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Sample records for exotic non-susy searches

  1. Exotic (non-SUSY) searches at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Ping; /Fermilab

    2009-12-01

    New studies on exotic (non-SUSY) searches beyond the Standard Model are reviewed, which include contact interactions using jet p{sub T} spectrum, leptoquark production, signals for new gauge bosons and extra dimensions, monojet events expected in ADD extra dimension scenarios, 4th generation quarks, and heavy stable charged particles. Emphasis is given to the potential for early discoveries at the LHC, e.g., within the first year of physics data taking.

  2. Non-susy exotics searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Pronko, Alexandre; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    The authors present results of searches for signs of physics beyond the Standard Model. The focus of this paper is on analyses not driven by SUSY models. Most of the presented results are based on {approx} 2 fb{sup -1} of data and obtained since summer of 2007. No significant excess of data over predicted background is observed. They report kinematic distributions, data and background counts, as well as limits on some parameters of selected models of new physics.

  3. Non-SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Strologas, John; /New Mexico U.

    2011-08-01

    We present recent results from searches for new physics beyond supersymmetry performed at the Tevatron accelerator at Fermilab. The CDF and D0 analyses presented here utilized data of integrated luminosity up to 6 fb{sup -1}. We cover leptonic and bosonic resonances interpreted in the Randall-Sundrum graviton and new-boson models, rare final states, and the search for vector-like quarks. The search for new phenomena beyond the weak-scale supersymmetry is a vital part of the Fermilab program. Both CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider actively look for signals not expected by the standard model (SM) or minimal supersymmetric models. The searches can be sorted in three categories: (a) searches for generic resonances that can be interpreted in several new-physics models; (b) searches for exotic combinations of final-state objects or abnormal kinematics (not necessarily predicted by current theories); and (c) model-dependent searches that test a particular theory. We present here latest results from all these categories: searches for new dilepton and diboson resonances (interpreted as gravitons and new gauge bosons), searches for anomalous {gamma} + E{sub T} + X production, and searches for vector-like quarks.

  4. Searches for BSM (non-SUSY) physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, Heather K.; /Illinois U., Urbana

    2005-11-01

    As of July 2005, the Tevatron at Fermilab has delivered {approx} 1 fb{sup -1} of data to the CDF and D0 experiments. Each experiment has recorded more than 80% of the delivered luminosity. Results of searches for physics (non-SUSY and non-Higgs) beyond the Standard Model using 200 pb{sup -1} to 480 pb{sup -1} at D0 and CDF are presented.

  5. Non SUSY Searches at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Cortabitarte, R. Vilar

    2004-08-26

    The Fermilab Tevatron collider experiments, CDF and D0, have collected {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} of data at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV since March 2002 (RunII). Both experiments have investigated physics beyond the standard model; this paper reviews some of the recent results on the searches for new phenomena, concentrating on Z', extra dimensions, excited electrons and lepto quarks. No signal was observed, therefore stringent limits on the signatures and models were derived.

  6. Searches for New Physics at D0 (non-SUSY)

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Arnd

    2008-11-23

    The D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider has already collected more than 4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, allowing for a large number of new phenomena searches. Recent results are presented including compositeness searches, leptoquarks, large extra dimensions, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, and extra gauge bosons. No deviations from the standard model expectations are found, and the presented limits on new physics are in many cases the world's best.

  7. Non-SUSY search for BSM physics at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proudfoot, James; Atlas Collaboration Collaboration; Cms Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Large Hadron Collider has restarted pp collisions at 13 TeV center of mass energy in June 2015. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have taken data at this new energy which allows greater reach in probing for physics beyond the Standard Model. Results on searches for physics not associated with supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model are presented, including searches for strongly produced dark matter and new massive gauge bosons.

  8. Exotics Searches with Atlas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tykhonov, Andrii

    2015-03-01

    An overview is presented for the non-SUSY searches for New Physics with the ATLAS detector. The results presented use data collected at centerof-mass energies of √ s = 7 TeV and √ s = 8 TeV, for data sets corresponding to a variety of integrated luminosities. Searches using leptons, photons, missing transverse energy, and jets are performed, as well as searches requiring custom jet and track reconstruction, and searches for the so-called lepton jets. No deviations from Standard Model expectations are observed, hence constraints are placed on the phase space of available theoretical models.

  9. Search for beyond standard model physics (non-SUSY) in final states with photons at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Palencia, Jose Enrique; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of searches for non-standard model phenomena in photon final states. These searches use data from integrated luminosities of {approx} 1-4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron. No significant excess in data has been observed. We report limits on the parameters of several BSM models (excluding SUSY) for events containing photons.

  10. SEARCHING FOR EXOTIC SPODOPTERA SPECIES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We used sex pheromone-baited traps to collect native and exotic Spodoptera spp. moths at an orchid nursery in Lake County, FL. Lures for S. eridania, exempta, exigua, frugiperda, littoralis, litura, praefica, and Pseudaletia unipuncta were placed in bucket traps that surrounded the greenhouses of t...

  11. Exotic Photon Searches at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eunsin; collaboration, for the CDF

    2009-10-01

    We present recent results of searches for exotic photons at CDF II. In the first signature-based search, we search for anomalous production of two photons with additional energetic objects. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. In the second analysis, we present a signature-based search for anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy. We find no indications of non-standard model phenomena. Finally, a search for a fermiophobic Higgs in the diphoton final state is presented. Since no evidence of a resonance in the diphoton mass spectrum is observed we exclude this Higgs boson with mass below 106 GeV/c{sup 2} at a 95% confidence level.

  12. Simplified models for exotic BSM searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heisig, Jan; Lessa, Andre; Quertenmont, Loic

    2015-12-01

    Simplified models are a successful way of interpreting current LHC searches for models beyond the standard model (BSM). So far simplified models have focused on topologies featuring a missing transverse energy (MET) signature. However, in some BSM theories other, more exotic, signatures occur. If a charged particle becomes long-lived on collider time scales — as it is the case in parts of the SUSY parameter space — it leads to a very distinct signature. We present an extension of the computer package SModelS which includes simplified models for heavy stable charged particles (HSCP). As a physical application we investigate the CMSSM stau co-annihilation strip containing long-lived staus, which presents a potential solution to the Lithium problem. Applying both MET and HSCP constraints we show that, for low values of tan β, all this region of parameter space either violates Dark Matter constraints or is excluded by LHC searches.

  13. EXOTIC PARTICLE SEARCHES WITH STAR AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    KANABA,S.

    2004-03-15

    We present preliminary results of the STAR experiment at RHIC on exotic particle searches in minimum bias Au + Au collisions at {radical} s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe a narrow peak at 1734 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 5 MeV in the {lambda}K{sub s}{sup 0} invariant mass with width consistent with the experimental resolution of about 6 MeV within the errors. The statistical significance can be quantified between 3 and 6 {sigma} depending on cuts and methods. If this peak corresponds to a real particle state it would be a candidate for the N{sup 0} or the {Xi}{sup 0} I = 1/2 pentaquark states.

  14. Decoupling of gravity on non-susy Dp branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayek, Kuntal; Roy, Shibaji

    2016-03-01

    We study the graviton scattering in the background of non-susy D p branes of type II string theories consisting of a metric, a dilaton and a (p + 1) form gauge field. We show numerically that in these backgrounds graviton experiences a scattering potential which takes the form of an infinite barrier in the low energy (near brane) limit for p ≤ 5 and therefore is never able to reach the branes. This shows, contrary to what is known in the literature, that gravity indeed decouples from the non-susy D p branes for p ≤ 5. For non-susy D6 brane, gravity couples as there is no such barrier for the potential. To give further credence to our claim we solve the scattering equation in some situation analytically and calculate the graviton absorption cross-sections on the non-susy branes and show that they vanish for p ≤ 4 in the low energy limit. This shows, as in the case of BPS branes, that gravity does decouple for non-susy D p branes for p ≤ 4 but it does not decouple for D6 brane as the potential here is always attractive. We argue for the non-susy D5 brane that depending on one of the parameters of the solution gravity either always decouples (unlike the BPS D5 brane) or it decouples when the energy of the graviton is below certain critical value, otherwise it couples, very similar to BPS D5 brane.

  15. Searches for exotic interactions in nuclear beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naviliat-Cuncic, O.

    2016-07-01

    This contribution presents current efforts in the search for exotic interactions in nuclear β decay using a calorimetric technique for the measurement of the β energy spectrum shape. We describe the criteria for the choice of sensitive candidates in Gamow-Teller transitions and present the status of measurements performed in 6He and 20F decay.

  16. LHC searches for exotic new particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golling, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    A coherent description of the ATLAS and CMS program of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model of particle physics (except supersymmetry) is subject of this review. The theoretical motivation for new phenomena and the associated phenomenology are discussed. The search approach and philosophy by the experiments are presented in detail with illustrative examples both from Run-1 and early Run-2 of the LHC. The searches are largely driven by a diverse set of experimental signatures predicted by the various hypotheses of new physics.

  17. Search for excited and exotic muons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, Heather; Hays, Christopher; Kotwal, Ashutosh; /Duke U.

    2006-05-01

    The authors present a search for the production of excited or exotic muons ({mu}*) via the reaction {bar p} + p {yields} {mu}* + {mu} {yields} {mu}{gamma}+{mu} using 371 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the Run II CDF detector. In this signature-based search, we look for a resonance in the {mu}{gamma} mass spectrum. The data are compared to standard model and detector background expectations, and with predictions of excited muon production. We use these comparisons to set limits on the {mu}* mass and compositeness scale {Lambda} in contact interaction and gauge-mediated models.

  18. Searches for High Mass Resonances and Exotics at the Tevatron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heintz, Ulrich

    2012-06-01

    In this paper I review some recent searches for physics beyond the standard model from the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron collider based on an integrated luminosity of 5 to 7 fb-1 from pbar p collisions at 1.96 TeV. I present a selection of recent results from both the CDF and D0 collaborations covering searches for 4th generation t' and b' quarks, exotic resonances that decay to tbar t quark pairs or ZZ boson pairs, universal extra dimensions, and dark matter particles.

  19. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chu, Pinghan; Weisman, E.; Liu, C. -Y.; Long, J. C.

    2015-05-26

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid-state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, nonmagnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore “monopole-dipole” forces on polarized electrons with unique ormore » unprecedented sensitivity. As a result, the solid-state, nonmagnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures could lead to a sensitivity over 10 orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.« less

  20. Search for exotic short-range interactions using paramagnetic insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Pinghan; Weisman, E.; Liu, C. -Y.; Long, J. C.

    2015-05-26

    We describe a proposed experimental search for exotic spin-coupled interactions using a solid-state paramagnetic insulator. The experiment is sensitive to the net magnetization induced by the exotic interaction between the unpaired insulator electrons with a dense, nonmagnetic mass in close proximity. An existing experiment has been used to set limits on the electric dipole moment of the electron by probing the magnetization induced in a cryogenic gadolinium gallium garnet sample on application of a strong electric field. With suitable additions, including a movable source mass, this experiment can be used to explore “monopole-dipole” forces on polarized electrons with unique or unprecedented sensitivity. As a result, the solid-state, nonmagnetic construction, combined with the low-noise conditions and extremely sensitive magnetometry available at cryogenic temperatures could lead to a sensitivity over 10 orders of magnitude greater than exiting limits in the range below 1 mm.

  1. SUITABILITY OF A NEW CALORIMETER FOR EXOTIC MESON SEARCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, C.; Ostrovidov, A.; Eugenio, P.

    2007-01-01

    that the DVCS calorimeter will be a valuable addition to CLAS for upcoming exotic meson searches in photoproduction.

  2. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, D. F.; Decamp, G.; Thulasi, S.; Fuentes, D.; Viegas, I.; Pustelny, S.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Gawlik, W.; Budker, D.; Leefer, N.; Wickenbrock, A.; Afach, S.; Zhivun, L.; Pankow, C.; Smith, J.; Read, J.; Folman, R.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Pospelov, M.; Semertzidis, Y. K.; Shin, Y.; Kornack, T. W.; Stalnaker, J.

    2015-05-01

    We discuss progress on the design and construction of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) would be sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. To date, no such search has ever been carried out, making the GNOME a novel experimental window on new physics. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar fields.

  3. Progress on the Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitri; Gnome Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We discuss progress on the construction, implementation, and coordination of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic magnetometers and comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) is sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by previous experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar (axion-like) fields. Supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation, Simons Foundation, and the National Science Foundation.

  4. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2007-10-01

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3pi channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  5. Exotic Mesons at JLab Before 2013? The Search for New Forms of Matter at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Bookwalter, Craig

    2007-10-26

    A proposal to search for exotic mesons in photoproduction has been accepted for running at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer in Hall B. This program will bolster previously-thin statistics in many photoproduction channels, primarily those with charged particles in the final state, as well as seeking to confirm earlier findings in neutral channels, if possible. The promise of the neutral 3{pi} channel is discussed. In addition, the experiment seeks to study the spectrum of both exotic and ordinary strangeonia. Limitations of the CLAS detector for meson spectroscopy are discussed, as well as possible solutions to minimize such limitations.

  6. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson Kimball, Derek; Pustelny, Szymon; Pospelov, Maxim; Ledbetter, Micah; Leefer, Nathan; Wlodarczyk, Przemyslaw; Wcislo, Piotr; Gawlik, Wojciech; Smith, Joshua; Read, Jocelyn; Pankow, Chris; Budker, Dmitry; Gnome Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    Construction of a network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics is underway [S. Pustelny et al., Annalen der Physik 525(8-9), 659-670 (2013)]. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers to search for Exotic physics (GNOME) would be sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields generated by astrophysical sources. To date, no such search has ever been carried out, making the GNOME a novel experimental window on new physics. A specific example of new physics detectable with the GNOME, presently unconstrained by astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments, is a network of domain walls of light pseudoscalar fields [M. Pospelov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 021803 (2013)]. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. Multiquark exotics

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The question Are Anomalons Multiquark Exotics is discussed. It is concluded that so far there is no convincing experimental evidence for any multiquark exotic bound state nor for any exotic resonance. Except for the delta and S* there are no candidates for bound states and no firm theoretical predictions waiting to be tested. Exotic resonances may exist in the 1.5 to 2.0 GeV region and in the charmed sector, e.g., the charmed-strange exotics. The experimental search for multiquark resonances is still open and active. (WHK)

  8. Search for higgs, leptoquarks, and exotics at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Song Ming Wang

    2004-06-22

    This paper reviews some of the most recent results from the CDF and D0 experiments on the searches for Standard Model and Non-Standard Model Higgs bosons, and other new phenomena at the Tevatron. Both experiments examine data from proton anti-proton collision at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, of integrated luminosity {approx} 200 pb{sup -1} (per experiment), to search for Higgs predicted in the Standard Model and beyond Standard Model, supersymmetric particles in the Gauge Mediated Symmetry Breaking scenario, leptoquarks, and excited electrons. No signal was observed, and limits on the signatures and models are derived.

  9. Searching for exotic particles in high-energy physics with deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, P.; Sadowski, P.; Whiteson, D.

    2014-07-01

    Collisions at high-energy particle colliders are a traditionally fruitful source of exotic particle discoveries. Finding these rare particles requires solving difficult signal-versus-background classification problems, hence machine-learning approaches are often used. Standard approaches have relied on ‘shallow’ machine-learning models that have a limited capacity to learn complex nonlinear functions of the inputs, and rely on a painstaking search through manually constructed nonlinear features. Progress on this problem has slowed, as a variety of techniques have shown equivalent performance. Recent advances in the field of deep learning make it possible to learn more complex functions and better discriminate between signal and background classes. Here, using benchmark data sets, we show that deep-learning methods need no manually constructed inputs and yet improve the classification metric by as much as 8% over the best current approaches. This demonstrates that deep-learning approaches can improve the power of collider searches for exotic particles.

  10. Searches for Exotics: Heavy resonances with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viel, Simon; ATLAS Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    Many theories that go beyond the Standard Model predict the existence of new heavy resonances decaying into pairs of particles. This review summarizes a wide collection of recent results from the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider on searches for resonances decaying into various combinations of charged leptons, neutrinos, jets from gluons or light quarks, top quarks, photons and heavy gauge bosons. Limits are set on a variety of theories beyond the Standard Model used as benchmarks, among them Kaluza-Klein, Randall-Sundrum and ADD models with extra dimensions, as well as Grand Unified Theories and Technicolour.

  11. A Search for Exotic Spin-Dependent Interactions of the Neutron using Neutron Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddock, Chris; Nsr Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model lead at low energy to spin-dependent, weakly-coupled interactions of mesoscopic range. Laboratory constraints on such interactions are quite poor. We describe an experiment in progress at the LANSCE spallation neutron source at Los Alamos to search for exotic axial couplings of neutrons to matter from light vector boson exchange. The experiment makes use of a slow neutron polarimeter and a target with an oscillating mass density. Neutron Spin Rotation.

  12. Search for exotic baryon states with the SPHINX detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.

    1994-11-01

    A number of diffractive processes involving the production of baryon states are studied in a series of experiments using the SPHINX detector and the E{sub p} = 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator. These include p + N {yields} [pK{sup +}K{sup {minus}}] + N, p + N {yields} [p{phi}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Lambda}(1520)K{sup +}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] + N, p + N {yields} [{Sigma}(1385){sup 0}K{sup +}] + N + (neutrals), p + N {yields} [{Sigma}{sup 0}K{sup +}] + N, and a number of other transitions. Searches for narrow heavy baryons, which are candidates for cryptoexotic hadron states with hidden strangeness, are reported. The first results on meson production in the deep fragmentation region are presented. 21 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Search for the photoexcitation of exotic mesons in the pi+pi+pi- system.

    PubMed

    Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Weygand, D P; Guo, L; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Eugenio, P; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Biselli, A S; Blaszczyk, L; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Boiarinov, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Bültmann, S; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Casey, L; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cheng, L; Cole, P L; Collins, P; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Crede, V; Cummings, J P; Dale, D; Dashyan, N; De Masi, R; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deur, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Dickson, R; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Feuerbach, R J; Forest, T A; Fradi, A; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gothe, R W; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Hardie, J; Hassall, N; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Johnstone, J R; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kalantarians, N; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Krahn, Z; Kramer, L H; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; Maccormick, M; Markov, N; Mattione, P; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moriya, K; Morrow, S A; Moteabbed, M; Mueller, J; Munevar, E; Mutchler, G S; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niroula, M R; Niyazov, R A; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Anefalos Pereira, S; Philips, S A; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Popa, I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salamanca, J; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Sharov, D; Shvedunov, N V; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S; Todor, L; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Watts, D P; Weinstein, L B; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

    2009-03-13

    A search for exotic mesons in the pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-} system photoproduced by the charge exchange reaction gammap-->pi;{+}pi;{+}pi;{-}(n) was carried out by the CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Lab. A tagged-photon beam with energies in the 4.8 to 5.4 GeV range, produced through bremsstrahlung from a 5.744 GeV electron beam, was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target. A partial wave analysis was performed on a sample of 83 000 events, the highest such statistics to date in this reaction at these energies. The main objective of this study was to look for the photoproduction of an exotic J;{PC}=1;{-+} resonant state in the 1 to 2 GeV mass range. Our partial wave analysis shows production of the a_{2}(1320) and the pi_{2}(1670) mesons, but no evidence for the a_{1}(1260), nor the pi_{1}(1600) exotic state at the expected levels. An upper limit of 13.5 nb is determined for the exotic pi_{1}(1600) cross section, less than 2% of the a_{2}(1320) production. PMID:19392105

  14. Recent Searches for Exotic Physics at the BaBar/PEP-II B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Sekula, Stephen Jacob; /Ohio State U.

    2008-10-22

    I present three recent results from searches for exotic physics at the BABAR/PEP-II B-factory. These results span many of the samples produced at the B-factory, including B mesons, {tau} leptons, and {Upsilon}(3S) mesons. We have searched for CPT-violation in B{sup 0} mixing and find no significant deviation from the no-violation hypothesis. We have also searched for lepton-flavor-violating decays of the {tau} using {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{ell}{sup -} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and their charge conjugates. We find no evidence for these processes and set upper limits on their branching fractions. Finally, we have searched for a low-mass Higgs boson in the decay {Upsilon}(3S) {yields} {gamma}A{sup 0}, where the Higgs decays invisibly. We find no evidence for such a decay and set upper limits across a range of possible Higgs masses.

  15. Combination of Run-1 exotic searches in diboson final states at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Gadatsch, S.; Gouzevich, M.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Novaes, S. F.; Oliveira, A.; Pierini, M.; Tomei, T.

    2016-04-01

    We perform a statistical combination of the ATLAS and CMS results for the search of a heavy resonance decaying to a pair of vector bosons with the √{s}=8 TeV datasets collected at the LHC. We take into account six searches in hadronic and semileptonic final states carried out by the two collaborations. We consider only public information provided by ATLAS and CMS in the HEPDATA database and in papers published in refereed journals. We interpret the combined results within the context of a few benchmark new physics models, such as models predicting the existence of a W' or a bulk Randall-Sundrum spin-2 resonance, for which we present exclusion limits, significances, p-values and best-fit cross sections. A heavy diboson resonance with a production cross section of ˜4-5 fb and mass between 1.9 and 2.0 TeV is the exotic scenario most consistent with the experimental results. Models in which a heavy resonance decays preferentially to a WW final state are disfavoured.

  16. GPS.DM Observatory: Search for Dark Matter and Exotic Physics with Atomic Clocks and GPS Constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Benjamin; Blewitt, Geoffrey; Derevianko, Andrei; Lundholm, Nathan; Pospelov, Maxim; Rollings, Alex; Sherman, Jeff; GPS. DM Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming cosmological evidence for the existence of dark matter, and the considerable effort of the scientific community over decades, there is no evidence for dark matter in terrestrial experiments. The GPS.DM observatory uses the existing GPS constellation as a 50,000 km-aperture sensor array, analyzing the satellite and terrestrial atomic clock data for exotic physics signatures. In particular, the collaboration searches for evidence of transient variations of fundamental constants correlated with the Earth's galactic motion through the dark matter halo. This type of search is particularly sensitive to exotic forms of dark matter, such as topological defects. We will present an update on the search. Supported by the NSF.

  17. First Search for Exotic Z Boson Decays into Photons and Neutral Pions in Hadron Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martínez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C., III; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    A search for forbidden and exotic Z boson decays in the diphoton mass spectrum is presented for the first time in hadron collisions, based on data corresponding to 10.0 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions at √s =1.96 TeV collected by the CDF experiment. No evidence of signal is observed, and 95% credibility level Bayesian upper limits are set on the branching ratios of decays of the Z boson to a photon and neutral pion (which is detected as a photon), a pair of photons, and a pair of neutral pions. The observed branching ratio limits are 2.01×10-5 for Z→π0γ, 1.46×10-5 for Z→γγ, and 1.52×10-5 for Z→π0π0. The Z→π0γ and Z→γγ limits improve the most stringent results from other experiments by factors of 2.6 and 3.6, respectively. The Z→π0π0 branching ratio limit is the first experimental result on this decay.

  18. First search for exotic Z Boson decays into photons and neutral pions in hadron collisions.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Martínez, M; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Ranjan, N; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester Iii, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2014-03-21

    A search for forbidden and exotic Z boson decays in the diphoton mass spectrum is presented for the first time in hadron collisions, based on data corresponding to 10.0 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity from proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF experiment. No evidence of signal is observed, and 95% credibility level Bayesian upper limits are set on the branching ratios of decays of the Z boson to a photon and neutral pion (which is detected as a photon), a pair of photons, and a pair of neutral pions. The observed branching ratio limits are 2.01 × 10(-5) for Z → π(0)γ, 1.46 × 10(-5) for Z → γγ, and 1.52 × 10(-5) for Z → π(0)π(0). The Z → π(0)γ and Z → γγ limits improve the most stringent results from other experiments by factors of 2.6 and 3.6, respectively. The Z → π(0)π(0) branching ratio limit is the first experimental result on this decay. PMID:24702351

  19. Searching for slow-developing cosmic-ray showers: Looking for evidence of exotic primaries at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayotte, Eric William

    The central purpose of this research was to add the event propagation velocity to the list of shower parameters that the Florescence Detector of Pierre Auger Observatory is capable of measuring. This capability was then leveraged to differentiate exotic slow moving events from the rest of the cosmic ray flux. Clearly, by relativistic necessity, all known cosmic ray primaries can only cause a measurable extensive air shower at velocities indistinguishably close to the speed of light. Therefore any accurate observation of an event propagating slower than the speed of light would provide an unmistakable indicator of new physics. A particle must possess very specific characteristics in order to be capable of producing a slow shower. High mass Strangelets, macroscopic dark matter, and super-symmetric Q-Balls were identified as strong candidates. Theory supporting high mass Strangelets and macroscopic dark matter appeared too late for full inclusion in this work, however super-symmetric Q-Balls were thoroughly examined. CORSIKA simulations were used to show that the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory has sensitivity to Q-Balls with a mass MQ > 3.25 x 1027 GeV c--2 while the surface detector is sensitive at a mass MQ > 1.15 x 10 27GeV c--2. The Pierre Auger Observatory was shown to be capable of accurately measuring a wide range of velocities with two independent methods. These methods were applied to 7 years of data and one candidate slow event was identified. This candidate measurement proved to be due to a rare and interesting, but ultimately, non-exotic effect, which when accounted for resulted in the event being measured normally. As a result of this, no exotic candidate events were found in the search. Recommendations are made for improving the result and promising alternative search methods are presented.

  20. Search for α-Cluster Structure in Exotic Nuclei with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, A.; Ayyad, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Carpenter, L.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Becchetti, F. D.; Howard, A. M.

    2016-03-01

    Some exotic nuclei appear to exhibit α-cluster structure. While various theoretical models currently describe such clustering, more experimental data are needed to constrain model predictions. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) has low-energy thresholds for charged-particle decay and a high luminosity due to its thick gaseous active target volume, making it well-suited to search for low-energy α-cluster reactions. Radioactive-ion beams produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame were delivered to the PAT-TPC to study nuclei including 14C and 14O via α-resonant scattering. Differential cross sections and excitation functions were measured. Preliminary results from our recent experiments will be presented. This work is supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation.

  1. Searches for Exotic Decays of the Upsilon(3S) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hooberman, Benjamin; /LBL, Berkeley /Heidelberg U.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present two searches for new physics in {Upsilon}(3S) decays collected by the BABAR detector. We search for charged lepton-flavour violating decays of the {Upsilon}(3S), which are unobservable in the Standard Model but are predicted to occur in several beyond-the-Standard Model scenarios. We also search for production of a light Higgs or Higgs-like state produced in radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(3S) and decaying to muon pairs.

  2. Search for exotic spin-dependent interactions with a spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P.-H.; Kim, Y. J.; Savukov, I.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel experimental approach to explore exotic spin-dependent interactions using a spin-exchange relaxation-free (SERF) magnetometer, the most sensitive noncryogenic magnetic-field sensor. This approach studies the interactions between optically polarized electron spins located inside a vapor cell of the SERF magnetometer and unpolarized or polarized particles of external solid-state objects. The coupling of spin-dependent interactions to the polarized electron spins of the magnetometer induces the tilt of the electron spins, which can be detected with high sensitivity by a probe laser beam similarly as an external magnetic field. We estimate that by moving unpolarized or polarized objects next to the SERF Rb vapor cell, the experimental limit to the spin-dependent interactions can be significantly improved over existing experiments, and new limits on the coupling strengths can be set in the interaction range below 10-2 m .

  3. Pioneer exotic tree search for the douglas-fir region. Forest Service general technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Silen, R.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-03-01

    After three-quarters of a century of introduction of 152 conifer and broadleaf species, no promising candidate exotic was found for the Douglas-fir region. Growth curves spanning 50 years or longer are figured for many species. Firs, pines, larches, spruces, hemlocks, and cedars orginating in northwestern North America had superior growth rates to those from other forest regions. The probable basis for these differences is discussed. The record highlights a general failure of introduced hardwoods, the slow decline of most introduced conifers, the long time needed to express failures, dramatic effects of climatic extremes or introduced pests, failure of native species of continental origin at Wind River, striking similarities of growth rate for the species originating in each country, and many important contrasts between results from early reports and long-term conclusions.

  4. QCD at the Large Hadron Collider—Higgs Searches and Some Non-SUSY Extensions Beyond the SM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, Prakash; Ravindran, V.

    We present a brief overview of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the role of quantum chromody- namics (QCD) in predicting various observables at the LHC with unprecedented accuracy. We have studied the production of Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson through gluon fusion channel and various signals of physics beyond the Standard Model (BSM) restricted to non-supersymmetric scenarios. These are models with large extra-dimensions such as ADD and Randall- Sundrum models and also physics senario resulting from scale/conformal invariant sector, namely unparticle physics. We have presented QCD effects to several of the observables in these models through higher order perturbative QCD corrections and parton distribution functions. We have demonstrated how the these corrections reduce the scale ambiguities coming from renormalisation and factorisation. Our study shows that the precise and unambiguous predictions are possible for various BSM studies at the LHC.

  5. GlueX at Jefferson Lab: a search for exotic states of matter in photon-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Matt

    2014-11-01

    The GlueX Experiment, which is currently under construction as a component of the 12 GeV upgrade to Jefferson Lab, will utilize photoproduction on a proton target to search for hybrid mesons in the light quark sector. Recent first-principles calculations of the hadron spectrum in Quantum Chromodynamics suggest the presence of bound states in the meson spectrum that cannot arise from a quark and an anti-quark. Such states appear to have valance gluonic content or gluonic degrees of freedom and are called hybrid mesons. An interesting subset of these, the “exotic hybrid mesons," have total angular momentum, parity, and charge conjugation quantum numbers that cannot be formed with a pair of spin-1/2 fermions. By performing an amplitude analysis of photon-proton reactions, the GlueX experiment will attempt to experimentally establish the spectrum of hybrid mesons. In this article, the present theoretical and experimental landscape is reviewed, the design of the GlueX detector presented, and the GlueX startup plans are briefly discussed.

  6. Searches for Exotic X,Y, and Z- States with BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtar, Arafat Gabareen; /SLAC

    2011-11-23

    Recently, several charmonium-like states above D{bar D} threshold have been discovered at the BELLE and BABAR B-factories. Some of these states are produced via Initial State Radiation (e.g. Y (4260) and Y (4350)) and some are observed in B meson decays (e.g. X(3872), Y (3940)). The BELLE observation of the enhancement in the {psi}(2S){pi}{sup -}, i.e. the Z(4430){sup -} state, has generated a great deal of interest, because such a state must have minimum quark content (c{bar c}d{bar u}), so that it would represent the unequivocal manifestation of a four-quark meson state. Here we report recent BABAR results on the Y (4260), X(3872), Y(3940), and a search for the Z(4430){sup -}.

  7. Search for exotic baryons in 800-GeV pp ---> p Xi+- pi+- X

    SciTech Connect

    Christian, D.C.; Felix, J.; Gottschalk, E.E.; Hartouni, E.P.; Knapp, B.C.; Kreisler, M.N.; Moreno, G.; Reyes, M.A.; Sosa, M.; Wang, M.H.L.S.; Wehmann, A.; /Fermilab /Guanajuato U. /LLNL, Livermore /Nevis Labs, Columbia U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst

    2005-07-01

    The authors report the results of a high-statistics, sensitive search for narrow baryon resonances decaying to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {bar {Xi}}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. The only resonances observed are the well known {Xi}{sup 0}(1530) and {bar {Xi}}{sup 0}(1530). No evidence is found for a state near 1862 MeV, previously reported by NA49[11]. At the 95% confidence level, we find the upper limit for the production of a Gaussian enhancement with {sigma} = 7.6 MeV in the {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} effective mass spectrum to be 0.3% of the number of observed {Xi}{sup 0}(1530 {yields} {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}). They find similarly restrictive upper limits for an enhancement at 1862 MeV in the {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {bar {Xi}}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} mass spectra.

  8. Search for Excited or Exotic Electron Production Using the Dielectron + Photon Signature at CDF in Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Gerberich, Heather Kay; /Duke U.

    2004-07-01

    The author presents a search for excited or exotic electrons decaying to an electron and a photon with high transverse momentum. An oppositely charged electron is produced in association with the excited electron, yielding a final state dielectron + photon signature. The discovery of excited electrons would be a first indication of lepton compositeness. They use {approx} 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab during March 2001 through September 2003. The data are consistent with standard model expectations. Upper limits are set on the experimental cross-section {sigma}({bar p}p {yields} ee* {yields} ee{gamma}) at the 95% confidence level in a contact-interaction model and a gauge-mediated interaction model. Limits are also presented as exclusion regions in the parameter space of the excited electron mass (M{sub e*}) and the compositeness energy scale ({Lambda}). In the contact-interaction model, for which there are no previously published limits, they find M{sub e*} < 906 GeV is excluded for M{sub e*} = {Lambda}. In the gauge-mediated model, the exclusion region in the M{sub e*} versus the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} parameter space is extended to M{sub e*} < 430 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. In comparison, other experiments have excluded M{sub e*} < 280 GeV for f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  9. Exotic physics: search for excited and exotic electrons in the e gamma decay channel in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2005-02-21

    We present a search for excited and exotic electrons (e*) decaying to an electron and a photon, both with high transverse momentum. We use 202 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV with the CDF II detector. No signal above standard model expectation is seen for associated ee* production. We discuss the e* sensitivity in the parameter space of the excited electron mass M{sub e*} and the compositeness energy scale {Lambda}. In the contact interaction model, we exclude 132 GeV/c{sup 2} < M{sub e*} < 879 GeV/c{sup 2} for {Lambda} = M{sub e*} at 95% confidence level (C.L.). In the gauge-mediated model, we exclude 126 GeV/c{sup 2} < M{sub e*} < 430 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% C.L. for the phenomenological coupling f/{Lambda} {approx} 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}.

  10. Object-based target search using remotely sensed data: A case study in detecting invasive exotic Australian Pine in south Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhixiao; Roberts, Charles; Johnson, Brian

    This study developed an object-based geographic image retrieval (GIR) approach for detecting invasive exotic Australian Pine in south Florida, USA. To filter out non-tree image objects, a hierarchical multi-resolution segmentation and filtering approach was first adopted to segment remote sensing images (DOQQs) into image objects (image regions) of irregular shape, compared to a regular square shape used in the literature. The study then computed object-level spectral, texture, and three-dimensional information for image object content representation using NDVI-based spectral, wavelet transform-based texture, variogram -based texture, and canopy surface height information. The effectiveness of content representation was evaluated using these different properties and their combinations in 10 sets of replica retrieval experiments with 5% random sample fractions of ground-truth identified Australian Pine image objects as query templates. The set of features providing the best fit was found to be a combination of canopy surface height and wavelet transform-based texture. These variables were selected for further tests to determine the similarity threshold beyond which retrieval is regarded as irrelevant. A series of regression tree models were built based on replica retrieval experiments with sample fractions of 1%, 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20%. The predicted results were analyzed to examine the sensitivity of retrieval performance (precision and recall) to the sample fraction and similarity threshold. A moderate retrieval performance was achieved in detecting Australian Pine in the study area. The study suggested that GIR with target search as its major objective by design could be an important supplement to image classification for invasive exotic plant species detection from remotely sensed images.

  11. Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn}

    2010-01-01

    Current experimental developments on the study of exotic nuclei far from the valley of stability are discussed. I start with general aspects related to the production of radioactive beams followed by the description of some of the experimental tools and specialized techniques for studies in reaction spectroscopy, nuclear structure research and nuclear applications with examples from selected topical areas with which I have been involved. I discuss some of the common challenges faced in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) science.

  12. The Search for Exotic Mesons in gamma p -> pi+pi+pi-n with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Craig Bookwalter

    2011-12-01

    The {pi}{sub 1}(1600), a J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic meson has been observed by experiments using pion beams. Theorists predict that photon beams could produce gluonic hybrid mesons, of which the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is a candidate, at enhanced levels relative to pion beams. The g12 rungroup at Jefferson Lab's CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) has recently acquired a large photoproduction dataset, using a liquid hydrogen target and tagged photons from a 5.71 GeV electron beam. A partial-wave analysis of 502K {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events selected from the g12 dataset has been performed, and preliminary fit results show strong evidence for well-known states such as the a{sub 1}(1260), a{sub 2}(1320), and {pi}{sub 2}(1670). However, we observe no evidence for the production of the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) in either the partial-wave intensities or the relative complex phase between the 1{sup {-+}} and the 2{sup {-+}} (corresponding to the {pi}{sub 2}) partial waves.

  13. Search for Exotic S=-2 Baryons in proton-antiproton Collisions at sqrt(s) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-12-01

    A search for a manifestly exotic S = -2 baryon state decaying to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}, and its neutral partner decaying to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, has been performed using 220 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. The {Xi}{sup -} trajectories were measured in a silicon tracker before their decay, resulting in a sample with low background and excellent position resolution. No evidence was found for S = -2 pentaquark candidates in the invariant mass range of 1600-2100 MeV/c{sup 2}. Upper limits on the product of pentaquark production cross section times its branching fraction to {Xi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +,-}, relative to the cross section of the well established {Xi}(1530) resonance, are presented for neutral and doubly negative candidates with p{sub T} > 2 GeV/c and |y| < 1 as a function of pentaquark mass. At 1862 MeV/c{sup 2}, these upper limits for neutral and doubly negative final states were found to be 3.2% and 1.7% at the 90% confidence level, respectively.

  14. Search for excited and exotic electrons in the egamma decay channel in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Arguin, J-F; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G J; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Casarsa, M; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chuang, S; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Donini, J; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallas, A; Galyardt, J; Gallinaro, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D W; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guenther, M; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huffman, B T; Huang, Y; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kong, D J; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; Lecompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefevre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; NcNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Plager, C; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stefanini, A; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veszpremi, V; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2005-03-18

    We present a search for excited and exotic electrons (e(*)) decaying to an electron and a photon, both with high transverse momentum. We use 202 pb(-1) of data collected in pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab II detector. No signal above standard model expectation is seen for associated ee(*) production. We discuss the e(*) sensitivity in the parameter space of the excited electron mass M(e(*)) and the compositeness energy scale Lambda. In the contact interaction model, we exclude 132 GeV/c(2)

  15. Exotic physics: search for first-generation scalar leptoquarks in ppbar collisions at sqrt = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-29

    We report on a search for pair production of first-generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using an integrated luminosity of 203 pb{sup -1} collected at the Fermilab Tevatron collider by the CDF experiment. We observe no evidence for LQ production in the topologies arising from LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eqeq and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} eq{nu}q, and derive 95% C.L. upper limits on the LQ production cross section. The results are combined with those obtained from a separately reported CDF search in the topology arising from LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {nu}q{nu}q and 95% C.L. lower limits on the LQ mass as a function of {beta} = BR(LQ {yields} eq) are derived. The limits are 236, 205 and 145 GeV/c{sup 2} for {beta} = 1, {beta} = 0.5 and {beta} = 0.1, respectively.

  16. Exotic heavy-quark states at Belle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Belle Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The search for multi-quark states beyond the meson (quark-antiquark) and baryon (three-quark) has resulted in the discovery of many new exotic states of matter, starting with the X(3872) discovery by Belle in 2003. We report selected recent results on searches for such states at Belle. supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science.

  17. Rare and exotic processes at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Culbertson, Ray; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    We report recent results in CDF searches for rare and exotic processes. In a signature-based search, we examine the diphoton dataset for additional energetic objects. In a second signature-based search, we search for anomalous production of a photon, a b-tagged jet, and missing E{sub T}. Finally, we search for a Fermiophobic Higgs in the two-photon decay mode, and conclude this Higgs must have mass greater than 106 GeV/c{sup 2}, at 95% confidence level.

  18. CMS supersymmetry and exotic Higgs results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yohay, R.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    A selection of results covering searches for supersymmetric particles and exotic decays of the Higgs boson are presented. These results are based on 8 TeV proton-proton collision data collected by the Compact Muon Solenoid experiment at the Large Hadron Collider.

  19. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; Shen, Bing

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.

  20. Exotic Superconductivity in Correlated Electron Systems

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mu, Gang; Sandu, Viorel; Li, Wei; Shen, Bing

    2015-05-25

    Over the past decades, the search for high-Tc superconductivity (SC) and its novel superconducting mechanisms is one of the most challenging tasks of condensed matter physicists and material scientists, wherein the most striking achievement is the discovery of high-c and unconventional superconductivity in strongly correlated 3d-electron systems, such as cuprates and iron pnictides/chalcogenides. Those exotic superconductors display the behaviors beyond the scope of the BCS theory (in the SC states) and the Landau-Fermi liquid theory (in the normal states). In general, such exotic superconductivity can be seen as correlated electron systems, where there are strong interplays among charge, spin, orbital,more » and lattice degrees of freedom. Thus, we focus on the exotic superconductivity in materials with correlated electrons in the present special issue.« less

  1. Search for excited and exotic muons in the mu gamma decay channel in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Acosta, D.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Baylor U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.

    2006-06-01

    The authors present a search for excited and exotic muon states {mu}*, conducted using an integrated luminosity of 371 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Tevatron with the CDF II detector. They search for associated production of {mu}{mu}* followed by the decay {mu}* {yields} {mu}{gamma}, resulting in the {mu}{mu}{gamma} final state. They compare the data to model predictions as a function of the mass of the excited muon M{sub {mu}*}, the compositeness energy scale {Lambda}, and the gauge coupling factor f. No signal above the standard model expectation is observed in the {mu}{gamma} mass spectrum. In the contact interaction model, they exclude 107 < M{sub {mu}*} < 853 GeV/c{sup 2} for {Lambda} = M{sub {mu}*}; in the gauge-mediated model, they exclude 100 < M{sub {mu}*} < 410 GeV/c{sup 2} for f/{Lambda} = 10{sup -2} GeV{sup -1}. These 95% confidence level exclusions extend previous limits and are the first hadron collider results on {mu}* production in the gauge-mediated model.

  2. First observation of γ γ →p p ¯K+K- and search for exotic baryons in p K systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Babu, V.; Badhrees, I.; Bakich, A. M.; Barberio, E.; Behera, P.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Biswal, J.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, N.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Eidelman, S.; Fang, W. X.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Glattauer, R.; Goldenzweig, P.; Grzymkowska, O.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hou, W.-S.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Inguglia, G.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Jaegle, I.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, K. K.; Julius, T.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. J.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Kotchetkov, D.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Li, C. H.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liventsev, D.; Lubej, M.; Luo, T.; Masuda, M.; Matsuda, T.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Moll, A.; Moon, H. K.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nanut, T.; Nath, K. J.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ostrowicz, W.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Pal, B.; Park, C.-S.; Park, H.; Pesántez, L.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Pulvermacher, C.; Rauch, J.; Ritter, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schlüter, T.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seong, I. S.; Sevior, M. E.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Strube, J. F.; Stypula, J.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takizawa, M.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tenchini, F.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Usov, Y.; Van Hulse, C.; Varner, G.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamaoka, J.; Yelton, J.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhukova, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The process γ γ →p p ¯ K+K- and its intermediate processes are measured for the first time using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider. The production of p p ¯K+K- and a Λ (1520 )0 (Λ ¯ (1520 )0) signal in the p K- (p ¯K+) invariant mass spectrum are clearly observed. However, no evidence for an exotic baryon near 1540 MeV /c2 , denoted as Θ (1540 )0 (Θ ¯(1540 )0) or Θ (1540 )++ (Θ (1540 )--), is seen in the p K- (p ¯K+) or p K+ (p ¯K-) invariant mass spectra. Cross sections for γ γ →p p ¯K+K-, Λ (1520 )0p ¯ K++c .c . and the products σ (γ γ →Θ (1540 )0p ¯ K++c .c .)B (Θ (1540 )0→p K-) and σ (γ γ →Θ (1540 )++p ¯ K-+c .c .)B (Θ (1540 )++→p K+) are measured. We also determine upper limits on the products of the χc 0 and χc 2 two-photon decay widths and their branching fractions to p p ¯ K+K- at the 90% credibility level.

  3. Exotic physics: search for new physics leading to high mass tau pairs with ppbar collisions at 1.96 tev using cdf ii

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-14

    We present the results of a search for anomalous resonant production of tau lepton pairs with large invariant mass, the first such search using the CDF II Detector in Run II of the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Such anomalous production could arise from various new physics processes. In a data sample corresponding to 195 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity we predict 2.8 {+-} 0.5 events from Standard Model background processes and observe 4. We use this result to set limits on the production of heavy scalar and vector particles decaying to tau lepton pairs.

  4. Exotic nonrelativistic string

    SciTech Connect

    Casalbuoni, Roberto; Gomis, Joaquim; Longhi, Giorgio

    2007-12-15

    We construct a classical nonrelativistic string model in 3+1 dimensions. The model contains a spurion tensor field that is responsible for the noncommutative structure of the model. Under double-dimensional reduction the model reduces to the exotic nonrelativistic particle in 2+1 dimensions.

  5. Using anti pp annihilation to find exotic mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, S.R.

    1987-10-01

    Present data suggests that a number of mesons have been found which cannot be accommodated in standard anti qq multiplets. Theory suggests that such exotic mesons should exist in the spectrum of Quantum Chromodynamics, but provides little guide to their properties. It is argued that a high luminosity, low energy anti pp machine would be a powerful tool with which to search for such exotics.

  6. Exotic branes and nongeometric backgrounds.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan; Shigemori, Masaki

    2010-06-25

    When string or M theory is compactified to lower dimensions, the U-duality symmetry predicts so-called exotic branes whose higher-dimensional origin cannot be explained by the standard string or M-theory branes. We argue that exotic branes can be understood in higher dimensions as nongeometric backgrounds or U folds, and that they are important for the physics of systems which originally contain no exotic charges, since the supertube effect generically produces such exotic charges. We discuss the implications of exotic backgrounds for black hole microstate (non-)geometries. PMID:20867363

  7. Exotic physics: search for doubly-charged higgs bosons decaying to dileptons in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2004-11-15

    The authors present the results of a search for doubly-charged Higgs bosons (H{sup {+-}}{sup {+-}}) decaying to dileptons (ll') using {approx} 240 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collision data collected by the CDF II experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron. In the search region, given by same-sign ll' mass m{sub ll'} > 80 GeV/c{sup 2} (100 GeV/c{sup 2} for ee channel), they observe no evidence for H{sup {+-}}{sup {+-}} production. They set limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} H{sup ++}H{sup --} {yields} l{sup +}l'{sup +}l{sup -}l'{sup -}) as a function of the mass of the H{sup {+-}}{sup {+-}} and the chirality of its couplings. Assuming exclusive same-sign dilepton decays, they derive lower mass limits on H{sub L}{sup {+-}}{sup {+-}} of 133 GeV/c{sup 2}, 136 GeV/c{sup 2}, and 115 GeV/c{sup 2} in the ee, {mu}{mu}, and e{mu} channels, respectively, and a lower mass limit of 113 GeV/c{sup 2} on H{sub R}{sup {+-}}{sup {+-}} in the {mu}{mu} channel, all at the 95% confidence level.

  8. Exotic physics: search for long-lived doubly-charged higgs bosons in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-03-02

    We present a search for long-lived doubly-charged Higgs bosons (H{sup {+-}{+-}}), with signatures of high ionization energy loss and muon-like penetration. We use 292 pb{sup -1} of data collected in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Observing no evidence of long-lived doubly-charged particle production, we exclude H{sub L}{sup {+-}{+-}} and H{sub R}{sup {+-}{+-}} bosons with masses below 133 GeV/c{sup 2} and 109 GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. In the degenerate case we exclude H{sup {+-}{+-}} mass below 146 GeV/c{sup 2}. All limits are quoted at the 95% confidence level.

  9. Exotic fluoride molecules in IRC +10216: Confirmation of AlF and searches for MgF and CaF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziurys, L. M.; Apponi, A. J.; Phillips, T. G.

    1994-01-01

    Three new rotational transitions of aluminum fluoride (AlF) at 0.8 and 1.2 mm have been observed. The J = 10-9, J = 8-7, and J = 7-6 lines of AlF at 230, 263, and 329 GHz, respectively, were seen toward IRC +10216 using the Caltech Submillimter Observatory (CSO). Combined with the earlier data obtained for this species at IRAM at 2 and 3 mm, these measurements confirm the presence of the metal halide in this carbon-rich circumstellar shell. Analysis of the CSO and IRAM data suggests that AlF arises from a source with a diameter of theta(sub s) approximately = 5-10 sec and hence is present chiefly in the inner envelope of IRC +10216. In this region, the molecule has a column density of (0.3-1.1) x 10(exp 15)/sq cm, which indicates a fractional abundance of at least approximately 10(exp -9), relative to H2. Searches for the metal fluoride species CaF and MgF have also been conducted toward IRC +10216, but with negative results. The column density upper limits for MgF and CaF are N(sub tot) less than (1-4) x 10(exp 14)/sq cm. Relative abundances of these metal fluoride molecules can be understood in terms of chemical thermodynamic equilibrium. The presence of AlF in IRC +10216 also indicates that large quantities of fluorine must be present in the inner stellar envelope, suggesting that this element may be produced not primarily in explosive nucleosynthesis but rather in helium shell flashes, as indicated also by HF spectroscopy of red giant stars.

  10. Promoting the exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Harris, Don J

    2005-09-01

    The marketing and promotion of an exotic pet veterinary practice allows the use of strategies that are not necessarily available in other veterinary disciplines. The advantage that an exotics practice enjoys is that it is able to capitalize not only on the unique nature of the species being attended but also on the specialized features of the hospital itself that make it specifically appropriate in caring for exotic pets. Before marketing, however, comes the responsibility that the practice live up to the claims made in promotional materials. A practice cannot ethically be presented as an "exotics" practice if it is nothing more than a dog and cat facility that is willing to attend to exotic pets. It is the competence of the veterinary staff and the appropriateness of the facility that determines the suitability of the practice for exotics management. PMID:16129354

  11. Current Status of Exotic Hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, M.A.; Ahmed, Maqsood; Fazal-e-Aleem

    2005-03-17

    Physics of exotic hadrons is in the limelight these days. The models for these baryons are discussed as well as their production and decay processes and methods of their identification. The results of recent experiments in this field are presented, in which some unusual states are observed. These states are candidates for exotic hadrons.

  12. Prospects for a Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic Physics (gnome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimball, D. F. Jackson; Pustelny, S.; Pospelov, M.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Leefer, N.; Wlodarczyk, P.; Wcislo, P.; Gawlik, W.; Smith, J.; Read, J.; Pankow, C.; Budker, D.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and prospects of a proposed international network of geographically separated, time-synchronized ultrasensitive atomic comagnetometers to search for correlated transient signals heralding new physics is discussed. The Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics (GNOME) would be sensitive to nuclear and electron spin couplings to various exotic fields. To date, no such search has ever been carried out, making the GNOME a novel experimental window on new physics.

  13. Discovering uncolored naturalness in exotic Higgs decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2015-12-01

    Solutions to the hierarchy problem usually require top partners. In standard SUSY or composite Higgs theories, the partners carry SM color and are becoming increasingly constrained by LHC searches. However, theories like Folded SUSY (FS), Twin Higgs (TH) and Quirky Little Higgs (QLH) introduce uncolored top partners, which can be SM singlets or carry electroweak charge. Their small production cross section left doubt as to whether the LHC can effectively probe such scenarios. Typically, these partners are charged under their own mirror color gauge group. In FS and QLH, the absence of light mirror matter allows glueballs to form at the bottom of the mirror spectrum. This is also the case in some TH realizations. The Higgs can decay to these mirror glueballs, with the glueballs decaying into SM particles with potentially observable lifetimes. We undertake the first detailed study of this glueball signature and quantitatively demonstrate the discovery potential of uncolored naturalness via exotic Higgs decays at the LHC and a potential future 100TeV collider. Our findings indicate that mirror glueballs are the smoking gun signature of natural FS and QLH type theories, in analogy to tree-level Higgs coupling shifts for the TH. We show that glueball masses in the ˜ 10-60 GeV mass range are theoretically preferred. Careful treatment of lifetime, mirror-hadronization and non-perturbative uncertainties is required to perform meaningful collider studies. We outline several new search strategies for exotic Higgs decays of the form h → XX → 4 f at the LHC, with X having lifetimes in the 10 μm to km range. We find that FS stops can be probed with masses up to 600 (1100) GeV at the LHC with 300 (3000) fb-1 of data, and TH top partners could be accessible with masses up to 900 (1500) GeV. This makes exotic Higgs decays the prime discovery channel for uncolored naturalness at the LHC.

  14. Exotics from Heavy Ion Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnishi, Akira; Jido, Daisuke; Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Yazaki, Koichi; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2011-10-21

    Discriminating hadronic molecular and multi-quark states is a long standing problem in hadronic physics. We propose here to utilize relativistic heavy ion collisions to resolve this problem, as exotic hadron yields are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model, we find that the exotic hadron yield relative to the statistical model result is typically an order of magnitude smaller for a compact multi-quark state, and larger by a factor of two or more for a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured at RHIC and LHC.

  15. EXOTIC MAGNETS FOR ACCELERATORS.

    SciTech Connect

    WANDERER, P.

    2005-09-18

    Over the last few years, several novel magnet designs have been introduced to meet the requirements of new, high performance accelerators and beam lines. For example, the FAIR project at GSI requires superconducting magnets ramped at high rates ({approx} 4 T/s) in order to achieve the design intensity. Magnets for the RIA and FAIR projects and for the next generation of LHC interaction regions will need to withstand high doses of radiation. Helical magnets are required to maintain and control the polarization of high energy protons at RHIC. In other cases, novel magnets have been designed in response to limited budgets and space. For example, it is planned to use combined function superconducting magnets for the 50 GeV proton transport line at J-PARC to satisfy both budget and performance requirements. Novel coil winding methods have been developed for short, large aperture magnets such as those used in the insertion region upgrade at BEPC. This paper will highlight the novel features of these exotic magnets.

  16. Probing exotic physics with cosmic neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab

    2005-10-01

    Traditionally, collider experiments have been the primary tool used in searching for particle physics beyond the Standard Model. In this talk, I will discuss alternative approaches for exploring exotic physics scenarios using high energy and ultra-high energy cosmic neutrinos. Such neutrinos can be used to study interactions at energies higher, and over baselines longer, than those accessible to colliders. In this way, neutrino astronomy can provide a window into fundamental physics which is highly complementary to collider techniques. I will discuss the role of neutrino astronomy in fundamental physics, considering the use of such techniques in studying several specific scenarios including low scale gravity models, Standard Model electroweak instanton induced interactions, decaying neutrinos and quantum decoherence.

  17. LOUISIANA EXOTIC INVASIVE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM MX964256

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana Exotic Invasive Species Symposium will provide a multi-state collaboration among agency representatives, scientists, and the affected public to address the problem of exotic invasive species and to improve coastal environmental conditions in Louisiana.

  18. Exotic atoms, K-nucleus scattering and hypernuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, P. D.

    1981-01-01

    Recent progress in exotic atom physics, kaon-nucleus scattering, and hypernuclear physics is reviewed. Specific problems discussed include searches for muon-nucleon interactions beyond QED, a comparison of data and recent calculation of K/sup + -/ + /sup 12/C elastic and inelastic scattering, as well as recent studies of ..sigma.. and ..lambda.. hypernuclei including new data on the level structure of /sup 13/C/..lambda...

  19. Exotic aphid control with pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic aphids are invading ecosystems worldwide. The principal factors favoring establishment of these pests are their small size, parthenogenetic reproduction, short generation time, ability for long distance dispersal as winged morphs, and explosive population dynamics. In the past, attention to i...

  20. Exotic smoothness and quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, T.

    2010-08-01

    Since the first work on exotic smoothness in physics, it was folklore to assume a direct influence of exotic smoothness to quantum gravity. Thus, the negative result of Duston (2009 arXiv:0911.4068) was a surprise. A closer look into the semi-classical approach uncovered the implicit assumption of a close connection between geometry and smoothness structure. But both structures, geometry and smoothness, are independent of each other. In this paper we calculate the 'smoothness structure' part of the path integral in quantum gravity assuming that the 'sum over geometries' is already given. For that purpose we use the knot surgery of Fintushel and Stern applied to the class E(n) of elliptic surfaces. We mainly focus our attention to the K3 surfaces E(2). Then we assume that every exotic smoothness structure of the K3 surface can be generated by knot or link surgery in the manner of Fintushel and Stern. The results are applied to the calculation of expectation values. Here we discuss the two observables, volume and Wilson loop, for the construction of an exotic 4-manifold using the knot 52 and the Whitehead link Wh. By using Mostow rigidity, we obtain a topological contribution to the expectation value of the volume. Furthermore, we obtain a justification of area quantization.

  1. Exotic power and propulsion concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forward, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The status of some exotic physical phenomena and unconventional spacecraft concepts that might produce breakthroughs in power and propulsion in the 21st Century are reviewed. The subjects covered include: electric, nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, antimatter, high energy density materials, metallic hydrogen, laser thermal, solar thermal, solar sail, magnetic sail, and tether propulsion.

  2. International Symposium on Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penionzhkevich, Yu. E.; Cherepanov, E. A.

    Methods of production of light exotic nuclei and study of their ptoperties -- Superheavy elements. Syhnthesis and properties -- Nuclear fission -- Nuclear reactions -- rare processes, decay and nuclear structure -- Experimental set-ups and future projects -- Radioactive beams. Production and research programmes -- Public relations.

  3. Children Prioritize Virtual Exotic Biodiversity over Local Biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Ballouard, Jean-Marie; Brischoux, François; Bonnet, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Environmental education is essential to stem current dramatic biodiversity loss, and childhood is considered as the key period for developing awareness and positive attitudes toward nature. Children are strongly influenced by the media, notably the internet, about biodiversity and conservation issues. However, most media focus on a few iconic, appealing, and usually exotic species. In addition, virtual activities are replacing field experiences. This situation may curb children knowledge and concerns about local biodiversity. Focusing our analyses on local versus exotic species, we examined the level of knowledge and the level of diversity of the animals that French schoolchildren are willing to protect, and whether these perceptions are mainly guided by information available in the internet. For that, we collected and compared two complementary data sets: 1) a questionnaire was administered to schoolchildren to assess their knowledge and consideration to protect animals, 2) an internet content analysis (i.e. Google searching sessions using keywords) was performed to assess which animals are the most often represented. Our results suggest that the knowledge of children and their consideration to protect animal are mainly limited to internet contents, represented by a few exotic and charismatic species. The identification rate of local animals by schoolchildren was meager, suggesting a worrying disconnection from their local environment. Schoolchildren were more prone to protect “virtual” (unseen, exotic) rather than local animal species. Our results reinforce the message that environmental education must also focus on outdoor activities to develop conservation consciousness and concerns about local biodiversity. PMID:21829710

  4. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.13 Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. This shall be... other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13......

  5. 9 CFR 352.13 - Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.13 Handling and disposal of condemned or other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. This shall be... other inedible exotic animal products at official exotic animal establishments. 352.13......

  6. Exotic containers for capillary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses 'exotic' rotationally symmetric containers that admit an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium capillary free surfaces. The paper extends earlier work to a larger class of parameters and clarifies and simplifies the governing differential equations, while expressing them in a parametric form appropriate for numerical integration. A unified presentation suitable for both zero and nonzero gravity is given. Solutions for the container shapes are depicted graphically along with members of the free-surface continuum, and comments are given concerning possible physical experiments.

  7. Exotic Zc states at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Wei

    2016-05-01

    The BESIII Experiment at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC2) collected large data samples for electron-positron collisions with center-of-mass above 4 GeV during 2013 and 2014. In this mass region, there are several states that are yet to be understood. In this article we will discuss BESIII analyses of the exotic Zc states. We present the studies of their decays to hidden charm and open charm final states for both the charged and neutral Zc states.

  8. Electron muon scattering in the exotic Z(0)' pole

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, H.; Ravinez, O.; Romero, D.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    The search for new physics in the future Internacional Linear Collider ILC, implies the existence of new particles, among them, the Z(0)' particle. In this regard, we calculate the e{sup +}+e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup +}+{mu}{sup -} scattering cross section near the Z(0)' pole, whitin the contex of the SU(3){sub L}xU(1){sub Y} weak model, which contains exotic leptons, quarks, and bosons (E,J,U,V) with the finality of obtain constraints in the parameters of the model.

  9. Search for weakly decaying Λn ‾ and ΛΛ exotic bound states in central Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmed, I.; Ahn, S. U.; Aimo, I.; Aiola, S.; Ajaz, M.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; Andrei, C.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anielski, J.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Aronsson, T.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Bach, M.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Ball, M.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Bossú, F.; Botje, M.; Botta, E.; Böttger, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Breitner, T.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Buxton, J. T.; Caffarri, D.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calero Diaz, L.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Cavicchioli, C.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Engel, H.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Eschweiler, D.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Esumi, S.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Felea, D.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Fleck, M. G.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gallio, M.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grinyov, B.; Grion, N.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Haake, R.; Haaland, Ø.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hanratty, L. D.; Hansen, A.; Harris, J. W.; Hartmann, H.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present results of a search for two hypothetical strange dibaryon states, i.e. the H-dibaryon and the possible Λn ‾ bound state. The search is performed with the ALICE detector in central (0-10%) Pb-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 2.76 TeV, by invariant mass analysis in the decay modes Λn ‾ → d ‾π+ and H-dibaryon → Λpπ-. No evidence for these bound states is observed. Upper limits are determined at 99% confidence level for a wide range of lifetimes and for the full range of branching ratios. The results are compared to thermal, coalescence and hybrid UrQMD model expectations, which describe correctly the production of other loosely bound states, like the deuteron and the hypertriton.

  10. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-10-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  11. Search for Gluonic Excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2007-10-26

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  12. Photoproduction of exotic baryon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karliner, Marek; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2016-01-01

    We point out that the new exotic resonances recently reported by LHCb in the J / ψ p channel are excellent candidates for photoproduction off a proton target. This test is crucial to confirming the resonant nature of such states, as opposed to their being kinematical effects. We specialize to an interpretation of the heavier narrow state as a molecule composed of Σc and Dbar*, and estimate its production cross section using vector dominance. The relevant photon energies and fluxes are well within the capabilities of the GlueX and CLAS12 detectors at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB). A corresponding calculation is also performed for photoproduction of an analogous resonance which is predicted to exist in the ϒp channel.

  13. Exotic nuclei and nuclear forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2013-01-01

    I overview new aspects of the structure of exotic nuclei as compared to stable nuclei, focusing on several characteristic effects of nuclear forces. The shell structure of nuclei has been proposed by Mayer and Jensen, and has been considered to be kept valid basically for all nuclei, with well-known magic numbers, 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, …. Nuclear forces were shown, very recently, to change this paradigm. It will be presented that the evolution of shell structure occurs in various ways as more neutrons and/or protons are added, and I will present basic points of this shell evolution in terms of the monopole interaction of nuclear forces. I will discuss three types of nuclear forces. The first one is the tensor force. The tensor force is one of the most fundamental nuclear forces, but its first-order effect on the shell structure has been clarified only recently in studies on exotic nuclei. The tensor force can change the spin-orbit splitting depending on the occupation of specific orbits. This results in changes of the shell structure in many nuclei, and consequently some of Mayer-Jensen's magic numbers are lost and new ones emerge, in certain nuclei. This mechanism can be understood in an intuitive way, meaning that the effect is general and robust. The second type of nuclear forces is central force. I will show a general but unknown property of the central force in the shell-model Hamiltonian that can describe nuclear properties in a good agreement with experiment. I will then demonstrate how it can be incorporated into a simple model of the central force, and will discuss how this force works in the shell evolution. Actually, by combining this central force with the tensor force, one can understand and foresee how the same proton-neutron interaction drives the shell evolution, for examples such as Sn/Sb isotopes, N = 20 nuclei and Ni/Cu isotopes. The distribution of single-particle strength is discussed also in comparison to (e,e‧p) experiment on 48Ca. The shell

  14. Exotic mammals disperse exotic fungi that promote invasion by exotic trees.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Martin A; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R; Amico, Guillermo C; Dimarco, Romina D; Barrios-Garcia, M Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area. PMID:23826154

  15. Exotic Mammals Disperse Exotic Fungi That Promote Invasion by Exotic Trees

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Martin A.; Hayward, Jeremy; Horton, Thomas R.; Amico, Guillermo C.; Dimarco, Romina D.; Barrios-Garcia, M. Noelia; Simberloff, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Biological invasions are often complex phenomena because many factors influence their outcome. One key aspect is how non-natives interact with the local biota. Interaction with local species may be especially important for exotic species that require an obligatory mutualist, such as Pinaceae species that need ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi. EM fungi and seeds of Pinaceae disperse independently, so they may use different vectors. We studied the role of exotic mammals as dispersal agents of EM fungi on Isla Victoria, Argentina, where many Pinaceae species have been introduced. Only a few of these tree species have become invasive, and they are found in high densities only near plantations, partly because these Pinaceae trees lack proper EM fungi when their seeds land far from plantations. Native mammals (a dwarf deer and rodents) are rare around plantations and do not appear to play a role in these invasions. With greenhouse experiments using animal feces as inoculum, plus observational and molecular studies, we found that wild boar and deer, both non-native, are dispersing EM fungi. Approximately 30% of the Pinaceae seedlings growing with feces of wild boar and 15% of the seedlings growing with deer feces were colonized by non-native EM fungi. Seedlings growing in control pots were not colonized by EM fungi. We found a low diversity of fungi colonizing the seedlings, with the hypogeous Rhizopogon as the most abundant genus. Wild boar, a recent introduction to the island, appear to be the main animal dispersing the fungi and may be playing a key role in facilitating the invasion of pine trees and even triggering their spread. These results show that interactions among non-natives help explain pine invasions in our study area. PMID:23826154

  16. Exotic physics: search for scalar leptoquark pairs decaying to nu nu-bar qq-bar in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2004-10-25

    We report on a search for the pair production of scalar leptoquarks, LQ, using 191 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collision data recorded by the CDF experiment during Run II of the Tevatron. The leptoquarks are sought via their decay into a neutrino and quark yielding missing transverse energy and several jets of large transverse energy. No evidence for leptoquark production is observed, and limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} LQ{ovr OQ}X {yields} v{bar v}q{bar q}X). Using a next-to-leading order theoretical prediction of the cross section for scalar leptoquark production, we exclude first-generation leptoquarks in the mass interval 78 to 117 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% confidence level for BR(LQ {yields} vq) = 100%.

  17. Exotic brane junctions from F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Tetsuji

    2016-05-01

    Applying string dualities to F-theory, we obtain various [ p, q]-branes whose constituents are standard branes of codimension two and exotic branes. We construct junctions of the exotic five-branes and their Hanany-Witten transitions associated with those in F-theory. In this procedure, we understand the monodromy of the single 5 2 2 -brane. We also find the objects which are sensitive to the branch cut of the 5 2 2 -brane. Considering the web of branes in the presence of multiple exotic five-branes analogous to the web of five-branes with multiple seven-branes, we obtain novel brane constructions for SU(2) gauge theories with n flavors and their superconformal limit with enhanced E n+1 symmetry in five, four, and three dimensions. Hence, adapting the techniques of the seven-branes to the exotic branes, we will be able to construct F-theories in diverse dimensions.

  18. Mathematical models for exotic wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Saikat; Stremler, Mark

    2014-11-01

    Vortex wakes are a common occurrence in the environment around us; the most famous example being the von Kármán vortex street with two vortices being shed by the bluff body in each cycle. However, frequently there can be many other more exotic wake configurations with different vortex arrangements, based on the flow parameters and the bluff body dimensions and/or its oscillation characteristics. Some examples include wakes with periodic shedding of three vortices (`P+S' mode) and four vortices (symmetric `2P' mode, staggered `2P' mode, `2C' mode). We present mathematical models for such wakes assuming two-dimensional potential flows with embedded point vortices. The spatial alignment of the vortices is inspired by the experimentally observed wakes. The idealized system follows a Hamiltonian formalism. Model-based analysis reveals a rich dynamics pertaining to the relative vortex motion in the mid-wake region. Downstream evolution of the vortices, as predicted from the model results, also show good correspondence with wake-shedding experiments performed on flowing soap films.

  19. Exotic terranes of western California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McWilliams, M.O.; Howell, D.G.

    1982-01-01

    Numerous distinct geological terranes compose the North American Cordillera1; there may be as many as 50 terranes in California alone2. Critical to deciphering the history of Cordilleran tectonic assembly is an understanding of the displacement history of individual terranes. It is therefore important to know: (1) whether a terrane has undergone significant motion with respect to the stable craton (that is, whether it is allochthonous or exotic); (2) if so, when relative motion started and stopped; (3) from where an individual terrane originated; and (4) the nature of interterrane movements. We consider here the problem of determining whether the now-juxtaposed Salinian and Stanley Mountain terranes of California became amalgamated at or near their present position with respect to cratonic North America, or if they collided at a considerable distance from their present positions and were later accreted to North America as a composite package. The palaeomagnetic data that we present indicate that the latter was the case. ?? 1982 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. Volume integral theorem for exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-12-15

    We answer an important question in general relativity about the volume integral theorem for exotic matter by suggesting an exact integral quantifier for matter violating Averaged Null Energy Condition (ANEC). It is checked against some well-known static, spherically symmetric traversable wormhole solutions of general relativity with a sign reversed kinetic term minimally coupled scalar field. The improved quantifier is consistent with the principle that traversable wormholes can be supported by arbitrarily small quantities of exotic matter.

  1. Video Otoscopy in Exotic Companion Mammals.

    PubMed

    Jekl, Vladimir; Hauptman, Karel; Knotek, Zdenek

    2015-09-01

    Ear disease is a common disorder seen in exotic companion mammals, especially in ferrets, rabbits, and rats. This article describes patient preparation, equipment, and video otoscopy technique in exotic companion mammals. This noninvasive technique facilitates accurate diagnosis of diseases affecting the external ear canal or middle ear. Moreover, therapeutic otoscopic evaluation of the external ear facilitates foreign body removal, external ear canal flushing, intralesional drug administration, myringotomy, and middle ear cavity flushing. PMID:26117517

  2. Exotic species, Experienced, and Idealized Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prévot-Julliard, Anne-Caroline; Clavel, Joanne; Teillac-Deschamps, Pauline; Julliard, Romain

    2011-11-01

    This paper is an answer to the Caplat and Coutts forum about our previous paper "The need for flexibility in conservation practices: exotic species as an example". We precise here why we proposed to consider exotic species as well as indigenous species in the reconnection framework in human-modified environments. One argument is that consistent and understandable arguments must be used in the communication from scientists to the public, in order not to decrease the gap between science and society.

  3. Exotic Meson Results from BNL E852

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manak, Joseph J.

    1998-10-01

    Results from BNL experiment 852 on exotic (non-q\\overlineq) meson production are presented. Production of final states with J^PC = 1^-+ is observed in π^-p interactions at 18 GeV/c in the ηπ^-, ρπ^- and η^'π^- channels. Since such states are manifestly exotic if they are resonant, we describe amplitude analyses which use the interference between these states and other well known states to measure the phase behavior of the J^PC = 1^-+ amplitudes. The analyses show that, in addition to the previously reported(D.R. Thompson et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1630 (1997) evidence for an exotic meson in the ηπ^- channel, there is strong evidence for a second exotic meson decaying to ρπ^- with a mass of M=1593 ±8^+29_-47 MeV/c^2 and a width of Γ=168 ±20^+150_-12 MeV/c^2. We also show that the η^'π^- system is dominated by J^PC = 1^-+ production and we use those data to determine decay branching ratios for the exotic mesons. Such measurements are expected to be crucial in determining the constituent nature of the exotic mesons - that is, whether they are consistent with being hybrid mesons or four-quark states.

  4. Reaction theories for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2012-11-20

    This contribution discusses two important dynamical effects in the scattering of exotic beams. The first part deals proton breakup. The Coulomb interactions between the core and the target and the proton and the target are treated to all orders, including also the full multipole expansion of the Coulomb potential. The dynamics of proton Coulomb breakup is compared to that of an equivalent neutron of larger binding energy in order to elucidate the differences with the well understood neutron breakup mechanism. With respect to nuclear breakup it is found that a proton behaves exactly as a neutron of larger binding energy. The extra 'effective energy' is due to the combined core-target Coulomb barrier. In Coulomb breakup we distinguish the effect of the core-target Coulomb potential (called recoil effect), with respect to which the proton behaves again as a more bound neutron, from the direct proton-target Coulomb potential. The latter gives cross sections about an order of magnitude larger than the recoil term. The two effects give rise to complicated interferences in the parallel momentum distributions. They are instead easily separable in the proton angular distributions which are therefore suggested as a very useful observable for future experimental studies. The second part has to do with the dynamics of one-neutron and one-proton removal from unstable nuclei with large asymmetry {Delta}S S{sub n}-S{sub p} in the separation energies and incident energies below 80 MeV/nucleon. Strong non-sudden effects are observed in the case of deeply-bound-nucleon removal. The corresponding parallel momentum distributions exhibit an abrupt cutoff at high momentum that corresponds to an energy threshold occurring when the incident energy per particle is of comparable magnitude as the nucleon separation energy.

  5. Distinctive exotic flavor and aroma compounds of some exotic tropical fruits and berries: a review.

    PubMed

    Lasekan, Ola; Abbas, Kassim A

    2012-01-01

    The characteristic flavor of exotic tropical fruits is one of their most attractive attributes to consumers. In this article, the enormous diversity of exotic fruit flavors is reviewed. Classifying some of the exotic fruits into two classes on the basis of whether esters or terpenes predominate in the aroma was also attempted. Indeed, as far as exotic tropical fruits are concerned, the majority of fruits have terpenes predominating in their aroma profile. Some of the fruits in this group are the Amazonian fruits such as pitanga, umbu-caja, camu-camu, garcinia, and bacuri. The ester group is made up of rambutan, durians, star fruit, snake fruit, acerola, tamarind, sapodilla, genipap, soursop, cashew, melon, jackfruit, and cupuacu respectively. Also, the role of sulphur-volatiles in some of the exotic fruits is detailed. PMID:22591343

  6. Uncovering light scalars with exotic Higgs decays to

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtin, David; Essig, Rouven; Zhong, Yi-Ming

    2015-06-01

    The search for exotic Higgs decays are an essential probe of new physics. In particular, the small width of the Higgs boson makes its decay uniquely sensitive to the existence of light hidden sectors. Here we assess the potential of an exotic Higgs decay search for h → 2 X → to constrain theories with light CP-even ( X = s) and CP-odd ( X = a) singlet scalars in the mass range of 15 to 60 GeV. This decay channel arises naturally in many scenarios, such as the Standard Model augmented with a singlet, the two-Higgs-doublet model with a singlet (2HDM + S) — which includes the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM) — and in hidden valley models. The 2 b2 μ channel may represent the best discovery avenue for many models. It has competitive reach, and is less reliant on low- p T b- and τ-reconstruction compared to other channels like 4 b, 4 τ, and 2 τ2 μ. We analyze the sensitivity of a 2 b2 μ search for the 8 and 14 TeV LHC, including the HL-LHC. We consider three types of analyses, employing conventional resolved b-jets with a clustering radius of R ˜ 0 .4, thin b-jets with R = 0 .2, and jet substructure techniques, respectively. The latter two analyses improve the reach for m X ˜ 15 GeV, for which the two b-jets are boosted and often merged. We find that Br( h → 2 X → 2 b2 μ) can be constrained at the few × 10-5 level across the entire considered mass range of X at the HL-LHC. This corresponds to a 1 - 10% reach in Br( h → 2 X) in 2HDM + S models, including the NMSSM, depending on the type of Higgs Yukawa couplings.

  7. Pentaquark Searches at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Rossi, Patrizia

    2007-01-01

    Since LEPS collaboration reported the first evidence for a S=+1 baryon resonance in early 2003 with a mass of 1.54 GeV, dubbed Θ+, more than ten experiments have confirmed this exotic state, among these two carried out at Jefferson Laboratory. At the same time, there are a number of experiments, mostly at high energies, that report null results. To try to clarify this situation, during the past year, The CLAS Collaboration at Jefferson Laboratory has undertaken a second generation high-statistics experimental program to search for exotics baryons. Here the preliminary results from these experiments are reported.

  8. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets

    PubMed Central

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-01-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as ‘pets’ including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009–2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic ‘pets’ are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004–2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients. PMID:22843648

  9. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets.

    PubMed

    Warwick, Clifford; Steedman, Catrina

    2012-07-01

    A variety of exotic vertebrate and invertebrate species are kept as 'pets' including fishes, amphibians (for example, frogs and toads), reptiles (turtles, crocodiles, lizards and snakes), birds, mammals (for example, primates, civets, and lions), and invertebrates (for example spiders, scorpions, and centipedes), and ownership of some of these animals is rising. Data for 2009-2011 suggest that the number of homes with reptiles rose by approximately 12.5%. Recent surveys, including only some of these animals, indicated that they might be present in around 18.6% of homes (equal to approximately 42 million animals of which around 40 million are indoor or outdoor fish). Many exotic 'pets' are capable of causing injury or poisoning to their keepers and some contacts prove fatal. We examined NHS Health Episode Statistics for England using selected formal categories for hospital admissions and bed days for 2004-2010 using the following categories of injury, envenomation or sting; bitten or struck by crocodile or alligator; bitten or crushed by other reptiles: contact with venomous snakes and lizards; contact with scorpions. Between 2004 and 2010 these data conservatively show a total of 760 full consultation episodes, 709 admissions and 2,121 hospital bed days were associated with injuries probably from exotic pets. Injuries, envenomations and stings from exotic pets constitute a small but important component of emerging medical problems. Greater awareness of relevant injuries and medical sequelae from exotic pet keeping may help medics formulate their clinical assessment and advice to patients. PMID:22843648

  10. Wildlife, exotic pets, and emerging zoonoses.

    PubMed

    Chomel, Bruno B; Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  11. Issues and opportunities in exotic hadrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Briceno, Raul A.; Cohen, Thomas D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, Jozef J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; et al

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. Consequently, it is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimentalmore » and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented.« less

  12. Wildlife, Exotic Pets, and Emerging Zoonoses1

    PubMed Central

    Belotto, Albino; Meslin, François-Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Most emerging infectious diseases are zoonotic; wildlife constitutes a large and often unknown reservoir. Wildlife can also be a source for reemergence of previously controlled zoonoses. Although the discovery of such zoonoses is often related to better diagnostic tools, the leading causes of their emergence are human behavior and modifications to natural habitats (expansion of human populations and their encroachment on wildlife habitat), changes in agricultural practices, and globalization of trade. However, other factors include wildlife trade and translocation, live animal and bushmeat markets, consumption of exotic foods, development of ecotourism, access to petting zoos, and ownership of exotic pets. To reduce risk for emerging zoonoses, the public should be educated about the risks associated with wildlife, bushmeat, and exotic pet trades; and proper surveillance systems should be implemented. PMID:17370509

  13. Dynamical effects in fusion with exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo-Phuoc, K.; Simenel, C.; Simpson, E. C.

    2016-08-01

    Background: Reactions with stable beams have demonstrated strong interplay between nuclear structure and fusion. Exotic beam facilities open new perspectives to understand the impact of neutron skin, large isospin, and weak binding energies on fusion. Microscopic theories of fusion are required to guide future experiments. Purpose: To investigate new effects of exotic structures and dynamics in near-barrier fusion with exotic nuclei. Method: Microscopic approaches based on the Hartree-Fock (HF) mean-field theory are used for studying fusion barriers in -54Ca40+116Sn reactions for even isotopes. Bare potential barriers are obtained assuming frozen HF ground-state densities. Dynamical effects on the barrier are accounted for in time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) calculations of the collisions. Vibrational couplings are studied in the coupled-channel framework and near-barrier nucleon transfer is investigated with TDHF calculations. Results: The development of a neutron skin in exotic calcium isotopes strongly lowers the bare potential barrier. However, this static effect is not apparent when dynamical effects are included. On the contrary, a fusion hindrance is observed in TDHF calculations with the most neutron-rich calcium isotopes which cannot be explained by vibrational couplings. Transfer reactions are also important in these systems due to charge equilibration processes. Conclusions: Despite its impact on the bare potential, the neutron skin is not seen as playing an important role in the fusion dynamics. However, the charge transfer with exotic projectiles could lead to an increase of the Coulomb repulsion between the fragments, suppressing fusion. The effects of transfer and dissipative mechanisms on fusion with exotic nuclei deserve further studies.

  14. Advances in exotic mammal clinical therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Michelle G

    2015-05-01

    It is important that veterinarians treating exotic companion mammals stay abreast of the latest developments relating to medications and drug delivery approaches for safety, efficacy and welfare issues. Sustained release formulations of commonly used drugs as well as newer routes for administration of therapeutic agents allow the veterinarian treating exotic companion mammals to reduce the stress associated with drug administration. Interactions can occur between vehicle and drugs when formulations are compounded, therefore research studies are warranted regarding potential problems associated with these formulations. PMID:25902274

  15. Exotic statistics of leapfrogging vortex rings.

    PubMed

    Niemi, Antti J

    2005-04-01

    The leapfrogging motion of vortex rings is a three-dimensional version of the motion that in two dimensions leads to exotic exchange statistics. The statistical phase factor can be computed using the hydrodynamical Euler equation, which suggests that three-dimensional exotic exchange statistics is a common property of vortex rings in a variety of quantum liquids and gases. Potential applications range from helium superfluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases, metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases, and maybe even nuclear matter in extreme conditions. PMID:15903923

  16. Exotic nuclei with open heavy flavor mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Shigehiro; Sudoh, Kazutaka

    2009-08-01

    We propose stable exotic nuclei bound with D and B mesons with respect to heavy quark symmetry. We indicate that an approximate degeneracy of D(B) and D*(B*) mesons plays an important role, and discuss the stability of DN and BN bound states. We find the binding energies 1.4 MeV and 9.4 MeV for each state in the J{sup P}=1/2{sup -} with the I=0 channel. We discuss also possible existence of exotic nuclei DNN and BNN.

  17. Exotic States of Nuclear Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Umberto; Baldo, Marcello; Burgio, Fiorella; Schulze, Hans-Josef

    2008-02-01

    pt. A. Theory of nuclear matter EOS and symmetry energy. Constraining the nuclear equation of state from astrophysics and heavy ion reactions / C. Fuchs. In-medium hadronic interactions and the nuclear equation of state / F. Sammarruca. EOS and single-particle properties of isospin-asymmetric nuclear matter within the Brueckner theory / W. Zuo, U. Lombardo & H.-J. Schulze. Thermodynamics of correlated nuclear matter / A. Polls ... [et al.]. The validity of the LOCV formalism and neutron star properties / H. R. Moshfegh ... [et al.]. Ferromagnetic instabilities of neutron matter: microscopic versus phenomenological approaches / I. Vidaã. Sigma meson and nuclear matter saturation / A. B. Santra & U. Lombardo. Ramifications of the nuclear symmetry energy for neutron stars, nuclei and heavy-ion collisions / A. W. Steiner, B.-A. Li & M. Prakash. The symmetry energy in nuclei and nuclear matter / A. E. L. Dieperink. Probing the symmetry energy at supra-saturation densities / M. Di Toro et al. Investigation of low-density symmetry energy via nucleon and fragment observables / H. H. Wolter et al. Instability against cluster formation in nuclear and compact-star matter / C. Ducoin ... [et al.]. Microscopic optical potentials of nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering / Z.-Y. Ma, J. Rong & Y.-Q. Ma -- pt. B. The neutron star crust: structure, formation and dynamics. Neutron star crust beyond the Wigner-Seitz approximation / N. Chamel. The inner crust of a neutron star within the Wigner-Seitz method with pairing: from drip point to the bottom / E. E. Saperstein, M. Baldo & S. V. Tolokonnikov. Nuclear superfluidity and thermal properties of neutron stars / N. Sandulescu. Collective excitations: from exotic nuclei to the crust of neutron stars / E. Khan, M. Grasso & J. Margueron. Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear medium: fermi gases, nuclei and the role of Pauli potentials / M. A. Pérez-García. Low-density instabilities in relativistic hadronic models / C. Provid

  18. Towards Exotic Hidden-Charm Pentaquarks in QCD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Steele, T G; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-10-23

    Inspired by P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) recently observed by LHCb, a QCD sum rule investigation is performed, by which they can be identified as exotic hidden-charm pentaquarks composed of an anticharmed meson and a charmed baryon. Our results suggest that P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) have quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and 5/2(+), respectively. Furthermore, two extra hidden-charm pentaqurks with configurations D̅Σ(c)(*) and D̅(*)Σ(c)(*) are predicted, which have spin-parity quantum numbers J(P)=3/2(-) and J(P)=5/2(+), respectively. As an important extension, the mass predictions of hidden-bottom pentaquarks are also given. Searches for these partners of P(c)(4380) and P(c)(4450) are especially accessible at future experiments like LHCb and BelleII. PMID:26551105

  19. Search for exotic cluster configurations in 14C nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korotkova, L. Yu; Chernyshev, B. A.; Gurov, Yu B.; Karpuhin, V. S.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Pritula, R. V.; Schurenkova, T. D.

    2016-02-01

    The analysis of 2-dimentional Dalitz’ diagram, measured in 14C(π-, pd)X reaction, allowed to distinguish the pion absorption by p intranuclear cluster and to obtain an indication on the existence of 3p + 11Li configuration in 14C nucleus. Highly excited states of 12,13Be isotopes were found with the energy of Ex ≈ 30 MeV for the first time. It was shown that these states decay as follows 12Be*→p + 11Li and 13Be*→d + 11Li.

  20. [Microbiological conservation medicine and exotic pets].

    PubMed

    Hassl, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    The keeping and the breeding of exotic pets in privacy is a hobby with increasing popularity in industrialised countries. The growing demand for animals usually imported from the tropics, the growing demand for unprofessionally bred feeder organisms, and the increasing number of cases of faulty caring behaviour lead to the creation of new infectiological niches in the interface between exotic pet--nurse--feed--vivarium. These niches are filled preferably by ubiquitous, facultative pathogenic, stress- and age-deduced opportunists with a broad host spectrum. On the one hand these extraordinary germ faunas, relating to their compositions, may generate broad relevance in human medicine, lead to bizarre clinical pictures in specific cases, and may contribute to a reduction of the mean span of life of exotic pets kept in human care. On the other hand the quantitative composition of the fauna may also be a direct measure of the degree of stress the pets are suffering in captivity. Thus, a professional designation of the germ fauna of an exotic pet may contribute to an optimisation of the captivity conditions. PMID:15683044

  1. Exotic Gauge Bosons in the 331 Model

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, D.; Ravinez, O.; Diaz, H.; Reyes, J.

    2009-04-30

    We analize the bosonic sector of the 331 model which contains exotic leptons, quarks and bosons (E,J,U,V) in order to satisfy the weak gauge SU(3){sub L} invariance. We develop the Feynman rules of the entire kinetic bosonic sector which will let us to compute some of the Z(0)' decays modes.

  2. Phenology of cheatgrass and associated exotic weeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), is an exotic, highly invasive annual grass that has dramatically changed the aspect and ecological functions of vast areas of formerly big sagebrush/bunchgrass and salt desert rangelands in the Intermountain west. Cheatgrass increases the chance of ignition, rate of spr...

  3. Study of Nuclear Moments on Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ishihara, Masayasu

    2010-04-30

    Nuclear moments have been measured for a few tens of light unstable nuclei located very far from the line of stability using beta-NMR methods and spin-polarized RI beams. The obtained values of those moments provided indispensable information to reveal/disentangle unique properties of exotic nuclei.

  4. RECOVERY OF EXOTIC ALLELES IN ENHANCED TROPICAL YELLOW GERMPLASM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  5. Exotic annual grass alters fuel amounts, continuity and moisture content

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    1. Invasion by exotic plants are one of the most serious threats to native plant communities, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. Of particular concern are exotic plants that alter disturbance regimes. Exotic annual grasses are believed to increase wildfire frequency to the detriment of nativ...

  6. Recovery of Exotic Alleles in Enhanced Tropical Yellow Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Enhancement of overall diversity levels and the incorporation of new favorable traits are major benefits of using exotic germplasm in elite breeding programs. Agronomic deficiencies and poor adaptation often limits use of exotic germplasm in plant breeding programs. To introgress exotic alleles into...

  7. Recent results on top, bottom and exotic physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, N.M. |

    1993-08-01

    A summary of results from the recently concluded 1991--1993 Tevatron run is presented. Selected topics from b physics and exotic particle searches from the CDF and D0 collaborations are reviewed. Preliminary results from the CDF top search, using 12pb{sup {minus}1} from the 1992--1993 run, are given. In particular, the lepton + b-tag and dilepton analyses are discussed. Preliminary results from the CDF dilepton analysis places a lower limit on the top quark mass of 108GeV/c{sup 2} at the 95% C.L.

  8. Electron microscopy of some exotic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Just about every material has been looked at under the microscope, either out of pure inquisitiveness or the need to relate the microstructure to its properties. Some of these materials are mundane, like steels or glass or polyethylene; others are so-called advanced, such as intermetallics, silicon nitride or zirconia; yet others might be called exotic whether they be martian rocks, high temperature superconductors, fullerenes, diamonds, or the latest thin film device. Many exotic materials are important in Los Alamos, not only weapons materials such as actinides, tritium and explosives, but also civilian materials for energy applications. Here the author will report briefly on plutonium and uranium, on rhenium disilicide, and on Cu-Nb nanolayered composites.

  9. RIB Production at LNL: the EXOTIC Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marco, Mazzocco

    2016-04-01

    Nuclear reactions involving radioactive isotopes are extremely relevant in several astrophysical scenarios, from the Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis to Supernovae explosions. In this contribution the production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) by means of the in-flight technique is reviewed. In particular, the use of direct reactions in inverse kinematics for the production of light weakly-bound RIBs by means of the facility EXOTIC at INFN-LNL (Italy) will be described in detail.

  10. Light exotic systems at relativistic velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, H.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper the results of a series of experiments, carried out at the GSI accelerator facilities in Darmstadt at the Aladin-LAND reaction setup are presented. Light nuclei at relativistic velocities, impinging on a carbon and a liquid hydrogen reaction target break up and all fragments are detected in coincidence. The observed correlations are used to draw conclusions on the underlying structure of the bound exotic projectiles as well as to explore continuum structures.

  11. Exotic leptoquarks from superstring derived models

    SciTech Connect

    Elwood, J.K.; Faraggi, A.E.

    1997-03-01

    The H1 and ZEUS collaborations have recently reported a significant excess of e{sup +}p {r_arrow} e{sup +} jet events at high Q{sup 2}. While there exists insufficient data to conclusively determine the origin of this excess, one possibility is that it is due to a new leptoquark at mass scale around 200 GeV. We examine the type of leptoquark states that exist in superstring derived standard-like models, and show that, while these models may contain the standard leptoquark states which exist in Grand Unified Theories, they also generically contain new and exotic leptoquark states with fractional lepton number, {+-}1/2. In contrast to the traditional GUT-type leptoquark states, the couplings of the exotic leptoquarks to the Standard Model states are generated after the breaking of U(1){sub B-L}. This important feature of the exotic leptoquark states may result in local discrete symmetries which forbid some of the undesired leptoquark couplings. We examine these couplings in several models and study the phenomenological implications. The flavor symmetries of the superstring models are found to naturally suppress leptoquark flavor changing processes.

  12. Infectious threats from exotic pets: dermatological implications.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Ted; Jablon, Jennifer

    2003-04-01

    Zoonoses are diseases that can be transmitted from animals to humans. More than 250 distinct zoonoses have been described in the literature. It is estimated that 56% of United States households contain at least one pet, and although considerable research has been performed regarding the more common household animals including dogs, cats, small birds, and rodents, surprisingly little is known about the zoonotic hazards of owning the more exotic pets. According to the 1997 USPHS/IDSA Report on the Prevention of Opportunistic Infections in Persons Infected with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, the immunocompromised patient should avoid contact with feces-laden soil, litter boxes, reptiles, most pet birds, and any animal less than 6 months old . It has also been documented that because of their inquisitive nature, children are at even higher risk for infection from animals than adolescents or immunocompetent adults. In this article the authors have reviewed the available data regarding hazards associated with the hedgehog, flying squirrel, iguana, chinchilla, and cockatoo. With the growing popularity of such exotic pets, further observation and research is warranted. Physicians need to be aware of the possibility of zoonotic disease related to exotic pet ownership, and they should address this issue when obtaining a history and formulating a differential diagnosis of cutaneous lesions suggestive of such illnesses. PMID:12757244

  13. Exotic Forms of Silicon for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, P. Craig

    2015-03-01

    Over the last few decades many exotic forms of carbon, such as carbon-60, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have generated novel scientific discoveries and revolutionized many important applications. Similar potentially transformative breakthroughs may be expected with exotic forms of silicon. Such structures include, but are not necessarily limited to, (1) those formed under high pressure that are metastable at ambient pressure, (2) single layers of Si (silicene), (2) clathrate Si, which has been studied for superconducting and thermoelectric properties but not in any detail for semiconductor applications, (3) nanostructured forms of Si (nanodots and nanowires), including those composed of diamond Si, (4) porous Si, and (5) any other structures that differ in their structural, optical or electronic properties from bulk diamond Si. Silicon is an abundant, non-toxic element around which an advanced technology exists for semiconducting devices based on diamond Si. One of these exotic forms of Si could form the basis for the next revolution in electronics or even opto-electronics, since some forms exhibit direct, or nearly direct, band gaps. Recent results toward producing pure and dopable semiconductors out of Si nanodots imbedded in amorphous matrices and in clathrate Si and clathrate Si-Ge alloys will be discussed. The author acknowledges important collaborations with R. T. Collins, C. A. Koh, L. Krishna, M. Lusk, and P. Stradins. DOE SUNSHOT program, under Contract DE-EE0005326 and by the NSF MRSEC program under Grant DMR-0820518.

  14. Pentaquark Searches With CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Tedeschi

    2006-02-01

    The production of a possible, exotic S=1 pentaquarks off protons and neutrons is being investigated in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. Three dedicated experiments have been carried out to search for pentaquark signals using the CLAS detector in conjunction with a photon beam incident on hydrogen and deuterium targets. The status of on-going analyses and preliminary results from a variety of channels are presented.

  15. Search for hybrids

    SciTech Connect

    Amsler, C.; Armstrong, D.S.; Augustin, I.; Baker, C.A.; Barnett, B.M.; Batty, C.J.; Beuchert, K.; Birien, P.; Bistirlich, J.; Bluem, P.

    1994-09-01

    The existence of exotic states that do not fit into the picture of q{bar q}-mesons is still an unanswered question of QCD. Proton-antiproton annhiliation at higher momenta might be a promising source in the search for such states. This report shows the first results obtained using the Crystal Barrel detector system at LEAR (CERN) at an antiproton beam momentum of 1940 MeV/c. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Exotic snakes are not always found in exotic places: how poison centres can assist emergency departments

    PubMed Central

    Lubich, Carol; Krenzelok, Edward P

    2009-01-01

    Emergency departments throughout the USA may have some familiarity with the management of envenomation from indigenous snake species such as Crotalinae (rattlesnakes) and Micrurus (coral snakes). However, venomous species may include exotic reptiles whose bites pose substantial treatment challenges due to both a lack of experience and the difficulty in obtaining antivenoms. Two pet cobra envenomation incidents illustrate the challenges that face emergency departments, especially in urban settings, that are confronted with these exposures. It is important for emergency departments to be aware of the large underground presence of exotic venomous reptile pets and to utilise the expertise of regional poison centres that will also assist in the procurement of exotic antivenoms. PMID:21686401

  17. Mitigating exotic impacts: restoring deer mouse populations elevated by an exotic food subsidy.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Dean E; Fletcher, Robert J

    2008-03-01

    The threat posed by exotic organisms to native systems has led to extensive research on exotic invaders, yet management of invasives has progressed relatively slowly. This is partly due to poor understanding of how exotic species management influences native organisms. To address this shortfall, we experimentally evaluated the efficacy of an invasives management tool for restoring native deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) populations elevated by exotic species. The exotic insects, Urophora spp., were introduced in North America for biological control of the Eurasian invader, spotted knapweed (Centaurea maculosa), but instead of controlling C. maculosa, Urophora have become an important food resource that doubles P. maniculatus populations, with substantial indirect effects on other organisms. We hypothesized that herbicide suppression of Urophora's host plant would reduce the Urophora food resource and restore P. maniculatus populations to natural levels. Prior to treatment, mouse populations did not differ between controls and treatments, but following treatment, P. maniculatus were half as abundant where treatment reduced Urophora. Peromyscus maniculatus is insensitive to direct herbicide effects, and herbicide-induced habitat changes could not explain the P. maniculatus response. Treatment-induced reductions of the Urophora food resource offered the most parsimonious explanation for the mouse response: Multistate mark-recapture models indicated that P. maniculatus survival declined where Urophora were removed, and survival rates were more correlated with variation in population size than movement rates. Other demographic and reproductive parameters (sex ratios, reproductive status, pregnancy rates, and juvenile recruitment) were unaffected by treatment. These results suggest the Urophora biocontrol elevated P. maniculatus survival, and the herbicide treatment restored mouse populations by removing the exotic food and reducing survival. This work illustrates the

  18. Super-Heavy Element and Other Exotic Nuclei Research at LLNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyer, M. A.

    2015-11-01

    The experimental nuclear physics group at LLNL is actively investigating exotic nuclei in a variety of regions of the chart of nuclides - from light nuclei to super-heavy elements. The experimental nuclear physics effort at LLNL is centered on investigating nuclei at the extremes--in particular, extremes of spin, isospin, neutron richness, excitation energy, decay and detectability, mass, and stability. This talk will focus on recent heavy and super-heavy element experiments including nuclear structure investigations of the heaviest nuclei. Other areas of research, including radioactive ion beam experiments, trapping experiments, nuclear decay spectroscopy experiments, and rare decay searches, will be discussed as time permits. Recent experimental results on studies of exotic nuclei by scientists at LLNL will be presented.

  19. Search for glueballs

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.

    1997-06-01

    In these Summer School lectures, the author reviews the results of recent glueball searches. He begins with a brief review of glueball phenomenology and meson spectroscopy, including a discussion of resonance behavior. The results on the f{sub o}(1500) and f{sub J}(1700) resonances from proton-antiproton experiments and radiative J/{Psi} decays are discussed. Finally, {pi}{pi} and {eta}{pi} studies from D{sub s} decays and exotic meson searches are reviewed. 46 refs., 40 figs.

  20. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cheng, Hsin -Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-14

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ~ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of themore » model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. As a result, depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ~ 2.5 TeV at the LHC and beyond 10 TeV at a future 100 TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.« less

  1. Exotic quarks in Twin Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Jung, Sunghoon; Salvioni, Ennio; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-03-01

    The Twin Higgs model provides a natural theory for the electroweak symmetry breaking without the need of new particles carrying the standard model gauge charges below a few TeV. In the low energy theory, the only probe comes from the mixing of the Higgs fields in the standard model and twin sectors. However, an ultraviolet completion is required below ˜ 10 TeV to remove residual logarithmic divergences. In non-supersymmetric completions, new exotic fermions charged under both the standard model and twin gauge symmetries have to be present to accompany the top quark, thus providing a high energy probe of the model. Some of them carry standard model color, and may therefore be copiously produced at current or future hadron colliders. Once produced, these exotic quarks can decay into a top together with twin sector particles. If the twin sector particles escape the detection, we have the irreducible stop-like signals. On the other hand, some twin sector particles may decay back into the standard model particles with long lifetimes, giving spectacular displaced vertex signals in combination with the prompt top quarks. This happens in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario with typical parameters, and sometimes is even necessary for cosmological reasons. We study the potential displaced vertex signals from the decays of the twin bottomonia, twin glueballs, and twin leptons in the Fraternal Twin Higgs scenario. Depending on the details of the twin sector, the exotic quarks may be probed up to ˜ 2.5TeV at the LHC and beyond 10TeV at a future 100TeV collider, providing a strong test of this class of ultraviolet completions.

  2. Big brake singularity is accommodated as an exotic quintessence field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chimento, Luis P.; Richarte, Martín G.

    2016-02-01

    We describe a big brake singularity in terms of a modified Chaplygin gas equation of state p =(γm-1 )ρ +α γmρ-n, accommodate this late-time event as an exotic quintessence model obtained from an energy-momentum tensor, and focus on the cosmological behavior of the exotic field, its kinetic energy, and the potential energy. At the background level the exotic field does not blow up, whereas its kinetic energy and potential both grow without limit near the future singularity. We evaluate the classical stability of this background solution by examining the scalar perturbations of the metric along with the inclusion of entropy perturbation in the perturbed pressure. Within the Newtonian gauge, the gravitational field approaches a constant near the singularity plus additional regular terms. When the perturbed exotic field is associated with α >0 the perturbed pressure and contrast density both diverge, whereas the perturbed exotic field and the divergence of the exotic field's velocity go to zero exponentially. When the perturbed exotic field is associated with α <0 the contrast density always blows up, but the perturbed pressure can remain bounded. In addition, the perturbed exotic field and the divergence of the exotic field's velocity vanish near the big brake singularity. We also briefly look at the behavior of the intrinsic entropy perturbation near the singular event.

  3. Relativistic Mean Field description of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.

    1994-03-01

    The Relativistic Mean Field (RMF) approach which essentially is an extension of the original σ — ω model of Walecka, has been applied to exotic nuclei as an illustration. We consider nuclei near Z = 34 in the very interesting 2p-1f region. The calculated binding energies, root mean square radii, deformations and other observables are very satisfactory and are in accordance with the experiment (where available) and also with the available empirical studies. Large deformations and shape co-existence are obtained for several cases.

  4. Global analysis of fermion mixing with exotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nardi, Enrico; Roulet, Esteban; Tommasini, Daniele

    1991-01-01

    The limits are analyzed on deviation of the lepton and quark weak-couplings from their standard model values in a general class of models where the known fermions are allowed to mix with new heavy particles with exotic SU(2) x U(1) quantum number assignments (left-handed singlets or right-handed doublets). These mixings appear in many extensions of the electroweak theory such as models with mirror fermions, E(sub 6) models, etc. The results update previous analyses and improve considerably the existing bounds.

  5. Physics of Exotic Nuclei at RIBF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2014-09-01

    ``Exotic nuclei'' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in the universe. Efforts have been made to produce and investigate such exotic nuclei at the accelerator facilities in the world. One of the facilities, the Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF) facility at RIKEN, Japan has delivered intense radioactive isotope (RI) beams since 2007. In US, the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams is being constructed to start around 2020. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, the RIBF facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The Super-conducting Ring Cyclotron delivers a 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. An inflight separator BigRIPS was designed to collect about 50% of fission fragments produced at the target and separate nuclei of interest. The RI beams produced at BigRIPS are then delivered to several experimental devices. Large-scale international collaborations have been formed at three spectrometers to conduct unique programs for the investigation of decay properties single particle orbits, collective motions, nucleon correlation, and the equation-of-state of asymmetric nuclear matter. Nuclear binding energy will be measured at a newly constructed ring for the r-process path, and charge distribution of exotic nuclei will be examined at a unique setup of an RI target section in an electron storage ring. Ultra slow RI beams available at a gas catcher system will be utilized for table-top and high precision measurements. In this talk, I would give a facility overview of RIBF, and introduce objectives at RIBF. Special emphasis would be given to selected recent highlights

  6. Monitoring two native Spodoptera species using an exotic pheromone lure developed for an exotic species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pheromone lure for the exotic species Spodoptera exempta was successful at attracting two native species, S. latifascia and S. albula. Trapping was conducted in north-central Florida and in southern Texas. Large numbers of both native species were collected throughout the season....

  7. Existence of Exotic Torus Isomer States and Their Precession Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Takatoshi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Maruhn, Joachim A.; Itagaki, Naoyuki

    We systematically investigate the existence of exotic high-spin torus isomers and their precession motions for a series of N = Z even-even nuclei from 28Si to 56Ni. For this purpose, we use the cranked three-dimensional Hatree-Fock (HF) method in a systematic search for high-spin torus isomers and the three-dimensional time-dependent Hatree-Fock (TDHF) method for describing the precession motion of the torus isomer. We obtain high-spin torus isomers in 36Ar, 40Ca, 44Ti, 48Cr, and 52Fe. The emergence of the torus isomers is associated with the alignments of single-particle angular momenta, which is the same mechanism as found in 40Ca. We find that all the obtained torus isomers execute the precession motion at least two rotational periods. The moment of inertia about a perpendicular axis, which characterizes the precession motion, is found to be close to the classical rigid-body value.

  8. Education and Feminist Aesthetics: Gauguin and the Exotic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duran, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Throughout this article, the author argued that the attraction of the "exotic" for Gauguin was largely revealed by his response to the women of various locales and that two notions--that of the "feminine" and the "foreign" or exotic--became intertwined for him. She relied both upon the commentary of Britt Salvesen with respect to Gauguin's obvious…

  9. Resources for Teaching and Learning about Exotic Species. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyonyong; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    Exotic species are organisms transported by humans, wildlife, wind, and water into regions where they did not historically exist. This ERIC Digest describes available materials and resources for teaching and learning about these exotic species. Sixteen Internet sources are provided along with six videotape resources. The digest also provides…

  10. Fire management to prevent and control exotic annual grass invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of fire is often a critical component of exotic plant prevention and control. It is especially important in the sagebrush ecosystem where exotic annual grasses are spreading rapidly. Historically, in the sagebrush ecosystem, infrequent fires shifted vegetation dominance from sagebrush t...

  11. Fire management to prevent and control exotic annual grass invasion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of fire is often a critical component of exotic plant prevention and control. It is especially important in the sagebrush ecosystem where exotic annual grasses are spreading rapidly. Historically, in the sagebrush ecosystem, infrequent fires shifted vegetation dominance from sagebrush to ...

  12. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Supersymmetry, New Phenomena Research of the CDF Exotics Group

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Exotics group searches for Supersymmetry and other New Phenomena. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  13. Electroweak baryogenesis from exotic electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, Nikita; Kozaczuk, Jonathan; Morrissey, David E.; Tamarit, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    We investigate scenarios in which electroweak baryogenesis can occur during an exotic stage of electroweak symmetry breaking in the early Universe. This transition is driven by the expectation value of a new electroweak scalar instead of the standard Higgs field. A later, second transition then takes the system to the usual electroweak minimum, dominated by the Higgs boson, while preserving the baryon asymmetry created in the first transition. We discuss the general requirements for such a two-stage electroweak transition to be suitable for electroweak baryogenesis and present a toy model that illustrates the necessary ingredients. We then apply these results to construct an explicit realization of this scenario within the inert two Higgs doublet model. Despite decoupling the Higgs from the symmetry-breaking transition required for electroweak baryogenesis, we find that this picture generically predicts new light states that are accessible experimentally.

  14. Probing Exotic Physics With Supernova Neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    Kelso, Chris; Hooper, Dan

    2010-09-01

    Future galactic supernovae will provide an extremely long baseline for studying the properties and interactions of neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the possibility of using such an event to constrain (or discover) the effects of exotic physics in scenarios that are not currently constrained and are not accessible with reactor or solar neutrino experiments. In particular, we focus on the cases of neutrino decay and quantum decoherence. We calculate the expected signal from a core-collapse supernova in both current and future water Cerenkov, scintillating, and liquid argon detectors, and find that such observations will be capable of distinguishing between many of these scenarios. Additionally, future detectors will be capable of making strong, model-independent conclusions by examining events associated with a galactic supernova's neutronization burst.

  15. The Exotic Exchange of Smoke Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemi, A. J.

    Smoke rings are fascinating, to humans and animals alike.Experienced cigarette smokers blow them for entertainment while dolphins play with air-filled underwater rings that they know how to puff.~Smoke ring machines can be bought from science gadget shops and Lord Kelvin explains in a paper [Lord Kelvin, Proceedings of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Vol. VI (1867), p. 94; reprinted in Philos. Mag. Vol. XXXIV (1867), p.~15] how one can be constructed from a cardboard box. Even Mount Etna [http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/696953.stm] and our Sun [http://spacescience.com/headlines/y2000/ast03feb_1.htm] are known to be sources of huge smoke rings. But a smoke ring is not only fun to watch. It is also an organized structure with the ability to engage in complex acts, best exemplified by the leapfrogging motion of two smoke rings. Here we propose that the leapfrogging actually encodes very important Physics: It is a direct three dimensional generalization of the motion that in the two dimensional context is responsible for exotic exchange statistics which rules the properties of structures and materials such as quantum Hall systems and high-temperature superconductors. By employing very simple and universal concepts with roots in the hydrodynamical Euler equation, the universal law that describes the properties of fluids and gases, we argue that three dimensional exotic exchange statistics is commonplace. Our observations could have far reaching consequences in fluids and gases which are subject to the laws of quantum mechanics, from helium supefluids to Bose-Einstein condensed alkali gases and even metallic hydrogen in its liquid phases.

  16. EDITORIAL: Focus on Superconductors with Exotic Symmetries FOCUS ON SUPERCONDUCTORS WITH EXOTIC SYMMETRIES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, T. Maurice; Sigrist, Manfred; Maeno, Yoshiteru

    2009-05-01

    Superconductors can usefully be divided into two classes, those that are well described by the classic Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) theory and its extensions and those which require a different microscopic description. The BCS theory of superconductivity solved the long standing mystery of this spectacular phenomenon and described all superconductors that were known when it was formulated in the 1950s. The key ingredient is an attractive interaction generated by the exchange of phonons between electrons which overcomes a Coulomb repulsion weakened by screening, to give a net attractive force on the low energy scale. In this case the simplest s-wave pairing always maximises the energy gain. There were speculations a little later that other types of electron pairing could be possible, but it took a quarter of a century until the first signs of superconductors with different and exotic pairing appeared. In the intervening thirty years many superconductors with exotic pairing have been and continue to be discovered and the study of their superconductivity has grown into a major subfield of condensed matter physics today. The importance of these exotic superconductors with unconventional symmetry is that their pairing is of electronic origin. As a result they are freed from the restrictions of low transition temperatures that go along with the phonon driven conventional superconductors. However in two of the main classes of the exotic superconductors, namely heavy fermion and organic superconductors, the intrinsic energy scales are very small leading to low temperature scales. The third class contains the small number of superconducting transition metal compounds with exotic pairing symmetry. The most studied of these are the high-Tc cuprates, the newly discovered iron pnictides and strontium ruthenate which is closely related to superfluid 3He. Although the basic electronic structure of these materials is well understood, the origin of the pairing is more complex

  17. Ecosystem engineers modulate exotic invasions in riparian plant communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corenblit, D.; Tabacchi, E.; Steiger, J.; Gonzales, E.; Planty-Tabacchi, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and invasibility of exotic plant species within different environments and at different spatial scales is still being discussed amongst scientists. In this study, patterns of native and exotic plant species richness and cover were examined in relation with ecosystem engineer effects of pioneer vegetation within the active tract of the Mediterranean gravel bed river Tech, South France. The floristic composition was characterized according to two distinct vegetation types corresponding to two habitats with contrasted conditions: (i) open and exposed alluvial bars dominated by herbaceous communities and (ii) islands and river margins partly stabilized by ecosystem engineer plants, disconnected from annual hydrogeomorphic disturbances, and covered by woody vegetation. A significant positive correlation between exotic and native plant species richness and cover was observed for the herbaceous and the woody types, indicating that both native and exotic richness benefit from the prevailing environmental conditions. However, significant differences in native and exotic specific richness and cover were found between these two vegetation types. Higher values of total species richness and Shannon diversity of native and exotic species were attained within the herbaceous vegetation type compared to the woody type. These differences may be related to changes in local exposure to hydrogeomorphic disturbances driven by engineer plant species, and to vegetation succession. A lower exotic cover within the woody vegetation type compared to the herbaceous type suggested an increase of resistance to invasion by exotic species during the biogeomorphic succession. The engineer effects of woody vegetation resulted in a decrease of alpha (α) diversity at patch scale but, in parallel, caused an increase in gamma (γ) diversity at the scale of the studied river segment. Our study corroborates recent investigations that support the theory of biotic

  18. Role of GNOME in dark-matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustelny, Szymon; Pospelov, Maxim; Ledbetter, Micah; Jackson Kimball, Derek; Gawlik, Wojciech; Budker, Dmitry; Wlodarczyk, Przemyslaw; Smith, Joshua; Read, Jocelyn; Pankow, Chris; Gnome Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    We present a novel scheme for exotic-interaction searches. The scheme enables detection of short-time interaction between spins and other objects, whose signatures in traditional studies are buried in noise or cannot be singled out from instrumental artifacts. These short signals may, for example, arise, when spins interact with a jet of exotic particles or go through a non-uniform scalar field. It is shown that their detection is possible with synchronous measurements of readouts of at least five spatially separated devices, whose readouts are correlated. The application of a new scheme is demonstrated based on an example of Global Network of Optical Magnetometers for Exotic physics (GNOME).

  19. Issues and Opportunities in Exotic Hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briceño, R. A.; Cohen, T. D.; Coito, S.; Dudek, J. J.; Eichten, E.; Fischer, C. S.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Jackura, A.; Kornicer, M.; Krein, G.; Lebed, R. F.; Machado, F. A.; Mitchell, R. E.; Morningstar, C. J.; Peardon, M.; Pennington, M. R.; Peters, K.; Richard, J. M.; Shen, C. P.; Shepherd, M. R.; Skwarnicki, T.; Swanson, E. S.; Szczepaniak, A. P.; Yuan, C. Z.

    2016-04-01

    The last few years have been witness to a proliferation of new results concerning heavy exotic hadrons. Experimentally, many new signals have been discovered that could be pointing towards the existence of tetraquarks, pentaquarks, and other exotic configurations of quarks and gluons. Theoretically, advances in lattice field theory techniques place us at the cusp of understanding complex coupled-channel phenomena, modelling grows more sophisticated, and effective field theories are being applied to an ever greater range of situations. It is thus an opportune time to evaluate the status of the field. In the following, a series of high priority experimental and theoretical issues concerning heavy exotic hadrons is presented. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy (Cohen); the Institute of Modern Physics and Chinese Academy of Sciences under contract Y104160YQ0 and agreement No. 2015-BH-02 (Coito); the U.S. Department of Energy, for grant DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC, manages and operates Jefferson Laboratory and DE-SC0006765, Early Career award (Dudek); Fermilab, operated by the Fermi Research Alliance under contract number DEAC02-07CH11359 with the U.S. Department of Energy (Eichten); BMBF, under contract No. 06GI7121, and the DAAD under contract No. 56889822 and by the Helmholtz International Center for FAIR within the LOEWE program of the State of Hesse (Fischer); the German Research Foundation DFG under contract number Collaborative Research Centre CRC-1044 (Gradl); the Conselho Nacional de Desenvolvimento Científico e Tecnológico - CNPq, Grant No. 305894/2009-9 and Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, Grant No. 2013/01907-0 (Krein); U.S. National Science Foundation, under grants PHY-1068286 and PHY-1403891 (Lebed); the Brazilian National Council for Scientific and Technological Development under grant CNPq/CAPES-208188/2014-2 (Machado); U.S. Department of Energy under grant DE-FG02-05ER41374

  20. Exotic particles with four or more quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, Stephen Lars

    2014-09-01

    The familiar denizens of the particle zoo are made of two or three quarks, but particle theory allows for states comprising any number of those fundamental particles. Finally, after decades of searching, tetraquarks seem to have been spotted.

  1. The 1 AU region around M-dwarfs as a habitable zone for exotic life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunine, J. I.

    2009-12-01

    A stringent test for the hypothesis that life is a general outcome of suitable physical and chemical processes is to search for life in planetary environments very different from that on Earth. Saturn’s moon Titan is one such target where hydrocarbon seas might host an exotic type of life. Further, Titan represents a planetary environment potentially abundant throughout the cosmos, because its effective temperature corresponds to that experienced by a body orbiting ~1 AU from a late M-dwarf, and suitable for direct spectroscopic study. Unlike the classical liquid-water habitable zone at ~0.1 AU from an M-dwarf, where tidal locking and effects of flares render habitability doubtful, the 1 AU zone is much less severe. A search for rocky/icy exoplanets with methane-rich atmospheres at appropriate distances from M-dwarfs--the cosmos' most abundant main sequence type-- would put exploration of Titan in a cosmic context.

  2. 9 CFR 352.3 - Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.3 Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application by official exotic...

  3. 9 CFR 352.3 - Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.3 Application by official exotic animal establishment for inspection services... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application by official exotic...

  4. Bio-Invasions: The Spread of Exotic Species.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bright, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Human mobility has radically increased the rate at which large numbers of living things are moving from one ecosystem to another. Discusses how ecosystems change when "exotic" species invade natural communities and notes efforts to control adverse effects. (LZ)

  5. Exotic grasslands on reclaimed midwestern coal mines: An ornithological perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.E.; Lima, S.L.

    2004-07-01

    The largest grasslands in Indiana and Illinois are on reclaimed surface coal mines, which are numerous in the Illinois Coal Basin. The reclamation goal of establishing a vegetation cover with inexpensive, hardy exotic grass species (e.g., tall fescue, smooth brome) inadvertently created persistent, large grassland bird refuges. We review research documenting the importance of these sites for native prairie birds. On mines, grassland specialist birds (restricted to grassland throughout their range) prefer sites dominated by exotic grasses to those rich in forbs, whereas nonspecialist bird species show no significant preference. Midwestern mine grasslands potentially could be converted into landscapes that include native warm-season grasses and forbs adapted to the relatively dry, poor soil conditions, in addition to the present successful exotic grass stands. A key question is whether native mixtures will resist conversion to forb-rich or woody growth over the long term, as the exotic grasses have done.

  6. Pentaquark searches at HERMES

    SciTech Connect

    Airapetian, Avetik

    2005-10-06

    An experimental search for exotic baryons was performed with the HERMES experiment at DESY in quasi-real photoproduction. Positive evidence is presented for a {theta}+ at a mass of 1528 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.1 (sys) MeV. No evidence for possible {theta}++, {xi}--(1860) and {xi}0(1860) resonances was found, instead, upper limits for their production cross section are given. In addition, photoproduction crosssections for the {lambda}(1520) and {xi}0(1530) resonances are presented, because they have similar decay modes as the {theta}++ and {xi}-- (1860), respectively.

  7. Pentaquark searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Litvintsev, Dmitry O.; Fermilab

    2004-10-01

    Recently there has been revival of interest in exotic baryon spectroscopy triggered by experimental evidence for pentaquarks containing u, d, s and c-quarks. They report results of the searches for pentaquark states in decays to pK{sub S}{sup 0}, {Xi}{sup -} {pi}{sup {+-}} and D*{sup -} p performed at CDF detector using 220 pb{sup -1} sample of p{bar p} interactions at {radical}s of 1.96 TeV. No evidence for narrow resonances were found in either mode.

  8. Controlling the exotic diseases: 2. Nursing management.

    PubMed

    Best, H R; Clayton, A J

    1980-11-01

    Advance planning can facilitate the care of a patient with an exotic disease who is admitted to a hospital that lacks facilities for high-security isolation. The Department of National Health and Welfare contingency plan for dealing with such patients lacks specific information in a number of areas of medical care, as described in this paper. Consideration must be given to the number of personnel trained and readied for employment, the criteria for selection and special preparation. The protective clothing generally used for hospital isolation procedures is inadequate. Several types of special clothing, including a respirator, are available for total protection of personnel; the clothing may be uncomfortable when worn for long periods, and does restrict movement, vision and communication. All persons entering the isolation suite must change into fully protective clothing, and double layers of clothing are required for direct patient care. All personnel must shower and change before leaving the isolation suite. Suitable facilities for dressing and showering, together with entry and exit routines, must be considered. Hand washing, daily cleaning procedures and disposal of liquid and solid wastes all require special procedures. The social and psychologic problems of patients and their families must also be considered. Preplanning is required to decrease the risks involved in monitoring vital signs and implementing emergency procedures requiring contact with the patient's blood. PMID:7437990

  9. Improving Qubit Quality Factors Through Exotic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Victoria

    In the time since the first qubits were successfully fabricated, the coherence times of superconducting Josephson junction qubits have improved by several orders of magnitude. Yet as the quantum information and computation field moves forward, these coherence times still need further improvement. We are now finding that in some superconducting systems, non-thermal equilibrium quasiparticles are becoming the limiting factor in qubit lifetimes. For SIS superconducting qubits, the T1 and T2* values may be improved by the use of materials with higher superconducting band gap, EG, for which low values may allow for quasiparticles to break up cooper pairs more easily, leading to a shorter lifetime. At this time, Al-Al2Ox3-Al transmons are very well characterized and understood and will therefore serve as an appropriate baseline with which to compare the more exotic junction materials. Using tantalum and niobium, which have Eg values of 3 times and 10 times that of aluminum respectively, we expect the T1 and T2* values to increase significantly for the Al-Al2Ox3-Nb, Al-Al2Ox3-Ta, and Ta-Ta2Ox5-Nb qubits.

  10. Using exotic atoms to keep borders safe

    SciTech Connect

    Jason, A; Miyadera, H; Esch, E I; Hoteling, N J; Adelmann, A; Heffner, R H; Green, A; Olsthoorn, J; Stocki, T J

    2010-01-01

    Muons, created by a particle accelerator, can be used to scan cargo for special nuclear materials (SNM). These muons exist long enough and are penetrating enough that they can be used to actively scan cargo to ensure the non-proliferation of SNM. A set of 'proof-of-concept' experiments have been performed to show that active muon analysis can be used. Experiments were performed at high intensity, medium energy particle accelerators (TRIUMF and PSI). Negative muons form exotic atoms with one electron replaced by the muon. Since the muon is captured in an excited state, it will give off x-rays which can be detected by high purity germanium detectors. These characteristic x-rays can be used to identify the nuclide. The muonic x-rays corresponding to the SNM of interest have been measured, even with the use of various shielding configurations composed of lead, iron, polyethylene, or fiberglass. These preliminary results show that muons can be successfully used to find shielded SNM. The safety of North Americans can be protected by the use of this technology.

  11. Exotic differentiable structures and general relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brans, Carl H.; Randall, Duane

    1993-02-01

    We review recent developments in differential topology with special concern for their possible significance to physical theories, especially general relativity. In particular we are concerned here with the discovery of the existence of non-standard (“fake” or “exotic”) differentiable structures on topologically simple manifolds such asS 7, ℝ4 andS 3 X ℝ1. Because of the technical difficulties involved in the smooth case, we begin with an easily understood toy example looking at the role which the choice of complex structures plays in the formulation of two-dimensional vacuum electrostatics. We then briefly review the mathematical formalisms involved with differentiable structures on topological manifolds, diffeomorphisms and their significance for physics. We summarize the important work of Milnor, Freedman, Donaldson, and others in developing exotic differentiable structures on well known topological manifolds. Finally, we discuss some of the geometric implications of these results and propose some conjectures on possible physical implications of these new manifolds which have never before been considered as physical models.

  12. Exotic muon decays and the KARMEN anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gninenko, S. N.; Krasnikov, N. V.

    1998-08-01

    An anomaly in time distribution of neutrinos from the ISIS pulsed beam stop source observed by the KARMEN collaboration is discussed. We show that the anomaly can be interpreted as a superposition of two exponentials, both having time constants consistent with the μ+ lifetime of 2.2 μs. It is assumed that they both originate from muon decays at rest. One of them describes the time distribution of the prompt neutrino events, while the other describes the time distribution of events from delayed decays of slowly moving (β~=0.02) particles in the KARMEN calorimeter. We propose here that these particles are produced in exotic decays of positive muons μ+-->e++X, resulting in the second exponential time distribution shifted by the time of flight with respect to the time distribution of neutrino events. This model gives an acceptable fit to the KARMEN data if X has a mass of 103.9 MeV. The possible decay modes of this new massive neutral particle are discussed. This hypothesis can be experimentally tested in the near future by studying the low energy part of the e+ spectrum in the μ+ decays.

  13. Highly excited and exotic meson spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2011-05-01

    I will discuss recent progress in extracting highly excited and exotic meson spectra using lattice QCD. New results in the light meson sector will be presented, where a combination of techniques have enabled us to confidently identify the spin of extracted states. Highlights include many states with exotic quantum numbers and, for the first time in a lattice QCD calculation, spin-four states. I will conclude with comments on future prospects.

  14. The mass formula for an exotic BTZ black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baocheng

    2016-04-01

    An exotic Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) black hole has an angular momentum larger than its mass in three dimension (3D), which suggests the possibility that cosmic censorship could be violated if angular momentum is extracted by the Penrose process. In this paper, we propose a mass formula for the exotic BTZ black hole and show no violation of weak cosmic censorship in the gedanken process above by understanding properly its mass formula. Unlike the other black holes, the total energy of the exotic BTZ black hole is represented by the angular momentum instead of the mass, which supports a basic point of view that the same geometry should be determined by the same energy in 3D general relativity whose equation of motion can be given either by normal 3D Einstein gravity or by exotic 3D Einstein gravity. However, only the mass of the exotic black hole is related to the thermodynamics and other forms of energy are "dumb", which is consistent with the earlier thermodynamic analysis about exotic black holes.

  15. Effects of exotic species on Yellowstone's grizzly bears

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinhart, D.P.; Haroldson, Mark A.; Mattson, D.J.; Gunther, Kerry A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans have affected grizzly bears (Ursus arctos horribilis) by direct mortality, competition for space and resources, and introduction of exotic species. Exotic organisms that have affected grizzly bears in the Greater Yellowstone Area include common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), nonnative clovers (Trifolium spp.), domesticated livestock, bovine brucellosis (Brucella abortus), lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and white pine blister rust (Cronartium ribicola). Some bears consume substantial amounts of dandelion and clover. However, these exotic foods provide little digested energy compared to higher-quality bear foods. Domestic livestock are of greater energetic value, but use of this food by bears often leads to conflicts with humans and subsequent increases in bear mortality. Lake trout, blister rust, and brucellosis diminish grizzly bears foods. Lake trout prey on native cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii) in Yellowstone Lake; white pine blister rust has the potential to destroy native whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) stands; and management response to bovine brucellosis, a disease found in the Yellowstone bison (Bison bison) and elk (Cervus elaphus), could reduce populations of these 2 species. Exotic species will likely cause more harm than good for Yellowstone grizzly bears. Managers have few options to mitigate or contain the impacts of exotics on Yellowstones grizzly bears. Moreover, their potential negative impacts have only begun to unfold. Exotic species may lead to the loss of substantial highquality grizzly bear foods, including much of the bison, trout, and pine seeds that Yellowstone grizzly bears currently depend upon.

  16. Search for nuclearites with the ANTARES detector

    SciTech Connect

    Pavalas, G. E.

    2010-11-24

    ANTARES is an underwater detector located in the Mediterranean Sea, near the French city of Toulon, dedicated to the search for cosmic neutrinos. ANTARES is optimized to detect the Cherenkov signal from up-going relativistic particles, but could also observe massive exotic objects, such as magnetic monopoles and nuclearites. In this article we present a search strategy for nuclearites and determine the sensitivity to nuclearites of ANTARES detector in complete configuration, using a set of data taken in 2008.

  17. Ticks imported to Europe with exotic reptiles.

    PubMed

    Mihalca, Andrei Daniel

    2015-09-30

    It is known that traded exotic animals carry with them an immense number of associated symbionts, including parasites. Reptiles are no exception. Most of the imported reptiles originate from tropical countries and their possibility to carry potentially dangerous pathogens is high. According to CITES, Europe is currently the main reptile importer in the world. Despite this, there is no review or analysis available for the risk related to the importation of tick-borne diseases with traded reptile to the EU. The main aim of the manuscript is to provide a review on the available literature on ticks introduced to and exchanged between European countries via the live reptile trade. So far, the published reports of ticks imported on reptiles are limited to few European countries: Italy, Poland, Spain, Netherlands, Belgium, Slovenia and UK. The following species have been reported: Hyalomma aegyptium, Amblyomma dissimile, Amblyomma exornatum, Amblyomma flavomaculatum, Amblyomma fuscolineatum, Amblyomma latum, Amblyomma quadricavum, Amblyomma marmoreum, Amblyomma nuttalli, Amblyomma sparsum, Amblyomma sphenodonti, Amblyomma transversale and Amblyomma varanense. The majority of species are of African origin, followed by American and Asian species. All groups of reptiles (chelonians, snakes, lizards, crocodiles, tuataras) were involved. However, it seems that certain groups (i.e. tortoises of genus Testudo, monitor lizards of genus Varanus, snakes of genus Python) are more important as host for imported ticks, but this may be related to higher levels of international trade. Even fewer are the reports of tick-borne pathogens associated with imported reptile ticks. Despite the diversity of tick species reported on imported reptiles, the situations of truly invasive species are atypical and are limited in natural environments to maximum two cases where H. aegyptium was involved. Otherwise, the risk associated with reptile trade for introduction of invasive tick to Europe is low

  18. Exotic Bbb R4 and quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asselmeyer-Maluga, Torsten; Mader, Roland

    2012-02-01

    Recent work on exotic smooth Bbb R4,s, i.e. topological Bbb R4 with exotic differential structure, shows the connection of 4-exotics with the codimension-1 foliations of S3, SU(2) WZW models and twisted K-theory KH(S3), H in H3(S3,Bbb Z). These results made it possible to explicate some physical effects of exotic 4-smoothness. Here we present a relation between exotic smooth Bbb R4 and operator algebras. The correspondence uses the leaf space of the codimension-1 foliation of S3 inducing a von Neumann algebra W(S3) as description. This algebra is a type III1 factor lying at the heart of any observable algebra of QFT. By using the relation to factor II, we showed that the algebra W(S3) can be interpreted as Drinfeld-Turaev deformation quantization of the space of flat SL(2, Bbb C) connections (or holonomies). Thus, we obtain a natural relation to quantum field theory. Finally we discuss the appearance of concrete action functionals for fermions or gauge fields and its connection to quantum-field-theoretical models like the Tree QFT of Rivasseau.

  19. Constraints on Models of the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity using Decays to Bottom-Antibottom Quarks in the Full CDF Data Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; d'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; Devoto, F.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; Donati, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Farrington, S.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Galloni, C.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González López, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucà, A.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Marchese, L.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Pranko, A.; Prokoshin, F.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Redondo Fernández, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Song, H.; Sorin, V.; St. Denis, R.; Stancari, M.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vernieri, C.; Vidal, M.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Zanetti, A. M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity JP=0- and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with JP=2+, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV /c2 . We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=1.96 TeV , and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb-1 . We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV /c2 at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  20. Observation of an exotic baryon with S=+1 in photoproduction from the proton.

    PubMed

    Kubarovsky, V; Guo, L; Weygand, D P; Stoler, P; Battaglieri, M; DeVita, R; Adams, G; Li, Ji; Nozar, M; Salgado, C; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Auger, T; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cetina, C; Chen, S; Ciciani, L; Cole, P L; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Sanctis, E; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Farhi, L; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Frolov, V; Funsten, H; Gaff, S J; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girard, P; Gothe, R; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heimberg, P; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Juengst, H G; Kelley, J H; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuhn, S E; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Longhi, A; Lukashin, K; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mozer, M U; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Nelson, S O; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Opper, A K; Osipenko, M; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Sabourov, K; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, T; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weisberg, A; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J

    2004-01-23

    The reaction gamma p-->pi(+)K(-)K(+)n was studied at Jefferson Laboratory using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S=+1 and mass M=1555+/-10 MeV/c(2) was observed in the nK(+) invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM=26 MeV/c(2)), and its statistical significance is (7.8+/-1.0)sigma. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by the chiral soliton model for the Theta(+) baryon. In addition, the pK(+) invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction gamma p-->K(-)K(+)p with high statistics in search of doubly charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum. PMID:14753864

  1. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale.

    PubMed

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F Jackson

    2015-08-21

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr(+) ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1  eV) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |g(A)(e)g(A)(e)/4πℏc|≤1.2×10(-17). Assuming CPT invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts. PMID:26340180

  2. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  3. Constraints on Exotic Dipole-Dipole Couplings between Electrons at the Micrometer Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Ozeri, Roee; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson

    2015-08-01

    New constraints on exotic dipole-dipole interactions between electrons at the micrometer scale are established, based on a recent measurement of the magnetic interaction between two trapped 88Sr+ ions. For light bosons (mass≤0.1 eV ) we obtain a 90% confidence interval for an axial-vector-mediated interaction strength of |gAegAe/4 π ℏc | ≤1.2 ×10-17 . Assuming C P T invariance, this constraint is compared to that on anomalous electron-positron interactions, derived from positronium hyperfine spectroscopy. We find that the electron-electron constraint is 6 orders of magnitude more stringent than the electron-positron counterpart. Bounds on pseudoscalar-mediated interaction as well as on torsion gravity are also derived and compared with previous work performed at different length scales. Our constraints benefit from the high controllability of the experimental system which contained only two trapped particles. It therefore suggests a useful new platform for exotic particle searches, complementing other experimental efforts.

  4. XMM-Newton closes in on space's exotic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-11-01

    With ESA's space telescope XMM-Newton, they are now closer to testing this idea. For the first time, XMM-Newton has been able to measure the influence of the gravitational field of a neutron star on the light it emits. This measurement provides much better insight into these objects. Neutron stars are among the densest objects in the Universe. They pack the mass of the sun inside a sphere 10 kilometres across. A sugar cube-sized piece of neutron star weighs over a billion tonnes. Neutron stars are the remnants of exploding stars up to eight times more massive than our Sun. They end their life in a supernova explosion and then collapse under their own gravity. Their interiors may therefore contain a very exotic form of matter. Scientists believe that in a neutron star, the density and the temperatures are similar to those existing a fraction of a second after the Big Bang. They assume that when matter is tightly packed as it is in a neutron star, it goes through important changes. Protons, electrons, and neutrons - the components of atoms - fuse together. It is possible that even the building-blocks of protons and neutrons, the so-called quarks, get crushed together, giving rise to a kind of exotic plasma of 'dissolved' matter. How to find out? Scientists have spent decades trying to identify the nature of matter in neutron stars. To do this, they need to know some important parameters very precisely: if you know a star’s mass and radius, or the relationship between them, you can obtain its compactness. However,no instrument has been advanced enough to perform the measurements needed, until now. Thanks to ESA's XMM-Newton observatory, astronomers have been able for the first time to measure the mass-to-radius ratio of a neutron star and obtain the first clues to its composition. These suggest that the neutron star contains normal, non-exotic matter, although they are not conclusive. The authors say this is a “key first step” and they will keep on with the

  5. Search for gluonic excitations in light unconventional mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Eugenio

    2007-07-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenologicalmodels for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by a discussion of plans at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  6. ALPI Setup as the SPES Accelerator of Exotic Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisoffi, G.; Bassato, G.; Battistella, A.; Bermudez, J.; Bortolato, D.; Canella, S.; Chalykh, B.; Comunian, M.; Facco, A.; Fagotti, E.; Galatà, A.; Giacchini, M.; Gramegna, F.; Lamy, T.; Modanese, P.; Palmieri, A.; Pengo, R.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.; Roncolato, C.; Scarpa, D.

    2014-03-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project for a national exotic beam facility in Legnaro includes pivotal upgrades of the existing superconducting linac ALPI (Acceleratore Lineare Per Ioni), to make it appropriate as the RIB (Radioactive Ion Beam) accelerator. The new injector, consisting of an Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR)-type charge breeder and a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ), will be described. Upgrade measures in ALPI to improve beam transmission and final energy, and handle low-intensity RIB will be explained, with the aim of increasing transmission to T > 90%, Ef by ~ 20%, reaching 10 MeV/u for the reference beam 132Sn.

  7. Annihilation physics of exotic galactic dark matter particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1990-01-01

    Various theoretical arguments make exotic heavy neutral weakly interacting fermions, particularly those predicted by supersymmetry theory, attractive candidates for making up the large amount of unseen gravitating mass in galactic halos. Such particles can annihilate with each other, producing secondary particles of cosmic-ray energies, among which are antiprotons, positrons, neutrinos, and gamma-rays. Spectra and fluxes of these annihilation products can be calculated, partly by making use of positron electron collider data and quantum chromodynamic models of particle production derived therefrom. These spectra may provide detectable signatures of exotic particle remnants of the big bang.

  8. More on wormholes supported by small amounts of exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhfittig, Peter K.F.

    2006-04-15

    Recent papers by Fewster and Roman have emphasized that wormholes supported by arbitrarily small amounts of exotic matter will have to be incredibly fine-tuned if they are to be traversable. This paper discusses a wormhole model that strikes a balance between two conflicting requirements, reducing the amount of exotic matter and fine-tuning the metric coefficients, ultimately resulting in an engineering challenge: one requirement can only be met at the expense of the other. The wormhole model is macroscopic and satisfies various traversability criteria.

  9. Exotic plant species invade hot spots of native plant diversity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Binkley, D.; Chong, G.W.; Kalkhan, M.A.; Schell, L.D.; Bull, K.A.; Otsuki, Y.; Newman, G.; Bashkin, M.; Yowhan, S.

    1999-01-01

    Some theories and experimental studies suggest that areas of low plant species richness may be invaded more easily than areas of high plant species richness. We gathered nested-scale vegetation data on plant species richness, foliar cover, and frequency from 200 1-m2 subplots (20 1000-m2 modified-Whittaker plots) in the Colorado Rockies (USA), and 160 1-m2 subplots (16 1000-m2 plots) in the Central Grasslands in Colorado, Wyoming, South Dakota, and Minnesota (USA) to test the generality of this paradigm. At the 1-m2 scale, the paradigm was supported in four prairie types in the Central Grasslands, where exotic species richness declined with increasing plant species richness and cover. At the 1-m2 scale, five forest and meadow vegetation types in the Colorado Rockies contradicted the paradigm; exotic species richness increased with native-plant species richness and foliar cover. At the 1000-m2 plot scale (among vegetation types), 83% of the variance in exotic species richness in the Central Grasslands was explained by the total percentage of nitrogen in the soil and the cover of native plant species. In the Colorado Rockies, 69% of the variance in exotic species richness in 1000-m2 plots was explained by the number of native plant species and the total percentage of soil carbon. At landscape and biome scales, exotic species primarily invaded areas of high species richness in the four Central Grasslands sites and in the five Colorado Rockies vegetation types. For the nine vegetation types in both biomes, exotic species cover was positively correlated with mean foliar cover, mean soil percentage N, and the total number of exotic species. These patterns of invasibility depend on spatial scale, biome and vegetation type, spatial autocorrelation effects, availability of resources, and species-specific responses to grazing and other disturbances. We conclude that: (1) sites high in herbaceous foliar cover and soil fertility, and hot spots of plant diversity (and

  10. Exotic hadron production in a quark combination model

    SciTech Connect

    Han Wei; Shao Fenglan; Li Shiyuan; Shang Yonghui; Yao Tao

    2009-09-15

    The philosophy on production of exotic hadrons (multiquark states) in the framework of the quark combination model is investigated, taking f{sub 0}(980) as an example. The production rate and p{sub T} spectra of f{sub 0}(980) considered as (ss) or (sqsq), respectively, are calculated and compared in Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The unitarity of various combination models, when open for exotic hadron production, is addressed.

  11. JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Papenbrock, Thomas

    2014-05-16

    The grant “JUSTIPEN: Japan US Theory Institute for Physics with Exotic Nuclei ” (DOE DE‐FG02‐06ER41407) ran from 02/01/2006 thru 12/31/2013. JUSTIPEN is a venue for international collaboration between U.S.‐based and Japanese scientists who share an interest in theory of rare isotopes. Since its inception JUSTIPEN has supported many visitors, fostered collaborations between physicists in the U.S. and Japan, and enabled them to deepen our understanding of exotic nuclei and their role in cosmos.

  12. Single particle versus collectivity, shapes of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jungclaus, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    In this article some selected topics of nuclear structure research will be discussed as illustration of the progress reached in this field during the last thirty years. These examples evidence the improvement of our understanding of the atomic nucleus reached on the basis of countless experiments, performed to study both exotic nuclei (nuclei far-off the valley of stability) as well as nuclei under exotic conditions (high excitation energy/temperature or large angular momentum/rotational frequency), using stable and radioactive ion beams. The experimental progress, in parallel to the advancement of modern theoretical descriptions, led us to a much richer view of this fundamental many-body system.

  13. Exotic mesons in /bar N/N annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Dover, C.B.

    1988-01-01

    We investigate the utility of the antinucleon-nucleon (/bar N/N) annihilation process as a means of producing exotic (non /bar Q/Q) mesons. Several examples are considered of J/sup ..pi..//sup C/ exotic formation in the /bar p/p ..-->.. ..pi..X reaction. We emphasize the usefulness of quantum number filtration, achieved by preparing the initial /bar p/p atom in tagged L = 0,1 states and focusing on selected exclusive final states. 36 refs., 4 tabs.

  14. Exotic Paired States with Anisotropic Spin-Dependent Fermi Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Feiguin, Adrian E.; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2009-07-10

    We propose a model for realizing exotic paired states in cold Fermi gases by using a spin-dependent optical lattice to engineer mismatched Fermi surfaces for each hyperfine species. The BCS phase diagram shows a stable paired superfluid state with coexisting pockets of momentum space with gapless unpaired carriers, similar to the Sarma state in polarized mixtures, but in our case the system is unpolarized. We propose the possible existence of an exotic 'Cooper-pair Bose-metal' phase, which has a gap for single fermion excitations but gapless and uncondensed 'Cooper-pair' excitations residing on a 'Bose surface' in momentum space.

  15. Relativistic Energy Density Functionals: Exotic modes of excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Vretenar, D.; Paar, N.; Marketin, T.

    2008-11-11

    The framework of relativistic energy density functionals has been applied to the description of a variety of nuclear structure phenomena, not only in spherical and deformed nuclei along the valley of {beta}-stability, but also in exotic systems with extreme isospin values and close to the particle drip-lines. Dynamical aspects of exotic nuclear structure have been investigated with the relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation. We present results for the evolution of low-lying dipole (pygmy) strength in neutron-rich nuclei, and charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections.

  16. Exotic decays of heavy B quarks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fox, Patrick J.; Tucker-Smith, David

    2016-01-08

    Heavy vector-like quarks of charge –1/3, B, have been searched for at the LHC through the decays B → bZ, bh, tW. In models where the B quark also carries charge under a new gauge group, new decay channels may dominate. We focus on the case where the B is charged under a U(1)' and describe simple models where the dominant decay mode is B → bZ' → b(bb¯¯). With the inclusion of dark matter such models can explain the excess of gamma rays from the Galactic center. We develop a search strategy for this decay chain and estimate thatmore » with integrated luminosity of 300 fb–1 the LHC will have the potential to discover both the B and the Z' for B quarks with mass below ~ 1.6 TeV, for a broad range of Z' masses. Furthermore, a high-luminosity run can extend this reach to 2 TeV.« less

  17. Existence of an exotic torus configuration in high-spin excited states of 40Ca.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, T; Maruhn, J A; Itagaki, N; Matsuyanagi, K; Reinhard, P-G; Ohkubo, S

    2012-12-01

    We investigate the possibility of the existence of the exotic torus configuration in the high-spin excited states of (40)Ca. We here consider the spin alignments about the symmetry axis. To this end, we use a three-dimensional cranked Skyrme Hartree-Fock method and search for stable single-particle configurations. We find one stable state with the torus configuration at the total angular momentum J=60 ħ and an excitation energy of about 170 MeV in all calculations using various Skyrme interactions. The total angular momentum J=60 ħ consists of aligned 12 nucleons with the orbital angular momenta Λ=+4, +5, and +6 for spin-up or -down neutrons and protons. The obtained results strongly suggest that a macroscopic amount of circulating current breaking the time-reversal symmetry emerges in the high-spin excited state of (40)Ca. PMID:23368188

  18. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    SciTech Connect

    Seabloom, Eric W.

    2013-08-14

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  19. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seabloom, Eric; Borer, Elizabeth; Buckley, Yvonne; Cleland, Elsa E.; Davies, Kendi; Firn, Jennifer; Harpole, W. Stanley; Hautier, Yann; Lind, Eric M.; MacDougall, Andrew; Orrock, John L.; Prober, Suzanne M.; Adler, Peter; Alberti, Juan; Anderson, T. Michael; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Biederman, Lori A.; Blumenthal, Dana; Brown, Cynthia S.; Brudvig, Lars A.; Caldeira, Maria; Chu, Cheng-Jin; Crawley, Michael J.; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen Ingman; D'Antonio, Carla M.; DeCrappeo, Nicole M.; Dickman, Chris R.; Du, Guozhen; Fay, Philip A.; Frater, Paul; Gruner, Daniel S.; Hagenah, Nicole; Hector, Andrew; Helm, Aveliina; Hillebrand, Helmut; Hofmockel, Kirsten S.; Humphries, Hope C.; Iribarne, Oscar; Jin, Virginia L.; Kay, Adam; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Klein, Julia A.; Knops, Johannes M.H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Ladwig, Laura M.; Lambrinos; John, G.; Leakey, Andrew D.B.; Li, Qi; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca; Melbourne, Brett; Mitchell; Charles, E.; Moore, Joslin L.; Morgan, John; Mortensen, Brent; O'Halloran, Lydia R.; Pärtel, Meelis; Pascual, Jesús; Pyke, David A.; Risch, Anita C.; Salguero-Gómez, Roberto; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Simonsen, Anna; Smith, Melinda; Stevens, Carly; Sullivan, Lauren; Wardle, Glenda M.; Wolkovich, Elizabeth M.; Wragg, Peter D.; Wright, Justin; Yang, Louie

    2013-01-01

    Invasions have increased the size of regional species pools, but are typically assumed to reduce native diversity. However, global-scale tests of this assumption have been elusive because of the focus on exotic species richness, rather than relative abundance. This is problematic because low invader richness can indicate invasion resistance by the native community or, alternatively, dominance by a single exotic species. Here, we used a globally replicated study to quantify relationships between exotic richness and abundance in grass-dominated ecosystems in 13 countries on six continents, ranging from salt marshes to alpine tundra. We tested effects of human land use, native community diversity, herbivore pressure, and nutrient limitation on exotic plant dominance. Despite its widespread use, exotic richness was a poor proxy for exotic dominance at low exotic richness, because sites that contained few exotic species ranged from relatively pristine (low exotic richness and cover) to almost completely exotic-dominated ones (low exotic richness but high exotic cover). Both exotic cover and richness were predicted by native plant diversity (native grass richness) and land use (distance to cultivation). Although climate was important for predicting both exotic cover and richness, climatic factors predicting cover (precipitation variability) differed from those predicting richness (maximum temperature and mean temperature in the wettest quarter). Herbivory and nutrient limitation did not predict exotic richness or cover. Exotic dominance was greatest in areas with low native grass richness at the site- or regional-scale. Although this could reflect native grass displacement, a lack of biotic resistance is a more likely explanation, given that grasses comprise the most aggressive invaders. These findings underscore the need to move beyond richness as a surrogate for the extent of invasion, because this metric confounds monodominance with invasion resistance. Monitoring

  20. Biodiversity maintenance mechanisms differ between native and exotic communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ongoing homogenization of Earth’s biota is affecting nearly every region of the globe. Grasslands contain perhaps the most disrupted and homogenized communities. We studied 9-species plant communities containing all exotic (i.e. introduced) or all native species under controlled field conditio...

  1. Regional collaborative research on cold tolerance of exotic biofuel grasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cold tolerance is a selectable trait for many exotic grasses, even those of tropical or subtropical origin. We are conducting cold tolerance assessments on an array of perennial biofuel grasses at Booneville, AR. In study one (published), we reported that two sugarcane clones (US84-1028 and US84-1...

  2. Comparing native and exotic litter decomposition and nutrient dynamics.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Melaleuca quinquenervia is one of the most problematic invasive species in Florida Everglades’ ecosystem. Treatment of these populations has been justified in part by hypothesized changes in the rate of organic matter decomposition and nutrient release from exotic litter. This study investigated t...

  3. Mechanisms underlying the impacts of exotic plant invasions.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Jonathan M; Vilà, Montserrat; D'Antonio, Carla M; Dukes, Jeffrey S; Grigulis, Karl; Lavorel, Sandra

    2003-01-01

    Although the impacts of exotic plant invasions on community structure and ecosystem processes are well appreciated, the pathways or mechanisms that underlie these impacts are poorly understood. Better exploration of these processes is essential to understanding why exotic plants impact only certain systems, and why only some invaders have large impacts. Here, we review over 150 studies to evaluate the mechanisms underlying the impacts of exotic plant invasions on plant and animal community structure, nutrient cycling, hydrology and fire regimes. We find that, while numerous studies have examined the impacts of invasions on plant diversity and composition, less than 5% test whether these effects arise through competition, allelopathy, alteration of ecosystem variables or other processes. Nonetheless, competition was often hypothesized, and nearly all studies competing native and alien plants against each other found strong competitive effects of exotic species. In contrast to studies of the impacts on plant community structure and higher trophic levels, research examining impacts on nitrogen cycling, hydrology and fire regimes is generally highly mechanistic, often motivated by specific invader traits. We encourage future studies that link impacts on community structure to ecosystem processes, and relate the controls over invasibility to the controls over impact. PMID:12737654

  4. PAMELA/ATIC anomaly from exotic mediated dark matter decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Kyu Jung; Kyae, Bumseok

    2009-05-01

    We discuss dark matter decay mediated by exotically charged particles (``exotics'') in a supersymmetric model with two dark matter (DM) components: one is the (bino-like) lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) χ, and the other is a newly introduced meta-stable neutral singlet N. N decays to χe+e- via a dimension 6 operator induced by a penguin-type one loop diagram with the life time of 1026 sec., explaining energetic cosmic e± excess observed recently by PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS. The superheavy masses of exotics ( ~ 1015-16 GeV) are responsible for the longevity of N. The superpartner of N develops the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of order TeV so that the DM N achieves the desired mass of 2 TeV. By the VEV, the U(1)R symmetry is broken to the discrete Z2 symmetry, which is identified with the matter parity in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). Since we have the two DM components, even extremely small amount of N [Script O(10-10) lesssim (nN/nχ)] could account for the observed positron flux with relatively light exotics' masses [1012 GeV lesssim Mexo lesssim 1016 GeV].

  5. Research update on exotic and emerging poultry diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic and emerging diseases of poultry continue to be a threat to US poultry. Studies over the past year have demonstrated: 1) cooking poultry meat at minimum of 70C kills avian influenza (AI) and Newcastle disease (ND) viruses in a few seconds, 2) low pathogenicity (LP) AI viruses isolated from fr...

  6. Phenology of exotic invasive weeds associated with downy brome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The exotic and highly invasive annual grass downy brome (Bromus tectorum) has invaded millions of hectares of rangelands throughout the Intermountain West. Downy brome increases the chance, rate, season and spread of wildfires, resulting in the destruction of native plant communities and the wildli...

  7. Soil ecosystem function under native and exotic plant assemblages as alternative states of successional grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirito, Florencia; Yahdjian, Laura; Tognetti, Pedro M.; Chaneton, Enrique J.

    2014-01-01

    Old fields often become dominated by exotic plants establishing persistent community states. Ecosystem functioning may differ widely between such novel communities and the native-dominated counterparts. We evaluated soil ecosystem attributes in native and exotic (synthetic) grass assemblages established on a newly abandoned field, and in remnants of native grassland in the Inland Pampa, Argentina. We asked whether exotic species alter soil functioning through the quality of the litter they shed or by changing the decomposition environment. Litter decomposition of the exotic dominant Festuca arundinacea in exotic assemblages was faster than that of the native dominant Paspalum quadrifarium in native assemblages and remnant grasslands. Decomposition of a standard litter (Triticum aestivum) was also faster in exotic assemblages than in native assemblages and remnant grasslands. In a common garden, F. arundinacea showed higher decay rates than P. quadrifarium, which reflected the higher N content and lower C:N of the exotic grass litter. Soil respiration rates were higher in the exotic than in the native assemblages and remnant grasslands. Yet there were no significant differences in soil N availability or net N mineralization between exotic and native assemblages. Our results suggest that exotic grass dominance affected ecosystem function by producing a more decomposable leaf litter and by increasing soil decomposer activity. These changes might contribute to the extended dominance of fast-growing exotic grasses during old-field succession. Further, increased organic matter turnover under novel, exotic communities could reduce the carbon storage capacity of the system in the long term.

  8. Risk of exotic annual grass-fire cycle in Goose Creek milkvetch habitat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a concern that habitats surrounding Goose Creek milkvetch populations are at risk of exotic annual grass invasion leading to an exotic annual grass-fire cycle. We sampled plant community and site characteristics to evaluate the risk of these habitats developing an exotic annual grass-fire ...

  9. Heavy quark in exotic hadron and nuclear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Shigehiro

    2014-09-01

    In recent years, it has turned out that heavy hadrons with charm and bottom flavors have rich structures, which are different from simple quark-antiquark or three-quark systems. The new states of heavy hadrons are called exotic hadrons X, Y and Z. The subjects are now covering not only exotic hadrons but also exotic ``nuclei'' in which heavy hadrons are bound. The purpose of the presentation is to discuss the general properties of exotic states of hadrons and nuclei with heavy quarks. We begin our discussion by the heavy quark spin (HQS) symmetry in the heavy quark limit, and show that all heavy hadrons are classified by the HQS symmetry, i.e. either HQS singlet or doublet. Next, in order to discuss the long-range physics of exotic hadrons, we introduce the heavy hadron effective theory according to the HQS symmetry in heavy quark sector as well as by chiral symmetry in light quark sector. As examples, we investigate the theoretically possible states of hadronic molecules with an anti-D meson (B meson) and nucleons with baryon number one, two and infinity (i.e. nuclear matter). Calculating the energies, we show that many of them exhibit the HQS doublets. Beyond the leading order in heavy quark limit, we further discuss the 1/M corrections with heavy hadron mass M, and show that finding the HQS-breaking (non-breaking) terms at 1/M is important to investigate the magnetic (electric) gluons in the heavy hadrons in nuclear medium [1,5]. In recent years, it has turned out that heavy hadrons with charm and bottom flavors have rich structures, which are different from simple quark-antiquark or three-quark systems. The new states of heavy hadrons are called exotic hadrons X, Y and Z. The subjects are now covering not only exotic hadrons but also exotic ``nuclei'' in which heavy hadrons are bound. The purpose of the presentation is to discuss the general properties of exotic states of hadrons and nuclei with heavy quarks. We begin our discussion by the heavy quark spin (HQS

  10. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chainsmore » of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.« less

  11. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-01-01

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high-energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3, N4, N5, N6) and chains (N∞). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44− anion. To our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure. PMID:26581175

  12. Exotic stable cesium polynitrides at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Feng; Han, Yunxia; Liu, Hanyu; Yao, Yansun

    2015-11-19

    New polynitrides containing metastable forms of nitrogen are actively investigated as potential high energy-density materials. Using a structure search method based on the CALYPSO methodology, we investigated the stable stoichiometries and structures of cesium polynitrides at high pressures. Along with the CsN3, we identified five new stoichiometric compounds (Cs3N, Cs2N, CsN, CsN2, and CsN5) with interesting structures that may be experimentally synthesizable at modest pressures (i.e., less than 50 GPa). Nitrogen species in the predicted structures have various structural forms ranging from single atom (N) to highly endothermic molecules (N2, N3 , N4, N5, N6) and chains (N). Polymeric chains of nitrogen were found in the high-pressure C2/c phase of CsN2. This structure contains a substantially high content of single N-N bonds that exceeds the previously known nitrogen chains in pure forms, and also exhibit metastability at ambient conditions. We also identified a very interesting CsN crystal that contains novel N44- anion. In conclusion, to our best knowledge, this is the first time a charged N4 species being reported. Results of the present study suggest that it is possible to obtain energetic polynitrogens in main-group nitrides under high pressure.

  13. Exotic Higgs decay via charged Higgs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Su, Shufang

    2015-11-01

    The most common search channel for heavy neutral Higgses in models with an extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector is A/H 0 → ττ which becomes ineffective when new decay modes of A/H 0 open. In this paper, we analyzed two such channels involving charged Higgses in the final states: A/H 0 → W ± H ∓ and H 0 → H + H -. With the consequent decay of H ± → τν, we found that the limits for σ × BR( gg → A/H 0 → W ± H ∓) × BR( H ± → τν) vary from 30 to 10fb for m A/ H 0 between 300 and 1000GeV for 95% C.L. exclusion, and about 80 to 30 fb for 5 σ discovery. For H + H - mode, 95% C.L. limits on σ × BR( gg → H 0 → H + H -) × BR2( H ± → τν) vary from 9 to 4 fb for m H 0 between 400 and 1000 GeV, while the 5σ reach is about 20 to 10 fb. We further interpret the cross section limits in the Type II 2HDM parameter space. While A → W ± H ∓ offers great sensitivity in both sin( β - α) versus tan β and m A versus tan β parameter space, H 0 → H + H - can cover most of the parameter space for H 0. Reach in H 0 → W ± H ∓ is more limited, especially for m H 0 > 2 m H ± . It is, however, complementary to H 0 → H + H - when BR( H 0 → H + H -) is accidentally suppressed.

  14. More about neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons: An alternative mechanism in low-scale string theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    We discuss an alternative for baryon-violating six quarks transition in the context of low scale string theory. In particular, with MS = 10-103 TeV, such a transition can be mediated by two color-triplets through a quartic coupling with down-quarks, generated by exotic instantons, in a calculable and controllable way. We show how flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs) limits on color-triplet mass are well compatible with n ‑n¯ oscillation ones. If an n ‑n¯ transition was found, this would be an indirect hint for our model. This would strongly motivate searches for direct channels in proton-proton colliders. In fact, our model can be directly tested in an experimentally challenging 100-1000 TeV proton-proton collider, searching for our desired color-triplet states and an evidence for exotic instantons resonances, in addition to stringy Regge resonances, anomalous Z‧-bosons and gauged megaxion. In particular, our scenario can be related to the 750 GeV diphoton hint identifying it with the gauged megaxion dual to the B-field. On the other hand, this scenario is compatible with TeV-ish color triplets visible at large hadron collider (LHC) and with 1-10 TeV string scale, i.e. stringy resonances at LHC.

  15. 9 CFR 352.8 - Time of inspection in the field and in an official exotic animal establishment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.8 Time of inspection in the field and in an official exotic animal... an official exotic animal establishment. 352.8 Section 352.8 Animals and Animal Products FOOD...

  16. 9 CFR 352.8 - Time of inspection in the field and in an official exotic animal establishment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION EXOTIC ANIMALS AND HORSES; VOLUNTARY INSPECTION Exotic Animals § 352.8 Time of inspection in the field and in an official exotic animal... an official exotic animal establishment. 352.8 Section 352.8 Animals and Animal Products FOOD...

  17. Towards a Deeper Understanding of the Nucleus with Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormand, Erich

    2006-10-01

    Despite more than fifty years of study, many questions about now nuclei are put together remain. While nuclei near the valley of stability have provided a wealth of information, they are not sufficient to provide us with a comprehensive and unified description of the nucleus. Especially lacking is an accurate picture of those exotic species that are the basis of cosmic alchemy. The missing pieces in the puzzle can be filled in with a determined experimental and theoretical effort focusing on nuclei lying far from the valley of stability. Here, I will outline the intellectual challenges that can be addressed by proposed exotic-beam facilities, and how new experimental data will quide and refine theoretical descriptions of the nucleus.

  18. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu, Graham Moir, Michael Peardon, Sinead Ryan, Christopher Thomas, Pol Vilaseca, Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, Balint Joo, David Richards

    2012-07-01

    We present a spectrum of highly excited charmonium mesons up to around 4.5 GeV calculated using dynamical lattice QCD. Employing novel computational techniques and the variational method with a large basis of carefully constructed operators, we extract and reliably identify the continuum spin of an extensive set of excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers (0+-, 1-+, 2+-) and states with high spin. Calculations are performed on two lattice volumes with pion mass ? 400 MeV and the mass determinations have high statistical precision even for excited states. We discuss the results in light of experimental observations, identify the lightest 'supermultiplet' of hybrid mesons and comment on the phenomenological implications of the spectrum of exotic mesons.

  19. Frustration of resonant preheating by exotic kinetic terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmati, Shohreh; Seahra, Sanjeev S.

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of exotic kinetic terms on parametric resonance during the preheating epoch of the early universe. Specifically, we consider modifications to the action of ordinary matter fields motivated by generalized uncertainty principles, polymer quantization, as well as Dirac-Born-Infeld and k-essence models. To leading order in an ``exotic physics'' scale, the equations of motion derived from each of these models have the same algebraic form involving a nonlinear self-interaction in the matter sector. Neglecting spatial dependence, we show that the nonlinearity effectively shuts down the parametric resonance after a finite time period. We find numeric evidence that the frustration of parametric resonance persists to spatially inhomogenous matter in (1+1)-dimensions.

  20. Frustration of resonant preheating by exotic kinetic terms

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmati, Shohreh; Seahra, Sanjeev S. E-mail: sseahra@unb.ca

    2014-10-01

    We study the effects of exotic kinetic terms on parametric resonance during the preheating epoch of the early universe. Specifically, we consider modifications to the action of ordinary matter fields motivated by generalized uncertainty principles, polymer quantization, as well as Dirac-Born-Infeld and k-essence models. To leading order in an ''exotic physics'' scale, the equations of motion derived from each of these models have the same algebraic form involving a nonlinear self-interaction in the matter sector. Neglecting spatial dependence, we show that the nonlinearity effectively shuts down the parametric resonance after a finite time period. We find numeric evidence that the frustration of parametric resonance persists to spatially inhomogenous matter in (1+1)-dimensions.

  1. Distributions of exotic plants in eastern Asia and North America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Qian, H.; Ricklefs, R.E.; Xi, W.

    2006-01-01

    Although some plant traits have been linked to invasion success, the possible effects of regional factors, such as diversity, habitat suitability, and human activity are not well understood. Each of these mechanisms predicts a different pattern of distribution at the regional scale. Thus, where climate and soils are similar, predictions based on regional hypotheses for invasion success can be tested by comparisons of distributions in the source and receiving regions. Here, we analyse the native and alien geographic ranges of all 1567 plant species that have been introduced between eastern Asia and North America or have been introduced to both regions from elsewhere. The results reveal correlations between the spread of exotics and both the native species richness and transportation networks of recipient regions. This suggests that both species interactions and human-aided dispersal influence exotic distributions, although further work on the relative importance of these processes is needed. ?? 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  2. Perspectives of Physics of Exotic Nuclei Beyond the Shell Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    2015-11-01

    I present one of the possible paradigm shifts with exotic nuclei. This is the shell evolution due to nuclear forces, such as tensor, central and three-nucleon forces. I shall present major points with the N=34 magic number confirmed in 54Ca by RIBF of RIKEN very recently, after the theoretical prediction made in 2001. The shell evolution has been generalized to phenomena caused by massive particle-hole excitations, being referred to as Type II Shell Evolution. This can be found in 68,70Ni. In particular, the shape coexistence of spherical, oblate and prolate shapes is suggested theoretically. Thus, the perspectives of physics with exotic nuclei is being expanded further from single-particle aspects to shapes/deformation, changing the landscape of nuclear structure.

  3. Direct neutrino mass experiments and exotic charged current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, Patrick Otto; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of exotic charged current interactions on the electron energy spectrum in tritium decay, focussing on the KATRIN experiment and a possible modified setup that has access to the full spectrum. Both sub-eV and keV neutrino masses are considered. We perform a fully relativistic calculation and take all possible new interactions into account, demonstrating the possible sizable distortions in the energy spectrum.

  4. Highly excited and exotic meson spectrum from dynamical lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jozef Dudek, Robert Edwards, David Richards, Christopher Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Using a new quark-field construction algorithm and a large variational basis of operators, we extract a highly excited isovector meson spectrum on dynamical anisotropic lattices. We show how carefully constructed operators can be used to identify the continuum spin of extracted states. This method allows us to extract, with confidence, excited states, states of high spin and states with exotic quantum numbers, including, for the first time, spin-four states.

  5. Exotic orientifolds in non-geometric flux cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2013-07-23

    We report on the existence of a stable de Sitter vacum in Type IIB non-geometric string compactification on an isotropic tours with orientifold 3-planes in the presence of odd integer 3-form fluxes. These fluxes yields the presence of exotic orientifold 3-planes increasing the size of the flux configuration space. We also find that there exist suitable conditions for multi-field inflation driven by the Kähler and axio-dilaton moduli.

  6. Excited and exotic charmonium spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L; Peardon, M J; Ryan, S M; Thomas, C; Vilaseca, P; Dudek, J; Edwards, R; Joo, B; Richards, D G

    2012-12-01

    We study the charmonium spectrum in full QCD on anisotropic lattices generated by Hadron Spectrum Collaboration. We adopt a large basis of interpolating operators to extract the excited charmonium states using the variational method. A detailed spectrum of excited charmonium mesons in many J{sup PC} channels is obtained. Some exotic hybrid states ( with J{sup PC} = 0{sup +-} , 1{sup -+} , 2{sup +-}) are also studied

  7. Exotic orientifolds in non-geometric flux cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    We report on the existence of a stable de Sitter vacum in Type IIB non-geometric string compactification on an isotropic tours with orientifold 3-planes in the presence of odd integer 3-form fluxes. These fluxes yields the presence of exotic orientifold 3-planes increasing the size of the flux configuration space. We also find that there exist suitable conditions for multi-field inflation driven by the Kähler and axio-dilaton moduli.

  8. [Requirements for the keeping of dangerous exotic animals].

    PubMed

    Moritz, J

    2003-05-01

    The problem of dangerous dogs receives a lot of public attention. However, there is another group of animals that can threaten public security--the group of dangerous exotic animals. In daily routine mainly venomous snakes, spiders and scorpions or crocodiles, giant snakes and snapping turtles are of practical importance. The paper gives hints how to keep these animals according to animal protection and public safety rules. PMID:12822263

  9. Global trade in exotic pets 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    Bush, Emma R; Baker, Sandra E; Macdonald, David W

    2014-06-01

    International trade in exotic pets is an important and increasing driver of biodiversity loss and often compromises the standards required for good animal welfare. We systematically reviewed the scientific and gray literature and used the United Nations Environment Programme - World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC) Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) trade database to establish temporal and geographical trade patterns of live exotic birds, mammals, and reptiles and to describe trends in research, taxonomic representation, and level of threat and legal protection of species traded. Birds were the most species-rich and abundant class reported in trade; reptiles were second most abundant but unusually the most studied in this context; and mammals were least abundant in trade. Mammalian and reptilian species traded as pets were more likely to be threatened than expected by random. There have been a substantial number of Appendix I listed captive-bred mammals and birds and wild-caught birds and reptiles reported in trade to CITES. We identified the Middle East's emerging role as a driver of demand for exotic pets of all taxa alongside the well-established and increasing role of South America and Southeast Asia in the market. Europe, North America, and the Middle East featured most heavily in trade reports to CITES, whereas trade involving South America and Southeast Asia were given most emphasis in the literature. For effective monitoring of and appropriate response to the international exotic pet trade, it is imperative that the reliability and detail of CITES trade reports improve and that scientific research be directed toward those taxa and locations that are most vulnerable. PMID:24661260

  10. Implications of a J{sup PC} exotic

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Page

    1997-09-01

    Recent experimental data from BNL on the isovector J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic at 1.6 GeV indicate the existence of a non-quarkonium state consistent with lattice gauge theory predictions. The authors discuss how further experiments can strengthen this conclusion. They show that the {rho}{pi}, {eta}{prime}{pi} and {eta}{pi} couplings of this state qualitatively support the hypothesis that it is a hybrid meson, although other interpretations cannot be eliminated.

  11. Fatalities due to indigenous and exotic species in Florida.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Barbara C; Harding, Brett E

    2014-01-01

    Florida's climate is suitable for many potentially hazardous animals, including both indigenous and exotic species, which are frequently kept as in zoos or as pets. This has resulted in many unforeseen fatal encounters between animals and the ever expanding human population. While the literature and knowledge pool for more common types of deaths referred to medical examiner/coroner's offices is abundant, the appreciation of wildlife and exotic pet-related deaths is far less widespread. We report seven animal attack-related deaths that occurred in Florida. The inflicted injuries included blunt and sharp force injuries, asphyxia, drowning, and envenomation. The underlying cause of death, however, was always a result of the human/animal interaction and in many cases related to human error and failure to appreciate the potentially dangerous behavior of nondomesticated species. These cases illustrate the varied circumstances and pathophysiologies associated with deaths due to indigenous and exotic species and the importance of the multidisciplinary approach in the medicolegal investigation of these cases. PMID:23980567

  12. Infections Associated with Exotic Cuisine: The Dangers of Delicacies.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Natasha S; Bhadelia, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    "Exotic" food dishes are an expression of regional culture, religion, and ethnicity worldwide. With the increase in international travel to remote areas of the world, globalization of the food supply, and changes in food habits, more people are consuming dishes once considered exotic. Such behavioral changes require awareness by consumers and clinicians about the risks of food-borne infections. This chapter addresses pathogens associated with consumption of raw or undercooked seafood including anisakidosis, Diphyllobothrium latum infection, flukes, and other infectious and toxin-mediated diseases. We discuss the geographic distribution of the pathogens, symptomatology, and basic principles of treatment. Food products derived from turtles, snakes, and other reptiles are reviewed, and we address the risk of gnathostomiasis, sparganosis, trichinellosis, and other pathogens. In discussing infections associated with undercooked beef, pork, and bush meat, we address dysentery, amebiasis, toxoplasmosis, Taenia infections, and risks of novel viral infections, among others. We also review infectious risks from poultry, dairy, and other food items, focusing on those organisms encountered less frequently by clinicians in developed countries. The wide range of infectious organisms related to exotic cuisine underscores the importance of educating the adventurous traveler and warrants continued vigilance on the part of the clinician. PMID:26542047

  13. Potential Habitats for Exotic Life Within the Life Supporting Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Johannes J.; Firneis, Maria G.; Hitzenberger, Regina

    2010-05-01

    Questions like "Are we alone in the universe?", "How unique is Earth as a planet?" or "How unique is water-based life in the universe?" still are nowhere near of being answered. In recent years, discussions on these topics are more and more influenced by questions whether water is really the only possible solvent, or which conditions are necessary for life to evolve in planetary habitats. A change in our present geocentric mindset on the existence of life is required, in order to address these new questions [see also 1]. In May 2009 a new research platform at the University of Vienna was initiated in order to contribute to the solution of these questions. One task is to find essential biomarkers relevant to the problem of the detection of exotic life. In this context exotic life means: life, which is not necessarily based on a double bond between carbon and oxygen (C=O) and not on water as the only possible solvent. At present little is known about metabolistic systems, which are not based on C=O or on metabolisms which are operative in alternative solvents and a high effort of future laboratory work is necessary to open this window for looking for exotic life. To address the whole spectrum of life the concept of a general life supporting zone is introduced in order to extend the classical habitable zone (which is based on liquid water on a planetary surface, [2]). The life supporting zone of a planetary system is composed of different single "habitable zones" for the liquid phases of specific solvents and composites between water and other solvents. Besides exoplanetary systems which seem to be the most promising place for exotic life in our present understanding, some potential places could also exist within our Solar System and habitats like the subsurface of Enceladus, liquid ethane/methane lakes on Titan or habitable niches in the Venus atmosphere will also be taken into account. A preliminary list of appropriate solvents and their abundances in the Solar

  14. Review of ''close-mass'' heavy lepton searches

    SciTech Connect

    Riles, K.

    1989-05-01

    Results from recent searches in e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilation at PEP (..sqrt..s = 29 GeV) for a fourth-generation charged lepton associated with a slightly lighter neutrino partner are presented. Some emphasis is given to the most recent search, which uses a novel approach based on radiative tagging, an approach that holds promise as a general tool in searching for exotic events characterized by very low visible energy. Prospects for upcoming sequential lepton searches at SLC and LEP experiments are also discussed. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero

    2015-04-10

    In this study, a search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity JP = 0 and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with JP = 2+, assuming for both a mass of 125 GeV/c2. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 1.96 TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45 fb–1. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV/c2 at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state.

  16. Constraints on models of the Higgs boson with exotic spin and parity using decays to bottom-antibottom quarks in the full CDF data set.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Bae, T; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Butti, P; Buzatu, A; Calamba, A; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Cremonesi, M; Cruz, D; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; D'Errico, M; Devoto, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, M; Driutti, A; Ebina, K; Edgar, R; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, S; Esham, B; Farrington, S; Fernández Ramos, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Frisch, H; Funakoshi, Y; Galloni, C; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González López, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gramellini, E; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Hahn, S R; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harrington-Taber, T; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hocker, A; Hong, Z; Hopkins, W; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kambeitz, M; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S H; Kim, S B; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Knoepfel, K; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Laasanen, A T; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lannon, K; Latino, G; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Liu, H; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lucà, A; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maestro, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Marchese, L; Margaroli, F; Marino, P; Matera, K; Mattson, M E; Mazzacane, A; Mazzanti, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Noh, S Y; Norniella, O; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Palni, P; Papadimitriou, V; Parker, W; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poprocki, S; Potamianos, K; Pranko, A; Prokoshin, F; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Redondo Fernández, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodriguez, T; Rolli, S; Ronzani, M; Roser, R; Rosner, J L; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scuri, F; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shreyber-Tecker, I; Simonenko, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Song, H; Sorin, V; St Denis, R; Stancari, M; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thomson, E; Thukral, V; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vernieri, C; Vidal, M; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Waters, D; Wester, W C; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wilbur, S; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamato, D; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Zanetti, A M; Zeng, Y; Zhou, C; Zucchelli, S

    2015-04-10

    A search for particles with the same mass and couplings as those of the standard model Higgs boson but different spin and parity quantum numbers is presented. We test two specific alternative Higgs boson hypotheses: a pseudoscalar Higgs boson with spin-parity J^{P}=0^{-} and a gravitonlike Higgs boson with J^{P}=2^{+}, assuming for both a mass of 125  GeV/c^{2}. We search for these exotic states produced in association with a vector boson and decaying into a bottom-antibottom quark pair. The vector boson is reconstructed through its decay into an electron or muon pair, or an electron or muon and a neutrino, or it is inferred from an imbalance in total transverse momentum. We use expected kinematic differences between events containing exotic Higgs bosons and those containing standard model Higgs bosons. The data were collected by the CDF experiment at the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider, operating at a center-of-mass energy of sqrt[s]=1.96  TeV, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 9.45  fb^{-1}. We exclude deviations from the predictions of the standard model with a Higgs boson of mass 125  GeV/c^{2} at the level of 5 standard deviations, assuming signal strengths for exotic boson production equal to the prediction for the standard model Higgs boson, and set upper limits of approximately 30% relative to the standard model rate on the possible rate of production of each exotic state. PMID:25910110

  17. Differences in beta diversity between exotic and native grasslands vary with scale along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leanne M; Wilsey, Brian J

    2015-04-01

    Biodiversity can be partitioned into alpha, beta, and gamma components, and beta diversity is not as clearly understood. Biotic homogenization predicts that exotic species should lower beta diversity at global and continental scales, but it is still unclear how exotic species impact beta diversity at smaller scales. Exotic species could theoretically increase or decrease beta diversity relative to natives depending on many factors, including abiotic conditions, community assembly history, management, dispersal rates of species, and connectivity among patches. We sampled plant species abundances in 42 novel, exotic- and native-dominated (remnant) grasslands across a latitudinal gradient in the tallgrass prairie region, and tested whether exotic and native grasslands differed in beta diversity at three scales: across sites within the entire biome, across sites within regions, and across locations within sites. Exotic-dominated grasslands differed from native-dominated grasslands in beta diversity at all scales, but the direction of the difference changed from positive to negative as scales went from large to small. Contrary to expectations, exotic-dominated grasslands had higher beta diversity than native-dominated grasslands at the largest scale considered. This occurred because the identity of dominant exotic species varied across the latitudinal gradient, with many exotic grassland pairs exhibiting zero similarity, whereas native-dominated grasslands differed more gradually with distance. Beta diversity among sites within a region was variable, with exotic-dominated grasslands having 29% higher beta diversity than native grasslands in the south and 33% lower beta diversity in the north. Within sites, beta diversity was 26% lower in exotic-dominated than native grasslands. Our results provide evidence that different regional identities and abundances of exotics, and lack of connectivity in fragmented landscapes can alter beta diversity in unexpected ways across

  18. Native weeds and exotic plants: relationships to disturbance in mixed grass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    The paper compares distributions of native weedy species and exotic species with respect to three kinds of disturbance, roads, trails, and prairie dog towns. Data were collected at the north and south units of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and at Wind Cave National Park. The paper concludes that many exotic species differ substantially from native weeds in their exploitation of disturbance. It is thus not useful to manage exotics as if they were just another weed.

  19. Are Local Filters Blind to Provenance? Ant Seed Predation Suppresses Exotic Plants More than Natives

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Dean E.; Icasatti, Nadia S.; Hierro, Jose L.; Bird, Benjamin J.

    2014-01-01

    The question of whether species’ origins influence invasion outcomes has been a point of substantial debate in invasion ecology. Theoretically, colonization outcomes can be predicted based on how species’ traits interact with community filters, a process presumably blind to species’ origins. Yet, exotic plant introductions commonly result in monospecific plant densities not commonly seen in native assemblages, suggesting that exotic species may respond to community filters differently than natives. Here, we tested whether exotic and native species differed in their responses to a local community filter by examining how ant seed predation affected recruitment of eighteen native and exotic plant species in central Argentina. Ant seed predation proved to be an important local filter that strongly suppressed plant recruitment, but ants suppressed exotic recruitment far more than natives (89% of exotic species vs. 22% of natives). Seed size predicted ant impacts on recruitment independent of origins, with ant preference for smaller seeds resulting in smaller seeded plant species being heavily suppressed. The disproportionate effects of provenance arose because exotics had generally smaller seeds than natives. Exotics also exhibited greater emergence and earlier peak emergence than natives in the absence of ants. However, when ants had access to seeds, these potential advantages of exotics were negated due to the filtering bias against exotics. The differences in traits we observed between exotics and natives suggest that higher-order introduction filters or regional processes preselected for certain exotic traits that then interacted with the local seed predation filter. Our results suggest that the interactions between local filters and species traits can predict invasion outcomes, but understanding the role of provenance will require quantifying filtering processes at multiple hierarchical scales and evaluating interactions between filters. PMID:25099535

  20. PREFACE: Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honma, Michio; Otsuka, Takaharu; Aoi, Nori

    2006-11-01

    The International Symposium on `Structure of Exotic Nuclei and Nuclear Forces' was held at The Koshiba Hall, University of Tokyo, on 9 - 12 March 2006. This symposium was organized as an activity of the Grant-in-Aid for the specially promoted area `Monte Carlo Shell Model' from the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture (MEXT) of Japan. The symposium was sponsored by the Center for Nuclear Study (CNS) and by RIKEN. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss theoretical and experimental developments in the study of the structure of exotic nuclei and its relationship with nuclear forces. There has been much progress recently in our understanding of what the structure of exotic nuclei is and how it can be linked to nuclear forces, with emerging intriguing perspectives. The following subjects were covered in this symposium

  21. Present status and future of the shell model
  22. Effective interaction theories
  23. Experimental results and perspectives
  24. Few-body methods including ab initio calculations
  25. Advancements of mean-fieeld models
  26. Transition between shell and cluster structure
  27. Nuclear astrophysics and nuclear structure
  28. Particle physics and the shell model
  29. Emphasis was placed on the interplay between many-body structures and nuclear forces, and on the experimental clarification of these topics. Around 80 participants attended the symposium and we enjoyed 34 excellent and lively invited talks and 26 oral presentations. The organizing committee consisted of B A Brown (MSU), S Fujii (CNS), M Honma (Aizu), T Kajino (NAO), T Mizusaki (Senshu), T Motobayashi (RIKEN), K Muto (TIT), T Otsuka (Chair, Tokyo/CNS/RIKEN), P Ring (TMU), N Shimizu (Scientific Secretary, Tokyo), S Shimoura (CNS), Y Utsuno (Scientific Secretary, JAEA). Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers and the participants as well as the other organizers for their contributions which made the symposium so successful.

  1. Core-satellite species hypothesis and native versus exotic species in secondary succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinez, Kelsey A.; Gibson, David J.; Middleton, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    A number of hypotheses exist to explain species’ distributions in a landscape, but these hypotheses are not frequently utilized to explain the differences in native and exotic species distributions. The core-satellite species (CSS) hypothesis predicts species occupancy will be bimodally distributed, i.e., many species will be common and many species will be rare, but does not explicitly consider exotic species distributions. The parallel dynamics (PD) hypothesis predicts that regional occurrence patterns of exotic species will be similar to native species. Together, the CSS and PD hypotheses may increase our understanding of exotic species’ distribution relative to natives. We selected an old field undergoing secondary succession to study the CSS and PD hypotheses in conjunction with each other. The ratio of exotic to native species (richness and abundance) was observed through 17 years of secondary succession. We predicted species would be bimodally distributed and that exotic:native species ratios would remain steady or decrease through time under frequent disturbance. In contrast to the CSS and PD hypotheses, native species occupancies were not bimodally distributed at the site, but exotic species were. The exotic:native species ratios for both richness (E:Nrichness) and abundance (E:Ncover) generally decreased or remained constant throughout supporting the PD hypothesis. Our results suggest exotic species exhibit metapopulation structure in old field landscapes, but that metapopulation structures of native species are disrupted, perhaps because these species are dispersal limited in the fragmented landscape.

  2. A rule-based model for mapping potential exotic plant distribution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Despain, D.G.; Weaver, T.; Aspinall, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Wildland managers need a method to predict which portions of the lands under their stewardship are susceptible to invasion by exotic plants. We combined a database listing exotic plant species known to occur in major environmental types (habitat types) throughout the northern Rocky Mountains with a digital vegetation map of environmental types for a major national park in the region (Yellowstone National Park) to produce maps of areas potentially threatened by major exotic species. Such maps should be helpful to managers concerned with monitoring and controlling exotic plants.

  3. Multiple muons of conventional and exotic origin in DUMAND

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grieder, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    A first summary of results from a theoretical analysis, based on hadron - muon cascade calculations, that yield relative intensities of very high energy multiple muons originating from ultra high energy interactions initiated by primary protons and iron nuclei in the atmosphere, under consideration of normal as well as direct and exotic production channels is presented. Lateral density distributions and target diagrams will be presented which show that only very large detectors, such as DUMAND, will be able to record multiple muons of conventional origin reliably. This, however, is a prerequisite for any primary mass determination based on multiple muon data.

  4. Principles of Wound Management and Wound Healing in Exotic Pets.

    PubMed

    Mickelson, Megan A; Mans, Christoph; Colopy, Sara A

    2016-01-01

    The care of wounds in exotic animal species can be a challenging endeavor. Special considerations must be made in regard to the animal's temperament and behavior, unique anatomy and small size, and tendency toward secondary stress-related health problems. It is important to assess the entire patient with adequate systemic evaluation and consideration of proper nutrition and husbandry, which could ultimately affect wound healing. This article summarizes the general phases of wound healing, factors that affect healing, and principles of wound management. Emphasis is placed on novel methods of treating wounds and species differences in wound management and healing. PMID:26611923

  5. Using superconducting qubit circuits to engineer exotic lattice systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsomokos, Dimitris I.; Ashhab, Sahel; Nori, Franco

    2010-11-15

    We propose an architecture based on superconducting qubits and resonators for the implementation of a variety of exotic lattice systems, such as spin and Hubbard models in higher or fractal dimensions and higher-genus topologies. Spin systems are realized naturally using qubits, while superconducting resonators can be used for the realization of Bose-Hubbard models. Fundamental requirements for these designs, such as controllable interactions between arbitrary qubit pairs, have recently been implemented in the laboratory, rendering our proposals feasible with current technology.

  6. Wormholes without exotic matter in Einstein-Cartan theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Galiakhmetov, A. M.

    2015-10-01

    We study the possible existence of static traversable wormholes without invoking exotic matter in the framework of the Einstein--Cartan theory. A family of exact static, spherically symmetric wormhole solutions with an arbitrary throat radius, with flat or AdS asymptotic behavior, has been obtained with sources in the form of two noninteracting scalar fields with nonzero potentials. Both scalar fields are canonical (that is, satisfy the weak energy condition), one is minimally and the other nonminimally coupled to gravity, and the latter is a source of torsion.

  7. New results on the structure of exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Hiroyoshi

    2015-04-01

    `Exotic nuclei' far from the stability line are unique objects of many-body quantum system, where ratios of neutron number to proton number are much larger or much smaller than those of nuclei found in nature. Their exotic properties and phenomena emerge from their large isospin asymmetry, and even affect scenarios of nucleosynthesis in universe. One of the exotic emergences is shell evolution. The magic numbers of stable nuclei are known; 2, 8, 20, 28, 50, 82 and 126. However the numbers 8, 20 and 28 have been found no more magic in a neutron-rich region, and new magic numbers such as 6, 16, 32 and 34 have been discovered. To access nuclei far from the stability line, especially neutron-rich nuclei, a large heavy-ion accelerator facility `Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory (RIBF)' was constructed at RIKEN, Japan in 2007. The facility is highly optimized for inflight production of fission fragments via a U beam. The accelerator complex delivers an intense 345 MeV/u U beam. The U nuclide is converted at a target to fission fragments. The fragments of interest are collected and separated at an inflight separator, and are delivered to several experimental devices. The shell evolution programs at RIBF have been conducted with two methods; in-beam gamma spectroscopy and decay spectroscopy. A standard setup of in-beam gamma spectroscopy is combination of a NaI gamma detector array `DALI2' and a beam line spectrometer `ZeroDegree Spectrometer (ZDS)'. Coincidence measurements of de-excitation gamma rays at DALI2 and of reaction products at ZDS make it possible to select reaction channels event-by-event and to observe excited states of exotic nuclei in a specific reaction channel. Recently, a French-made thick liquid hydrogen target system `MINOS' has been introduced to access more neutron-rich nuclei. Isomer and beta-delayed gamma spectroscopy is organized with a Euroball germanium cluster array system `EURICA' and an active silicon stopper In this talk, I would like to

  8. Exotic modes of excitation in proton rich nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Paar, N.

    2011-11-30

    The framework of relativistic energy density functional has been applied in description of excitation phenomena in nuclei close to the proton drip line. In particular, low-lying dipole excitations have been studied using relativistic quasiparticle random phase approximation, based on effective Lagrangians with density dependent meson nucleon couplings. In the isovector dipole channel, the occurrence of pronounced low-lying dipole peaks is predicted, corresponding to the proton pygmy dipole resonance. Since this exotic mode still awaits its experimental confirmation, systematic calculations have been conducted within a pool of neutron deficient nuclei, in order to identify the best possible candidates for measurements.

  9. Natural hybridization between Gossypium mustelinum and exotic allotetraploid cotton species.

    PubMed

    de Menezes, I P P; da Silva, J O; Malafaia, G; Silveira, R D D; Barroso, P A V

    2015-01-01

    Cotton has been collected in Brazil for decades for its conservation, evaluation, and the use of its genetic resources. Gossypium mustelinum is an allotetraploid cotton species that only occurs in Brazil, and little is known about its genetic potential for improvement. However, the species is threatened by habitat fragmentation and interspecific hybridization with exotic species of cotton. In this study, we investigated the rate of natural hybridization in two populations of G. mustelinum in Bahia, Brazil, with G. hirsutum and G. barbadense using a set of microsatellite markers. PMID:26535735

  10. Halos and rainbows: The elastic scattering of light exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.; Hussein, M.H.

    1993-10-01

    The scattering of an exotic light nucleus with a halo is compared with that of a normal nucleus. Four, sometimes opposing effects arising from the halo are identified. Semiclassical expressions are derived which embody these effects. The cases of {sup 11}Li and {sup 11}C scattering from {sup 12}C at E/A = 60 MeV are compared. We conclude that the {sup 11}Li differential cross sections are probably smaller than those for {sup 11}C, in agreement with recent analyses of the measurements.

  11. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, ... Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  12. Search Cloud

    MedlinePlus

    ... www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search cloud ...

  13. The GlueX experiment: Search for gluonic excitations via photoproduction at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Eugenio, Paul

    2013-07-01

    Studies of meson spectra via strong decays provide insight regarding QCD at the confinement scale. These studies have led to phenomenological models for QCD such as the constituent quark model. However, QCD allows for a much richer spectrum of meson states which include extra states such as exotics, hybrids, multi-quarks, and glueballs. First discussion of the status of exotic meson searches is given followed by an overview of the progress at Jefferson Lab to double the energy of the machine to 12 GeV, which will allow us to access photoproduction of mesons in search for gluonic excited states.

  14. On wormholes with arbitrarily small quantities of exotic matter

    SciTech Connect

    Fewster, Christopher J.; Roman, Thomas A.

    2005-08-15

    Recently several models of traversable wormholes have been proposed which require only arbitrarily small amounts of negative energy to hold them open against self-collapse. If the exotic matter is assumed to be provided by quantum fields, then quantum inequalities can be used to place constraints on the negative energy densities required. In this paper, we introduce an alternative method for obtaining constraints on wormhole geometries, using a recently derived quantum inequality bound on the null-contracted stress-energy averaged over a timelike worldline. The bound allows us to perform a simplified analysis of general wormhole models, not just those with small quantities of exotic matter. We then use it to study, in particular, the models of Visser, Kar, and Dadhich (VKD) and the models of Kuhfittig. The VKD models are constrained to be either submicroscopic or to have a large discrepancy between throat size and curvature radius. A recent model of Kuhfittig is shown to be nontraversable. This is due to the fact that the throat of his wormhole flares outward so slowly that light rays and particles, starting from outside the throat, require an infinite lapse of affine parameter to reach the throat.

  15. Are the nuclei beyond 132Sn very exotic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozeva, R.; Naïdja, H.; Nowacki, F.; Odahara, A.; Moon, C.-B.; NP1112-RIBF87 collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The term exotic nucleus is used for nuclei that have different from normal behavior. However, it turns out that the term normal is valid only for nuclei close to stability and more particularly for regions close to double-shell closures. As long as one drives away in the neutron-rich nuclei, especially at intermediate mass number, interplay between normal single-particle and many collective particle-hole excitations compete. In some cases with the addition of neutrons, these may turn to evolve as a skin, acting against the core nucleus that may also influence its shell evolution. Knowledge of these nuclear ingredients is especially interesting beyond the doubly-magic 132Sn, however a little is known on how the excitations modes develop with the addition of both protons and neutrons. Especially for the Sb nuclei, where one gradually increases these valence particles, the orbital evolution and its impact on exoticness is very intriguing. Experimental studies were conducted on several such isotopes using isomer and, β-decay spectroscopy at RIBF within EURICA. In particular, new data on 140Sb and 136Sb are examined and investigated in the framework of shell model calculations.

  16. 1{sup -+} exotic meson at light quark masses

    SciTech Connect

    Hedditch, J.N.; Kamleh, W.; Lasscock, B.G.; Leinweber, D.B.; Williams, A.G.; Zanotti, J.M.

    2005-12-01

    The mass of the 1{sup -+} exotic meson, created with hybrid interpolating fields, is explored in numerical simulations of quenched QCD on large (20{sup 3}x40) lattices to obtain good control of statistical and finite volume errors. Using the Fat-Link Irrelevant Clover (FLIC) fermion action, the properties of the 1{sup -+} are investigated at light quark masses approaching 25 MeV (m{sub {pi}}/m{sub {rho}}{approx_equal}1/3). Under the standard assumption that the coupling to the quenched a{sub 1}{eta}{sup '} channel comes with a negative metric, our results indicate that the 1{sup -+} exotic exhibits significant curvature close to the chiral limit, suggesting previous linear extrapolations have overestimated the mass of the 1{sup -+}. We find for the first time in lattice studies a 1{sup -+} mass consistent with the {pi}{sub 1}(1600) candidate. We also find a strangeness {+-}1 J{sup P}=1{sup -} state with a mass close to 2 GeV.

  17. Theory and phenomenology of exotic isosinglet quarks and squarks

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Junhai; Langacker, Paul; Nelson, Brent D.

    2008-02-01

    Extensions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model often predict the existence of new fermions and their scalar superpartners which are vectorlike with respect to the standard model gauge group but may be chiral under additional gauge factors. In this paper we explore the production and decay of an important example, i.e., a heavy isosinglet charge -1/3 quark and its scalar partner, using the charge assignments of a 27-plet of E{sub 6} for illustration. We emphasize that, depending on the symmetries of the low-energy theory, such exotic particles may decay by the mixing of the fermion with the d, s, or b quarks; may decay by leptoquark or diquark couplings (which may nevertheless preserve a form of R parity); or may be stable with respect to renormalizable couplings but decay by higher-dimension operators on cosmological times scales. We discuss the latter two possibilities in detail for various assumptions concerning the relative masses of the exotic fermions, scalars, and the lightest neutralino, and emphasize the necessity of considering the collider signatures in conjunction with the normal minimal supersymmetric standard model processes. Existing and projected constraints from colliders, indirect experiments, proton decay, and big bang nucleosynthesis are considered.

  18. Exotic invaders gain foraging benefits by shoaling with native fish

    PubMed Central

    Camacho-Cervantes, Morelia; Garcia, Constantino Macías; Ojanguren, Alfredo F.; Magurran, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Freshwater habitats are under increasing threat due to invasions of exotic fish. These invasions typically begin with the introduction of small numbers of individuals unfamiliar with the new habitat. One way in which the invaders might overcome this disadvantage is by associating with native taxa occupying a similar ecological niche. Here we used guppies (Poecilia reticulata) from a feral population in Mexico to test the prediction that exotic shoaling fish can associate with heterospecifics, and that they improve their foraging efficiency by doing so. Guppies have invaded the Mexican High Plateau and are implicated in the declines of many native topminnow (Goodeinae) species. We show that heterospecific associations between guppies and topminnows can deliver the same foraging benefits as conspecific shoals, and that variation in foraging gains is linked to differences in association tendency. These results uncover a mechanism enabling founding individuals to survive during the most vulnerable phase of an invasion and help explain why guppies have established viable populations in many parts of Mexico as well in every continent except Antarctica. PMID:26064552

  19. Possible exotic superconductivity in the monolayer and bilayer silicene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Yao, Yugui; Zhang, Li-Da; Liu, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Feng

    2014-03-01

    Silicene, the silicon-based counterpart of graphene, has attracted a lot of research interest since synthesized recently. Similar honeycomb lattice structures of the two systems let them share most of their marvelous physical properties. The most important structural difference between the two systems lie in the noncoplanar lowbuckled geometry in silicene, which brings up a lot of interesting physical consequence to the system. Here we focus on possible exotic superconductivity (SC) in the family, via random phase approximation (RPA) study on the relevant Hubbard-models. Two systems of this family are studied, including the monolayer and bilayer silicene. For the former system, we found an electric-field driven quantum phase transition (QPT) from chiral d+id to f-wave SC when the field is perpendicular to the silicene plane. For the latter system, we found that even the undoped system is intrinsically metallic and superconducting with chiral d+id symmetry and tunable Tc which can be high . Our study not only provides a new playground for the study of the exotic SC, but also brings a new epoch to the familiar Si industry.

  20. New particle searches at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Nodulman, L.J.

    1995-09-01

    One of the fundamental roles of a general purpose detector exploring, by means of increasing luminosity, higher and higher mass reach, is to search for new particles and exotic phenomena. This is a continuing effort for the CDF collaboration, and will report on several searches using about 20 pb{sup -1} from the 1992/93 run labelled {open_quotes}run 1a{close_quotes} and {approximately}50 of the 90 pb{sup -1} so far from the current {open_quotes}run 1b.{close_quotes} These are mostly preliminary analyses, typically using a total of 70 pb{sup -1}. Our limits on SUSY using missing E{sub T} with jets as well as three leptons are discussed elsewhere; results from the D0 collaboration are similar. I will discuss searches for additional vector bosons Z{prime} and W{prime}, second generation scalar leptoquarks, as well as a broad search for objects decaying into jet pairs, including b-tagged jet pairs. I will also describe two events which do not fit in comfortably with either the standard model or a phenomenologically motivated search.

  1. New mechanism of phase enhancement in neutron interferometry and ``exotic'' interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Vladimir

    2009-10-01

    The possibility to search for anomalous ``gravitational'' interactions in neuron interferometric experiments has been recently considered for cold [1] and ultra cold [2] neutrons, where it was shown a very large contribution to the phase of neutron wave function from these anomalous interactions. To understand the origin of this phase enhancement, we consider one dimensional Schr"odinger equation which describes neutron propagation through materials. It is shown that in many cases this Schr"odinger equation can be transformed into Hill's equation, and/or, under some conditions, into Heun's and Mathieu's equations. The asymptotic solution of the considered equations shows that the contribution of weak exotic interactions to the phase of propagated neutrons is accumulated with a distance exponentially rather than linearly. This can lead to rather large enhancement factor for a contribution of these interactions into neutron phase. Using perturbation theory approach, one can see that this enhanced phase is also proportional to the value of neutron wavelength. This explains why one can see the phase enhancement only with very cold neutrons. [4pt] [1] G. L. Greene and V. Gudkov, Phys. Rev. C 75, 015501 (2007).[0pt] [2] V. Gudkov, H. M. Shimizu and G. L. Greene, NIM A (2009), in press.

  2. Biodiversity maintenance mechanisms differ between native and novel exotic-dominated communities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ongoing homogenization of the Earth’s biota is affecting nearly every region of Earth. We experimentally compared species diversity decline between nine-species grassland communities containing either all exotic (i.e. introduced) or all native species under controlled field conditions. Exotic ...

  3. Use of exotic plants to control Spartina alterniflora invasion and promote mangrove restoration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ting; Liu, Shuchao; Feng, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Gan, Qian; Peng, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, the exotic invasive Spartina alterniflora is preventing the establishment of native mangroves. The use of exotic species, control of exotic plant invasion, and restoration of native plant communities are timely research issues. We used exotic Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham and S. caseolaris (L.) Engl. to control invasive Spartina alterniflora Loisel through replacement control for five years, which concurrently promoted the restoration of native mangroves. This process includes three stages. I: In a mangrove area invaded by S. alterniflora, exotic S. apetala and S. caseolaris grew rapidly due to their relatively fast-growing character and an allelopathic effect. II: Fast-growing S. apetala and S. caseolaris eradicate S. alterniflora through shading and allelopathy. III: The growth of native mangrove was promoted because exotic plant seedlings cannot regenerate in the understory shade, whereas native mesophytic mangrove plants seedlings can grow; when the area experiences extreme low temperatures in winter or at other times, S. apetala dies, and native mangrove species grow to restore the communities. This model has important implications for addressing the worldwide problems of "how to implement the ecological control of invasion using exotic species" and "how to concurrently promote native community restoration during the control of exotic invasion". PMID:26291074

  4. Exotic plant traits lead to functional diversity decline in novel ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic species have become common and even dominant in some grasslands forming novel ecosystems because the species in them have no common evolutionary history. Recent work on these novel ecosystems suggest that exotic species contribute to diversity declines. In order to identify the plant traits...

  5. Body size, colony size, abundance, and ecological impact of exotic ants in Florida's upland ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With hundreds of species established in new localities around the world, ants are an important, widely distributed, and growing group of exotic animals. The success of many established exotic ants is hypothesized to be related to competitive advantages associated with smaller workers and larger col...

  6. Use of exotic plants to control Spartina alterniflora invasion and promote mangrove restoration

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ting; Liu, Shuchao; Feng, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Gan, Qian; Peng, Shaolin

    2015-01-01

    In coastal China, the exotic invasive Spartina alterniflora is preventing the establishment of native mangroves. The use of exotic species, control of exotic plant invasion, and restoration of native plant communities are timely research issues. We used exotic Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham and S. caseolaris (L.) Engl. to control invasive Spartina alterniflora Loisel through replacement control for five years, which concurrently promoted the restoration of native mangroves. This process includes three stages. I: In a mangrove area invaded by S. alterniflora, exotic S. apetala and S. caseolaris grew rapidly due to their relatively fast-growing character and an allelopathic effect. II: Fast-growing S. apetala and S. caseolaris eradicate S. alterniflora through shading and allelopathy. III: The growth of native mangrove was promoted because exotic plant seedlings cannot regenerate in the understory shade, whereas native mesophytic mangrove plants seedlings can grow; when the area experiences extreme low temperatures in winter or at other times, S. apetala dies, and native mangrove species grow to restore the communities. This model has important implications for addressing the worldwide problems of “how to implement the ecological control of invasion using exotic species” and “how to concurrently promote native community restoration during the control of exotic invasion”. PMID:26291074

  7. Biodiversity and native plant abundance decline with increasing abundance of exotic annual grass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic plants are generally considered a serious problem in wildlands around the world. However, some argue that the impacts of exotic plants have been exaggerated and that biodiversity and other important plant community characteristics are commonly improved with invasion. Thus, disagreement exis...

  8. Predicting invasion in grassland ecosystems: Is exotic dominance the real embarrassment of richness?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For two centuries there has been a perception that while exotic species are dominant in many areas, others remain largely unaffected. This unquantified observation suggests a fundamental ecological question: why do exotics dominate some locations and not others? While invasions are clearly important...

  9. Biodiversity, phenology and temporal niche differences between native- and novel exotic-dominated grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic species are significant components of many ecosystems, and have become the dominant species in some situations. Many exotic plant species have been introduced or escaped into grasslands where they form low diversity ‘novel ecosystems’ of species with no evolutionary history of interaction. ...

  10. Biodiversity and temporal niche differences between native- and novel exotic-dominated grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many exotic plant species have been introduced or escaped into grasslands where they combine to form low diversity 'novel ecosystems' of species with no evolutionary history of interaction. Ecologists have long argued over whether low diversity of exotic communities results from species interaction...

  11. Assessing the influence of environmental and human factors on native and exotic species richness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Albuquerque, Fábio Suzart; Castro-Díez, Pilar; Rodríguez, Miguel Á.; Cayuela, Luis

    2011-03-01

    Understanding the ecological determinants of biological invasions is a key issue for predicting the spread of exotic species over broad geographical extents. The goal of this study was to investigate independent and combined effects of climatic and human-related factors on native and exotic plant species richness in Great Britain. We used multiple and partial regression techniques and spatial methods to investigate the effect of these variables on species richness. The highest plant richness was found in southeastern Great Britain and the lowest in the North for both native and exotic species. We found that energy input was the best predictor of either native or exotic plant richness, followed by water availability. Richness increased linearly with energy input for native plants, but exponentially for exotics. This is probably due to the lower chances of exotic species to succeed in low-energy sites, and/or to the lower species saturation of more productive ecosystems. The low portion of richness variance explained by human footprint was probably due to the study scale and to the overlapping between climatic and human factors. We conclude that the environment-human models are robust to enhance our understanding of the factors controlling the distribution of exotic species. Models containing water-energy measures can be a key component for explaining the broad-scale patterns of exotic species.

  12. Evidence for an Exotic Baryon State, Theta{sup +}(1540), in Photoproduction Reactions from Protons and Deuterons with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Stepan Stepanyan

    2003-05-01

    CLAS photoproduction data on deuterium and hydrogen targets have been analyzed in a search for an exotic baryon state with strangeness S = +1, the {Theta}{sup +} (originally named the Z{sup +}). This resonance was predicted recently in theoretical work based on the chiral soliton model as a lowest mass member of an anti-decuplet of 5-quark states. The reaction {gamma}d {yields} pK{sup -}K{sup +}n, which requires a final state interaction inside the deuteron, was used in the analysis of deuteron data. In the analysis of proton data, the reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +}K{sup -}K{sup +}n was studied. Evidence for the {Theta}{sup +} state is found in both analyzes in the invariant mass distribution of the nK{sup +}. Our results are consistent with previously reported results by LEPS/Spring-8 collaboration (Japan), and by the ITEP (Moscow) group.

  13. Spectroscopy of exotic baryons with CLAS: search for ground and first excited states

    SciTech Connect

    M. Battaglieri

    2004-07-20

    In the last year many Collaborations reported about the evidence of a possible pentaquark state but so far the results are not yet conclusive. New dedicated experiments with higher statistics and precision are necessary to confirm the pentaquark existence and its properties. In this contribution, I will report about a new photoproduction experiment on a proton target, the so-called 'G11' experiment, just performed in the Hall-B at Jefferson Lab that collected ten times the existing statistics.

  14. Remarks on search methods for stable, massive, elementary particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perl, Martin L.

    2001-11-01

    This paper was presented at the 69th birthday celebration of Professor Eugene Commins, honoring his research achievements. These remarks are about the experimental techniques used in the search for new stable, massive particles, particles at least as massive as the electron. A variety of experimental methods such as accelerator experiments, cosmic ray studies, searches for halo particles in the galaxy and searches for exotic particles in bulk matter are described. A summary is presented of the measured limits on the existence of new stable, massive particle. .

  15. The SQCRAMscope: Probing exotic materials with quantum gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Shenglan; Turner, Richard; Disciacca, Jack; Lev, Benjamin

    2015-03-01

    Microscopy techniques co-opted from nonlinear optics and high energy physics have complemented solid-state probes in elucidating exotic order manifest in condensed matter materials. Up until now, however, no attempts have been made to use modern techniques of ultracold atomic physics to directly explore properties of strongly correlated or topologically protected materials. Our talk will present the SQCRAMscope, a novel Scanning Quantum CRyogenic Atom Microscope technique for imaging magnetic and electric fields near cryogenically cooled materials. With our SQCRAMscope, we aim to image inhomogeneous transport and domain percolation in technologically relevant materials whose order has evaded elucidation. We are grateful to the Moore Foundation and the Department of Energy for their generous support.

  16. Elastic scattering, fusion, and breakup of light exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolata, J. J.; Guimarães, V.; Aguilera, E. F.

    2016-05-01

    The present status of fusion reactions involving light ( A < 20) radioactive projectiles at energies around the Coulomb barrier ( E < 10 MeV per nucleon) is reviewed, emphasizing measurements made within the last decade. Data on elastic scattering (providing total reaction cross section information) and breakup channels for the involved systems, demonstrating the relationship between these and the fusion channel, are also reviewed. Similarities and differences in the behavior of fusion and total reaction cross section data concerning halo nuclei, weakly-bound but less exotic projectiles, and strongly-bound systems are discussed. One difference in the behavior of fusion excitation functions near the Coulomb barrier seems to emerge between neutron-halo and proton-halo systems. The role of charge has been investigated by comparing the fusion excitation functions, properly scaled, for different neutron- and proton-rich systems. Possible physical explanations for the observed differences are also reviewed.

  17. Recent Astrophysical Studies with Exotic Beams at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Bardayan, Daniel W

    2006-02-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holi led Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made several recent measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  18. Exotic properties and optimal control of quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Congjie; Abe, Sumiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    A quantum heat engine of a specific type is studied. This engine contains a single particle confined in the infinite square well potential with variable width and consists of three processes: the isoenergetic process (which has no classical analogs) as well as the isothermal and adiabatic processes. It is found that the engine possesses exotic properties in its performance. The efficiency takes the maximum value when the expansion ratio of the engine is appropriately set, and, in addition, the lower the temperature is, the higher the maximum efficiency becomes, highlighting aspects of the influence of quantum effects on thermodynamics. A comment is also made on the relevance of this engine to that of Carnot.

  19. Sensitivity of LHC experiments to exotic highly ionising particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roeck, A.; Katre, A.; Mermod, P.; Milstead, D.; Sloan, T.

    2012-04-01

    The experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are able to discover or set limits on the production of exotic particles with TeV-scale masses possessing values of electric and/or magnetic charge such that they behave as highly ionising particles (HIPs). In this paper the sensitivity of the LHC experiments to HIP production is discussed in detail. It is shown that a number of different detection methods are required to investigate as fully as possible the charge-mass range. These include direct detection as the HIPs pass through either passive or active detectors and, in the case of magnetically charged objects, the so-called induction method with which magnetic monopoles which stop in accelerator and detector material could be observed. The benefit of using complementary approaches to HIP detection is discussed.

  20. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  1. An exotic k-essence interpretation of interactive cosmological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    We define a generalization of scalar fields with non-canonical kinetic term which we call exotic k-essence or, briefly, exotik. These fields are generated by the global description of cosmological models with two interactive fluids in the dark sector and under certain conditions they correspond to usual k-essences. The formalism is applied to the cases of constant potential and of inverse square potential and also we develop the purely exotik version for the modified holographic Ricci type (MHR) of dark energy, where the equations of state are not constant. With the kinetic function F=1+mx and the inverse square potential we recover, through the interaction term, the identification between k-essences and quintessences of an exponential potential, already known for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker and Bianchi type I geometries. Worked examples are shown that include the self-interacting MHR and also models with crossing of the phantom divide line (PDL).

  2. Can extra dimensional effects allow wormholes without exotic matter?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Sayan; Lahiri, Sayantani; SenGupta, Soumitra

    2015-11-01

    We explore the existence of Lorentzian wormholes in the context of an effective on-brane, scalar-tensor theory of gravity. In such theories, the timelike convergence condition, which is always violated for wormholes, has contributions, via the field equations, from on-brane matter as well as from an effective geometric stress energy generated by a bulk-induced radion field. It is shown that, for a class of wormholes, the required on-brane matter, as seen by an on-brane observer in the Jordan frame, is not exotic and does not violate the Weak Energy Condition. The presence of the effective geometric stress energy in addition to on-brane matter is largely responsible for creating this intriguing possibility. Thus, if such wormholes are ever found to exist in the Universe, they would clearly provide pointers towards the existence of a warped extra dimension as proposed in the two-brane model of Randall and Sundrum.

  3. Turning a band insulator into an exotic superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xiangang; Savrasov, Sergey Y.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding exotic, non-s-wave-like states of Cooper pairs is important and may lead to new superconductors with higher critical temperatures and novel properties. Their existence is known to be possible but has always been thought to be associated with non-traditional mechanisms of superconductivity where electronic correlations play an important role. Here we use a first principles linear response calculation to show that in doped Bi2Se3 an unconventional p-wave-like state can be favoured via a conventional phonon-mediated mechanism, as driven by an unusual, almost singular behaviour of the electron–phonon interaction at long wavelengths. This may provide a new platform for our understanding of superconductivity phenomena in doped band insulators. PMID:25014912

  4. Exotic charges, multicomponent dark matter and light sterile neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeck, Julian; Zhang, He

    2013-05-01

    Generating small sterile neutrino masses via the same seesaw mechanism that suppresses active neutrino masses requires a specific structure in the neutral fermion mass matrix. We present a model where this structure is enforced by a new U(1)' gauge symmetry, spontaneously broken at the TeV scale. The additional fermions necessary for anomaly cancellation need to carry exotic charges in order not to spoil the neutrino structure and turn out to form multicomponent cold dark matter. The active-sterile mixing then connects the new particles and the Standard Model — opening a new portal in addition to the usual Higgs- and kinetic-mixing portals — which leads to dark matter annihilation almost exclusively into neutrinos.

  5. Self-isospectrality, mirror symmetry, and exotic nonlinear supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Plyushchay, Mikhail S.; Nieto, Luis-Miguel

    2010-09-15

    We study supersymmetry of a self-isospectral one-gap Poeschl-Teller system in the light of a mirror symmetry that is based on spatial and shift reflections. The revealed exotic, partially broken, nonlinear supersymmetry admits seven alternatives for a grading operator. One of its local, first order supercharges may be identified as a Hamiltonian of an associated one-gap, nonperiodic Bogoliubov-de Gennes system. The latter possesses a nonlinear supersymmetric structure, in which any of the three nonlocal generators of a Clifford algebra may be chosen as the grading operator. We find that the supersymmetry generators for both systems are the Darboux-dressed integrals of a free spin-1/2 particle in the Schroedinger picture, or of a free massive Dirac particle. Nonlocal Foldy-Wouthuysen transformations are shown to be involved in the supersymmetric structure.

  6. Exotic Lepton Flavour Violating Processes in the Presence of Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papoulias, D. K.; Kosmas, T. S.

    2013-02-01

    The discovery of neutrino oscillations indicates the existence of massive neutrinos in contrast to the massless neutrinos predicted by the Standard Model. One of the simplest extensions of the SM obtained by adding a heavy right-handed neutrino singlet, NR, per neutrino generation is the Seesaw mechanism. Within the context of this mechanism, flavour changing neutral current neutrino-nucleus reactions of the type are predicted to occur. In this contribution, motivated by the extensive studies (theoretical and experimental) of the LFV in ν- → e- conversion in nuclei, we investigate FCNC in neutrino-nucleus reactions. From a nuclear theory point of view, the Donnelly-Walecka model for cross sections calculations is employed. To this purpose, the single-particle transition matrix elements are evaluated from a Mathematica code developed in this work. Neutrino-nucleus reactions have important impact in Astrophysics and hence a detailed study of such exotic processes is of significant importance.

  7. Three-Body Forces and Neutron-Rich Exotic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu; Suzuki, Toshio

    2013-08-01

    Physics of three-body forces in connection to exotic nuclei will be discussed. Three-nucleon forces (3NF), especially Fujita-Miyazawa 3NF, are shown to be the key for the solution to the long-standing problem of oxygen drip line, which deviates from basic trend towards the stability line. Three-body forces produce repulsive modifications to effective interaction between valence neutrons, and make the ground states less bound. The oxygen drip line is then located at the right place. The relation to the neutron matter is presented. Applications to Ca isotopes will be presented. The shell evolution due to the 3NF depicts the raising of single-particle energies and the widening of splitting among the orbits. This is in contrast to the so-called shell quenching. The 2+ levels are calculated for Ca isotopes, suggesting about the same sub-magic structure for N = 32 and 34.

  8. Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses: Chemistry, petrology, and exotic origin

    SciTech Connect

    Delano, J.W.; Lindsley, D.H.; Ma, M.; Schmitt, R.A.

    1982-11-15

    The Apollo 15 yellow impact glasses are characterized by moderate TiO/sub 2/ (approx.4.8%) and high abundances of the large ion lithophile elements (e.g., K, P, Hf, Th, REE). Since the chemistry of these glasses cannot be duplicated by any combination of local components presently known to occur at the Apollo 15 landing site, these yellow glasses seem to be exotic to that area. Chemical and petrologic constraints suggest that these samples were produced by impact melting of an immature mare regolith developed upon an unusual variety of mare basalt. We speculate that the target basalt were the youngest lava flows known to exist on the moon (i.e., Eratosphenian-age lavas in Oceanus Procellarum and Mare Imbrium). Specific tests are proposed for evaluating this provocative hypothesis.

  9. Human behavioral regularity, fractional Brownian motion, and exotic phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaohui; Yang, Guang; An, Kenan; Huang, Jiping

    2016-08-01

    The mix of competition and cooperation (C&C) is ubiquitous in human society, which, however, remains poorly explored due to the lack of a fundamental method. Here, by developing a Janus game for treating C&C between two sides (suppliers and consumers), we show, for the first time, experimental and simulation evidences for human behavioral regularity. This property is proved to be characterized by fractional Brownian motion associated with an exotic transition between periodic and nonperiodic phases. Furthermore, the periodic phase echoes with business cycles, which are well-known in reality but still far from being well understood. Our results imply that the Janus game could be a fundamental method for studying C&C among humans in society, and it provides guidance for predicting human behavioral activity from the perspective of fractional Brownian motion.

  10. Recent astrophysical studies with exotic beams at ORNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardayan, D. W.

    2006-03-01

    The availability of exotic beams has produced great opportunities for advances in our understanding of the nucleosynthesis occurring in stellar burning and stellar explosions such as novae, X-ray bursts, and supernovae. In these extreme environments, synthesized radioactive nuclei can undergo subsequent nuclear processing before they decay, and thus to understand these events, we must understand reaction rates involving radioactive nuclei. At the ORNL Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), we have made a number of measurements using proton-rich beams such as 18F and 7Be and neutron-rich beams such as 82Ge and 84Se that help clarify the structure of astrophysically-important nuclei. We are also poised to begin studies with doubly-magic 132Sn. The experimental methods and results are discussed.

  11. "FruitZotic": A Sensory Approach to Introducing Preschoolers to Fresh Exotic Fruits at Head Start Locations in Western Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kannan, Srimathi; Smith, Rebecca; Foley, Christine; Del Sole, Sarah; White, Alissa; Sheldon, Lisa A.; Mietlcki-Floyd, Shirley; Severin, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    FruitZotic incorporated fruit stories (exotic-fruits-literacy), a "See, Smell, Hear, Touch and Taste" (sensory) segment and a question-prompted discussion. Three take-home components incorporating the exotic fruits were: Coloring Activity, Recipes, and Fact Sheets. Sensory based nutrition education can increase familiarity with exotic fruits among…

  12. Invasion in a diversity hotspot: Exotic cover and native richness in the Californian serpentine flora

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, S.; Grace, J.B.; Davies, K.F.; Safford, H.D.; Viers, J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Exotic species have been observed to be more prevalent in sites where the richness of native species is highest, possibly reflecting variation among sites in resources, propagule supply, heterogeneity, or disturbance. However, such a pattern leaves unclear whether natives at species-rich sites are subject to especially severe impacts from exotics as a result. We considered this question using path models in which relationships between exotic cover and native richness were evaluated in the presence of correlated environmental factors. At 109 sites on serpentine soils across California, USA, exotic cover was positively correlated with total native herbaceous richness and was negatively correlated with the richness of both serpentine-endemic and rare native herbs. However, in path models that accounted for the influences of soil chemistry, disturbance, overstory cover, and regional rainfall and elevation, we found no indication that exotic cover reduced any component of native herb richness. Rather, our results indicated similarities and differences in the conditions favoring exotic, native, endemic, and rare species. Our results suggest that, in spite of some localized impacts, exotic species are not exerting a detectable overall effect on the community richness of the unique native flora of Californian serpentine. ?? 2006 by the Ecological Society of America.

  13. Exotic Dance in Baltimore: From Entry to STI/HIV Risk

    PubMed Central

    Reuben, Jacqueline; Sherman, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented health risks associated with sex work, but few U.S. studies have focused on the exotic dance industry. We undertook to describe the factors that influenced women's entry into exotic dance and explored the relation of these forces to their subsequent Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI)/HIV risk trajectory. Qualitative interviews (N=25) were conducted with female exotic dancers from June through August, 2009. Data were analyzed through Atlas-ti using an inductive approach. Economic vulnerability was the primary force behind women's initiation into the profession. Drug use, physical abuse, and enjoyment of dancing were often concurrent with economic need and provided a further push toward exotic dance. Social networks facilitated entry by normalizing the profession and presenting it as a solution to financial hardship. Characteristics of exotic dance clubs, such as immediate hire and daily pay, attracted women in a state of financial vulnerability. Women's motivations for dancing, including economic vulnerability and drug use practices, shaped their STI/HIV risk once immersed in the club environment, with social networks often facilitating sexual risk behavior. Understanding the factors that drive women to exotic dance and influence risk behavior in the club may assist in the development of targeted harm reduction interventions for exotic dancers. PMID:25807063

  14. Assessing an exotic plant surveying program in the Mojave Desert, Clark County, Nevada, USA.

    PubMed

    Abella, Scott R; Spencer, Jessica E; Hoines, Joshua; Nazarchyk, Carrie

    2009-04-01

    Exotic species can threaten native ecosystems and reduce services that ecosystems provide to humans. Early detection of incipient populations of exotic species is a key step in containing exotics before explosive population growth and corresponding impacts occur. We report the results of the first three years of an exotic plant early detection and treatment program conducted along more than 3,000 km of transportation corridors within an area >1.5 million ha in the Mojave Desert, USA. Incipient populations of 43 exotic plant species were mapped using global positioning and geographic information systems. Brassica tournefortii (Sahara mustard) infested the most soil types (47% of 256) surveyed in the study area, while Nicotiana glauca (tree tobacco) and others currently occupy less than 5% of soil types. Malcolmia africana (African mustard) was disproportionately detected on gypsum soils, occurring on 59% of gypsum soil types compared to 27% of all surveyed soils. Gypsum soils constitute unique rare plant habitat in this region, and by conventional wisdom were not previously considered prone to invasion. While this program has provided an initial assessment of the landscape-scale distribution of exotic species along transportation corridors, evaluations of both the survey methods and the effectiveness of treating incipient populations are needed. An exotic plant information system most useful to resource mangers will likely include integrating planning oriented coarse-scale surveys, more detailed monitoring of targeted locations, and research on species life histories, community invasibility, and treatment effectiveness. PMID:18369728

  15. Including the introduction of exotic species in life cycle impact assessment: the case of inland shipping.

    PubMed

    Hanafiah, Marlia M; Leuven, Rob S E W; Sommerwerk, Nike; Tockner, Klement; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2013-12-17

    While the ecological impact of anthropogenically introduced exotic species is considered a major threat for biodiversity and ecosystems functioning, it is generally not accounted for in the environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) of products. In this article, we propose a framework that includes exotic species introduction in an LCA context. We derived characterization factors for exotic fish species introduction related to the transport of goods across the Rhine-Main-Danube canal. These characterization factors are expressed as the potentially disappeared fraction (PDF) of native freshwater fish species in the rivers Rhine and Danube integrated over space and time per amount of goods transported (PDF·m(3)·yr·kg(-1)). Furthermore, we quantified the relative importance of exotic fish species introduction compared to other anthropogenic stressors in the freshwater environment (i.e., eutrophication, ecotoxicity, greenhouse gases, and water consumption) for transport of goods through the Rhine-Main-Danube waterway. We found that the introduction of exotic fish species contributed to 70-85% of the total freshwater ecosystem impact, depending on the distance that goods were transported. Our analysis showed that it is relevant and feasible to include the introduction of exotic species in an LCA framework. The proposed framework can be further extended by including the impacts of other exotic species groups, types of water bodies and pathways for introduction. PMID:24251685

  16. Exotic pediculosis and hair-loss syndrome in deer (Odocoileus hemionus) populations in California.

    PubMed

    Roug, Annette; Swift, Pamela; Puschner, Birgit; Gerstenberg, Greg; Mertins, James W; Johnson, Christine Kreuder; Torres, Steve; Mortensen, Jack; Woods, Leslie

    2016-07-01

    Infestation with nonnative, "exotic" lice was first noted in Washington black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in 1994 and has since then spread throughout the western United States. In California, infestation with the exotic louse Damalinia (Cervicola) sp. was first detected in black-tailed deer from northern California in 2004, and, in 2009, the exotic louse species Bovicola tibialis and Linognathus africanus were identified on mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus californicus) in central Sierra Nevada in association with a mortality event. Exotic lice have since been detected in various locations throughout the state. We describe the geographic distribution of these exotic lice within California, using data from 520 live-captured and 9 postmortem-sampled, free-ranging mule deer examined between 2009 and 2014. Data from live-captured deer were used to assess possible associations between louse infestation and host age, host sex, migratory behavior, season, and blood selenium and serum copper concentrations. Damalinia (Cervicola) sp. and B. tibialis lice were distinctively distributed geographically, with D. (Cervicola) sp. infesting herds in northern and central coastal California, B. tibialis occurring in the central coastal mountains and the Sierra Nevada, and L. africanus occurring only sporadically. Younger age classes and low selenium concentrations were significantly associated with exotic louse infestation, whereas no significant relationship was detected with serum copper levels. Our results show that exotic lice are widespread in California, and younger age classes with low blood selenium concentrations are more likely to be infested with lice than older deer. PMID:27240567

  17. Local dominance of exotic plants declines with residence time: a role for plant–soil feedback?

    PubMed Central

    Speek, Tanja A.A.; Schaminée, Joop H.J.; Stam, Jeltje M.; Lotz, Lambertus A.P.; Ozinga, Wim A.; van der Putten, Wim H.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species may be released from their native soil-borne pathogens, but that they become exposed to increased soil pathogen activity in the new range when time since introduction increases. Other studies have shown that introduced exotic plant species become less dominant when time since introduction increases, and that plant abundance may be controlled by soil-borne pathogens; however, no study yet has tested whether these soil effects might explain the decline in dominance of exotic plant species following their initial invasiveness. Here we determine plant–soil feedback of 20 plant species that have been introduced into The Netherlands. We tested the hypotheses that (i) exotic plant species with a longer residence time have a more negative soil feedback and (ii) greater local dominance of the introduced exotic plant species correlates with less negative, or more positive, plant–soil feedback. Although the local dominance of exotic plant species decreased with time since introduction, there was no relationship of local dominance with plant–soil feedback. Plant–soil feedback also did not become more negative with increasing time since introduction. We discuss why our results may deviate from some earlier published studies and why plant–soil feedback may not in all cases, or not in all comparisons, explain patterns of local dominance of introduced exotic plant species. PMID:25770013

  18. Exotic Dance in Baltimore: From Entry to STI/HIV Risk.

    PubMed

    Lilleston, Pamela S; Reuben, Jacqueline; Sherman, Susan G

    2015-01-01

    Research has documented health risks associated with sex work, but few U.S. studies have focused on the exotic dance industry. We undertook this study to describe the factors that influenced women's entry into exotic dance and explored the relation of these forces to their subsequent sexually transmitted infection (STI)/HIV risk trajectory. Qualitative interviews (N = 25) were conducted with female exotic dancers from June through August 2009. Data were analyzed through Atlas-ti using an inductive approach. Economic vulnerability was the primary force behind women's initiation into the profession. Drug use, physical abuse, and enjoyment of dancing were often concurrent with economic need and provided a further push toward exotic dance. Social networks facilitated entry by normalizing the profession and presenting it as a solution to financial hardship. Characteristics of exotic dance clubs, such as immediate hire and daily pay, attracted women in a state of financial vulnerability. Women's motivations for dancing, including economic vulnerability and drug use practices, shaped their STI/HIV risk once immersed in the club environment, with social networks often facilitating sexual risk behavior. Understanding the factors that drive women to exotic dance and influence risk behavior in the club may assist in the development of targeted harm reduction interventions for exotic dancers. PMID:25807063

  19. Native weeds and exotic plants: Relationships to disturbance in mixed-grass prairie

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larson, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Disturbance frequently is implicated in the spread of invasive exotic plants. Disturbances may be broadly categorized as endogenous (e.g., digging by fossorial animals) or exogenous (e.g., construction and maintenance of roads and trails), just as weedy species may be native or exotic in origin. The objective of this study was to characterize and compare exotic and native weedy plant occurrence in and near three classes of disturbance -digging by prairie dogs (an endogenous disturbance to which native plants have had the opportunity to adapt), paved or gravel roads (an exogenous disturbance without natural precedent), and constructed trails (an exogenous disturbance with a natural precedent in trails created by movement of large mammals) - in three geographically separate national park units. I used plant survey data from the North and South Units of Theodore Roosevelt National Park and Wind Cave National Park in the northern mixed-grass prairie of western North and South Dakota, USA, to characterize the distribution of weedy native and exotic plants with respect to the three disturbance classes as well as areas adjacent to them. There were differences both in the susceptibility of the disturbance classes to invasion and in the distributions of native weeds and exotic species among the disturbance classes. Both exotic and native weedy species richness were greatest in prairie dog towns and community composition there differed most from undisturbed areas. Exotic species were more likely to thrive near roadways, where native weedy species were infrequently encountered. Exotic species were more likely to have spread beyond the disturbed areas into native prairie than were weedy native species. The response of individual exotic plant species to the three types of disturbance was less consistent than that of native weedy species across the three park units.

  20. Herbivory and dominance shifts among exotic and congeneric native plant species during plant community establishment.

    PubMed

    Engelkes, Tim; Meisner, Annelein; Morriën, Elly; Kostenko, Olga; Van der Putten, Wim H; Macel, Mirka

    2016-02-01

    Invasive exotic plant species often have fewer natural enemies and suffer less damage from herbivores in their new range than genetically or functionally related species that are native to that area. Although we might expect that having fewer enemies would promote the invasiveness of the introduced exotic plant species due to reduced enemy exposure, few studies have actually analyzed the ecological consequences of this situation in the field. Here, we examined how exposure to aboveground herbivores influences shifts in dominance among exotic and phylogenetically related native plant species in a riparian ecosystem during early establishment of invaded communities. We planted ten plant communities each consisting of three individuals of each of six exotic plant species as well as six phylogenetically related natives. Exotic plant species were selected based on a rapid recent increase in regional abundance, the presence of a congeneric native species, and their co-occurrence in the riparian ecosystem. All plant communities were covered by tents with insect mesh. Five tents were open on the leeward side to allow herbivory. The other five tents were completely closed in order to exclude insects and vertebrates. Herbivory reduced aboveground biomass by half and influenced which of the plant species dominated the establishing communities. Exposure to herbivory did not reduce the total biomass of natives more than that of exotics, so aboveground herbivory did not selectively enhance exotics during this early stage of plant community development. Effects of herbivores on plant biomass depended on plant species or genus but not on plant status (i.e., exotic vs native). Thus, aboveground herbivory did not promote the dominance of exotic plant species during early establishment of the phylogenetically balanced plant communities. PMID:26481795

  1. Confidential Searches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Linda Chion

    2003-01-01

    Will the stealth superintendent hunt in Cincinnati become tomorrow's standard approach? Search consultants and superintendents offer their views on how far confidentiality should go. Also includes a search firm's process for shielding identities and a confidentiality pledge. (MLF)

  2. Savvy Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacso, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Explains desktop metasearch engines, which search the databases of several search engines simultaneously. Reviews two particular versions, the Copernic 2001 Pro and the BullsEye Pro 3, comparing costs, subject categories, display capabilities, and layout for presenting results. (LRW)

  3. Vermicomposting of Solid Waste Using Local and Exotic Earthworms: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Amit, Krishan; Ajit, Kumar; Arthanareeswari, M; Kamaraj, P

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the decomposition efficiency of earthworms, local (L.mauritii) as well as exotic (Eisenia foetida) in vermicomposting of garden litter in SRM University campus. The vermicompost produced through vermicomposting of garden litter mixed with cow dung in the ratio of 3:1 by using local and exotic earthworms (Eisenia foetida) was rich in ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, available phosphorus, total potassium and TKN, and there was a reduction in total organic carbon and carbon to nitrogen ratio. The study reveals that the decomposition efficiency of exotic earthworms is better compared to local earthworms. PMID:26563089

  4. Are bison exotic in the Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peek, James M.; Miquelle, Dale G.; Wright, R. Gerald

    1987-03-01

    The effect of past distributions of animal populations now extinct in an area from unknown causes is considered relative to their status as exotic or native in national parks. The example is the bison (Bison bison) on the Copper and Chitina river drainages in Alaska in the USA which was introduced prior to establishment of Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve. The fossil record suggests that bison were present as recently as 500 years ago in Alaska. The policy of the US National Park Service to maintain natural ecosystems and restrict or eliminate exotic species raises the issue of whether this species should be treated as exotic or native.

  5. Suspicionless Searches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2000-01-01

    In a federal case involving a vice-principal's pat-down search of middle-school students in a cafeteria (for a missing pizza knife), the court upheld the search, saying it was relatively unintrusive and met "TLO's" reasonable-suspicion standards. Principals need reasonable justification for searching a group. (Contains 18 references.) (MLH)

  6. Dewey Searches!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Library Media Activities Monthly, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity for young children that helps them conduct subject searches using an automated system that allows customization of access to a library's collection. Explains a timed game that makes use of subject searching and word searching on the topic of dinosaurs. (LRW)

  7. Analytical Searching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pappas, Marjorie L.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses analytical searching, a process that enables searchers of electronic resources to develop a planned strategy by combining words or phrases with Boolean operators. Defines simple and complex searching, and describes search strategies developed with Boolean logic and truncation. Provides guidelines for teaching students analytical…

  8. Partition search

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsberg, M.L.

    1996-12-31

    We introduce a new form of game search called partition search that incorporates dependency analysis, allowing substantial reductions in the portion of the tree that needs to be expanded. Both theoretical results and experimental data are presented. For the game of bridge, partition search provides approximately as much of an improvement over existing methods as {alpha}-{beta} pruning provides over minimax.

  9. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of J/{psi} mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Chudakov, E.; Ent, R.; Gaskell, D.; Meekins, D. G.; Roche, J.; Wood, S. A.; Dunne, J.; Junnarkar, P.; Dutta, D.; Lee, C. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Strikman, M.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Christy, M. E.; Keppel, C. E.

    2009-01-15

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  10. Search for sub-threshold photoproduction of j/{Psi} mesons.

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, P.; Dunne, J.; Lee, C. A.; Junnarkar, P.; Arrington, J.; Physics; Thomas Jefferson Accelerator Lab.; Mississippi State Univ.; Univ. of Witwatersrand

    2009-01-01

    A search was made for sub-threshold J/{psi} production from a carbon target by using a mixed real and quasireal Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions under the assumption of quasifree production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasifree production.

  11. Fitness dynamics within a poplar hybrid zone: II. Impact of exotic sex on native poplars in an urban jungle

    PubMed Central

    Roe, Amanda D; MacQuarrie, Chris JK; Gros-Louis, Marie-Claude; Simpson, J Dale; Lamarche, Josyanne; Beardmore, Tannis; Thompson, Stacey L; Tanguay, Philippe; Isabel, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Trees bearing novel or exotic gene components are poised to contribute to the bioeconomy for a variety of purposes such as bioenergy production, phytoremediation, and carbon sequestration within the forestry sector, but sustainable release of trees with novel traits in large-scale plantations requires the quantification of risks posed to native tree populations. Over the last century, exotic hybrid poplars produced through artificial crosses were planted throughout eastern Canada as ornamentals or windbreaks and these exotics provide a proxy by which to examine the fitness of exotic poplar traits within the natural environment to assess risk of exotic gene escape, establishment, and spread into native gene pools. We assessed postzygotic fitness traits of native and exotic poplars within a naturally regenerated stand in eastern Canada (Quebec City, QC). Pure natives (P. balsamifera and P. deltoides spp. deltoides), native hybrids (P. deltoides × P. balsamifera), and exotic hybrids (trees bearing Populus nigra and P. maximowiczii genetic components) were screened for reproductive biomass, yield, seed germination, and fungal disease susceptibility. Exotic hybrids expressed fitness traits intermediate to pure species and were not significantly different from native hybrids. They formed fully viable seed and backcrossed predominantly with P. balsamifera. These data show that exotic hybrids were not unfit and were capable of establishing and competing within the native stand. Future research will seek to examine the impact of exotic gene regions on associated biotic communities to fully quantify the risk exotic poplars pose to native poplar forests. PMID:24963382

  12. Search for Gluonic Excitations in Hadrons with GlueX

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Senderovich

    2011-12-01

    The GlueX experiment will employ a linearly polarized 9 GeV tagged photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target to search for exotic states in the light meson spectrum. Optimized for this purpose, the detector has a highly uniform acceptance over nearly 4p solid angle, with high efficiency for both neutral and charged final state particles. An overview of the physics motivation and detector design will be given.

  13. Quark nuggets search using gravitational waves aluminum bar detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronga, Francesco

    2016-07-01

    Up to now there is no evidence of supersymmetric WIMPS dark matter. This may suggests to look for more exotic possibilities, for example compact ultra-dense quark nuggets. Nuclearites are an example of compact objects that could be constituent of the dark matter. After a short discussion on nuclearites, the result of a nuclearite search with the gravitational wave bar detectors NAUTILUS and EXPLORER is reported.

  14. Occurrence and distribution of the exotic lizard Hemidactylus mabouia Moreau de Jonnès, 1818 in Ilha Grande, RJ, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rocha, C F D; Bergallo, H G

    2011-05-01

    The gekkonid lizard Hemidactylus mabouia is an exotic species in Brazil and is found in different ecosystems. This species was recorded at Ilha Grande, RJ, one of the largest insular remains of the Atlantic Rainforest in Brazil. In this study, the occurrence of H. mabouia was determined throughout the island, including the rain forest, restinga and anthropic environments. We used the active search method in points along 19 trails that surround Ilha Grande. At each regular interval of 100 m, we searched for the presence of H. mabouia. The species was recorded in a total of 100 points among the 719 sampled and, in all cases, the occurrence of the lizard corresponded to points located in anthropic or perianthropic areas. As most of Ilha Grande is covered by dense tropical rain forest, we believe this has restricted the invasion of H. mabouia in natural environments within the island. PMID:21755162

  15. Apparent competition and native consumers exacerbate the strong competitive effect of an exotic plant species.

    PubMed

    Orrock, John L; Dutra, Humberto P; Marquis, Robert J; Barber, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Direct and indirect effects can play a key role in invasions, but experiments evaluating both are rare. We examined the roles of direct competition and apparent competition by exotic Amur honeysuckle (Lonicera maackii) by manipulating (1) L. maackii vegetation, (2) presence of L. maackii fruits, and (3) access to plants by small mammals and deer. Direct competition with L. maackii reduced the abundance and richness of native and exotic species, and native consumers significantly reduced the abundance and richness of native species. Although effects of direct competition and consumption were more pervasive, richness of native plants was also reduced through apparent competition, as small-mammal consumers reduced richness only when L. maackii fruits were present. Our experiment reveals the multiple, interactive pathways that affect the success and impact of an invasive exotic plant: exotic plants may directly benefit from reduced attack by native consumers, may directly exert strong competitive effects on native plants, and may also benefit from apparent competition. PMID:26230025

  16. Exotic Hybrid Meson Spectroscopy with the GlueX detector at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David W.

    2014-03-01

    The GlueX experiment is scheduled to begin taking data in 2015. The goal is to discover evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons and to map out their spectrum in the light quark sector. Recent theoretical developments using Lattice QCD predict exotic hybrid states in a mass range accessible using the newly upgraded 12GeV electron accelerator at Jefferson Lab. Hybrid mesons, and in particular exotic hybrid mesons, provide the ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime since these mesons explicitly manifest the gluonic degrees of freedom. The experiment will use 9 GeV linearly polarized photons produced via coherent bremsstrahlung to produce the exotic hybrids. The decay products will be detected in the solenoid-based GlueX detector currently under construction at Jefferson Lab. The status of the GlueX experiment including detector parameters will be presented along with theoretical motivation for the experiment.

  17. Soil feedback of exotic savanna grass relates to pathogen absence and mycorrhizal selectivity.

    PubMed

    van der Putten, W H; Kowalchuk, G A; Brinkman, E P; Doodeman, G T A; van der Kaaij, R M; Kamp, A F D; Menting, F B J; Veenendaal, E M

    2007-04-01

    Enemy release of exotic plants from soil pathogens has been tested by examining plant-soil feedback effects in repetitive growth cycles. However, positive soil feedback may also be due to enhanced benefit from the local arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Few studies actually have tested pathogen effects, and none of them did so in arid savannas. In the Kalahari savanna in Botswana, we compared the soil feedback of the exotic grass Cenchrus biflorus with that of two dominant native grasses, Eragrostis lehmanniana and Aristida meridionalis. The exotic grass had neutral to positive soil feedback, whereas both native grasses showed neutral to negative feedback effects. Isolation and testing of root-inhabiting fungi of E. lehmanniana yielded two host-specific pathogens that did not influence the exotic C. biflorus or the other native grass, A. meridionalis. None of the grasses was affected by the fungi that were isolated from the roots of the exotic C. biflorus. We isolated and compared the AMF community of the native and exotic grasses by polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel elecrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), targeting AMF 18S rRNA. We used roots from monospecific field stands and from plants grown in pots with mixtures of soils from the monospecific field stands. Three-quarters of the root samples of the exotic grass had two nearly identical sequences, showing 99% similarity with Glomus versiforme. The two native grasses were also associated with distinct bands, but each of these bands occurred in only a fraction of the root samples. The native grasses contained a higher diversity of AMF bands than the exotic grass. Canonical correspondence analyses of the AMF band patterns revealed almost as much difference between the native and exotic grasses as between the native grasses. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that release from soil-borne enemies may facilitate local abundance of exotic plants, and we provide the first evidence that these

  18. A universal explanation of tunneling conductance in exotic superconductors

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jongbae; Abergel, D. S. L.

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding mystery in understanding cuprate superconductors is the inconsistency between the experimental data measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In particular, the gap between prominent side peaks observed in STS is much bigger than the superconducting gap observed by ARPES measurements. Here, we reconcile the two experimental techniques by generalising a theory which was previously applied to zero-dimensional mesoscopic Kondo systems to strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) exotic superconductors. We show that the side peaks observed in tunneling conductance measurements in all these materials have a universal origin: They are formed by coherence-mediated tunneling under bias and do not directly reflect the underlying density of states (DOS) of the sample. We obtain theoretical predictions of the tunneling conductance and the density of states of the sample simultaneously and show that for cuprate and pnictide superconductors, the extracted sample DOS is consistent with the superconducting gap measured by ARPES. PMID:27511315

  19. Phylogeography illuminates maternal origins of exotic Coptotermes gestroi (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Tracie M; Jones, Susan C; Lee, Chow-Yang; Forschler, Brian T; Chen, Zhenbang; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Gallagher, Nicola T; Brown, Graham; Neal, Michael; Thistleton, Brian; Kleinschmidt, Scott

    2007-03-01

    Coptotermes gestroi, the Asian subterranean termite (AST), is an economically important structural and agricultural pest that has become established in many areas of the world. For the first time, phylogeography was used to illuminate the origins of new found C. gestroi in the US Commonwealth of Puerto Rico; Ohio, USA; Florida, USA; and Brisbane, Australia. Phylogenetic relationships of C. gestroi collected in indigenous locations within Malaysia, Thailand, and Singapore as well as from the four areas of introduction were investigated using three genes (16S rRNA, COII, and ITS) under three optimality criteria encompassing phenetic and cladistic assumptions (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and neighbor-joining). All three genes showed consistent support for a close genetic relationship between C. gestroi samples from Singapore and Ohio, whereas termite samples from Australia, Puerto Rico, and Key West, FL were more closely related to those from Malaysia. Shipping records further substantiated that Singapore and Malaysia were the likely origin of the Ohio and Australia C. gestroi, respectively. These data provide support for using phylogeography to understand the dispersal history of exotic termites. Serendipitously, we also gained insights into concerted evolution in an ITS cluster from rhinotermitid species in two genera. PMID:17254806

  20. Synthesis of Exotic Soaps in the Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phanstiel, Otto, IV; Dueno, Eric; Xianghong Wang, Queenie

    1998-05-01

    A variety of different triglyceride sources ranging from Vietnamese garlic oil to a local restaurant's grill sludge were saponified to generate a series of exotic soaps. Students did not quantify their results, but described their products in terms of color, texture and odor. Their results were compared with existing data on the triglyceride content for each source used (when possible). Soap texture seemed to be related to the degree of unsaturation present in the starting triglyceride. However, texture alterations due to occluded impurities could not be ruled out. In general, fats and oils high in saturated fats (butter) gave hard, chunky, and waxlike soaps, while those high in unsaturated fats gave flaky and easily crumbled soaps (olive, corn, peanut and sunflower oils). Soap color was not consistent with triglyceride unsaturation levels during the time frame studied. Odor changes were dramatic and were explained in terms of a change in chemical structure (i.e. conversion from an ester to a carboxylate salt). In general, the experiment was well received by students and stressed the importance of making precise qualitative observations during the experiment.

  1. New solutions of exotic charged black holes and their stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhangkhah, N.

    2016-01-01

    We find a class of charged black hole solutions in third-order Lovelock Gravity. To obtain this class of solutions, we are not confined to the usual assumption of maximal symmetry on the horizon and will consider the solution whose boundary is Einstein space with supplementary conditions on its Weyl tensor. The Weyl tensor of such exotic horizons exposes two chargelike parameter to the solution. These parameters in addition with the electric charge, cause different features in comparison with the charged solution with constant-curvature horizon. For this class of asymptotically (A)dS solutions, the electric charge dominates the behavior of the metric as r goes to zero, and thus the central singularity is always timelike. We also compute the thermodynamic quantities for these solutions and will show that the first law of thermodynamics is satisfied. We also show that the extreme black holes with nonconstant-curvature horizons whose Ricci scalar are zero or a positive constant could exist depending on the value of the electric charge and chargelike parameters. Finally, we investigate the stability of the black holes by analyzing the behavior of free energy and heat capacity specially in the limits of small and large horizon radius. We will show that in contrast with charged solution with constant-curvature horizon, a phase transition occurs between very small and small black holes from a stable phase to an unstable one, while the large black holes show stability to both perturbative and nonperturbative fluctuations.

  2. Compact high resolution isobar separator for study of exotic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchepunov, V.; Piechaczek, A.; Carter, H. K.; Batchelder, J. C.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2009-05-01

    A compact isobar separator, based on the Multi-Pass-Time-of-Flight (MTOF) principle, is developed. A mass resolving power (MRP) of 110,000 (FWHM) is achieved as spectrometer with a transmission of 50 - 80%. The transverse beam acceptance and the energy acceptance are 42 π mm mrad and about ± 2.5%. Operated as a separator, molecules of N2 and CO with δM/M = 1/2500 or 10.433 MeV were separated with a Bradbury Nielsen gate. In that mode of operation, the MRP (FWHM) is about 40,000 after 120 laps. To inject radioactive ion beams into the separator, and to further improve its MRP, cooler and buncher RF quadrupoles were designed^1 and tested. A bunch width of 30 ns at 1% of the peak height (FWHM = 9 ns) and a transmission in DC mode of 75 -- 80 % were achieved. With such bunch parameters, MRPs of ˜ 400,000 (FWHM) are expected for the MTOF separator. At HRIBF, it will provide pure samples of exotic nuclides around ^100Sn, of neutron deficient rare-earth nuclei and of neutron-rich nuclei. Incidental measurements of mass differences will determine Qβ values with accuracies of ˜ 1%. ^1 V. Shchepunov and V. Kozlovskiy et al., to be published

  3. Evidence against exotic decays of b-flavored hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, G.J.

    1983-01-01

    Data from the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring have been used to measure the fraction of center-of-mass energy carried by charged particles in decays of the Upsilon(1S), Upsilon(2S), Upsilon(3S), and Upsilon(4S) resonances. These fractions are, respectively, 0.638 +/- 0.005, 0.639 +/- 0.005, 0.622 +/- 0.005, and 0.603 +/- 0.007 where the errors are statistical. There is an additional systematic uncertainity of +/- 0.020 in each of these measurements. Measurement of charged energy in Upsilon(4S) decays has been used to demonstrate that b-quark decay is not exotic. Three broad classes of nonstandard b-quark decay: b ..-->.. II q with quarks and charged or neutral leptons of arbitrary flavor, b ..-->.. I anti q anti q, and b ..-->.. q a/sup -/ where a/sup -/ is a Higgs boson or hyperpion. For the three classes of nonstandard decays Monte Carlo calculations of the yields of charged energy, electrons, muons, protons, and lambdas in Upsilon(4S) decay are described, and it is demonstrated that the model predictions are inconsistent with CLEO measurements.

  4. An Inexpensive Apparatus for Growing Photosynthetic Microorganisms in Exotic Atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, David J.; Herbert, Stephen K.

    2005-02-01

    Given the need for a light source, cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic microorganisms can be difficult and expensive to grow in large quantities. Lighted growth chambers and incubators typically cost 50-100% more than standard microbiological incubators. Self-shading of cells in liquid cultures prevents the growth of dense suspensions. Growing liquid cultures on a shaker table or lighted shaker incubator achieves greater cell densities, but adds considerably to the cost. For experiments in which gases other than air are required, the cost for conventional incubators increases even more. We describe an apparatus for growing photosynthetic organisms in exotic atmospheres that can be built relatively inexpensively (approximately $100 U.S.) using parts available from typical hardware or department stores (e.g., Wal-mart or K-mart). The apparatus uses microfiltered air (or other gases) to aerate, agitate, and mix liquid cultures, thus achieving very high cell densities (A750 > 3). Because gases are delivered to individual culture tubes, a variety of gas mixes can be used without the need for enclosed chambers. The apparatus works with liquid cultures of unicellular and filamentous species, and also works with agar slants.

  5. A universal explanation of tunneling conductance in exotic superconductors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jongbae; Abergel, D S L

    2016-01-01

    A longstanding mystery in understanding cuprate superconductors is the inconsistency between the experimental data measured by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). In particular, the gap between prominent side peaks observed in STS is much bigger than the superconducting gap observed by ARPES measurements. Here, we reconcile the two experimental techniques by generalising a theory which was previously applied to zero-dimensional mesoscopic Kondo systems to strongly correlated two-dimensional (2D) exotic superconductors. We show that the side peaks observed in tunneling conductance measurements in all these materials have a universal origin: They are formed by coherence-mediated tunneling under bias and do not directly reflect the underlying density of states (DOS) of the sample. We obtain theoretical predictions of the tunneling conductance and the density of states of the sample simultaneously and show that for cuprate and pnictide superconductors, the extracted sample DOS is consistent with the superconducting gap measured by ARPES. PMID:27511315

  6. Exotic X-ray Sources from Intermediate Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Chouffani, K.; Wells, D.; Harmon, F.; Jones, J.L.; Lancaster, G.

    2003-08-26

    High intensity x-ray beams are used in a wide variety of applications in solid-state physics, medicine, biology and material sciences. Synchrotron radiation (SR) is currently the primary, high-quality x-ray source that satisfies both brilliance and tunability. The high cost, large size and low x-ray energies of SR facilities, however, are serious limitations. Alternatively, 'novel' x-ray sources are now possible due to new small linear accelerator (LINAC) technology, such as improved beam emittance, low background, sub-Picosecond beam pulses, high beam stability and higher repetition rate. These sources all stem from processes that produce Radiation from relativistic Electron beams in (crystalline) Periodic Structures (REPS), or the periodic 'structure' of laser light. REPS x-ray sources are serious candidates for bright, compact, portable, monochromatic, and tunable x-ray sources with varying degrees of polarization and coherence. Despite the discovery and early research into these sources over the past 25 years, these sources are still in their infancy. Experimental and theoretical research are still urgently needed to answer fundamental questions about the practical and ultimate limits of their brightness, mono-chromaticity etc. We present experimental results and theoretical comparisons for three exotic REPS sources. These are Laser-Compton Scattering (LCS), Channeling Radiation (CR) and Parametric X-Radiation (PXR)

  7. [Mosquitoes as vectors for exotic pathogens in Germany].

    PubMed

    Becker, N; Krüger, A; Kuhn, C; Plenge-Bönig, A; Thomas, S M; Schmidt-Chanasit, J; Tannich, E

    2014-05-01

    As a result of intensified globalization of international trade and of substantial travel activities, mosquito-borne exotic pathogens are becoming an increasing threat for Europe. In Germany some 50 different mosquito species are known, several of which have vector competence for pathogens. During the last few years a number of zoonotic arboviruses that are pathogenic for humans have been isolated from mosquitoes in Germany including Usutu, Sindbis and Batai viruses. In addition, filarial worms, such as Dirofilaria repens have been repeatedly detected in mosquitoes from the federal state of Brandenburg. Other pathogens, in particular West Nile virus, are expected to emerge sooner or later in Germany as the virus is already circulating in neighboring countries, e.g. France, Austria and the Czech Republic. In upcoming years the risk for arbovirus transmission might increase in Germany due to increased occurrence of new so-called "invasive" mosquito species, such as the Asian bush mosquito Ochlerotatus japonicus or the Asian tiger mosquito Aedes albopictus. These invasive species are characterized by high vector competence for a broad range of pathogens and a preference for human blood meals. For risk assessment, a number of mosquito and pathogen surveillance projects have been initiated in Germany during the last few years; however, mosquito control strategies and plans of action have to be developed and put into place to allow early and efficient action against possible vector-borne epidemics. PMID:24781910

  8. Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1999-11-13

    Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

  9. Predicting, Realizing and Exploiting Exotic Topological Phases of Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansil, Arun

    The revolution started by the discovery of topological insulators a few years ago has turned out to be the proverbial tip of the much larger iceberg of exotic phases harbored by quantum matter. Consideration of electronic states protected by time-reversal, crystalline and particle-hole symmetries has led to the prediction of many novel 3D materials, which can support Weyl, Dirac and Majorana fermions, and to new types of insulators such as topological crystalline insulators and topological Kondo insulators, as well as 2D quantum spin Hall insulators with large band gaps capable of surviving room temperature thermal excitations. In this talk, I will discuss our recent theoretical work aimed at predicting topological materials beyond the standard topological insulators and identify cases where robust experimental evidence has been obtained toward their successful materials realization. I will also comment on the potential of topological materials as next generation platforms for manipulating spin and charge transport and other applications. Work supported by the Materials Science & Engineering Division, Basic Energy Sciences, U.S.D.O.E.

  10. Exotic singularities and spatially curved loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Parampreet; Vidotto, Francesca

    2011-03-15

    We investigate the occurrence of various exotic spacelike singularities in the past and the future evolution of k={+-}1 Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and loop quantum cosmology using a sufficiently general phenomenological model for the equation of state. We highlight the nontrivial role played by the intrinsic curvature for these singularities and the new physics which emerges at the Planck scale. We show that quantum gravity effects generically resolve all strong curvature singularities including big rip and big freeze singularities. The weak singularities, which include sudden and big brake singularities, are ignored by quantum gravity when spatial curvature is negative, as was previously found for the spatially flat model. Interestingly, for the spatially closed model there exist cases where weak singularities may be resolved when they occur in the past evolution. The spatially closed model exhibits another novel feature. For a particular class of equation of state, this model also exhibits an additional physical branch in loop quantum cosmology, a baby universe separated from the parent branch. Our analysis generalizes previous results obtained on the resolution of strong curvature singularities in flat models to isotropic spacetimes with nonzero spatial curvature.

  11. An inexpensive apparatus for growing photosynthetic microorganisms in exotic atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Thomas, David J; Herbert, Stephen K

    2005-02-01

    Given the need for a light source, cyanobacteria and other photosynthetic microorganisms can be difficult and expensive to grow in large quantities. Lighted growth chambers and incubators typically cost 50-100% more than standard microbiological incubators. Self-shading of cells in liquid cultures prevents the growth of dense suspensions. Growing liquid cultures on a shaker table or lighted shaker incubator achieves greater cell densities, but adds considerably to the cost. For experiments in which gases other than air are required, the cost for conventional incubators increases even more. We describe an apparatus for growing photosynthetic organisms in exotic atmospheres that can be built relatively inexpensively (approximately 100 dollars U.S.) using parts available from typical hardware or department stores (e.g., Wal-mart or K-mart). The apparatus uses microfiltered air (or other gases) to aerate, agitate, and mix liquid cultures, thus achieving very high cell densities (A750 > 3). Because gases are delivered to individual culture tubes, a variety of gas mixes can be used without the need for enclosed chambers. The apparatus works with liquid cultures of unicellular and filamentous species, and also works with agar slants. PMID:15711171

  12. Heavy Quark Hadrons and Exotics a challenge for QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Lipkin, Harry J.; Karliner, Marek

    2011-10-21

    Exotic hadrons with heavy quarks can confirm in the same multiquark system that the qq-bar interaction is much stronger than the qq interaction and produces color structures totally different from those of normal hadrons. Unusual heavy tetraquark structure may explain unusual properties of newly discovered mesons like the X(3872). Both charged and neutral B decays produce this narrow neutral resonant state that decays to both J/{psi}{rho} and J/{psi}{omega}, while no charged resonances in the same multiplet are found. This suggests that the X is an isoscalar resonance whose production conserves isospin, while isospin is violated only in the decay by an electromagnetic interaction allowing the isospin-forbidden J/{psi}{rho} decay. New data for X production in B decays provide a separation between production and decay, sharpen several experimental puzzles and impose serious constraints on all models. A proposed isoscalar tetraquark model agrees with all present data, conserves isospin in its production and breaks isospin only in an electromagnetic X(3872)J/{psi}{rho}{sup o} decay. The narrow X decay width results from the tiny phase space available for the J/{psi}{omega} decay and enables competition with the electromagnetic isospin-forbidden J/{psi}{rho} decay which has much larger phase space. Experimental tests are proposed for this isospin production invariance.

  13. Elastic scattering and reactions of light exotic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keeley, N.; Alamanos, N.; Kemper, K. W.; Rusek, K.

    2009-10-01

    The present work provides a literature survey of elastic scattering of exotic nuclei from 6He to 17F. It presents a set of definitions that allow different analyses to be put into a common language. A calculational approach is proposed that yields consistent results across different beams and targets so that conclusions concerning the influence of virtual and real breakup as well as transfer couplings on the elastic scattering may be drawn. Calculations of elastic scattering around the Coulomb barrier are emphasised, employing a Pb target whose large Z allows the interplay between nuclear and Coulomb forces to be exploited to maximise possible effects arising from proton or neutron haloes or skins. A series of test calculations is performed and where possible compared to data, demonstrating that there are instances where coupling to transfer channels can have a large effect on the elastic scattering angular distributions. By careful choice of target/beam combination, different aspects of the coupling effects may be emphasised.

  14. Exotic interactions among C-jets and Pb-jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The C-jets and Pb-jets were surveyed on the part of Chacaltaya emulsion chamber No.19 amounting to an exposure of 28.8 sq m yr. It is shown that the adopted events make up an unbiased sample of C-jets for sigma sub E gamma TeV. Mini-Centauro interaction gives the most natural explanation for the eight pinaught-less C-jets with three or more constituent shower core. Out of the eight double-cored pinaught-less events, three are found to have visible invariant masses 1.8 GeV/c. Three Pb-jets-lower are composed of double cores whose respective visible transverse momenta are greater than 0.5 GeV/c, suggesting that they are of Geminion origin or chiron origin. The energies of the parent particles are estimated to be 100 to 200 TeV for all three kinds of events. The implications of this energy estimate and the frequency of observed exotic events are discussed.

  15. Electron Microscopy Study of Exotic Nanostructures of Cadmium Sulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lifeng; Jiao, Jun

    2005-04-01

    In this article, two simple methods, evaporation-condensation and catalytic thermal evaporation, were used to investigate the synthesis of CdS nanostructures for nanoscale optoelectronic applications. To understand their growth mechanisms, various electron microscopy and microanalysis techniques were utilized in characterizing their morphologies, internal structures, growth directions and elemental compositions. The electron microscopy study reveals that when using the evaporation-condensation method, branched CdS nanorods and self-assembled arrays of CdS nanorods were synthesized at 800°C and 1000°C, respectively. Instead of morphological differences, both types of CdS nanorods grew along the [0001] direction. However, when using the catalytic thermal evaporation method (Au as the catalyst), patterned CdS nanowires and nanobelts were formed at the temperature region of 500 600°C and 600 750°C, respectively. Their growth direction was along the direction [1010] instead of [0001]. Based on the microscopy and microanalysis results, we propose some growth mechanisms in relation to the growth processes of those exotic CdS nanostructures.

  16. Rotating neutron stars with exotic cores: masses, radii, stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haensel, P.; Bejger, M.; Fortin, M.; Zdunik, L.

    2016-03-01

    A set of theoretical mass-radius relations for rigidly rotating neutron stars with exotic cores, obtained in various theories of dense matter, is reviewed. Two basic observational constraints are used: the largest measured rotation frequency (716Hz) and the maximum measured mass (2 M ⊙ . The present status of measuring the radii of neutron stars is described. The theory of rigidly rotating stars in general relativity is reviewed and limitations of the slow rotation approximation are pointed out. Mass-radius relations for rotating neutron stars with hyperon and quark cores are illustrated using several models. Problems related to the non-uniqueness of the crust-core matching are mentioned. Limits on rigid rotation resulting from the mass-shedding instability and the instability with respect to the axisymmetric perturbations are summarized. The problem of instabilities and of the back-bending phenomenon are discussed in detail. Metastability and instability of a neutron star core in the case of a first-order phase transition, both between pure phases, and into a mixed-phase state, are reviewed. The case of two disjoint families (branches) of rotating neutron stars is discussed and generic features of neutron-star families and of core-quakes triggered by the instabilities are considered.

  17. Effects of exotic grasses on soil seed banks in Southeastern Arizona grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, S.P.; Bowers, Janice E.

    2007-01-01

    At the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch, an ungrazed grassland preserve in southeastern Arizona, soil seed banks were sampled in June, August, and October 2002 and June 2003. Wildfire had previously burned 90% of the research ranch in May 2002. Seed density and species richness in burned native grassland (2 plots) were compared to those in burned exotic grassland (2 plots). Averaged over 4 sample dates, seed densities were as follows: burned native grassland, 591 ?? 243.1 seeds??m-2 and 784 ?? 334.9 seeds??m-2; burned exotic grassland, 501 ?? 198.9 seeds??m-2 and 196 ?? 123.8 seeds??m-2. Species richness in the seed bank, also averaged over 4 sample dates, was as follows: burned native grassland, 16.3 ?? 1.7 species??m -2 and 19.5 ?? 1.0 species??m-2; burned exotic grassland, 12.0 ?? 3.4 species??m-2 and 11.06 ?? 2.5 species??m-2. The seed bank of burned exotic grassland contained significantly fewer seeds and species than that of burned native grassland. In addition, the seed bank in burned exotic grassland comprised mainly exotic grasses, whereas annual and perennial herbs, most of them native, dominated the seed bank of burned native grassland. Of the 50 species detected in soil samples, only 20 had a persistent seed bank, and only 1 of these was a native perennial bunchgrass. The preponderance of transient species means that eradication of exotic grasses must be followed by reseeding of native grasses and herbs, perhaps repeatedly, if native grassland is to replace exotic grassland.

  18. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Farris, Zach J; Golden, Christopher D; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M; Kelly, Marcella J

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar's largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar's largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (mean=90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (mean=58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (mean=31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are highest. These various

  19. Roads as conduits for exotic plant invasions in a semiarid landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelbard, J.L.; Belnap, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roads are believed to be a major contributing factor to the ongoing spread of exotic plants. We examined the effect of road improvement and environmental variables on exotic and native plant diversity in roadside verges and adjacent semiarid grassland, shrubland, and woodland communities of southern Utah (U.S.A.). We measured the cover of exotic and native species in roadside verges and both the richness and cover of exotic and native species in adjacent interior communities (50 m beyond the edge of the road cut) along 42 roads stratified by level of road improvement (paved, improved surface, graded, and four-wheel-drive track). In roadside verges along paved roads, the cover of Bromus tectorum was three times as great (27%) as in verges along four-wheel-drive tracks (9%). The cover of five common exotic forb species tended to be lower in verges along four-wheel-drive tracks than in verges along more improved roads. The richness and cover of exotic species were both more than 50% greater, and the richness of native species was 30% lower, at interior sites adjacent to paved roads than at those adjacent to four-wheel-drive tracks. In addition, environmental variables relating to dominant vegetation, disturbance, and topography were significantly correlated with exotic and native species richness and cover. Improved roads can act as conduits for the invasion of adjacent ecosystems by converting natural habitats to those highly vulnerable to invasion. However, variation in dominant vegetation, soil moisture, nutrient levels, soil depth, disturbance, and topography may render interior communities differentially susceptible to invasions originating from roadside verges. Plant communities that are both physically invasible (e.g., characterized by deep or fertile soils) and disturbed appear most vulnerable. Decision-makers considering whether to build, improve, and maintain roads should take into account the potential spread of exotic plants.

  20. Native and exotic plants of fragments of sagebrush steppe produced by geomorphic processes versus land use

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huntly, N.; Bangert, R.; Hanser, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation and invasion by exotic species are regarded as major threats to the biodiversity of many ecosystems. We surveyed the plant communities of two types of remnant sagebrush-steppe fragments from nearby areas on the Snake River Plain of southeastern Idaho, USA. One type resulted from land use (conversion to dryland agriculture; hereafter AG Islands) and the other from geomorphic processes (Holocene volcanism; hereafter kipukas). We assessed two predictions for the variation in native plant species richness of these fragments, using structural equation models (SEM). First, we predicted that the species richness of native plants would follow the MacArthur-Wilson (M-W) hypothesis of island biogeography, as often is expected for the communities of habitat fragments. Second, we predicted a negative relationship between native and exotic plants, as would be expected if exotic plants are decreasing the diversity of native plants. Finally, we assessed whether exotic species were more strongly associated with the fragments embedded in the agricultural landscape, as would be expected if agriculture had facilitated the introduction and naturalization of non-native species, and whether the communities of the two types of fragments were distinct. Species richness of native plants was not strongly correlated with M-W characteristics for either the AG Islands or the **kipukas. The AG Islands had more species and higher cover of exotics than the kipukas, and exotic plants were good predictors of native plant species richness. Our results support the hypothesis that proximity to agriculture can increase the diversity and abundance of exotic plants in native habitat. In combination with other information, the results also suggest that agriculture and exotic species have caused loss of native diversity and reorganization of the sagebrush-steppe plant community. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  1. Plant invasions differentially affected by diversity and dominant species in native- and exotic-dominated grasslands.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xia; Polley, H Wayne; Hofmockel, Kirsten; Daneshgar, Pedram P; Wilsey, Brian J

    2015-12-01

    Plant invasions are an increasingly serious global concern, especially as the climate changes. Here, we explored how plant invasions differed between native- and novel exotic-dominated grasslands with experimental addition of summer precipitation in Texas in 2009. Exotic species greened up earlier than natives by an average of 18 days. This was associated with a lower invasion rate early in the growing season compared to native communities. However, invasion rate did not differ significantly between native and exotic communities across all sampling times. The predictors of invasion rate differed between native and exotic communities, with invasion being negatively influenced by species richness in natives and by dominant species in exotics. Interestingly, plant invasions matched the bimodal pattern of precipitation in Temple, Texas, and did not respond to the pulse of precipitation during the summer. Our results suggest that we will need to take different approaches in understanding of invasion between native and exotic grasslands. Moreover, with anticipated increasing variability in precipitation under global climate change, plant invasions may be constrained in their response if the precipitation pulses fall outside the normal growing period of invaders. PMID:27069615

  2. Exotic grassland species have stronger priority effects than natives regardless of whether they are cultivated or wild genotypes.

    PubMed

    Wilsey, Brian J; Barber, Kaitlin; Martin, Leanne M

    2015-01-01

    During community assembly, early arriving exotic species might suppress other species to a greater extent than do native species. Because most exotics were intentionally introduced, we hypothesize there was human selection on regeneration traits during introduction. This could have occurred at the across- or within-species level (e.g. during cultivar development). We tested these predictions by seeding a single species that was either native, exotic 'wild-type' (from their native range), or exotic 'cultivated' using 28 grassland species in a glasshouse experiment. Priority effects were assessed by measuring species' effect on establishment of species from a seed mix added 21 d later. Exotic species had higher germination and earlier emergence dates than native species, and differences were found in both 'wild' and 'cultivated' exotics. Exotic species reduced biomass and species diversity of later arriving species much more than native species, regardless of seed source. Results indicate that in situations in which priority effects are likely to be strong, effects will be greater when an exotic species arrives first than when a native species arrives first; and this difference is not merely a result of exotic species cultivation, but might be a general native-exotic difference that deserves further study. PMID:25252271

  3. Exotic plant species associations with horse trails, old roads, and intact native communities in the Missouri Ozarks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stroh, E.D.; Struckhoff, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the extent to which exotic species are associated with horse trails, old roads, and intact communities within three native vegetation types in Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri. We used a general linear model procedure and a Bonferroni multiple comparison test to compare exotic species richness, exotic to native species ratios, and exotic species percent cover across three usage types (horse trails, old roads, and intact communities) and three community types (river bottoms, upland waterways, and glades). We found that both exotic species richness and the ratio of exotic species to native species were greater in plots located along horse trails than in plots located either in intact native communities or along old roads. Native community types did not differ in the number of exotic species present, but river bottoms had a significantly higher exotic to native species ratio than glades. Continued introduction of exotic plant propagules may explain why horse trails contain more exotic species than other areas in a highly disturbed landscape.

  4. Search for supersymmetry and leptoquark states in D0

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.T.; D0 Collaboration

    1994-01-01

    Results are presented on the search for two types of exotic particles. First, a mass limit is given for first generation leptoquarks assuming pair production with the final state being either two electrons and two jets or one electron, a neutrino and two jets. This is followed by the presentation of a preliminary result on a search for the supersymmetric partners of the W{plus_minus} and Z{sup o}, the lightest chargino, W symmetry particle {sub 1}, and the second lightest neutralino, Z symmetry particle {sub 2} via a trilepton signature.

  5. Rare Decays And Exotic States With BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, S.H.; /McGill U.

    2006-08-28

    Results from the BABAR experiment are presented for searches for several rare FCNC B and D meson decays, including the modes B{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -} and D{sup 0} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}, B {yields} ({rho},{omega}){gamma} and B{sup +} {yields} (K,{pi}){sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}. Limits on lepton flavor violation in neutrino-less {tau} decays are also discussed. Finally, results of BABAR searches for the strange pentaquark states {Theta}{sup +}(1540), {Xi}{sup --}(1860) and {Xi}{sup 0}(1860) are summarized.

  6. Are search committees really searching?

    PubMed

    Hoffmeir, Patricia A

    2003-02-01

    Academic chair searches are admittedly a labor-intensive process, but they are made more difficult and often lead to less-than-optimal outcomes because search committees spend their time "advertising," "looking," but not truly searching for academic chairs. At the onset, certain "realities" must be acknowledged, including (1) understanding that unless your organization is renowned in the specialty for which you are conducting the search, candidates won't be pounding at your door for a job, (2) searches that fail to include an overall assessment of the department in question are likely to miss the mark, (3) chairs must have demonstrated not only clinical expertise but also business savvy, (4) the best candidate is not necessarily someone who is already a department chair, (5) when it comes to chair searches, it's a buyer's market, and (6) the search process is inextricably linked to the success of the search. Key to the process of conducting an academic chair search are the judicious formation of the search committee; committee members' willingness to do their homework, attend all committee meeting, and keep the committee's activities confidential; crafting, not revising, the current job description for the open chair position; interviewing viable candidates rather than all candidates and adhering to a coordinated interviewing process; and evaluating internal and external candidates according to the same parameters. PMID:12584089

  7. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section. PMID:27376406

  8. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-01

    Alkali-doped fullerides ({{A}3}{{\\text{C}}60} with A  =  K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature ({{T}\\text{c}} ) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund’s coupling within the {{\\text{C}}60} molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-{{T}\\text{c}} superconductivity.

  9. Pressure-induced exotic states in rare earth hexaborides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Liling; Wu, Qi

    2016-08-01

    Finding the exotic phenomena in strongly correlated electron systems (SCESs) and understanding the corresponding microphysics have long been the research frontiers of condensed matter physics. The remarkable examples for the intriguing phenomena discovered in past years include unconventional superconductivity, heavy Fermion behaviors, giant magneto-resistance and so on. A fascinating type of rare earth hexaboride RB6 (R  =  Sm, Yb, Eu and Ce) belongs to a strongly correlated electron system (SCES), but shows unusual ambient-pressure and high-pressure behaviors beyond the phenomena mentioned above. Particularly, the recent discovery of the coexistence of an unusual metallic surface state and an insulating bulk state in SmB6, known to be a Kondo insulator decades ago, by theoretical calculations and many experimental measurements creates new interest for the investigation of the RB6. This significant progress encourages people to revisit the RB6 with an attempt to establish a new physics that links the SCES and the unusual metallic surface state which is a common feature of a topological insulator (TI). It is well known that pressure has the capability of tuning the electronic structure and modifying the ground state of solids, or even inducing a quantum phase transition which is one of the kernel issues in studies of SCESs. In this brief review, we will describe the progress in high pressure studies on the RB6 based on our knowledge and research interests, mainly focusing on the pressure-induced phenomena in YbB6 and SmB6, especially on the quantum phase transitions and their connections with the valence state of the rare earth ions. Moreover, some related high-pressure results obtained from CeB6 and EuB6 are also included. Finally, a summary is given in the conclusions and perspectives section.

  10. Ecosystem impacts of exotic annual invaders in the Genus Bromus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germino, Matthew J.; Belnap, Jayne; Stark, John M.; Allen, Edith B.; Rau, Benjamin M.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of the impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystems is necessary to justify and guide efforts to limit their spread, restore natives, and plan for conservation. Invasive annual grasses such as Bromus tectorum, B. rubens, B. hordeaceus, and B. diandrus (hereafter collectively referred to as Bromus) transform the structure and function of ecosystems they dominate. Experiments that prove cause-and-effect impacts of Bromus are rare, yet inferences can be gleaned from the combination of Bromus-ecosystem associations, ecosystem condition before/after invasion, and an understanding of underlying mechanisms. Bromus typically establishes in bare soil patches and can eventually replace perennials such as woody species or bunchgrasses, creating a homogeneous annual cover. Plant productivity and cover are less stable across seasons and years when Bromus dominates, due to a greater response to annual climate variability. Bromus’ “flash” of growth followed by senescence early in the growing season, combined with shallow rooting and annual habit, may lead to incomplete use of deep soil water, reduced C sequestration, and accelerated nutrient cycling. Litter produced by Bromus alters nearly all aspects of ecosystems and notably increases wildfire occurrence. Where Bromus has become dominant, it can decrease soil stability by rendering soils bare for months following fire or episodic, pathogen-induced stand failure. Bromus-invaded communities have lower species diversity, and associated species tend to be generalists adapted to unstable and variable habitats. Changes in litter, fire, and soil properties appear to feedback to reinforce Bromus’ dominance in a pattern that portends desertification.

  11. Shell closures, loosely bound structures, and halos in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, G.; Singh, D.

    2013-04-15

    Inspired by the recent experiments indicating doubly magic nuclei that lie near the drip-line and encouraged by the success of our relativistic mean-field (RMF) plus state-dependent BCS approach to the description of the ground-state properties of drip-line nuclei, we develop this approach further, across the entire periodic table, to explore magic nuclei, loosely bound structures, and halo formation in exotic nuclei. In our RMF+BCS approach, the single-particle continuum corresponding to the RMF is replaced by a set of discrete positive-energy states for the calculations of pairing energy. Detailed analysis of the single-particle spectrum, pairing energies, and densities of the nuclei predict the unusual proton shell closures at proton numbers Z = 6, 14, 16, 34, and unusual neutron shell closures at neutron numbers N = 6, 14, 16, 34, 40, 70, 112. Further, in several nuclei like the neutron-rich isotopes of Ca, Zr, Mo, etc., the gradual filling of lowlying single-particle resonant state together with weakly bound single-particle states lying close to the continuum threshold helps accommodate more neutrons but with an extremely small increase in the binding energy. This gives rise to the occurrence of loosely bound systems of neutron-rich nuclei with a large neutron-to-proton ratio. In general, the halo-like formation, irrespective of the existence of any resonant state, is seen to be due to the large spatial extension of the wave functions for the weakly bound single-particle states with low orbital angular momentum having very small or no centrifugal barriers.

  12. Exotic s-wave superconductivity in alkali-doped fullerides.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yusuke; Sakai, Shiro; Capone, Massimo; Arita, Ryotaro

    2016-04-20

    Alkali-doped fullerides (A3C60 with A = K, Rb, Cs) show a surprising phase diagram, in which a high transition-temperature (Tc) s-wave superconducting state emerges next to a Mott insulating phase as a function of the lattice spacing. This is in contrast with the common belief that Mott physics and phonon-driven s-wave superconductivity are incompatible, raising a fundamental question on the mechanism of the high-Tc superconductivity. This article reviews recent ab initio calculations, which have succeeded in reproducing comprehensively the experimental phase diagram with high accuracy and elucidated an unusual cooperation between the electron-phonon coupling and the electron-electron interactions leading to Mott localization to realize an unconventional s-wave superconductivity in the alkali-doped fullerides. A driving force behind the exotic physics is unusual intramolecular interactions, characterized by the coexistence of a strongly repulsive Coulomb interaction and a small effectively negative exchange interaction. This is realized by a subtle energy balance between the coupling with the Jahn-Teller phonons and Hund's coupling within the C60 molecule. The unusual form of the interaction leads to a formation of pairs of up- and down-spin electrons on the molecules, which enables the s-wave pairing. The emergent superconductivity crucially relies on the presence of the Jahn-Teller phonons, but surprisingly benefits from the strong correlations because the correlations suppress the kinetic energy of the electrons and help the formation of the electron pairs, in agreement with previous model calculations. This confirms that the alkali-doped fullerides are a new type of unconventional superconductors, where the unusual synergy between the phonons and Coulomb interactions drives the high-Tc superconductivity. PMID:26974650

  13. Exotic Earthworm Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in FACE Forest Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Top, S. M.; Filley, T. R.

    2010-12-01

    Exotic earthworm invasion in northern North American forests has the potential to significantly alter nitrogen and carbon cycling in forest soils, through litter layer losses, loss of organic horizon, and changes in fine root density. Earthworm influence on nitrogen cycling is currently being investigated in the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) sites at Rhinelander, WI. Because of the 13C depleted CO2 used in the FACE experiment and a 15N addition to the soil, this system affords an ideal opportunity to determine the impact of earthworm activity on soil organic matter dynamics by tracking the relative abundance and stable isotope compositions of biopolymers (amino acids, etc.) isolated in earthworms fecal pellets and soils. The 15N and 13C isotope composition of earthworm fecal matter from epigeic (litter and organic matter horizon dwelling) and endogeic (predominantly mineral soil dwelling) species highlighted their distinct role in litter, surface soil, and deeper soil movement through the soil. Specifically, endogeic fecal matter exhibited a lower uptake of FACE-derived C and a more enriched 15N signal. Nitrogen content of soil between the control and elevated CO2 treatments is not significantly different; however, elevated CO2 treatments exhibited relative depletion in both the soil and root 15N with respect to controls. The loss of 15N in the roots and the top 5 cm of the soil under elevated CO2, suggests that there is greater cycling power with increased below ground productivity and earthworm activity under elevated CO2, as higher abundances of earthworms exist in the elevated CO2 treatments. Amino acid extractions from the soil and fecal matter are ongoing and will help clarify the details regarding molecular nitrogen cycling.

  14. The relative importance of disturbance and exotic-plant abundance in California coastal sage scrub

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, G.M.; Diffendorfer, J.E.; Zedler, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    Many ecosystems of conservation concern require some level of disturbance to sustain their species composition and ecological function. However, inappropriate disturbance regimes could favor invasion or expansion of exotic species. In southern California coastal sage scrub (CSS) fire is a natural disturbance, but because of human influence, frequencies may now be unnaturally high. Other anthropogenic disturbances such as grazing also occur in reserve areas. Managers charged with imposing or tolerating fire or other disturbance within their reserves are concerned that habitat quality may be degraded by an increasing abundance of exotic plants. We used vegetation monitoring data from Camp Pendleton, California, USA, to assess the correlation between past disturbances (frequent fire, agriculture, or grazing and mechanical disturbances) and current exotic species abundance in CSS. We found that disturbance history was only modestly related to exotic abundance overall, but fire frequency showed the strongest association. We also examined whether cover and richness of various native plant life forms (woody species, perennial herbs, and annual herbs) were more strongly influenced by disturbance history or by exotic-plant abundance. Native plant responses varied among life forms, but woody species and annual herbs were generally more strongly and negatively associated with exotic abundance than with disturbance. Effective CSS conservation will require developing means to curb the negative impacts of exotic plants, which may abound with or without severe or recent disturbance. Additionally, more focus should be given to understory herbs showing sensitivity to invasion. Though understudied, native herbs comprise the greatest portion of plant diversity in CSS and are critical to preservation of the community as a whole. ?? 2009 by the Ecological Society of America.

  15. Central Appalachian Exotic Terranes and Exposures of Former Orogenic Middle Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    In the northern and southern Appalachians, rocks that formed Paleozoic orogenic middle crust mostly are exposed within or directly inboard of terranes that originated near Gondwana. Most outcrops of the Paleozoic orogenic middle crust of the eastern edge of Laurentia occur adjacent to these exotic terranes. However, a narrow belt of Paleozoic orogenic middle crust is exposed in the Piedmont of the central Appalachians despite the absence of recognized exotic terranes. The presence of these deformed, amphibolite facies rocks raises the questions: "Did central Appalachian orogeny occur in the absence of accreted exotic terranes?" and, more generally, "Is exotic terrane collision required for exhumation of Appalachian former middle crust?" Previous U/Pb isotopic dating of spots in detrital zircon revealed the presence of Gondwanan terranes in three locations in the central Appalachians: central Virginia, central Maryland, and southeastern Pennsylvania. Two new samples collected near the discovery locations in Virginia and Maryland yielded prominent peaks in zircon U/Pb age distributions at ca. 630-610 Ma, confirming the Gondwanan affinity of these rocks. Hf isotopic compositions of spots in these upper Neoproterozoic zircon grains range to both more and less depleted than spots in zircon from the few possible Laurentian granitic sources, consistent with derivation of the zircon from Gondwana. Abundant 1700-1000 Ma detrital zircon rules out the West Africa Craton as a potential source; Amazonia is the most likely ultimate source of the zircon. The extent of the exotic terrane(s) in the central Appalachian Piedmont remains enigmatic due to uncertain connections between isolated exposures of the terrane(s). Nevertheless, the discovery of one or more exotic terranes in the central Appalachian Piedmont underscores the relationship between exotic terranes and exposed former middle crust in the Appalachians. This relationship may be a feature of several other major

  16. The occurrence of an exotic bisexual Artemia species, Artemia franciscana, in two coastal salterns of Shandong Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo; Sun, Shichun; Ma, Lin

    2004-10-01

    The alien halophilous Artemia species, Artemia franciscana, was found in Chengkou Saltern and Yangkou Saltern of Shandong Province, P.R. China. Although the indigenous parthenogenetic Artemia is detectable, the exotic species is dominant in both salterns. The cross-breeding tests between the exotic A. franciscana and 5 bisexual Artemia species were conducted. The results of hybridization and morphological observations on the exotic A. franciscana are briefly presented in this short communication.

  17. Provenance of KREEP and the exotic component - Elemental and isotopic studies of grain size fractions in lunar soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evensen, N. M.; Murthy, V. R.; Coscio, M. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Sieve fraction analyses of lunar soils reveal the presence of a fine-grained exotic component enriched in K, Rb, Sr, Ba, and in radiogenic Sr in all soils. The probable source of this exotic component is the areas of high-surficial radioactivity observed by orbital gamma ray spectrometry, such as those at Fra Mauro and Archimedes. If the exotic component is fine-grained KREEP, the origin and distribution of KREEP fragments in the soils are identified. It is suggested that the exotic component represents trace element enriched material located at some depth in the Imbrium area which was surficially deposited during Imbrium excavation.

  18. Relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for two generalist native trematodes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A.; Lal, Aparna; Dale, Marcia; Townsend, Colin R.; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Exotic fish species frequently acquire native parasites despite the absence of closely related native hosts. They thus have the potential to affect native counterparts by altering native host–parasite dynamics. In New Zealand, exotic brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have acquired two native trematodes (Telogaster opisthorchis and Stegodexamene anguillae) from their native definitive host (the longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii). We used a combination of field surveys and experimental infections to determine the relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for these native parasites. Field observations indicated that the longfin eel was the superior host for both parasites, although differences between native and exotic hosts were less apparent for S. anguillae. Experimental infections indicated that both parasites had poorer establishment and survival in salmonids, although some worms matured and attained similar sizes to those in eels before dying. Overall, the field surveys and experimental infections indicate that these exotic salmonids are poor hosts of both native trematodes and their presence may decrease native parasite flow to native hosts. PMID:24533327

  19. Mortality of exotic and native seeds in invaded and uninvaded habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orrock, John L.; Hoisington-López, Jessica L.

    2009-09-01

    We examined seed survival in exotic- and native-dominated grasslands by placing seeds of a once-pervasive native grass species, Nassella pulchra, and two of the most common, widespread exotic grass species, Avena fatua and Bromus hordeaceus, in mesh bags in the field for 3 months. Compared to germination of unexposed seeds not placed in the field, exotic species experienced an approximately 40% reduction in viability, whereas the mortality experienced by the native species was <20%. Despite these differences, germination rates of exposed seeds were similar between native and exotic species because native N. pulchra seeds had lower initial viability prior to entering the seed bank. Seed mortality did not differ based on whether seeds were placed in habitats dominated by exotic or native grasses. Rather, our results suggest that re-establishment of native N. pulchra must focus on maximizing seed viability and survival, and that A. fatua and B. hordeaceus overcome relatively higher losses of viable seeds in the seed bank, potentially by producing large numbers of highly viable seeds.

  20. Climate change and invasion by intracontinental range-expanding exotic plants: the role of biotic interactions

    PubMed Central

    Morriën, Elly; Engelkes, Tim; Macel, Mirka; Meisner, Annelein; Van der Putten, Wim H.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims In this Botanical Briefing we describe how the interactions between plants and their biotic environment can change during range-expansion within a continent and how this may influence plant invasiveness. Scope We address how mechanisms explaining intercontinental plant invasions by exotics (such as release from enemies) may also apply to climate-warming-induced range-expanding exotics within the same continent. We focus on above-ground and below-ground interactions of plants, enemies and symbionts, on plant defences, and on nutrient cycling. Conclusions Range-expansion by plants may result in above-ground and below-ground enemy release. This enemy release can be due to the higher dispersal capacity of plants than of natural enemies. Moreover, lower-latitudinal plants can have higher defence levels than plants from temperate regions, making them better defended against herbivory. In a world that contains fewer enemies, exotic plants will experience less selection pressure to maintain high levels of defensive secondary metabolites. Range-expanders potentially affect ecosystem processes, such as nutrient cycling. These features are quite comparable with what is known of intercontinental invasive exotic plants. However, intracontinental range-expanding plants will have ongoing gene-flow between the newly established populations and the populations in the native range. This is a major difference from intercontinental invasive exotic plants, which become more severely disconnected from their source populations. PMID:20354072

  1. Future directions in training of veterinarians for small exotic mammal medicine: expectations, potential, opportunities, and mandates.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Karen

    2006-01-01

    Small exotic mammals have been companions to people for almost as long as dogs and cats have been. The challenge for veterinary medicine today is to decipher the tea leaves and determine whether small mammals are fad or transient pets or whether they will still be popular in 20 years. This article focuses on pet small-mammal medicine, as the concerns of the laboratory animal are better known and may differ profoundly from those of a pet. Dozens of species of small exotic mammals are kept as pets. These pet small-mammal species have historically served human purposes other than companionship: for hunting, for their pelts, or for meat. Now, they are common pets. At present, most veterinary schools lack courses in the medical care of these animals. Veterinary students need at least one required class to introduce them to these pets. Currently, there are no small-mammal-only residency programs. This does not correspond with current needs. The only way to judge current needs is by assessing what employers are looking for. In a recent JAVMA classified section, almost 30% of small-animal practices in suburban/urban areas were hiring veterinarians with knowledge of exotic pets. All veterinarians must recognize that pet exotic small mammals have changed the landscape of small-animal medicine. It is a reality that, today, many small-animal practices see pet exotic small mammals on a daily basis. PMID:17035210

  2. Stress relief may promote the evolution of greater phenotypic plasticity in exotic invasive species: a hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Qiao Q; Pan, Xiao Y; Fan, Zhi W; Peng, Shao L

    2015-01-01

    Invasion ecologists have often found that exotic invaders evolve to be more plastic than conspecific populations from their native range. However, an open question is why some exotic invaders can even evolve to be more plastic given that there may be costs to being plastic. Investigation into the benefits and costs of plasticity suggests that stress may constrain the expression of plasticity (thereby reducing the benefits of plasticity) and exacerbate the costs of plasticity (although this possibility might not be generally applicable). Therefore, evolution of adaptive plasticity is more likely to be constrained in stressful environments. Upon introduction to a new range, exotic species may experience more favorable growth conditions (e.g., because of release from natural enemies). Therefore, we hypothesize that any factors mitigating stress in the introduced range may promote exotic invaders to evolve increased adaptive plasticity by reducing the costs and increasing the benefits of plasticity. Empirical evidence is largely consistent with this hypothesis. This hypothesis contributes to our understanding of why invasive species are often found to be more competitive in a subset of environments. Tests of this hypothesis may not only help us understand what caused increased plasticity in some exotic invaders, but could also tell us if costs (unless very small) are more likely to inhibit the evolution of adaptive plasticity in stressful environments in general. PMID:25859323

  3. Different responses to the 2011 drought between native- and exotic-dominated experimental communities in Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilsey, B. J.; Polley, W.; Daneshgar, P. P.

    2014-12-01

    Global change includes invasion by non-native species, and invasion may affect ecosystem recovery from drought, especially when they cause species diversity declines. Here we test predictions in central Texas in a six-year experiment that compares mixtures of all exotic or all native species under two summer irrigation treatments (128 or 0 mm) that varies the amount of summer drought stress. A major drought (precipitation of 41% of normal) occurred in year 4 (2011), allowing a "natural experiment" test of how treatments affect drought resistance and recovery. Peak biomass was only 8% of pre-drought values in the drought year of 2011. Biomass resistance (drought/pre-drought biomass) and resilience (post-drought/pre-drought biomass) were similar among treatments. Native communities lost fewer species during the drought, and recovered more species after the drought than exotic communities. Over time, the responses in peak biomass to summer irrigation changed between native and exotic communities, with initially large responses in exotic communities in year 1 diminishing to non-significant responses by years 5 and 6. Native communities on the other hand, showed a small response to summer irrigation in year 1, but this response grew to become a large increase with irrigation by years 4-6. Reduced response to summer irrigation in exotic communities were associated with reduced species diversity and shifts in species composition towards C4 grasses. The differential effects of the drought indicate that non-native species will alter grassland community responses to drought events.

  4. Hamiltonian dynamics of an exotic action for gravity in three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Escalante, Alberto Manuel-Cabrera, J.

    2014-04-15

    The Hamiltonian dynamics and the canonical covariant formalism for an exotic action in three dimensions are performed. By working with the complete phase space, we report a complete Hamiltonian description of the theory such as the extended action, the extended Hamiltonian, the algebra among the constraints, the Dirac’s brackets and the correct gauge transformations. In addition, we show that in spite of exotic action and tetrad gravity with a cosmological constant give rise to the same equations of motion, they are not equivalent, in fact, we show that their corresponding Dirac’s brackets are quite different. Finally, we construct a gauge invariant symplectic form which in turn represents a complete Hamiltonian description of the covariant phase space. -- Highlights: •We report a detailed Hamiltonian analysis for an exotic action of gravity. •We show that Palatini and exotic actions are not equivalent. •The exotic action is a non-commutative theory. •The fundamental gauge transformations of the theory are Λ-deformed Poincaré transformations. •A Lorentz and gauge invariant symplectic two-form is constructed.

  5. High Energy Density Physics and Exotic Acceleration Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, T.; Colby, E.; /SLAC

    2005-09-27

    The High Energy Density and Exotic Acceleration working group took as our goal to reach beyond the community of plasma accelerator research with its applications to high energy physics, to promote exchange with other disciplines which are challenged by related and demanding beam physics issues. The scope of the group was to cover particle acceleration and beam transport that, unlike other groups at AAC, are not mediated by plasmas or by electromagnetic structures. At this Workshop, we saw an impressive advancement from years past in the area of Vacuum Acceleration, for example with the LEAP experiment at Stanford. And we saw an influx of exciting new beam physics topics involving particle propagation inside of solid-density plasmas or at extremely high charge density, particularly in the areas of laser acceleration of ions, and extreme beams for fusion energy research, including Heavy-ion Inertial Fusion beam physics. One example of the importance and extreme nature of beam physics in HED research is the requirement in the Fast Ignitor scheme of inertial fusion to heat a compressed DT fusion pellet to keV temperatures by injection of laser-driven electron or ion beams of giga-Amp current. Even in modest experiments presently being performed on the laser-acceleration of ions from solids, mega-amp currents of MeV electrons must be transported through solid foils, requiring almost complete return current neutralization, and giving rise to a wide variety of beam-plasma instabilities. As keynote talks our group promoted Ion Acceleration (plenary talk by A. MacKinnon), which historically has grown out of inertial fusion research, and HIF Accelerator Research (invited talk by A. Friedman), which will require impressive advancements in space-charge-limited ion beam physics and in understanding the generation and transport of neutralized ion beams. A unifying aspect of High Energy Density applications was the physics of particle beams inside of solids, which is proving to

  6. A Novel Antimatter Detector with Application to Dark Matter Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, W W; Fabris, L; Madden, N; Ziock, K; Hailey, C; Aramaki, T; Gabhauer, F; Koglin, J; Mori, K; Yu, H

    2006-02-13

    We report on recent accelerator testing of a prototype general antiparticle spectrometer (GAPS). GAPS uses a novel approach for indirect dark matter searches that exploits the antideuterons produced in neutralino-neutralino annihilations. GAPS captures these antideuterons into a target with the subsequent formation of exotic atoms. These exotic atoms decay with the emission of x-rays of precisely defined energy and a correlated pion signature from nuclear annihilation. This signature uniquely characterizes the antideuterons. Preliminary analysis of data from a prototype GAPS in an antiproton beam at the KEK accelerator in Japan has confirmed the multiple x-ray/pion star topology and indicated x-ray yields consistent with prior expectations. Moreover, our success in utilizing solid rather than gas targets represents a significant simplification over our original approach and offers potential gains in sensitivity through reduced dead mass in the target area.

  7. Physics of the interior of a black hole with an exotic scalar matter

    SciTech Connect

    Doroshkevich, Andrey; Shatskiy, Alexander; Hansen, Jakob; Novikov, Dmitriy; Novikov, Igor; Park, Dong-Ho

    2010-06-15

    We use a numerical code to consider the nonlinear processes arising when a Reissner-Nordstroem black hole is irradiated by an exotic scalar field ( modeled as a free massless scalar field with an opposite sign for its energy-momentum tensor). These processes are quite different from the processes arising in the case of the same black hole being irradiated by a pulse of a normal scalar field. In our case, we did not observe the creation of a spacelike strong singularity in the T region of the space-time. We investigate the antifocusing effects in the gravity field of the exotic scalar field with the negative energy density and the evolution of the mass function. We demonstrate the process of the vanishing of the black hole when it is irradiated by a strong pulse of an exotic scalar field.

  8. Thermodynamics of "exotic" Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli black holes.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Paul K; Zhang, Baocheng

    2013-06-14

    A number of three-dimensional (3D) gravity models, such as 3D conformal gravity, admit "exotic" black hole solutions: the metric is the same as the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli metric of 3D Einstein gravity but with reversed roles for mass and angular momentum, and an entropy proportional to the length of the inner horizon instead of the event horizon. Here we show that the Bañados-Teitelboim-Zanelli solutions of the exotic 3D Einstein gravity (with parity-odd action but Einstein field equations) are exotic black holes, and we investigate their thermodynamics. The first and second laws of black hole thermodynamics still apply, and the entropy still has a statistical interpretation. PMID:25165908

  9. Exotic Twisted Equivariant Cohomology of Loop Spaces, Twisted Bismut-Chern Character and T-Duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Fei; Mathai, Varghese

    2015-07-01

    We define exotic twisted - equivariant cohomology for the loop space LZ of a smooth manifold Z via the invariant differential forms on LZ with coefficients in the (typically non-flat) holonomy line bundle of a gerbe, with differential an equivariantly flat superconnection. We introduce the twisted Bismut-Chern character form, a loop space refinement of the twisted Chern character form in Bouwknegt et al. (Commun Math Phys 228:17-49, 2002) and Mathai and Stevenson (Commun Math Phys 236:161-186, 2003), which represents classes in the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology of LZ.We establish a localisation theorem for the completed periodic exotic twisted -equivariant cohomology for loop spaces and apply it to establish T-duality in a background flux in type II String Theory from a loop space perspective.

  10. Riparian zones as havens for exotic plant species in the central grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Bull, K.A.; Otsuki, Y.; Villa, C.A.; Lee, M.

    1998-01-01

    In the Central Grasslands of the United States, we hypothesized that riparian zones high in soil fertility would contain more exotic plant species than upland areas of low soil fertility. Our alternate hypothesis was that riparian zones high in native plant species richness and cover would monopolize available resources and resist invasion by exotic species. We gathered nested-scale vegetation data from 40 1 m2subplots (nested in four 1000 m2 plots) in both riparian and upland sites at four study areas in Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota (a total of 320 1 m2subplots and 32 1000 m2 plots). At the 1 m2 scale, mean foliar cover of native species was significantly greater (P < 0.001) in riparian zones (36.6% ?? 1.7%) compared to upland sites (28.7% ?? 1.5%), but at this small scale there were no consistent patterns of native and exotic species richness among the four management areas. Mean exotic species cover was slightly higher in upland sites compared to riparian sites (9.0% ?? 3.8% versus 8.2% ?? 3.0% cover). However, mean exotic species richness and cover were greater in the riparian zones than upland sites in three of four management areas. At the 1000 m2 scale, mean exotic species richness was also significantly greater (P < 0.05) in riparian zones (7.8 ?? 1.0 species) compared to upland sites (4.8 ?? 1.0 species) despite the heavy invasion of one upland site. For all 32 plots combined, 21% of the variance in exotic species richness was explained by positive relationships with soil % silt (t = 1.7, P = 0.09) and total foliar cover (t = 2.4, P = 0.02). Likewise, 26% of the variance in exotic species cover (log10 cover) was explained by positive relationships with soil % silt (t = 2.3, P = 0.03) and total plant species richness (t = 2.4, P = 0.02). At landscape scales (four 1000 m2 plots per type combined), total foliar cover was significantly and positively correlated with exotic species richness (r = 0.73, P < 0.05) and cover (r = 0.74, P < 0.05). Exotic

  11. Exotic Fish in Exotic Plantations: A Multi-Scale Approach to Understand Amphibian Occurrence in the Mediterranean Region

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Joana; Sarmento, Pedro; Carretero, Miguel A.; White, Piran C. L.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, amphibian populations are threatened by a diverse range of factors including habitat destruction and alteration. Forestry practices have been linked with low diversity and abundance of amphibians. The effect of exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations on amphibian communities has been studied in a number of biodiversity hotspots, but little is known of its impact in the Mediterranean region. Here, we identify the environmental factors influencing the presence of six species of amphibians (the Caudata Pleurodeles waltl, Salamandra salamandra, Lissotriton boscai, Triturus marmoratus and the anurans Pelobates cultripes and Hyla arborea/meridionalis) occupying 88 ponds. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean landscape dominated by eucalypt plantations alternated with traditional use (agricultural, montados and native forest) at three different scales: local (pond), intermediate (400 metres radius buffer) and broad (1000 metres radius buffer). Using the Akaike Information Criterion for small samples (AICc), we selected the top-ranked models for estimating the probability of occurrence of each species at each spatial scale separately and across all three spatial scales, using a combination of covariates from the different magnitudes. Models with a combination of covariates at the different spatial scales had a stronger support than those at individual scales. The presence of predatory fish in a pond had a strong effect on Caudata presence. Permanent ponds were selected by Hyla arborea/meridionalis over temporary ponds. Species occurrence was not increased by a higher density of streams, but the density of ponds impacted negatively on Lissotriton boscai. The proximity of ponds occupied by their conspecifics had a positive effect on the occurrence of Lissotriton boscai and Pleurodeles waltl. Eucalypt plantations had a negative effect on the occurrence of the newt Lissotriton boscai and anurans Hyla arborea/meridionalis, but had a positive effect on the presence of

  12. Exotic Fish in Exotic Plantations: A Multi-Scale Approach to Understand Amphibian Occurrence in the Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Joana; Sarmento, Pedro; Carretero, Miguel A; White, Piran C L

    2015-01-01

    Globally, amphibian populations are threatened by a diverse range of factors including habitat destruction and alteration. Forestry practices have been linked with low diversity and abundance of amphibians. The effect of exotic Eucalyptus spp. plantations on amphibian communities has been studied in a number of biodiversity hotspots, but little is known of its impact in the Mediterranean region. Here, we identify the environmental factors influencing the presence of six species of amphibians (the Caudata Pleurodeles waltl, Salamandra salamandra, Lissotriton boscai, Triturus marmoratus and the anurans Pelobates cultripes and Hyla arborea/meridionalis) occupying 88 ponds. The study was conducted in a Mediterranean landscape dominated by eucalypt plantations alternated with traditional use (agricultural, montados and native forest) at three different scales: local (pond), intermediate (400 metres radius buffer) and broad (1000 metres radius buffer). Using the Akaike Information Criterion for small samples (AICc), we selected the top-ranked models for estimating the probability of occurrence of each species at each spatial scale separately and across all three spatial scales, using a combination of covariates from the different magnitudes. Models with a combination of covariates at the different spatial scales had a stronger support than those at individual scales. The presence of predatory fish in a pond had a strong effect on Caudata presence. Permanent ponds were selected by Hyla arborea/meridionalis over temporary ponds. Species occurrence was not increased by a higher density of streams, but the density of ponds impacted negatively on Lissotriton boscai. The proximity of ponds occupied by their conspecifics had a positive effect on the occurrence of Lissotriton boscai and Pleurodeles waltl. Eucalypt plantations had a negative effect on the occurrence of the newt Lissotriton boscai and anurans Hyla arborea/meridionalis, but had a positive effect on the presence of

  13. Survey of zoonotic dermatoses in client-owned exotic pet mammals in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    d'Ovidio, D; Santoro, D

    2015-03-01

    Several 'exotic' mammalian species (e.g. rabbits, rodents, ferrets and hedgehogs) live in close proximity to humans as companion pets. Skin diseases (SD) are frequent causes of morbidity in exotic pet mammals, and most of those SDs have a zoonotic potential. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequencies and types of zoonotic dermatosis (ZD) in client-owned, exotic pet mammals in Southern Italy. Six-hundred and fifty-five medical records of exotic pet mammals examined between 2011 and 2012, across twenty private practice veterinary clinics around the Naples area (Italy), were retrospectively evaluated and screened for animals diagnosed with SDs (rabbits n = 455, guinea pigs n = 93, ferrets n = 64, hedgehogs n = 19, chinchillas n = 13 and rats n = 11). The records of animals diagnosed with SD, whose causative agents had a zoonotic potential, were selected for analysis. The Mann-Whitney independent test was used for statistical analysis. A P value ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Eighty-two records (12.5%) of animals with ZD were identified. Of those, 56.1% (46/82) were affected by fungal infections and 42.7% (35/82) by parasitic infections. No zoonotic bacterial or viral infections were diagnosed. Dermatophytosis was significantly diagnosed more frequently in younger animals. The results of this survey indicate that exotic pet mammals may serve as active carriers for many highly contagious pathogens with zoonotic potential. Awareness and vigilance by the veterinary practitioner is crucial in the prevention of occurrences of ZDs. Children frequently come in close contact with exotic pets. To prevent the unplanned transmission of pathogen from pet to human, an active routine screening examination and preventative treatments are strongly recommended for every newly purchased pet mammal. PMID:24506806

  14. Effects of an exotic prey species on a native specialist: Eexample of the snail kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cattau, Christopher E.; Martin, J.; Kitchens, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite acknowledging that exotic species can exhibit tremendous influence over native populations, few case studies have clearly demonstrated the effects of exotic prey species on native predators. We examined the effects of the recently introduced island apple snail (Pomacea insularum) on the foraging behavior and energetics of the endangered snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. We conducted time-activity budgets: (i) on kites foraging for native Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) in major wetland units within the kites' range that had not been invaded by the exotic island apple snail and (ii) on kites foraging for exotic apple snails in Lake Tohopekaliga, the only major wetland utilized by the snail kite that had suffered a serious invasion of P. insularum. When foraging for P. insularum, snail kites dropped a greater proportion of snails, and they experienced increased handling times and decreased consumption rates; however, kites foraging for P. insularum also spent a smaller proportion of the day in flight. Estimates of net daily energy balances between kites feeding on P. insularum versus P. paludosa were comparable for adults, but juveniles experienced energetic deficiencies when feeding on the exotic snail. Due to this discrepancy, we hypothesize that wetlands invaded by P. insularum, such as Lake Tohopekaliga, may function as ecological traps for the snail kite in Florida by attracting breeding adults but simultaneously depressing juvenile survival. This study highlights the conservation implications and importance of elucidating the effects that exotic species have on native specialists, especially those that are endangered, because subtle influences on behavior may have significant population consequences. ?? 2009 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Effects of an exotic prey species on a native specialist: example of the snail kite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cattau, Christopher E.; Martin, J.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2010-01-01

    Despite acknowledging that exotic species can exhibit tremendous influence over native populations, few case studies have clearly demonstrated the effects of exotic prey species on native predators. We examined the effects of the recently introduced island apple snail (Pomacea insularum) on the foraging behavior and energetics of the endangered snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) in Florida. We conducted time-activity budgets: (i) on kites foraging for native Florida apple snails (Pomacea paludosa) in major wetland units within the kites' range that had not been invaded by the exotic island apple snail and (ii) on kites foraging for exotic apple snails in Lake Tohopekaliga, the only major wetland utilized by the snail kite that had suffered a serious invasion of P. insularum. When foraging for P. insularum, snail kites dropped a greater proportion of snails, and they experienced increased handling times and decreased consumption rates; however, kites foraging for P. insularum also spent a smaller proportion of the day in flight. Estimates of net daily energy balances between kites feeding on P. insularum versus P. paludosa were comparable for adults, but juveniles experienced energetic deficiencies when feeding on the exotic snail. Due to this discrepancy, we hypothesize that wetlands invaded by P. insularum, such as Lake Tohopekaliga, may function as ecological traps for the snail kite in Florida by attracting breeding adults but simultaneously depressing juvenile survival. This study highlights the conservation implications and importance of elucidating the effects that exotic species have on native specialists, especially those that are endangered, because subtle influences on behavior may have significant population consequences.

  16. Exotic decays of a heavy neutral Higgs through HZ/AZ channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleppa, Baradhwaj; Kling, Felix; Su, Shufang

    2014-09-01

    Models of electroweak symmetry breaking with extended Higgs sectors are theoretically well motivated. In this study, we focus on the Two Higgs Doublet Model with a low energy spectrum containing scalars H and a pseudoscalar A. We study the decays A → HZ or H → AZ, which could reach sizable branching fractions in certain parameter regions. With detailed collider analysis, we obtain model independent exclusion bounds as well as discovery reach at the 14 TeV LHC for the process: gg → A/ H → HZ/ AZ, looking at final states bbℓℓ, ττℓℓ and ZZZ(4 ℓ + 2 j) for ℓ = e, μ. We further interpret these bounds in the context of the Type II Two Higgs Doublet Model, considering three different classes of processes: A → h 0 Z, A → H 0 Z, and H 0 → AZ, in which h 0 and H 0 are the light and heavy CP-even Higgses respectively. For 100 fb-1 integrated luminosity at the 14 TeV LHC, we find that for parent particle mass around 300-400 GeV, A → h 0 Z has the greatest reach when H 0 is interpreted as the 126 GeV Higgs: most regions in the tan β versus sin( β - α) plane can be excluded and a significant fraction at small and large tan β can be covered by discovery. For 126 GeV h 0, only relatively small tan β ≲ 10 (5) can be reached by exclusion (discovery) while a wide range of sin( β - α) is accessible. For A → H 0 Z, the reach is typically restricted to sin( β - α) ~ ±1 with tan β ≲ 10 in bbℓℓ and ττℓℓ channels. The ZZZ(4 ℓ2 j) channel, on the other hand, covers a wide range of 0 .3 < | sin( β - α)| < 1 for tan β ≲ 4. H 0 → AZ typically favors negative values of sin( β - α), with exclusion/discovery reach possibly extending to all values of tan β. A study of exotic decays of extra Higgses appearing in extensions of the Standard Model would extend the reach at the LHC and provides nice complementarity to conventional Higgs search channels.

  17. Large acceptance spectrometers for invariant mass spectroscopy of exotic nuclei and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Kondo, Y.

    2016-06-01

    Large acceptance spectrometers at in-flight RI separators have played significant roles in investigating the structure of exotic nuclei. Such spectrometers are in particular useful for probing unbound states of exotic nuclei, using invariant mass spectroscopy with reactions at intermediate and high energies. We discuss here the key characteristic features of such spectrometers, by introducing the recently commissioned SAMURAI facility at the RIBF, RIKEN. We also investigate the issue of cross talk in the detection of multiple neutrons, which has become crucial for exploring further unbound states and nuclei beyond the neutron drip line. Finally we discuss future perspectives for large acceptance spectrometers at the new-generation RI-beam facilities.

  18. Dynamical picture for the formation and decay of the exotic XYZ mesons.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Stanley J; Hwang, Dae Sung; Lebed, Richard F

    2014-09-12

    We present a new dynamical picture that identifies the formation of the exotic c[over ¯]c-containing states XYZ with the confinement-induced hadronization of a rapidly separating pair of a compact diquark and antidiquark. This picture combines the advantages of diquark-based models, which can accommodate much of the known XYZ spectrum, with the experimental fact that such states are both relatively narrow and are produced promptly. It also naturally explains the preference of some of the exotic states to decay to ψ(2S), rather than J/ψ, in terms of a simple wave-function overlap effect. PMID:25259968

  19. Hunting, Exotic Carnivores, and Habitat Loss: Anthropogenic Effects on a Native Carnivore Community, Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Zach J.; Golden, Christopher D.; Karpanty, Sarah; Murphy, Asia; Stauffer, Dean; Ratelolahy, Felix; Andrianjakarivelo, Vonjy; Holmes, Christopher M.; Kelly, Marcella J.

    2015-01-01

    The wide-ranging, cumulative, negative effects of anthropogenic disturbance, including habitat degradation, exotic species, and hunting, on native wildlife has been well documented across a range of habitats worldwide with carnivores potentially being the most vulnerable due to their more extinction prone characteristics. Investigating the effects of anthropogenic pressures on sympatric carnivores is needed to improve our ability to develop targeted, effective management plans for carnivore conservation worldwide. Utilizing photographic, line-transect, and habitat sampling, as well as landscape analyses and village-based bushmeat hunting surveys, we provide the first investigation of how multiple forms of habitat degradation (fragmentation, exotic carnivores, human encroachment, and hunting) affect carnivore occupancy across Madagascar’s largest protected area: the Masoala-Makira landscape. We found that as degradation increased, native carnivore occupancy and encounter rates decreased while exotic carnivore occupancy and encounter rates increased. Feral cats (Felis species) and domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) had higher occupancy than half of the native carnivore species across Madagascar’s largest protected landscape. Bird and small mammal encounter rates were negatively associated with exotic carnivore occupancy, but positively associated with the occupancy of four native carnivore species. Spotted fanaloka (Fossa fossana) occupancy was constrained by the presence of exotic feral cats and exotic small Indian civet (Viverricula indica). Hunting was intense across the four study sites where hunting was studied, with the highest rates for the small Indian civet (x¯ = 90 individuals consumed/year), the ring-tailed vontsira (Galidia elegans) (x¯ = 58 consumed/year), and the fosa (Cryptoprocta ferox) (x¯ = 31 consumed/year). Our modeling results suggest hunters target intact forest where carnivore occupancy, abundance, and species richness, are

  20. Herbivore Preference for Native vs. Exotic Plants: Generalist Herbivores from Multiple Continents Prefer Exotic Plants That Are Evolutionarily Naïve

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Wendy E.; Hay, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Enemy release and biotic resistance are competing, but not mutually exclusive, hypotheses addressing the success or failure of non-native plants entering a new region. Enemy release predicts that exotic plants become invasive by escaping their co-adapted herbivores and by being unrecognized or unpalatable to native herbivores that have not been selected to consume them. In contrast, biotic resistance predicts that native generalist herbivores will suppress exotic plants that will not have been selected to deter these herbivores. We tested these hypotheses using five generalist herbivores from North or South America and nine confamilial pairs of native and exotic aquatic plants. Four of five herbivores showed 2.4–17.3 fold preferences for exotic over native plants. Three species of South American apple snails (Pomacea sp.) preferred North American over South American macrophytes, while a North American crayfish Procambarus spiculifer preferred South American, Asian, and Australian macrophytes over North American relatives. Apple snails have their center of diversity in South America, but a single species (Pomacea paludosa) occurs in North America. This species, with a South American lineage but a North American distribution, did not differentiate between South American and North American plants. Its preferences correlated with preferences of its South American relatives rather than with preferences of the North American crayfish, consistent with evolutionary inertia due to its South American lineage. Tests of plant traits indicated that the crayfish responded primarily to plant structure, the apple snails primarily to plant chemistry, and that plant protein concentration played no detectable role. Generalist herbivores preferred non-native plants, suggesting that intact guilds of native, generalist herbivores may provide biotic resistance to plant invasions. Past invasions may have been facilitated by removal of native herbivores, introduction of non

  1. Grasshopper herbivory affects native plant diversity and abundance in a grassland dominated by the exotic grass Agropyron cristatum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The indirect effects of native generalist insect herbivores on interactions between exotic and native grassland plants have received limited attention. Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) is the most common exotic grass in western North America. Crested wheatgrass communities are resistant to c...

  2. Commingling of native and exotic wildlife in South Carolina zoological gardens and their position in vector ecology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zoological parks expose native and exotic wildlife to a wide range of ectoparasites and biting flies. Our study focused on two zoological parks in South Carolina and we report on ticks, lice, flies, fleas, and other ectoparasites from both native and exotic wildlife in these parks. We also report on...

  3. Intraspecific and interspecific pair-wise seedling competition between exotic annual grasses and native perennials: Plant-soil relationships

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few studies have examined plant-soil relationships in competitive arenas between exotic and native plants in the western United States. A pair-wise competitive design was used to evaluate plant-soil relationships between seedings of the exotic annual grasses Bromus tectorum and Taentherium caput-med...

  4. Using a botanical garden to assess factors influencing the colonization of exotic woody plants by phyllophagous insects.

    PubMed

    Kirichenko, Natalia; Kenis, M

    2016-09-01

    The adoption of exotic plants by indigenous herbivores in the region of introduction can be influenced by numerous factors. A botanical garden in Western Siberia was used to test various hypotheses on the adaptation of indigenous phyllophagous insects to exotic plants invasions, focusing on two feeding guilds, external leaf chewers and leaf miners. A total of 150 indigenous and exotic woody plant species were surveyed for insect damage, abundance and species richness. First, exotic woody plants were much less damaged by chewers and leaf miners than native plants, and the leaf miners' species richness was much lower on exotic than native plants. Second, exotic woody plants having a congeneric species in the region of introduction were more damaged by chewers and hosted a more abundant and species-rich community of leaf miners than plants without native congeneric species. Third, damage by chewers significantly increased with the frequency of planting of exotic host plants outside the botanical garden, and leaf miners' abundance and species richness significantly increased with residence time in the garden. Finally, no significant relationship was found between insect damage or abundance and the origin of the exotic plants. Besides the ecological implications of the results, this study also illustrates the potential of botanical gardens to test ecological hypotheses on biological invasions and insect-plant interactions on a large set of plant species. PMID:27167225

  5. Frustration under pressure: Exotic magnetism in new pyrochlore oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, C. R.; Hallas, A. M.

    2015-04-01

    Pyrochlore structures, of chemical formula A{sub 2}B{sub 2}O{sub 7} (A and B are typically trivalent and tetravalent ions, respectively), have been the focus of much activity in the condensed matter community due to the ease of substitution of rare earth and transition metal ions upon the two interpenetrating corner-shared tetrahedral lattices. Over the last few decades, superconductivity, spin liquid states, spin ice states, glassy states in the absence of chemical disorder, and metal-insulator transitions have all been discovered in these materials. Geometric frustration plays a role in the relevant physics of all of these phenomena. In the search for new pyrochlore materials, it is the R{sub A}/R{sub B} cation radius ratio which determines the stability of the lattice over the defect fluorite structure in the lower limit. Under ambient pressure, the pyrochlores are stable for 1.36 ≤ R{sub A}/R{sub B} ≤ 1.71. However, using high pressure synthesis techniques (1-10 GPa of pressure), metastable pyrochlores exist up to R{sub A}/R{sub B} = 2.30. Many of these compounds are stable on a timescale of years after synthesis, and provide a means to greatly enhance exchange, and thus test theories of quantum magnetism and search for new phenomena. Within this article, we review new pyrochlore compounds synthesized via high pressure techniques and show how the ground states are extremely sensitive to chemical pressure.

  6. Recent CDF results on heavy and exotic baryons in p-pbar collisions at s**(1/2)=1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Curbis, F.; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome

    2005-01-01

    Since March 2001 a new period of CDF data taking (called Run II) began at the p{bar p} Tevatron collider. The upgrade of Collider Detector at Fermilab improved the tracking system: the vertexing, triggering and particle identification capabilities. This has allowed a further development of B physics, because the B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b} are produced in hadronic collisions. Here measurements of the mass and lifetime of {Lambda}{sub b} in two decay channels are presented. Using particle identification (PID) information from the time of flight and the dE/dx, CDF performed pentaquark searches for {Theta}{sup +}, {Xi}{sub 3/2}{sup --,0} and {Theta}{sub c}{sup 0}, following the recent interest in exotic baryon spectroscopy.

  7. Mechanisms driving diversity-productivity relationships differ between exotic and native communities and are affected by gastropod herbivory.

    PubMed

    Korell, Lotte; Schmidt, Robin; Bruelheide, Helge; Hensen, Isabell; Auge, Harald

    2016-04-01

    Biodiversity experiments have shown that productivity usually increases with plant species richness. However, most of those studies disregarded the importance of trophic interactions to the diversity-productivity relationship, and focused on the loss of native species while ignoring invasions by exotic species. Yet, as functional complementarity and the impact of plant antagonists are likely to differ between native and exotic communities, the diversity-productivity relationship may change when native communities are invaded by exotic species. We conducted a mesocosm experiment to test how diversity effects, evenness, and productivity differed between exotic and native assemblages of grassland plants, and how these communities were influenced by slug herbivory. In line with other experiments, we found higher productivity in exotic than in native communities. However, different mechanisms (complementarity vs. selection effect) contributed to the positive diversity-productivity relationships in exotic vs. native communities. Against expectations, native communities showed much lower evenness and a greater selection effect, suggesting that competitive dominance among native species may be even stronger than among exotic species. Slug herbivory decreased productivity independently of species origin and species diversity. However, exotic communities showed a threefold higher complementarity effect than native communities in the absence of slugs, which was mainly driven by differences in the responses of native and exotic legumes and nonleguminous herbs. Our results imply that underlying mechanisms for the positive diversity-productivity relationship differ between native and exotic communities in the early stages of community development, and that differential responses of plant functional groups to generalist herbivory can contribute to this pattern. PMID:26235964

  8. Hadron interactions and exotic hadrons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Yoichi

    2014-09-01

    One of the interesting subjects in hadron physics is to look for the multiquark configurations. One of candidates is the H-dibaryon (udsuds), and the possibility of the bound H-dibaryon has been recently studied from lattice QCD. We also extend the HAL QCD method to define potentials on the lattice between baryons to meson-meson systems including charm quarks to search for the bound tetraquark Tcc (ud c c) and Tcs (ud c s). In the presentation, after reviewing the HAL QCD method, we report the results on the H-dibaryon, the tetraquark Tcc (ud c c) and Tcs (ud c s), where we have employed the relativistic heavy quark action to treat the charm quark dynamics with pion masses, mπ = 410, 570, 700 MeV.

  9. Observation of lasing modes with exotic localized wave patterns from astigmatic large-Fresnel-number cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, T H; Lin, Y C; Liang, H C; Huang, Y J; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the lasing modes in large-Fresnel-number laser systems with astigmatism effects. Experimental results reveal that numerous lasing modes are concentrated on exotic patterns corresponding to intriguing geometries. We theoretically use the quantum operator algebra to construct the wave representation for manifesting the origin of the localized wave patterns. PMID:20125716

  10. [Effects of exotic Larix kaempferi on forest soil quality and bacterial diversity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Cao, Jing; Dong, Mao-Xing; Ma, Xiao-Jun

    2008-10-01

    The study on the soil quality and bacterial diversity under 8-30 years old exotic Larix kaempferi, native Pinus tabulaeformis, and secondary deciduous broadleaf forest stands in Xiaolong-shan Mountains of Gansu, Northwest China showed that the soil pH under different forest stands had no distinct variation, but soil moisture content was increased with increasing age of forest stands. Soil organic matter and nitrogen contents were the highest under secondary deciduous forest, followed by under L. kaermpferi, and P. tabulaeformis. However, the soils under different ages of forest stands had no obvious variations in their organic matter and nitrogen contents, suggesting that tree species was the main factor affecting soil quality. Compared with P. tabulaeformis, exotic L. kaempferi could significantly increase soil organic matter and nitrogen contents. PCR-DGGE banding patterns suggested that the soil under secondary deciduous broadleaf forest had the highest bacterial diversity, followed by under L. kaempferi, and P. tabulaeformis. The sequenced DGGE bands were classified into three bacterial groups, i. e., Proteobacteria, Cytophaga - Flavobacterium - Bacteroides, and high G + C content gram-positive type, among which, Proteobacteria occurred most frequently. Further detailed analyses suggested that the soil bacterial compositions under exotic Larix stands were more similar to each other than those under pine and secondary deciduous broadleaf forests. It was concluded that exotic L. kaempferi induced the changes of microbial diversity in the forest soils of this region. PMID:19123342

  11. Invasion of shrublands by exotic grasses: Ecohydrological consequences in cold vs. warm deserts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Across the globe, native savannas and woodlands are undergoing conversion to exotic grasslands. Here we summarize the current state of knowledge concerning the ecohydrological consequences of this conversion for the cold deserts (Great Basin, Colorado Plateau) and the warm deserts (Mojave, Sonoran, ...

  12. New Technology, New Pedagogy? Employing Video Podcasts in Learning and Teaching about Exotic Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jennifer L.; Nelson, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the experiences of undergraduate university students in response to the employment of video podcasts to support learning and teaching about exotic ecosystems. Six, 15-20-minute podcasts were made accessible to students through a virtual learning environment, either online or to download to mobile technology. The students were…

  13. Maize Haploid Induction and Doubling II – Experience with Exotic and Elite Maize Populations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As a follow-up to our previous study, second year information will be presented addressing questions on haploid induction and doubling, utilizing exotic and elite maize. These projects result from collaborations between Iowa State Doubled Haploid Facility (http://www.plantbreeding.iastate.edu/DHF/D...

  14. Drop-tower experiments for capillary surfaces in an exotic container

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Weislogel, Mark

    1991-01-01

    Low-gravity drop-tower experiments are carried out for an 'exotic' rotationally-symmetric container, which admits an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium symmetric capillary free surfaces. It is found that an initial equilibrium planer interface, a member of the continuum, will reorient toward a non-symmetric interface, as predicted by recent mathematical theory.

  15. Drop-tower experiments for capillary surfaces in an exotic container

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P. ); Finn, R. . Dept. of Mathematics); Weislogel, M. . Lewis Research Center)

    1990-10-01

    Low-gravity drop-tower experiments are carried out for an exotic'' rotationally-symmetric container, which admits an entire continuum of distinct equilibrium symmetric capillary free surfaces. It is found that an initial equilibrium planar interface, a member of the continuum, will reorient toward a non-symmetric interface, as predicted by recent mathematical theory. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Vector-like exotics in F-theory and 750 GeV diphotons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palti, Eran

    2016-06-01

    The recent excess in diphoton events around 750 GeV seen by the ATLAS and CMS experiments could be hinting at the existence of new vector-like charged matter around the TeV scale which couples to a singlet. Such a spectrum of exotics arises inevitably in certain classes of F-theory GUTs with hypercharge flux when the GUT symmetry is extended by a U (1) symmetry under which the Higgs fields of the MSSM are not vector-like. The exotics are not vector-like under the U (1) symmetry and therefore their mass is naturally related to its breaking scale. Previously this scale was taken to be close to the GUT scale which led to tension with proton decay, the μ-term magnitude, and too large R-parity violation. The 750 GeV excess provides new motivation for considering breaking the U (1) around the TeV scale, which additionally alleviates the previous problems. We study the possible TeV-scale spectrum in such an SU (5) GUT scenario and show that it is constrained and predictive. Gauge coupling unification can be retained at the accuracy of the MSSM at one loop even though typically the spectrum does not form complete GUT representations. For example the exotics cannot form a complete 10 multiplet but nonetheless happen to behave as one in the beta functions. We present an initial analysis of the diphoton production rates for the exotics spectra and find them compatible with data.

  17. Grasshopper host-plant selection influences seedling recruitment of native plants in an exotic dominated grassland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crested wheatgrass (Agropyron cristatum) is the most common exotic grass in western North America. Areas planted to crested wheatgrass are resistant to colonization by native plant species and often remain relatively stable for decades, imposing problems for the restoration of native grasslands. Gra...

  18. Irradiation of diets fed to captive exotic felids: microbial destruction, consumption, and fecal consistency.

    PubMed

    Crissey, S D; Slifka, K A; Jacobsen, K L; Shumway, P J; Mathews, R; Harper, J

    2001-09-01

    Two frozen, raw horse meat-based diets fed to captive exotic felids at Brookfield Zoo were irradiated to determine the extent of microbial destruction and whether radiation treatment would affect consumption and/or fecal consistency in exotic cats. Fifteen cats, two African lions (Panthera leo), two Amur tigers (Panthera tigris altaica), one Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis), two clouded leopards (Neofelis nebulosa), two caracals (Felis caracal), one bobcat (Felis rufus), and five fishing cats (Felis viverrinus), housed at Brookfield Zoo were fed nonirradiated and irradiated raw diets containing horse meat with cereal products and fortified with nutrients: Nebraska Brand Feline and/or Canine Diet (Animal Spectrum, North Platte, Nebraska 69103, USA). Baseline data were obtained during a 2-wk control period (nonirradiated diets), which was followed by a 4-wk period of feeding comparable irradiated diets. Feed intake and fecal consistency data were collected. An estimated radiation dose range of 0.5-3.9 kilograys reduced most microbial populations, depending on specific diet and microbe type. Irradiation had no overall effect on either feed consumption or fecal consistency in captive exotic cats, regardless of species, age, sex, or body mass. Data indicate that irradiation of frozen horse meat-based diets (packaged in 2.2-kg portions) result in microbial destruction in these products but that product storage time between irradiation and sampling may also affect microbial reduction. However, irradiation would be an appropriate method for reducing potentially pathologic bacteria in raw meat fed to exotic cats. PMID:12785680

  19. Remarks on a Johann spectrometer for exotic-atom research and more

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotta, Detlev E.; Simons, Leopold M.

    2016-06-01

    General properties of a Johann-type spectrometer equipped with spherically bent crystals are described leading to simple rules of thumb for practical use. They are verified by comparing with results from Monte-Carlo studies and demonstrated by selected measurements in exotic-atom and X-ray fluorescence research.

  20. Evolution and population genetics of exotic and re-emerging pathogens: Novel tools and approaches

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Given human population growth and accelerated global trade, the rate of emergence of exotic plant pathogens is bound to increase. Understanding the processes that lead to the emergence of new pathogens can help manage emerging epidemics. Novel tools to analyze population genetic variation can be use...

  1. [What comes after bluetongue--Europe as target for exotic arboviruses].

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Martin; Dobler, Gerhard

    2009-01-01

    Many factors led to the situation in which we fear the appearance of yet another exotic microbe simply demonstrating our vulnerability to new invaders and the shrinking of the globe. Beside the tremendous increase in international travel and trade, climatic changes are a crucial factor for exotic arboviruses to establish endemic transmission cycles in Europe. Certain temperatures, humidity and--at least for mosquitoes--suitable water bodies are required for the respective species to develop and become abundant. Increasing temperatures reduce the overall time of the mosquito life cycle because the aquatic developmental stages are completed faster, and secondly, the time span required for the mosquito to be capable to transmit the acquired arbovirus to another susceptible host is shortened. Thus the chances for an exotic arbovirus to establish an autochtonous transmission cycle are increasing. Here, a review is provided on the known factors that determine vector competence for mosquitoes and a particular arbovirus. The comparison of the closely related West Nile and Usutu viruses in Europe and North America further demonstrates how different and unpredictable the epidemiology of such arboviruses can be. Time will answer the question on who is going to be the next arboviral intruder into Europe. But it is today that we can bring ourselves into a good position to conquer the next "alien" by setting up interdisciplinary networks to promote research on these "exotic" and thus neglected pathogens thereby enhancing our understanding on their transmission and the factors and mechanisms required for this. PMID:19999382

  2. Preliminary assessment of dual use bioenergy-forage potential of exotic and native grasses in Arkansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some bioenergy grasses may have dual use potential as livestock feed or bioenergy feedstock. We conducted two studies on exotic and native grasses thought to have primary use as either livestock forage [‘Bumpers’ eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides) and ‘Alamo’ switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)] ...

  3. Exotic weevil invasion increases floral herbivore community density, function, and impact on a native plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumer communities are being re-arranged through unprecedented rates of human-mediated invasions and extinctions. Such changes in consumer composition and diversity potentially alter pressure and impact on resource populations. Although insect herbivore invasions are common, and exotic herbivores...

  4. Seeds of Myth: Exotic Disease Theory and Deconstructing the Australian Narrative of Indigenous Depopulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blyton, Greg

    2009-01-01

    The theory that the rapid depopulation of Indigenous people post-colonisation was largely caused by European introduced or exotic disease to which Indigenous people had no immunity resonates through most narratives of the early years of colonisation. The question of whether this narrative is based on sound medical evidence or is better placed in…

  5. Exotic multi-quark states in the deconfined phase from gravity dual models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burikham, P.; Chatrabhuti, A.; Hirunsirisawat, E.

    2009-05-01

    In the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma, it seems that most of the quarks, antiquarks and gluons should be effectively free in the absence of the linear confining potential. However, the remaining Coulomb-type potential between quarks in the plasma could still be sufficiently strong that certain bound states, notably of heavy quarks such as J/ψ are stable even in the deconfined plasma up to a certain temperature. Baryons can also exist in the deconfined phase provided that the density is sufficiently large. We study three kinds of exotic multi-quark bound states in the deconfined phase of quark-gluon plasma from gravity dual models in addition to the normal baryon. They are k-baryon, (N+bar k)-baryon and a bound state of j mesons which we call ``j-mesonance''. Binding energies and screening lengths of these exotic states are studied and are found to have similar properties to those of mesons and baryons at the leading order. Phase diagram for the exotic nuclear phases is subsequently studied in the Sakai-Sugimoto model. Even though the exotics are less stable than normal baryons, in the region of high chemical potential and low temperature, they are more stable thermodynamically than the vacuum and chiral-symmetric quark-gluon plasma phases (χS-QGP).

  6. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of isogenic doubled haploid exotic introgression lines in maize

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We characterized the genotypic and phenotypic variation for cell wall digestibility (CWD) and other agronomic traits of 50 backcross 1 generation doubled haploids (BC1DH) lines developed from the Germplasm Enhancement of Maize (GEM) project. These lines consisted of 31 exotic, unadapted maize race...

  7. PATHOGENESIS OF CHICKEN-PASSAGED NEWCASTLE DISEASE VIRUSES ISOLATED FROM CHICKENS, WILD, AND EXOTIC BIRDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogenesis of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from chickens and wild (anhinga) and exotic (yellow nape parrot, pheasant, and dove isolate) birds was examined after four passages of the isolates in domestic chickens. Groups of four-week-old specific-pathogen-free White Legh...

  8. Remote Sensing of Exotic Invasive Weeds in the Rio Grande System of Texas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic invasive weeds are a serious problem in the Rio Grande system of Texas. This paper presents the results of several aerial remote sensing studies conducted from 2002 to 2006 on the Rio Grande from its mouth near Brownsville in south Texas to El Paso in west Texas. Weed species addressed inc...

  9. Restoration of exotic annual grass-invaded rangelands: importance of seed mix composition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Restoration of exotic annual grass-invaded rangelands is needed to improve ecosystem function and services. Increasing plant species and plant functional group diversity is generally believed to increase resistance to invasion and increase desired vegetation. However, the effects of diversity and ...

  10. Resistant Starch and Starch Thermal Characteristics in Exotic Corn Lines Grown in Temperate and Tropical Environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Corn as a food that is heated and cooled to allow starch retrogradation has higher levels of resistant starch (RS). Increasing the amount of RS can make corn an even healthier food and may be accomplished by breeding and selection, especially by using exotic germplasm. Sixty breeding lines of introg...

  11. Status of exotic woody species in big cypress national preserve. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, L.H.

    1983-12-01

    The current status of exotic woody plants in Big Cypress National Preserve is documented. A map of the distribution of principal pest species, Melaleuca quinquenervia, Schinus terebinthifolius, and Casuarina sp., is presented. Prognoses of population increases of these problem species are determined utilizing the current distributions and assessing environmental conditions. Some potential problem species are also identified.

  12. Perennial grass dominance: creating a resilient plant community in an exotic annual grass invaded rangeland

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Millions of hectares of western rangelands have been invaded by the exotic and invasive annual grass, cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum). Cheatgrass provides a fine-textured, early maturing fuel that has increased the chance, rate, spread and season of wildfire to public and private lands throughout the ...

  13. Are early summer wildfires an opportunity to revegetate exotic annual grass-invaded plant communities?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae (L.) Nevski) is an exotic annual grass reducing biodiversity and altering ecosystem function and processes in rangelands. Revegetation of medusahead-invaded plant communities is needed to improve ecosystem function, increase livestock forage production, and im...

  14. Detection and isolation of exotic Newcastle disease (ENDV) from field collected flies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flies were collected by sweep net from the vicinity of two small groups of "backyard" poultry (10-20 chickens per group) that had been identified as infected with exotic Newcastle disease virus (ENDV) in Los Angeles County during the 2002-2003 END outbreak in California. Collected flies were subdiv...

  15. Genetic characterization for intraspecific hybridization of an exotic parasitoid prior its introduction for classical biological control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The successful establishment of an exotic parasitoid in the context of classical biological control of insect pests depends upon its adaptability to the new environment. In theory, intraspecific hybridization may improve the success of the establishment as a result of an increase in the available ge...

  16. Persistence of exotic Newcastle disease virus (ENDV) in laboratory infected Musca domestica and Fannia canicularis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    House flies (Musca domestica) and little house flies (Fannia canicularis) were examined for their ability to take up and harbor a velogenic strain of exotic Newcastle disease virus (family Paramyxoviridae, genus Avulavirus, ENDV). Laboratory reared flies were allowed to feed on evaporated milk cont...

  17. Aliens in Paradise. Boat density and exotic coastal mollusks in Moorea Island (French Polynesia).

    PubMed

    Ardura, Alba; Planes, Serge; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2015-12-01

    Pacific islands are particularly vulnerable to the effects of invasive species. After habitat destruction or modification, invasive species are responsible for more biological extinctions than any other cause. Further, the rate of extinction of native species has been higher on islands than anywhere else in the world. Invasive species have also degraded native ecosystems. In order to detect exotic intertidal mollusk species, an extensive sampling around Moorea Island, a more or less unspoiled island surrounded by a rich coral reef habitat, has been developed considering that sampled points have different characteristics in wave exposure, algae coverage, type of substrate, distance to ports, distance to freshwater, distance sewage and boat traffic. Samples were DNA barcoded for unequivocal species assignation. The presence of five NIS among 26 species seems an important signal of introduction of alien biota in Moorea Island coast. However they were represented by a total of 38 individuals among 1487 mollusks (2.55%). While the distance to relatively big ports influenced directly species richness, the intensity of maritime traffic measured as boat density near sampling points was significantly associated with the frequency of exotic species. Other environmental factors did not show significant correlation with the frequency of exotics, suggesting that in an environment without big discontinuities, with little habitat modification, local boat traffic is the most influential factor in the spread of exotic species. This could be mitigated relatively easily by reducing boat density in local zones of ecological interest. PMID:26364683

  18. Evaluation of Exotic Temperate Accessions and Release of Introgressed Germplasm from the GEM Project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Germplasm Enhancement of Maize Project (GEM) is a cooperative effort of the USDA-ARS, land grant universities, private industry, international, and non-governmental organizations to broaden the germplasm base of maize. Top cross performance of exotic temperate maize accessions identified germpla...

  19. Differential Impacts of Virus Diversity on Biomass Production of a Native and an Exotic Grass Host.

    PubMed

    Mordecai, Erin A; Hindenlang, Madeleine; Mitchell, Charles E

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens are common and diverse in natural communities and have been implicated in the success of host invasions. Yet few studies have experimentally measured how pathogens impact native versus exotic hosts, particularly when individual hosts are simultaneously coinfected by diverse pathogens. To estimate effects of interactions among multiple pathogens within host individuals on both transmission of pathogens and fitness consequences for hosts, we conducted a greenhouse experiment using California grassland species: the native perennial grass Nassella (Stipa) pulchra, the exotic annual grass Bromus hordeaceus, and three virus species, Barley yellow dwarf virus-PAV, Barley yellow dwarf virus-MAV, and Cereal yellow dwarf virus-RPV. In terms of virus transmission, the native host was less susceptible than the exotic host to MAV. Coinfection of PAV and MAV did not occur in any of the 157 co-inoculated native host plants. In the exotic host, PAV infection most strongly reduced root and shoot biomass, and coinfections that included PAV severely reduced biomass. Infection with single or multiple viruses did not affect biomass in the native host. However, in this species the most potentially pathogenic coinfections (PAV + MAV and PAV + MAV + RPV) did not occur. Together, these results suggest that interactions among multiple pathogens can have important consequences for host health, which may not be predictable from interactions between hosts and individual pathogens. This work addresses a key empirical gap in understanding the impact of multiple generalist pathogens on competing host species, with potential implications for population and community dynamics of native and exotic species. It also demonstrates how pathogens with relatively mild impacts independently can more substantially reduce host performance in coinfection. PMID:26230720

  20. Strong decay patterns of the 1{sup -+} exotic hybrid mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Pengzhi; Chen Huaxing; Zhu Shilin

    2011-01-01

    We calculate the coupling constants of the decay modes 1{sup -+}{yields}{rho}{pi}, f{sub 1}{pi}, b{sub 1}{pi}, {eta}{pi}, {eta}{sup '}{pi}, a{sub 1}{pi}, f{sub 1}{eta} within the framework of the light-cone QCD sum rule. Then we calculate the partial width of these decay channels, which differ greatly from the existing calculations using phenomenological models. For the isovector 1{sup -+} state, the dominant decay modes are {rho}{pi}, f{sub 1}{pi}. For its isoscalar partner, its dominant decay mode is a{sub 1}{pi}. We also discuss the possible search of the 1{sup -+} state at BESIII, for example through the decay chains J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{gamma} or J/{psi}({psi}{sup '}){yields}{pi}{sub 1}+{rho}, where {pi}{sub 1} can be reconstructed through the decay modes {pi}{sub 1}{yields}{rho}{pi}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} or {pi}{sub 1}{yields}f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup 0}. Hopefully the present work will be helpful to the experimental establishment of the 1{sup -+} hybrid meson.

  1. Responses to invasion and invader removal differ between native and exotic plant groups in a coastal dune.

    PubMed

    Magnoli, Susan M; Kleinhesselink, Andrew R; Cushman, J Hall

    2013-12-01

    The spread of exotic, invasive species is a global phenomenon that is recognized as a major source of environmental change. Although many studies have addressed the effects of exotic plants on the communities they invade, few have quantified the effects of invader removal on plant communities, or considered the degree to which different plant groups vary in response to invasion and invader removal. We evaluated the effects of an exotic succulent, iceplant (Carpobrotus edulis), on a coastal dune plant community in northern California, as well as the community responses to its removal. To assess possible mechanisms by which iceplant affects other plants, we also evaluated its above- and belowground influences on the germination and growth of a dominant exotic annual grass, Bromus diandrus. We found that iceplant invasion was associated with reduced native plant cover as well as increased cover and density of some exotic plants-especially exotic annual grasses. However, iceplant removal did not necessarily lead to a reversal of these effects: removal increased the cover and density of both native and exotic species. We also found that B. diandrus grown in iceplant patches, or in soil where iceplant had been removed, had poorer germination and growth than B. diandrus grown in soil not influenced by iceplant. This suggests that the influence of iceplant on this dune plant community occurs, at least in part, due to belowground effects, and that these effects remain after iceplant has been removed. Our study demonstrates the importance of considering how exotic invasive plants affect not only native species, but also co-occurring exotic taxa. It also shows that combining observational studies with removal experiments can lead to important insights into the influence of invaders and the mechanisms of their effects. PMID:23839266

  2. Search for Sub-threshold Photoproduction of J/Psi Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bosted, Peter; Dunne, James; Lee, C.A.; Junnarkar, Parikshit; Arrington, John; Asaturyan, Razmik; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Christy, Michael; Chudakov, Eugene; Clasie, Benjamin; Connell, Simon; Dalton, Mark; Daniel, AJI; Day, Donal; Dutta, Dipangkar; Ent, Rolf; Fomin, Nadia; Gaskell, David; Horn, Tanja; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keppel, Cynthia; Meekins, David; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Navasardyan, Tigran; Roche, Julie; Rodriguez, Victor; Rohe, Daniela; Seely, Charles; Slifer, Karl; Strikman, Mark; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Testa, Giuseppe; Trojer, Roman; Wesselmann, Frank; Wood, Stephen; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2009-01-01

    A search was made for sub-threshold $J/\\psi$ production from a carbon target using a mixed real and quasi-real Bremsstrahlung photon beam with an endpoint energy of 5.76 GeV. No events were observed, which is consistent with predictions assuming quasi-free production. The results place limits on exotic mechanisms that strongly enhance quasi-free production.

  3. Search for Pentaquarks: the Experimental Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    S. Niccolai

    2005-01-01

    Experimental evidences for the existence of exotic 5-quark baryons have been reported recently by several groups. These data may open new perspectives in hadron spectroscopy as well as in QCD. However, the statistical significance of these results is quite low, and the pentaquark signal has not been seen in various other experiments. The new dedicated experiments currently underway at CLAS will hopefully give a clearer answer on the existence and, possibly, on the properties of pentaquarks. This paper summarizes the results obtained so far in the search for 5-quark states and describes the characteristics and goals of the new experiments running at CLAS.

  4. The charge breeder beam line for the selective production of exotic species project at INFN-Legnaro National Laboratories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galatà, A.; Comunian, M.; Maggiore, M.; Manzolaro, M.; Angot, J.; Lamy, T.

    2014-02-01

    SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) is an INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) project with the aim at producing and post-accelerating exotic beams to perform forefront research in nuclear physics. To allow post-acceleration of the radioactive ions, an ECR-based Charge Breeder (CB) developed on the basis of the Phoenix booster was chosen. The design of the complete beam line for the SPES-CB will be described: a system for stable 1+ beams production was included; special attention was paid to the medium resolution mass spectrometer after the CB to limit possible superposition of the exotic beams with the impurities present in the ECR plasma.

  5. Towards a novel laser-driven method of exotic nuclei extraction-acceleration for fundamental physics and technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Nishio, K.; Pikuz, T. A.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Skobelev, I. Yu.; Orlandi, R.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Kanasaki, M.; Kiriyama, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Koura, H.; Kando, M.; Yamauchi, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Bulanov, S. V.; Kondo, K.; Imai, K.; Nagamiya, S.

    2016-04-01

    A combination of a petawatt laser and nuclear physics techniques can crucially facilitate the measurement of exotic nuclei properties. With numerical simulations and laser-driven experiments we show prospects for the Laser-driven Exotic Nuclei extraction-acceleration method proposed in [M. Nishiuchi et al., Phys, Plasmas 22, 033107 (2015)]: a femtosecond petawatt laser, irradiating a target bombarded by an external ion beam, extracts from the target and accelerates to few GeV highly charged short-lived heavy exotic nuclei created in the target via nuclear reactions.

  6. Correlates of current transactional sex among a sample of female exotic dancers in Baltimore, MD.

    PubMed

    Reuben, Jacqueline; Serio-Chapman, Chris; Welsh, Christopher; Matens, Richard; Sherman, Susan G

    2011-04-01

    Transactional sex work, broadly defined as the exchange of money, drugs, or goods for sexual services, occurs in a wide range of environments. There is a large body of research characterizing the risks and harms associated with street- and venue-based sex work, but there is a dearth of research characterizing the risk associated with the environment of exotic dance clubs. The current study aimed to: (1) characterize the nature of female exotic dancers' sex- and drug-related risk behaviors, (2) to examine the role of the club environment in these behaviors, and (3) to examine correlates of currently exchanging sex. From June 2008 to February 2009, we conducted a cross-sectional study among women who were aged 18 years or older and reported exotic dancing within the past 3 months (n = 98). The survey ascertained socio-demographic characteristics, personal health, medical history, sexual practices, drug use, and employment at clubs on the block. Bivariate and multivariate Poisson regression with robust variance was used to identify correlates of current sex exchange. Participants were a median of 24 years old, and were 58% white; 43% had not completed high school. Seventy-four percent reported ever having been arrested. Twenty-six percent reported having injected heroin and 29% reported having smoked crack in the past 3 months. Fifty-seven percent reported using drugs in the club in the past 3 months. Sixty-one percent had ever engaged in transactional sex, and 67% of those did so for the first time after beginning to dance. Forty-three percent reported selling any sex in the club in the past 3 months. In multiple Poisson regression, factors associated with current sex exchange included: race, ever having been arrested, and using drugs in the club. High levels of both drug use and transactional sex among this sample of exotic dancers were reported. These findings indicate that there are a number of drug- and sex-related harms faced by exotic dancers in strip clubs

  7. TOF-Bρ mass measurements of very exotic nuclides for astrophysical calculations at the NSCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoš, M.; Estrade, A.; Amthor, M.; Aprahamian, A.; Bazin, D.; Becerril, A.; Elliot, T.; Galaviz, D.; Gade, A.; Gupta, S.; Lorusso, G.; Montes, F.; Pereira, J.; Portillo, M.; Rogers, A. M.; Schatz, H.; Shapira, D.; Smith, E.; Stolz, A.; Wallace, M.

    2008-01-01

    Atomic masses play a crucial role in many nuclear astrophysics calculations. The lack of experimental values for relevant exotic nuclides triggered a rapid development of new mass measurement devices around the world. The time-of-flight (TOF) mass measurements offer a complementary technique to the most precise one, Penning trap measurements (Blaum 2006 Phys. Rep. 425 1), the latter being limited by the rate and half-lives of the ions of interest. The NSCL facility provides a well-suited infrastructure for the TOF mass measurements of very exotic nuclei. At this facility, we have recently implemented a TOF-Bρ technique and performed mass measurements of neutron-rich nuclides in the Fe region, important for r-process calculations and for calculations of processes occurring in the crust of accreting neutron stars.

  8. Expert (exotic Particle Emission and Radioactivity by Tracking) Studies at the Super-Frs Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geissel, H.; Kiselev, O.; Mukha, I.; Simon, H.; Scheidenberger, C.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.; Fomichev, A.; Belogurov, S.; Bezbakh, A.; Chudoba, V.; Golovkov, M.; Gorshkov, A.; Itkis, Y.; Kaminski, G.; Knyazev, A.; Knyazheva, G.; Kozulin, E.; Krupko, S.; Mianowski, S.; Rymzhanova, S.; Sidorchuk, S.; Sharov, P.; Slepnev, R.; Ter-Akopian, G.; Zagrebaev, V.; Pfützner, M.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Mazzocchi, Ch.; Mianowski, S.; Korsheninnikov, A. A.; Kuzmin, E. A.; Nikolskii, E. Yu.; Eremin, I.; Eremin, V.; Fadeeva, N.; Terukov, E.; Tuboltsev, Yu.; Verbitskaya, E.; Ershov, S. N.; Egorova, I. A.; Nasirov, A. K.; Dunin, V. B.; Alkhazov, G. D.; Dobrovolsky, A. V.; Khanzadeev, A. V.; Parfenova, Yu. L.; Xu, X.; Kaminski, G.; Kopatch, Y.

    2015-06-01

    The proposal EXPERT is suggested for the Super-FRS Collaboration physics program [1] in the NUSTAR Collaboration of the project FAIR (Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research) in Darmstadt, Germany. It is aimed at studies of the nuclear landscape beyond the proton and neutron drip-lines and intends to push researches up to limits of nuclear existence. By combining the EXPERT instrumentation (two tracking techniques applied for radioactivity and nuclear decays in-flight), the phenomena of multi-nucleon radioactivity, resonance decays in continuum, beta-delayed exotic decays and exotic excitation modes can be studied via observations of particle emissions, including the 2p, 4p, 6p, n, 2n, 4n, 6n channels.

  9. Exotic and excited-state meson spectroscopy and radiative transitions from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Thomas

    2010-09-01

    We discuss recent progress in extracting the excited meson spectrum and radiative transition form factors using lattice QCD. We mention results in the charmonium sector, including the first lattice QCD calculation of radiative transition rates involving excited charmonium states, highlighting results for high spin and exotic states. We present recent results on a highly excited isovector meson spectrum from dynamical anisotropic lattices. Using carefully constructed operators we show how the continuum spin of extracted states can be reliably identified and confidently extract excited states, states with exotic quantum numbers and states of high spin. This spectrum includes the first spin-four state extracted from lattice QCD. We conclude with some comments on future prospects.

  10. Exploring the potential nutraceutical values of durian (Durio zibethinus L.) - an exotic tropical fruit.

    PubMed

    Ho, Lee-Hoon; Bhat, Rajeev

    2015-02-01

    This review focuses on providing informations on potential uses of durian, an exotic tropical fruit as a source of food, as well as a potential therapeutic agent. Apart from disseminating details on the traditional value, in this review we have focussed on the nutritional composition, presence of bioactive compounds, volatiles, antimicrobials, as well as on the toxicological effects of durian fruit consumption. Durian fruits are enjoyed for their unique taste and organoleptic qualities, but there is also a need to ensure that their potential is exploited for the international market. In addition, in the present socio-economic scenario, tapping the potential of exotic tropical fruit such as durian could benefit the health of consumers as well as support the local population who depend on farming for a livelihood. Overall, it is envisaged that identifying the nutraceutical potential of the edible and non-edible parts of durian fruits can benefit food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:25172686

  11. Effects of copper oxide wire particle bolus therapy on trichostrongyle fecal egg counts in exotic artiodactylids.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Deidre K; Kinney-Moscona, Allyson; Kaplan, Ray M; Miller, James

    2008-12-01

    Four species of artiodactylids (scimitar-horned oryx [Oryx dama]), roan antelope [Hippotragus equinus], blackbuck [Antilope cervicapra]), and blesbok [Damaliscus pygargus phillipsi]) totaling 13 animals were treated with a one-time 12.5-g dose of copper oxide wire particles (COWPs) in a bolus form. Pretreatment, individual trichostrongyle fecal egg counts (FECs) were performed using the McMaster technique. Individual posttreatment FECs were performed every 7 days for 35 days beginning 7 days after bolus administration, and FEC reduction ratios (FECRRs) expressed as percentage reductions from pretreatment values were calculated every 7 days. Mean FECRRs for the 13 animals were 93% +/- 16%, 98% +/- 7%, 91% +/- 28%, 94% +/- 16%, and 90% +/- 13% at 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 days posttreatment, respectively. These data demonstrate that COWPs in a bolus form were an effective method for reducing FEC in exotic artiodactylids. Based on this limited data, COWPs show promise as an anthelmintic alternative for exotic artiodactylids in zoologic collections. PMID:19110710

  12. Investigation of Coulomb dipole polarization effects on reactions involving exotic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-García, J. P.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Chamon, L. C.

    2015-07-01

    We have analyzed elastic scattering angular distributions and total reaction cross sections of the exotic nuclei 11,9Li on 208Pb, at energies below and above the Coulomb barrier. For this purpose, we have used an optical potential with no adjustable parameters, composed by the nuclear São Paulo potential, derived from the nonlocal nature of the interaction, and the Coulomb dipole polarization potential, derived from the semiclassical theory of Coulomb excitation. Within this formalism, we identified an unusual long-range absorption for the +208Pb 11Li system, which is dominated by the Coulomb interaction. We compare it to the absorption mechanisms observed for +208Pb6He which, unlike those of +208Pb11Li, take place at small interacting distances, where both Coulomb and nuclear interactions are important. The proposed approach shows to be a fundamental basis to study reactions involving exotic nuclei.

  13. Degeneracies and exotic phases in an isotropic frustrated spin-1/2 chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parvej, Aslam; Kumar, Manoranjan

    2016-03-01

    In the presence of an axial magnetic field, a frustrated isotropic J1 - J2 model system shows many exotic phases, such as vector chiral and multipolar phases. In this paper, the phase boundaries of these exotic phases are calculated based on the order parameters, energy level crossings and magnetization jumps in the system. The order parameter of the vector chiral phase is calculated using the broken symmetry states at a finite magnetic field. The exact diagonalization and the density matrix renormalization group results are used to show that the vector chiral phase exists only in a narrow range of J2/J1 parameter space. In the quadrupolar phase, the magnetization jumps can be associated with the binding energy of two magnons localized at two different legs of the zigzag chain. The energy level crossings and degeneracies in the presence of the axial magnetic field are studied in detail using the exact diagonalization method.

  14. Homogeneous singularity generated by exotic matter, with applications to collapsed black holes and wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, Elena I.; Novikov, Igor D.

    2010-05-15

    We analyze analytically and numerically the origin of the singularity in the course of the collapse of a wormhole with the exotic scalar field {Psi} with negative energy density, and with this field {Psi} together with the ordered magnetic field H. We do this under the simplifying assumptions of the spherical symmetry and that in the vicinity of the singularity the solution of the Einstein equations depends only on one coordinate (the homogeneous approximation). In the framework of these assumptions we found the principal difference between the case of the collapse of the ordinary scalar field {Phi} with the positive energy density together with an ordered magnetic field H and the collapse of the exotic scalar field {Psi} together with the magnetic field H. The later case is important for the possible astrophysical manifestation of the wormholes.

  15. Exposure of Asian Elephants and Other Exotic Ungulates to Schmallenberg Virus

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Fieke M.; La Rocca, S. Anna; Khatri, Meenakshi; Lopez, Javier; Steinbach, Falko; Dastjerdi, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Schmallenberg virus (SBV) is an emerging Orthobunyavirus, first described in 2011 in cattle in Germany and subsequently spread throughout Europe, affecting mainly ruminant livestock through the induction of foetal malformations. To gain a better understanding of the spectrum of susceptible species and to assess the value of current SBV serological assays, screening of serum samples from exotic artiodactyls and perissodactyls collected at the Living Collections from the Zoological Society of London (Whipsnade and London Zoos) and Chester Zoo was carried out. There was compelling evidence of SBV infection in both zoological collections. The competitive ELISA has proved to be applicable for the detection of SBV in exotic Bovidae, Cervidae, Suidae, Giraffidae and most notably in endangered Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), but unreliable for the screening of Camelidae, for which the plaque reduction neutralisation test was considered the assay of choice. PMID:26274399

  16. Investigation of surface topography differences in native and exotic invertebrates in the St. Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Brown, D R S; Brown, C A

    2010-01-01

    The texture, or topography, interior of shells from native and exotic mollusks are measured and compared to determine if they can be discriminated. Area-scale fractal analysis is used to calculate relative areas as a function of scale, and the relative areas are used to evaluate the measurements. Measurements from a scanning laser profiler and from confocal and interferometric microscopes are compared, as are measurements of an original and a replica. The relative areas indicate clear differences between the measurement instruments. The largest relative areas are calculated from the confocal measurements. The trueness of the measurements has not been determined. However, the relative areas calculated from the confocal measurements are capable of discriminating the native clam from the exotic mussels with a confidence of greater than 99% at scales below 10 µm². PMID:20949618

  17. Exotic μτjj events from heavy ISS neutrinos at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arganda, E.; Herrero, M. J.; Marcano, X.; Weiland, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this letter we study new relevant phenomenological consequences of the right-handed heavy neutrinos with masses at the O (1)TeV energy scale, working within the context of the Inverse Seesaw Model that includes three pairs of quasi-degenerate pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos. We propose a new exotic signal of these heavy neutrinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider containing a muon, a tau lepton, and two jets in the final state, which is based on the interesting fact that this model can incorporate large Lepton Flavor Violation for specific choices of the relevant parameters, particularly, the neutrino Yukawa couplings. We will show here that an observable number of μτjj exotic events, without missing energy, can be produced at this ongoing run of the LHC.

  18. Exotic Self-trapped States of an Electron in Superfluid Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elser, Veit

    2015-09-01

    We explore the possibility that the fast and exotic negative ions in superfluid helium are electrons bound to quantized vortex structures, the simplest being a ring. In the states we consider, the electron energy is only slightly below the conduction band minimum of bulk helium. To support our proposal, we present two calculations. In the first, we show that the electron pressure on the vortex core is insufficient to cavitate the helium and form an electron bubble. In the second, we estimate the equilibrium radius of the vortex ring that would bind an electron and find it is much smaller than the electron bubble, about 7 Å. The many exotic ions reported in experiments might be bound states of an electron with more complex vortex structures.

  19. Differences in native soil ecology associated with invasion of the exotic annual chenopod, Halgeton glomeratus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Jeffrey J.; Freeman, D. Carl; Emlen, John M.; Belnap, Jayne; Kitchen, Stanley G.; Zak, John C.; Sobek, Edward; Tracy, Mary; Montante, James

    2003-01-01

    Various biotic and abiotic components of soil ecology differed significantly across an area whereHalogeton glomeratus is invading a native winterfat, [ Krascheninnikovia (= Ceratoides) lanata] community. Nutrient levels were significantly different among the native, ecotone, and exotic-derived soils. NO3, P, K, and Na all increased as the cover of halogeton increased. Only Ca was highest in the winterfat area. A principal components analysis, conducted separately for water-soluble and exchangeable cations, revealed clear separation between halogeton- and winterfat-derived soils. The diversity of soil bacteria was highest in the exotic, intermediate in the ecotone, and lowest in the native community. Although further studies are necessary, our results offer evidence that invasion by halogeton alters soil chemistry and soil ecology, possibly creating conditions that favor halogeton over native plants.

  20. Exotic Fruits as Therapeutic Complements for Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Devalaraja, Samir; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity, type 2-diabetes, and the resultant metabolic syndrome are rapidly increasing. As successful preventive and therapeutic strategies for these life-threatening health ailments often come with adverse side effects, nutritional elements are widely used in many countries as preventive therapies to prevent or manage metabolic syndrome. Fruits are important dietary components, and contain various bioactive constituents. Many of these constituents have been proven to be useful to manage and treat various chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Although exotic fruits are understudied throughout the world due to their limited regional presence, many studies reveal their potent ability to ameliorate metabolic derangements and the resultant conditions i.e. diabetes and obesity. The aim of this article is to review the role of exotic fruits and their constituents in the regulation of metabolic functions, which can beneficially alter diabetes and obesity pathophysiology. PMID:21857774

  1. Experimental Status of Exotic Mesons and the GlueX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Carman

    2006-10-22

    One of the unanswered and most fundamental questions in physics regards the nature of the confinement mechanism of quarks and gluons in QCD. Exotic hybrid mesons manifest gluonic degrees of freedom and their spectroscopy will provide the data necessary to test assumptions in lattice QCD and the specific phenomenology leading to confinement. Within the past two decades a number of experiments have put forth tantalizing evidence for the existence of exotic hybrid mesons in the mass range below 2 GeV. This talk represents an overview of the available data and what has been learned. In looking toward the future, the GlueX experiment at Jefferson Laboratory represents a new initiative that will perform detailed spectroscopy of the light-quark meson spectrum. This experiment and its capabilities will be reviewed.

  2. Dual trapped-ion quantum simulators: an alternative route towards exotic quantum magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej; Bermudez, Alejandro

    2016-03-01

    We present a route towards the quantum simulation of exotic quantum magnetism in ion traps by exploiting dual relations between different spin models. Our strategy allows one to start from Hamiltonians that can be realized with current technology, while properties of an exotic dual model are inferred from measurements of non-local, string-order-like, operators. The latter can be achieved from fluorescence, or from certain spectroscopic measurements, both of which can be combined with finite-size scaling by controlling the number of ions in the dual quantum simulator. We apply this concept to propose quantum simulators of frustrated quantum magnets, and Ising models with multi-spin interactions. We test the validity of the idea by showing numerically that the predictions of an ideal dual quantum simulator are not qualitatively modified by relevant perturbations that occur naturally in the trapped-ion scenario.

  3. Pushing the relative mass accuracy limit of ISOLTRAP on exotic nuclei below 10 ppb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaum, K.; Beck, D.; Bollen, G.; Herfurth, F.; Kellerbauer, A.; Kluge, H.-J.; Moore, R. B.; Sauvan, E.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.

    2003-05-01

    The Penning trap mass spectrometer ISOLTRAP plays a leading role in mass spectrometry of short-lived nuclides. The recent installation of a radio-frequency quadrupole trap and a carbon cluster ion source allowed for the first time mass measurements on exotic nuclei with a relative uncertainty of δ m/ m≈1×10 -8. The status of ISOLTRAP mass spectrometry and recent highlights are presented.

  4. A new genus and species of native exotic millipede in Australia (Diplopoda, Polydesmida, Paradoxosomatidae)

    PubMed Central

    Mesibov, Robert; Car, Catherine A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Taxidiotisoma portabile gen. n., sp. n. is described from scattered populations in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania, Australia. Populations of Taxidiotisoma portabile in Victoria, Tasmania and parts of New South Wales occur in urban, suburban and agricultural areas, with no collections of the species in natural habitats in the same district. Taxidiotisoma portabile is likely to be a native exotic species whose home range is in eastern New South Wales. PMID:25931961

  5. Differentiation of ovarian development and the evolution of fecundity in rapidly diverging exotic beetle populations.

    PubMed

    Macagno, Anna L M; Beckers, Oliver M; Moczek, Armin P

    2015-11-01

    Fecundity is a fundamental determinant of fitness, yet the proximate developmental and physiological mechanisms that enable its often rapid evolution in natural populations are poorly understood. Here, we investigated two populations of the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus that were established in exotic ranges in the early 1970s. These populations are subject to drastically different levels of resource competition in the field, and have diverged dramatically in female fecundity. Specifically, Western Australian O. taurus experience high levels of resource competition, and exhibit greatly elevated reproductive output compared to beetles from the Eastern US, where resource competition is minimal and female fecundity is low. We compared patterns of ovarian maturation, relative investment into and timing of egg production, and potential trade-offs between ovarian investment and the duration of larval development and adult body size between populations representative of both exotic ranges. We found that the rapid divergence in fecundity between exotic populations is associated with striking differences in several aspects of ovarian development: (1) Western Australian females exhibit accelerated ovarian development, (2) produce more eggs, (3) bigger eggs, and (4) start laying eggs earlier compared to their Eastern US counterparts. At the same time, divergence in ovarian maturation patterns occurred alongside changes in (5) larval developmental time, and (6) adult body size, and (7) mass. Western Australian females take longer to complete larval development and, surprisingly, emerge into smaller yet heavier adults than size-matched Eastern US females. We discuss our results in the context of the evolutionary developmental biology of fecundity in exotic populations. PMID:26300520

  6. New Experiments with Stored Exotic Nuclei at the FRS-ESR Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Geissel, H.

    2009-08-26

    High accuracy mass and novel nuclear lifetime measurements have been performed with bare and few-electron ions produced via projectile fragmentation and fission, separated in flight and stored at relativistic energies. Characteristic experimental results and new developments are reviewed. A new generation of studies with exotic nuclei will be possible with the advent of the proposed international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR)

  7. The relationship between fire history and an exotic fungal disease in a deciduous forest.

    PubMed

    Holzmueller, Eric J; Jose, Shibu; Jenkins, Michael A

    2008-03-01

    Exotic diseases have fundamentally altered the structure and function of forest ecosystems. Controlling exotic diseases across large expanses of forest has proven difficult, but fire may reduce the levels of diseases that are sensitive to environmental conditions. We examined Cornus florida populations in burned and unburned Quercus-Carya stands to determine if burning prior to anthracnose infection has reduced the impacts of an exotic fungal disease, dogwood anthracnose, caused by Discula destructiva. We hypothesized that fire has altered stand structure and created open conditions less conducive to dogwood anthracnose. We compared C. florida density, C. florida health, and species composition and density among four sampling categories: unburned stands, and stands that had burned once, twice, and 3 times over a 20-year period (late 1960s to late 1980s). Double burn stands contained the greatest density of C. florida stems (770 stems ha(-1)) followed by triple burn stands (233 stems ha(-1)), single burn stands (225 stems ha(-1)) and unburned stands (70 stems ha(-1); P < 0.01). We observed less crown dieback in small C. florida trees (<5 cm diameter at breast height) in burned stands than in unburned stands (P < 0.05). Indicator species analysis showed that burning favored species historically associated with Quercus-Carya forests and excluded species associated with secondary succession following nearly a century of fire suppression. Our results suggest that fire may mitigate the decline of C. florida populations under attack by an exotic pathogen by altering forest structure and composition. Further, our results suggest that the burns we sampled have had an overall restorative effect on forest communities and were within the fire return interval of the historic fire regime. Consequently, prescribed fire may offer a management tool to reduce the impacts of fungal disease in forest ecosystems that developed under historic burning regimes. PMID:18026756

  8. Native shrub reestablishment in exotic annual grasslands: do ecosystem processes recover?

    PubMed

    Yelenik, S G; Levine, J M

    2010-04-01

    The impacts of exotic plant species on ecosystem processes are well established, motivating numerous efforts to facilitate native-species recovery. Nonetheless, how the return of native species influences ecosystem processes and how these changes feed back to influence the recovery process are poorly understood. We examined these questions in exotic annual grasslands on Santa Cruz Island, California, USA, where the removal of nonnative herbivores has led to the recovery of the native shrubs Artemisia californica and Eriogonum arborescens. To examine the influence of shrub colonization on nutrient cycling, and the mechanisms by which these changes arise, we measured available nitrogen and phosphorus, and quantified nitrogen mineralization and litterfall rates under shrubs and grasses in the field and in experimental monoculture plots. Both native shrubs altered nitrogen cycling as they colonized the grassland, but they did so in opposite directions. Eriogonum depressed nitrogen pools and mineralization rates via large inputs of nitrogen-poor litter. In contrast Artemisia increased nitrogen and phosphorus pools and nitrogen mineralization rates. Last, to determine if shrub effects on soils favor shrubs or grasses, we conducted a nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiment in the field. Only the exotic grass was significantly limited by nitrogen. Thus the depressed nitrogen availability associated with Eriogonum colonization is more harmful to exotic grasses than to the native shrub. By contrast, the elevated nitrogen associated with recovering Artemisia favors grasses over the shrub, possibly hindering recovery of the native. Mechanistic studies of the ecosystem ,impacts of native-plant recovery are useful for managers wishing to predict which native species return ecosystem function, and whether such changes feed back to influence native recovery. PMID:20437958

  9. Masses of JP C=1-+ exotic quarkonia in a Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilger, T.; Gómez-Rocha, M.; Krassnigg, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the properties of mesons with the exotic JP C=1-+ quantum numbers. Starting out from the light-quark domain, where the π1 states are used as references, we predict the masses of analogous quarkonia for c c ¯ and b b ¯ configurations. We employ a covariant Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter-equation approach with a rainbow-ladder truncated model of quantum chromodynamics.

  10. A critique of Bem's "exotic becomes erotic" theory of sexual orientation development.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Joseph; Byrd, A Dean

    2002-06-01

    A critique of Bem's "Exotic Becomes Erotic" theory (1996) on the development of male homosexuality was offered. Limitations were outlined in light of relevant research findings. The authors proposed an alternative model to explain male homosexuality, i.e., reparation of early boyhood trauma, which better accounts for significant psychodynamic elements and available research. Finally, comparisons were made between specific elements of the two models. PMID:12090531

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhizal assemblages in native plant roots change in the presence of invasive exotic grasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hawkes, C.V.; Belnap, J.; D'Antonio, C.; Firestone, M.K.

    2006-01-01

    Plant invasions have the potential to significantly alter soil microbial communities, given their often considerable aboveground effects. We examined how plant invasions altered the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi of native plant roots in a grassland site in California and one in Utah. In the California site, we used experimentally created plant communities composed of exotic (Avena barbata, Bromus hordeaceus) and native (Nassella pulchra, Lupinus bicolor) monocultures and mixtures. In the Utah semi-arid grassland, we took advantage of invasion by Bromus tectorum into long-term plots dominated by either of two native grasses, Hilaria jamesii or Stipa hymenoides. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonizing roots were characterized with PCR amplification of the ITS region, cloning, and sequencing. We saw a significant effect of the presence of exotic grasses on the diversity of mycorrhizal fungi colonizing native plant roots. In the three native grasses, richness of mycorrhizal fungi decreased; in the native forb at the California site, the number of fungal RFLP patterns increased in the presence of exotics. The exotic grasses also caused the composition of the mycorrhizal community in native roots to shift dramatically both in California, with turnover of Glomus spp., and Utah, with replacement of Glomus spp. by apparently non-mycorrhizal fungi. Invading plants may be able to influence the network of mycorrhizal fungi in soil that is available to natives through either earlier root activity or differential carbon provision compared to natives. Alteration of the soil microbial community by plant invasion can provide a mechanism for both successful invasion and the resulting effects of invaders on the ecosystem. ?? Springer 2006.

  12. Population control of exotic rainbow trout in streams of a natural area park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Stephen E.; Larson, Gary L.; Ridley, Bromfield

    1986-03-01

    Expansion of the distribution of exotic rainbow trout is thought to be a leading cause for the decline of native brook trout since the 1930s in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, USA. An experimental rehabilitation project was conducted from 1976 to 1981 using backpack electrofish shockers on four remnant brook trout populations sympatric with rainbow trout. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of the technique to remove the exotic rainbow trout, to determine the population responses by native brook trout, and to evaluate the usefulness of the technique for trout management in the park. Rainbow trout populations were greatly reduced in density after up to six years of electrofishing, but were not eradicated. Rainbow trout recruitment, however, was essentially eliminated. Brook trout populations responded by increasing in density (including young-of-the-year), but rates of recovery differed among streams. The maximum observed densities ir each stream occurred at the end of the project. The findings suggest that electrofishing had a major negative impact on the exotic species, which was followed by positive responses from the native species in the second and third order study streams. The technique would probably be less effective in larger (fourth-order) park streams, but as an eradication tool the technique may have its highest potential in small first order streams. Nonetheless, the technique appears useful for population control without causing undue impacts on native aquatic species, although it is labor intensive, and capture efficiency is greatly influenced by fish size and stream morphology. To completely remove the exotic fish from selected streams, different technologies will have to be explored and developed.

  13. Sociality, exotic ectoparasites, and fitness in the plural breeding rodent Octodon degus

    PubMed Central

    Chesh, Adrian S.; Muñoz, Pamela; Fredes, Fernando; Ebensperger, Luis A.; Hayes, Loren D.

    2012-01-01

    Social animals are susceptible to high infection levels by contact-transmitted parasites due to increased conspecific interaction. Exotic parasites are known to have adverse consequences on native hosts. We examined the relationship between social group size and exotic ectoparasite loads, and adult infection levels with per capita fitness and offspring survival in the plural breeding rodent Octodon degus in central Chile. Degus at our site were almost entirely infected by two exotic ectoparasites: the fleas Leptopsylla segnis and Xenopsylla cheopis. Neither group size nor number of females per group predicted the abundance of either exotic flea species. The per capita number of pups (per capita fitness) that emerged from burrow systems used by known social groups was negatively correlated with abundance of L. segnis but not X. cheopis. On adults, X. cheopis abundance was three times greater than L. segnis but was not significantly correlated with per capita fitness. In females, L. segnis abundance was negatively correlated with peak body mass during pregnancy. Adult ectoparasite load was not correlated with offspring survival. Based on these results, we hypothesize that high infection levels of L. segnis result in decreased reproductive fitness of adult female degus but are not a cost of sociality because parasite loads are not predicted by social group size. Further work is needed to experimentally test this hypothesis and to determine if L. segnis serves as a vector for a deleterious pathogen. Lastly, the lack of native ectoparasites may explain why a previous study at our site determined that behavioral adaptations needed to cope with high ectoparasite burdens (e.g., grooming) are not extensive in degus; they simply have not had the coevolutionary time needed for selection of these behaviors. PMID:22328801

  14. Web Search Engines: Search Syntax and Features.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojala, Marydee

    2002-01-01

    Presents a chart that explains the search syntax, features, and commands used by the 12 most widely used general Web search engines. Discusses Web standardization, expanded types of content searched, size of databases, and search engines that include both simple and advanced versions. (LRW)

  15. A predictive framework and review of the ecological impacts of exotic plant invasions on reptiles and amphibians.

    PubMed

    Martin, Leigh J; Murray, Brad R

    2011-05-01

    The invasive spread of exotic plants in native vegetation can pose serious threats to native faunal assemblages. This is of particular concern for reptiles and amphibians because they form a significant component of the world's vertebrate fauna, play a pivotal role in ecosystem functioning and are often neglected in biodiversity research. A framework to predict how exotic plant invasion will affect reptile and amphibian assemblages is imperative for conservation, management and the identification of research priorities. Here, we present a new predictive framework that integrates three mechanistic models. These models are based on exotic plant invasion altering: (1) habitat structure; (2) herbivory and predator-prey interactions; (3) the reproductive success of reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. We present a series of testable predictions from these models that arise from the interplay over time among three exotic plant traits (growth form, area of coverage, taxonomic distinctiveness) and six traits of reptiles and amphibians (body size, lifespan, home range size, habitat specialisation, diet, reproductive strategy). A literature review provided robust empirical evidence of exotic plant impacts on reptiles and amphibians from each of the three model mechanisms. Evidence relating to the role of body size and diet was less clear-cut, indicating the need for further research. The literature provided limited empirical support for many of the other model predictions. This was not, however, because findings contradicted our model predictions but because research in this area is sparse. In particular, the small number of studies specifically examining the effects of exotic plants on amphibians highlights the pressing need for quantitative research in this area. There is enormous scope for detailed empirical investigation of interactions between exotic plants and reptile and amphibian species and assemblages. The framework presented here and further testing of

  16. Exclusion of an Exotic Top Quark with -4/3 Electric Charge Using Soft Lepton Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2010-06-01

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of the top quark using p{bar p} collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} at the CDF II detector. We reconstruct t{bar t} events in the lepton+jets final state and use kinematic information to determine which b-jet is associated with the leptonically- or hadronically-decaying t-quark. Soft lepton taggers are used to determine the b-jet flavor. Along with the charge of the W boson decay lepton, this information permits the reconstruction of the top quark's electric charge. Out of 45 reconstructed events with 2.4 {+-} 0.8 expected background events, 29 are reconstructed as tt with the standard model +2/3 charge, whereas 16 are reconstructed as t{bar t} with an exotic -4/3 charge. This is consistent with the standard model and excludes the exotic scenario at 95% confidence level. This is the strongest exclusion of the exotic charge scenario and the first to use soft leptons for this purpose.

  17. Soliton defects in one-gap periodic system and exotic supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arancibia, Adrián; Correa, Francisco; Jakubský, Vít; Mateos Guilarte, Juan; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2014-12-01

    By applying Darboux-Crum transformations to the quantum one-gap Lamé system, we introduce an arbitrary countable number of bound states into forbidden bands. The perturbed potentials are reflectionless and contain two types of soliton defects in the periodic background. The bound states with a finite number of nodes are supported in the lower forbidden band by the periodicity defects of the potential well type, while the pulse-type bound states in the gap have an infinite number of nodes and are trapped by defects of the compression modulations nature. We investigate the exotic nonlinear N =4 supersymmetric structure in such paired Schrödinger systems, which extends an ordinary N =2 supersymmetry and involves two bosonic generators composed from Lax-Novikov integrals of the subsystems. One of the bosonic integrals has a nature of a central charge and allows us to liaise the obtained systems with the stationary equations of the Korteweg-de Vries and modified Korteweg-de Vries hierarchies. This exotic supersymmetry opens the way for the construction of self-consistent condensates based on the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations and associated with them new solutions to the Gross-Neveu model. They correspond to the kink or kink-antikink defects of the crystalline background in dependence on whether the exotic supersymmetry is unbroken or spontaneously broken.

  18. Exotic and excited-state radiative transitions in charmonium from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.; Thomas, Christopher E.

    2009-05-01

    We compute, for the first time using lattice QCD methods, radiative transition rates involving excited charmonium states, states of high spin and exotics. Utilizing a large basis of interpolating fields we are able to project out various excited state contributions to three-point correlators computed on quenched anisotropic lattices. In the first lattice QCD calculation of the exotic $1^{-+}$ $\\eta_{c1}$ radiative decay, we find a large partial width $\\Gamma(\\eta_{c1} \\to J/\\psi \\gamma) \\sim 100 \\,\\mathrm{keV}$. We find clear signals for electric dipole and magnetic quadrupole transition form factors in $\\chi_{c2} \\to J/\\psi \\gamma$, calculated for the first time in this framework, and study transitions involving excited $\\psi$ and $\\chi_{c1,2}$ states. We calculate hindered magnetic dipole transition widths without the sensitivity to assumptions made in model studies and find statistically significant signals, including a non-exotic vector hybrid candidate $Y_{\\mathrm{hyb?}} \\to \\et

  19. Water dispersal of vegetative bulbils of the invasive exotic Dioscorea oppositifolia L. in southern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, J.R.; Gibson, D.J.; Middleton, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Riparian corridors promote dispersal of several species of exotic invasives worldwide. Dispersal plays a role in the colonization of exotic invasive species into new areas and this study was conducted to determine if the invasiveness of Dioscorea oppositifolia L. (Chinese yam) is facilitated by secondary dispersal of vegetative diaspores (bulbils) by water. Since seed production of this plant has not been observed in the United States, bulbils represent the only means of dispersal to new habitats. Dispersal was monitored by placing aquatic traps, tethered bulbils, and painted bulbil caches in a tributary of Drury Creek, Giant City State Park, Illinois. Results indicate that high-energy flow in the creek accelerated secondary dispersal of bulbils downstream and onto the floodplain. The longest recorded dispersal distance was 206.2 m downstream. Dispersal distance of tethered bulbils was not related to rainfall or flow velocity in the creek; however the total number of bulbils trapped was positively related to flow velocity. We conclude that secondary dispersal by water in streams can facilitate dispersal of vegetative bulbils of this exotic species.

  20. Elevation and stream-size thresholds affect distributions of native and exotic warmwater fishes in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the influence of elevation and stream width on the occurrence of 28 native and six exotic fish species using data collected (1954-2003) from 1,114 stream reaches in Wyoming. Medians and ranges of elevation and stream width were used to assess how elevation and stream width influenced the occurrence of individual species and to indicate which species had large and small ranges of distribution. Twenty-four species were common at elevations below 1,550 m and 31 species occurred in streams less than 20 m wide. The six exotic species had the potential to overlap all of the native species with regard to both elevation and stream width. In general, species that were collected over a wide range of elevations were also collected over a wide range of stream widths. Red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis) and river carpsucker (Carpiodes carpio) occurred over the smallest elevation ranges ( 2,500 m). Longnose sucker and white sucker (Catostomus commersoni) occurred over the greatest ranges in stream widths (> 90 m), and brook stickleback (Culaea inconstans), black bullhead (Ameiurus melas), and quillback (Carpiodes cyprinus) were found over the lowest ranges in stream widths (< 12 m). The distributions of native and exotic species in streams that transition from the Rocky Mountains to the Great Plains were largely explained by elevation and stream width.

  1. Unification of standard and exotic matter through a Z{sub 2} symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Matute, Ernesto A.

    2006-03-01

    We consider a scenario in which the discrete weak symmetry between quarks and leptons is extended to the weak force by introducing exotic partners. We conjecture that there exists a hidden discrete symmetry P-tilde, defining a Z{sub 2} group, between standard and exotic quarks and leptons. The unified model SU(3){sub q}xSU(3){sub q-tilde}xSU(2){sub ql-tilde}xSU(2){sub q-tildel}xU(1){sub Y}= xP-tilde is discussed, where the unifying discrete symmetry extends over particles and forces. It is shown that the lighter neutral and charged weak bosons generated upon spontaneous symmetry breaking have the same properties as those of the standard model. Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa unitarity is used to set a mass of order 2.8 TeV for the nonstandard weak bosons, which do not exhibit quark-lepton universality. A grand unified theory of (GUT){sub ql-tilde}x(GUT){sub q-tildel}xP-tilde type, with decay of exotic matter into standard matter and no decay of the ordinary nucleon, is put forward.

  2. The worldwide airline network and the dispersal of exotic species: 2007–2010

    PubMed Central

    Tatem, Andrew J

    2009-01-01

    International air travel has played a significant role in driving recent increases in the rates of biological invasion and spread of infectious diseases. By providing high speed, busy transport links between spatially distant, but climatically similar regions of the world, the worldwide airline network (WAN) increases the risks of deliberate or accidental movements and establishment of climatically sensitive exotic organisms. With traffic levels continuing to rise and climates changing regionally, these risks will vary, both seasonally and year-by-year. Here, detailed estimates of air traffic trends and climate changes for the period 2007–2010 are used to examine the likely directions and magnitudes of changes in climatically sensitive organism invasion risk across the WAN. Analysis of over 144 million flights from 2007–2010 shows that by 2010, the WAN is likely to change little overall in terms of connecting regions with similar climates, but anticipated increases in traffic and local variations in climatic changes should increase the risks of exotic species movement on the WAN and establishment in new areas. These overall shifts mask spatially and temporally heterogenous changes across the WAN, where, for example, traffic increases and climatic convergence by July 2010 between parts of China and northern Europe and North America raise the likelihood of exotic species invasions, whereas anticipated climatic shifts may actually reduce invasion risks into much of eastern Europe. PMID:20300170

  3. Consequences of exotic host use: impacts on Lepidoptera and a test of the ecological trap hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Su'ad; Read, Quentin

    2016-08-01

    Investigating the effects of invasive species on native biodiversity is one of the most pressing challenges in ecology. Our goal in this study was to quantify the effects of invasive plants on butterfly and moth communities. In addition, we sought to elucidate the fitness consequences of non-native hosts on lepidopterans. We conducted a meta-analysis on a total of 76 studies which provided data on larval performance, survival, oviposition preference, abundance, and species richness of Lepidoptera on native and exotic plants. Overwhelmingly, we found that performance and survival were reduced for larvae developing on exotic hosts, relative to native hosts. At the community level, alien plant invasion was associated with a reduction in the overall abundance and richness of lepidopteran communities. We found that lepidopterans did not show strong oviposition preference for native hosts. This result suggests that many invasive plant species may decrease lepidopteran abundance by providing a target for oviposition where larvae have a relatively poor chance of survival. Among studies that tested both survival and preference on exotic hosts, 37.5 % found evidence for novel hosts that could function as ecological traps (the figure was 18 % when considering studies that only assayed larval performance). Thus, although the majority of novel hosts included in our analyses are not likely to act as ecological traps, the potential clearly exists for this effect, and the role of ecological traps should be considered along with other aspects of global change impacting natural communities. PMID:26820566

  4. An artificial perch to help Snail Kites handle an exotic Apple Snail

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pias, Kyle E.; Welch, Zach C.; Kitchens, Wiley M.

    2012-01-01

    In the United States, the Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus) is a federally endangered species and restricted to the wetlands of south-central Florida where the current population numbers less than 1,500. The Snail Kite is an extreme dietary specialist, previously feeding almost exclusively on one species of snail, the Florida Apple Snail (Pomacea paludosa). Within the past decade, an exotic species of apple snail, the Island Apple Snail (Pomacea insularum), has become established on lakes in central Florida. Island Apple Snails are larger than the native Florida Apple Snails, and Snail Kites handle the exotic snails less efficiently. Juvenile Snail Kites, in particular, have lower daily energy balances while feeding on Island Apple Snails. An inexpensive, easy-to-construct platform was developed that would provide Snail Kites with a flat, stable surface on which to extract snails. The platform has the potential to reduce the difficulties Snail Kites experience when handling exotic snails, and may benefit the Snail Kite population as a whole. Initial observations indicate that Snail Kites use the platforms frequently, and snails extracted at the platforms are larger than snails extracted at other perches.

  5. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, Yu. M.; Artamonov, A. V.; Batarin, V. A.; Eroshin, O. V.; Golovkin, S. V.; Gorin, Yu. P.; Govorun, V. N.; Isaev, A. N.; Kozhevnikov, A. P.; Kubarovsky, V. P.; Kurshetsov, V. F.; Landsberg, L. G.; Medovikov, V. A.; Molchanov, V. V.; Mukhin, V. A.; Patalakha, D. I.; Petrenko, S. V.; Petrukhin, A. I.; Senko, V. A.; Shalanda, N. A.; Sytin, A. N.; Vaniev, V. S.; Vavilov, D. V.; Victorov, V. A.; Yakimchuk, V. I.; Zimin, S. A.; Kolganov, V. Z.; Lomkatsi, G. S.; Nilov, A. F.; Smolyankin, V. T.

    2002-11-01

    The first preliminary results from the upgraded SPHINX spectrometer, working in the proton beam with the energy of 70 GeV of the IHEP accelerator, are presented. The data for the reaction p + N ⊒ [Σ0 K +] + N based on new statistics are in good agreement with our previous data and strongly support the existence of the X (2000) state (with an increase in statistics for this state by a factor of ˜5). We also observed radiative decay of Λ(1520) → Λγ. The significant increase in statistics for many diffractive-production reactions will allow us to study them in great detail.

  6. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurshetsov, Victor

    2002-06-01

    First preliminary results from upgraded SPHINX spectrometer, working in the proton beam with the energy of 70 GeV of IHEP accelerator, are presented. The data for the reaction p + N [right arrow] [Sigma]0K+ + N based on a new statistics are in a good agreement with our previous data and strongly supports the existence of X(2000) state (with the increase of statistics for this state by a factor of approx 5). We also observed radiative decay of Lambda(1520) [right arrow] Lambda + gamma. The significant increase of statistics for many diffractive production reactions will allow us to study them in great detail.

  7. Significant niche overlap between native and exotic Sonneratia mangrove species along a continuum of varying inundation periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luzhen; Tam, Nora F. Y.; Wang, Wenqing; Zhang, Yihui; Lin, Guanghui

    2013-01-01

    Sonneratia apetala Buch.-Ham., an introduced mangrove species from Bangladesh, has been popularly used in mangrove afforestation in China for more than 20 years. Whether there is an overlap in niche between this exotic species and native mangrove species is still unknown. The purpose of this study is to evaluate differences in growth and physiological responses to tidal inundation between the exotic S. apetala and its congeneric species in China, Sonneratia caseolaris. A set of tidal tanks was used to simulate different tidal ranges by controlling different inundation periods (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 h). Both the inundation period and species showed significant effects on almost all morphological, growth and physiological parameters measured; however, there were no significant differences between the two species in the responses of these parameters to the inundation period, except for specific leaf area (SLA) and light compensation point (LCP). Significant increases in SLA under the long inundation periods (10, 12 h) for the exotic, but not for the native species, indicate that the exotic one tended to increase its leaf area for assimilation. Thus, the exotic S. apetala seedling exhibited phenotypic plasticity to tidal inundation similar that of the native, S. caseolaris, which suggests that the exotic and native Sonneratia species will occupy a similar niche along the entire tidal range.

  8. Leaf-cutting ant nests near roads increase fitness of exotic plant species in natural protected areas

    PubMed Central

    Farji-Brener, Alejandro G; Ghermandi, Luciana

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that promote the invasion of natural protected areas by exotic plants is a central concern for ecology. We demonstrated that nests of the leaf-cutting ant, Acromyrmex lobicornis, near roadsides promote the abundance, growth and reproduction of two exotic plant species, Carduus nutans and Onopordum acanthium, in a national park in northern Patagonia, Argentina and determine the mechanisms that produce these effects. Refuse dumps (RDs) from ant nests have a higher nutrient content than nearby non-nest soils (NNSs); foliar nutrient content and their 15N isotopic signature strongly suggest that plants reach and use these nutrients. Both species of exotic plants in RDs were 50–600% more abundant; seedlings had 100–1000% more foliar area and root and leaf biomass; and adult plants produced 100–300% more seeds than nearby NNS plants. Plants can thus gain access to and benefit from the nutrient content of ant RD, supporting the hypotheses that enhanced resource availability promotes exotic plant performance that could increase the likelihood of biological invasions. The two exotics produce an estimated of 8 385 000 more seeds ha−1 in areas with ant nests compared with areas without; this exceptional increase in seed production represents a potential threat to nearby non-invaded communities. We propose several management strategies to mitigate this threat. Removal efforts of exotics should be focused on ant RDs, where plants are denser and represent a higher source of propagules. PMID:18364316

  9. Assessing early fitness consequences of exotic gene flow in the wild: a field study with Iberian pine relicts.

    PubMed

    Unger, Gregor M; Heuertz, Myriam; Vendramin, Giovanni G; Robledo-Arnuncio, Juan J

    2016-02-01

    Gene flow from plantations of nonlocal (genetically exotic) tree provenances into natural stands of the same species is probably a widespread phenomenon, but its effects remain largely unexamined. We investigated early fitness consequences of intraspecific exotic gene flow in the wild by assessing differences in survival among native, nonlocal, and F1 intraspecific hybrid seedlings naturally established within two native pine relicts (one of Pinus pinaster and the other of P. sylvestris) surrounded by nonlocal plantations. We obtained broad-scale temporally sequential genotypic samples of a cohort of recruits in each pine relict, from seeds before dispersal to established seedlings months after emergence, tracking temporal changes in the estimated proportion of each parental cross-type. Results show significant proportions of exotic male gametes before seed dispersal in the two pine relicts. Subsequently to seedling establishment, the frequency of exotic male gametes became nonsignificant in P. pinaster, and dropped by half in P. sylvestris. Exotic zygotic gene flow was significantly different from zero among early recruits for P. sylvestris, decreasing throughout seedling establishment. Seedling mortality resulted in small late sample sizes, and temporal differences in exotic gene flow estimates were not significant, so we could not reject the null hypothesis of invariant early viability across parental cross types in the wild. PMID:26834830

  10. Relations among habitat characteristics, exotic species, and turbid-river cyprinids in the Missouri River drainage of Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    We used data from 91 stream reaches in the Missouri River drainage of Wyoming to determine whether abiotic and biotic factors were related to the abundance of four cyprinid species associated with turbid-river environments: flathead chub Platygobio gracilis, sturgeon chub Macrhybopsis gelida, plains minnow Hybognathus placitus, and western silvery minnow H. argyritis. The abundance of these cyprinids was positively related to the percentage of fine substrate in a reach and inversely related to the percentage of gravel substrate, the percentage of large rocky substrate, and the abundance of exotic piscivores. Differences in substrate composition and abundance of exotic piscivores were largely explained by the presence and location of large, mainstem impoundments. Reaches without any large impoundments in their watershed had a high percentage of fine substrate, high catch rates of turbid-river cyprinids, few exotic piscivores, and little gravel or large rocky substrate. Reaches with a downstream impoundment (i.e., within 200 km) had habitat characteristics similar to those without impoundments but had few turbid-river cyprinids and many exotic piscivores. Reaches with an upstream impoundment (i.e., within 200 km) had little fine substrate, a high percentage of large rocky substrate, few turbid-river cyprinids, and many exotic piscivores. Our results suggest that impoundments have had a substantial influence on the distribution and abundance of cyprinid species adapted to hydrologically dynamic, turbid prairie streams and that conserving these species is dependent on maintaining natural flow and sediment transport regimes and on reducing habitat suitability for exotic piscivores.

  11. Ecological and geochemical impacts of exotic earthworm dispersal in forest ecosystems of Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drouin, Melanie; Fugere, Martine; Lapointe, Line; Vellend, Mark; Bradley, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    In Eastern Canada, native earthworm species did not survive the Wisconsin glaciation, which ended over 11,000 years ago. Accordingly, the 17 known Lumbricidae species in the province of Québec were introduced in recent centuries by European settlers. Given that natural migration rates are no more than 5-10 m yr‑1, exotic earthworm dispersal across the landscape is presumed to be mediated by human activities, although this assertion needs further validation. In agroecosystems, earthworms have traditionally been considered beneficial soil organisms that facilitate litter decomposition, increase nutrient availability and improve soil structure. However, earthworm activities could also increase soil nutrient leaching and CO2 emissions. Furthermore, in natural forest ecosystems, exotic earthworms may reduce organic forest floors provoking changes in watershed hydrology and loss of habitat for some faunal species. Over the past decade, studies have also suggested a negative effect of exotic earthworms on understory plant diversity, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Finally, there are no studies to our knowledge that have tested the effects of Lumbricidae species on the production of N2O (an important greenhouse gas) in forest ecosystems. We report on a series of field, greenhouse and laboratory studies on the human activities responsible for the dispersal of exotic earthworms, and on their ecological / geochemical impacts in natural forest ecosystems. Our results show: (1) Car tire treads and bait discarded by fishermen are important human vectors driving the dispersal of earthworms into northern temperate forests; (2) Exotic earthworms significantly modify soil physicochemical properties, nutrient cycling, microbial community structure and biomass; (3) Earthworm abundances in the field correlate with a decrease in understory plant diversity; (4) Lumbricus terrestris, an anecic earthworm species and favorite bait of fishermen, reduces seed germination and

  12. Comparative sensitivity of European native (Anodonta anatina) and exotic (Corbicula fluminea) bivalves to mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Patrícia; Lopes-Lima, Manuel; Machado, Jorge; Guilhermino, Lúcia

    2015-12-01

    Pollution is believed to be an important factor modulating the competition between exotic invasive bivalves and their native competitors. Thus, the objective of the present study was to compare the sensitivity of the European native Anodonta anatina and the exotic invasive species Corbicula fluminea to mercury, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant of high concern. In laboratory acute bioassays, adult organisms of both species were exposed independently to mercury for 96 h (31-500 μg/L). The criteria indicative of toxicity were mortality and biomarkers of oxidative stress and damage, neurotoxicity, and energy production changes. Mercury induced mortality in A. anatina (72 h-LC10 and 72 h-LC50 of 14.0 μg/L and 49.6 μg/L, respectively) but not in C. fluminea. The ability of C. fluminea to maintaining the shell closed for considerable periods of time when exposed to high concentrations of mercury and the effective activation (up to 63 μg/L) of mechanisms against the oxidative stress caused by mercury may have contributed to its relatively low sensitivity. In the range of concentrations tested, mercury had no significant effects on the other parameters analysed in C. fluminea. Overall, the findings of the present study, suggest that in real scenarios of competition between C. fluminea and A. anatina populations, the presence of mercury may modulate the process, acting in favour of the exotic species because it is less sensitive to this environmental contaminant than the native bivalve. The results of the present study highlight the need of further investigation on the effects of mercury on the competition between exotic invasive species and their native competitors, especially the effects potentially induced by long-term exposure to low concentrations of this metal, the mechanisms involved in the tolerance to mercury-induced stress, and the potential post-exposure recovery of both exotic invasive and native bivalves. This knowledge is most important for

  13. Probing the Search Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Energy Search, Geography Search, Geology Search, Archeology Search, and Community Search are microcomputer software games, usable in grades five to nine, which provide educational simulations, numbers and situational choices, and calculation of implications of decisions. The series is a pathfinder usable by entire class and requiring only one…

  14. Timing and searching millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Timing the dozen pulsars discovered in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the eclipse region and the orbital secular evolution). We also request time for performing pilot observations for a new deeper than ever search for millisecond pulsars in a subset of suitable clusters. This revamped search (as well as the requested timing observations) will exploit the new back-ends (APSR and DFB4) now available at Parkes.

  15. Timing and searching millisecond pulsars in globular clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Amico, Nichi; Possenti, Andrea; Manchester, Dick; Johnston, Simon; Kramer, Michael; Sarkissian, John; Lyne, Andrew; Burgay, Marta; Corongiu, Alessandro; Camilo, Fernando; Bailes, Matthew; van Straten, Willem

    2010-04-01

    Timing the dozen pulsars discovered in P303 is ensuring high quality results: (a) the peculiarities (in position or projected acceleration) of all the 5 millisecond pulsars in NGC6752 suggested the presence of non thermal dynamics in the core, perhaps due to black-holes of intermediate mass; (b) the eclipsing pulsar in NGC6397 is a stereotype for studying the late evolution of exotic binaries. We propose to continue our timing project focusing mostly on NGC6752 at 20cm (in order to measure additional parameters useful to constrain the existence of a black-hole) and NGC6397 at 10cm (for studying the eclipse region and the orbital secular evolution). We also request time for performing observations for a new deeper than ever search for millisecond pulsars in a subset of suitable clusters. This revamped search (as well as the requested timing observations) will exploit the new back-ends (APSR and DFB4) now available at Parkes.

  16. Pulsar Search Results from the Arecibo Remote Command Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Miguel; Stovall, Kevin; Banaszak, Shawn A.; Becker, Alison; Biwer, Christopher M.; Boehler, Keith; Caballero, Keeisi; Christy, Brian; Cohen, Stephanie; Crawford, Fronefield; Cuellar, Andres; Danford, Andrew; Percy Dartez, Louis; Day, David; Flanigan, Joseph D.; Fonrouge, Aldo; Gonzalez, Adolfo; Gustavson, Kathy; Handzo, Emma; Hinojosa, Jesus; Jenet, Fredrick A.; Kaplan, David L. A.; Lommen, Andrea N.; Longoria, Chasity; Lopez, Janine; Lunsford, Grady; Mahany, Nicolas; Martinez, Jose; Mata, Alberto; Miller, Andy; Murray, James; Pankow, Chris; Ramirez, Ivan; Reser, Jackie; Rojas, Pablo; Rohr, Matthew; Rolph, Kristina; Rose, Caitlin; Rudnik, Philip; Siemens, Xavier; Tellez, Andrea; Tillman, Nicholas; Walker, Arielle; Wells, Bradley L.; Zaldivar, Jonathan; Zermeno, Adrienne; Gbncc Consortium, Palfa Consortium, Gbtdrift Consortium, Ao327 Consortium

    2015-01-01

    This poster presents the pulsar discoveries made by students in the Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) program. The ARCC program was started at the University of Texas - Brownsville (UTB) within the Center for Advanced Radio Astronomy (CARA) as a group of scientists, faculty, graduate, undergraduate, and high school students interested in astrophysics. It has since expanded to form other ARCC programs at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM) and Franklin and Marshall College (F&M). The students in the ARCC group control the world's largest radio telescopes to search and discover pulsars. Pulsars are exotic neutron stars that emit beams of electromagnetic radiation. ARCC students use a web application to view and rate the images of radio pulsar candidates based on their signal characteristics. To date, ARCC students have searched through thousands of candidates and have discovered 61 pulsars to date.

  17. Contrasting Effects of Land Use Intensity and Exotic Host Plants on the Specialization of Interactions in Plant-Herbivore Networks

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Vieira, Marcos Costa; Lewinsohn, Thomas M.; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Human land use tends to decrease the diversity of native plant species and facilitate the invasion and establishment of exotic ones. Such changes in land use and plant community composition usually have negative impacts on the assemblages of native herbivorous insects. Highly specialized herbivores are expected to be especially sensitive to land use intensification and the presence of exotic plant species because they are neither capable of consuming alternative plant species of the native flora nor exotic plant species. Therefore, higher levels of land use intensity might reduce the proportion of highly specialized herbivores, which ultimately would lead to changes in the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks. This study investigates the community-wide effects of land use intensity on the degree of specialization of 72 plant-herbivore networks, including effects mediated by the increase in the proportion of exotic plant species. Contrary to our expectation, the net effect of land use intensity on network specialization was positive. However, this positive effect of land use intensity was partially canceled by an opposite effect of the proportion of exotic plant species on network specialization. When we analyzed networks composed exclusively of endophagous herbivores separately from those composed exclusively of exophagous herbivores, we found that only endophages showed a consistent change in network specialization at higher land use levels. Altogether, these results indicate that land use intensity is an important ecological driver of network specialization, by way of reducing the local host range of herbivore guilds with highly specialized feeding habits. However, because the effect of land use intensity is offset by an opposite effect owing to the proportion of exotic host species, the net effect of land use in a given herbivore assemblage will likely depend on the extent of the replacement of native host species with exotic ones. PMID

  18. Biodiversity loss following the introduction of exotic competitors: does intraguild predation explain the decline of native lady beetles?

    PubMed

    Smith, Chelsea A; Gardiner, Mary M

    2013-01-01

    Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae) provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens) and common (Coleomegilla maculata) native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis) eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats. PMID:24386383

  19. Contrasting effects of land use intensity and exotic host plants on the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Walter Santos; Vieira, Marcos Costa; Lewinsohn, Thomas M; Almeida-Neto, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Human land use tends to decrease the diversity of native plant species and facilitate the invasion and establishment of exotic ones. Such changes in land use and plant community composition usually have negative impacts on the assemblages of native herbivorous insects. Highly specialized herbivores are expected to be especially sensitive to land use intensification and the presence of exotic plant species because they are neither capable of consuming alternative plant species of the native flora nor exotic plant species. Therefore, higher levels of land use intensity might reduce the proportion of highly specialized herbivores, which ultimately would lead to changes in the specialization of interactions in plant-herbivore networks. This study investigates the community-wide effects of land use intensity on the degree of specialization of 72 plant-herbivore networks, including effects mediated by the increase in the proportion of exotic plant species. Contrary to our expectation, the net effect of land use intensity on network specialization was positive. However, this positive effect of land use intensity was partially canceled by an opposite effect of the proportion of exotic plant species on network specialization. When we analyzed networks composed exclusively of endophagous herbivores separately from those composed exclusively of exophagous herbivores, we found that only endophages showed a consistent change in network specialization at higher land use levels. Altogether, these results indicate that land use intensity is an important ecological driver of network specialization, by way of reducing the local host range of herbivore guilds with highly specialized feeding habits. However, because the effect of land use intensity is offset by an opposite effect owing to the proportion of exotic host species, the net effect of land use in a given herbivore assemblage will likely depend on the extent of the replacement of native host species with exotic ones. PMID

  20. Biodiversity Loss following the Introduction of Exotic Competitors: Does Intraguild Predation Explain the Decline of Native Lady Beetles?

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Chelsea A.; Gardiner, Mary M.

    2013-01-01

    Exotic species are widely accepted as a leading cause of biodiversity decline. Lady beetles (Coccinellidae) provide an important model to study how competitor introductions impact native communities since several native coccinellids have experienced declines that coincide with the establishment and spread of exotic coccinellids. This study tested the central hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic species has caused these declines. Using sentinel egg experiments, we quantified the extent of predation on previously-common (Hippodamia convergens) and common (Coleomegilla maculata) native coccinellid eggs versus exotic coccinellid (Harmonia axyridis) eggs in three habitats: semi-natural grassland, alfalfa, and soybean. Following the experiments quantifying egg predation, we used video surveillance to determine the composition of the predator community attacking the eggs. The extent of predation varied across habitats, and egg species. Native coccinellids often sustained greater egg predation than H. axyridis. We found no evidence that exotic coccinellids consumed coccinellid eggs in the field. Harvestmen and slugs were responsible for the greatest proportion of attacks. This research challenges the widely-accepted hypothesis that intraguild predation by exotic competitors explains the loss of native coccinellids. Although exotic coccinellids may not be a direct competitor, reduced egg predation could indirectly confer a competitive advantage to these species. A lower proportion of H. axyridis eggs removed by predators may have aided its expansion and population increase and could indirectly affect native species via exploitative or apparent competition. These results do not support the intraguild predation hypothesis for native coccinellid decline, but do bring to light the existence of complex interactions between coccinellids and the guild of generalist predators in coccinellid foraging habitats. PMID:24386383

  1. 'Net Search Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Suzanne S.

    1997-01-01

    Provides strategies for effective Internet searches. Categorizes queries into four types and describes tools: subject lists; indexes/directories; keyword search engines; Usenet newsgroups; and special purpose search tools. Discusses the importance of deciphering information and adjusting to changes. (AEF)

  2. Soil-plant hydrology of indigenous and exotic trees in an Ethiopian montane forest.

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, Florian; Abate, Asferachew; Fetene, Masresha; Beck, Erwin; Weise, Stephan; Guggenberger, Georg

    2006-08-01

    Fast-growing exotic trees are widely planted in the tropics to counteract deforestation; however, their patterns of water use could be detrimental to overall ecosystem productivity through their impact on ecosystem water budget. In a comparative field study on seasonal soil-plant water dynamics of two exotic species (Cupressus lusitanica Mill. and Eucalyptus globulus Labill.) and the indigenous Podocarpus falcatus (Thunb.) Mirb. in south Ethiopia, we combined a 2.5-year record for climate and soil water availability, natural-abundance oxygen isotope ratios (delta(18)O) of soil and xylem water, destructive root sampling and transpiration measurements. Soil was generally driest under C. lusitanica with its dense canopy and shallow root system, particularly following a relatively low-rainfall wet season, with the wettest soil under E. globulus. Wet season transpiration of C. lusitanica was twice that of the other species. In the dry season, P. falcatus and C. lusitanica reduced transpiration by a factor of six and two, respectively, whereas E. globulus showed a fivefold increase. In all species, there was a shift in water uptake to deeper soil layers as the dry season progressed, accompanied by relocation of live fine root biomass (LFR) of C. lusitanica and P. falcatus to deeper layers. Under P. falcatus, variability in soil matric potential, narrow delta(18)O depth gradients and high LFR indicated fast water redistribution. Subsoil water uptake was important only for E. globulus, which had low topsoil LFR and tap roots exploiting deep water. Although P. falcatus appeared better adapted to varying soil water availability than the exotic species, both conifers decreased growth substantially during dry weather. Growth of E. globulus was largely independent of topsoil water content, giving it the potential to cause substantial dry-season groundwater depletion. PMID:16651254

  3. Plant species richness at different scales in native and exotic grasslands in Southeastern Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLaughlin, S.P.; Bowers, Janice E.

    2006-01-01

    Species richness in Madrean mixed-grass prairies dominated by native or exotic species in southeastern Arizona was characterized at the community and point scales using ten 1-m2 quadrats nested within each of eight 1000-m2 plots. In the 1000-m2 plots average richness was significantly higher in oak savanna (OS, 121.0 species) than in exotic grassland on mesa tops (EMT, 52.0 species), whereas native grassland on mesa slopes (NMS, 92.5 species) and native grassland on mesa tops (NMT, 77.0 species) did not differ significantly in richness from OS or EMT When richness was partitioned by life form, EMT was notably poorer than other community types in species of perennial grasses, perennial herbs, and summer annuals. In the 1-m2 quadrats, OS (21.2 species), NMS (20.9 species), and NMT (20.7 species) were significantly richer than EMT (5.9 species). Cover in 1-m2 plots was significantly higher in EMT than in NMT, NMS, or OS. Species richness at the point scale showed a unimodal relation to canopy cover, with cover accounting for 30% of the variation in number of species in 1-m2 quadrats. Competitive exclusion and allelopathy have perhaps limited species richness at the point scale in exotic grassland. There was no evidence of a species-pool effect between point and community scales, but such an effect between community and landscape scales was supported. Madrean mixed-grass prairies are landscapes with high species richness in comparison to other grassland types in North America, providing a large pool of potential colonizing species at the community scale. Beta-diversity (between communities) within the landscape of the Appleton-Whittell Research Ranch was consequently high despite a relative lack of habitat diversity.

  4. Loss of foundation species increases population growth of exotic forbs in sagebrush steppe.

    PubMed

    Prevéy, Janet S; Germino, Matthew J; Huntly, Nancy J

    2010-10-01

    The invasion and spread of exotic plants following land disturbance threatens semiarid ecosystems. In sagebrush steppe, soil water is scarce and is partitioned between deep-rooted perennial shrubs and shallower-rooted native forbs and grasses. Disturbances commonly remove shrubs, leaving grass-dominated communities, and may allow for the exploitation of water resources by the many species of invasive, tap-rooted forbs that are increasingly successful in this habitat. We hypothesized that exotic forb populations would benefit from increased soil water made available by removal of sagebrush, a foundation species capable of deep-rooting, in semiarid shrub-steppe ecosystems. To test this hypothesis, we used periodic matrix models to examine effects of experimental manipulations of soil water on population growth of two exotic forb species, Tragopogon dubius and Lactuca serriola, in sagebrush steppe of southern Idaho, USA. We used elasticity analyses to examine which stages in the life cycle of T. dubius and L. serriola had the largest relative influence on population growth. We studied the demography of T. dubius and L. serriola in three treatments: (1) control, in which vegetation was not disturbed, (2) shrubs removed, or (3) shrubs removed but winter-spring recharge of deep-soil water blocked by rainout shelters. The short-term population growth rate (Lambda) of T. dubius in the shrub-removal treatment was more than double that of T. dubius in either sheltered or control treatments, both of which had limited soil water. All L. serriola individuals that emerged in undisturbed sagebrush plots died, whereas Lambda of L. serriola was high (Lambda > 2.5) in all shrub-removal plots, whether they had rainout shelters or not. Population growth of both forbs in all treatments was most responsive to flowering and seed production, which are life stages that should be particularly reliant on deep-soil water, as well as seedling establishment, which is important to most plant

  5. RIB in-flight production and the facility EXOTIC at LNL

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzocco, Marco

    2014-05-09

    The production of Radioactive Ion Beams (RIBs) via the In-Flight technique is reviewed. This separation method typically employs four main production mechanisms: (i) Projectile Fragmentation; (ii) Projectile Fission; (iii) Nuclear Fusion and (iv) Direct Processes in Inverse Kinematics. We will concentrate particularly on the last mechanism, the one used by the facility EXOTIC at the INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) for the production of light RIBs. An extensive description of the facility and a brief overview of the most recent scientific achievements with {sup 7}Be and {sup 17}F are given.

  6. Width of the exotic Xb(5568 ) state through its strong decay to Bs0π+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agaev, S. S.; Azizi, K.; Sundu, H.

    2016-06-01

    The width of the newly observed exotic state Xb(5568 ) is calculated via its dominant strong decay to Bs0π+ using the QCD sum rule method on the light cone in conjunction with the soft-meson approximation. To this end, the vertex XbBsπ is studied and the strong coupling gXbBsπ is computed employing for Xb(5568 ) state the interpolating diquark-antidiquark current of the [s u ][b ¯d ¯] type. The obtained prediction for the decay width of Xb(5568 ) is confronted and a nice agreement found with the experimental data of the D0 Collaboration.

  7. Coulomb excitation of exotic nuclei at the R3B-LAND setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, D. M.; Adrich, P.; Aksouh, F.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Benlliure, J.; Böhmer, M.; Boretzky, K.; Casarejos, E.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Datta Pramanik, U.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Geissel, H.; Gorska, M.; Heil, M.; Johansson, H.; Junghans, A.; Kiselev, O.; Klimkiewicz, A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kurz, N.; Labiche, M.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu A.; Mahata, K.; Maierbeck, P.; Movsesyan, A.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Palit, R.; Paschalis, S.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Simon, H.; Sümmerer, K.; Wagner, A.; Walus, W.; Weick, H.; Winkler, M.

    2013-03-01

    Exotic Ni isotopes have been measured at the R3B-LAND setup at GSI in Darmstadt, using Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics at beam energies around 500 MeV/u. As the experimental setup allows kinematically complete measurements, the excitation energy was reconstructed using the invariant mass method. The GDR and additional low-lying strength have been observed in 68Ni, the latter exhausting 4.1(1.9)% of the E1 energy-weighted sum rule. Also, the branching ratio for the non-statistical decay of the excited 68Ni nuclei was measured and amounts to 24(4)%.

  8. Anatomy and Disorders of the Oral Cavity of Ferrets and Other Exotic Companion Carnivores.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Delaney, Cathy A

    2016-09-01

    Exotic companion carnivores such as ferrets, skunks, fennec foxes, coatimundis, raccoons, and kinkajous presented in clinical practice share similar dental anatomy, function, and diseases. The domestic ferret serves as the representative species for this group with its anatomy, diseases, and conditions described in detail. Dog and cat guidelines for veterinary and home care seem to be relevant and applicable, including dental endodontic procedures. Annual or biannual dental examinations and prophylaxis are recommended. The most common dental and oral problems are tooth wear, plaque and calculus, teeth fractures, gingivitis and periodontitis, tooth loss, abscesses, oral ulceration, tonsillitis, and neoplasia. PMID:27497211

  9. Two-Portal Access Laparoscopic Ovariectomy Using Ligasure Atlas in Exotic Companion Mammals.

    PubMed

    Proença, Laila M

    2015-09-01

    Laparoscopic sterilization techniques are becoming accepted in veterinary medicine, and there has been interest in reducing the number and size of portals. Computer-controlled bipolar electrocoagulation devices facilitate sealing and dividing ovarian pedicles, reducing operative time. The 2-portal laparoscopic ovariectomy has been proved to be safe, feasible, and effective in dogs and cats, but has not yet been described in exotic companion mammals. Based on the author's experience, the 2-portal laparoscopic ovariectomy seems to be safe and feasible in rabbits, but complications such as emergency conversion to laparotomy and severe postoperative ileus have occurred in pigs. PMID:26094023

  10. TheX(4350) Narrow Structure Described As a 1{sup -+} Exotic State

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Jorgivan M.; Albuquerque, Raphael M.; Nielsen, Marina

    2010-11-12

    We use the QCD sum rules to test if the narrow structure X(4350) can be described as a J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} exotic D{sub s}*D{sub s0}* molecular state. We consider the contribution of the condensates up to dimension eight and we keep terms wich are linear in the strange quark mass m{sub s}. We obtain m{sub D{sub sD{sub s{sub 0*}}}} (5.05{+-}0.19) GeV which is much bigger than the X(4350) experimental mass.

  11. Observation of an Exotic S = +1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan; Kenneth Hicks; Daniel Carman; Evgueni Pasyuk; Reinhard Schumacher; Elton Smith; David Tedeschi; Luminita Todor

    2003-12-19

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction {gamma}d {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} p n, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S = +1 is seen in the K{sup +}n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1542 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2} with a measured width of 21 MeV/c{sup 2} FWHM, equivalent to the experimental invariant mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is 5.3 {+-} 0.5 {sigma} for a Gaussian peak shape on top of a smooth background.

  12. Exotic Haldane superfluid phase of soft-core bosons in optical lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jian-Ping; Wang, Z. D.

    2016-05-01

    We propose to realize an exotic Haldane superfluid (HSF) phase in an extended Bose-Hubbard model on the two-leg ladder (i.e., a two-species mixture of interacting bosons). The proposal is confirmed by means of large-scale quantum Monte Carlo simulations, with a significant part of the ground-state phase diagram being revealed. Most remarkably, the newly discovered HSF phase features both superfluidity and nonlocal topological Haldane order. The effects induced by varying the number of legs are furthermore explored. Our results shed light on how topological superfluid emerges in bosonic systems.

  13. Next-Generation Facilities for the Research with Exotic Nuclei and Super-Heavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheidenberger, Christoph

    The present decade is governed by the construction and advent of new, dedicated radioactive beam facilities in several continents. These forthcoming facilities will allow to explore hitherto unknown territory in the chart of nuclei and to study new phenomena, effects and structural features in exotic nuclei. Increasing intensity of primary and secondary beams, selective and efficient separation techniques adapted to the reaction mechanisms and production methods, and sensitive instruments and detectors are the key prerequisites for new findings and exploratory measurements. The new facilities and instruments will enhance the science potential tremendously.

  14. Exotic Meson Decay to {omega}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect

    M. Lu; G.S. Adams; T. Adams; Z. Bar-Yam; J.M. Bishop; V.A. Bodyagin; D.S. Brown; N.M. Cason; S.U. Chung; J.P. Cummings; K. Danyo; A.I. Demianov; S.P. Denisov; V. Dorofeev; J.P. Dowd; P. Eugenio; X.L. Fan; A.M. Gribushin; R.W. Hackenburg; M. Hayek; J. Hu; E.I. Ivanov; D. Joffe; I. Kachaev; W. Kern; E. King; O.L. Kodolova; V.L. Korotkikh; M.A. Kostin; J. Kuhn; V.V. Lipaev; J.M. LoSecco; J.J. Manak; J. Napolitano; M. Nozar; C. Olchanski; A.I. Ostrovidov; T.K. Pedlar; A.V. Popov; D.I. Ryabchikov; L.I. Sarycheva; K.K. Seth; N. Shenhav; X. Shen; W.D. Shephard; N.B. Sinev; D.L. Stienike; J.S. Suh; S.A. Taegar; A. Tomaradze; I.N. Vardanyan; D.P. Weygand; D.B. White; H.J. Willutzki; M. Witkowski; A.A. Yershov

    2004-05-01

    A partial-wave analysis of the mesons from the reaction {pi}{sup -} p {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}p has been performed. The data show b{sub 1}{pi} decay of the spin-exotic states {pi}{sub 1}(1600) and {pi}{sub 1}(2000). Three isovector 2{sup -+} states were seen in the {omega}{rho}{sup -} decay channel. In addition to the well known {pi}{sub 2}(1670), signals were also observed for {pi}{sub 2}(1880) and {pi}{sub 2}(1970).

  15. Constraints on Models for the Higgs Boson with Exotic Spin and Parity

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Emily Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The production of a Higgs boson in association with a vector boson at the Tevatron offers a unique opportunity to study models for the Higgs boson with exotic spin J and parity P assignments. At the Tevatron the V H system is produced near threshold. Different JP assignments of the Higgs boson can be distinguished by examining the behavior of the cross section near threshold. The relatively low backgrounds at the Tevatron compared to the LHC put us in a unique position to study the direct decay of the Higgs boson to fermions. If the Higgs sector is more complex than predicted, studying the spin and parity of the Higgs boson in all decay modes is important. In this Thesis we will examine the WH → ℓνb¯b production and decay mode using 9.7 fb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment in an attempt to derive constraints on models containing exotic values for the spin and parity of the Higgs boson. In particular, we will examine models for a Higgs boson with JP = 0- and JP = 2+. We use a likelihood ratio to quantify the degree to which our data are incompatible with exotic JP predictions for a range of possible production rates. Assuming the production cross section times branching ratio of the signals in the models considered is equal to the standard model prediction, the WH → ℓνb¯b mode alone is unable to reject either exotic model considered. We will also discuss the combination of the ZH → ℓℓb¯b, WH → ℓνb¯b, and V H → ννb¯b production modes at the D0 experiment and with the CDF experiment. When combining all three production modes at the D0 experiment we reject the JP = 0- and JP = 2+ hypotheses at the 97.6% CL and at the 99.0% CL, respectively, when assuming the signal production cross section times branching ratio is equal to the standard model predicted value. When combining with the CDF experiment we reject the JP = 0- and JP = 2+ hypotheses with significances of 5.0 standard deviations and 4.9 standard deviations

  16. Parity-violating effects in an exotic perturbation of the rigid rotator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallares-Rivera, A.; Kirchbach, M.

    2015-03-01

    The perturbation of the free rigid rotator by the trigonometric Scarf potential is shown to conserve its energy excitation patterns and change only the wave functions towards spherical harmonics rescaled by a function of an unspecified parity, or mixtures of such rescaled harmonics of equal magnetic quantum numbers and different angular momenta. In effect, no parity can be assigned to the states of the rotational bands emerging in this exotic way, and the electric dipole operator is allowed to acquire non-vanishing expectation values.

  17. GMSB at a stable vacuum and MSSM without exotics from heterotic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihn E.

    2007-11-01

    We show that it is possible to introduce the confining hidden sector gauge group SU(5) ‧ with the chiral matter 100‧ plus 5bar0‧, which are neutral under the standard model gauge group, toward a gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking (GMSB) in a Z12 - I orbifold compactification of E8 ×E8‧ heterotic string. Three families of MSSM result without exotics. We also find a desirable matter parity P (or R-parity) assignment. We note that this model contains the spectrum of the Lee-Weinberg model which has a nice solution of the μ problem.

  18. Prevalence of coccidiosis among village and exotic breed of chickens in Maiduguri, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lawal, Jallailudeen Rabana; Jajere, Saleh Mohammed; Ibrahim, Umar Isa; Geidam, Yaqub Ahmed; Gulani, Isa Adamu; Musa, Gambo; Ibekwe, Benjamin U.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coccidiosis is an important enteric parasitic disease of poultry associated with significant economic losses to poultry farmers worldwide. This survey was conducted from June 2014 through July 2015 with the main goal of investigating the prevalence and associated risk factors of coccidiosis among village and exotic breeds of chickens in Maiduguri, Northeastern Nigeria. Materials and Methods: A total of 600 fecal samples from live and slaughtered birds comprising 284 young, 141, growers and 175 adult birds; 379 male and 221 female birds; 450 exotic and 150 local breeds of birds were randomly collected either as bird’s fresh droppings or cutting open an eviscerated intestine of slaughtered birds, while noting their age, sex, and breeds. Samples were analyzed using standard parasitological methods and techniques. Results: An overall prevalence rate of 31.8% (95% confidence interval: 28.07-35.52) was obtained. Higher prevalence rates were recorded in growing birds 58.9% (50.78-67.02), female birds 35.3% (29.00-41.60), exotic birds 42.4% (37.83-46.97), and broiler birds 68.7% (61.28-76.12). Similarly, higher infection rates were also observed among birds sampled from Mairi ward 66.7% (56.03-77.37), intensive management system 46.5% (41.61-51.39), and constructed local cages 54.0% (46.02-61.98). The difference in prevalence of coccidiosis among age groups, breeds, among exotic breeds, sampling sites, husbandry management systems, and litter management systems was statistically significant (<0.0001). However, no significant difference (p>0.05) of infection rates was observed in sex. Conclusion: Coccidiosis is endemic in both commercial and backyard poultry farms in Maiduguri due to poor management practices encouraging Eimeria oocysts build-up. It is therefore, recommended that poultry farmers should practice strict biosecurity measures on their farms, creating awareness on the prevalence of coccidiosis, routine vaccination against coccidiosis and educating poultry

  19. An overview of restraint and blood collection techniques in exotic pet practice.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Stephen M; Cervasio, Erika L

    2008-09-01

    As more data about blood test results become available, blood sampling becomes increasingly important as a diagnostic tool. The increased availability of biochemistry analyzers that sample small volumes of blood has made it possible to get diagnostic profiles and hematology results from pets that have only small volumes of blood to contribute. This article describes techniques for restraint, phlebotomy, and sample preparation of several of the more popular exotic animals in the pet trade. The species covered include birds, lizards, chelonians, snakes, frogs, salamanders, fish, rabbits, ferrets, guinea pigs, mice, rats, hamsters, gerbils, hedgehogs, sugar gliders, and giant spiders (tarantulas). PMID:18675727

  20. {alpha}-decay studies of the exotic N=125, 126, and 127 isotones

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Chang; Ren Zhongzhou

    2007-08-15

    The {alpha}-decay half-lives of the exotic N=125, 126, and 127 isotones (Po, Rn, Ra, Th, and U) are systematically studied by the density-dependent cluster model (DDCM). The influence of the neutron shell closure N=126 on the {alpha}-cluster formation and penetration probabilities is analyzed and discussed in detail. By combining the DDCM and a two-level microscopic model together, the experimental half-lives of {alpha} transitions to both the ground state and the excited state in the daughter nuclei are reproduced very well.