrophobicity, amphipathicity and helicity). Antibacterial and hemolytic properties of temporin-SHc derivatives depend strongly on physicochemical properties. Therefore, slight decreasing amphipathicity together with hydrophobicity and helicity by the substitution Ile(5) → Leu decreased antimicrobial potency approximately twofold without changing of hemolytic activity. It is noteworthy that a conservative amino acid substitution decreases the antimicrobial activity, underlining the differences between Leu/Ile side chains insertion into the lipid bilayer. While the modification of N-terminal hydrophobic character by four residue inversion decreased amphipathicity (twofold) of (4-1)L5temp-SHc and resulted in an increase in antibacterial activity against E. coli, E. faecalis and C. parapsilosis of at least fourfold, its therapeutic potential is limited by its drastic increase of hemolysis (LC₅₀ = 2 μM). We found that the percentage of helicity of temp-SHc analog is directly correlated to its hemolytic activity. Last, the hydrophobic N-terminal character is an important determinant of antimicrobial activity. PMID:24842084

  2. Computational modeling of the N-terminus of the human dopamine transporter and its interaction with PIP2-containing membranes

    PubMed Central

    Khelashvili, George; Doktorova, Milka; Sahai, Michelle A.; Johner, Niklaus; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a transmembrane protein belonging to the family of Neurotransmitter:Sodium Symporters (NSS). Members of the NSS are responsible for the clearance of neurotransmitters from the synaptic cleft, and for their translocation back into the presynaptic nerve terminal. The DAT contains long intracellular N- and C-terminal domains that are strongly implicated in the transporter function. The N-terminus (N-term), in particular, regulates the reverse transport (efflux) of the substrate through DAT. Currently, the molecular mechanisms of the efflux remain elusive in large part due to lack of structural information on the N-terminal segment. Here we report a computational model of the N-term of the human DAT (hDAT), obtained through an ab initio structure prediction, in combination with extensive atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in the context of a lipid membrane. Our analysis reveals that whereas the N-term is a highly dynamic domain, it contains secondary structure elements that remain stable in the long MD trajectories of interactions with the bilayer (totaling >2.2 µs). Combining MD simulations with continuum mean-field modeling we found that the N-term engages with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions with the charged lipids PIP2 (phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Biphosphate) or PS (phosphatidylserine) that are present in these bilayers. We identify specific motifs along the N-term implicated in such interactions and show that differential modes of N-term/membrane association result in differential positioning of the structured segments on the membrane surface. These results will inform future structure-based studies that will elucidate the mechanistic role of the N-term in DAT function. PMID:25739722

  3. Determinant for beta-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ channels: an additional transmembrane region at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1996-12-10

    The pore-forming alpha subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a beta subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming alpha subunit necessary for beta-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to beta-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the alpha subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel alpha subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1-S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers beta-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  4. The N Terminus of Type III Secretion Needle Protein YscF from Yersinia pestis Functions To Modulate Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Jessen Condry, Danielle L.; Toosky, Melody; Roughead, William; Bradley, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The type III secretion system is employed by many pathogens, including the genera Yersinia, Shigella, Pseudomonas, and Salmonella, to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. The injectisome needle is formed by the polymerization of a single protein, e.g., YscF (Yersinia pestis), PscF (Pseudomonas aeruginosa), PrgI (Salmonella enterica SPI-1), SsaG (Salmonella enterica SPI-2), or MxiH (Shigella flexneri). In this study, we demonstrated that the N termini of some needle proteins, particularly the N terminus of YscF from Yersinia pestis, influences host immune responses. The N termini of several needle proteins were truncated and tested for the ability to induce inflammatory responses in a human monocytic cell line (THP-1 cells). Truncated needle proteins induced proinflammatory cytokines to different magnitudes than the corresponding wild-type proteins, except SsaG. Notably, N-terminally truncated YscF induced significantly higher activation of NF-κB and/or AP-1 and higher induction of proinflammatory cytokines, suggesting that a function of the N terminus of YscF is interference with host sensing of YscF, consistent with Y. pestis pathogenesis. To directly test the ability of the N terminus of YscF to suppress cytokine induction, a YscF-SsaG chimera with 15 N-terminal amino acids from YscF added to SsaG was constructed. The chimeric YscF-SsaG induced lower levels of cytokines than wild-type SsaG. However, the addition of 15 random amino acids to SsaG had no effect on NF-κB/AP-1 activation. These results suggest that the N terminus of YscF can function to decrease cytokine induction, perhaps contributing to a favorable immune environment leading to survival of Y. pestis within the eukaryotic host. PMID:25644012

  5. Lost in translation: translational interference from a recurrent mutation in exon 1 of MECP2

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, A; de Lagarde, D; Leonard, H; Williamson, S L; Vasudevan, V; Christodoulou, J; Thompson, E; MacLeod, P; Ravine, D

    2006-01-01

    Background Rett syndrome (RTT) is an X linked neuro‐developmental disorder affecting mostly girls. Mutations in the coding region of MECP2 are found in 80% of classic RTT patients. Until recently, the region encoding MECP2 was believed to comprise exons 2, 3, and 4 with the ATG start site located at the end of exon 2 (MeCP2_e2). Methods Recent reports of another mRNA transcript transcribed from exon 1 (MeCP2_e1) prompted us to screen exon 1 among RNA samples from 20 females with classic or atypical RTT. Results A previously reported 11 base pair deletion in exon 1 was detected in one subject with a milder phenotype. Although RNA expression for both protein isoforms was detected from the mutant allele, evaluation of MeCP2 protein in uncultured patient lymphocytes by immunocytochemistry revealed that MeCP2 protein production was restricted to only 74–76% of lymphocytes. X chromosome inactivation studies of genomic DNA revealed similar XCI ratios at the HUMARA locus (73:27 with HpaII and 74:26 with McrBC). We have demonstrated that translation but not transcription of the MeCP2_e2 isoform is ablated by the 11 nucleotide deletion, 103 nucleotides upstream of the e2 translation start site. Conclusions These findings reveal that nucleotides within the deleted sequence in the 5′‐UTR of the MeCP2_e2 transcript, while not required for transcription, are essential for translation. PMID:16155192

  6. Novel alleles of the transforming growth factor β-1 regulatory region and exon 1.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, E; Madrigal, J A; Shaw, B E

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-1, encoded by the TGFB1 gene, is a cytokine that plays a central role in many physiologic and pathogenic processes with pleiotropic effects. Regulatory activity for this gene has been shown for 3.0 kb between positions -2665 and +423 from its translational start site. At least 17 TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles have been defined on the basis of 18 polymorphic sites. Polymorphisms in TGFB1's regulatory region have been associated with differential levels of expression of this cytokine and to genetic risk in cancer and transplantation. In this report, we present 19 novel TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles: p018-p036. Amplification of TGFB1's regulatory region was performed with an in-house protocol, and novel alleles were defined by either allele-specific amplification and/or molecular cloning of the amplicons, followed by sequencing in isolation. Three of these novel alleles (p018, p019, and p020) are shown to be formed by novel combinations of the aforementioned known polymorphic positions. Another 16 novel alleles are shown to carry additional known and unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Polymorphism in TGFB1's regulatory region could have an impact on important processes, including embryogenesis, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune responses, and transplantation, making its characterization necessary. PMID:25808355

  7. α-Synuclein and huntingtin exon 1 amyloid fibrils bind laterally to the cellular membrane

    PubMed Central

    Monsellier, Elodie; Bousset, Luc; Melki, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Fibrillar aggregates involved in neurodegenerative diseases have the ability to spread from one cell to another in a prion-like manner. The underlying molecular mechanisms, in particular the binding mode of the fibrils to cell membranes, are poorly understood. In this work we decipher the modality by which aggregates bind to the cellular membrane, one of the obligatory steps of the propagation cycle. By characterizing the binding properties of aggregates made of α-synuclein or huntingtin exon 1 protein displaying similar composition and structure but different lengths to mammalian cells we demonstrate that in both cases aggregates bind laterally to the cellular membrane, with aggregates extremities displaying little or no role in membrane binding. Lateral binding to artificial liposomes was also observed by transmission electron microscopy. In addition we show that although α-synuclein and huntingtin exon 1 fibrils bind both laterally to the cellular membrane, their mechanisms of interaction differ. Our findings have important implications for the development of future therapeutic tools that aim to block protein aggregates propagation in the brain. PMID:26757959

  8. TDP-43 N terminus encodes a novel ubiquitin-like fold and its unfolded form in equilibrium that can be shifted by binding to ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Qin, Haina; Lim, Liang-Zhong; Wei, Yuanyuan; Song, Jianxing

    2014-12-30

    Transactivation response element (TAR) DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is the principal component of ubiquitinated inclusions characteristic of most forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia-frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FTLD-TDP), as well as an increasing spectrum of other neurodegenerative diseases. Previous structural and functional studies on TDP-43 have been mostly focused on its recognized domains. Very recently, however, its extreme N terminus was identified to be a double-edged sword indispensable for both physiology and proteinopathy, but thus far its structure remains unknown due to the severe aggregation. Here as facilitated by our previous discovery that protein aggregation can be significantly minimized by reducing salt concentrations, by circular dichroism and NMR spectroscopy we revealed that the TDP-43 N terminus encodes a well-folded structure in concentration-dependent equilibrium with its unfolded form. Despite previous failure in detecting any sequence homology to ubiquitin, the folded state was determined to adopt a novel ubiquitin-like fold by the CS-Rosetta program with NMR chemical shifts and 78 unambiguous long-range nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) constraints. Remarkably, this ubiquitin-like fold could bind ssDNA, and the binding shifted the conformational equilibrium toward reducing the unfolded population. To the best of our knowledge, the TDP-43 N terminus represents the first ubiquitin-like fold capable of directly binding nucleic acid. Our results provide a molecular mechanism rationalizing the functional dichotomy of TDP-43 and might also shed light on the formation and dynamics of cellular ribonucleoprotein granules, which have been recently linked to ALS pathogenesis. As a consequence, one therapeutic strategy for TDP-43-causing diseases might be to stabilize its ubiquitin-like fold by ssDNA or designed molecules. PMID:25503365

  9. Insight into the structural and biological relevance of the T/R transition of the N-terminus of the B-chain in human insulin.

    PubMed

    Kosinová, Lucie; Veverka, Václav; Novotná, Pavlína; Collinsová, Michaela; Urbanová, Marie; Moody, Nicholas R; Turkenburg, Johan P; Jiráček, Jiří; Brzozowski, Andrzej M; Žáková, Lenka

    2014-06-01

    The N-terminus of the B-chain of insulin may adopt two alternative conformations designated as the T- and R-states. Despite the recent structural insight into insulin-insulin receptor (IR) complexes, the physiological relevance of the T/R transition is still unclear. Hence, this study focused on the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of human insulin analogues structurally locked in expected R- or T-states. Sites B3, B5, and B8, capable of affecting the conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain, were subjects of rational substitutions with amino acids with specific allowed and disallowed dihedral φ and ψ main-chain angles. α-Aminoisobutyric acid was systematically incorporated into positions B3, B5, and B8 for stabilization of the R-state, and N-methylalanine and d-proline amino acids were introduced at position B8 for stabilization of the T-state. IR affinities of the analogues were compared and correlated with their T/R transition ability and analyzed against their crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures. Our data revealed that (i) the T-like state is indeed important for the folding efficiency of (pro)insulin, (ii) the R-state is most probably incompatible with an active form of insulin, (iii) the R-state cannot be induced or stabilized by a single substitution at a specific site, and (iv) the B1-B8 segment is capable of folding into a variety of low-affinity T-like states. Therefore, we conclude that the active conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain must be different from the "classical" T-state and that a substantial flexibility of the B1-B8 segment, where GlyB8 plays a key role, is a crucial prerequisite for an efficient insulin-IR interaction. PMID:24819248

  10. Insight into the Structural and Biological Relevance of the T/R Transition of the N-Terminus of the B-Chain in Human Insulin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The N-terminus of the B-chain of insulin may adopt two alternative conformations designated as the T- and R-states. Despite the recent structural insight into insulin–insulin receptor (IR) complexes, the physiological relevance of the T/R transition is still unclear. Hence, this study focused on the rational design, synthesis, and characterization of human insulin analogues structurally locked in expected R- or T-states. Sites B3, B5, and B8, capable of affecting the conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain, were subjects of rational substitutions with amino acids with specific allowed and disallowed dihedral φ and ψ main-chain angles. α-Aminoisobutyric acid was systematically incorporated into positions B3, B5, and B8 for stabilization of the R-state, and N-methylalanine and d-proline amino acids were introduced at position B8 for stabilization of the T-state. IR affinities of the analogues were compared and correlated with their T/R transition ability and analyzed against their crystal and nuclear magnetic resonance structures. Our data revealed that (i) the T-like state is indeed important for the folding efficiency of (pro)insulin, (ii) the R-state is most probably incompatible with an active form of insulin, (iii) the R-state cannot be induced or stabilized by a single substitution at a specific site, and (iv) the B1–B8 segment is capable of folding into a variety of low-affinity T-like states. Therefore, we conclude that the active conformation of the N-terminus of the B-chain must be different from the “classical” T-state and that a substantial flexibility of the B1–B8 segment, where GlyB8 plays a key role, is a crucial prerequisite for an efficient insulin–IR interaction. PMID:24819248

  11. The long N-terminus of the human monocarboxylate transporter 8 is a target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation which regulates protein expression and oligomerization capacity.

    PubMed

    Zwanziger, Denise; Schmidt, Mathias; Fischer, Jana; Kleinau, Gunnar; Braun, Doreen; Schweizer, Ulrich; Moeller, Lars Christian; Biebermann, Heike; Fuehrer, Dagmar

    2016-10-15

    Monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) equilibrates thyroid hormones between the extra- and the intracellular sides. MCT8 exists either with a short or a long N-terminus, but potential functional differences between both variants are yet not known. We, therefore, generated MCT8 constructs which are different in N-terminal length: MCT8(1-613), MCT8(25-613), MCT8(49-613) and MCT8(75-613). The M75G substitution prevents translation of MCT8(75-613) and ensures expression of full-length MCT8 protein. The K56G substitution was made to prevent ubiquitinylation. Cell-surface expression, localization and proteasomal degradation were investigated using C-terminally GFP-tagged MCT8 constructs (HEK293 and MDCK1 cells) and oligomerization capacity was determined using N-terminally HA- and C-terminally FLAG-tagged MCT8 constructs (COS7 cells). MCT8(1-613)-GFP showed a lower protein expression than the shorter MCT8(75-613)-GFP protein. The proteasome inhibitor lactacystin increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein amount, suggesting proteasomal degradation of MCT8 with the long N-terminus. Ubiquitin conjugation of MCT8(1-613)-GFP was found by immuno-precipitation. A diminished ubiquitin conjugation caused by K56G substitution resulted in increased MCT8(1-613)-GFP protein expression. Sandwich ELISA was performed to investigate if the bands at higher molecular weight observed in Western blot analysis are due to MCT8 oligomerization, which was indeed shown. Our data imply a role of the long N-terminus of MCT8 as target of ubiquitin-dependent proteasomal degradation affecting MCT8 amount and subsequently oligomerization capacity. PMID:27222294

  12. Barbiturates require the N terminus and first transmembrane domain of the delta subunit for enhancement of alpha1beta3delta GABAA receptor currents.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hua-Jun; Macdonald, Robert L

    2010-07-30

    GABA(A) receptors are composed predominantly of alphabetagamma receptors, which mediate primarily synaptic inhibition, and alphabetadelta receptors, which mediate primarily extrasynaptic inhibition. At saturating GABA concentrations, the barbiturate pentobarbital substantially increased the amplitude and desensitization of the alpha1beta3delta receptor but not the alpha1beta3gamma2L receptor currents. To explore the structural domains of the delta subunit that are involved in pentobarbital potentiation and increased desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents, chimeric cDNAs were constructed by progressive replacement of gamma2L subunit sequence with a delta subunit sequence or a delta subunit sequence with a gamma2L subunit sequence, and HEK293T cells were co-transfected with alpha1 and beta3 subunits or alpha1 and beta3 subunits and a gamma2L, delta, or chimeric subunit. Currents evoked by a saturating concentration of GABA or by co-application of GABA and pentobarbital were recorded using the patch clamp technique. By comparing the extent of enhancement and changes in kinetic properties produced by pentobarbital among chimeric and wild type receptors, we concluded that although potentiation of alpha1beta3delta currents by pentobarbital required the delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to proline 241 in the first transmembrane domain (M1), increasing desensitization of alpha1beta3delta currents required a delta subunit sequence from the N terminus to isoleucine 235 in M1. These findings suggest that the delta subunit N terminus and N-terminal portion of the M1 domain are, at least in part, involved in transduction of the allosteric effect of pentobarbital to enhance alpha1beta3delta currents and that this effect involves a distinct but overlapping structural domain from that involved in altering desensitization. PMID:20525684

  13. Immunochemical detection of proteins related to the human c-myc exon 1.

    PubMed Central

    Gazin, C; Rigolet, M; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H; Galibert, F

    1986-01-01

    Published sequence data of the human c-myc gene indicate the presence of a coding capacity for a polypeptide of 188 residues within the first exon. Using antibodies raised against five synthetic peptides corresponding to different non-over-lapping parts of this polypeptide, two proteins of 32 kd and 58 kd antigenically related to the synthetic peptides have been detected in extracts of human cells. The confidence of this detection has been reinforced by showing that epitopes corresponding to different peptides were indeed located on the same molecule and that the 58 kd protein appears to be a dimeric form of the 32 kd protein. That these proteins originate from the first exon was indicated by: hybrid-arrested translation experiments followed by immunodetection of the translation products; in vitro translation of messenger RNA derived from cloned exon 1 by SP6 polymerase transcription. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:2430795

  14. Exploring the structure of the 100 amino-acid residue long N-terminus of the plant antenna protein CP29.

    PubMed

    Shabestari, Maryam Hashemi; Wolfs, Cor J A M; Spruijt, Ruud B; van Amerongen, Herbert; Huber, Martina

    2014-03-18

    The structure of the unusually long (∼100 amino-acid residues) N-terminal domain of the light-harvesting protein CP29 of plants is not defined in the crystal structure of this membrane protein. We studied the N-terminus using two electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) approaches: the rotational diffusion of spin labels at 55 residues with continuous-wave EPR, and three sets of distances with a pulsed EPR method. The N-terminus is relatively structured. Five regions that differ considerably in their dynamics are identified. Two regions have low rotational diffusion, one of which shows α-helical character suggesting contact with the protein surface. This immobile part is flanked by two highly dynamic, unstructured regions (loops) that cover residues 10-22 and 82-91. These loops may be important for the interaction with other light-harvesting proteins. The region around residue 4 also has low rotational diffusion, presumably because it attaches noncovalently to the protein. This section is close to a phosphorylation site (Thr-6) in related proteins, such as those encoded by the Lhcb4.2 gene. Phosphorylation might influence the interaction with other antenna complexes, thereby regulating the supramolecular organization in the thylakoid membrane. PMID:24655510

  15. Exploring the Structure of the 100 Amino-Acid Residue Long N-Terminus of the Plant Antenna Protein CP29

    PubMed Central

    Shabestari, Maryam Hashemi; Wolfs, Cor J.A.M.; Spruijt, Ruud B.; van Amerongen, Herbert; Huber, Martina

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the unusually long (∼100 amino-acid residues) N-terminal domain of the light-harvesting protein CP29 of plants is not defined in the crystal structure of this membrane protein. We studied the N-terminus using two electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) approaches: the rotational diffusion of spin labels at 55 residues with continuous-wave EPR, and three sets of distances with a pulsed EPR method. The N-terminus is relatively structured. Five regions that differ considerably in their dynamics are identified. Two regions have low rotational diffusion, one of which shows α-helical character suggesting contact with the protein surface. This immobile part is flanked by two highly dynamic, unstructured regions (loops) that cover residues 10–22 and 82–91. These loops may be important for the interaction with other light-harvesting proteins. The region around residue 4 also has low rotational diffusion, presumably because it attaches noncovalently to the protein. This section is close to a phosphorylation site (Thr-6) in related proteins, such as those encoded by the Lhcb4.2 gene. Phosphorylation might influence the interaction with other antenna complexes, thereby regulating the supramolecular organization in the thylakoid membrane. PMID:24655510

  16. Anionic Phospholipid Interactions of the Prion Protein N Terminus Are Minimally Perturbing and Not Driven Solely by the Octapeptide Repeat Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Martin P.; Hatty, Claire R.; Separovic, Frances; Hill, Andrew F.; Tew, Deborah J.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Haigh, Cathryn L.; James, Michael; Masters, Colin L.; Collins, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Although the N terminus of the prion protein (PrPC) has been shown to directly associate with lipid membranes, the precise determinants, biophysical basis, and functional implications of such binding, particularly in relation to endogenously occurring fragments, are unresolved. To better understand these issues, we studied a range of synthetic peptides: specifically those equating to the N1 (residues 23–110) and N2 (23–89) fragments derived from constitutive processing of PrPC and including those representing arbitrarily defined component domains of the N terminus of mouse prion protein. Utilizing more physiologically relevant large unilamellar vesicles, fluorescence studies at synaptosomal pH (7.4) showed absent binding of all peptides to lipids containing the zwitterionic headgroup phosphatidylcholine and mixtures containing the anionic headgroups phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidylserine. At pH 5, typical of early endosomes, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation showed the highest affinity binding occurred with N1 and N2, selective for anionic lipid species. Of particular note, the absence of binding by individual peptides representing component domains underscored the importance of the combination of the octapeptide repeat and the N-terminal polybasic regions for effective membrane interaction. In addition, using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and solid-state NMR, we characterized for the first time that both N1 and N2 deeply insert into the lipid bilayer with minimal disruption. Potential functional implications related to cellular stress responses are discussed. PMID:20679345

  17. Conserved amino acids within the N-terminus of the West Nile virus NS4A protein contribute to virus replication, protein stability and membrane proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrose, R.L.; Mackenzie, J.M.

    2015-07-15

    The West Nile virus strain Kunjin virus (WNV{sub KUN}) NS4A protein is a multifunctional protein involved in many aspects of the virus life-cycle and is a major component of the WNV{sub KUN} replication complex (RC). Previously we identified a conserved region in the C-terminus of NS4A regulating proteolytic processing and RC assembly, and now investigate key conserved residues in the N-terminus of NS4A and their contribution to WNV{sub KUN} replication. Mutation of P13 completely ablated replication, whereas, mutation of P48 and D49, near the first transmembrane helix, and G66 within the helix, showed variable defects in replication, virion secretion and membrane proliferation. Intriguingly, the P48 and G66 NS4A mutants resulted in specific proteasome depletion of NS4A that could in part be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. Our results suggest that the N-terminus of NS4A contributes to correct folding and stability, essential for facilitating the essential roles of NS4A during replication. - Highlights: • Mutation of Proline13 of the WNV NS4A protein is lethal to replication. • 1st TMB helix of NS4A contributes to protein stability and membrane remodelling. • Unstable mutants of NS4A can be rescued with a proteasome inhibitor. • This study (and of others) contributes to a functional mapping of the NS4A protein.

  18. Peptide vaccine against canine parvovirus: identification of two neutralization subsites in the N terminus of VP2 and optimization of the amino acid sequence.

    PubMed

    Casal, J I; Langeveld, J P; Cortés, E; Schaaper, W W; van Dijk, E; Vela, C; Kamstrup, S; Meloen, R H

    1995-11-01

    The N-terminal domain of the major capsid protein VP2 of canine parvovirus was shown to be an excellent target for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine, but detailed information about number of epitopes, optimal length, sequence choice, and site of coupling to the carrier protein was lacking. Therefore, several overlapping peptides based on this N terminus were synthesized to establish conditions for optimal and reproducible induction of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits. The specificity and neutralizing ability of the antibody response for these peptides were determined. Within the N-terminal 23 residues of VP2, two subsites able to induce neutralizing antibodies and which overlapped by only two glycine residues at positions 10 and 11 could be discriminated. The shortest sequence sufficient for neutralization induction was nine residues. Peptides longer than 13 residues consistently induced neutralization, provided that their N termini were located between positions 1 and 11 of VP2. The orientation of the peptides at the carrier protein was also of importance, being more effective when coupled through the N terminus than through the C terminus to keyhole limpet hemocyanin. The results suggest that the presence of amino acid residues 2 to 21 (and probably 3 to 17) of VP2 in a single peptide is preferable for a synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:7474152

  19. The N-terminus zinc finger domain of Xenopus SIP1 is important for neural induction, but not for suppression of Xbra expression.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Kazuhiro R; Takahashi, Shuji; Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Fukuda, Masakazu; Tanegashima, Kousuke; Onuma, Yasuko; Asashima, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Smad-interacting protein-1 (SIP1), also known as deltaEF2, ZEB2 and zfhx1b, is essential for the formation of the neural tube and the somites. Overexpression of Xenopus SIP1 causes ectopic neural induction via inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and inhibition of Xbra expression. Here, we report the functional analyses of 4 domain-deletion mutants of XSIP1. Deletion of the N-terminus zinc finger domain suppressed neural induction and BMP inhibition, but these were not affected by deletion of the other domains (the Smad binding domain, the DNA-binding homeodomain together with the CtBP binding site and the C-terminus zinc finger). Therefore SIP1 does not inhibit BMP signaling by binding to Smad proteins. In contrast, all of the deletion constructs inhibited Xbra expression. These results suggest that the N-terminus zinc finger domain of XSIP1 has an important role in neural induction and that Xbra suppression occurs via a mechanism separate from the neural inducing activity. PMID:17554684

  20. Characterization of 5' promoter and exon 1-3 polymorphism of the RAET1E gene.

    PubMed

    Cox, Steven T; Pearson, Hayley; Laza-Briviesca, Raquel; Pesoa, Susanna; Vullo, Carlos; Madrigal, J Alejandro; Saudemont, Aurore

    2016-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating receptor utilized by natural killer (NK) cells that recognizes upregulated ligands on infected, tumorigenic and damaged cells, leading to their cytolysis. However, the NKG2D ligand (NKG2DL) system is very complex with eight known gene loci encoding slightly different molecules. Furthermore, most NKG2DL gene loci such as MICA and MICB are highly polymorphic with potential for functional differences. NKG2DL expression on tumors varies depending on the malignancy and tumors can also release soluble NKG2DL that exert anergic effects on NK cells when engagement with NKG2D occurs, allowing escape from NK cell immunosurveillance. We carried out RAET1E typing of IHW cell line DNA, including a 580 bp proximal promoter fragment and exons 1-3 identifying 13 of 15 known RAET1E alleles. We determined 7 polymorphisms within the promoter region, including 2 already known that contributed to 9 promoter types. RAET1E alleles with variability in the extracellular region also differed with respect to promoter type and one allele, RAET1E(∗)003, associated with 5 promoter types. We then identified putative transcription factor binding sites for RAET1E, and found 5 of the 7 promoter polymorphisms may disrupt these sites, abrogating binding of transcription factors and varying the potential level of expression. PMID:26519211

  1. Rapid molecular diagnosis of the Gilbert's syndrome-associated exon 1 mutation within the UGT1A1 gene.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, T-Y; Shiu, T-Y; Chu, N-F; Chao, T-Y; Chu, H-C; Chang, W-K; Chao, Y-C; Huang, H-H

    2014-01-01

    Gilbert's syndrome is suspected in patients with unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by decreased activity of the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1) gene in the absence of abnormal liver function and hemolysis. The major genetic variants underlying Gilbert's syndrome are TATA-box repeats of the promoter region and exon 1 G211A of the coding region, particularly in Asians. The efficacy of DNA melting curve analysis, however, has not been established for the G211A mutation. For rapid and accurate molecular diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome, DNA melting curve analysis was evaluated for its genotyping capability not only for TATA-box repeats of the UGT1A1 promoter, but also for G211A of UGT1A1 exon 1. TA repeats within the TATA-box sequence and the exon 1 G211A mutation of the UGT1A1 gene were analyzed by DNA melting curve analysis. To evaluate the assay reliability, direct sequencing or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used as a comparative method. All homozygous and heterozygous polymorphisms of A(TA)7TAA within the TATA-box allele and of exon 1 G211A mutants of the UGT1A1 gene were successfully identified with DNA melting curve analysis. DNA melting curve analysis is, therefore, an effective molecular method for the rapid diagnosis of Gilbert's syndrome, as it detects not only TATA-box polymorphisms but also the exon 1 G211A mutation located within the UGT1A1 gene. PMID:24615032

  2. Conserved Residues in the N Terminus of Lipin-1 Are Required for Binding to Protein Phosphatase-1c, Nuclear Translocation, and Phosphatidate Phosphatase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Bernard P. C.; Skene-Arnold, Tamara D.; Ling, Ji; Benesch, Matthew G. K.; Dewald, Jay; Harris, Thurl E.; Holmes, Charles F. B.; Brindley, David N.

    2014-01-01

    Lipin-1 is a phosphatidate phosphatase in glycerolipid biosynthesis and signal transduction. It also serves as a transcriptional co-regulator to control lipid metabolism and adipogenesis. These functions are controlled partly by its subcellular distribution. Hyperphosphorylated lipin-1 remains sequestered in the cytosol, whereas hypophosphorylated lipin-1 translocates to the endoplasmic reticulum and nucleus. The serine/threonine protein phosphatase-1 catalytic subunit (PP-1c) is a major protein dephosphorylation enzyme. Its activity is controlled by interactions with different regulatory proteins, many of which contain conserved RVXF binding motifs. We found that lipin-1 binds to PP-1cγ through a similar HVRF binding motif. This interaction depends on Mg2+ or Mn2+ and is competitively inhibited by (R/H)VXF-containing peptides. Mutating the HVRF motif in the highly conserved N terminus of lipin-1 greatly decreases PP-1cγ interaction. Moreover, mutations of other residues in the N terminus of lipin-1 also modulate PP-1cγ binding. PP-1cγ binds poorly to a phosphomimetic mutant of lipin-1 and binds well to the non-phosphorylatable lipin-1 mutant. This indicates that lipin-1 is dephosphorylated before PP-1cγ binds to its HVRF motif. Importantly, mutating the HVRF motif also abrogates the nuclear translocation and phosphatidate phosphatase activity of lipin-1. In conclusion, we provide novel evidence of the importance of the lipin-1 N-terminal domain for its catalytic activity, nuclear localization, and binding to PP-1cγ. PMID:24558042

  3. Cauliflower mosaic virus gene VI product N-terminus contains regions involved in resistance-breakage, self-association and interactions with movement protein

    PubMed Central

    Hapiak, Michael; Li, Yongzhong; Agama, Keli; Swade, Shaddy; Okenka, Genevieve; Falk, Jessica; Khandekar, Sushant; Raikhy, Gaurav; Anderson, Alisha; Pollock, Justin; Zellner, Wendy; Schoelz, James; Leisner, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) gene VI encodes a multifunctional protein (P6) involved in the translation of viral RNA, the formation of inclusion bodies, and the determination of host range. Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Tsu-0 prevents the systemic spread of most CaMV isolates, including CM1841. However, CaMV isolate W260 overcomes this resistance. In this paper, the N-terminal 110 amino acids of P6 (termed D1) were identified as the resistance-breaking region. D1 also bound full-length P6. Furthermore, binding of W260 D1 to P6 induced higher β-galactosidase activity and better leucine-independent growth in the yeast two-hybrid system than its CM1841 counterpart. Thus, W260 may evade Tsu-0 resistance by mediating P6 self-association in a manner different from that of CM1841. Because Tsu-0 resistance prevents virus movement, interaction of P6 with P1 (CaMV movement protein) was investigated. Both yeast two-hybrid analyses and maltose-binding protein pull-down experiments show that P6 interacts with P1. Although neither half of P1 interacts with P6, the N-terminus of P6 binds P1. Interestingly, D1 by itself does not interact with P1, indicating that different portions of the P6 N-terminus are involved in different activities. The P1-P6 interactions suggest a role for P6 in virus transport, possibly by regulating P1 tubule formation or the assembly of movement complexes. PMID:18851998

  4. Multisite tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminus of Mint1/X11α by Src kinase regulates the trafficking of amyloid precursor protein.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Christopher J R; Black, Hannah L; Andrews, Katie L; Davenport, Elizabeth C; Conboy, Michael; Chawla, Sangeeta; Dowle, Adam A; Ashford, David; Thomas, Jerry R; Evans, Gareth J O

    2016-05-01

    Mint/X11 is one of the four neuronal trafficking adaptors that interact with amyloid precursor protein (APP) and are linked with its cleavage to generate β-amyloid peptide, a key player in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. How APP switches between adaptors at different stages of the secretory pathway is poorly understood. Here, we show that tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 regulates the destination of APP. A canonical SH2-binding motif ((202) YEEI) was identified in the N-terminus of Mint1 that is phosphorylated on tyrosine by C-Src and recruits the active kinase for sequential phosphorylation of further tyrosines (Y191 and Y187). A single Y202F mutation in the Mint1 N-terminus inhibits C-Src binding and tyrosine phosphorylation. Previous studies observed that co-expression of wild-type Mint1 and APP causes accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi. Unphosphorylatable Mint1 (Y202F) or pharmacological inhibition of Src reduced the accumulation of APP in the trans-Golgi of heterologous cells. A similar result was observed in cultured rat hippocampal neurons where Mint1(Y202F) permitted the trafficking of APP to more distal neurites than the wild-type protein. These data underline the importance of the tyrosine phosphorylation of Mint1 as a critical switch for determining the destination of APP. The regulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) trafficking is poorly understood. We have discovered that the APP adapter, Mint1, is phosphorylated by C-Src kinase. Mint1 causes APP accumulation in the trans-Golgi network, whereas inhibition of Src or mutation of Mint1-Y202 permits APP recycling. The phosphorylation status of Mint1 could impact on the pathological trafficking of APP in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26865271

  5. Ipomoelin, a Jacalin-Related Lectin with a Compact Tetrameric Association and Versatile Carbohydrate Binding Properties Regulated by Its N Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei-Chieh; Liu, Kai-Lun; Hsu, Fang-Ciao; Jeng, Shih-Tong; Cheng, Yi-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Many proteins are induced in the plant defense response to biotic stress or mechanical wounding. One group is lectins. Ipomoelin (IPO) is one of the wound-inducible proteins of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas cv. Tainung 57) and is a Jacalin-related lectin (JRL). In this study, we resolved the crystal structures of IPO in its apo form and in complex with carbohydrates such as methyl α-D-mannopyranoside (Me-Man), methyl α-D-glucopyranoside (Me-Glc), and methyl α-D-galactopyranoside (Me-Gal) in different space groups. The packing diagrams indicated that IPO might represent a compact tetrameric association in the JRL family. The protomer of IPO showed a canonical β-prism fold with 12 strands of β-sheets but with 2 additional short β-strands at the N terminus. A truncated IPO (ΔN10IPO) by removing the 2 short β-strands of the N terminus was used to reveal its role in a tetrameric association. Gel filtration chromatography confirmed IPO as a tetrameric form in solution. Isothermal titration calorimetry determined the binding constants (KA) of IPO and ΔN10IPO against various carbohydrates. IPO could bind to Me-Man, Me-Glc, and Me-Gal with similar binding constants. In contrast, ΔN10IPO showed high binding ability to Me-Man and Me-Glc but could not bind to Me-Gal. Our structural and functional analysis of IPO revealed that its compact tetrameric association and carbohydrate binding polyspecificity could be regulated by the 2 additional N-terminal β-strands. The versatile carbohydrate binding properties of IPO might play a role in plant defense. PMID:22808208

  6. The N terminus of SKAP55 enables T cell adhesion to TCR and integrin ligands via distinct mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ophir, Michael J.; Liu, Beiyun C.

    2013-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) triggers the assembly of “SLP-76 microclusters,” which mediate signals required for T cell activation. In addition to regulating integrin activation, we show that Src kinase–associated phosphoprotein of 55 kD (SKAP55) is required for microcluster persistence and movement, junctional stabilization, and integrin-independent adhesion via the TCR. These functions require the dimerization of SKAP55 and its interaction with the adaptor adhesion and degranulation-promoting adaptor protein (ADAP). A “tandem dimer” containing two ADAP-binding SKAP55 Src homology 3 (SH3) domains stabilized SLP-76 microclusters and promoted T cell adhesion via the TCR, but could not support adhesion to integrin ligands. Finally, the SKAP55 dimerization motif (DM) enabled the coimmunoprecipitation of the Rap1-dependent integrin regulator Rap1-GTP–interacting adaptor molecule (RIAM), the recruitment of talin into TCR-induced adhesive junctions, and “inside-out” signaling to β1 integrins. Our data indicate that SKAP55 dimers stabilize SLP-76 microclusters, couple SLP-76 to the force-generating systems responsible for microcluster movement, and enable adhesion via the TCR by mechanisms independent of RIAM, talin, and β1 integrins. PMID:24368808

  7. The RZZ complex requires the N-terminus of KNL1 to mediate optimal Mad1 kinetochore localization in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Caldas, Gina V.; Lynch, Tina R.; Anderson, Ryan; Afreen, Sana; Varma, Dileep; DeLuca, Jennifer G.

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that blocks anaphase onset until all chromosomes are properly attached to microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Checkpoint activity requires kinetochore localization of Mad1/Mad2 to inhibit activation of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome in the presence of unattached kinetochores. In budding yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans, Bub1, recruited to kinetochores through KNL1, recruits Mad1/Mad2 by direct linkage with Mad1. However, in human cells it is not yet established which kinetochore protein(s) function as the Mad1/Mad2 receptor. Both Bub1 and the RZZ complex have been implicated in Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment; however, their specific roles remain unclear. Here, we investigate the contributions of Bub1, RZZ and KNL1 to Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment. We find that the RZZ complex localizes to the N-terminus of KNL1, downstream of Bub1, to mediate robust Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore localization. Our data also point to the existence of a KNL1-, Bub1-independent mechanism for RZZ and Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment. Based on our results, we propose that in humans, the primary mediator for Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore localization is the RZZ complex. PMID:26581576

  8. N terminus determinants of MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae mediate interaction with FtsZ but do not affect interaction with MinD or homodimerization.

    PubMed

    Greco-Stewart, V; Ramirez-Arcos, S; Liao, M; Dillon, J R

    2007-06-01

    While bacterial cell division has been widely studied in rod-shaped bacteria, the mechanism of cell division in round (coccal) bacteria remains largely enigmatic. In the present study, interaction between the cell division inhibitor MinC from Neisseria gonorrhoeae (MinC(Ng)) and the gonococcal cell division proteins MinD(Ng) and FtsZ(Ng) are demonstrated. Protein truncation and site-directed mutagenic approaches determined which N-terminal residues were essential for cell division inhibition by MinC(Ng) using cell morphology as an indicator of protein functionality. Truncation from or mutation at the 13th amino acid of the N terminus of MinC(Ng) resulted in loss of protein function. Bioinformatic analyses predicted that point mutations of L35P and L68P would affect the alpha-helical conformation of the protein and we experimentally showed that these mutations alter the functionality of MinC(Ng). The bacterial two-hybrid system showed that interaction of MinC(Ng) with FtsZ(Ng) is abrogated upon truncation of 13 N-terminal residues while MinC(Ng)-MinD(Ng) interaction or MinC(Ng) homodimerization is unaffected. These data confirm interactions among gonococcal cell division proteins and determine the necessity of the 13th amino acid for MinC(Ng) function. PMID:17287984

  9. Identification of a novel domain at the N terminus of caveolin-1 that controls rear polarization of the protein and caveolae formation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xing-Hui; Flynn, Daniel C; Castranova, Vincent; Millecchia, Lyndell L; Beardsley, Andrew R; Liu, Jun

    2007-03-01

    When cells are migrating, caveolin-1, the principal protein component of caveolae, is excluded from the leading edge and polarized at the cell rear. The dynamic feature depends on a specific sequence motif that directs intracellular trafficking of the protein. Deletion mutation analysis revealed a putative polarization domain at the N terminus of caveolin-1, between amino acids 32-60. Alanine substitution identified a minimal sequence of 10 residues ((46)TKEIDLVNRD(55)) necessary for caveolin-1 rear polarization. Interestingly, deletion of amino acids 1-60 did not prevent the polarization of caveolin-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells or wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts because of an interaction of Cav(61-178) mutant with endogenous caveolin-1. Surprisingly, expression of the depolarization mutant in caveolin-1 null cells dramatically impeded caveolae formation. Furthermore, knockdown of caveolae formation by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin failed to prevent wild-type caveolin-1 rear polarization. Importantly, genetic depletion of caveolin-1 led to disoriented migration, which can be rescued by full-length caveolin-1 but not the depolarization mutant, indicating a role of caveolin-1 polarity in chemotaxis. Thus, we have identified a sequence motif that is essential for caveolin-1 rear polarization and caveolae formation. PMID:17213184

  10. Vaccination of Cattle with the N Terminus of LppQ of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides Results in Type III Immune Complex Disease upon Experimental Infection

    PubMed Central

    Frey, Joachim; Smith, Ken; Schnier, Christian; Wesonga, Hezron; Naessens, Jan; McKeever, Declan

    2015-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N′) of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N′ formulated in Freund's adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N′ in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP. PMID:25733516

  11. Evidence for auto-inhibition by the N terminus of hADAR2 and activation by dsRNA binding

    PubMed Central

    MACBETH, MARK R.; LINGAM, ARUNTH T.; BASS, BRENDA L.

    2004-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases that act on RNA (ADARs) catalyze adenosine to inosine conversion in RNA that is largely double stranded. Human ADAR2 (hADAR2) contains two double-stranded RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs), separated by a 90-amino acid linker, and these are followed by the C-terminal catalytic domain. We assayed enzymatic activity of N-terminal deletion constructs of hADAR2 to determine the role of the dsRBMs and the intervening linker peptide. We found that a truncated protein consisting of one dsRBM and the deaminase domain was capable of deaminating a short 15-bp substrate. In contrast, full-length hADAR2 was inactive on this short substrate. In addition, we observed that the N terminus, which was deleted from the truncated protein, inhibits editing activity when added in trans. We propose that the N-terminal domain of hADAR2 contains sequences that cause auto-inhibition of the enzyme. Our results suggest activation requires binding to an RNA substrate long enough to accommodate interactions with both dsRBMs. PMID:15383678

  12. C11449. Native N-Terminus Nitrophorin 2 from the Kissing Bug: Similarities to and Differences from NP2(D1A)

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Robert E.; Muthu, Dhanasekaran; Shokhireva, Tatiana K.; Garrett, Sarah A.; Zhang, Hongjun; Walker, F. Ann

    2012-01-01

    The first amino acid of mature native nitrophorin 2 is aspartic acid, and when expressed in E. coli the wild-type gene of the mature protein retains the methionine-0 which is produced by translation of the start codon. This form of NP2, (M0)NP2, has been found to have different properties from its D1A mutant, for which the Met0 is cleaved by the methionine aminopeptidase of E. coli [R. E. Berry, T. K. Shokhireva, I. Filippov, M. N. Shokhirev, H. Zhang, F. A. Walker, Biochemistry 2007, 46, 6830]. Native N-terminus nitrophorin 2 ((ΔM0)NP2) has been prepared by employing periplasmic expression of NP2 in E. coli using the pelB leader sequence from Erwinia carotovora, which is present in the pET-26b expression plasmid (Novagen). This paper details the similarities and differences between the three different N-terminal forms of nitrophorin 2, (M0)NP2, NP2(D1A), and (ΔM0)NP2. It is found that the NMR spectra of high- and low-spin (ΔM0)NP2 are essentially identical to those of NP2(D1A), but the rate and equilibrium constants for histamine and NO dissociation/association of the two are different. PMID:22976966

  13. The structural organization of the N-terminus domain of SopB, a virulence factor of Salmonella, depends on the nature of its protein partners.

    PubMed

    Roblin, Pierre; Lebrun, Pierre; Rucktooa, Prakash; Dewitte, Frederique; Lens, Zoe; Receveur-Brechot, Véronique; Raussens, Vincent; Villeret, Vincent; Bompard, Coralie

    2013-12-01

    The TTSS is used by Salmonella and many bacterial pathogens to inject virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of target eukaryotic cells. Once translocated these so-called effector proteins hijack a vast array of crucial cellular functions to the benefit of the bacteria. In the bacterial cytoplasm, some effectors are stabilized and maintained in a secretion competent state by interaction with specific type III chaperones. In this work we studied the conformation of the Chaperone Binding Domain of the effector named Salmonella Outer protein B (SopB) alone and in complex with its cognate chaperone SigE by a combination of biochemical, biophysical and structural approaches. Our results show that the N-terminus part of SopB is mainly composed by α-helices and unfolded regions whose organization/stabilization depends on their interaction with the different partners. This suggests that the partially unfolded state of this N-terminal region, which confers the adaptability of the effector to bind very different partners during the infection cycle, allows the bacteria to modulate numerous host cells functions limiting the number of translocated effectors. PMID:24075929

  14. Turnip yellow mosaic virus forms infectious particles without the native beta-annulus structure and flexible coat protein N-terminus.

    PubMed

    Powell, Joshua D; Barbar, Elisar; Dreher, Theo W

    2012-01-20

    Structural studies have implicated the TYMV N-terminal amino acids of the coat protein (CP) in both static (virion stabilization) and dynamic (RNA encapsidation and disencapsidation) roles. We have deleted residues 2-5, 2-10 and 2-26 from the N-terminus and expressed the mutant CPs in E. coli to assess assembly in the absence of genomic RNA and in plant infections to assess infectivity and virion properties. In E. coli, the deletion constructs formed virus-like particles, but in decreased yield. All mutants were infectious in Chinese cabbage, producing normal symptoms but with a slight delay and decreased viral yields. Virions were progressively less stable with increasing deletion size and also more accessible to small molecules. These results show that the N-terminal 26 amino acids are not essential for viral processes in vivo, although removal of these residues decreases stability and increases porosity, both important factors for virion integrity and survival outside the host. PMID:22078163

  15. The RZZ complex requires the N-terminus of KNL1 to mediate optimal Mad1 kinetochore localization in human cells.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Gina V; Lynch, Tina R; Anderson, Ryan; Afreen, Sana; Varma, Dileep; DeLuca, Jennifer G

    2015-11-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint is a surveillance mechanism that blocks anaphase onset until all chromosomes are properly attached to microtubules of the mitotic spindle. Checkpoint activity requires kinetochore localization of Mad1/Mad2 to inhibit activation of the anaphase promoting complex/cyclosome in the presence of unattached kinetochores. In budding yeast and Caenorhabditis elegans, Bub1, recruited to kinetochores through KNL1, recruits Mad1/Mad2 by direct linkage with Mad1. However, in human cells it is not yet established which kinetochore protein(s) function as the Mad1/Mad2 receptor. Both Bub1 and the RZZ complex have been implicated in Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment; however, their specific roles remain unclear. Here, we investigate the contributions of Bub1, RZZ and KNL1 to Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment. We find that the RZZ complex localizes to the N-terminus of KNL1, downstream of Bub1, to mediate robust Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore localization. Our data also point to the existence of a KNL1-, Bub1-independent mechanism for RZZ and Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore recruitment. Based on our results, we propose that in humans, the primary mediator for Mad1/Mad2 kinetochore localization is the RZZ complex. PMID:26581576

  16. A C-terminal Hydrophobic, Solvent-protected Core and a Flexible N-terminus are Potentially Required for Human Papillomavirus 18 E7 Protein Functionality

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, S.; Tian, Y; Greenaway, F; Sun, M

    2010-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of the high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) relies on the expression of genes specifying the E7 and E6 proteins. To investigate further the variation in oligomeric structure that has been reported for different E7 proteins, an HPV-18 E7 cloned from a Hispanic woman with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was purified to homogeneity most probably as a stable monomeric protein in aqueous solution. We determined that one zinc ion is present per HPV-18 E7 monomer by amino acid and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy analysis. Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results indicate that the zinc ion is important for the correct folding and thermal stability of HPV-18 E7. Hydroxyl radical mediated protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry and other biochemical and biophysical data indicate that near the C-terminus, the four cysteines of the two Cys-X{sub 2}-Cys motifs that are coordinated to the zinc ion form a solvent inaccessible core. The N-terminal LXCXE pRb binding motif region is hydroxyl radical accessible and conformationally flexible. Both factors, the relative flexibility of the pRb binding motif at the N-terminus and the C-terminal metal-binding hydrophobic solvent-protected core, combine together and facilitate the biological functions of HPV-18 E7.

  17. The N-terminus of histone H2B, but not that of histone H3 or its phosphorylation, is essential for chromosome condensation

    PubMed Central

    de la Barre, Anne-Elisabeth; Angelov, Dimitri; Molla, Annie; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    We have studied the role of individual histone N-termini and the phosphorylation of histone H3 in chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes, reconstituted with histone octamers containing different combinations of recombinant full-length and tailless histones, were used as competitors for chromosome assembly in Xenopus egg extracts. Nucleosomes reconstituted with intact octamers inhibited chromosome condensation as efficiently as the native ones, while tailless nucleosomes were unable to affect this process. Importantly, the addition to the extract of particles containing only intact histone H2B strongly interfered with chromosome formation while such an effect was not observed with particles lacking the N-terminal tail of H2B. This demonstrates that the inhibition effect observed in the presence of competitor nucleosomes is mainly due to the N-terminus of this histone, which, therefore, is essential for chromosome condensation. Nucleosomes in which all histones but H3 were tailless did not impede chromosome formation. In addition, when competitor nucleosome particles were reconstituted with full-length H2A, H2B and H4 and histone H3 mutated at the phosphorylable serine 10 or serine 28, their inhibiting efficiency was identical to that of the native particles. Hence, the tail of H3, whether intact or phosphorylated, is not important for chromosome condensation. A novel hypothesis, termed ‘the ready production label’ was suggested to explain the role of histone H3 phosphorylation during cell division. PMID:11707409

  18. Synthesis and properties of peptide nucleic acid labeled at the N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

    PubMed

    Hnedzko, Dziyana; McGee, Dennis W; Rozners, Eriks

    2016-09-15

    Fluorescently labeled peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) are important tools in fundamental research and biomedical applications. However, synthesis of labeled PNAs, especially using modern and expensive dyes, is less explored than similar preparations of oligonucleotide dye conjugates. Herein, we present a simple procedure for labeling of the PNA N-terminus with HiLyte Fluor 488 as the last step of solid phase PNA synthesis. A minimum excess of 1.25equiv of activated carboxylic acid achieved labeling yields close to 90% providing a good compromise between the price of dye and the yield of product and significant improvement over previous literature procedures. The HiLyte Fluor 488-labeled PNAs retained the RNA binding ability and in live cell fluorescence microscopy experiments were brighter and significantly more photostable than PNA labeled with carboxyfluorescein. In contrast to fluorescein-labeled PNA, the fluorescence of PNAs labeled with HiLyte Fluor 488 was independent of pH in the biologically relevant range of 5-8. The potential of HiLyte Fluor 488-labeling for studies of PNA cellular uptake and distribution was demonstrated in several cell lines. PMID:27430566

  19. Modular elements of the TPR domain in the Mps1 N terminus differentially target Mps1 to the centrosome and kinetochore.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Joseph R; Perkins, Jennifer L; Beuoy, Kyle J; Fisk, Harold A

    2016-07-12

    Faithful segregation of chromosomes to two daughter cells is regulated by the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and the spindle assembly checkpoint, ensuring proper spindle function. Here we show that the proper localization of the kinase Mps1 (monopolar spindle 1) is critical to both these processes. Separate elements in the Mps1 N-terminal extension (NTE) and tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domains govern localization to either the kinetochore or the centrosome. The third TPR (TPR3) and the TPR-capping helix (C-helix) are each sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome. TPR3 binds to voltage-dependent anion channel 3, but although this is sufficient for centrosome targeting of Mps1, it is not necessary because of the presence of the C-helix. A version of Mps1 lacking both elements cannot localize to or function at the centrosome, but maintains kinetochore localization and spindle assembly checkpoint function, indicating that TPR3 and the C-helix define a bipartite localization determinant that is both necessary and sufficient to target Mps1 to the centrosome but dispensable for kinetochore targeting. In contrast, elements required for kinetochore targeting (the NTE and first two TPRs) are dispensable for centrosomal localization and function. These data are consistent with a separation of Mps1 function based on localization determinants within the N terminus. PMID:27339139

  20. Vaccination of cattle with the N terminus of LppQ of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides results in type III immune complex disease upon experimental infection.

    PubMed

    Mulongo, Musa; Frey, Joachim; Smith, Ken; Schnier, Christian; Wesonga, Hezron; Naessens, Jan; McKeever, Declan

    2015-05-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is a serious respiratory disease of cattle caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. Current vaccines against CBPP induce short-lived immunity and can cause severe postvaccine reactions. Previous studies have identified the N terminus of the transmembrane lipoprotein Q (LppQ-N') of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides as the major antigen and a possible virulence factor. We therefore immunized cattle with purified recombinant LppQ-N' formulated in Freund's adjuvant and challenged them with M. mycoides subsp. mycoides. Vaccinated animals showed a strong seroconversion to LppQ, but they exhibited significantly enhanced postchallenge glomerulonephritis compared to the placebo group (P = 0.021). Glomerulonephritis was characterized by features that suggested the development of antigen-antibody immune complexes. Clinical signs and gross pathological scores did not significantly differ between vaccinated and placebo groups. These findings reveal for the first time the pathogenesis of enhanced disease as a result of antibodies against LppQ during challenge and also argue against inclusion of LppQ-N' in a future subunit vaccine for CBPP. PMID:25733516

  1. The N-terminus of Mcm10 is important for interaction with the 9-1-1 clamp and in resistance to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Alver, Robert C.; Zhang, Tianji; Josephrajan, Ajeetha; Fultz, Brandy L.; Hendrix, Chance J.; Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate replication of the genome requires the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance protein, Mcm10. Although the details of the precise role of Mcm10 in DNA replication are still debated, it interacts with the Mcm2-7 core helicase, the lagging strand polymerase, DNA polymerase-α and the replication clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Loss of these interactions caused by the depletion of Mcm10 leads to chromosome breakage and cell cycle checkpoint activation. However, whether Mcm10 has an active role in DNA damage prevention is unknown. Here, we present data that establish a novel role of the N-terminus of Mcm10 in resisting DNA damage. We show that Mcm10 interacts with the Mec3 subunit of the 9-1-1 clamp in response to replication stress evoked by UV irradiation or nucleotide shortage. We map the interaction domain with Mec3 within the N-terminal region of Mcm10 and demonstrate that its truncation causes UV light sensitivity. This sensitivity is not further enhanced by a deletion of MEC3, arguing that MCM10 and MEC3 operate in the same pathway. Since Rad53 phosphorylation in response to UV light appears to be normal in N-terminally truncated mcm10 mutants, we propose that Mcm10 may have a role in replication fork restart or DNA repair. PMID:24972833

  2. Heat stability of maize endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is enhanced by insertion of a cysteine in the N terminus of the small subunit.

    PubMed

    Linebarger, Carla R Lyerly; Boehlein, Susan K; Sewell, Aileen K; Shaw, Janine; Hannah, L Curtis

    2005-12-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. However, plant AGPases differ in several parameters, including spatial and temporal expression, allosteric regulation, and heat stability. AGPases of cereal endosperms are heat labile, while those in other tissues, such as the potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber, are heat stable. Sequence comparisons of heat-stable and heat-labile AGPases identified an N-terminal motif unique to heat-stable enzymes. Insertion of this motif into recombinant maize (Zea mays) endosperm AGPase increased the half-life at 58 degrees C more than 70-fold. Km values for physiological substrates were unaffected, although Kcat was doubled. A cysteine within the inserted motif gives rise to small subunit homodimers not found in the wild-type maize enzyme. Placement of this N-terminal motif into a mosaic small subunit containing the N terminus from maize endosperm and the C terminus from potato tuber AGPase increases heat stability more than 300-fold. PMID:16299180

  3. Harvey ras genes transform without mutant codons, apparently activated by truncation of a 5' exon (exon -1).

    PubMed Central

    Cichutek, K; Duesberg, P H

    1986-01-01

    The hypothesis is tested that the ras gene of Harvey sarcoma virus (Ha-SV) and the proto-ras DNAs from certain tumor cells derive transforming function from specific codons in which they differ from normal proto-ras genes. Molecularly cloned Harvey proviral vectors carrying viral ras, normal rat proto-ras, and recombinant ras genes in which the virus-specific ras codons 12 and 59 were replaced by proto-ras equivalents each transformed aneuploid mouse 3T3 cells after latent periods that ranged from 4 to 10 days. Viruses with or without virus-specific ras codons all transformed diploid rat cells in 3-5 days equally well. However, in the absence of virus replication, mutant codons were beneficial for transforming function. Deletion of non-ras regions of Ha-SV did not affect transforming function. We conclude that specific ras codons are not necessary for transforming function. Comparisons of the ras sequences of Ha-SV, BALB SV, and Rasheed SV with sequences of proto-ras genes from rat and man revealed an upstream proto-ras exon, termed exon -1. The 3' end of this exon is present in all three viruses and in a ras pseudogene of the rat. Since ras genes transform without mutation and since exon -1 is truncated in viral ras genes and all transforming proto-ras DNAs of the Harvey and the Kirsten ras family, we propose that ras genes are activated by truncation of exon -1 either via viral transduction or artificially via cloning and transfection. The proposal implies that untruncated proto-ras genes with point mutations may not be cellular cancer genes. Images PMID:3517865

  4. Association between CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism and asthma: an updated meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ying-Shui; Wang, Lin-Hong; Chang, Wei-Wei; He, Lian-Ping; Li, Jie; Jin, Yue-Long; Li, Chao-Pin

    2015-01-01

    The results of studies on association between CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G (rs231775) polymorphism and susceptibility to asthma are controversial. To derive a more precise estimation of the relationship between the CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism and asthma, a meta-analysis of 15 published case-control studies was performed. 15 studies meeting our inclusion criteria comprising 4006 asthma cases and 3729 controls were included. The effect summary odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were obtained. Publication bias was tested by funnel plot, Egger's test and heterogeneity was assessed. The combined results showed that there were significant differences in genotype distribution between asthma cases and control on the basis of all studies, GG + GA versus AA (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62-0.93; P = 0.008). When stratifying for the race, the phenomenon was found that asthma cases had a significantly higher frequency of GG/GA versus AA (OR = 0.71; 95% CI: 0.51-0.99; P = 0.04) than control in Caucasian. Stratifying subjects by age indicated an association between CTLA-4 +49 GG + GA genotype and asthma in children (OR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.62-0.90; P = 0.002), but no association in adults (OR = 0.93; 95% CI: 0.76-1.14; P = 0.48). Furthermore, significant association was observed in atopic asthma under the fixed-effects model (GG + GA vs. AA: P = 0.03, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.67-0.98, P heterogeneity = 0.22). Our meta-analysis results suggest that CTLA-4 exon-1 +49A/G polymorphism might be a risk factor for asthma susceptibility, at least in Caucasian, children, and patients with atopy status. PMID:26064199

  5. DNA Methylation in the Exon 1 Region and Complex Regulation of Twist1 Expression in Gastric Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Ayuna; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Shimada, Shu; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Yuasa, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Twist1 overexpression is frequently observed in various cancers including gastric cancer (GC). Although DNA methylation of the Twist1 gene has been reported in cancer cells, the mechanisms underlying transcriptional activation remain uncertain. In this study, we first examined epigenetic alterations of the Twist1 using Twist1 transcription-positive and -negative cell lines that are derived from our established diffuse-type GC mouse model. Treatment with a DNA demethylation agent 5-aza-dC re-activated Twist1 expression in Twist1 expression-negative GC cells. According to methylation-specific PCR and bisulfite sequencing analysis, methylation at the CpG-rich region within Twist1 coding exon 1, rather than its promoter region, was tightly linked to transcriptional silencing of the Twist1 expression in mouse GC cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that active histone mark H3K4me3 was enriched in Twist1 expression-positive cells, and inactive histone mark H3K9me3 was enriched in Twist1 expression-negative cells. The expression levels of Suv39h1 and Suv39h2, histone methyltransferases for H3K9me3, were inversely correlated with Twist1 expression, and knockdown of Suv39h1 or Suv39h2 induced Twist1 expression. Moreover, Sp1 transcription factor bound to the exon 1 CpG-rich region in Twist1 expression-positive cell lines, and Twist1 expression was diminished by mithramycin, which that interferes with Sp1 binding to CpG-rich regulatory sequences. Our studies suggested that the Twist1 transcription in GC cells might be regulated through potential cooperation of DNA methylation, histone modification in complex with Sp1 binding to CpG-rich regions within the exon 1 region. PMID:26695186

  6. Novel polymorphism in exon 1 of the melatonin receptor gene unassociated with reproductive characteristics of buffaloes in the Amazon Region.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, E M; Souza, B B; Guimarães, R C; Azevedo, J S N; Gonçalves, E C; Ribeiro, H F L; Rolim Filho, S T; Silva Filho, E

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to sequence part of the exon 1 in the melatonin receptor 1A gene (MTRN1A) in buffaloes to detect a novel polymorphism with which to associate reproductive characteristics, such as age at first birth and the interval between births, in buffaloes from the northeastern region of the State of Pará (Brazil). Buffalo hair samples (77) were collected from the Terra Firme region of Pará. DNA was extracted and polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were carried out with a primer that was designed using the GenBank accession No. AY524665 reference sequence. PCR products were purified and sequenced. After editing and analysis of the sequences, a mutation was observed at the 62nd position in exon 1 of MTRN1A (T↔C), which corresponded with a change in the 21st amino acid from leucine to proline. All possible genotypes were observed, with the most common being genotype CC (0.481). The allele frequencies were T = 0.377 and C = 0.623. Statistical analysis of FIS showed inbreeding within the sample group (FIS = 0.397) and deviations from the Hardy- Weinberg equilibrium were observed (P < 0.05). Associations between genotypes and reproductive characteristics were not significant (P > 0.05). Although the related SNP was not synonymous, there were no observable effects on the reproductive characteristics under investigation. As such, it would be ideal to detect other SNPs in exon 1 of the MTRN1A gene that can be associated with reproductive characteristics in Amazonian buffaloes. PMID:27421017

  7. In vivo reconstitution of a homodimeric cytochrome b559 like structure: The role of the N-terminus α-subunit from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Luján, María A; Martínez, Jesús I; Alonso, Pablo J; Torrado, Alejandro; Roncel, Mercedes; Ortega, José M; Sancho, Javier; Picorel, Rafael

    2015-11-01

    The cytochrome b559 is a heme-bridged heterodimeric protein with two subunits, α and β. Both subunits from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 have previously been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli and in vivo reconstitution experiments have been carried out. The formation of homodimers in the bacterial membrane with endogenous heme was only observed in the case of the β-subunit (β/β) but not with the full length α-subunit. In the present work, reconstitution of a homodimer (α/α) cytochrome b559 like structure was possible using a chimeric N-terminus α-subunit truncated before the amino acid isoleucine 17, eliminating completely a short amphipathic α-helix that lays on the surface of the membrane. Overexpression and in vivo reconstitution in the bacteria was clearly demonstrated by the brownish color of the culture pellet and the use of a commercial monoclonal antibody against the fusion protein carrier, the maltoside binding protein, and polyclonal antibodies against a synthetic peptide of the α-subunit from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, a simple partial purification after membrane solubilization with Triton X-100 confirmed that the overexpressed protein complex corresponded with the maltoside binding protein-chimeric α-subunit cytochrome b559 like structure. The features of the new structure were determined by UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance and redox potentiometric techniques. Ribbon representations of all possible structures are also shown to better understand the mechanism of the cytochrome b559 maturation in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. PMID:26183783

  8. The N Terminus of the Vaccinia Virus Protein F1L Is an Intrinsically Unstructured Region That Is Not Involved in Apoptosis Regulation.

    PubMed

    Caria, Sofia; Marshall, Bevan; Burton, Robyn-Lee; Campbell, Stephanie; Pantaki-Eimany, Delara; Hawkins, Christine J; Barry, Michele; Kvansakul, Marc

    2016-07-01

    Subversion of host cell apoptotic responses is a prominent feature of viral immune evasion strategies to prevent premature clearance of infected cells. Numerous poxviruses encode structural and functional homologs of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, and vaccinia virus harbors antiapoptotic F1L that potently inhibits the mitochondrial apoptotic checkpoint. Recently F1L has been assigned a caspase-9 inhibitory function attributed to an N-terminal α helical region of F1L spanning residues 1-15 (1) preceding the domain-swapped Bcl-2-like domains. Using a reconstituted caspase inhibition assay in yeast we found that unlike AcP35, a well characterized caspase-9 inhibitor from the insect virus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus, F1L does not prevent caspase-9-mediated yeast cell death. Furthermore, we found that deletion of the F1L N-terminal region does not impede F1L antiapoptotic activity in the context of a viral infection. Solution analysis of the F1L N-terminal regions using small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the region of F1L spanning residues 1-50 located N-terminally from the Bcl-2 fold is an intrinsically unstructured region. We conclude that the N terminus of F1L is not involved in apoptosis inhibition and may act as a regulatory element in other signaling pathways in a manner reminiscent of other unstructured regulatory elements commonly found in mammalian prosurvival Bcl-2 members including Bcl-xL and Mcl-1. PMID:27151220

  9. NMR structures of anti-HIV D-peptides derived from the N-terminus of viral chemokine vMIP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Mayuko; Liu Dongxiang; Kumar, Santosh; Huang Ziwei; E-mail: ziweihuang@burnham.org

    2005-09-30

    The viral macrophage inflammatory protein-II (vMIP-II) encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus has unique biological activities in that it blocks the cell entry by several different human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains via chemokine receptors including CXCR4 and CCR5. In this paper, we report the solution structure of all-D-amino acid peptides derived from the N-terminus of vMIP-II, which have been shown to have strong CXCR4 binding activity and potently inhibit HIV-1 entry via CXCR4, by using long mixing time two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiments. Both of all-D-peptides vMIP-II (1-10) and vMIP-II (1-21), which are designated as DV3 and DV1, respectively, have higher CXCR4 binding ability than their L-peptide counterparts. They are partially structured in aqueous solution, displaying a turn-like structure over residues 5-8. The small temperature coefficients of His-6 amide proton for both peptides also suggest the formation of a small hydrophobic pocket centered on His-6. The structural features of DV3 are very similar to the reported solution structure of all-L-peptide vMIP-II (1-10) [M.P. Crump, E. Elisseeva, J. Gong, I. Clark-Lewis, B.D. Sykes, Structure/function of human herpesvirus-8 MIP-II (1-71) and the antagonist N-terminal segment (1-10), FEBS Lett. 489 (2001) 171], which is consistent with the notion that D- and L-enantiomeric peptides can adopt mirror image conformations. The NMR structures of the D-peptides provide a structural basis to understand their mechanism of action and design new peptidomimetic analogs to further explore the structure-activity relationship of D-peptide ligand binding to CXCR4.

  10. A Nonviral Peptide Can Replace the Entire N Terminus of Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Potyvirus Coat Protein and Permits Viral Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Arazi, T.; Shiboleth, Y. M.; Gal-On, A.

    2001-01-01

    Systematic deletion and peptide tagging of the amino-terminal domain (NT, ∼43 amino acids) of an attenuated zucchini yellow mosaic potyvirus (ZYMV-AGII) coat protein (CP) were used to elucidate its role in viral systemic infection. Deletion mutants truncated by 8, 13, and 33 amino acid residues from the CP-NT 5′ end were systemically infectious and produced symptoms similar to those of the AGII virus. Tagging these deletion mutants with either human c-Myc (Myc) or hexahistidine peptides maintained viral infectivity. Similarly, addition of these peptides to the intact AGII CP-NT did not affect viral life cycle. To determine which parts, if any, of the CP-NT are essential for viral systemic infection, a series of Myc-tagged mutants with 8 to 43 amino acids removed from the CP-NT were constructed. All Myc-tagged CP-NT deletion mutants, including those from which virtually all the viral CP-NT had been eliminated, were able to encapsidate and cause systemic infection. Furthermore, chimeric viruses with deletions of up to 33 amino acids from CP-NT produced symptoms indistinguishable from those caused by the parental AGII virus. In contrast to CP-NT Myc fusion, addition of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) immunogenic epitope to AGII CP-NT did not permit systemic infection. However, fusion of the Myc peptide to the N terminus of the FMDV peptide restored the capability of the virus to spread systemically. We have demonstrated that all CP-NT fused peptides were exposed on the virion surface, masking natural CP immunogenic determinants. Our findings demonstrate that CP-NT is not essential for ZYMV spread and that it can be replaced by an appropriate foreign peptide while maintaining systemic infectivity. PMID:11413299

  11. Engineering the Expression and Characterization of Two Novel Laccase Isoenzymes from Coprinus comatus in Pichia pastoris by Fusing an Additional Ten Amino Acids Tag at N-Terminus

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Chunjuan; Zheng, Fei; Long, Liangkun; Wang, Jing; Ding, Shaojun

    2014-01-01

    The detail understanding of physiological/biochemical characteristics of individual laccase isoenzymes in fungi is necessary for fundamental and application purposes, but our knowledge is still limited for most of fungi due to difficult to express laccases heterologously. In this study, two novel laccase genes, named lac3 and lac4, encoding proteins of 547 and 532-amino acids preceded by 28 and 16-residue signal peptides, respectively, were cloned from the edible basidiomycete Coprinus comatus. They showed 70% identity but much lower homology with other fungal laccases at protein level (less than 58%). Two novel laccase isoenzymes were successfully expressed in Pichia pastoris by fusing an additional 10 amino acids (Thr-Pro-Phe-Pro-Pro-Phe-Asn-Thr-Asn-Ser) tag at N-terminus, and the volumetric activities could be dramatically enhanced from undetectable level to 689 and 1465 IU/l for Lac3 and Lac4, respectively. Both laccases possessed the lowest Km and highest kcat/Km value towards syringaldazine, followed by ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-dimethylphenol similar as the low redox potential laccases from other microorganisms. Lac3 and Lac4 showed resistant to SDS, and retained 31.86% and 43.08% activity in the presence of 100 mM SDS, respectively. Lac3 exhibited higher decolorization efficiency than Lac4 for eleven out of thirteen different dyes, which may attribute to the relatively higher catalytic efficiency of Lac3 than Lac4 (in terms of kcat/Km) towards syringaldazine and ABTS. The mild synergistic decolorization by two laccases was observed for triphenylmethane dyes but not for anthraquinone and azo dyes. PMID:24710109

  12. Structure–activity relationships of the N-terminus of calcitonin gene-related peptide: key roles of alanine-5 and threonine-6 in receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Hay, Debbie L; Harris, Paul WR; Kowalczyk, Renata; Brimble, Margaret A; Rathbone, Dan L; Barwell, James; Conner, Alex C; Poyner, David R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: The N-terminus of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is important for receptor activation, especially the disulphide-bonded ring (residues 1–7). However, the roles of individual amino acids within this region have not been examined and so the molecular determinants of agonism are unknown. This study has examined the role of residues 1, 3–6 and 8–9, excluding Cys-2 and Cys-7. Experimental Approach: CGRP derivatives were substituted with either cysteine or alanine; further residues were introduced at position 6. Their affinity was measured by radioligand binding and their efficacy by measuring cAMP production in SK-N-MC cells and β-arrestin 2 translocation in CHO-K1 cells at the CGRP receptor. Key Results: Substitution of Ala-5 by cysteine reduced affinity 270-fold and reduced efficacy for production of cAMP in SK-N-MCs. Potency at β-arrestin translocation was reduced by ninefold. Substitution of Thr-6 by cysteine destroyed all measurable efficacy of both cAMP and β-arrestin responses; substitution with either alanine or serine impaired potency. Substitutions at positions 1, 4, 8 and 9 resulted in approximately 10-fold reductions in potency at both responses. Similar observations were made at a second CGRP-activated receptor, the AMY1(a) receptor. Conclusions and Implications: Ala-5 and Thr-6 are key determinants of agonist activity for CGRP. Ala-5 is also very important for receptor binding. Residues outside of the 1–7 ring also contribute to agonist activity. PMID:24125506

  13. Identification of an epitope in the C terminus of normal prion protein whose expression is modulated by binding events in the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Liu, T; Wong, B S; Pan, T; Morillas, M; Swietnicki, W; O'Rourke, K; Gambetti, P; Surewicz, W K; Sy, M S

    2000-08-18

    We have characterized the epitopes of a panel of 12 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed to normal human cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) using ELISA and Western blotting of recombinant PrP or synthetic peptide fragments of PrP. The first group of antibodies, which is represented by Mabs 5B2 and 8B4, reacts with PrP(23-145), indicating that the epitopes for these Mabs are located in the 23 to 145 N-terminal region of human PrP. The second group includes Mabs 1A1, 6H3, 7A9, 8C6, 8H4, 9H7 and 2G8. These antibodies bind to epitopes localized within N-terminally truncated recombinant PrP(90-231). Finally, Mabs 5C3, 2C9 and 7A12 recognize both PrP(23-145) and PrP(90-231), suggesting that the epitopes for this group are located in the region encompassing residues 90 to 145. By Western blotting with PepSpot(TM), only three of Mabs studied (5B2, 8B4 and 2G8) bind to linear epitopes that are present in 13-residue long synthetic peptides corresponding to human PrP fragments. The remaining nine Mabs appear to recognize conformational epitopes. Two N terminus-specific Mabs were found to prevent the binding of the C terminus-specific Mab 6H3. This observation suggests that the unstructured N-terminal region may influence the local conformation within the folded C-terminal domain of prion protein. PMID:10966770

  14. Novel Mutation in Exon 1 of the BMP15 Gene and its Association with Reproduction Traits in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Nadri, S; Zamani, P; Ahmadi, A

    2016-10-01

    The BMP15 gene is a growth factor and a member of the transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) superfamily, specifically expressed in oocytes. In the present study, polymorphism of BMP15 gene exon 1 was studied using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) and direct DNA sequencing methods in 170 Mehraban and Lori sheep ewes. A 231-bp fragment in BMP15 exon 1 was amplified by PCR reactions. Two genotypes (GG and AG) with a new point mutation at position 121 bp of the studied fragment (c.379G>A in reference GenBank number AF236078.1 sequence), deducing an amino acid exchange in the codified amino acid sequence (p.Glu41Lys) were identified in the studied populations. The AG and GG frequencies were 74.4% and 25.6% in Mehraban and 44.7% and 55.3% in Lori sheep, respectively. Frequencies of the A and G alleles were 37.2% and 62.8% in Mehraban and 22.4% and 77.6% in Lori sheep, respectively. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for encoded precursor protein. The genotypes GG and AG did not have any significant association with the studied reproductive traits, but the AA genotype is likely to have a lethal or sterility effect. PMID:27565869

  15. Molecular genetic analysis of exons 1 to 6 of the APC gene in non-polyposis familial colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Joyce, J A; Froggatt, N J; Davies, R; Evans, D G; Trembath, R; Barton, D E; Maher, E R

    1995-12-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis coli is caused by constitutional mutations in the APC gene. The hallmark of familial adenomatous polyposis coli is the presence of numerous (> 100) colorectal polyps, but mutations in the 5' end of the APC gene have been associated with familial colorectal cancer without florid polyposis. Although familial adenomatous polyposis coli accounts for only a minority of familial colorectal cancer cases, we hypothesised that APC mutations which were not associated with florid polyposis might make a significant contribution to nonpolyposis familial colorectal cancer. To investigate this possibility, we analysed 40 unrelated patients with familial colorectal cancer without classical familial adenomatous polyposis coli for mutations in exons 1 to 6 (codons 1 to 243) of the APC gene. No mutations were detected, but a C-->T polymorphism at nucleotide 333 (Arg-->Trp at codon 99) was identified. No 5' APC mutations were detected in two patients with desmoid tumours and a family history of colorectal cancer and polyps. We conclude that mutations in exons 1 to 6 of the APC gene are infrequent in patients with familial colorectal cancer who do not have many colorectal polyps. PMID:8835324

  16. The unique Leishmania EIF4E4 N-terminus is a target for multiple phosphorylation events and participates in critical interactions required for translation initiation.

    PubMed

    de Melo Neto, Osvaldo P; da Costa Lima, Tamara D C; Xavier, Camila C; Nascimento, Larissa M; Romão, Tatiany P; Assis, Ludmila A; Pereira, Mariana M C; Reis, Christian R S; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) recognizes the mRNA cap structure and, together with eIF4G and eIF4A, form the eIF4F complex that regulates translation initiation in eukaryotes. In trypanosomatids, 2 eIF4E homologues (EIF4E3 and EIF4E4) have been shown to be part of eIF4F-like complexes with presumed roles in translation initiation. Both proteins possess unique N-terminal extensions, which can be targeted for phosphorylation. Here, we provide novel insights on the Leishmania infantum EIF4E4 function and regulation. We show that EIF4E4 is constitutively expressed throughout the parasite development but is preferentially phosphorylated in exponentially grown promastigote and amastigote life stages, hence correlating with high levels of translation. Phosphorylation targets multiple serine-proline or threonine-proline residues within the N-terminal extension of EIF4E4 but does not require binding to the EIF4E4's partner, EIF4G3, or to the cap structure. We also report that EIF4E4 interacts with PABP1 through 3 conserved boxes at the EIF4E4 N-terminus and that this interaction is a prerequisite for efficient EIF4E4 phosphorylation. EIF4E4 is essential for Leishmania growth and an EIF4E4 null mutant was only obtained in the presence of an ectopically provided wild type gene. Complementation for the loss of EIF4E4 with several EIF4E4 mutant proteins affecting either phosphorylation or binding to mRNA or to EIF4E4 protein partners revealed that, in contrast to other eukaryotes, only the EIF4E4-PABP1 interaction but neither the binding to EIF4G3 nor phosphorylation is essential for translation. These studies also demonstrated that the lack of both EIF4E4 phosphorylation and EIF4G3 binding leads to a non-functional protein. Altogether, these findings further highlight the unique features of the translation initiation process in trypanosomatid protozoa. PMID:26338184

  17. Interaction of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of canine distemper virus fusion protein with phospholipid vesicles: a biophysical study.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Francisco J; Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    The F protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a classic type I glycoprotein formed by two polypeptides, F1 and F2. The N-terminal regions of the F1 polypeptides of CDV, measles virus and other paramyxoviruses present moderate to high homology, supporting the existence of a high conservation within these structures, which emphasises its role in viral-host cell membrane fusion. This N-terminal polypeptide is usually termed the fusion peptide. The fusion peptides of most viral fusion-mediating glycoproteins contain a high proportion of hydrophobic amino acids, which facilitates its insertion into target membranes during fusion. In this work we report on the interaction of a 31-residue synthetic peptide (FP31) corresponding to the N terminus of CDV F1 protein with phospholipid membranes composed of various phospholipids, as studied by means of various biophysical techniques. FTIR investigation of FP31 secondary structure in aqueous medium and in membranes resulted in a major proportion of alpha-helical structure which increased upon membrane insertion. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the presence of concentrations of FP31 as low as 0.1 mol%, in mixtures with L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and L-alpha-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC), already affected the thermotropic properties of the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition. In mixtures with the three lipids, increasing the concentration of peptide made the pretransition to disappear, and lowered and broadened the main transition. This effect was slightly stronger as the acyl chain length of the phospholipid grew larger. In the corresponding partial phase diagrams, no immiscibilities or critical points were observed. FTIR showed that incorporation of 1 mol% of peptide in DPPC shifted the antisymmetric and symmetric CH2 stretching bands to higher values, indicating the existence of an additional disordering of the acyl chain

  18. Novel exon 1 protein-coding regions N-terminally extend human KCNE3 and KCNE4.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-08-01

    The 5 human (h)KCNE β subunits each regulate various cation channels and are linked to inherited cardiac arrhythmias. Reported here are previously undiscovered protein-coding regions in exon 1 of hKCNE3 and hKCNE4 that extend their encoded extracellular domains by 44 and 51 residues, which yields full-length proteins of 147 and 221 residues, respectively. Full-length hKCNE3 and hKCNE4 transcript and protein are expressed in multiple human tissues; for hKCNE4, only the longer protein isoform is detectable. Two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology revealed that, when coexpressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes with various potassium channels, the newly discovered segment preserved conversion of KCNQ1 by hKCNE3 to a constitutively open channel, but prevented its inhibition of Kv4.2 and KCNQ4. hKCNE4 slowing of Kv4.2 inactivation and positive-shifted steady-state inactivation were also preserved in the longer form. In contrast, full-length hKCNE4 inhibition of KCNQ1 was limited to 40% at +40 mV vs. 80% inhibition by the shorter form, and augmentation of KCNQ4 activity by hKCNE4 was entirely abolished by the additional segment. Among the genome databases analyzed, the longer KCNE3 is confined to primates; full-length KCNE4 is widespread in vertebrates but is notably absent from Mus musculus Findings highlight unexpected KCNE gene diversity, raise the possibility of dynamic regulation of KCNE partner modulation via splice variation, and suggest that the longer hKCNE3 and hKCNE4 proteins should be adopted in future mechanistic and genetic screening studies.-Abbott, G. W. Novel exon 1 protein-coding regions N-terminally extend human KCNE3 and KCNE4. PMID:27162025

  19. Effective quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of the parkin gene (PARK2) exon 1–12 dosage

    PubMed Central

    Shadrina, Maria I; Semenova, Elena V; Slominsky, Petr A; Bagyeva, Gulbahar H; Illarioshkin, Sergei N; Ivanova-Smolenskaia, Irina I; Limborska, Svetlana A

    2007-01-01

    Background One of the causes of Parkinson's disease is mutations in the PARK2 gene. Deletions and duplications of single exons or exon groups account for a large proportion of the gene mutations. Direct detection of these mutations can be used for the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. Methods To detect these mutations, we developed an effective technique based on the real-time TaqMan PCR system, which allows us to evaluate the copynumbers of the PARK2 gene exons by comparing the intensity of the amplification signals from some exon of this gene with that of the β-globin gene (the internal control). Results We analyzed rearrangements in exons 1–12 of the PARK2 gene in 64 patients from Russia with early-onset Parkinson's disease. The frequency of these mutations in our patients was 14%. Conclusion We have developed a simple, accurate, and reproducible method applicable to the rapid detection of exon rearrangements in the PARK2 gene. It is suitable for the analysis of large patient groups, and it may become the basis for a diagnostic test. PMID:17324265

  20. Association of GCN1–GCN20 regulatory complex with the N-terminus of eIF2α kinase GCN2 is required for GCN2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Barrio, Minerva; Dong, Jinsheng; Ufano, Sandra; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    Stimulation of GCN4 mRNA translation due to phosphorylation of the α-subunit of initiation factor 2 (eIF2) by its specific kinase, GCN2, requires binding of uncharged tRNA to a histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS)-like domain in GCN2. GCN2 function in vivo also requires GCN1 and GCN20, but it was unknown whether these latter proteins act directly to promote the stimulation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNA. We found that the GCN1–GCN20 complex physically interacts with GCN2, binding to the N-terminus of the protein. Overexpression of N-terminal GCN2 segments had a dominant-negative phenotype that correlated with their ability to interact with GCN1–GCN20 and impede association between GCN1 and native GCN2. Consistently, this Gcn– phenotype was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2, GCN1–GCN20 or tRNAHis. The requirement for GCN1 was also reduced by overexpressing tRNAHis in a gcn1Δ strain. We conclude that binding of GCN1–GCN20 to GCN2 is required for its activation by uncharged tRNA. The homologous N-terminus of Drosophila GCN2 interacted with yeast GCN1–GCN20 and had a dominant Gcn– phenotype, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this interaction. PMID:10775272

  1. Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance on the Static and Dynamic Domains of Huntingtin Exon-1 Fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Isas, J. Mario; Langen, Ralf; Siemer, Ansgar B.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-like fibrils formed by huntingtin exon-1 (httex1) are a hallmark of Huntington's Disease (HD). The structure of these fibrils is unknown and determining their structure is an important step towards understanding the misfolding processes that cause HD. In HD a polyglutamine (polyQ) domain in httex1 is expanded to a degree that it gains the ability to form aggregates comprising the core of the resulting fibrils. Despite the simplicity of this polyQ sequence the structure of httex1 fibrils has been difficult to determine. The current study provides a detailed structural investigation of fibrils formed by httex1 using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We show that the polyQ domain of httex1 forms the static amyloid core similar to polyQ model peptides. The Gln residues of this domain exist in two distinct conformations that are found in separate domains or monomers but are relatively close in space. The rest of httex1 is relatively dynamic on an NMR time scale, especially the proline-rich C-terminus, which we found to be in a polyproline II helical and random coil conformation. We observed a similar dynamic C-terminus in a soluble form of (httex1 indicating that the conformation of this part of httex1 is not changed when aggregating into an amyloid fibril. From these data we propose a bottlebrush model for the fibrils formed by httex1. In this model, the polyQ domains form the center and the proline-rich domains the bristles of the bottlebrush. PMID:26020223

  2. Identification of a novel heterozygous truncation mutation in exon 1 of ARHGAP29 in an Indian subject with nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekharan, Deepak; Ramanathan, Arvind

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Mutations in exon 1 of ARHGAP29, a RhoA specific GTPase have been identified in North American and Filipino subjects with nonsyndromic cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate. Since the genetic status of ARHGAP29 in Indian subjects with nonsyndromic oral clefts is not known, we designed the present study to investigate the occurrence of the above mutations in them. Materials and Methods: Total genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood of 60 subjects with nonsyndromic cleft palate and cleft lip with or without cleft palate, and equal number of control healthy subjects were amplified with primers flanking exon 1 of ARHGAP29 gene and subjected to direct sequencing. Results: Sequencing analysis identified a nonsense mutation in exon 1 of ARHGAP29 that caused substitution of lysine to stop codon at codon position 32 in a subject with nonsyndromic cleft lip with cleft palate. The mutation, however, occurred in heterozygous condition. None of the other subjects carried mutation in this region. Conclusion: The study has thus identified a rare but novel truncation mutation in ARHGAP29 gene for the first time in nonsyndromic oral clefts. PMID:25512736

  3. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutant (Δada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor. PMID:24161731

  4. Functional and topological studies with Trp-containing analogs of the peptide StII(1-30) derived from the N-terminus of the pore forming toxin sticholysin II: contribution to understand its orientation in membrane.

    PubMed

    Ros, Uris; Souto, Ana Lucia C F; de Oliveira, Felipe J; Crusca, Edson; Pazos, Fabiola; Cilli, Eduardo M; Lanio, Maria E; Schreier, Shirley; Alvarez, Carlos

    2013-07-01

    Sticholysin II (St II) is the most potent cytolysin produced by the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, exerting hemolytic activity via pore formation in membranes. The toxin's N-terminus contains an amphipathic α-helix that is very likely involved in pore formation. We have previously demonstrated that the synthetic peptide StII(1-30) encompassing the 1-30 segment of St II forms pores of similar radius to that of the protein (around 1 nm), being a good model of toxin functionality. Here we have studied the functional and conformational properties of fluorescent analogs of StII(1-30) in lipid membranes. The analogs were obtained by replacing Leu residues at positions 2, 12, 17, and 24 with the intrinsically fluorescent amino acid Trp (StII(1-30L2W), StII(1-30L12W), StII(1-30L17W), or StII(1-30L24W), respectively). The exchange by Trp did not significantly modify the activity and conformation of the parent peptide. The blue-shift and intensity enhancement of fluorescence in the presence of membrane indicated that Trp at position 2 is more deeply buried in the hydrophobic region of the bilayer. These experiments, as well as assays with water-soluble or spin-labeled lipid-soluble fluorescence quenchers suggest an orientation of StII(1-30) with its N-terminus oriented towards the hydrophobic core of the bilayer while the rest of the peptide is more exposed to the aqueous environment, as hypothesized for sticholysins. PMID:23868208

  5. Disruption of Hydrogen Bonds between Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II and the Peptide N-Terminus Is Not Sufficient to Form a Human Leukocyte Antigen-DM Receptive State of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II

    PubMed Central

    Schulze, Monika-Sarah E. D.; Anders, Anne-Kathrin; Sethi, Dhruv K.; Call, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    Peptide presentation by MHC class II is of critical importance to the function of CD4+ T cells. HLA-DM resides in the endosomal pathway and edits the peptide repertoire of newly synthesized MHC class II molecules before they are exported to the cell surface. HLA-DM ensures MHC class II molecules bind high affinity peptides by targeting unstable MHC class II:peptide complexes for peptide exchange. Research over the past decade has implicated the peptide N-terminus in modulating the ability of HLA-DM to target a given MHC class II:peptide combination. In particular, attention has been focused on both the hydrogen bonds between MHC class II and peptide, and the occupancy of the P1 anchor pocket. We sought to solve the crystal structure of a HLA-DR1 molecule containing a truncated hemagglutinin peptide missing three N-terminal residues compared to the full-length sequence (residues 306–318) to determine the nature of the MHC class II:peptide species that binds HLA-DM. Here we present structural evidence that HLA-DR1 that is loaded with a peptide truncated to the P1 anchor residue such that it cannot make select hydrogen bonds with the peptide N-terminus, adopts the same conformation as molecules loaded with full-length peptide. HLA-DR1:peptide combinations that were unable to engage up to four key hydrogen bonds were also unable to bind HLA-DM, while those truncated to the P2 residue bound well. These results indicate that the conformational changes in MHC class II molecules that are recognized by HLA-DM occur after disengagement of the P1 anchor residue. PMID:23976922

  6. Novel single base-pair deletion in exon 1 of XK gene leading to McLeod syndrome with chorea, muscle wasting, peripheral neuropathy, acanthocytosis and haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Wiethoff, Sarah; Xiromerisiou, Georgia; Bettencourt, Conceição; Kioumi, Anna; Tsiptsios, Iakovos; Tychalas, Athanasios; Evaggelia, Markousi; George, Kaltsounis; Makris, Vasileios; Hardy, John; Houlden, Henry

    2014-04-15

    We present a 70-year-old male patient of Greek origin with choreatic movements of the tongue and face, lower limb muscle weakness, peripheral neuropathy, elevated creatinephosphokinase (CPK), acanthocytosis and haemolysis in the absence of Kell RBC antigens with an additional Factor IX-deficiency. Genetic testing for mutations in the three exons of the XK gene revealed a previously unreported hemizygous single base-pair frameshift deletion at exon 1 (c.229delC, p.Leu80fs). In conclusion, we hereby describe a rare phenotype of a patient with McLeod syndrome which was discovered coincidentally during routine blood group testing and consecutively genetically confirmed. PMID:24529944

  7. A Reduced Risk of Infection with Plasmodium vivax and Clinical Protection against Malaria Are Associated with Antibodies against the N Terminus but Not the C Terminus of Merozoite Surface Protein 1†

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Paulo Afonso; Piovesan Alves, Fabiana; Fernandez-Becerra, Carmen; Pein, Oliver; Rodrigues Santos, Neida; Pereira da Silva, Luiz Hildebrando; Plessman Camargo, Erney; del Portillo, Hernando A.

    2006-01-01

    Progress towards the development of a malaria vaccine against Plasmodium vivax, the most widely distributed human malaria parasite, will require a better understanding of the immune responses that confer clinical protection to patients in regions where malaria is endemic. The occurrence of clinical protection in P. vivax malaria in Brazil was first reported among residents of the riverine community of Portuchuelo, in Rondônia, western Amazon. We thus analyzed immune sera from this same human population to determine if naturally acquired humoral immune responses against the merozoite surface protein 1 of P. vivax, PvMSP1, could be associated with reduced risk of infection and/or clinical protection. Our results demonstrated that this association could be established with anti-PvMSP1 antibodies predominantly of the immunoglobulin G3 subclass directed against the N terminus but not against the C terminus, in spite of the latter being more immunogenic and capable of natural boosting. This is the first report of a prospective study of P. vivax malaria demonstrating an association of reduced risk of infection and clinical protection with antibodies against an antigen of this parasite. PMID:16622209

  8. A transient α-helical molecular recognition element in the disordered N-terminus of the Sgs1 helicase is critical for chromosome stability and binding of Top3/Rmi1

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Jessica A.; Daughdrill, Gary W.; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2013-01-01

    The RecQ-like DNA helicase family is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all organisms. Sgs1, a member of this family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regulates early and late steps of double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that the N-terminal 125 residues of Sgs1 are disordered and contain a transient α-helix that extends from residue 25 to 38. Based on the residue-specific knowledge of transient secondary structure, we designed proline mutations to disrupt this α-helix and observed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and increased frequency of genome rearrangements. In vitro binding assays show that the defects of the proline mutants are the result of impaired binding of Top3 and Rmi1 to Sgs1. Extending mutagenesis N-terminally revealed a second functionally critical region that spans residues 9–17. Depending on the position of the proline substitution in the helix functional impairment of Sgs1 function varied, gradually increasing from the C- to the N-terminus. The multiscale approach we used to interrogate structure/function relationships in the long disordered N-terminal segment of Sgs1 allowed us to precisely define a functionally critical region and should be generally applicable to other disordered proteins. PMID:24038467

  9. A transient α-helical molecular recognition element in the disordered N-terminus of the Sgs1 helicase is critical for chromosome stability and binding of Top3/Rmi1.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jessica A; Daughdrill, Gary W; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2013-12-01

    The RecQ-like DNA helicase family is essential for the maintenance of genome stability in all organisms. Sgs1, a member of this family in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, regulates early and late steps of double-strand break repair by homologous recombination. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, we show that the N-terminal 125 residues of Sgs1 are disordered and contain a transient α-helix that extends from residue 25 to 38. Based on the residue-specific knowledge of transient secondary structure, we designed proline mutations to disrupt this α-helix and observed hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and increased frequency of genome rearrangements. In vitro binding assays show that the defects of the proline mutants are the result of impaired binding of Top3 and Rmi1 to Sgs1. Extending mutagenesis N-terminally revealed a second functionally critical region that spans residues 9-17. Depending on the position of the proline substitution in the helix functional impairment of Sgs1 function varied, gradually increasing from the C- to the N-terminus. The multiscale approach we used to interrogate structure/function relationships in the long disordered N-terminal segment of Sgs1 allowed us to precisely define a functionally critical region and should be generally applicable to other disordered proteins. PMID:24038467

  10. A noncoding melanophilin gene (MLPH) SNP at the splice donor of exon 1 represents a candidate causal mutation for coat color dilution in dogs.

    PubMed

    Drögemüller, Cord; Philipp, Ute; Haase, Bianca; Günzel-Apel, Anne-Rose; Leeb, Tosso

    2007-01-01

    Coat color dilution in several breeds of dog is characterized by a specific pigmentation phenotype and sometimes accompanied by hair loss and recurrent skin inflammation, the so-called color dilution alopecia or black hair follicular dysplasia. Coat color dilution (d) is inherited as a Mendelian autosomal recessive trait. In a previous study, MLPH polymorphisms showed perfect cosegregation with the dilute phenotype within breeds. However, different dilute haplotypes were found in different breeds, and no single polymorphism was identified in the coding sequence that was likely to be causative for the dilute phenotype. We resequenced the 5'-region of the canine MLPH gene and identified a strong candidate single nucleotide polymorphism within the nontranslated exon 1, which showed perfect association to the dilute phenotype in 65 dilute dogs from 7 different breeds. The A/G polymorphism is located at the last nucleotide of exon 1 and the mutant A-allele is predicted to reduce splicing efficiency 8-fold. An MLPH mRNA expression study using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction confirmed that dd animals had only about approximately 25% of the MLPH transcript compared with DD animals. These results provide preliminary evidence that the reported regulatory MLPH mutation might represent a causal mutation for coat color dilution in dogs. PMID:17519392

  11. Calpastatin exon 1B-derived peptide, a selective inhibitor of calpain: enhancing cell permeability by conjugation with penetratin.

    PubMed

    Gil-Parrado, Shirley; Assfalg-Machleidt, Irmgard; Fiorino, Ferdinando; Deluca, Dominga; Pfeiler, Dietmar; Schaschke, Norbert; Moroder, Luis; Machleidt, Werner

    2003-03-01

    The ubiquitous calpains, mu- and m-calpain, have been implicated in essential physiological processes and various pathologies. Cell-permeable specific inhibitors are important tools to elucidate the roles of calpains in cultivated cells and animal models. The synthetic N-acetylated 27-mer peptide derived from exon B of the inhibitory domain 1 of human calpastatin (CP1B) is unique as a potent and highly selective reversible calpain inhibitor, but is poorly cell-permeant. By addition of N-terminal cysteine residues we have generated a disulfide-conjugated CP1B with the cell-penetrating 16-mer peptide penetratin derived from the third helix of the Antennapedia homeodomain protein. The inhibitory potency and selectivity of CP1B for calpain versus cathepsin B and L, caspase 3 and the proteasome was not affected by the conjugation with penetratin. The conjugate was shown to efficiently penetrate into living LCLC 103H cells, since it prevents ionomycin-induced calpain activation at 200-fold lower concentration than the non-conjugated inhibitor and is able to reduce calpain-triggered apoptosis of these cells. Penetratin-conjugated CP1B seems to be a promising alternative to the widely used cell-permeable peptide aldehydes (e.g. calpain inhibitor 1) which inhibit the lysosomal cathepsins and partially the proteasome as well or even better than the calpains. PMID:12715890

  12. Fluorescent tagging of VP22 in N-terminus reveals that VP22 favors Marek’s disease virus (MDV) virulence in chickens and allows morphogenesis study in MD tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an alpha-herpesvirus causing Marek’s disease in chickens, mostly associated with T-cell lymphoma. VP22 is a tegument protein abundantly expressed in cells during the lytic cycle, which is essential for MDV spread in culture. Our aim was to generate a pathogenic MDV expressing a green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to the N-terminus of VP22 to better decipher the role of VP22 in vivo and monitor MDV morphogenesis in tumors cells. In culture, rRB-1B EGFP22 led to 1.6-fold smaller plaques than the parental virus. In chickens, the rRB-1B EGFP22 virus was impaired in its ability to induce lymphoma and to spread in contact birds. The MDV genome copy number in blood and feathers during the time course of infection indicated that rRB-1B EGFP22 reached its two major target cells, but had a growth defect in these two tissues. Therefore, the integrity of VP22 is critical for an efficient replication in vivo, for tumor formation and horizontal transmission. An examination of EGFP fluorescence in rRB-1B EGFP22-induced tumors showed that about 0.1% of the cells were in lytic phase. EGFP-positive tumor cells were selected by cytometry and analyzed for MDV morphogenesis by transmission electron microscopy. Only few particles were present per cell, and all types of virions (except mature enveloped virions) were detected unequivocally inside tumor lymphoid cells. These results indicate that MDV morphogenesis in tumor cells is more similar to the morphorgenesis in fibroblastic cells in culture, albeit poorly efficient, than in feather follicle epithelial cells. PMID:24359464

  13. Mapping of the Tacaribe Arenavirus Z-Protein Binding Sites on the L Protein Identified both Amino Acids within the Putative Polymerase Domain and a Region at the N Terminus of L That Are Critically Involved in Binding▿

    PubMed Central

    Wilda, Maximiliano; Lopez, Nora; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Franze-Fernandez, Maria T.

    2008-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TacV) is the prototype of the New World group of arenaviruses. The TacV genome encodes four proteins: the nucleoprotein (N), the glycoprotein precursor, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger protein (Z). Using a reverse genetics system, we demonstrated that TacV N and L are sufficient to drive transcription and replication mediated by TacV-like RNAs and that Z is a powerful inhibitor of these processes (Lopez et al., J. Virol. 65:12241-12251, 2001). More recently, we provided the first evidence of an interaction between Z and L and showed that Z's inhibitory activity was dependent on its ability to bind to L (Jácamo et al., J. Virol. 77:10383-10393, 2003). In the present study, we mapped the TacV Z-binding sites on the 2,210-amino-acid L polymerase. To that end, we performed deletion analysis and point mutations of L and studied the Z-L interaction by coimmunoprecipitation with specific sera. We found that the C-terminal region of L was not essential for the interaction and identified two noncontiguous regions that were critical for binding: one at the N-terminus of L between residues 156 and 292 and a second one in the polymerase domain (domain III). The importance of domain III in binding was revealed by substitutions in D1188 and H1189 within motif A and in each residue of the conserved SDD sequence (residues 1328, 1329, and 1330) within motif C. Our results showed that of the substituted residues, only H1189 and D1329 appeared to be critically involved in binding Z. PMID:18799569

  14. Fluorescent tagging of VP22 in N-terminus reveals that VP22 favors Marek's disease virus (MDV) virulence in chickens and allows morphogenesis study in MD tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Rémy, Sylvie; Blondeau, Caroline; Le Vern, Yves; Lemesle, Monique; Vautherot, Jean-François; Denesvre, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is an alpha-herpesvirus causing Marek's disease in chickens, mostly associated with T-cell lymphoma. VP22 is a tegument protein abundantly expressed in cells during the lytic cycle, which is essential for MDV spread in culture. Our aim was to generate a pathogenic MDV expressing a green fluorescent protein (EGFP) fused to the N-terminus of VP22 to better decipher the role of VP22 in vivo and monitor MDV morphogenesis in tumors cells. In culture, rRB-1B EGFP22 led to 1.6-fold smaller plaques than the parental virus. In chickens, the rRB-1B EGFP22 virus was impaired in its ability to induce lymphoma and to spread in contact birds. The MDV genome copy number in blood and feathers during the time course of infection indicated that rRB-1B EGFP22 reached its two major target cells, but had a growth defect in these two tissues. Therefore, the integrity of VP22 is critical for an efficient replication in vivo, for tumor formation and horizontal transmission. An examination of EGFP fluorescence in rRB-1B EGFP22-induced tumors showed that about 0.1% of the cells were in lytic phase. EGFP-positive tumor cells were selected by cytometry and analyzed for MDV morphogenesis by transmission electron microscopy. Only few particles were present per cell, and all types of virions (except mature enveloped virions) were detected unequivocally inside tumor lymphoid cells. These results indicate that MDV morphogenesis in tumor cells is more similar to the morphorgenesis in fibroblastic cells in culture, albeit poorly efficient, than in feather follicle epithelial cells. PMID:24359464

  15. A tumor of the uterine cervix with a complex histology in a Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patient with genomic deletion of the STK11 exon 1 region.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yusuke; Masuda, Kenta; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Nomura, Hiroyuki; Hirasawa, Akira; Banno, Kouji; Susumu, Nobuyuki; Sugano, Kokichi; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-02-01

    Patients with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) have a risk of complicating malignant tumors, including cancer of the uterine cervix. Mutations in the STK11 gene have been identified as being responsible for PJS. However, the genotype-phenotype correlation in PJS is poorly understood, especially with respect to malignant tumors. Here, we report a detailed analysis of a case of a cervical tumor in a PJS patient showing a large genomic deletion in exon 1 of STK11 without human papillomavirus infection. Histological examination revealed a complex histology consisting of three components: lobular endocervical gland hyperplasia (LEGH), minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and mucinous adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemistry for STK11 was positive in the LEGH and MDA components, while that of the mucinous adenocarcinoma stained very faintly. These findings support a close relationship among LEGH, MDA and mucinous adenocarcinoma and imply that inactivation of STK11 may occur during progression from MDA to mucinous adenocarcinoma. PMID:24490603

  16. Site-specific methylation changes in the glucocorticoid receptor exon 1F promoter in relation to life adversity: systematic review of contributing factors

    PubMed Central

    Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    There has been recent interest in epigenetics in psychiatry since it offers a means of understanding how stressful life experiences, in interaction with the genotype, result in epigenetic changes that result in altered gene expression, ultimately affecting the risk for mental disorders. Many studies focused on methylation of the glucocorticoid receptor exon 1F promoter following an initial observation that changes in this region could be modulated by the environment. This review examines all published studies that have attempted to measure methylation in this region using different techniques, several tissue types, populations at different behavioral state and stages of development. Methodological issues have been raised with the aim of attempting to understand methylation quantification and site of action. We propose that it is useful to examine whether methylation at specific sites within the promoter region may be particularly relevant to psychiatric vulnerability to stress-related outcomes. PMID:25484853

  17. Ethanol Induced Acetylation of Histone at G9a Exon1 and G9a-Mediated Histone H3 Dimethylation leads to Neurodegeneration in Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Shivakumar, Madhu; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Psychoyos, Delphine; Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2014-01-01

    The transient exposure of immature rodents to ethanol during postnatal day 7 (P7), comparable to a time point within the third trimester of human pregnancy, induces neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the deleterious effects of ethanol on the developing brain are poorly understood. In our previous study, we showed that a high dose administration of ethanol at P7 enhances G9a and leads to caspase-3-mediated degradation of dimethylated H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me2). In this study, we investigated the potential role of epigenetic changes at G9a exon1, G9a-mediated H3 dimethylation on neurodegeneration and G9a-associated proteins in the P7 brain following exposure to a low dose of ethanol. We found that a low dose of ethanol induces mild neurodegeneration in P7 mice, enhances specific acetylation of H3 on lysine 14 (H3K14ace) at G9a exon1, G9a protein levels, augments the dimethylation of H3K9 and H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me2). However, neither dimethylated H3K9 nor K27 underwent degradation. Pharmacological inhibition of G9a activity prior to ethanol treatment prevented H3 dimethylation and neurodegeneration. Further, our immunoprecipitation data suggest that G9a directly associates with DNA methyltransferase (DNMT3A) and methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). In addition, DNMT3A and MeCP2 protein levels were enhanced by a low dose of ethanol that was shown to induce mild neurodegeneration. Collectively, these epigenetic alterations lead to association of G9a, DNMT3A and MeCP2 to form a larger repressive complex and have a significant role in low dose ethanol-induced neurodegeneration in the developing brain. PMID:24300108

  18. Triggering Klystrons

    SciTech Connect

    Stefan, Kelton D.; /Purdue U. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    To determine if klystrons will perform to the specifications of the LCLS (Linac Coherent Light Source) project, a new digital trigger controller is needed for the Klystron/Microwave Department Test Laboratory. The controller needed to be programmed and Windows based user interface software needed to be written to interface with the device over a USB (Universal Serial Bus). Programming the device consisted of writing logic in VHDL (VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated Circuits) hardware description language), and the Windows interface software was written in C++. Xilinx ISE (Integrated Software Environment) was used to compile the VHDL code and program the device, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 was used to compile the C++ based Windows software. The device was programmed in such a way as to easily allow read/write operations to it using a simple addressing model, and Windows software was developed to interface with the device over a USB connection. A method of setting configuration registers in the trigger device is absolutely necessary to the development of a new triggering system, and the method developed will fulfill this need adequately. More work is needed before the new trigger system is ready for use. The configuration registers in the device need to be fully integrated with the logic that will generate the RF signals, and this system will need to be tested extensively to determine if it meets the requirements for low noise trigger outputs.

  19. Large conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent K+ channel, a distinct member of voltage-dependent ion channels with seven N-terminal transmembrane segments (S0-S6), an extracellular N terminus, and an intracellular (S9-S10) C terminus.

    PubMed

    Meera, P; Wallner, M; Song, M; Toro, L

    1997-12-01

    Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-dependent K+ (MaxiK) channels show sequence similarities to voltage-gated ion channels. They have a homologous S1-S6 region, but are unique at the N and C termini. At the C terminus, MaxiK channels have four additional hydrophobic regions (S7-S10) of unknown topology. At the N terminus, we have recently proposed a new model where MaxiK channels have an additional transmembrane region (S0) that confers beta subunit regulation. Using transient expression of epitope tagged MaxiK channels, in vitro translation, functional, and "in vivo" reconstitution assays, we now show that MaxiK channels have seven transmembrane segments (S0-S6) at the N terminus and a S1-S6 region that folds in a similar way as in voltage-gated ion channels. Further, our results indicate that hydrophobic segments S9-S10 in the C terminus are cytoplasmic and unequivocally demonstrate that S0 forms an additional transmembrane segment leading to an exoplasmic N terminus. PMID:9391153

  20. Large conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent K+ channel, a distinct member of voltage-dependent ion channels with seven N-terminal transmembrane segments (S0-S6), an extracellular N terminus, and an intracellular (S9-S10) C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin; Song, Min; Toro, Ligia

    1997-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-dependent K+ (MaxiK) channels show sequence similarities to voltage-gated ion channels. They have a homologous S1-S6 region, but are unique at the N and C termini. At the C terminus, MaxiK channels have four additional hydrophobic regions (S7-S10) of unknown topology. At the N terminus, we have recently proposed a new model where MaxiK channels have an additional transmembrane region (S0) that confers β subunit regulation. Using transient expression of epitope tagged MaxiK channels, in vitro translation, functional, and “in vivo” reconstitution assays, we now show that MaxiK channels have seven transmembrane segments (S0-S6) at the N terminus and a S1-S6 region that folds in a similar way as in voltage-gated ion channels. Further, our results indicate that hydrophobic segments S9-S10 in the C terminus are cytoplasmic and unequivocally demonstrate that S0 forms an additional transmembrane segment leading to an exoplasmic N terminus. PMID:9391153

  1. Cloning and expression of the liver and muscle isoforms of ovine carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1: residues within the N-terminus of the muscle isoform influence the kinetic properties of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Price, Nigel T; Jackson, Vicky N; van der Leij, Feike R; Cameron, Jacqueline M; Travers, Maureen T; Bartelds, Beatrijs; Huijkman, Nicolette C; Zammit, Victor A

    2003-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence data reported will appear in DDBJ, EMBL, GenBank(R) and GSDB Nucleotide Sequence Databases; the sequences of ovine CPT1A and CPT1B cDNAs have the accession numbers Y18387 and AJ272435 respectively and the partial adipose tissue and liver CPT1A clones have the accession numbers Y18830 and Y18829 respectively. Fatty acid and ketone body metabolism differ considerably between monogastric and ruminant species. The regulation of the key enzymes involved may differ accordingly. Carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT 1) is the key locus for the control of long-chain fatty acid beta-oxidation and liver ketogenesis. Previously we showed that CPT 1 kinetics in sheep and rat liver mitochondria differ. We cloned cDNAs for both isoforms [liver- (L-) and muscle- (M-)] of ovine CPT 1 in order to elucidate the structural features of these proteins and their genes ( CPT1A and CPT1B ). Their deduced amino acid sequences show a high degree of conservation compared with orthologues from other mammalian species, with the notable exception of the N-terminus of ovine M-CPT 1. These differences were also present in bovine M-CPT 1, whose N-terminal sequence we determined. In addition, the 5'-end of the sheep CPT1B cDNA suggested a different promoter architecture when compared with previously characterized CPT1B genes. Northern blotting revealed differences in tissue distribution for both CPT1A and CPT1B transcripts compared with other species. In particular, ovine CPT1B mRNA was less tissue restricted, and the predominant transcript in the pancreas was CPT1B. Expression in yeast allowed kinetic characterization of the two native enzymes, and of a chimaera in which the distinctive N-terminal segment of ovine M-CPT 1 was replaced with that from rat M-CPT 1. The ovine N-terminal segment influences the kinetics of the enzyme for both its substrates, such that the K (m) for palmitoyl-CoA is decreased and that for carnitine is increased for the chimaera, relative to the

  2. Spectroscopic and Functional Characterization of Nitrophorin 7 from the Blood-Feeding Insect Rhodnius prolixus Reveals an Important Role of Its Isoform-Specific N-Terminus for Proper Protein Function†

    PubMed Central

    Knipp, Markus; Yang, Fei; Berry, Robert E.; Zhang, Hongjun; Shokhirev, Maxim N.; Walker, F. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Nitrophorins (NPs) are a class of NO transporting and histamine sequestering heme b proteins that occur in the saliva of the bloodsucking insect Rhodnius prolixus. A detailed study of the newly described member, NP7, is presented herein. NP7 NO association constants KeqIII(NO) reveal a drastic change when the pH is varied from 5.5 (reflecting the insect's saliva) to slightly above plasma pH (7.5) (>109 M−1 → 4.0 × 106 M−1); thus, the protein promotes the storage of NO in the insect's saliva and its release inside the victim's tissue. In contrast to the other nitrophorins NP1-4, histamine sequestering cannot be accomplished in vivo due to the low binding constant KeqIII(histamine) = 105 M−1 compared to [histamine] = 1 − 10 × 10−9 M in the blood. A major part of this study deals with the N-terminus 1Leu–Pro–Gly–Glu–Cys5 of NP7, which is not found in NP1-4. Since NP7 has not been isolated from the insects so far, but was recognized in a cDNA library instead, the N-terminal site of signal peptidase cleavage upon protein secretion was predicted by the program SignalP [Andersen, J.F., Gudderra, N.P., Francischetti, I.M.B., Valenzuela, J.G., Ribeiro, J.M.C. (2004) Biochemistry 43, 6987-6994]. In marked contrast to wild-type NP7, NP7(Δ1-3) shows a very high NO-affinity at pH 7.5 (KeqIII(NO)≈ 109 M−1), suggesting that the release of NO in the plasma cannot efficiently be accomplished by the truncated form. Comparison of the reduction potentials of both constructs by spectroelectrochemistry revealed an average increase of +85 mV for various distal ligands bound to the heme-iron when 1Leu–Pro–Gly3 was removed. However, 1H NMR and EPR spectroscopy show that the electronic properties of the FeIII cofactor are similar in both wild-type NP7 and NP7(Δ1-3). Further, thermal denaturation that revealed a higher stability of wild-type NP7 compared to NP7(Δ1-3), in combination with a homology model based on the NP2 crystal structure (RMSD = 0.39

  3. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed "barnacle cement". In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as "Trx-Balcp19k gel", and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials. PMID:26317205

  4. Protein Aggregation Formed by Recombinant cp19k Homologue of Balanus albicostatus Combined with an 18 kDa N-Terminus Encoded by pET-32a(+) Plasmid Having Adhesion Strength Comparable to Several Commercial Glues

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Chao; Li, Yunqiu; Liu, Zhiming; Wu, Wenjian; Hu, Biru

    2015-01-01

    The barnacle is well known for its tenacious and permanent attachment to a wide variety of underwater substrates, which is accomplished by synthesizing, secreting and curing a mixture of adhesive proteins termed “barnacle cement”. In order to evaluate interfacial adhesion abilities of barnacle cement proteins, the cp19k homologous gene in Balanus albicostatus (Balcp19k) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Here, we report an intriguing discovery of a gel-like super adhesive aggregation produced by Trx-Balcp19k, a recombinant Balcp19k fusion protein. The Trx-Balcp19k consists of an 18 kDa fragment at the N-terminus, which is encoded by pET-32a(+) plasmid and mainly comprised of a thioredoxin (Trx) tag, and Balcp19k at the C-terminus. The sticky aggregation was designated as “Trx-Balcp19k gel”, and the bulk adhesion strength, biochemical composition, as well as formation conditions were all carefully investigated. The Trx-Balcp19k gel exhibited strong adhesion strength of 2.10 ± 0.67 MPa, which was approximately fifty folds higher than that of the disaggregated Trx-Balcp19k (40 ± 8 kPa) and rivaled those of commercial polyvinyl acetate (PVA) craft glue (Mont Marte, Australia) and UHU glue (UHU GmbH & Co. KG, Germany). Lipids were absent from the Trx-Balcp19k gel and only a trace amount of carbohydrates was detected. We postulate that the electrostatic interactions play a key role in the formation of Trx-Balcp19k gel, by mediating self-aggregation of Trx-Balcp19k based on its asymmetric distribution pattern of charged amino acids. Taken together, we believe that our discovery not only presents a promising biological adhesive with potential applications in both biomedical and technical fields, but also provides valuable paradigms for molecular design of bio-inspired peptide- or protein-based materials. PMID:26317205

  5. Cell type-restricted expression of erythrocyte tropomodulin Isoform41 in exon 1 knockout/LacZ knock-in heterozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weijuan; Chu, Xin; Sung, Lanping Amy

    2015-01-01

    Full-length erythrocyte tropomodulin (E-Tmod or Tmod1) isoform of 41 kDa is an actin nucleation protein and caps the pointed end of tropomyosin-coated actin filaments. It participates in the length control of short actin protofilaments in the erythrocyte membrane skeletal network as well as the organization of microfilaments in non-erythroid cells. Recently we discovered and characterized a truncated isoform of 29 kDa, which lacks the N-terminal sequence encoded by exons 1 and 2 required for nucleation and capping. Thus, it is important to study the expression pattern of solely the E-Tmod41 isoform in tissues. We utilized our exon 1 knockout (KO) mouse model with a knock-in lacZ reporter gene which reports the expression of E-Tmod41, but not E-Tmod29. Because this homozygous isoform-specific KO is an embryonic lethal mutation, we used heterozygous mice. X-gal staining localized specific signals at the single cell level and revealed a timed expression during embryonic development and restricted expression in adult mice. Our results showed that E-Tmod41 expressing cells include developing and young erythroid cells, developing somites, young fiber cells in the lens, certain subtype(s) of tubular cells in the kidney, smooth muscle cells in various tissues, and horizontal cells in the retina. A comparison with previous studies revealed that most if not all tissues known to express E-Tmod contained lacZ-expressing cells. Interestingly, some tubular cells were lacZ-positive while others in the same renal tubule were not, indicating heterogeneity within the tubular cells. Combined with double immunocytochemistry, we further localized E-Tmod41 to dendritic spines of horizontal cells. These timed and cell-type restricted expressions of E-Tmod41 suggest a role of actin nucleation and/or short actin protofilaments in these cell types and sub-cellular structures. PMID:25721257

  6. Methylation of Exons 1D, 1F, and 1H of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene Promoter and Exposure to Adversity in Pre-School Aged Children

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, Audrey R.; Parade, Stephanie H.; Eslinger, Nicole M.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Lesseur, Corina; Armstrong, David A.; Philip, Noah S.; Josefson, Brittney; Seifer, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications to the genome are a key mechanism involved in the biological encoding of experience. Animal studies and a growing body of literature in humans have shown that early adversity is linked to methylation of the gene for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) which is a key regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis as well as a broad range of physiological systems including metabolic and immune function. One hundred eighty-four families participated, including n=74 with child welfare documentation of moderate-severe maltreatment in the past six months. Children ranged in age from 3 to 5 years, and were racially and ethnically diverse. Structured record review and interviews in the home were used to assess a history of maltreatment, other traumas, and contextual life stressors, and a composite variable assessed the number exposures to these adversities. Methylation of regions 1D, 1F, and 1H of the GR gene was measured via sodium bisulfite pyrosequencing. The composite measure of adversity was positively correlated with methylation at exons 1D and 1F in the promoter of NR3C1. Individual stress measures were significantly associated with a several CpG sites in these regions. GR gene methylation may be a mechanism of the bio-behavioral effects of adverse exposures in young children. PMID:25997773

  7. Non-covalent interactions of the carcinogen (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras proto-oncogene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Jorge H.; Deligkaris, Christos

    2013-03-01

    Investigating the complementary, but different, effects of physical (non-covalent) and chemical (covalent) mutagen-DNA and carcinogen-DNA interactions is important for understanding possible mechanisms of development and prevention of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. A highly mutagenic and carcinogenic metabolite of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[ α]pyrene, namely (+)-anti-BPDE, is known to undergo both physical and chemical complexation with DNA. The major covalent adduct, a promutagenic, is known to be an external (+)-trans-anti-BPDE-N2-dGuanosine configuration whose origins are not fully understood. Thus, it is desirable to study the mechanisms of external non-covalent BPDE-DNA binding and their possible relationships to external covalent trans adduct formation. We present a detailed codon-by-codon computational study of the non-covalent interactions of (+)-anti-BPDE with DNA which explains and correctly predicts preferential (+)-anti-BPDE binding at minor groove guanosines. Due to its relevance to carcinogenesis, the interaction of (+)-anti-BPDE with exon 1 of the human K-ras gene has been studied in detail. Present address: Department of Physics, Drury University

  8. Mutation in Exon 1f of PLEC, Leading to Disruption of Plectin Isoform 1f, Causes Autosomal-Recessive Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Gundesli, Hulya; Talim, Beril; Korkusuz, Petek; Balci-Hayta, Burcu; Cirak, Sebahattin; Akarsu, Nurten A.; Topaloglu, Haluk; Dincer, Pervin

    2010-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) is a genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscular disorders manifesting symmetric, proximal, and slowly progressive muscle weakness. Using Affymetrix 250K SNP Array genotyping and homozygosity mapping, we mapped an autosomal-recessive LGMD phenotype to the telomeric portion of chromosome 8q in a consanguineous Turkish family with three affected individuals. DNA sequence analysis of PLEC identified a homozygous c.1_9del mutation containing an initiation codon in exon 1f, which is an isoform-specific sequence of plectin isoform 1f. The same homozygous mutation was also detected in two additional families during the analysis of 72 independent LGMD2-affected families. Moreover, we showed that the expression of PLEC was reduced in the patient's muscle and that there was almost no expression for plectin 1f mRNA as a result of the mutation. In addition to dystrophic changes in muscle, ultrastructural alterations, such as membrane duplications, an enlarged space between the membrane and sarcomere, and misalignment of Z-disks, were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Unlike the control skeletal muscle, no sarcolemmal staining of plectin was detected in the patient's muscle. We conclude that as a result of plectin 1f deficiency, the linkage between the sarcolemma and sarcomere is broken, which could affect the structural organization of the myofiber. Our data show that one of the isoforms of plectin plays a key role in skeletal muscle function and that disruption of the plectin 1f can cause the LGMD2 phenotype without any dermatologic component as was previously reported with mutations in constant exons of PLEC. PMID:21109228

  9. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 Gene from Cameroon Shows Conserved Tat HLA-Binding Epitopes: Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Teto, Georges; Fonsah, Julius Y; Tagny, Claude T; Mbanya, Dora; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Leopoldine; Fokam, Joseph; Njamnshi, Dora M; Kouanfack, Charles; Njamnshi, Alfred K; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a critical role in viral transactivation. Subtype-B Tat has potential use as a therapeutic vaccine. However, viral genetic diversity and population genetics would significantly impact the efficacy of such a vaccine. Over 70% of the 37-million HIV-infected individuals are in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and harbor non-subtype-B HIV-1. Using specimens from 100 HIV-infected Cameroonians, we analyzed the sequences of HIV-1 Tat exon-1, its functional domains, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-binding epitopes. Molecular phylogeny revealed a high genetic diversity with nine subtypes, CRF22_01A1/CRF01_AE, and negative selection in all subtypes. Amino acid mutations in Tat functional domains included N24K (44%), N29K (58%), and N40K (30%) in CRF02_AG, and N24K in all G subtypes. Motifs and phosphorylation analyses showed conserved amidation, N-myristoylation, casein kinase-2 (CK2), serine and threonine phosphorylation sites. Analysis of HLA allelic frequencies showed that epitopes for HLAs A*0205, B*5301, Cw*0401, Cw*0602, and Cw*0702 were conserved in 58%-100% of samples, with B*5301 epitopes having binding affinity scores > 100 in all subtypes. This is the first report of N-myristoylation, amidation, and CK2 sites in Tat; these PTMs and mutations could affect Tat function. HLA epitopes identified could be useful for designing Tat-based vaccines for highly diverse HIV-1 populations, as in SSA. PMID:27438849

  10. Molecular and Genetic Characterization of HIV-1 Tat Exon-1 Gene from Cameroon Shows Conserved Tat HLA-Binding Epitopes: Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Teto, Georges; Fonsah, Julius Y.; Tagny, Claude T.; Mbanya, Dora; Nchindap, Emilienne; Kenmogne, Leopoldine; Fokam, Joseph; Njamnshi, Dora M.; Kouanfack, Charles; Njamnshi, Alfred K.; Kanmogne, Georgette D.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat plays a critical role in viral transactivation. Subtype-B Tat has potential use as a therapeutic vaccine. However, viral genetic diversity and population genetics would significantly impact the efficacy of such a vaccine. Over 70% of the 37-million HIV-infected individuals are in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and harbor non-subtype-B HIV-1. Using specimens from 100 HIV-infected Cameroonians, we analyzed the sequences of HIV-1 Tat exon-1, its functional domains, post-translational modifications (PTMs), and human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-binding epitopes. Molecular phylogeny revealed a high genetic diversity with nine subtypes, CRF22_01A1/CRF01_AE, and negative selection in all subtypes. Amino acid mutations in Tat functional domains included N24K (44%), N29K (58%), and N40K (30%) in CRF02_AG, and N24K in all G subtypes. Motifs and phosphorylation analyses showed conserved amidation, N-myristoylation, casein kinase-2 (CK2), serine and threonine phosphorylation sites. Analysis of HLA allelic frequencies showed that epitopes for HLAs A*0205, B*5301, Cw*0401, Cw*0602, and Cw*0702 were conserved in 58%–100% of samples, with B*5301 epitopes having binding affinity scores > 100 in all subtypes. This is the first report of N-myristoylation, amidation, and CK2 sites in Tat; these PTMs and mutations could affect Tat function. HLA epitopes identified could be useful for designing Tat-based vaccines for highly diverse HIV-1 populations, as in SSA. PMID:27438849

  11. A platform to view huntingtin exon 1 aggregation flux in the cell reveals divergent influences from chaperones hsp40 and hsp70.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Angelique R; Ramdzan, Yasmin M; Mok, Yee-Foong; Jovanoski, Kristijan D; Hatters, Danny M

    2013-12-27

    Our capacity for tracking how misfolded proteins aggregate inside a cell and how different aggregation states impact cell biology remains enigmatic. To address this, we built a new toolkit that enabled the high throughput tracking of individual cells enriched with polyglutamine-expanded Htt exon 1 (Httex1) monomers, oligomers, and inclusions using biosensors of aggregation state and flow cytometry pulse shape analysis. Supplemented with gel filtration chromatography and fluorescence-adapted sedimentation velocity analysis of cell lysates, we collated a multidimensional view of Httex1 aggregation in cells with respect to time, polyglutamine length, expression levels, cell survival, and overexpression of protein quality control chaperones hsp40 (DNAJB1) and hsp70 (HSPA1A). Cell death rates trended higher for Neuro2a cells containing Httex1 in inclusions than with Httex1 dispersed through the cytosol at time points of expression over 2 days. hsp40 stabilized monomers and suppressed inclusion formation but did not otherwise change Httex1 toxicity. hsp70, however, had no major effect on aggregation of Httex1 but increased the survival rate of cells with inclusions. hsp40 and hsp70 also increased levels of a second bicistronic reporter of Httex1 expression, mKate2, and increased total numbers of cells in culture, suggesting these chaperones partly rectify Httex1-induced deficiencies in quality control and growth rates. Collectively, these data suggest that Httex1 overstretches the protein quality control resources and that the defects can be partly rescued by overexpression of hsp40 and hsp70. Importantly, these effects occurred in a pronounced manner for soluble Httex1, which points to Httex1 aggregation occurring subsequently to more acute impacts on the cell. PMID:24196953

  12. A Platform to View Huntingtin Exon 1 Aggregation Flux in the Cell Reveals Divergent Influences from Chaperones hsp40 and hsp70*

    PubMed Central

    Ormsby, Angelique R.; Ramdzan, Yasmin M.; Mok, Yee-Foong; Jovanoski, Kristijan D.; Hatters, Danny M.

    2013-01-01

    Our capacity for tracking how misfolded proteins aggregate inside a cell and how different aggregation states impact cell biology remains enigmatic. To address this, we built a new toolkit that enabled the high throughput tracking of individual cells enriched with polyglutamine-expanded Htt exon 1 (Httex1) monomers, oligomers, and inclusions using biosensors of aggregation state and flow cytometry pulse shape analysis. Supplemented with gel filtration chromatography and fluorescence-adapted sedimentation velocity analysis of cell lysates, we collated a multidimensional view of Httex1 aggregation in cells with respect to time, polyglutamine length, expression levels, cell survival, and overexpression of protein quality control chaperones hsp40 (DNAJB1) and hsp70 (HSPA1A). Cell death rates trended higher for Neuro2a cells containing Httex1 in inclusions than with Httex1 dispersed through the cytosol at time points of expression over 2 days. hsp40 stabilized monomers and suppressed inclusion formation but did not otherwise change Httex1 toxicity. hsp70, however, had no major effect on aggregation of Httex1 but increased the survival rate of cells with inclusions. hsp40 and hsp70 also increased levels of a second bicistronic reporter of Httex1 expression, mKate2, and increased total numbers of cells in culture, suggesting these chaperones partly rectify Httex1-induced deficiencies in quality control and growth rates. Collectively, these data suggest that Httex1 overstretches the protein quality control resources and that the defects can be partly rescued by overexpression of hsp40 and hsp70. Importantly, these effects occurred in a pronounced manner for soluble Httex1, which points to Httex1 aggregation occurring subsequently to more acute impacts on the cell. PMID:24196953

  13. Firearm trigger assembly

    DOEpatents

    Crandall, David L.; Watson, Richard W.

    2010-02-16

    A firearm trigger assembly for use with a firearm includes a trigger mounted to a forestock of the firearm so that the trigger is movable between a rest position and a triggering position by a forwardly placed support hand of a user. An elongated trigger member operatively associated with the trigger operates a sear assembly of the firearm when the trigger is moved to the triggering position. An action release assembly operatively associated with the firearm trigger assembly and a movable assembly of the firearm prevents the trigger from being moved to the triggering position when the movable assembly is not in the locked position.

  14. Myofascial trigger point pain.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Bernadette

    2013-01-01

    Myofascial trigger point pain is an extremely prevalent cause of persistent pain disorders in all parts of the body, not just the head, neck, and face. Features include deep aching pain in any structure, referred from focally tender points in taut bands of skeletal muscle (the trigger points). Diagnosis depends on accurate palpation with 2-4 kg/cm2 of pressure for 10 to 20 seconds over the suspected trigger point to allow the referred pain pattern to develop. In the head and neck region, cervical muscle trigger points (key trigger points) often incite and perpetuate trigger points (satellite trigger points) and referred pain from masticatory muscles. Management requires identification and control of as many perpetuating factors as possible (posture, body mechanics, psychological stress or depression, poor sleep or nutrition). Trigger point therapies such as spray and stretch or trigger point injections are best used as adjunctive therapy. PMID:24864393

  15. Novel NUP98-HOXC11 fusion gene resulted from a chromosomal break within exon 1 of HOXC11 in acute myeloid leukemia with t(11;12)(p15;q13).

    PubMed

    Taketani, Takeshi; Taki, Tomohiko; Shibuya, Noriko; Kikuchi, Akira; Hanada, Ryoji; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2002-08-15

    The NUP98 gene has been reported to be fused to 11 partner genes in hematological malignancies with 11p15 translocations. Among NUP98 fusion partner genes, HOXA and HOXD clusters have been reported thus far; however, no HOXC or HOXB clusters have been reported. We identified a novel NUP98-HOXC11 fusion gene in a pediatric patient with de novo acute myeloid leukemia having t(11;12)(p15;q13). The breakpoint of NUP98 was located within a LINE repetitive sequence (HAL1) in intron 12, and the breakpoint of HOXC11 was located within exon 1, resulting in a NUP98-HOXC11 in-frame fusion transcript containing exon 12 of NUP98 fused to a part of exon 1 of HOXC11 with an 8-bp insertion derived from the intron sequence just 5' of the breakpoint of NUP98. The NUP98-HOXC11 fusion protein consists of the NH2-terminal phenylalanine-glycine repeat motif of NUP98 and the COOH-terminal homeodomain of HOXC11. Although the frequency of HOXC11 expression was not high in leukemia cell lines, its expression was significantly more frequent in myeloid than lymphoid leukemia cell lines. These data suggest that the NUP98-HOXC11 fusion protein plays a role in the pathogenesis of myeloid malignancies. PMID:12183408

  16. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  17. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  18. Triggered Jovian radio emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1985-01-01

    Certain Jovian radio emissions seem to be triggered from outside, by much weaker radio waves from the sun. Recently found in the Voyager observations near Jupiter, such triggering occurs at hectometric wavelengths during the arrival of solar radio bursts, with the triggered emissions lasting sometimes more than an hour as they slowly drifted toward higher frequencies. Like the previous discovery of similar triggered emissions at the earth, this suggests that Jupiter's emissions might also originate from natural radio lasers.

  19. Ethanol Exposure Induces Neonatal Neurodegeneration by Enhancing CB1R Exon1 Histone H4K8 Acetylation and Up-regulating CB1R Function causing Neurobehavioral Abnormalities in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Subbanna, Shivakumar; Nagre, Nagaraja N.; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pace, Betty S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Ethanol exposure to rodents during postnatal day 7 (P7), which is comparable to the third trimester of human pregnancy, induces long-term potentiation and memory deficits. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these deficits are still poorly understood. Methods: In the present study, we explored the potential role of epigenetic changes at cannabinoid type 1 (CB1R) exon1 and additional CB1R functions, which could promote memory deficits in animal models of fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. Results: We found that ethanol treatment of P7 mice enhances acetylation of H4 on lysine 8 (H4K8ace) at CB1R exon1, CB1R binding as well as the CB1R agonist-stimulated GTPγS binding in the hippocampus and neocortex, two brain regions that are vulnerable to ethanol at P7 and are important for memory formation and storage, respectively. We also found that ethanol inhibits cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression in neonatal and adult mice. The blockade or genetic deletion of CB1Rs prior to ethanol treatment at P7 rescued CREB phosphorylation and Arc expression. CB1R knockout mice exhibited neither ethanol-induced neurodegeneration nor inhibition of CREB phosphorylation or Arc expression. However, both neonatal and adult mice did exhibit enhanced CREB phosphorylation and Arc protein expression. P7 ethanol-treated adult mice exhibited impaired spatial and social recognition memory, which were prevented by the pharmacological blockade or deletion of CB1Rs at P7. Conclusions: Together, these findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment induces CB1R expression through epigenetic modification of the CB1R gene, and that the enhanced CB1R function induces pCREB, Arc, spatial, and social memory deficits in adult mice. PMID:25609594

  20. Stay away from asthma triggers

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma triggers - stay away from; Asthma triggers - avoiding; Reactive airway disease - triggers; Bronchial asthma - triggers ... to them. Have someone who does not have asthma cut the grass, or wear a facemask if ...

  1. Sequence analysis and structure prediction of 23S rRNA:m1G methyltransferases reveals a conserved core augmented with a putative Zn-binding domain in the N-terminus and family-specific elaborations in the C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Bujnicki, Janusz M; Blumenthal, Robert M; Rychlewski, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    N1-methylation of G748 within 23S ribosomal RNA results in resistance to the macrolide tylosin in Streptomyces. In contrast, the Escherichia coli mutant lacking N1-methylation of G745 exhibits increased resistance to viomycin, in addition to severe defects of growth characteristics. Both methylated guanines are located in hairpin 35, in domain II of prokaryotic 23S rRNA. G748 and G745 are modified by related S-adenosylmethionine-dependent methyltransferases (MTases), TlrB and RrmA respectively. Earlier sequence comparisons allowed identification of the AdoMet-binding site, however the catalytic site and the target-recognition region of these enzymes could not be delineated unambiguously. In this work, we carried out sequence-to-structure threading of the rRNA:m1G MTase family against the database of known structures to Identify those "missing regions". Our analysis confirms the earlier prediction of the AdoMet-binding site, but suggests a different location of the putative catalytic center than was previously postulated. We predict that RrmA and TlrB possess two regions that may be responsible for specific interactions with their target nucleic acid sequences: a putative Zn-finger domain in the N-terminus and the variable domain close to the C-terminus, which indicates that 23S rRNA MTases exhibit the primary structural organization distinct from other nucleic acid MTases, despite sharing the common catalytic domain. PMID:11763974

  2. Axon injury triggers EFA-6 mediated destabilization of axonal microtubules via TACC and doublecortin like kinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lizhen; Chuang, Marian; Koorman, Thijs; Boxem, Mike; Jin, Yishi; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2015-01-01

    Axon injury triggers a series of changes in the axonal cytoskeleton that are prerequisites for effective axon regeneration. In Caenorhabditis elegans the signaling protein Exchange Factor for ARF-6 (EFA-6) is a potent intrinsic inhibitor of axon regrowth. Here we show that axon injury triggers rapid EFA-6-dependent inhibition of axonal microtubule (MT) dynamics, concomitant with relocalization of EFA-6. EFA-6 relocalization and axon regrowth inhibition require a conserved 18-aa motif in its otherwise intrinsically disordered N-terminal domain. The EFA-6 N-terminus binds the MT-associated proteins TAC-1/Transforming-Acidic-Coiled-Coil, and ZYG-8/Doublecortin-Like-Kinase, both of which are required for regenerative growth cone formation, and which act downstream of EFA-6. After injury TAC-1 and EFA-6 transiently relocalize to sites marked by the MT minus end binding protein PTRN-1/Patronin. We propose that EFA-6 acts as a bifunctional injury-responsive regulator of axonal MT dynamics, acting at the cell cortex in the steady state and at MT minus ends after injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08695.001 PMID:26339988

  3. Causality and headache triggers

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Dana P.; Smitherman, Todd A.; Martin, Vincent T.; Penzien, Donald B.; Houle, Timothy T.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the conditions necessary to assign causal status to headache triggers. Background The term “headache trigger” is commonly used to label any stimulus that is assumed to cause headaches. However, the assumptions required for determining if a given stimulus in fact has a causal-type relationship in eliciting headaches have not been explicated. Methods A synthesis and application of Rubin’s Causal Model is applied to the context of headache causes. From this application the conditions necessary to infer that one event (trigger) causes another (headache) are outlined using basic assumptions and examples from relevant literature. Results Although many conditions must be satisfied for a causal attribution, three basic assumptions are identified for determining causality in headache triggers: 1) constancy of the sufferer; 2) constancy of the trigger effect; and 3) constancy of the trigger presentation. A valid evaluation of a potential trigger’s effect can only be undertaken once these three basic assumptions are satisfied during formal or informal studies of headache triggers. Conclusions Evaluating these assumptions is extremely difficult or infeasible in clinical practice, and satisfying them during natural experimentation is unlikely. Researchers, practitioners, and headache sufferers are encouraged to avoid natural experimentation to determine the causal effects of headache triggers. Instead, formal experimental designs or retrospective diary studies using advanced statistical modeling techniques provide the best approaches to satisfy the required assumptions and inform causal statements about headache triggers. PMID:23534872

  4. AMY trigger system

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Yoshihide

    1989-04-01

    A trigger system of the AMY detector at TRISTAN e{sup +}e{sup -} collider is described briefly. The system uses simple track segment and shower cluster counting scheme to classify events to be triggered. It has been operating successfully since 1987.

  5. Increased Levels of β-catenin, LEF-1, and HPA-1 Correlate with Poor Prognosis for Acral Melanoma with Negative BRAF and NRAS Mutation in BRAF Exons 11 and 15 and NRAS Exons 1 and 2

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Sanxiong; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yongxin; Chen, Yongbin; Li, Hongjun; Liu, Xuefeng; Xu, Da; Chen, Yanjin; Yang, Yihao; Zhang, Ya; Li, Dongxu; Xia, Junfeng

    2015-01-01

    To determine the expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1 (LEF-1), and heparanase-1 (HPA-1) and to evaluate these proteins' potential prognostic values in malignant acral melanoma without mutations in BRAF exons 11 and 15 and NRAS exons 1 and 2, specimens from 90 patients with wild-type BRAF and NRAS were assessed and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and western blotting. The positive expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was observed in 36 (72%), 31 (62%), and 32 (64%) of the detected acral melanomas, respectively. The expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was not correlated with gender, age, or diseased body parts (p>0.05), but was significantly positively correlated with the tumor node metastasis (TNM) stage and metastasis (correlation=0.406 and 0.716, 0.397 and 0.582, 0.353 and 0.579; p=0.040 and 0.0001, 0.0040 and 0.0001, 0.0120 and 0.0001, respectively). We also observed that the increased expression of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 was significantly correlated with decreased survival and poor prognosis (p=0.001, 0.010, and 0.023, respectively). A multifactorial analysis using Cox's regression model revealed that β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, heparanase-1, and the TNM stage were all independent factors in malignant melanoma (risk ratios were 7.294, 5.550, 5.622, and 4.794; p-values were 0.007, 0.018, 0.018, and 0.029, respectively). This study may provide the basis for the use of β-catenin, lymphoid enhancer-binding protein-1, and heparanase-1 as novel targets in the treatment of malignant invasion and metastasis in acral melanoma cancer. The expression of β-catenin, LEF-1, and HPA-1 was assessed and compared in malignant melanoma with that of peritumoral tissue and benign nevus in the patients with negative mutations in BRAF exons 11 and 15 and NRAS exons 1 and 2. The study may provide the basis for

  6. LHCb Topological Trigger Reoptimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Ilten, Philip; Khairullin, Egor; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Williams, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The main b-physics trigger algorithm used by the LHCb experiment is the so- called topological trigger. The topological trigger selects vertices which are a) detached from the primary proton-proton collision and b) compatible with coming from the decay of a b-hadron. In the LHC Run 1, this trigger, which utilized a custom boosted decision tree algorithm, selected a nearly 100% pure sample of b-hadrons with a typical efficiency of 60-70%; its output was used in about 60% of LHCb papers. This talk presents studies carried out to optimize the topological trigger for LHC Run 2. In particular, we have carried out a detailed comparison of various machine learning classifier algorithms, e.g., AdaBoost, MatrixNet and neural networks. The topological trigger algorithm is designed to select all ’interesting” decays of b-hadrons, but cannot be trained on every such decay. Studies have therefore been performed to determine how to optimize the performance of the classification algorithm on decays not used in the training. Methods studied include cascading, ensembling and blending techniques. Furthermore, novel boosting techniques have been implemented that will help reduce systematic uncertainties in Run 2 measurements. We demonstrate that the reoptimized topological trigger is expected to significantly improve on the Run 1 performance for a wide range of b-hadron decays.

  7. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  8. Dealing with Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... smell given off by paint or gas, and air pollution. If you notice that an irritant triggers your ... or other tobacco products around you. If outdoor air pollution is a problem, running the air conditioner or ...

  9. ELECTRONIC TRIGGER CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Russell, J.A.G.

    1958-01-01

    An electronic trigger circuit is described of the type where an output pulse is obtained only after an input voltage has cqualed or exceeded a selected reference voltage. In general, the invention comprises a source of direct current reference voltage in series with an impedance and a diode rectifying element. An input pulse of preselected amplitude causes the diode to conduct and develop a signal across the impedance. The signal is delivered to an amplifier where an output pulse is produced and part of the output is fed back in a positive manner to the diode so that the amplifier produces a steep wave front trigger pulsc at the output. The trigger point of the described circuit is not subject to variation due to the aging, etc., of multi-electrode tabes, since the diode circuit essentially determines the trigger point.

  10. Calorimetry Triggering in ATLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Igonkina, O.; Achenbach, R.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Alexandre, G.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.; Aracena, I.; Backlund, S.; Baines, J.; Barnett, B.M.; Bauss, B.; Bee, C.; Behera, P.; Bell, P.; Bendel, M.; Benslama, K.; Berry, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Bohm, C.; Bold, T.; /UC, Irvine /AGH-UST, Cracow /Birmingham U. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Rutherford /Montreal U. /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Barcelona, IFAE /CERN /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Lisbon, LIFEP /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Birmingham U. /Copenhagen U. /Copenhagen U. /Brookhaven /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Montreal U. /SLAC /CERN /Michigan State U. /Chile U., Catolica /City Coll., N.Y. /Oxford U. /La Plata U. /McGill U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /CERN /Rutherford /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Birmingham U. /Montreal U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Liverpool U. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Pennsylvania U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Geneva U. /Birmingham U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Rutherford /Royal Holloway, U. of London /AGH-UST, Cracow /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Geneva U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Michigan State U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /CERN /Montreal U. /Stockholm U. /Arizona U. /Regina U. /Regina U. /Rutherford /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /City Coll., N.Y. /University Coll. London /Humboldt U., Berlin /Queen Mary, U. of London /Argonne /LPSC, Grenoble /Arizona U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Antonio Narino U. /Hamburg U. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Chile U., Catolica /Indiana U. /Manchester U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Rutherford /City Coll., N.Y. /Stockholm U. /La Plata U. /Antonio Narino U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Antonio Narino U. /Pavia U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Pennsylvania U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, IFAE /Chile U., Catolica /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Rutherford /Barcelona, IFAE /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /CERN /Antonio Narino U. /McGill U. /Rutherford /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso /Rutherford /Chile U., Catolica /Brookhaven /Oregon U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /McGill U. /Antonio Narino U. /Antonio Narino U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Sydney U. /Rutherford /McGill U. /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Barcelona, IFAE /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Moscow State U. /Stockholm U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /DESY /DESY, Zeuthen /Birmingham U. /Geneva U. /Oregon U. /Barcelona, IFAE /University Coll. London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Birmingham U. /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Oregon U. /La Plata U. /Geneva U. /Chile U., Catolica /McGill U. /Pavia U. /Barcelona, IFAE /Regina U. /Birmingham U. /Birmingham U. /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /Oxford U. /CERN /Kirchhoff Inst. Phys. /UC, Irvine /UC, Irvine /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rutherford /Mainz U., Inst. Phys. /CERN /Geneva U. /Copenhagen U. /City Coll., N.Y. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Rio de Janeiro Federal U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Stockholm U. /University Coll. London

    2011-12-08

    The ATLAS experiment is preparing for data taking at 14 TeV collision energy. A rich discovery physics program is being prepared in addition to the detailed study of Standard Model processes which will be produced in abundance. The ATLAS multi-level trigger system is designed to accept one event in 2/10{sup 5} to enable the selection of rare and unusual physics events. The ATLAS calorimeter system is a precise instrument, which includes liquid Argon electro-magnetic and hadronic components as well as a scintillator-tile hadronic calorimeter. All these components are used in the various levels of the trigger system. A wide physics coverage is ensured by inclusively selecting events with candidate electrons, photons, taus, jets or those with large missing transverse energy. The commissioning of the trigger system is being performed with cosmic ray events and by replaying simulated Monte Carlo events through the trigger and data acquisition system.

  11. Dynamic Triggering Stress Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Huizar, H.; Velasco, A. A.

    2008-12-01

    It has been well established that static (permanent) stress changes can trigger nearby earthquakes, within a few fault lengths from the causative event, whereas triggering by dynamic (transient) stresses carried by seismic waves both nearby and at remote distances has not been as well documented nor understood. An analysis of the change in the local stress caused by the passing of surfaces waves is important for the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, we modeled the change in the stress that the passing of Rayleigh and Loves waves causes on a fault plane of arbitrary orientation, and applied a Coulomb failure criteria to calculate the potential of these stress changes to trigger reverse, normal or strike-slip failure. We preliminarily test these model results with data from dynamically triggering earthquakes in the Australian Bowen Basin. In the Bowen region, the modeling predicts a maximum triggering potential for Rayleigh waves arriving perpendicularly to the strike of the reverse faults present in the region. The modeled potentials agree with our observations, and give us an understanding of the dynamic stress orientation needed to trigger different type of earthquakes.

  12. Cygnus Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    G. Corrow, M. Hansen, D. Henderson, C. Mitton

    2008-02-01

    The Cygnus Dual Beam Radiographic Facility consists of two radiographic sources (Cygnus 1, Cygnus 2) each with a dose rating of 4 rads at 1 m, and a 1-mm diameter spot size. The electrical specifications are: 2.25 MV, 60 kA, 60 ns. This facility is located in an underground environment at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These sources were developed as a primary diagnostic for subcritical tests, which are single-shot, high-value events. In such an application there is an emphasis on reliability and reproducibility. A robust, low-jitter trigger system is a key element for meeting these goals. The trigger system was developed with both commercial and project-specific equipment. In addition to the traditional functions of a trigger system there are novel features added to protect the investment of a high-value shot. Details of the trigger system, including elements designed specifically for a subcritical test application, will be presented. The individual electronic components have their nominal throughput, and when assembled have a system throughput with a measured range of jitter. The shot-to-shot jitter will be assessed both individually and in combination. Trigger reliability and reproducibility results will be presented for a substantial number of shots executed at the NTS.

  13. Trigger mechanism for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, L.R.

    1989-02-28

    A trigger mechanism is described for a blower-vacuum apparatus having a trigger mounted within a handle and a small engine comprising: a throttle; a ''L'' shaped lever having first and second legs mounted for rotation about an intermediate pivot within the handle when the trigger is depressed, interconnecting the trigger and the throttle, the second leg having first teeth defined therein, the lever further having idle, full throttle and stop positions; a normally raised latch means adapted to be rotated and axially depressed, the latch means having second teeth situated on a cam to engage the first teeth for holding the lever in an intermediate position between the idle and full throttle positions when the latch means is rotated. The latch means further are cam teeth into potential engagement with the lever teeth when the trigger is depressed, lever is biased to the stop position; and idle adjusting means means for intercepting the second leg for preventing the second leg from reaching the stop position when the latch means is raised.

  14. Microfabricated triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Schare, Joshua M.; Bunch, Kyle

    2010-05-11

    A microfabricated vacuum switch is disclosed which includes a substrate upon which an anode, cathode and trigger electrode are located. A cover is sealed over the substrate under vacuum to complete the vacuum switch. In some embodiments of the present invention, a metal cover can be used in place of the trigger electrode on the substrate. Materials used for the vacuum switch are compatible with high vacuum, relatively high temperature processing. These materials include molybdenum, niobium, copper, tungsten, aluminum and alloys thereof for the anode and cathode. Carbon in the form of graphitic carbon, a diamond-like material, or carbon nanotubes can be used in the trigger electrode. Channels can be optionally formed in the substrate to mitigate against surface breakdown.

  15. Video Event Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Glenn L.; Lichter, Michael J.

    1994-01-01

    Video event trigger (VET) processes video image data to generate trigger signal when image shows significant change like motion or appearance, disappearance, change in color, change in brightness, or dilation of object. System aids in efficient utilization of image-data-storage and image-data-processing equipment in applications in which many video frames show no changes and are wasteful to record and analyze all frames when only relatively few frames show changes of interest. Applications include video recording of automobile crash tests, automated video monitoring of entrances, exits, parking lots, and secure areas.

  16. TOTEM Trigger System Firmware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopal, Josef

    2014-06-01

    This paper describes the TOTEM Trigger System Firmware that is operational at LHC since 2009. The TOTEM experiment is devoted to the forward hadronic physics at collision energy from 2.7 to 14TeV. It is composed of three different subdetectors that are placed at 9, 13.5, and 220m from the Interaction Point 5. A time-critical-logic firmware is implemented inside FPGA circuits to review collisions and to select the relevant ones to be stored by the Data Acquisition (DAQ). The Trigger system has been modified in the 2012-2013 LHC runs allowing the experiment to take data in cooperation with CMS.

  17. Disambiguating Syntactic Triggers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sakas, William Gregory; Fodor, Janet Dean

    2012-01-01

    We present data from an artificial language domain that suggest new contributions to the theory of syntactic triggers. Whether a learning algorithm is capable of matching the achievements of child learners depends in part on how much parametric ambiguity there is in the input. For practical reasons this cannot be established for the domain of all…

  18. Triggered plasma opening switch

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, C W

    1988-02-23

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  19. Triggered plasma opening switch

    DOEpatents

    Mendel, Clifford W.

    1988-01-01

    A triggerable opening switch for a very high voltage and current pulse includes a transmission line extending from a source to a load and having an intermediate switch section including a plasma for conducting electrons between transmission line conductors and a magnetic field for breaking the plasma conduction path and magnetically insulating the electrons when it is desired to open the switch.

  20. Optically triggered infrared photodetector.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Íñigo; Martí, Antonio; Antolín, Elisa; López, Esther; Datas, Alejandro; Luque, Antonio; Ripalda, José M; González, Yolanda

    2015-01-14

    We demonstrate a new class of semiconductor device: the optically triggered infrared photodetector (OTIP). This photodetector is based on a new physical principle that allows the detection of infrared light to be switched ON and OFF by means of an external light. Our experimental device, fabricated using InAs/AlGaAs quantum-dot technology, demonstrates normal incidence infrared detection in the 2-6 μm range. The detection is optically triggered by a 590 nm light-emitting diode. Furthermore, the detection gain is achieved in our device without an increase of the noise level. The novel characteristics of OTIPs open up new possibilities for third generation infrared imaging systems ( Rogalski, A.; Antoszewski, J.; Faraone, L. J. Appl. Phys. 2009, 105 (9), 091101). PMID:25490236

  1. Neural networks for triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Denby, B. ); Campbell, M. ); Bedeschi, F. ); Chriss, N.; Bowers, C. ); Nesti, F. )

    1990-01-01

    Two types of neural network beauty trigger architectures, based on identification of electrons in jets and recognition of secondary vertices, have been simulated in the environment of the Fermilab CDF experiment. The efficiencies for B's and rejection of background obtained are encouraging. If hardware tests are successful, the electron identification architecture will be tested in the 1991 run of CDF. 10 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  3. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Band, D.; Kippen, M.

    2004-09-28

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  4. Isolating Triggered Star Formation

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, Elizabeth J.; Arnold, Jacob A.; Zentner, Andrew R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2007-09-12

    Galaxy pairs provide a potentially powerful means of studying triggered star formation from galaxy interactions. We use a large cosmological N-body simulation coupled with a well-tested semi-analytic substructure model to demonstrate that the majority of galaxies in close pairs reside within cluster or group-size halos and therefore represent a biased population, poorly suited for direct comparison to 'field' galaxies. Thus, the frequent observation that some types of galaxies in pairs have redder colors than 'field' galaxies is primarily a selection effect. We use our simulations to devise a means to select galaxy pairs that are isolated in their dark matter halos with respect to other massive subhalos (N= 2 halos) and to select a control sample of isolated galaxies (N= 1 halos) for comparison. We then apply these selection criteria to a volume-limited subset of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey with M{sub B,j} {le} -19 and obtain the first clean measure of the typical fraction of galaxies affected by triggered star formation and the average elevation in the star formation rate. We find that 24% (30.5 %) of these L* and sub-L* galaxies in isolated 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc pairs exhibit star formation that is boosted by a factor of {approx}> 5 above their average past value, while only 10% of isolated galaxies in the control sample show this level of enhancement. Thus, 14% (20 %) of the galaxies in these close pairs show clear triggered star formation. Our orbit models suggest that 12% (16%) of 50 (30) h{sup -1} kpc close pairs that are isolated according to our definition have had a close ({le} 30 h{sup -1} kpc) pass within the last Gyr. Thus, the data are broadly consistent with a scenario in which most or all close passes of isolated pairs result in triggered star formation. The isolation criteria we develop provide a means to constrain star formation and feedback prescriptions in hydrodynamic simulations and a very general method of understanding the importance of

  5. Triggered Codeswitching between Cognate Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broersma, Mirjam

    2009-01-01

    This study shows further evidence for triggered codeswitching. In natural speech from a Dutch-English bilingual, codeswitches occurred more often directly next to a cognate (or "trigger word") than elsewhere. This evidence from typologically related, cognate languages extends previous evidence for triggering between typologically unrelated…

  6. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  7. Subnanosecond trigger system for ETA

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, E.G.; Lauer, E.J.; Reginato, L.L.; Rogers D.; Schmidt, J.A.

    1980-05-30

    A high-voltage trigger system capable of triggering 30, 250 kV spark gaps; each with less than +- 1 ns jitter has been constructed. In addition to low jitter rates, the trigger system must be capable of delivering the high voltage pulses to the spark gaps either simultaneously or sequentially as determined by other system requirements. The trigger system consists of several stages of pulse amplification culminating in 160 kV pulses having 30 ns risetime. The trigger system is described and test data provided.

  8. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. PMID:27463140

  9. Effector triggered immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajamuthiah, Rajmohan; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria produce virulence factors called effectors, which are important components of the infection process. Effectors aid in pathogenesis by facilitating bacterial attachment, pathogen entry into or exit from the host cell, immunoevasion, and immunosuppression. Effectors also have the ability to subvert host cellular processes, such as hijacking cytoskeletal machinery or blocking protein translation. However, host cells possess an evolutionarily conserved innate immune response that can sense the pathogen through the activity of its effectors and mount a robust immune response. This “effector triggered immunity” (ETI) was first discovered in plants but recent evidence suggest that the process is also well conserved in metazoans. We will discuss salient points of the mechanism of ETI in metazoans from recent studies done in mammalian cells and invertebrate model hosts. PMID:25513770

  10. The CMS high level trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a 2-level trigger system: the Level 1 Trigger, implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running on the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. Here we will present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simpler single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We will discuss the optimisation of the triggers and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  11. The CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trocino, Daniele

    2014-06-01

    The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger, implemented in custom-designed electronics, and the High-Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the CMS offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a tradeoff between the complexity of the algorithms running with the available computing power, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. We present the performance of the main triggers used during the 2012 data taking, ranging from simple single-object selections to more complex algorithms combining different objects, and applying analysis-level reconstruction and selection. We discuss the optimisation of the trigger and the specific techniques to cope with the increasing LHC pile-up, reducing its impact on the physics performance.

  12. Triggering with the LHCb calorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefevre, Regis; LHCb Collaboration

    2009-04-01

    The LHCb experiment at the LHC has been conceived to pursue high precision studies of CP violation and rare phenomena in b hadron decays. The online selection is crucial in LHCb and relies on the calorimeters to trigger on high transverse energy electrons, photons, π0 and hadrons. In this purpose a dedicated electronic has been realized. The calorimeter trigger system has been commissioned and is used to trigger on cosmic muons before beams start circulating in the LHC. When the LHC will start, it will also provide a very useful interaction trigger.

  13. The NA62 trigger system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivda, M.; NA62 Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The main aim of the NA62 experiment (NA62 Technical Design Report, [1]) is to study ultra-rare Kaon decays. In order to select rare events over the overwhelming background, central systems with high-performance, high bandwidth, flexibility and configurability are necessary, that minimize dead time while maximizing data collection reliability. The NA62 experiment consists of 12 sub-detector systems and several trigger and control systems, for a total channel count of less than 100,000. The GigaTracKer (GTK) has the largest number of channels (54,000), and the Liquid Krypton (LKr) calorimeter shares with it the largest raw data rate (19 GB/s). The NA62 trigger system works with 3 trigger levels. The first trigger level is based on a hardware central trigger unit, so-called L0 Trigger Processor (L0TP), and Local Trigger Units (LTU), which are all located in the experimental cavern. Other two trigger levels are based on software, and done with a computer farm located on surface. The L0TP receives information from triggering sub-detectors asynchronously via Ethernet; it processes the information, and then transmits a final trigger decision synchronously to each sub-detector through the Trigger and Timing Control (TTC) system. The interface between L0TP and the TTC system, which is used for trigger and clock distribution, is provided by the Local Trigger Unit board (LTU). The LTU can work in two modes: global and stand-alone. In the global mode, the LTU provides an interface between L0TP and TTC system. In the stand-alone mode, the LTU can fully emulate L0TP and so provides an independent way for each sub-detector for testing or calibration purposes. In addition to the emulation functionality, a further functionality is implemented that allows to synchronize the clock of the LTU with the L0TP and the TTC system. For testing and debugging purposes, a Snap Shot Memory (SSM) interface is implemented, that can work

  14. Triggering of repeated earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, G. A.; Zakrzhevskaya, N. A.; Sobolev, D. G.

    2016-03-01

    Based on the analysis of the world's earthquakes with magnitudes M ≥ 6.5 for 1960-2013, it is shown that they cause global-scale coherent seismic oscillations which most distinctly manifest themselves in the period interval of 4-6 min during 1-3 days after the event. After these earthquakes, a repeated shock has an increased probability to occur in different seismically active regions located as far away as a few thousand km from the previous event, i.e., a remote interaction of seismic events takes place. The number of the repeated shocks N( t) decreases with time, which characterizes the memory of the lithosphere about the impact that has occurred. The time decay N( t) can be approximated by the linear, exponential, and powerlaw dependences. No distinct correlation between the spatial locations of the initial and repeated earthquakes is revealed. The probable triggering mechanisms of the remote interaction between the earthquakes are discussed. Surface seismic waves traveling several times around the Earth's, coherent oscillations, and global source are the most preferable candidates. This may lead to the accumulation and coalescence of ruptures in the highly stressed or weakened domains of a seismically active region, which increases the probability of a repeated earthquake.

  15. Fermi GBM Early Trigger Characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Paciesas, Bill; Meegan, Charles

    2009-05-25

    Since the launch of the Fermi observatory on June 11 2008, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has seen approximately 250 triggers of which about 150 were cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GBM operates dozens of trigger algorithms covering various energy bands and timescales and is therefore sensitive to a wide variety of phenomena, both astrophysical and not.

  16. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  17. Seismology: dynamic triggering of earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Gomberg, Joan; Johnson, Paul

    2005-10-01

    After an earthquake, numerous smaller shocks are triggered over distances comparable to the dimensions of the mainshock fault rupture, although they are rare at larger distances. Here we analyse the scaling of dynamic deformations (the stresses and strains associated with seismic waves) with distance from, and magnitude of, their triggering earthquake, and show that they can cause further earthquakes at any distance if their amplitude exceeds several microstrain, regardless of their frequency content. These triggering requirements are remarkably similar to those measured in the laboratory for inducing dynamic elastic nonlinear behaviour, which suggests that the underlying physics is similar. PMID:16208360

  18. Pulsed thyristor trigger control circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nola, F. J. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A trigger control circuit is provided for producing firing pulses for the thyristor of a thyristor control system such as a power factor controller. The control circuit overcomes thyristor triggering problems involved with the current lag associated with controlling inductive loads and utilizes a phase difference signal, already present in the power factor controller, in deriving a signal for inhibiting generation of a firing pulse until no load current is flowing from the preceding half cycle and thereby ensuring that the thyristor is triggered on during each half cycle.

  19. Triggered Release from Polymer Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Esser-Kahn, Aaron P.; Odom, Susan A.; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.; Moore, Jeffrey S.

    2011-07-06

    Stimuli-responsive capsules are of interest in drug delivery, fragrance release, food preservation, and self-healing materials. Many methods are used to trigger the release of encapsulated contents. Here we highlight mechanisms for the controlled release of encapsulated cargo that utilize chemical reactions occurring in solid polymeric shell walls. Triggering mechanisms responsible for covalent bond cleavage that result in the release of capsule contents include chemical, biological, light, thermal, magnetic, and electrical stimuli. We present methods for encapsulation and release, triggering methods, and mechanisms and conclude with our opinions on interesting obstacles for chemically induced activation with relevance for controlled release.

  20. The D0 upgrade trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Eno, S.

    1994-09-01

    The current trigger system for the D0 detector at Fermilab`s Tevatron will need to be upgraded when the Min Injector is installed and the Tevatron can operate at luminosities exceeding 10{sup 32} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and with a crossing time of 132 ns. We report on preliminary designs for upgrades to the trigger system for the Main Injector era.

  1. Slow earthquakes triggered by typhoons.

    PubMed

    Liu, ChiChing; Linde, Alan T; Sacks, I Selwyn

    2009-06-11

    The first reports on a slow earthquake were for an event in the Izu peninsula, Japan, on an intraplate, seismically active fault. Since then, many slow earthquakes have been detected. It has been suggested that the slow events may trigger ordinary earthquakes (in a context supported by numerical modelling), but their broader significance in terms of earthquake occurrence remains unclear. Triggering of earthquakes has received much attention: strain diffusion from large regional earthquakes has been shown to influence large earthquake activity, and earthquakes may be triggered during the passage of teleseismic waves, a phenomenon now recognized as being common. Here we show that, in eastern Taiwan, slow earthquakes can be triggered by typhoons. We model the largest of these earthquakes as repeated episodes of slow slip on a reverse fault just under land and dipping to the west; the characteristics of all events are sufficiently similar that they can be modelled with minor variations of the model parameters. Lower pressure results in a very small unclamping of the fault that must be close to the failure condition for the typhoon to act as a trigger. This area experiences very high compressional deformation but has a paucity of large earthquakes; repeating slow events may be segmenting the stressed area and thus inhibiting large earthquakes, which require a long, continuous seismic rupture. PMID:19516339

  2. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  3. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  4. Anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor "foreshocks", since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  5. Industrial accidents triggered by lightning.

    PubMed

    Renni, Elisabetta; Krausmann, Elisabeth; Cozzani, Valerio

    2010-12-15

    Natural disasters can cause major accidents in chemical facilities where they can lead to the release of hazardous materials which in turn can result in fires, explosions or toxic dispersion. Lightning strikes are the most frequent cause of major accidents triggered by natural events. In order to contribute towards the development of a quantitative approach for assessing lightning risk at industrial facilities, lightning-triggered accident case histories were retrieved from the major industrial accident databases and analysed to extract information on types of vulnerable equipment, failure dynamics and damage states, as well as on the final consequences of the event. The most vulnerable category of equipment is storage tanks. Lightning damage is incurred by immediate ignition, electrical and electronic systems failure or structural damage with subsequent release. Toxic releases and tank fires tend to be the most common scenarios associated with lightning strikes. Oil, diesel and gasoline are the substances most frequently released during lightning-triggered Natech accidents. PMID:20817399

  6. Know Your Smoking Triggers | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    Triggers are the things that make you want to smoke. Different people have different triggers, like a stressful situation, sipping coffee, going to a party, or smelling cigarette smoke. Most triggers fall into one of these four categories: Emotional Pattern Social Withdrawal Knowing your triggers and understanding the best way to deal with them is your first line of defense.

  7. Integral magnetic ignition pickup trigger

    SciTech Connect

    King, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a trigger system for the ignition system of an internal combustion engine having a crankcase with a rotatable crankshaft therein, and a flywheel on one end of the crankcase connected to an end of the crankshaft. It comprises: a nonferromagnetic disk-shaped hub for connection to the crankshaft and rotatable therewith on the end opposite the flywheel; and a stationary sensor mounted adjacent the hub for detecting impulses from the magnetically responsive elements as the hub rotates and utilizing the impulses to trigger the ignition system.

  8. Detector array control and triggering

    SciTech Connect

    Aiello, S.; Anzalone, A.; Bartolucci, M. |

    1998-08-01

    A commercial DSP-based board installed in a host-PC was employed for the fast, on-line and real-time computation of special algorithms, in order to perform event selection and operate as a 2nd level trigger. Moreover an ad hoc build interface, realized using PLDs with a view to connecting the DSP-board to the ADCs and to the data acquisition system, has been tested in order to evaluate the performances of these programmable devices used as a look-up-table and as a decisional part of a 1st level trigger.

  9. A New Look at Trigger Point Injections

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Clara S. M.; Wong, Steven H. S.

    2012-01-01

    Trigger point injections are commonly practised pain interventional techniques. However, there is still lack of objective diagnostic criteria for trigger points. The mechanisms of action of trigger point injection remain obscure and its efficacy remains heterogeneous. The advent of ultrasound technology in the noninvasive real-time imaging of soft tissues sheds new light on visualization of trigger points, explaining the effect of trigger point injection by blockade of peripheral nerves, and minimizing the complications of blind injection. PMID:21969825

  10. Environmental Triggers of Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Burek, C. Lynne; Talor, Monica V.

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger or autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2h4 mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  11. Environmental triggers of autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Burek, C Lynne; Talor, Monica V

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis is among the most prevalent of all the autoimmunities. Autoimmune thyroiditis is multifactorial with contributions from genetic and environmental factors. Much information has been published about the genetic predisposition to autoimmune thyroiditis both in experimental animals and humans. There is, in contrast, very little data on environmental agents that can serve as the trigger for autoimmunity in a genetically predisposed host. The best-established environmental factor is excess dietary iodine. Increased iodine consumption is strongly implicated as a trigger for thyroiditis, but only in genetically susceptible individuals. However, excess iodine is not the only environmental agent implicated as a trigger leading to autoimmune thyroiditis. There are a wide variety of other synthetic chemicals that affect the thyroid gland or have the ability to promote immune dysfunction in the host. These chemicals are released into the environment by design, such as in pesticides, or as a by-product of industry. Candidate pollutants include polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polybrominated biphenols, and polychlorinated biphenols, among others. Infections are also reputed to trigger autoimmunity and may act alone or in concert with environmental chemicals. We have utilized a unique animal model, the NOD.H2(h4) mouse to explore the influence of iodine and other environmental factors on autoimmune thyroiditis. PMID:19818584

  12. Suicide Triggers Described by Herodotus

    PubMed Central

    Auchincloss, Stephane; Ahmadi, Jamshid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to better understand the triggers of suicide, particularly among the ancient Greek and Persian soldiers and commanders. Method: ‘Herodotus:TheHistories’ is a history of the rulers and soldiery who participated in the Greco-Persian wars (492-449 BCE). A new translation (2013) of this manuscript was studied. Accounts of suicide were collected and collated, with descriptions of circumstances, methods, and probable triggers. Results: Nine accounts of suicide were identified. Eight of these were named individuals (4 Greeks and 4 Persians); of whom, seven were male. Only one (not the female) appeared to act in response to a mental disorder. Other triggers of suicide included guilt, avoidance of dishonour/punishment and altruism. Cutting/ stabbing was the most common method; others included hanging, jumping, poison, and burning (the single female). Conclusion: While soldiers at a time of war do not reflect the general community, they are nevertheless members of their society. Thus, this evidence demonstrates that suicide triggered by burdensome circumstances (in addition to mental disorder) was known to the Greek and Persian people more than two millennia ago. PMID:27437010

  13. Host defenses trigger salmonella's arsenal.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2011-03-17

    Salmonella survives in macrophages by using a molecular syringe to deliver proteins into the host-cell cytosol where they manipulate phagocyte physiology. Arpaia and colleagues (Arpaia et al., 2011) show that deployment of this virulence factor is triggered by the very responses that are intended to confer host resistance. PMID:21402352

  14. Soluble CD40 ligand induces β3 integrin tyrosine phosphorylation and triggers platelet activation by outside-in signaling

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K. S. Srinivasa; Andre, Patrick; He, Ming; Bao, Ming; Manganello, Jeanne; Phillips, David R.

    2003-01-01

    We earlier reported that the soluble form of the CD40 ligand (sCD40L), is involved in thrombosis by stabilizing platelet thrombi. In this article, we have determined the mechanism by which this protein affects platelet biology. Addition of sCD40L to washed platelets was found to activate the receptor function of αIIbβ3 as measured by the induction of fibrinogen binding and the formation of platelet microparticles. Mutation in the KGD sequence (D117E) of sCD40L, the αIIbβ3-binding domain in the N terminus of the protein resulted in a loss of the platelet-stimulatory activity of this protein. Integrilin, a αIIbβ3 antagonist, but not an antibody to CD40 that blocked the ligand-binding activity, inhibited these platelet-stimulatory events. CD40-/- platelets bound fibrinogen and formed microparticles similar to WT platelets, again indicating that CD40 is not involved in sCD40L-induced platelet activation. Exposure of platelets to sCD40L, but not D117E-sCD40L-coated surfaces, induced platelet thrombi formation under arterial shear rate. sCD40L-induced platelet stimulation resulted in the phosphorylation of tyrosine-759 in the cytoplasmic domain of β3. Platelets from the diYF mouse strain, expressing β3 in which both cytoplasmic tyrosines are mutated to phenylalanine, were defective in sCD40L-induced platelet stimulation. These data indicate that sCD40L is a primary platelet agonist and that platelet stimulation is induced by the binding of the KGD domain of sCD40L to αIIbβ3, triggering outside-in signaling by tyrosine phosphorylation of β3. PMID:14519852

  15. The L3 energy trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizzarri, R.; Cesaroni, F.; Gentile, S.; Lunadei, G.; Fukushima, M.; Herten, G.; Hebbeker, T.

    1989-11-01

    The L3 first-level energy trigger is based on energy measurements in electromagnetic and hadronic calorimeters and in luminosity monitors. The information from these detectors is evaluated and a decision is taken in about 20 μs (the time between two bunch crossings in LEP is 22 μs). This trigger makes use of 300 CAMAC modules: an arithmetic logic unit (ALU), a BUS multiplexer (BS), a memory lookup table (MLU), a data stack (DS) and a fast encoding and readout ADC (FERA), each of them performing dedicated functions. The data are transmitted via front-panel ECL buses. The CAMAC data-way is used only for initialization and checking purposes. The system operates synchronously with a period of 60 ns.

  16. Method for triggering an action

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Johnson, Monte L.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2006-10-17

    A method for triggering an action of at least one downhole device on a downhole network integrated into a downhole tool string synchronized to an event comprises determining latency, sending a latency adjusted signal, and performing the action. The latency is determined between a control device and the at least one downhole device. The latency adjusted signal for triggering an action is sent to the downhole device. The action is performed downhole synchronized to the event. A preferred method for determining latency comprises the steps: a control device sends a first signal to the downhole device; after receiving the signal, the downhole device sends a response signal to the control device; and the control device analyzes the time from sending the signal to receiving the response signal.

  17. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  18. Optical Spectra of Triggered Lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, T. D.; Biagi, C. J.; Hill, J. D.; Jordan, D. M.; Uman, M. A.; Christian, H. J., Jr.

    2009-12-01

    In August 2009, the first optical spectra of triggered lightning flashes were acquired. Data from two triggered lightning flashes were obtained at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing in north-central Florida. The spectrometer that was used has an average dispersion of 260 Å/mm resulting in an average resolution of 5 Å when mated to a Photron (SA1.1) high-speed camera. The spectra captured with this system had a free spectral range of 3800-8000 Å. The spectra were captured at 300,000 frames per second. The spectrometer's vertical field of view was 3 m at an altitude 50 m above the launch tower, intended to view the middle of the triggering wire. Preliminary results show that the copper spectrum dominated the earliest part of the flash and copper lines persisted during the total lifetime of the detectable spectrum. Animations over the lifetime of the stroke from the initial wire illumination to multiple return strokes show the evolution of the spectrum. In addition, coordinated high speed channel base current, electric field and imagery measurements of the exploding wire, downward leaders, and return strokes were recorded. Quantitative analysis of the spectral evolution will be discussed in the context of the overall flash development.

  19. Laser-triggered vacuum switch

    DOEpatents

    Brannon, Paul J.; Cowgill, Donald F.

    1990-01-01

    A laser-triggered vacuum switch has a material such as a alkali metal halide on the cathode electrode for thermally activated field emission of electrons and ions upon interaction with a laser beam, the material being in contact with the cathode with a surface facing the discharge gap. The material is preferably a mixture of KCl and Ti powders. The laser may either shine directly on the material, preferably through a hole in the anode, or be directed to the material over a fiber optic cable.

  20. Star formation and its triggers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combes, F.

    2016-06-01

    The relation between star formation and gas density appears linear for galaxies on the main sequence, and when the molecular gas is considered. However, the star formation efficiency (SFE) defined as the ratio of SFR to gas surface densities, can be much higher when SF is triggered by a dynamical process such as galaxy interaction or mergers, or even secular evolution and cold gas accretion. I review recent work showing how the SFE can vary as a function of morphological type, environment, or redshift. Physical processes able to explain positive and negative feedback from supernovae or AGN are discussed.

  1. The Database Driven ATLAS Trigger Configuration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavez, Carlos; Gianelli, Michele; Martyniuk, Alex; Stelzer, Joerg; Stockton, Mark; Vazquez, Will

    2015-12-01

    The ATLAS trigger configuration system uses a centrally provided relational database to store the configurations for all levels of the ATLAS trigger system. The configuration used at any point during data taking is maintained in this database. A interface to this database is provided by the TriggerTool, a Java-based graphical user interface. The TriggerTool has been designed to work as both a convenient browser and editor of configurations in the database for both general users and experts. The updates to the trigger system necessitated by the upgrades and changes in both hardware and software during the first long shut down of the LHC will be explored.

  2. Triggering for charm, beauty, and truth

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1982-02-01

    As the search for more and more rare processes accelerates, the need for more and more effective event triggers also accelerates. In the earliest experiments, a simple coincidence often sufficed not only as the event trigger, but as the complete record of an event of interest. In today's experiments, not only has the fast trigger become more sophisticated, but one or more additional level of trigger processing precedes writing event data to magnetic tape for later analysis. Further search experiments will certainly require further expansion in the number of trigger levels required to filter those rare events of particular interest.

  3. XI UV Laser Trigger System

    SciTech Connect

    Brickeen, B.K.; Morelli, G.L.; Paiva, R.A.; Powell, C.A.; Sundvold, P.D.

    1999-01-26

    The X1 accelerator project at Sandia National Laboratory/New Mexico utilizes SF6 insulated, multi-stage, UV laser triggered gas switches. A 265 nm UV laser system was designed and built to generate eight simultaneous output pulses of 10 mJ each with a 13 nsec pulse width. A 1061 nm solid-state Nd:Cr:GSGG laser was frequency quadrupled using a two-stage doubling process. The 1061 nm fundamental laser energy was frequency doubled with a KTP crystal to 530 nm, achieving 65% conversion efficiency. The 530 nm output was frequency doubled with KD*P crystal to 265 nm, achieving conversion efficiency of 31%. The 265 nm beam pulse was split into eight parallel channels with a system of partially reflecting mirrors. Low timing jitter and stable energy output were achieved. The entire optical system was packaged into a rugged, o-ring sealed, aluminum structure 10''x19''x2.75''. The size of the electronics was 12''x8''x8''. Subsequent accelerator system requirements dictated a redesign of the triggering system for an output beam with less angular divergence. An unstable, crossed porro prism resonator was designed and incorporated into the system. The beam divergence of the redesigned system was successfully decreased to 0.97 mrad in the UV. The resulting frequency doubling efficiencies were 55% to 530 nm and 25% to 265 nm. The optical output remained at 10 mJ in each channel with an 11 nsec pulse width.

  4. Landslides triggered by the earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, E.L.; Keefer, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    The May 2 earthquake triggered landslides numbering in the thousands. Most numerous were rockfalls and rockslides that occurred mainly on slopes steeper than 60{degree} within sandstone, siltstone, and shale units of Upper Cretaceous and Tertiary strata. Soil falls from cutbank slopes along streams were also numerous. Seven slumps in natural slopes were triggered, and minor liquefaction-induced lateral-spread failures occurred along Los Gatos Creek. Rockfalls and rockslides occurred as far as 34 km northwest, 15 km south, and 26 km southwest of the epicenter. There were few slope failures to the east of the epicenter, owing to the absence of steep slopes in that direction. Throughout the area affected, rockfalls and rockslides were concentrated on southwest-facing slopes; the failures on slopes facing in the southwest quadrant accounted for as much as 93% of all failures in some areas. Rockfalls and rockslides from ridge crests were predominantly from sandstone units. Along steeply incised canyons, however, failures in shale and siltstone units were also common. Small rockslides and soil slides occurred from cut slopes above oil-well pump pads in the oil fields; slumps were common in the outer parts of steep fill slopes of the pump pads. The distribution of seismically induced landslides throughout the entire earthquake-affected area was mapped from true-color airphotos taken on May 3, 1985.

  5. Membrane-triggered plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Su-Jin; Lee, Hong Gil; Seo, Pil Joon

    2014-01-01

    Plants have evolved sophisticated defense mechanisms to resist pathogen invasion. Upon the pathogen recognition, the host plants activate a variety of signal transduction pathways, and one of representative defense responses is systemic acquired resistance (SAR) that provides strong immunity against secondary infections in systemic tissues. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that modulation of membrane composition contributes to establishing SAR and disease resistance in Arabidopsis, but underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that a membrane-bound transcription factor (MTF) is associated with plant responses to pathogen attack. The MTF is responsive to microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered membrane rigidification at the levels of transcription and proteolytic processing. The processed nuclear transcription factor possibly regulates pathogen resistance by directly regulating PATHOGENESIS-RELATED (PR) genes. Taken together, our results suggest that pathogenic microorganisms trigger changes in physico-chemical properties of cellular membrane in plants, and the MTF conveys the membrane information to the nucleus to ensure prompt establishment of plant immunity. PMID:25763708

  6. What triggers coronal mass ejections ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are large clouds of highly magnetized plasma. They are ac-celerated from the solar atmosphere into interplanetary space by the Lorentz force, which is associated to their strong current-carrying magnetic fields. Both theory and observations lead to the inevitable conclusion that the launch of a CME must result from the sudden release of free magnetic energy, which has slowly been accumulated in the corona for a long time before the eruption. Since the incomplete, but seminal, loss-of-equilibrium model was proposed by van Tend and Kuperus (1978), a large variety of analytical and numerical storage-and-release MHD models has been put forward in the past 20 years or so. All these models rely on the slow increase of currents and/or the slow decrease of the restraining magnetic tension preceding the eruption. But they all put the emphazis on different physical mechanisms to achieve this preeruptive evolution, and to suddenly trigger and later drive a CME. Nevertheless, all these models actually share many common features, which all describe many individual observed aspects of solar eruptions. It is therefore not always clear which of all the suggested mecha-nisms do really account for the triggering of observed CMEs in general. Also, these mechanisms should arguably not be as numerous as the models themselves, owing to the common occurence of CMEs. In order to shed some light on this challenging, but unripe, topic, I will attempt to rediscuss the applicability of the models to the Sun, and to rethink the most sensitive ones in a common frame, so as to find their common denominator. I will elaborate on the idea that many of the proposed triggering mechanisms may actually only be considered as different ways to apply a "last push", which puts the system beyond its eruptive threshold. I will argue that, in most cases, the eruptive threshold is determined by the vertical gradient of the magnetic field in the low-β corona, just like the usual

  7. Acoustic properties of triggered lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dayeh, M. A.; Evans, N.; Ramaekers, J.; Trevino, J.; Rassoul, H.; Lucia, R. J.; Dwyer, J. R.; Uman, M. A.; Jordan, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic signatures from rocket-triggered lightning are measured by a 15m long, one-dimensional microphone array consisting of 16 receivers situated 90 meters from the lightning channel. Measurements were taken at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in Camp Blanding, FL during the summer of 2014. The linear array was oriented in an end-fire position so that the peak acoustic reception pattern can be steered vertically along the channel with a frequency-dependent spatial resolution, enabling us to sample the acoustic signatures from different portions along the lightning channel. We report on the characteristics of acoustic signatures associated with several return strokes in 6 measured flashes (total of 29 return strokes). In addition, we study the relationship between the amplitude, peak frequency, and inferred energy input of each stroke acoustic signature and the associated measured lightning parameters. Furthermore, challenges of obtaining acoustic measurements in thunderstorm harsh conditions and their countermeasures will also be discussed.

  8. CDF level 2 trigger upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Anikeev, K.; Bogdan, M.; DeMaat, R.; Fedorko, W.; Frisch, H.; Hahn, K.; Hakala, M.; Keener, P.; Kim, Y.; Kroll, J.; Kwang, S.; Lewis, J.; Lin, C.; Liu, T.; Marjamaa, F.; Mansikkala, T.; Neu, C.; Pitkanen, S.; Reisert, B.; Rusu, V.; Sanders, H.; /Fermilab /Chicago U. /Pennsylvania U.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the new CDF Level 2 Trigger, which was commissioned during Spring 2005. The upgrade was necessitated by several factors that included increased bandwidth requirements, in view of the growing instantaneous luminosity of the Tevatron, and the need for a more robust system, since the older system was reaching the limits of maintainability. The challenges in designing the new system were interfacing with many different upstream detector subsystems, processing larger volumes of data at higher speed, and minimizing the impact on running the CDF experiment during the system commissioning phase. To meet these challenges, the new system was designed around a general purpose motherboard, the PULSAR, which is instrumented with powerful FPGAs and modern SRAMs, and which uses mezzanine cards to interface with upstream detector components and an industry standard data link (S-LINK) within the system.

  9. Is osseointegration inflammation-triggered?

    PubMed

    Vitkov, Ljubomir; Hartl, Dominik; Hannig, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Bioinert endosteal implants cause a foreign body reaction, whereas bioactive ones cause osseointegration. However, the mechanisms responsible for the two modi of host response remain unclear. COX-2(-/-) animal models showed the dependence of osseointegration on prostaglandins. PGE2, a product of COX-2, augments Wnt signalling, a pathway that promotes the regeneration in many types of tissues. Recently, we demonstrated the ability of bioactive implants to recruit neutrophils and to trigger neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are a potent source of PGE2. In bioinert implants no PGE2 release has been ascertained. Collectively, these findings suggest that osseointegration might be the host response to bioactive implants, novel and quite different to the so-called foreign body reaction. PMID:27372846

  10. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  11. Tail reconnection triggering substorm onset.

    PubMed

    Angelopoulos, Vassilis; McFadden, James P; Larson, Davin; Carlson, Charles W; Mende, Stephen B; Frey, Harald; Phan, Tai; Sibeck, David G; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Auster, Uli; Donovan, Eric; Mann, Ian R; Rae, I Jonathan; Russell, Christopher T; Runov, Andrei; Zhou, Xu-Zhi; Kepko, Larry

    2008-08-15

    Magnetospheric substorms explosively release solar wind energy previously stored in Earth's magnetotail, encompassing the entire magnetosphere and producing spectacular auroral displays. It has been unclear whether a substorm is triggered by a disruption of the electrical current flowing across the near-Earth magnetotail, at approximately 10 R(E) (R(E): Earth radius, or 6374 kilometers), or by the process of magnetic reconnection typically seen farther out in the magnetotail, at approximately 20 to 30 R(E). We report on simultaneous measurements in the magnetotail at multiple distances, at the time of substorm onset. Reconnection was observed at 20 R(E), at least 1.5 minutes before auroral intensification, at least 2 minutes before substorm expansion, and about 3 minutes before near-Earth current disruption. These results demonstrate that substorms are likely initiated by tail reconnection. PMID:18653845

  12. Bars Triggered By Galaxy Flybys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lang, Meagan; Sinha, Manodeep

    2015-05-01

    Galaxy mergers drive galaxy evolution and are a key mechanism by which galaxies grow and transform. Unlike galaxy mergers where two galaxies combine into one remnant, galaxy flybys occur when two independent galaxy halos interpenetrate but detach at a later time; these one-time events are surprisingly common and can even out-number galaxy mergers at low redshift for massive halos. Although these interactions are transient and occur far outside the galaxy disk, flybys can still drive a rapid and large pertubations within both the intruder and victim halos. We explored how flyby encounters can transform each galaxy using a suite of N-body simulations. We present results from three co-planar flybys between disk galaxies, demonstrating that flybys can both trigger strong bar formation and can spin-up dark matter halos.

  13. A Mechanochemically Triggered "Click" Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2015-11-16

    "Click" chemistry represents one of the most powerful approaches for linking molecules in chemistry and materials science. Triggering this reaction by mechanical force would enable site- and stress-specific "click" reactions--a hitherto unreported observation. We introduce the design and realization of a homogeneous Cu catalyst able to activate through mechanical force when attached to suitable polymer chains, acting as a lever to transmit the force to the central catalytic system. Activation of the subsequent copper-catalyzed "click" reaction (CuAAC) is achieved either by ultrasonication or mechanical pressing of a polymeric material, using a fluorogenic dye to detect the activation of the catalyst. Based on an N-heterocyclic copper(I) carbene with attached polymeric chains of different flexibility, the force is transmitted to the central catalyst, thereby activating a CuAAC in solution and in the solid state. PMID:26420664

  14. Landslide triggering by rain infiltration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iverson, Richard M.

    2000-01-01

    Landsliding in response to rainfall involves physical processes that operate on disparate timescales. Relationships between these timescales guide development of a mathematical model that uses reduced forms of Richards equation to evaluate effects of rainfall infiltration on landslide occurrence, timing, depth, and acceleration in diverse situations. The longest pertinent timescale is A/D0, where D0 is the maximum hydraulic diffusivity of the soil and A is the catchment area that potentially affects groundwater pressures at a prospective landslide slip surface location with areal coordinates x, y and depth H. Times greater than A/D0 are necessary for establishment of steady background water pressures that develop at (x, y, H) in response to rainfall averaged over periods that commonly range from days to many decades. These steady groundwater pressures influence the propensity for landsliding at (x, y, H), but they do not trigger slope failure. Failure results from rainfall over a typically shorter timescale H2/D0 associated with transient pore pressure transmission during and following storms. Commonly, this timescale ranges from minutes to months. The shortest timescale affecting landslide responses to rainfall is √(H/g), where g is the magnitude of gravitational acceleration. Postfailure landslide motion occurs on this timescale, which indicates that the thinnest landslides accelerate most quickly if all other factors are constant. Effects of hydrologic processes on landslide processes across these diverse timescales are encapsulated by a response function, R(t*) = √(t*/π) exp (-1/t*) - erfc (1/√t*), which depends only on normalized time, t*. Use of R(t*) in conjunction with topographic data, rainfall intensity and duration information, an infinite-slope failure criterion, and Newton's second law predicts the timing, depth, and acceleration of rainfall-triggered landslides. Data from contrasting landslides that exhibit rapid, shallow motion and slow, deep

  15. Diet and Dermatitis: Food Triggers

    PubMed Central

    Schlichte, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Given increasing awareness of the link between diet and health, many patients are concerned that dietary factors may trigger dermatitis. Research has found that dietary factors can indeed exacerbate atopic dermatitis or cause dermatitis due to systemic contact dermatitis. In atopic dermatitis, dietary factors are more likely to cause an exacerbation among infants or children with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis relative to other populations. Foods may trigger rapid, immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reactions or may lead to late eczematous reactions. While immediate reactions occur within minutes to hours of food exposure, late eczematous reactions may occur anywhere from hours to two days later. Screening methods, such as food allergen-specific serum immunoglobulin E tests or skin prick tests, can identify sensitization to specific foods, but a diagnosis of food allergy requires specific signs and symptoms that occur reproducibly upon food exposure. Many patients who are sensitized will not develop clinical findings upon food exposure; therefore, these tests may result in false-positive tests for food allergy. This is why the gold standard for diagnosis remains the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge. In another condition, systemic contact dermatitis, ingestion of a specific food can actually cause dermatitis. Systemic contact dermatitis is a distinct T-cell mediated immunological reaction in which dietary exposure to specific allergens results in dermatitis. Balsam of Peru and nickel are well-known causes of systemic contact dermatitis, and reports have implicated multiple other allergens. This review seeks to increase awareness of important food allergens, elucidate their relationship with atopic dermatitis and systemic contact dermatitis, and review available diagnostic and treatment strategies. PMID:24688624

  16. A novel calorimeter trigger concept: The jet trigger of the H1 experiment at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, Bob; Dubak-Behrendt, Ana; Kiesling, Christian; Reisert, Burkard; Aktas, Adil; Antunovic, Biljana; Bracinik, Juraj; Braquet, Charles; Brettel, Horst; Dulny, Barbara; Fent, Jürgen; Fras, Markus; Fröchtenicht, Walter; Haberer, Werner; Hoffmann, Dirk; Modjesch, Miriam; Placakyte, Ringaile; Schörner-Sadenius, Thomas; Wassatsch, Andreas; Zimmermann, Jens

    2011-06-01

    We report on a novel trigger for the liquid argon calorimeter which was installed in the H1 Experiment at HERA. This trigger, called the "Jet Trigger", was running at level 1 and implemented a real-time cluster algorithm. Within only 800 ns, the Jet Trigger algorithm found local energy maxima in the calorimeter, summed their immediate neighbors, sorted the resulting jets by energy, and applied topological conditions for the final level 1 trigger decision. The Jet Trigger was in operation from the year 2006 until the end of the HERA running in the summer of 2007. With the Jet Trigger it was possible to substantially reduce the thresholds for triggering on electrons and jets, giving access to a largely extended phase space for physical observables which could not have been reached in H1 before. The concepts of the Jet Trigger may be an interesting upgrade option for the LHC experiments.

  17. Disaster triggers disaster: Earthquake triggering by tropical cyclones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wdowinski, S.; Tsukanov, I.

    2011-12-01

    Three recent devastating earthquakes, the 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi (Taiwan), 2010 M=7.0 Leogane (Haiti), 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung (Taiwan), and additional three moderate size earthquakes (66 earthquake that occurred in the central mountainous area of Taiwan within three years after the typhoon. The 2009 Morakot typhoon was followed by 2009 M=6.2 Nantou and 2010 M=6.4 Kaohsiung earthquakes; the 1969 Flossie typhoon was followed by an M=6.3 earthquake in 1972; and the 1996 Herb typhoon by the 1998 M=6.2 Rueyli and 1999 M=7.6 Chi-Chi earthquakes. The earthquake catalog of Taiwan lists only two other M>6 main-shocks that occurred in Taiwan's central mountainous belt, one of them was in 1964 only four months after the wet Typhoon Gloria poured heavy rain in the same area. We suggest that the close proximity in time and space between wet tropical cyclones and earthquakes reflects a physical link between the two hazard types in which these earthquakes were triggered by rapid erosion induced by tropical cyclone's heavy rain. Based on remote sensing observations, meshfree finite element modeling, and Coulomb failure stress analysis, we show that the

  18. Smart trigger logic for focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, James E; Campbell, David V; Holmes, Michael L; Lovejoy, Robert; Wojciechowski, Kenneth; Kay, Randolph R; Cavanaugh, William S; Gurrieri, Thomas M

    2014-03-25

    An electronic device includes a memory configured to receive data representing light intensity values from pixels in a focal plane array and a processor that analyzes the received data to determine which light values correspond to triggered pixels, where the triggered pixels are those pixels that meet a predefined set of criteria, and determines, for each triggered pixel, a set of neighbor pixels for which light intensity values are to be stored. The electronic device also includes a buffer that temporarily stores light intensity values for at least one previously processed row of pixels, so that when a triggered pixel is identified in a current row, light intensity values for the neighbor pixels in the previously processed row and for the triggered pixel are persistently stored, as well as a data transmitter that transmits the persistently stored light intensity values for the triggered and neighbor pixels to a data receiver.

  19. The BTeV trigger: Recent developments

    SciTech Connect

    Kasper, Penelope; /Fermilab

    2003-12-01

    BTeV is a collider experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron dedicated to precision measurements of CP violation, mixing and rare decays of beauty and charm hadrons. The detector is a forward spectrometer with a pixel vertex detector inside a dipole magnet. A unique feature of BTeV is the trigger, which reconstructs tracks and vertices in every beam crossing. They present here an overview of the BTeV trigger and a description of recent improvements in trigger timing.

  20. Understanding dengue virus capsid protein disordered N-Terminus and pep14-23-based inhibition.

    PubMed

    Faustino, André F; Guerra, Gabriela M; Huber, Roland G; Hollmann, Axel; Domingues, Marco M; Barbosa, Glauce M; Enguita, Francisco J; Bond, Peter J; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Da Poian, Andrea T; Almeida, Fabio C L; Santos, Nuno C; Martins, Ivo C

    2015-02-20

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection affects millions of people and is becoming a major global disease for which there is no specific available treatment. pep14-23 is a recently designed peptide, based on a conserved segment of DENV capsid (C) protein. It inhibits the interaction of DENV C with host intracellular lipid droplets (LDs), which is crucial for viral replication. Combining bioinformatics and biophysics, here, we analyzed pep14-23 structure and ability to bind different phospholipids, relating that information with the full-length DENV C. We show that pep14-23 acquires α-helical conformation upon binding to negatively charged phospholipid membranes, displaying an asymmetric charge distribution structural arrangement. Structure prediction for the N-terminal segment reveals four viable homodimer orientations that alternatively shield or expose the DENV C hydrophobic pocket. Taken together, these findings suggest a new biological role for the disordered N-terminal region, which may function as an autoinhibitory domain mediating DENV C interaction with its biological targets. The results fit with our current understanding of DENV C and pep14-23 structure and function, paving the way for similar approaches to understanding disordered proteins and improved peptidomimetics drug development strategies against DENV and similar Flavivirus infections. PMID:25412346

  1. Structural and Functional Characterization of the N Terminus of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cwf10

    PubMed Central

    Livesay, S. Brent; Collier, Scott E.; Bitton, Danny A.; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic macromolecular machine that catalyzes the removal of introns from pre-mRNA, yielding mature message. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Cwf10 (homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Snu114 and human U5-116K), an integral member of the U5 snRNP, is a GTPase that has multiple roles within the splicing cycle. Cwf10/Snu114 family members are highly homologous to eukaryotic translation elongation factor EF2, and they contain a conserved N-terminal extension (NTE) to the EF2-like portion, predicted to be an intrinsically unfolded domain. Using S. pombe as a model system, we show that the NTE is not essential, but cells lacking this domain are defective in pre-mRNA splicing. Genetic interactions between cwf10-ΔNTE and other pre-mRNA splicing mutants are consistent with a role for the NTE in spliceosome activation and second-step catalysis. Characterization of Cwf10-NTE by various biophysical techniques shows that in solution the NTE contains regions of both structure and disorder. The first 23 highly conserved amino acids of the NTE are essential for its role in splicing but when overexpressed are not sufficient to restore pre-mRNA splicing to wild-type levels in cwf10-ΔNTE cells. When the entire NTE is overexpressed in the cwf10-ΔNTE background, it can complement the truncated Cwf10 protein in trans, and it immunoprecipitates a complex similar in composition to the late-stage U5.U2/U6 spliceosome. These data show that the structurally flexible NTE is capable of independently incorporating into the spliceosome and improving splicing function, possibly indicating a role for the NTE in stabilizing conformational rearrangements during a splice cycle. PMID:24014766

  2. The mycobacterial Mpa–proteasome unfolds and degrades pupylated substrates by engaging Pup's N-terminus

    PubMed Central

    Striebel, Frank; Hunkeler, Moritz; Summer, Heike; Weber-Ban, Eilika

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, along with other actinobacteria, harbours proteasomes in addition to members of the general bacterial repertoire of degradation complexes. In analogy to ubiquitination in eukaryotes, substrates are tagged for proteasomal degradation with prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) that is recognized by the N-terminal coiled-coil domain of the ATPase Mpa (also called ARC). Here, we reconstitute the entire mycobacterial proteasome degradation system for pupylated substrates and establish its mechanistic features with respect to substrate recruitment, unfolding and degradation. We show that the Mpa–proteasome complex unfolds and degrades Pup-tagged proteins and that this activity requires physical interaction of the ATPase with the proteasome. Furthermore, we establish the N-terminal region of Pup as the structural element required for engagement of pupylated substrates into the Mpa pore. In this process, Mpa pulls on Pup to initiate unfolding of substrate proteins and to drag them toward the proteasome chamber. Unlike the eukaryotic ubiquitin, Pup is not recycled but degraded with the substrate. This assigns a dual function to Pup as both the Mpa recognition element as well as the threading determinant. PMID:20203624

  3. N-Terminus of Cardiac Myosin Essential Light Chain Modulates Myosin Step-Size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yihua; Ajtai, Katalin; Kazmierczak, Katarzyna; Szczesna-Cordary, Danuta; Burghardt, Thomas P

    2016-01-12

    Muscle myosin cyclically hydrolyzes ATP to translate actin. Ventricular cardiac myosin (βmys) moves actin with three distinct unitary step-sizes resulting from its lever-arm rotation and with step-frequencies that are modulated in a myosin regulation mechanism. The lever-arm associated essential light chain (vELC) binds actin by its 43 residue N-terminal extension. Unitary steps were proposed to involve the vELC N-terminal extension with the 8 nm step engaging the vELC/actin bond facilitating an extra ∼19 degrees of lever-arm rotation while the predominant 5 nm step forgoes vELC/actin binding. A minor 3 nm step is the unlikely conversion of the completed 5 to the 8 nm step. This hypothesis was tested using a 17 residue N-terminal truncated vELC in porcine βmys (Δ17βmys) and a 43 residue N-terminal truncated human vELC expressed in transgenic mouse heart (Δ43αmys). Step-size and step-frequency were measured using the Qdot motility assay. Both Δ17βmys and Δ43αmys had significantly increased 5 nm step-frequency and coincident loss in the 8 nm step-frequency compared to native proteins suggesting the vELC/actin interaction drives step-size preference. Step-size and step-frequency probability densities depend on the relative fraction of truncated vELC and relate linearly to pure myosin species concentrations in a mixture containing native vELC homodimer, two truncated vELCs in the modified homodimer, and one native and one truncated vELC in the heterodimer. Step-size and step-frequency, measured for native homodimer and at two or more known relative fractions of truncated vELC, are surmised for each pure species by using a new analytical method. PMID:26671638

  4. Immunization of N terminus of enterovirus 71 VP4 elicits cross-protective antibody responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is major cause of hand, foot and mouth disease. Large epidemics of EV71 infection have been recently reported in the Asian-Pacific region. Currently, no vaccine is available to prevent EV71 infection. Results The peptide (VP4N20) consisting of the first 20 amino acids at the N-terminal of VP4 of EV71 genotype C4 were fused to hepatitis B core (HBcAg) protein. Expression of fusion proteins in E. coli resulted in the formation of chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs). Mice immunized with the chimeric VLPs elicited anti-VP4N20 antibody response. In vitro microneutralization experiments showed that anti-chimeric VLPs sera were able to neutralize not only EV71 of genotype C4 but also EV71 of genotype A. Neonatal mice model confirmed the neutralizing ability of anti-chimeric VLPs sera. Eiptope mapping led to the identification of a “core sequence” responsible for antibody recognition within the peptide. Conclusions Immunization of chimeric VLPs is able to elicit antibodies displaying a broad neutralizing activity against different genotypes of EV71 in vitro. The “core sequence” of EV71-VP4 is highly conserved across EV71 genotypes. The chimeric VLPs have a great potential to be a novel vaccine candidate with a broad cross-protection against different EV71 genotypes. PMID:24320792

  5. Phosphorylation Interferes with Maturation of Amyloid-β Fibrillar Structure in the N Terminus.

    PubMed

    Rezaei-Ghaleh, Nasrollah; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2016-07-29

    Neurodegeneration is characterized by the ubiquitous presence of modifications in protein deposits. Despite their potential significance in the initiation and progression of neurodegenerative diseases, the effects of posttranslational modifications on the molecular properties of protein aggregates are largely unknown. Here, we study the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide and investigate how phosphorylation at serine 8 affects the structure of Aβ aggregates. Serine 8 is shown to be located in a region of high conformational flexibility in monomeric Aβ, which upon phosphorylation undergoes changes in local conformational dynamics. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange NMR and fluorescence quenching techniques, we demonstrate that Aβ phosphorylation at serine 8 causes structural changes in the N-terminal region of Aβ aggregates in favor of less compact conformations. Structural changes induced by serine 8 phosphorylation can provide a mechanistic link between phosphorylation and other biological events that involve the N-terminal region of Aβ aggregates. Our data therefore support an important role of posttranslational modifications in the structural polymorphism of amyloid aggregates and their modulatory effect on neurodegeneration. PMID:27252381

  6. Cloning and bioinformatical analysis of the N-terminus of the sonic hedgehog gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Shu; Dong, Weiren; He, Suifen; Wang, Haihong; Zhang, Lihua; Tang, Yinjuan; Guo, Jiasong; Guo, Suiqun

    2013-01-25

    The sonic hedgehog protein not only plays a key role in early embryonic development, but also has essential effects on the adult nervous system, including neural stem cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and neuronal axon guidance. The N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog is the key functional element in this process. Therefore, this study aimed to clone and analyze the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene. Total RNA was extracted from the notochord of a Sprague-Dawley rat at embryonic day 9 and the N-terminal fragment of sonic hedgehog was amplified by nested reverse transcription-PCR. The N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog gene was successfully cloned. The secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal fragment of the sonic hedgehog protein were predicted using Jpred and Phyre online. PMID:25206596

  7. Function of the N-terminus of zizimin1: autoinhibition and membrane targeting

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Nahum; Westbrook, Marjorie W.; Shannon, John D.; Guda, Chittibabu; Schwartz, Martin Alexander

    2009-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Rho family small GTPases are critical regulators of multiple cellular functions. Dbl homology domain-containing proteins are the classical guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) responsible for activation of Rho proteins. Zizimin1 is a Cdc42-specific GEF that belongs to a second family of mammalian Rho-GEFs, CZH proteins, which possess a novel type of GEF Domain. CZH proteins can be divided into a subfamily related to DOCK180 and a subfamily related to zizimin1. The two groups share two conserved regions named the CZH1 (or DHR1) domain and the CZH2 (DHR2 or DOCKER) domains, the latter exhibiting GEF activity. We now show that limited proteolysis of zizimin1 suggests the existence of structural domains that do not correspond to those identified on the basis of homologies. We demonstrate that the N-terminal half binds to the GEF domain through three distinct areas, including the CZH1, to inhibit the interaction with Cdc42. The N-terminal Pleckstrin homology (PH) domain binds phosphoinositides and mediates zizimin1 membrane targeting. These data define two novel functions for the N-terminal region of zizimin1. PMID:17935486

  8. Ischemic Compression After Trigger Point Injection Affect the Treatment of Myofascial Trigger Points

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo A; Oh, Ki Young; Choi, Won Hyuck

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of trigger point injection with or without ischemic compression in treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle. Methods Sixty patients with active myofascial trigger points in upper trapezius muscle were randomly divided into three groups: group 1 (n=20) received only trigger point injections, group 2 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 30 seconds of ischemic compression, and group 3 (n=20) received trigger point injections with 60 seconds of ischemic compression. The visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold, and range of motion of the neck were assessed before treatment, immediately after treatment, and 1 week after treatment. Korean Neck Disability Indexes were assessed before treatment and 1 week after treatment. Results We found a significant improvement in all assessment parameters (p<0.05) in all groups. But, receiving trigger point injections with ischemic compression group showed significant improvement as compared with the receiving only trigger point injections group. And no significant differences between receiving 30 seconds of ischemic compression group and 60 seconds of ischemic compression group. Conclusion This study demonstrated the effectiveness of ischemic compression for myofascial trigger point. Trigger point injections combined with ischemic compression shows better effects on treatment of myofascial trigger points in the upper trapezius muscle than the only trigger point injections therapy. But the duration of ischemic compression did not affect treatment of myofascial trigger point. PMID:24020035

  9. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul A; Knuth, Matthew W; Kaproth, Bryan M; Carpenter, Brett; Guyer, Robert A; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves; Daub, Eric G; Marone, Chris

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  10. Global Trigger Upgrade firmware architecture for the level-1 Trigger of the CMS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaran, B.; Arnold, B.; Bergauer, H.; Wittmann, J.; Matsushita, T.

    2015-02-01

    The Global Trigger (GT) is the final step of the CMS Level-1 Trigger and implements the ``menu'' of triggers, which is a set of selection requirements applied to the final list of objects (such as muons, electrons or jets) to trigger the readout of the detector and serve as basis for further calculations by the High Level Trigger. Operational experience in developing trigger menus from the first LHC run has shown that the requirements increased as the luminosity and pile-up increased. The new GT (μGT) is designed based on Xilinx Virtex-7 FPGAs, which combine unsurpassed flexibility with regard to scalability and high robustness. Furthermore, a custom board which receives signals from legacy electronics and basic binary inputs from less complex trigger sources is presented. Additionally, this paper describes the architecture of a distributed testing framework and the Trigger Menu Editor.