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Sample records for expandable metal stent

  1. Expandable metal stents in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Charnley, RM

    2003-01-01

    Background Biliary obstruction in chronic pancreatitis may be relieved by the insertion of a biliary endoprosthesis. Stenting is usually achieved with a plastic device, but self-expandable metal stents may also be used. Case outlines Two patients are described with severe chronic pancreatitis complicated by biliary obstruction and portal vein thrombosis, who underwent insertion of metallic biliary endoprostheses. In both patients the endoprostheses became occluded, at 12 and 7 months respectively, which necessitated open operation. Both patients experienced surgical complications and one patient died postoperatively. Discussion The use of metal endoprostheses in chronic pancreatitis may result in occlusion, necessitating open operation. Such stents should be used with caution in these patients, who are likely to be high-risk surgical candidates. PMID:18332959

  2. Study of the physical properties of expandable metallic stents.

    PubMed

    Sawada, S; Saito, S; Kotani, K; Fujiwara, Y; Tanigawa, N; Katsube, Y; Nakamura, H

    1991-01-01

    The expansile force of self-expanding metallic stents is currently estimated only by wall-distending pressure (P). We estimated the expansile force of the stent not only by P but also by F, the degree of embedding into the vessel wall defined as force per unit length of wire. P and F were thought to be useful in selecting the best stent. PMID:1823394

  3. Airway stenoses after lung transplantation: management with expanding metal stents.

    PubMed

    Higgins, R; McNeil, K; Dennis, C; Parry, A; Large, S; Nashef, S A; Wells, F C; Flower, C; Wallwork, J

    1994-01-01

    Success in lung transplantation has been hindered by airway complications, usually as a result of anastomotic ischemia and stenosis. We report our experience with expanding metal stents in managing airway stenoses after lung transplantation. From April 1984 through November 1993, 46 single lung, 5 double lung, and 154 heart-lung transplantations were performed at Papworth Hospital. All patients received immunosuppression with azathioprine, cyclosporine, methylprednisolone, and induction antithymocyte globulin. Fourteen patients (nine single lung, two double lung, and three heart-lung) had an airway stenosis requiring a stent. The most common features were shortness of breath, wheezing or stridor, and a fall in pulmonary function tests (11 patients). Three patients had pneumonia. Airway stenosis was diagnosed on bronchoscopy an average of 61 days after transplantation (range 3 to 245 days). Stent placement occurred an average of 18 days after the diagnosis (range 2 to 84 days). One heart-lung transplant recipient received a silicone rubber stent. All other patients received expanding metal stents. Six patients required multiple stent placements. After stent placement the average increase in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second was 117%. Infection complicated the stenoses in 12 patients. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Aspergillus fumigatus were the most common pathogens, each occurring in six cases. Multiple pathogens were isolated in seven cases. Three patients died as a direct consequence of their airway problems. Two died of pneumonia despite stenting, and a third died of acute occlusion of the silicone rubber stent. Expanding metal stents are an effective treatment of airway stenoses in lung transplant recipients. Patients with suspected airway problems should be referred for early bronchoscopy with the potential for stent placement. PMID:7803417

  4. [Esophageal Injury Treated with a Covered Expandable Metallic Stent].

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Go; Aoki, Masaya; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Suenaga, Toyokuni; Sato, Masami

    2016-07-01

    We report a case of iatrogenic esophageal injury treated with a covered expandable metallic stent after thoracoscopic chest drainage. A 70-year-old man who had stricture of the esophagus after endoscopic submucosal dissection underwent balloon dilation. Chest computed tomography revealed esophageal rupture. Initially, continuous intra-esophageal drainage was carried out, however, due to the development of mediastinitis with enlarged abscess around the descending aorta and the left pneumothorax, thoracoscopic chest drainage was performed. Since direct closure was thought to be in appropriate, an intra-esophageal approach was chosen and a covered expandable metallic stent was mounted under fluorography on the next day. After the treatment, the patient was able to eat, and was able to discharge 42 days later. Intra-esophageal covered expandable metallic stent can be an alternative treatment for esophageal rupture. PMID:27365065

  5. Endoscopic Ultrasound-guided Antegrade Stenting in an Occluded Biliary Self-expandable Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Almadi, Majid A.; Eltayeb, Mohanned; Thaniah, Salem

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) is an attractive option for patients who cannot undergo conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and do not want surgery or percutaneous drainage procedures. We present the use of EUS-antegrade (EUS-AG) insertion of a self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) in a patient with a common hepatic duct cholangiocarcinoma, as well as a huge gastric lipoma, after recurrent biliary obstruction of a prior SEMS inserted via ERCP in the same session as a duodenal stent insertion for gastric outlet obstruction. PMID:27488330

  6. Role of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents in colorectal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Metallic stents are effective in relieving colorectal obstruction in more than 80% of cases. Self expanding metallic stents allow for decompression of the proximal colon and preoperative bowel cleansing. Hence, emergent surgery for large bowel obstruction with its associated high morbidity and mortality might be avoided. Endoscopic laser photoablation and stent placement may successfully palliate inoperable colorectal cancer patients by maintaining luminal patency and avoiding the need for a colostomy. Major complications associated with metallic stents include pressure necrosis, perforation, bleeding and migration. The effectiveness of expandable metallic stents in obstructive colorectal carcinoma is critically reviewed. The authors present a concise review of the effectiveness of endoscopic laser photoablation and expandable metal stent placement.

  7. Thoracic Discitis as a Complication of Self-Expanding Metallic Stents in Esophageal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    McQueen, A. S.; Eljabu, W.; Latimer, J. Raju, P. P. J.

    2011-02-15

    The role of metallic stents in the palliation of esophageal cancer is well established. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMSs) are frequently used, as they provide an effective and safe method of relieving malignant dysphagia. A number of complications are associated with the use of SEMSs, including esophageal perforation. We report a case of thoracic discitis occurring in a patient with advanced esophageal malignancy, treated with SEMSs. We propose that the likely etiology in this patient was esophageal perforation by a metallic stent.

  8. Evaluation of anti-migration properties of biliary covered self-expandable metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Minaga, Kosuke; Kitano, Masayuki; Imai, Hajime; Harwani, Yogesh; Yamao, Kentaro; Kamata, Ken; Miyata, Takeshi; Omoto, Shunsuke; Kadosaka, Kumpei; Sakurai, Toshiharu; Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To assess anti-migration potential of six biliary covered self-expandable metal stents (C-SEMSs) by using a newly designed phantom model. METHODS: In the phantom model, the stent was placed in differently sized holes in a silicone wall and retracted with a retraction robot. Resistance force to migration (RFM) was measured by a force gauge on the stent end. Radial force (RF) was measured with a RF measurement machine. Measured flare structure variables were the outer diameter, height, and taper angle of the flare (ODF, HF, and TAF, respectively). Correlations between RFM and RF or flare variables were analyzed using a linear correlated model. RESULTS: Out of the six stents, five stents were braided, the other was laser-cut. The RF and RFM of each stent were expressed as the average of five replicate measurements. For all six stents, RFM and RF decreased as the hole diameter increased. For all six stents, RFM and RF correlated strongly when the stent had not fully expanded. This correlation was not observed in the five braided stents excluding the laser cut stent. For all six stents, there was a strong correlation between RFM and TAF when the stent fully expanded. For the five braided stents, RFM after full stent expansion correlated strongly with all three stent flare structure variables (ODF, HF, and TAF). The laser-cut C-SEMS had higher RFMs than the braided C-SEMSs regardless of expansion state. CONCLUSION: RF was an important anti-migration property when the C-SEMS did not fully expand. Once fully expanded, stent flare structure variables plays an important role in anti-migration. PMID:27570427

  9. Fully covered self-expandable metal stents for treatment of malignant and benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Samie, Ahmed; Dette, Stephan; Vöhringer, Ulrich; Stumpf, Michael; Kopischke, Karolin; Theilmann, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To present a series of covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMS) placed for different indications and to evaluate the effectiveness, complications and extractability of these devices. METHODS: We therefore retrospectively reviewed the courses of patients who received CSEMS due to malignant as well as benign biliary strictures and post-sphincterotomy bleeding in our endoscopic unit between January 2010 and October 2011. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients received 28 stents due to different indications (20 stents due to malignant biliary strictures, six stents due to benign biliary strictures and two stents due to post-sphincterotomy bleeding). Biliary obstruction was relieved in all cases, regardless of the underlying cause. Hemostasis could be achieved in the two patients who received the stents for this purpose. Complications occurred in five patients (18%). Two patients (7%) developed cholecystitis, stents dislocated/migrated in other two patients (7%), and in one patient (3.6%) stent occlusion was documented during the study period. Seven stents were extracted endoscopically. Removal of stents was easily possible in all cases in which it was desired using standard forceps. Twelve patients underwent surgery with pylorus preserving duodenopancreatectomy. In all patients stents could be removed during the operation without difficulties. CONCLUSION: Despite the higher costs of these devices, fully covered self-expanding metal stents may be suitable to relief biliary obstruction due to bile duct stenosis, regardless of the underlying cause. CSEMS may also represent an effective treatment strategy of severe post-sphincterotomy bleeding, not controlled by other measures. PMID:23125898

  10. Successful Palliation of a Malignant Cologastric Fistula with a Covered Self-Expanding Metal Stent

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbauch, Mathilde Therese Winther; Tøttrup, Anders

    2015-01-01

    When patients present with malignant cologastric fistulas, the tumor stage is often advanced and management is only palliative. We report the case of a 75-year-old man with a symptomatic cologastric fistula arising from an advanced tumor in the transverse colon, previously stented owing to malignant obstruction. An 8-cm-long covered self-expanding metal stent (COMVI enteral colonic stent; Taewoong Medical) was placed inside the primary stent, which sealed the fistula and completely alleviated the symptoms. Considering the successful outcome, we propose that insertion of a covered stent be considered in the palliative management of patients with malignant cologastric fistulas. PMID:26668809

  11. Predictors of the patency of self-expandable metallic stents in malignant gastroduodenal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seung Han; Chun, Hoon Jai; Yoo, In Kyung; Lee, Jae Min; Nam, Seung Joo; Choi, Hyuk Soon; Kim, Eun Sun; Keum, Bora; Seo, Yeon Seok; Jeen, Yoon Tae; Lee, Hong Sik; Um, Soon Ho; Kim, Chang Duck

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the predictive factors of self-expandable metallic stent patency after stent placement in patients with inoperable malignant gastroduodenal obstruction. METHODS: A total of 116 patients underwent stent placements for inoperable malignant gastroduodenal obstruction at a tertiary academic center. Clinical success was defined as acceptable decompression of the obstructive lesion within the malignant gastroduodenal neoplasm. We evaluated patient comorbidities and clinical statuses using the World Health Organization’s scoring system and categorized patient responses to chemotherapy using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria. We analyzed the relationships between possible predictive factors and stent patency. RESULTS: Self-expandable metallic stent placement was technically successful in all patients (100%), and the clinical success rate was 84.2%. In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels were correlated with a reduction in stent patency [P = 0.006; adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 2.92, 95%CI: 1.36-6.25]. Palliative chemotherapy was statistically associated with an increase in stent patency (P = 0.009; aHR = 0.27, 95%CI: 0.10-0.72). CONCLUSION: CEA levels can easily be measured at the time of stent placement and may help clinicians to predict stent patency and determine the appropriate stent procedure. PMID:26290640

  12. Endoscopic removal and trimming of distal self-expandable metallic biliary stents

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Itoi, Takao; Sofuni, Atsushi; Itokawa, Fumihide; Tsuchiya, Takayoshi; Kurihara, Toshio; Tsuji, Shujiro; Ikeuchi, Nobuhito; Umeda, Junko; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of endoscopic removal and trimming of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS). METHODS: All SEMS had been placed for distal biliary strictures. Twenty-seven endoscopic procedures were performed in 19 patients in whom SEMS (one uncovered and 18 covered) removal had been attempted, and 8 patients in whom stent trimming using argon plasma coagulation (APC) had been attempted at Tokyo Medical University Hospital. The APC settings were: voltage 60-80 W and gas flow at 1.5 L/min. RESULTS: The mean stent indwelling period for all patients in whom stent removal had been attempted was 113.7 ± 77.6 d (range, 8-280 d). Of the 19 patients in whom removal of the SEMS had been attempted, the procedure was successful in 14 (73.7%) without procedure-related adverse events. The indwelling period in the stent removable group was shorter than that in the unremovable group (94.9 ± 71.5 d vs 166.2 ± 76.2 d, P = 0.08). Stent trimming was successful for all patients with one minor adverse event consisting of self-limited hemorrhage. Trimming time ranged from 11 to 16 min. CONCLUSION: Although further investigations on larger numbers of cases are necessary to accumulate evidence, the present data suggested that stent removal and stent trimming is feasible and effective for stent-related complications. PMID:21677835

  13. Fatal Complications After Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Placement for Inferior Vena Cava Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Kin, Yoko; Takimoto, Yukiko; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2003-08-15

    We present the case of a 71-year-old man with inferior vena cava syndrome due to metastatic lymph nodes from hepatocellular carcinoma with serious complications that were strongly suspected to result from rapid changes in hemodynamics after self-expandable metallic stent placement.

  14. Cholecystoduodenal fistula: A complication of inserted self-expandable metallic bilitary stents

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirotoshi; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nagata, Yukitaka; Kato, Takeshi; Miyazono, Nobuaki; Nakajo, Masayuki

    1998-05-15

    We encountered a case of hepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma resulting in cholecystoduodenal fistula after insertion of self-expandable metallic biliary stents (EMBSs). To our knowledge, there has been no report of cholecystoduodenal fistula after insertion of EMBSs. This case suggests that immediate gallbladder decompression may be necessary if acute cholecystitis occurs after insertion of EMBSs.

  15. Cholecystoduodenal Fistula: A Complication of Inserted Self-Expandable Metallic Biliary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Hirotoshi; Inoue, Hiroki; Ueno, Kazuto; Nagata, Yukitaka; Kato, Takeshi; Miyazono, Nobuaki; Nakajo, Masayuki

    1998-05-15

    We encountered a case of hepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma resulting in cholecystoduodenal fistula after insertion of self-expandable metallic biliary stents (EMBSs). To our knowledge, there has been no report of cholecystoduodenal fistula after insertion of EMBSs. This case suggests that immediate gallbladder decompression may be necessary if acute cholecystitis occurs after insertion of EMBSs.

  16. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed

    Hogan, Brian J; O'Beirne, James P

    2016-01-10

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  17. Role of self-expanding metal stents in the management of variceal haemorrhage: Hype or hope?

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, Brian J; O’Beirne, James P

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances of medical, endoscopic and radiological therapy over recent years the mortality rates of acute variceal haemorrhage are still 16%-20% and the medium term outcome has not improved in the last 25 years. Early transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt has proved to be an effective therapy for selected groups of patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and moderate liver disease. However, there is an unmet need for a therapy that can be applied in patients with a high risk of re-bleeding and advanced liver disease either as definitive therapy or as a bridge to permanent therapy. Self-expanding metal stents can be placed without the need for endoscopic or fluoroscopic control and, once in place, will provide effective haemostasis and allow a route for oral fluids and nutrition. They can remain in place whilst liver function recovers and secondary prophylaxis is initiated. We review the results of 6 case series including a total of 83 patients and the first randomised controlled trial of self-expanding metal stents vs balloon tamponade (BT) in the management of refractory variceal haemorrhage. We report that self-expanding metal stents provide effective haemostasis and perform better than BT in refractory bleeding, where they are associated with fewer complications. Whilst the most effective place for self-expanding metal stents in the management algorithm needs to be determined by further randomised controlled trials, currently they provide an effective alternative to BT in selected patients. PMID:26788260

  18. Removal of Endobronchially Placed Vascular Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Using Flexible Bronchoscopy.

    PubMed

    Kremens, Karol

    2016-04-01

    Self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) are commonly placed in malignant airway obstruction and sometimes in benign obstruction. Complications from SEMS placement are common, especially after 30 days from deployment. SEMS removal can be complicated and often involves significant resources. We report a case of a 78-year-old man with small cell carcinoma who underwent placement of a Luminexx endovascular stent in his right main stem bronchus, complicated by stent migration after initiation of chemotherapy. Stent removal was performed by flexible bronchoscopy, utilizing forceps inserted via a working channel, as well as a goose neck snare operated parallel to the bronchoscope. The patient was discharged the same day with no complications. PMID:27197344

  19. Endoscopic drainage of pancreatic fluid collections using a fully covered expandable metal stent with antimigratory fins

    PubMed Central

    Raijman, Isaac; Tarnasky, Paul R.; Patel, Sandeep; Fishman, Douglas S.; Surapaneni, Sri Naveen; Rosenkranz, Laura; Talreja, Jayant P.; Nguyen, Dang; Gaidhane, Monica; Kahaleh, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Endoscopic drainage is the first consideration in treating pancreatic fluid collections (PFCs). Recent data suggests it may be useful in complicated PFCs as well. Most of the available data assess the use of plastic stents, but scarce data exists on metal stent management of PFCs. The aim of our study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a metal stent in the management of PFCs. Patients and Methods: Data were collected prospectively on 47 patients diagnosed with PFCs from March 2007 to August 2011 at 3 tertiary care centers. These patients underwent endoscopic transmural placement of a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (FCSEMS) with antimigratory fins of 10 mm diameter. Results: The stent was successfully placed in all patients, and left in place an average of 13 weeks (range 0.4-36 weeks). Etiology of the PFC was biliary pancreatitis (23), pancreas divisum (2), trauma (4), hyperlipidemia (3), alcoholic (8), smoking (2), idiopathic (4), and medication-induced (1). PFCs resolved in 36 patients, for an overall success rate of 77%. Complications included fever (3), stent migration (2) and abdominal pain (1). Conclusions: The use of FCSEMS is successful in the majority of patients with low complication rates. A large sample-sized RCT is needed to confirm if the resolution of PFCs is long-standing. PMID:26374579

  20. [Trimming with argon plasma of self-expanding metal stents: report of 7 cases].

    PubMed

    Jury, Gastón; Amieva, Leandro; López, Fagalde Rafael; Jury, Rubén

    2014-06-01

    The use of self-expandable enteral stents for palliation of malignant stenosis may present the complication of concealing the ampulla of Vater behind the metallic mesh. Anchoring in the duodenal wall (distal or partial migration) may also be a complication of biliary metallic stents and therefore may cause difficulty in gaining access to the biliary tract. In these cases of difficult access, a fenestration on the prosthesis ( biliary or enteral) can be created to allow reaching the obstructed biliary tract by means of argon plasma (AP). Were retrospectively analysed 7 cases. Under endoscopic vision, AP was directed to filgurate and cut 6 biliary prosthesis and a duodenal stent. Fulguration and cut of biliary stent was performed in 5 cases of distal partial migration and cholangitis. In one case of obstruction caused by distal migration inside the duodenal stent light, cutting of the biliary stent was performed. A window was created in the enteral prosthesis in order to access the ampulla of Vater and place a biliary tract prosthesis. All cases were resolved successfully and without complications. We conclude that the use of AP to fulgurate and cut nitinol prosthesis was effective and presented no complications in this series. PMID:25199306

  1. Fully versus partially covered self-expandable metal stents in benign esophageal strictures.

    PubMed

    Gangloff, A; Lecleire, S; Di Fiore, A; Huet, E; Iwanicki-Caron, I; Antonietti, M; Michel, P

    2015-10-01

    Self-expandable plastic stents are currently recommended for refractory benign esophageal strictures but they show disappointing results in terms of migration and long-term efficacy. We report here our experience in the management of benign esophageal strictures with partially covered (PCSEMS) and fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS). We performed a retrospective analysis of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placements for benign esophageal strictures from 1998 to 2011 in Rouen University Hospital. Twenty-two patients (15 men, 7 women) attempted 40 esophageal SEMS placements (17 PCSEMS, 23 FCSEMS) during this period. All technical complications were migrations. Migration was noted after 3/17 PCSEMS (17.6%) and 4/23 FCSEMS placement (17.4%, P = ns). Clinical complications occurred after 6/17 PCSEMS and 2/23 FCSEMS placements (35.3% vs. 8.7%, P = 0.053). PCSEMS caused two major complications (fistulae) whereas FCSEMS did not cause any major complication (11.7% vs. 0%). Mean dysphagia score was significantly lower after SEMS placement (1.68 vs. 3.08, P < 0.001) with similar results for PCSEMS and FCSEMS. Stent placement resulted in long-term clinical success for 23.5% of PCSEMS and 34.7% of FCSEMS (P = 0.0505). FCSEMS provide satisfying clinical success rate with an acceptable complication rate and they could constitute a relevant therapeutic option in the management of benign esophageal strictures. PMID:25168061

  2. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage.

  3. Efficacy of Self-Expandable Metallic Stent Inserted for Refractory Hemorrhage of Duodenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Orii, Takashi; Karasawa, Yukihiko; Kitahara, Hiroe; Yoshimura, Masaki; Okumura, Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Because of advances in the technology of gastrointestinal endoscopy and improvements in the quality of stents, it has become routine to place a stent as palliative therapy for malignant gastrointestinal obstruction. On the other hand, stent placement for malignant gastrointestinal hemorrhage has scarcely been reported, although it may be performed for hemorrhage of the esophageal varicose vein. We recently experienced a patient with refractory hemorrhage from an unresectable duodenal cancer who underwent placement of a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) and thereafter had no recurrence of the hemorrhage. A 46-year-old man underwent laparotomy to radically resect a cancer in the third portion of the duodenum, which invaded widely to the superior mesenteric vein and its branches and was considered unresectable. After stomach-partitioning gastrojejunostomy was performed, chemotherapy was initiated according to the regimen of chemotherapy of far advanced gastric cancer. One year and 4 months after induction of chemotherapy, gastrointestinal hemorrhage occurred. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed the hemorrhage oozing from the duodenal cancer, and endoscopic hemostasis, such as injection of hypertonic saline epinephrine and argon plasma coagulation, was unsuccessful. Twenty days after emergence of the hemorrhage, an endoscopic covered SEMS was placed with confirmation by fluoroscopy. Immediately after placement of the stent, the tarry stool stopped and the anemia ceased to progress. The recurrence of the hemorrhage has not been confirmed without migration of the stent. SEMS is an effective hemostatic procedure for malignant refractory hemorrhage. PMID:27403118

  4. Self-expanding metal stenting for obstructing left colon cancer: A district hospital experience.

    PubMed

    Harilingam, Mohan Raj; Khushal, Amjad; Aikoye, Abdulmalik

    2016-07-01

    Stenting of malignant colonic obstructions using self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) is commonly used for palliation and can be used as an interim procedure prior to definitive surgery. We retrospectively reviewed prospectively collected data from all consecutive colonic stenting procedures undertaken between September 2007 and December 2014 at a district general hospital. Technical and clinical success rates, mortality, colonic perforation, and other complications were documented and analyzed. Sixty-four colonic stenting procedures were undertaken. Fifty-three (83 %) were for palliation and eleven (17 %) were performed as a bridge to definitive surgery. Technical (98.4 %) and clinical (89.9 %) success rates were excellent. The single documented failure was secondary to complete luminal obstruction. Three stent occlusions (4.6 %), one colonic perforation (1.5 %), and one migration were encountered. There were no procedure-related deaths. Colonic stenting for obstructing left-sided colon cancer is a safe and effective procedure, even in the district general hospital setting. The use of SEMS as a bridge to elective surgery balances surgical and oncological considerations and, therefore, is most appropriate for high surgical risk patients in this setting. PMID:27448435

  5. Efficacy of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents for esophageal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Gowra; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Malignant dysphagia is a serious condition in which 70% of patients die within one year, regardless of the treatment received. It provokes a rapid deterioration of a patient's physical condition and a significant worsening of quality of life. The surgical treatment of dysphagia is frequently complicated with technical difficulties, and often the tumors cannot be excised because of extensive invasion into adjacent structures. Furthermore, many patients are considered inoperable due to advanced age, associated diseases and malnutrition. Laser photoablative therapy coupled with expandable metal stents restores luminal patency in more than 80% of patients allowing them to eat liquids and soft foods. The efficacy of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents for the palliation esophageal carcinoma will be critically reviewed.

  6. Self-expandable metal stents for malignant gastric outlet obstruction: A pooled analysis of prospective literature

    PubMed Central

    van Halsema, Emo E; Rauws, Erik AJ; Fockens, Paul; van Hooft, Jeanin E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To provide an overview of the clinical outcomes of self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement for malignant gastric outlet obstruction (MGOO). METHODS: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed of the literature published between January 2009 and March 2015. Only prospective studies that reported on the clinical success of stent placement for MGOO were included. The primary endpoint was clinical success, defined according to the definition used in the original article. Data were pooled and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Subgroup analyses were performed for partially covered SEMSs (PCSEMSs) and uncovered SEMSs (UCSEMSs) using Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies, including 1281 patients, were included in the final analysis. Gastric (42%) and pancreatic (37%) cancer were the main causes of MGOO. UCSEMSs were used in 76% of patients and PCSEMSs in 24%. The overall pooled technical success rate was 97.3% and the clinical success rate was 85.7%. Stent dysfunction occurred in 19.6% of patients, mainly caused by re-obstruction (12.6%) and stent migration (4.3%), and was comparable between PCSEMSs and UCSEMSs (21.2% vs 19.1%, respectively, P = 0.412). Re-obstruction was more common with UCSEMSs (14.9% vs 5.1%, P < 0.001) and stent migration was more frequent after PCSEMS placement (10.9% vs 2.2%, P < 0.001). The overall perforation rate was 1.2%. Bleeding was reported in 4.1% of patients, including major bleeding in 0.8%. The median stent patency ranged from 68 to 307 d in five studies. The median overall survival ranged from 49 to 183 d in 13 studies. CONCLUSION: The clinical outcomes in this large population showed that enteral stent placement was feasible, effective and safe. Therefore, stent placement is a valid treatment option for the palliation of MGOO. PMID:26604654

  7. Endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage with replacement of a covered self-expandable metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Sasahira, Naoki; Nakai, Yousuke; Kogure, Hirofumi; Sasaki, Takashi; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2011-02-16

    Endoscopic self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement has become a standard palliative therapy for patients with malignant biliary obstruction. Acute cholecystitis after SEMS placement is a serious complication. We report a patient with an acute cholecystitis after covered SEMS placement, who was managed successfully with endoscopic transpapillary gallbladder drainage (ETGBD) and replacement of the covered SEMS. An 85-year-old man with pancreatic cancer suffered from acute cholecystitis after covered SEMS placement. It was impossible to perform percutaneous transhepatic gallbladder drainage. After removal of the covered SEMS with a snare, a 7Fr double pigtail stent was placed between the gallbladder and duodenum, subsequently followed by another covered SEMS insertion into the common bile duct beside the gallbladder stent. The cholecystitis improved immediately after ETGBD. ETGBD with replacement of the covered SEMS thus proved to be effective for treatment of patients with acute cholecystitis after covered SEMS placement. PMID:21403817

  8. Gastroduodenal outlet obstruction and palliative self-expandable metal stenting: a dual-centre experience.

    PubMed

    Ding, Nik S; Alexander, Sina; Swan, Michael P; Hair, Christopher; Wilson, Patrick; Clarebrough, Emma; Devonshire, David

    2013-01-01

    Background. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMs) are increasingly being utilised instead of invasive surgery for the palliation of patients with malignant gastroduodenal outlet obstruction. Aim. To review two tertiary centres' experience with placement of SEMs and clinical outcomes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data over 12 years. Results. Ninety-four patients (mean age, 68; range 28-93 years) underwent enteral stenting during this period. The primary tumour was gastric adenocarcinoma in 27 (29%) patients, pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 45 (48%), primary duodenal adenocarcinoma in 8 (9%), and cholangiocarcinoma and other metastatic cancers in 14 (16%). A stent was successfully deployed in 95% of cases. There was an improvement in gastric outlet obstruction score (GOOS) in 84 (90%) of patients with the ability to tolerate an enteral diet. Median survival was 4.25 months (range 0-49) without any significant differences between types of primary malignancy. Mean hospital stay was 3 days (range 1-20). Reintervention rate for stent related complications was 5%. Conclusion. The successful deployment of enteral stents achieves excellent palliation often resulting in the prompt reintroduction of enteral diet and early hospital discharge with minimal complications and reintervention. PMID:24319458

  9. Gastroduodenal Outlet Obstruction and Palliative Self-Expandable Metal Stenting: A Dual-Centre Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Nik S.; Alexander, Sina; Swan, Michael P.; Hair, Christopher; Wilson, Patrick; Devonshire, David

    2013-01-01

    Background. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMs) are increasingly being utilised instead of invasive surgery for the palliation of patients with malignant gastroduodenal outlet obstruction. Aim. To review two tertiary centres' experience with placement of SEMs and clinical outcomes. Methods. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data over 12 years. Results. Ninety-four patients (mean age, 68; range 28–93 years) underwent enteral stenting during this period. The primary tumour was gastric adenocarcinoma in 27 (29%) patients, pancreatic adenocarcinoma in 45 (48%), primary duodenal adenocarcinoma in 8 (9%), and cholangiocarcinoma and other metastatic cancers in 14 (16%). A stent was successfully deployed in 95% of cases. There was an improvement in gastric outlet obstruction score (GOOS) in 84 (90%) of patients with the ability to tolerate an enteral diet. Median survival was 4.25 months (range 0–49) without any significant differences between types of primary malignancy. Mean hospital stay was 3 days (range 1–20). Reintervention rate for stent related complications was 5%. Conclusion. The successful deployment of enteral stents achieves excellent palliation often resulting in the prompt reintroduction of enteral diet and early hospital discharge with minimal complications and reintervention. PMID:24319458

  10. Small caliber covered self-expanding metal stents in the management of malignant dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kucera, Stephen; Barthel, James; Klapman, Jason; Shridhar, Ravi; Hoffe, Sarah; Harris, Cynthia; Almhanna, Khaldoun

    2016-01-01

    Background Use of large caliber [≥18 mm body diameter (BD)] self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) for management of malignant dysphasia is associated with substantial adverse event (AE) and mortality rates (MRs). We sought to determine dysphagia response, stent migration rates, and AE and MRs, for small caliber covered SEMS (sccSEMS) with BDs between 10–16 mm in malignant dysphagia. Methods Thirty-one patients underwent direct endoscopic placement of 50 sccSEMS between January 2008 and March 2011. Patients were monitored for change in dysphagia score (DS), stent migration, AEs, and death through May 2011. Results DS improved in 30 of 31 patients (97%). The median DS decreased from 3 to 2 (P<0.0001). The median effective duration of first sccSEMS placement was 116 (95% CI: 75–196) days. Major and minor AE rates were 6.5% and 19.4% respectively. No stent related deaths were encountered. The overall migration rate was 36% (18/50). The anticipated migration rate was 45.7% (16/35) and the unanticipated migration rate was 13.3% (2/15) (P=0.052). Positive effective clinical outcome occurred in 93.5% (29/31) of cases. Conclusions In malignant dysphagia, direct endoscopic sccSEMS placement provided acceptable dysphagia control and migration rates with substantial reductions in stent related AEs and MRs compared to those reported for large caliber SEMS. PMID:27284474

  11. Partially covered self-expandable metal stents versus polyethylene stents for malignant biliary obstruction: A cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barkun, Alan N; Adam, Viviane; Martel, Myriam; AlNaamani, Khalid; Moses, Peter L

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Partially covered self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) and polyethylene stents (PES) are both commonly used in the palliation of malignant biliary obstruction. Although SEMS are significantly more expensive, they are more efficacious than PES. Accordingly, a cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. METHODS: A cost-effectiveness analysis compared the approach of initial placement of PES versus SEMS for the study population. Patients with malignant biliary obstruction underwent an endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to insert the initial stent. If the insertion failed, a percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram was performed. If stent occlusion occurred, a PES was inserted at repeat endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, either in an outpatient setting or after admission to hospital if cholangitis was present. A third-party payer perspective was adopted. Effectiveness was expressed as the likelihood of no occlusion over the one-year adopted time horizon. Probabilities were based on a contemporary randomized clinical trial, and costs were issued from national references. Deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were performed. RESULTS: A PES-first strategy was both more expensive and less efficacious than an SEMS-first approach. The mean per-patient costs were US$6,701 for initial SEMS and US$20,671 for initial PES, which were associated with effectiveness probabilities of 65.6% and 13.9%, respectively. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the robustness of these results. CONCLUSION: At the time of initial endoscopic drainage for patients with malignant biliary obstruction undergoing palliative stenting, an initial SEMS insertion approach was both more effective and less costly than a PES-first strategy. PMID:26125107

  12. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting in the Management of a Benign Colonic Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jessamy, Kegan; Ozden, Nuri; Simon, Howard M.; Kobrossi, Semaan; Ubagharaji, Ezinnaya

    2016-01-01

    Colonic postanastomotic strictures occur in 1.5–8% of patients following colorectal surgery. Traditionally, colonic strictures were treated by multiple modalities including endoscopic dilatation. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been indicated in the management of benign colonic strictures; however, there are limited available data with regard to their efficacy. We present the case of a 68-year-old male who had perforated sigmoid diverticulitis followed by Hartmann's procedure with eventual reanastomosis 6 months later. He subsequently developed benign colonic stricture, which was treated with a metal stent. SEMS are associated with a low mortality rate and are appropriate in treating acute colonic obstruction as a result of benign stricture in the setting of postanastomosis. PMID:27403114

  13. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae J.; Jeong, Yeon S.; Park, Young S.; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M.; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5–21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3–84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13–128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17–366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  14. Comparison of Endoscopic Vacuum Therapy and Endoscopic Stent Implantation With Self-Expandable Metal Stent in Treating Postsurgical Gastroesophageal Leakage.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae J; Jeong, Yeon S; Park, Young S; Yoon, Hyuk; Shin, Cheol M; Kim, Nayoung; Lee, Dong H

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the more effective therapy for the postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage by a head-to-head comparison of endoscopic vacuum therapy (EVT) and endoscopic stent implantation with self-expandable metal stent (E-SEMS). In this hospital-based, retrospective, observative study, the patients were classified into 2 groups. Those treated with EVT were assigned to the EVT group (n = 7), and those treated with E-SMS were assigned to the E-SEMS group (n = 11). We evaluated the clinical characteristics and treatment outcomes between the 2 groups. All 7 patients (100%) were treated with EVT, but only 7 of 11 patients (63.6%) in the stenting group were treated successfully. The median time to clinical success was 19.5 (5-21) days in the EVT group and 27.0 (3-84) days in the E-SEMS group. The median hospital stay was 37.1 (13-128) days in the EVT group and 87.3 (17-366) days in the E-SEMS group. The complicaion rate was lower in the EVT group (0/7, 0.0%) than that in the E-SEMS group (6/11, 54.5%) with statistically significant difference (P = 0.042). EVT is more effective and has fewer adverse effects than E-SMS therapy as a treatment for postsurgical gastroesophageal leakage. PMID:27100431

  15. [Placement of An Expandable Metallic Stent for Malignant Tracheal Stenosis: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Yoshinobu; Kawasaki, Junji; Yoshida, Tetsuro; Hamatsu, Takayuki; Suehiro, Taketoshi; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Sugimachi, Keizo

    2016-03-01

    The utility of stent placements has been widely reported. We performed a thought-provoking stent placement for malignant tracheal stenosis recently. A 90-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital because of a urinary tract infection was treated with a course of antibiotics, but she demonstrated a rapidly progressive course with dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed severe tracheal stenosis due to an upper mediastinal mass. She was put on noninvasive positive pressure ventilation (NPPV) because of severe respiratory failure. Bronchoscopy showed severe tracheal stenosis due to direct invasion by the upper mediastinal mass. An expandable metallic stent (EMS) was placed in the trachea, after which a bronchoscopy showed a widely patent airway, and she got off NPPV. Then she did not need supplemental oxygen. She could seat herself, and have an enough meal, independently. However, takotsubo cardiomyopathy occurred and she died 11 days after the placement of the EMS. Since a malignant airway complication can be fatal, tracheal stent placement is a useful treatment in the management of malignancy with airway stenosis. In this case, it was thought that an early intervention of airway stenosis would have reduced the risk of takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with severe symptoms of airway stenosis and stress. PMID:26972948

  16. Lumen-apposing covered self-expanding metal stent for management of benign gastrointestinal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Shounak; Buttar, Navtej S.; Gostout, Christopher; Levy, Michael J.; Martin, John; Petersen, Bret; Topazian, Mark; Wong Kee Song, Louis M.; Abu Dayyeh, Barham K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are safe and effective for endoscopic management of malignant gastrointestinal strictures, but there is limited experience with their use in refractory benign strictures. We assessed the use of a new lumen-apposing covered SEMS for the management of benign gastrointestinal strictures. Methods: A single-center case-series of five patients who underwent lumen-apposing covered SEMS placement for benign gastrointestinal strictures. Results: Three patients had a benign gastroduodenal stricture, one had a distal colonic anastomotic stricture, and one with complete gastrojejunal anastomotic stenosis underwent endoscopic creation of a new gastrojejunostomy. None of the patients developed any immediate or delayed stent-related adverse events. In two patients, the stents were left in place indefinitely. Stents were removed from the other three patients with successful resolution of their symptoms during follow-up. Conclusion: Lumen-apposing, fully covered SEMS appear to be safe and effective for management of selected benign gastrointestinal strictures. PMID:26793793

  17. Gastrotracheal fistula: treatment with a covered self-expanding Y-shaped metallic stent.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Yu, Hong; Zhu, Ming-Hui; Li, Quan-Peng; Ge, Xian-Xiu; Nie, Jun-Jie; Miao, Lin

    2015-01-21

    A 67-year-old man had a sev-ere cough and pulmonary infection for 1 wk before seeking evaluation at our hospital. He had undergone esophagectomy with gastric pull-up and radiotherapy for esophageal cancer 3 years previously. After admission to our hospital, gastroscopy and bronchoscopy revealed a fistulous communication between the posterior tracheal wall near the carina and the upper residual stomach. We measured the diameter of the trachea and bronchus and determined the site and size of the fistula using multislice computed tomography and gastroscopy. A covered self-expanding Y-shaped metallic stent was implanted into the trachea and bronchus. Subsequently, the fistula was closed completely. The patient tolerated the stent well and had good palliation of his symptoms. PMID:25624743

  18. Self-expandable metal stents for achalasia: Thinking out of the box!

    PubMed Central

    Sioulas, Athanasios D; Malli, Chrysoula; Dimitriadis, George D; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Achalasia is a primary motor disorder of the esophagus diagnosed manometrically in the clinical setting of dysphagia to both solids and liquids. Currently established treatment options include pneumatic dilation, laparoscopic Heller myotomy, botulinum toxin injection performed endoscopically, oral agents that relax the lower esophageal sphincter and esophagectomy for refractory, end-stage disease. Despite their effectiveness, a significant proportion of patients eventually relapses and needs retreatment. In this setting, several new techniques are under investigation promising future enrichment of our therapeutic armamentarium for achalasic patients. Among them, peroral endoscopic myotomy and self-expandable metal stents placed across the gastro-esophageal junction represent the most encouraging modalities, as initial studies assessing their efficacy and safety indicate. This review highlights the role of self-expandable metal stents in the management of patients with achalasia. Their possible position in the therapeutic algorithm of achalasia along with established and novel techniques is also assessed. Finally, the need for large prospective randomized trials is underlined in order to elucidate the numerous relevant issues. PMID:25610533

  19. Self-Expandable Metal Stents in the Treatment of Acute Esophageal Variceal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Escorsell, Àngels; Bosch, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication in patients with cirrhosis. Hemostatic therapy of AVB includes early administration of vasoactive drugs that should be combined with endoscopic therapy, preferably banding ligation. However, failure to control bleeding or early rebleed within 5 days still occurs in 15–20% of patients with AVB. In these cases, a second endoscopic therapy may be attempted (mild bleeding in a hemodynamically stable patient) or we can use a balloon tamponade as a bridge to definitive derivative treatment (i.e., a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt). Esophageal balloon tamponade provides initial control in up to 80% of AVB, but it carries a high risk of major complications, especially in cases of long duration of tamponade (>24 h) and when tubes are inserted by inexperienced staff. Preliminary reports suggest that self-expandable covered esophageal metallic stents effectively control refractory AVB (i.e., ongoing bleeding despite pharmacological and endoscopic therapy or massive bleeding precluding endoscopic therapy) with a low incidence of complications. Thus, covered self-expanding metal stents may represent an alternative to the Sengstaken-Blakemore balloon for the temporary control of bleeding in treatment failures. Further studies are required to determine the role of this new device in AVB. PMID:22013436

  20. Implantation of self-expanding metal stent in the treatment of severe bleeding from esophageal ulcer after endoscopic band ligation.

    PubMed

    Mishin, I; Ghidirim, G; Dolghii, A; Bunic, G; Zastavnitsky, G

    2010-09-01

    Endoscopic variceal ligation is superior to sclerotherapy because of its lower rebleeding and complication rates. However, ligation may be associated with life-threatening bleeding from postbanding esophageal ulcer. We report a case of a 49-year-old male with massive hemorrhage from esophageal ulcer on 8th day after successful band ligation of bleeding esophageal varices caused by postviral liver cirrhosis (Child-Pugh class C). A removable polyurethane membrane-covered self-expanding metal stent (SX-ELLA stent Danis, 135 mm × 25 mm, ELLA-CS, Hradec-Kralove, Czech Republic) was inserted in ICU for preventing fatal hemorrhage. Complete hemostasis was achieved and stent was removed after 8 days without rebleeding or any complications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in English literature regarding life-threatening hemorrhage from postbanding esophageal ulcer successfully treated by self-expanding metal stent in a patient with portal hypertension. PMID:20731698

  1. Endoscopic removal of a spontaneously fractured biliary uncovered self-expandable metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kawakubo, Kazumichi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Tsujino, Takeshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Sasahira, Naoki; Kogure, Hirofumi; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nagano, Rie; Miyabayashi, Kouji; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Ito, Yukiko; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are widely used for the palliative treatment of unresectable malignant biliary obstruction. However, the long-term durability of SEMSs in biliary strictures is not clear. We describe a case of endoscopic removal of spontaneously fractured uncovered biliary SEMS. A 59-year-old woman presented to our institution with a 1-year history of recurrent cholangitis. Her medical history included a proctectomy for rectal cancer and right hemihepatectomy for liver metastasis 10 years earlier. Five years after these operations, she developed a benign hilar stricture and had an uncovered SEMS placed in another hospital. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography demonstrated that the SEMS was torn in half and the distal part of the stent was floating in the dilated common bile duct. The papillary orifice was dilated by endoscopic papillary large balloon dilation (EPLBD) using a 15-mm wire-guided balloon catheter. Subsequently, we inserted biopsy forceps into the bile duct and grasped the distal end of the broken SEMS under fluoroscopy. We successfully removed the fragment of the SEMS from the bile duct, along with the endoscope. The patient was discharged without complications. Placement of an uncovered biliary SEMS is not the preferred treatment for benign biliary strictures. Spontaneous fracture of an uncovered biliary SEMS is an extremely rare complication. We should be aware that stent fracture can occur when placing uncovered biliary SEMSs in patients with a long life expectancy. EPLBD is very useful for retrieving the fractured fragment of SEMS. PMID:22507093

  2. Hemostasis in uncontrolled esophageal variceal bleeding by self−expanding metal stents: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pontone, Stefano; Giusto, Michela; Filippini, Angelo; Cicerone, Clelia; Pironi, Daniele; Merli, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the current reported efficacy and the mortality rate of SEMS treatment in uncontrolled bleeding patients. Background: Esophageal variceal bleeding (EVB) represents a life threatening pathology. Despite the adequate pharmacologic and endoscopic treatment, continuous or recurrent bleeding, named as uncontrolled bleeding, occurs in 10-20% of cases. A new removable, covered, and self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) was proposed to control the variceal bleeding. Materials and methods: The study was conducted according to the PRISMA statement. Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (1989-present) and SCOPUS (1989-present) databases. The last search was run on 01 July 2015. Results: Nine studies (period range=2002-2015) met the inclusion criteria and were included in quantitative analysis. High rate of SEMS efficacy in controling acute bleeding was observed, with a reported percentage ranging from 77.7 to 100%. In 10% to 20% of patients, re-bleeding occurred with SEMS in situ. Stent deployment was successful in 77.8% to 100% of patients while 11 to 36.5% of patients experienced stent migration. Conclusion: SEMS could be effective and safe in control EVB and can be proposed as a reliable option to ballon tamponed for patient stabilization and as a bridging to other therapeutic approach. PMID:26744608

  3. Preoperative drainage for malignant biliary strictures: is it time for self-expanding metallic stents?

    PubMed

    Roque, Jason; Ho, Shiaw-Hooi; Goh, Khean-Lee

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of jaundice improves the general health of the patient and, therefore, surgical outcomes. Because of the complexity and location of strictures, especially proximally, drainage has been accompanied by increased morbidity due to sepsis. Another concern is the provocation of an inflammatory and fibrotic reaction around the area of stent placement. Preoperative biliary drainage with self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) insertion can be achieved via a percutaneous method or through endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. A recently published multicenter randomized Dutch study has shown increased morbidity with preoperative biliary drainage. A Cochrane meta-analysis has also shown a significantly increased complication rate with preoperative drainage. However, few of these studies have used a SEMS, which allows better biliary drainage. No randomized controlled trials have compared preoperative deployment of SEMS versus conventional plastic stents. The outcomes of biliary drainage also depend on the location of the obstruction, namely the difficulty with proximal compared to distal strictures. Pathophysiologically, palliation of jaundice will benefit all patients awaiting surgery. However, preoperative drainage often results in increased morbidity because of procedure-related sepsis. The use of SEMS may change the outcome of preoperative biliary drainage dramatically. PMID:25674520

  4. Self-Expanding Metal Stent (SEMS): an innovative rescue therapy for refractory acute variceal bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Changela, Kinesh; Ona, Mel A.; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Background: Acute variceal bleeding (AVB) is a life-threatening complication of liver cirrhosis or less commonly splenic vein thrombosis. Pharmacological and endoscopic interventions are cornerstones in the management of variceal bleeding but may fail in 10 – 15 % of patients. Rescue therapy with balloon tamponade (BT) or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) may be required to control refractory acute variceal bleeding effectively but with some limitations. The self-expanding metal stent (SEMS) is a covered, removable tool that can be deployed in the lower esophagus under endoscopic guidance as a rescue therapy to achieve hemostasis for refractory AVB. Aims: To evaluate the technical feasibility, efficacy, and safety of SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Methods: In this review article, we have performed an extensive literature search summarizing case reports and case series describing SEMS as a rescue therapy for AVB. Indications, features, technique, deployment, success rate, limitations, and complications are discussed. Results: At present, 103 cases have been described in the literature. Studies have reported 97.08 % technical success rates in deployment of SEMS. Most of the stents were intact for 4 – 14 days with no major complications reported. Stent extraction had a success rate of 100 %. Successful hemostasis was achieved in 96 % of cases with only 3.12 % found to have rebleeding after placement of SEMS. Stent migration, which was the most common complication, was observed in 21 % of patients. Conclusion: SEMS is a safe and effective alternative approach as a rescue therapy for refractory AVB. PMID:26135101

  5. Metallic expandable stents in the management of malignant tracheal stenosis due to esophageal cancer with lymph node metastasis

    PubMed Central

    PENG, ZHAOHONG; XU, SHENGDE; LI, HUA; SUN, CHAOBIN; FU, MINYAN

    2013-01-01

    Esophageal cancer with post-operative lymph node metastasis (LNM) compressing and infiltrating the trachea causing dyspnea is considered a serious complication. However, chemotherapy or radiotherapy are often ineffective methods for such patients. Approaches employing metallic expandable stents to relieve airway obstruction are extremely effective in advanced-stage cancer patients. The present study reports the use of metallic expandable stents as a treatment for tracheal stenosis. A total of 11 patients with tracheal stenosis due to LNM compressing and infiltrating the trachea were selected between November 2009 and January 2013. All the patients were diagnosed by computed tomography and presented with varying degrees of dyspnea. A total of 13 stents were placed in 11 patients, without significant intraoperative complications. Post-operatively, all patients presented with significant improvement in respiratory function. The Borg score was determined 1 day after stent application. The mean score of dyspnea declined significantly from 7.0 to 0.9 (P<0.01), the mean heart rate decreased from 128 to 86 bpm (P<0.01), the mean respiratory rate decreased from 34 to 23 breaths/min (P<0.01) and the mean oxygen saturation increased from 85 to 97% (P<0.01). Complications included coughing, hemorrhage, chest pain, retention of secretions, halitosis and tumor regrowth. It may be concluded that metallic expandable stent placement is an effective strategy to palliate malignant tracheal stenosis. PMID:24179541

  6. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage using a lumen-apposing self-expanding metal stent: a case series.

    PubMed

    Brückner, Stefan; Arlt, Alexander; Hampe, Jochen

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary drainage (EUS-BD) might be an alternative to percutaneous or transpapillary biliary drainage in unresectable pancreatic or biliary cancer. A lumen-apposing, fully covered, self-expanding metal stent, which creates a sealed transluminal conduit between the biliary and gastrointestinal tract may offer advantages over conventional plastic and metal stents. In this retrospective, observational, open-label case study, five patients underwent EUS-BD for obstructive jaundice in pancreatic cancer (n = 4) or distal cholangiocarcinoma (n = 1). Technical and functional success was achieved in all patients without complications. The development of specialized stent and delivery systems may render EUS-BD an effective and safe alternative to percutaneous or transpapillary approaches. PMID:26021309

  7. Covered versus Uncovered Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Managing Malignant Distal Biliary Obstruction: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ping; Yu, Qihong; Wang, Kun; Chang, Weilong; Song, Zifang; Zheng, Qichang

    2016-01-01

    Aim To compare the efficacy of using covered self-expandable metal stents (CSEMSs) and uncovered self-expandable metal stents (UCSEMSs) to treat objective jaundice caused by an unresectable malignant tumor. Methods We performed a comprehensive electronic search from 1980 to May 2015. All randomized controlled trials comparing the use of CSEMSs and UCSEMSs to treat malignant distal biliary obstruction were included. Results The analysis included 1417 patients enrolled in 14 trials. We did not detect significant differences between the UCSEMS group and the CSEMS group in terms of cumulative stent patency (hazard ratio (HR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19–4.53; p = 0.93, I2 = 0%), patient survival (HR 0.77, 95% CI 0.05–10.87; p = 0.85, I2 = 0%), overall stent dysfunction (relative ratio (RR) 0.85, M-H, random, 95% CI 0.57–1.25; p = 0.83, I2 = 63%), the overall complication rate (RR 1.26, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 0.94–1.68; p = 0.12, I2 = 0%) or the change in serum bilirubin (weighted mean difference (WMD) -0.13, IV fixed, 95% CI 0.56–0.3; p = 0.55, I2 = 0%). However, we did detect a significant difference in the main causes of stent dysfunction between the two groups. In particular, the CSEMS group exhibited a lower rate of tumor ingrowth (RR 0.25, M-H, random, 95% CI 0.12–0.52; p = 0.002, I2 = 40%) but a higher rate of tumor overgrowth (RR 1.76, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 1.03–3.02; p = 0.04, I2 = 0%). Patients with CSEMSs also exhibited a higher migration rate (RR 9.33, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 2.54–34.24; p = 0.008, I2 = 0%) and a higher rate of sludge formation (RR 2.47, M-H, fixed, 95% CI 1.36–4.50; p = 0.003, I2 = 0%). Conclusions Our meta-analysis indicates that there is no significant difference in primary stent patency and stent dysfunction between CSEMSs and UCSEMSs during the period from primary stent insertion to primary stent dysfunction or patient death. However, when taking further management for occluded stents into consideration, CSEMSs is a

  8. Temporary placement of fully covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Chaput, Ulriikka; Vienne, Ariane; Audureau, Etienne; Bauret, Paul; Bichard, Philippe; Coumaros, Dimitri; Napoléon, Bertrand; Ponchon, Thierry; Duchmann, Jean-Christophe; Laugier, René; Lamouliatte, Hervé; Védrenne, Bruno; Gaudric, Marianne; Chaussade, Stanislas; Robin, Françoise; Leblanc, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoscopic treatment of benign biliary strictures (BBS) can be challenging. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of fully covered self-expandable metal stents (FCSEMS) in BBS. Methods Ninety-two consecutive patients with BBS (chronic pancreatitis (n = 42), anastomotic after liver transplantation (n = 36), and post biliary surgical procedure (n = 14)) were included. FCSEMS were placed across strictures for 6 months before endoscopic extraction. Early success rate was defined as the absence of biliary stricture or as a minimal residual anomaly on post-stent removal endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). Secondary outcomes were the final success and stricture recurrence rates as well as procedure-related morbidity. Results Stenting was successful in all patients. Stenting associated complications were minor and occurred in 22 (23.9%) patients. Migration occurred in 23 (25%) patients. Stent extraction was successful in all but two patients with proximal stent migration. ERCP after the 6 months stenting showed an early success in 84.9% patients (chronic pancreatitis patients: 94.7%, liver transplant: 87.9%, post-surgical: 61.5%) (p = 0.01). Final success was observed in 57/73 (78.1%) patients with a median follow-up of 12 ± 3.56 months. Recurrence of biliary stricture occurred in 16/73 (21.9%) patients. Conclusions FCSEMS placement is efficient for patients with BBS, in particular for chronic pancreatitis patients. Stent extraction after 6 months indwelling, although generally feasible, may fail in a few cases. PMID:27403307

  9. Palliation of malignant rectal obstruction from invasive prostate cancer with multiple overlapping self-expanding metal stents.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aja S; Cole, Matthew; Vega, Kenneth J; Munoz, Juan Carlos

    2009-12-01

    Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) are used for colonic neoplastic and extracolonic metastatic obstruction relief. Limited data exists on their use for locally invasive prostate cancer. We describe a unique approach using overlapping SEMS to alleviate a rectosigmoid obstruction from locally invasive prostate cancer. A patient with locally advanced prostate cancer presented with obstipation and lymphedema. Placement of overlapping rectosigmoid SEMS was performed, relieving the visualized rectosigmoid obstruction. PMID:20016435

  10. Efficacy and safety of fully covered self-expandable metallic stents in biliary complications after liver transplantation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Traina, Mario; Tarantino, Ilaria; Barresi, Luca; Volpes, Riccardo; Gruttadauria, Salvatore; Petridis, Ioannis; Gridelli, Bruno

    2009-11-01

    After liver transplantation, the most common biliary complication is the anastomotic stricture, which is followed by biliary leakage. Studies have focused on the endoscopic treatment of biliary complications in transplanted patients with duct-to-duct reconstruction, showing a success rate of 70% to 80% after orthotopic liver transplantation and of 60% after living-related liver transplantation. Once the endoscopic approach fails, surgical treatment with a Roux-en-Y choledochojejunostomy is the sole alternative treatment. The aim of this prospective observational study was to analyze the efficacy and safety of fully covered self-expandable metallic stents for the treatment of posttransplant biliary stenosis and leaks in patients in whom conventional endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) failed. From January 2008 to January 2009, 16 patients met the criteria of endoscopic treatment failure, and instead of surgery, a fully covered stent was placed. All patients had at least 6 months of follow-up (mean follow-up of 10 months). After removal, 14 patients showed immediate resolution of both the biliary stenosis and leak. After a mean of 10 months of follow-up, only 1 patient showed biliary stenosis recurrence. No major complications occurred in any of the patients, except for stent migration in 6 patients, although these presented with no clinical consequences. In conclusion, in patients not responding to standard endoscopic treatment, the placement of fully covered metal stents is a valid alternative to surgery. A cost analysis should be performed in order to evaluate whether to treat transplanted patients suffering from biliary complications with covered self-expandable metallic stent placement as first-line therapy. PMID:19877248

  11. Self-Expanding Metallic Stents for Palliation and as a Bridge to Minimally Invasive Surgery in Colorectal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Guilherme; Zeichen, Marianna S.; Mata, Wilmer N.; Maciel, Victor; Plasencia, Gustavo; Hartmann, Rene F.; Viamonte, Manuel; Fogel, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Acute colorectal obstruction is a potentially life-threatening emergency that requires immediate surgical treatment. Emergency procedures had an associated mortality rate of 10% to 30%. This encouraged development of other options, most notably self-expanding metallic stents. The primary endpoint of this study to is to report our group's experience. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of 37 patients who underwent self-expanding metallic stent placement for colorectal obstruction between July 2000 and May 2012. Data collected were age, comorbidities, diagnosis, intent of intervention (palliative vs bridge to surgery), complications, and follow-up. Results: The study comprised 21 men (56.76%) and 16 women (43.24%), with a mean age of 67 years. The intent of the procedure was definitive treatment in 22 patients (59.46%) and bridge to surgery in 15 (40.54%). The highest technical success rate was at the rectosigmoid junction (100%). The causes of technical failure were inability of the guidewire to traverse the stricture and bowel perforation related to stenting. The mean follow-up period was 9.67 months. Pain and constipation were the most common postprocedure complications. Discussion: The use of a self-expanding metallic stent has been shown to be effective for palliation of malignant obstruction. It is associated with a lower incidence of intensive care unit admission, shorter hospital stay, lower stoma rate, and earlier chemotherapy administration. Laparoscopic or robotic surgery can then be performed in an elective setting on a prepared bowel. Therefore the patient benefits from advantages of the combination of 2 minimally invasive procedures in a nonemergent situation. Further large-scale prospective studies are necessary. PMID:23925013

  12. A randomized trial of a fully covered self-expandable metallic stent versus plastic stents in anastomotic biliary strictures after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Sean; Vaughan, Rhys; James, Martin; Chua, Tee; Tee, Hoi; Dinesen, Lotte; Corte, Crispin; Gill, Raghubinder

    2014-01-01

    Background: Post-liver-transplant biliary anastomotic strictures (ASs) are currently managed with repeated endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographies (ERCPs) inserting multiple plastic stents. Fully covered self-expanding metal stents (FCSEMSs) are being increasingly reported in the management of this condition, however no prospective randomized trials have been performed to date. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether FCSEMSs decrease overall numbers of ERCPs needed to achieve stricture resolution and to establish the safety, efficacy and cost-effectiveness in this setting. Methods: Two tertiary referral centres performed this open-label prospective randomized trial. A total of 32 patients consented and subsequently 20 were randomized with 10 in the FCSEMS arm and 10 in the plastic arm. The FCSEMS arm had the stent in situ for 12 weeks with the plastic stent arm undergoing 3-monthly multiple plastic stenting with or without dilatation over a year. Results: The median number of ERCPs performed per patient in the FCSEMS was 2 versus 4.5 (p = 0.0001) in the plastic stenting arm. Stricture resolution was achieved in all 10 patients with FCSEMSs compared with 8/10 in the plastic arm [p = not significant (NS)]. Complications occurred in 1/10 patients in the FCSEMS arm versus 5/10 in the plastic arm (p = 0.051). Days in hospital for complications was 6 in the FCSEMS versus 56 in the plastic arm (p = 0.11). Cost analysis shows that the FCSEMS arm was more cost effective. No cases of FCSEMS migration were seen. Conclusions: FCSEMSs reduced the number of ERCPs needed to achieve stricture resolution with similar recurrence rates between arms. The FCSEMSs may do so with fewer complications making it cost effective. PMID:24587819

  13. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system

    PubMed Central

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Ágnes; Altorjay, Áron; Madácsy, László

    2013-01-01

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  14. Endoscopic transluminal pancreatic necrosectomy using a self-expanding metal stent and high-flow water-jet system.

    PubMed

    Hritz, István; Fejes, Roland; Székely, András; Székely, Iván; Horváth, László; Sárkány, Agnes; Altorjay, Aron; Madácsy, László

    2013-06-21

    Walled-off pancreatic necrosis and a pancreatic abscess are the most severe complications of acute pancreatitis. Surgery in such critically ill patients is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality within the first few weeks after the onset of symptoms. Minimal invasive approaches with high success and low mortality rates are therefore of considerable interest. Endoscopic therapy has the potential to offer safe and effective alternative treatment. We report here on 3 consecutive patients with infected walled-off pancreatic necrosis and 1 patient with a pancreatic abscess who underwent direct endoscopic necrosectomy 19-21 d after the onset of acute pancreatitis. The infected pancreatic necrosis or abscess was punctured transluminally with a cystostome and, after balloon dilatation, a non-covered self-expanding biliary metal stent was placed into the necrotic cavity. Following stent deployment, a nasobiliary pigtail catheter was placed into the cavity to ensure continuous irrigation. After 5-7 d, the metal stent was removed endoscopically and the necrotic cavity was entered with a therapeutic gastroscope. Endoscopic debridement was performed via the simultaneous application of a high-flow water-jet system; using a flush knife, a Dormia basket, and hot biopsy forceps. The transluminal endotherapy was repeated 2-5 times daily during the next 10 d. Supportive care included parenteral antibiotics and jejunal feeding. All patients improved dramatically and with resolution of their septic conditions; 3 patients were completely cured without any further complications or the need for surgery. One patient died from a complication of prolonged ventilation severe bilateral pneumonia, not related to the endoscopic procedure. No procedure related complications were observed. Transluminal endoscopic necrosectomy with temporary application of a self-expanding metal stent and a high-flow water-jet system shows promise for enhancing the potential of this endoscopic

  15. The First Egyptian Experience Using New Self-Expandable Metal Stents in Acute Esophageal Variceal Bleeding: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakaria, Mohamed S.; Hamza, Iman M.; Mohey, Mohamed A.; Hubamnn, Rainer G.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aim: Balloon tamponade has been widely available in emergency situations of acute variceal bleeding. To lessen the complications of Balloon tamponade, a new special type of stent for exclusive use in acute variceal bleeding has been developed. This study aims to investigate the effectiveness and safety of the new self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in the initial control of acute variceal bleeding. We also hypothesized that using SEMS can bridge the acute bleeding episode converting endoscopic management by sclerotherapy or band ligation to an elective procedure. Patients and Methods: Twenty patients with acute variceal bleeding were included in the study and 16 of them were allocated to receive stent treatment. Results: Stent deployment was successful in 15 of 16 patients (93.75%). Technical errors were reported in 3 (18.75%) patients. Initial control of variceal bleeding was reported in 14 (out of 16) (87.5%) patients. The mean duration of the procedure was 10 (±6) min. Mortality was reported in 4 (25.0%) patients. Conclusion: SEMS is a safe and effective mean to control acute variceal bleeding. PMID:23828748

  16. Self-expanding metal mesh stents and laser therapy: a complementary approach for the palliation of malignant dysphagia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhotra, Ravi; Raouf, A.; Sturgess, R.; Krasner, Neville

    1997-12-01

    Re-establishment of the oesophageal lumen is the main focus of care in patients with inoperable oesophageal carcinomas. The self-expanding metal mesh stents (MMS) are increasingly being used. 51 patients aged 44 - 89 with inoperable oesophago-gastric carcinomas were intubated with MMS. 18 of these patients had endoscopic laser therapy (ELT) as primary palliation. 25 patients required follow-up endoscopy at variable intervals after stent insertion. 17 patients were found to have significant tumor growth (9), overgrowth (4) and both (4). All these patients were treated with Nd:YAG or diode laser for maintenance of satisfactory swallowing. 4 patients being treated with Nd:YAG laser developed deformity of MMS. This complication was not encountered with diode laser. The reblockage of MMS due to ingrowth or overgrowth of tumor is a not uncommon complication. The timing of the stent insertion should be carefully chosen since the longer the stent is in situ, the greater is the likelihood of tumor ingrowth or overgrowth. ELT can effectively deal with tumor ingrowth and overgrowth. Nd:YAG laser can cause melting of MMS. Overall the combination of ELT and MMS may offer the best palliation, particularly when patient survival of several months is anticipated.

  17. Treatment of Esophageal Variceal Hemorrhage with Self-Expanding Metal Stents as a Rescue Maneuver in a Swiss Multicentric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Fierz, Fabienne C.; Kistler, Walter; Stenz, Volker; Gubler, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Acute esophageal variceal bleeding in patients with portal hypertension remains a complication with a high mortality today. In cases refractory to standard therapy including endoscopic band ligation and pharmacological therapy, traditionally balloon tamponade has been used as salvage therapy. However, these techniques show several important limitations. Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) have been proposed as an alternative rescue treatment. The use of variceal stenting in 7 patients with a total of 9 bleeding episodes in three different Swiss hospitals is demonstrated. While immediate bleeding control is achieved in a high percentage of cases, the 5-day and 6-week mortality rate remain high. Mortality is strongly influenced by the severity of the underlying liver disease. Accordingly, our data represent a high-risk patient collective. Thanks to their safety and easy handling, SEMS are an interesting alternative to balloon tamponade as a bridging intervention to definitive therapy including the pre-hospital setting. PMID:23626509

  18. Hepaticojejunostomy by interventional radiology with an expandable metallic stent after extended right hepatectomy for hilar cholangiocarcinoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Yamagiwa, Kentaro; Tabata, Masami; Matsumoto, Eiichi; Mizuno, Shugo; Isaji, Shuji

    2008-08-01

    As a rare complication of extended right hepatectomy with portal vein resection, we were unable to find the cut end of the bile duct of the lateral segment to create a hepaticojejunostomy in a 57-year-old man with hilar cholangiocarcinoma. However, we succeeded in safely creating a hepaticojejunostomy between the bile duct of the lateral segment and a Roux-en-Y jejunum by using the guide wire technique and an expandable metallic stent under fluoroscopic and cholangioscopic guidance after the operation. The patient was discharged with an internal biliary drainage tube, but died of recurrence about 2 years after the operation with the hepaticojejunostomy remaining patent. PMID:18716543

  19. Self-Expandable Metal Stents for Persisting Esophageal Variceal Bleeding after Band Ligation or Injection-Therapy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Martin; Seufferlein, Thomas; Perkhofer, Lukas; Wagner, Martin; Kleger, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Aims Despite a pronounced reduction of lethality rates due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding, esophageal variceal bleeding remains a challenge for the endoscopist and still accounts for a mortality rate of up to 40% within the first 6 weeks. A relevant proportion of patients with esophageal variceal bleeding remains refractory to standard therapy, thus making a call for additional tools to achieve hemostasis. Self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) incorporate such a tool. Methods We evaluated a total number of 582 patients admitted to our endoscopy unit with the diagnosis “gastrointestinal bleeding” according to our documentation software between 2011 and 2014. 82 patients suffered from esophageal variceal bleeding, out of which 11 cases were refractory to standard therapy leading to SEMS application. Patients with esophageal malignancy, fistula, or stricture and a non-esophageal variceal bleeding source were excluded from the analysis. A retrospective analysis reporting a series of clinically relevant parameters in combination with bleeding control rates and adverse events was performed. Results The initial bleeding control rate after SEMS application was 100%. Despite this success, we observed a 27% mortality rate within the first 42 days. All of these patients died due to non-directly hemorrhage-associated reasons. The majority of patients exhibited an extensive demand of medical care with prolonged hospital stay. Common complications were hepatic decompensation, pulmonary infection and decline of renal function. Interestingly, we found in 7 out of 11 patients (63.6%) stent dislocation at time of control endoscopy 24 h after hemostasis or at time of stent removal. The presence of hiatal hernia did not affect obviously stent dislocation rates. Refractory patients had significantly longer hospitalization times compared to non-refractory patients. Conclusions Self-expandable metal stents for esophageal variceal bleeding seem to be safe and

  20. Treatment of esophageal anastomotic leakage with self-expanding metal stents: analysis of risk factors for treatment failure

    PubMed Central

    Persson, Saga; Rouvelas, Ioannis; Kumagai, Koshi; Song, Huan; Lindblad, Mats; Lundell, Lars; Nilsson, Magnus; Tsai, Jon A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aim: The endoscopic placement of self-expandable metallic esophageal stents (SEMS) has become the preferred primary treatment for esophageal anastomotic leakage in many institutions. The aim of this study was to investigate possible risk factors for failure of SEMS-based therapy in patients with esophageal anastomotic leakage. Patients and methods: Beginning in 2003, all patients with an esophageal leak were initially approached and assessed for temporary closure with a SEMS. Until 2014, all patients at the Karolinska University Hospital with a leak from an esophagogastric or esophagojejunal anastomosis were identified. Data regarding the characteristics of the patients and leaks and the treatment outcomes were compiled. Failure of the SEMS treatment strategy was defined as death due to the leak or a major change in management strategy. The risk factors for treatment failure were analyzed with simple and multivariable logistic regression statistics. Results: A total of 447 patients with an esophagogastric or esophagojejunal anastomosis were identified. Of these patients, 80 (18 %) had an anastomotic leak, of whom 46 (58 %) received a stent as first-line treatment. In 29 of these 46 patients, the leak healed without any major change in treatment strategy. Continuous leakage after the application of a stent, decreased physical performance preoperatively, and concomitant esophagotracheal fistula were identified as independent risk factors for failure with multivariable logistic regression analysis. Conclusion: Stent treatment for esophageal anastomotic leakage is successful in the majority of cases. Continuous leakage after initial stent insertion, decreased physical performance preoperatively, and the development of an esophagotracheal fistula decrease the probability of successful treatment. PMID:27092321

  1. SU-E-T-115: Dose Perturbation Study of Self-Expandable Metal and Polyester Esophageal Stents in Proton Therapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S; Li, Z; Jalaj, S; McGaw, C; B K, John; J S, Scolapio; J C, Munoz

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This work investigates dose perturbations due to Self-expandable metal and polyester esophageal stents undergoing proton radiotherapy for esophageal cancer. Methods: Five commercially available esophageal stents made of nitinol (Evolution, Wallflex and Ultraflex), stainless steel (Z-Stent) and polyester (Polyflex) were tested. Radiochromic film (GafChromic EBT3 film, Ashland, Covington, KY) wrapped around a stent and a 12cc syringe was irradiated with 2CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) of proton beam in a custom fabricated acrylic phantom. An air-hollow syringe simulates the esophagus. Results: The Z-stent created the largest dose perturbations ranges from -14.5% to 6.1% due to the steel composition. The WallFlex, Evolution and Ultraflex stents produced the dose perturbation ranges of (−9.2%∼8.6%), (−6.8%∼5.7%) and (−6.2%∼6.2%), respectively. The PolyFlex stent contains the radiopaque tungsten markers located top, middle and bottom portions. When the focal cold spots induced by the markers were excluded in the analysis, the dose perturbation range was changed from (−11.6%∼6.4%) to (−0.6%∼5.0%). Conclusion: The magnitude of dose perturbation is related to material of a metallic stent. The non-metallic stent such as PolyFlex shows relatively lower dose perturbation than metallic stents except a radiopaque marker region. Overall Evolution and Ultraflex stent appear to be less dose perturbations. The largest dose perturbations (cold spots) were located at both edges of stents in distal area for the single proton beam irradiation study. The analysis of more than two proton beam which is more typical clinical beam arrangement would be necessary to minimize the doe perturbation effect in proton ratiotherapy.

  2. Chronic pancreatic pain successfully treated by endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticogastrostomy using fully covered self-expandable metallic stent

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Arunchai; Aswakul, Pitulak; Prachayakul, Varayu

    2016-01-01

    One of the most common symptoms presenting in patients with chronic pancreatitis is pancreatic-type pain. Obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis can be treated by a multitude of therapeutic approaches, ranging from pharmacologic, endoscopic and radiologic treatments to surgical interventions. When the conservative treatment approaches fail to resolve symptomatic cases, however, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with pancreatic duct drainage is the preferred second approach, despite its well-recognized drawbacks. When the conventional transpapillary approach fails to achieve the necessary drainage, the patients may benefit from application of the less invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic duct interventions. Here, we describe the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with severe abdominal pain that had lasted for 3 mo. Computed tomography scanning showed evidence of chronic obstructive pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stricture at genu. After conventional endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography failed to eliminate the symptoms, EUS-guided pancreaticogastrostomy (PGS) was applied using a fully covered, self-expandable, 10-mm diameter metallic stent. The treatment resolved the case and the patient experienced no adverse events. EUS-guided PGS with a regular biliary fully covered, self-expandable metallic stent effectively and safely treated pancreatic-type pain in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27099862

  3. Chronic pancreatic pain successfully treated by endoscopic ultrasound-guided pancreaticogastrostomy using fully covered self-expandable metallic stent.

    PubMed

    Chang, Arunchai; Aswakul, Pitulak; Prachayakul, Varayu

    2016-04-16

    One of the most common symptoms presenting in patients with chronic pancreatitis is pancreatic-type pain. Obstruction of the main pancreatic duct in chronic pancreatitis can be treated by a multitude of therapeutic approaches, ranging from pharmacologic, endoscopic and radiologic treatments to surgical interventions. When the conservative treatment approaches fail to resolve symptomatic cases, however, endoscopic retrograde pancreatography with pancreatic duct drainage is the preferred second approach, despite its well-recognized drawbacks. When the conventional transpapillary approach fails to achieve the necessary drainage, the patients may benefit from application of the less invasive endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic duct interventions. Here, we describe the case of a 42-year-old man who presented with severe abdominal pain that had lasted for 3 mo. Computed tomography scanning showed evidence of chronic obstructive pancreatitis with pancreatic duct stricture at genu. After conventional endoscopic retrograde pancreaticography failed to eliminate the symptoms, EUS-guided pancreaticogastrostomy (PGS) was applied using a fully covered, self-expandable, 10-mm diameter metallic stent. The treatment resolved the case and the patient experienced no adverse events. EUS-guided PGS with a regular biliary fully covered, self-expandable metallic stent effectively and safely treated pancreatic-type pain in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:27099862

  4. Self-Expanding Metal Stenting for Palliation of Patients with Malignant Colonic Obstruction: Effectiveness and Efficacy on 255 Patients with 12-Month's Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Meisner, Søren; González-Huix, Ferran; Vandervoort, Jo G.; Repici, Alessandro; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Grund, Karl E.; Goldberg, Paul; Registry Group, The WallFlex Colonic

    2012-01-01

    Background. Self-expanding metal stents can alleviate malignant colonic obstruction in incurable patients and avoid palliative stoma surgery. Objective. Evaluate stent effectiveness and safety on palliation of patients with malignant colorectal strictures. Design. Two prospective, one Spanish and one global, multicenter studies. Settings. 39 centers (22 academic, 17 community hospitals) from 13 countries. Patients. A total of 257 patients were enrolled, and 255 patients were treated with a WallFlex uncovered enteral colonic stent. Follow-up was up to 12 months or until death or retreatment. Interventions(s). Self-expanding metal stent placement. Main Outcome Measures. Procedural success, clinical success, and safety. Results. Procedural success was 98.4% (251). Clinical success rates were 87.8% at 30 days, 89.7% at 3 months, 92.8% at 6 months, and 96% at 12 months. Overall perforation rate was 5.1%. Overall migration rate was 5.5%. Overall death rate during follow-up was 48.6% (124), with 67.7% of deaths related to the patient's colorectal cancer, unrelated in 32.3%. Only 2 deaths were related to the stent or procedure. Limitations. No control group. Conclusions. The primary palliative option for patients with malignant colonic obstruction should be self-expanding metal stent placement due to high rates of technical success and efficacy in symptom palliation and few complications. PMID:22761609

  5. Comparative retrospective study on the use of plastic prostheses and self-expanding metal stents in the palliative treatment of malignant strictures of the esophagus and cardia.

    PubMed

    Mosca, F; Consoli, A; Stracqualursi, A; Persi, A; Portale, T R

    2003-01-01

    Palliative treatment of malignant strictures of the esophagus and cardia is usually carried out by the endoscopic placement of a prosthesis. The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate short- and long-term outcomes of the use of expandable stents, compared with conventional plastic prostheses. One hundred and thirteen endoscopic intubations were carried out in 120 patients affected by malignant stenosis of the esophagus and cardia using plastic prosthesis and self-expanding metal stents. Dysphagia was scored according to Atkinson and Ferguson's classification and the preoperative median score (3.6) was comparable in both groups. The technical success rate was 94.4% with plastic prosthesis and 93.7% with self-expanding metal stent while the functional success rate was, respectively, 85.2% and 88.8%. Three deaths occurred with plastic prostheses (4.4%), while no deaths were observed with metal stents. A comparative analysis of the results of this study suggests that the endoscopic placement of self-expanding metal stents is effective and safe and has to be preferred to the conventional plastic prosthesis for easier implantation and lower morbidity. PMID:12823210

  6. Role of self expandable stents in management of colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Dogrul, Ahmet Bulent; Tirnaksiz, Mehmet Bulent

    2016-01-01

    Acute malignant colorectal obstruction is a complication of colorectal cancer that can occur in 7%-29% of patients. Self-expanding metallic stent placement for malignant colorectal obstruction has gained popularity as a safe and effective procedure for relieving obstruction. This technique can be used in the palliation of malignant colorectal obstruction, as a bridge to elective surgery for resectable colorectal cancers, palliation of extracolonic malignant obstruction, and for nonmalignant etiologies such as anastomotic strictures, Crohn’s disease, radiation therapy, and diverticular diseases. Self-expanding metallic stent has its own advantages and disadvantages over the surgery in these indications. During the insertion of the self-expanding metallic stent, and in the follow-up, short term and long term morbidities should be kept in mind. The most important complications of the stents are perforation, stent obstruction, stent migration, and bleeding. Additionally, given the high risk of perforation, if a patient is treated or being considered fortreatmentwith antiangiogenic agents such as bevacizumab, it is not recommended to use self-expanding metallic stent as a palliative treatment for obstruction. Therefore, there is a need for careful clinical evaluation for each patient who is a candidate for this procedure. The purpose of this review was to evaluate self-expanding metallic stent in the management of the obstruction of the colon due to the colorectal and extracolonic obstruction. PMID:26798442

  7. Antireflux versus conventional self-expanding metallic Stents (SEMS) for distal esophageal cancer: results of a multicenter randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Coron, E.; David, G.; Lecleire, S.; Jacques, J.; Le Sidaner, A.; Barrioz, T.; Coumaros, D.; Volteau, C.; Vedrenne, B.; Bichard, P.; Boustière, C.; Touchefeu, Y.; Brégeon, J.; Prat, F.; Le Rhun, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) are commonly used in the palliation of dysphagia in patients with inoperable esophageal carcinoma. However, they predispose to gastroesophageal reflux when deployed across the gastroesophageal junction. The aims of this study were to: 1) assess the influence of the antireflux valve on trans-prosthetic reflux (primary outcome); and 2) compare the results of SEMS with and without antireflux valve in terms of reflux symptoms, quality of life (QOL), improvement of dysphagia and adverse events (secondary outcomes). Patients and methods: Thirty-eight patients were enrolled in nine centers. Carcinomas were locally advanced (47 %) or metastatic. After randomization, patients received either a covered SEMS with antireflux valve (n = 20) or a similar type of SEMS with no antireflux device but assigned to standard proton pump inhibitor therapy and postural advice (n = 18). Trans-prosthetic reflux was assessed at day 2 using a radiological score based on barium esophagography performed after Trendelenburg maneuver and graded from 0 (no reflux) to 12 (maximum). Monthly telephone interviews were conducted for Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) scoring from 0 (excellent) to 5 (poor), QOL assessment (based on the Reflux-Qual Simplifié scoring system) from 0 (poor) to 100 (excellent), dysphagia scoring from 0 (no dysphagia) to 5 (complete dysphagia) and regurgitation scoring from 0 (no regurgitation) to 16 (maximum). Results: No difference was noted in terms of age, sex, size of lesion, prosthesis length or need for dilation prior to SEMS placement. No difficulty in placing SEMS nor complications were noted. Radiological scores of reflux were found to be significantly lower in patients with an antireflux stent compared to the conventional stent and associated measures. The regurgitation scores were significantly decreased in patients with antireflux stents during the first 2 months after stent placement and

  8. Palliative treatment of recurrent obstructing gastric cancer. A case report of successful treatment with three self-expanding metallic stents.

    PubMed

    Bernik, T R; Bernik, S F; Morgenstern, B R; Pindyck, F; Wallack, M K

    2000-06-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent gastric cancer affecting the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract usually experience obstructive symptoms, causing a severe compromise in their quality of life. Surgery may not be feasible because of the patient's precarious medical condition and multilevel tumor infiltration. When faced with these circumstances, surgeons have few options. Parenteral nutrition and comfort measures are utilized when surgical bypass is not a tenable option. We herein describe a unique case of multilevel upper and lower gastrointestinal obstruction secondary to recurrent gastric cancer. The patient was treated palliatively through a combined surgical, radiological, and endoscopic approach by implanting a series of self-expanding metallic stents. To our knowledge, there are no previous reports of successful management of simultaneous strictures of the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract using this technique. PMID:11265066

  9. Treatment of nostril and nasal stenosis due to facial burn using a self-expandable metallic esophageal stent.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Kuwon; Matsune, Shoji; Shiiba, Kyoko; Kimura, Maki; Okubo, Kimihiro; Kaneshiro, Tadashi; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Masahiro; Kurokawa, Akira

    2015-08-01

    For the treatment of nasal and nostril stenosis caused by facial burn, it is necessary to perform rhinoplasty and nasal vestibuloplasty using various flaps, perform cicatrectomy of the nostrils with a rhinosurgical procedure, and prevent restenosis of the nostrils and nasal cavity for a certain period by methods such as placement of a nasal retainer or transnasal airway and gauze packing of the nasal cavity. With all methods, postoperative placement of a retainer or nasal treatment is necessary for the prevention of postoperative restenosis, and the patient's cooperation is essential. In a patient who did not cooperate in postoperative treatments due to autism and had recurrences of nasal and nostril stenosis after conventional surgical treatments, adequate patency of the nasal cavity and nostrils could be maintained with minimal postoperative treatment by placing a self-expandable metallic esophageal stent. PMID:25748514

  10. Fully covered self-expandable metal stent in the treatment of postsurgical colorectal diseases: outcome in 29 patients

    PubMed Central

    Cereatti, Fabrizio; Fiocca, Fausto; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Ceci, Vincenzo; Vergeau, Bertrand-Marie; Tuszynski, Thierry; Meduri, Bruno; Donatelli, Gianfranco

    2016-01-01

    Background: Self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement is a minimally invasive treatment for palliation of malignant colorectal strictures and as a bridge to surgery. However, the use of SEMS for benign colorectal diseases is controversial. The purpose of this retrospective study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of fully covered SEMS (FCSEMS) placement in postsurgical colorectal diseases. Methods: From 2008 to 2014, 29 patients with 32 FCSEMS deployment procedures were evaluated. The indications for stent placement were: 17 anastomotic strictures (3/17 presented complete closure of the anastomosis); four anastomotic leaks; seven strictures associated with anastomotic leak; and one rectum-vagina fistula. Results: Clinical success was achieved in 18 out of 29 patients (62.1%) being symptom-free at an average of 19 months. In the remaining 11 patients (37.9%), a different treatment was needed: four patients required multiple endoscopic dilations, 4 patients colostomy confection, one patient definitive ileostomy and three patients revisional surgery. The FCSEMS were kept in place for a mean period of 34 (range: 6–65) days. Major complications occurred in 12 out of 29 patients (41.4%) and consisted of stent migration. Minor complications included two cases of transient fever, eight cases of abdominal or rectal pain, and one case of tenesmus. Conclusion: FCSEMS are considered a possible therapeutic option for treatment of postsurgical strictures and leaks. However, their efficacy in guaranteeing long-term anastomotic patency and leak closure is moderate. A major complication is migration. The use of FCSEMS for colonic postsurgical pathologies should be carefully evaluated for each patient. PMID:26929780

  11. Safety and efficacy of a fully covered large-diameter self-expanding metal stent for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal perforations, anastomotic leaks, and fistula.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, M W; Kerbert, A C; van Soest, E J; Schwartz, M P; Bakker, C M; Gilissen, L P L; van Hooft, J E

    2016-08-01

    Upper gastrointestinal perforations, fistula, and anastomotic leaks are severe conditions with high mortality. Temporary endoscopic placement of fully covered self-expanding metal stent (fSEMS) has emerged as treatment option. Stent migration is a major drawback of currently used stents. Migration is often attributed to a relatively too small stent diameter as esophageal stents were initially intended for the treatment of strictures. This study aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of a large-diameter fSEMS for treatment of these conditions. Data were retrospectively collected from patients who received this stent in the Netherlands between March 2011 and August 2013. Clinical success was defined as sufficient leak closure after stent removal as confirmed by endoscopy or X-ray with oral contrast without surgical intervention or placement of another type of stent. Adverse events were graded according a standardized grading system. Stent placement was performed in 34 patients for the following indications: perforation (n = 6), anastomotic leak (n = 26), and fistula (n = 2). Technical success rate was 97% (33/34). Clinical success rate was 44% (15/34) after one stent and 50% (17/34) after an additional stent. There were no severe adverse events and stent-related mortality. The overall adverse event rate was 50% (all graded 'moderate'). There were 14 (41%) stent migrations (complete n = 8, partial n = 6). Other adverse events were bleeding (n = 2) and aspiration pneumonia (n = 1). Reinterventions for failure of the large-diameter fSEMS were placement of another type of fSEMS (n = 4), surgical repair (n = 3), or esophagectomy (n = 1). Eleven patients (32%) died in-hospital because of persisting intrathoracic sepsis (n = 10) or preexistent bowel ischemia (n = 1). This study suggests that temporary placement of a large-diameter fSEMS for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal perforations, fistula, and anastomotic leaks is safe in terms of severe adverse events

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy with a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent for palliative biliary drainage.

    PubMed

    French, Joshua Blake; Coe, Adam Wesley; Pawa, Rishi

    2016-04-01

    In addition to the poor prognosis associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, it can also lead to several other conditions including obstructive jaundice that can affect a patient's quality of life. This is a major concern in non-operative patients where palliation is considered the main therapeutic goal. Traditionally, there are several ways to pursue palliative biliary drainage including endoscopic methods, a variety of surgical procedures, and percutaneous techniques. Generally, endoscopic methods such as endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with transpapillary stent placement are considered first-line therapies. Unfortunately, ERCP is not always possible due to several potential reasons. Although endoscopic ultrasound-guided biliary puncture has been well described for several years, there are limitations to its usefulness in biliary drainage, in part due to complication concerns. However, more recently a lumen-apposing, self-expandable fully covered metal stent has been employed for such situations. We describe two cases in which this type of stent was used in patients for palliative biliary drainage in pancreatic adenocarcinoma where standard ERCP was not feasible. In both cases, stent deployment was successful without immediate complications related to the procedure or the stent. Furthermore, the main goal of these therapies was palliation and in both cases the patient chose this procedure for quality of life reasons. In the future, randomized trials are needed to better define the long-term effectiveness and safety of these stents compared to more standard therapies. PMID:26956721

  13. Endoscopy management algorithms: role of cyanoacrylate glue injection and self-expanding metal stents in acute variceal haemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    El Sayed, G; Tarff, S; O'Beirne, J; Wright, G

    2015-01-01

    Mortality from acute variceal bleeding (AVB) has improved markedly over the last 2–3 decades due to increased specialisation and standardisation of medical and endoscopic practice culminating in the production of consensus guidance based on expert opinion. Nonetheless, despite greater exposure, training and endoscopic practices, 30-day mortality still remains high at around 30%. This is a reflection of the high morbidity with liver disease, and limited endoscopic experience and/or endoscopic techniques used by the majority of general endoscopists. Clinical necessity defines our drive for further endoscopic innovation to improve ‘best practice’ and, therefore, clinical outcomes accordingly. Sclerotherpy, variceal band ligation and/or rescue balloon tamponade have been entrenched in most treatment algorithms over the decades. However, in recent years and albeit limited to specialised liver centres, cyanoacrylate glue injection therapy (for oesophageal and gastric varices), and the placement of a self-expanding metallic stent for oesophageal varices have begun to offer improved endoscopic care in experienced hands. Yet even in specialised centres, their application is sporadic and operator dependent. Here, we discuss the evidence of these newer endoscopic approaches, and hope to propose their inclusion in endoscopic therapy algorithms for ‘best practice’ management of AVB in all appropriately supported endoscopy units. PMID:26167267

  14. Bare metal stenting of the iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tanner I; Schneider, Peter A

    2016-06-01

    A significant subset of patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD) has iliac artery involvement that requires treatment. The development of bare metal stents has improved the short- and long-term outcomes of endovascular repair and has become first line therapy. Open surgical bypass has been reserved for extremely complex anatomic morphologies or endovascular failures. It is unclear whether primary stenting is superior to angioplasty with provisional stenting but if angioplasty is used alone, it is likely only appropriate for the most focal lesions. Self-expanding and balloon-expandable stents have unique characteristics that are suitable to different lesion morphologies. Both stent-types have demonstrated similar outcomes. Herein, we review the practice and results of bare metal stents in the iliac arteries. PMID:27035892

  15. Anatomy-shaped design of a fully-covered, biliary, self-expandable metal stent for treatment of benign distal biliary strictures

    PubMed Central

    Weigt, Jochen; Kandulski, Arne; Malfertheiner, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The treatment success of benign biliary strictures with fully covered metal stents (CSEMS) is altered by high stent dislocation rates. We aimed to evaluate a new stent design to prevent dislocation. Patients and methods: Patients with benign biliary strictures were treated with a newly designed double-coned stent (dcSEMS). Mechanical analysis of the new stent was performed and it was compared with a cylindrical stent. Results: A total of 13 dcCSEMS were implanted in 11 patients (2 female, 9 male, median age 47, range 33 – 71). All patients had distal biliary strictures due to chronic pancreatitis. No stent migration occurred. In all but one patient the stents were removed. One patient refused stent extraction and was lost to follow up. Stent occlusion occurred twice leading to cholangitis in both cases. The duration of stent treatment was 170 days (range 61 – 254). After extraction only one patient had early recurrent stricture and received the same stent again. Three stents showed minimal tissue granulation at the papilla. One stent presented ingrowth at the proximal end and was removed after implantation of a second fully covered stent. Mechanical examination revealed significantly lower radial expansion force of the new stent as compared to the cylindrical stent. Conclusions: The new stent design has a low rate of migration. Biomechanical properties may explain this effect. PMID:26793789

  16. Square Stent: A New Self-Expandable Endoluminal Device and Its Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry; Timmermans, Hans; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2001-07-15

    The square stent is a new, simply constructed, self-expanding device that has recently been described. Compared with other stents, the square stent has a minimal amount of metal and thus requires a smaller-diameter catheter for introduction. Despite the small amount of metal present, the square stent has adequate expansile force. We have been evaluating the square stent for various interventional applications. In addition to the basic square stent, combinations of square stents and coverings for square stents were developed and evaluated to expand its uses and indications. One of the coverings tested is a new biomaterial: small intestinal submucosa (SIS). This paper will discuss the various applications of the square stent, which include a retrievable inferior vena cava filter, vascular occluder, graft adapter, and venous and aortic valves. In addition, we will review the important properties of SIS as a covering for the square stent.

  17. Post-biliary sphincterotomy bleeding despite covered metallic stent deployment

    PubMed Central

    Donatelli, Gianfranco; Cereatti, Fabrizio; Dumont, Jean-Loup; Dhumane, Parag; Tuszynski, Thierry; Vergeau, Bertrand Marie; Meduri, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Several endoscopic techniques have been proposed for the management of post-sphincterotomy bleeding. Lately, self-expandable metal stents deployment has gained popularity especially as a rescue therapy when other endoscopic techniques fail. Methods-results: We report the case report of a massive post-sphincterotomy bleeding in a patient with a self-expandable metal stent in the biliary tree. Despite the presence of a correctly positioned self-expandable metal stent, a new endoscopic session was required to control the bleeding. Conclusions: Self-expandable metal stent may be useful to manage post-endoscopic sphincterotomy bleeding. However, up to now there is no specifically designed self-expandable metal stent for such complication. Large new designed self-expandable metal stent may be a useful tool for biliary endoscopist. PMID:27489716

  18. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided transhepatic anterograde self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) placement across malignant biliary obstruction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Tang, T; Binmoeller, K F; Sanchez-Yague, A; Shah, J N

    2010-03-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) for palliation of malignant obstruction may not be possible in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage methods may be useful in this setting. This study aimed to determine the outcomes of EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement across malignant strictures in patients with an inaccessible biliary orifice. Over a 2-year period, procedural and outcomes data on all patients undergoing EUS-guided anterograde SEMS drainage after failed ERCP were prospectively entered into a database and reviewed. Five patients underwent EUS-guided anterograde SEMS. Indications included: advanced pancreatic cancer (n = 3), metastatic cancer (n = 1), and anastomotic stricture (n = 1). The biliary orifice could not be reached endoscopically due to duodenal stricture (n = 4) or inaccessible hepaticojejunostomy (n = 1). EUS-guided punctures were performed transgastrically into left intrahepatic ducts (n = 4) or transbulbar into the common bile duct (n = 1). Guide wires were passed and SEMS were successfully deployed across strictures in an anterograde fashion in all patients. Jaundice resolved and serum bilirubin levels decreased in all cases. No procedure-related complications were noted during a mean follow-up of 9.2 months. EUS-guided anterograde SEMS placement appears to be a safe and efficient technique for palliation of biliary obstruction in patients with an endoscopically inaccessible biliary orifice. The procedure can be performed at the time of failed standard ERCP, and provides an alternative drainage option to percutaneous or surgical decompression and to EUS-guided creation of bilioenteric fistulae. PMID:20119894

  19. Percutaneous cholangioscopy in obstructed biliary metal stents

    SciTech Connect

    Hausegger, Klaus A.; Mischinger, Hans J.; Karaic, Radenko; Klein, Guenther E.; Kugler, Cristian; Kern, Robert; Uggowitzer, Martin; Szolar, Dieter

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To reevaluate the reasons for the occlusion of self-expanding biliary metal stents, on the basis of cholangioscopic findings. Methods. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) was performed in 15 patients with obstructed biliary Wallstents. The reason for stent insertion was a malignant obstruction in 14 patients; 1 had a benign biliary stricture. Conventional noncovered stents had been inserted in 12 patients; in 3 cases a polyurethane-covered prototype Wallstent had been used. Stent occlusions occurred after 1-55 months. PTCS was performed with a 2.3-mm endoscope through an 11 Fr sheath. Biopsies were taken via the working channel of the endoscope. Results. In all patients with noncovered stents the inner surface of the stent was highly irregular with seaweed-like protrusions (biopsy-proven granulation tissue). Stent incorporation varied from absent (n=1) to subtotal (n=8), but was always incomplete, no matter how long the stent had been in place. Tumor ingrowth was histologically proven in 2 patients. One patient had a large occluding concrement at the proximal end of the stent. In patients with covered stents, the inner surface appeared more regular; however, viable granulation tissue was found inside two stents and tumor ingrowth in one of them. Conclusion. PTCS showed that incorporation of the stent is virtually always incomplete. The factors contributing most to stent occlusion are the buildup of granulation tissue, bile sludge, and tumor overgrowth. Stone formation and tumor ingrowth can also be important, although less common causes of occlusion. A polyurethane stent covering could not prevent tumor ingrowth in one patient and the buildup of viable granulation tissue inside the stent in two further patients; mean stent patency in the three patients with such a stent was 3 months.

  20. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-03-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  1. Current Status of Biliary Metal Stents

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyeong Seok; Kang, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Many advances have been achieved in biliary stenting over the past 30 years. Endoscopic stent placement has become the primary management therapy to relieve obstruction in patients with benign or malignant biliary tract diseases. Compared with plastic stents, a self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has been used for management in patients with malignant strictures because of a larger lumen and longer stent patency. Recently, SEMS has been used for various benign biliary strictures and leaks. In this article, we briefly review the characteristics of SEMS as well as complications of stent placement. We review the current guidelines for managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions. Recent developments in biliary stenting are also discussed. PMID:26911896

  2. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-03-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS. PMID:27000423

  3. Basic Knowledge about Metal Stent Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seok

    2016-01-01

    Biliary self-expandable metal stents (SEMS), a group of non-vascular stents, have been used in the palliative management of biliary obstruction around the world. However, there are still unmet needs in the clinical application of biliary SEMS. Comprehensive understanding of the SEMS is required to resolve the drawbacks and difficulties of metal stent development. The basic structure of SEMS, including the materials and knitting methods of metal wires, covering materials, and radiopaque markers, are discussed in this review. What we know about the physical and mechanical properties of the SEMS is very important. With an understanding of the basic knowledge of metal stents, hurdles such as stent occlusion, migration, and kinking can be overcome to develop more ideal SEMS. PMID:27000423

  4. Use of a partially covered self-expandable metallic stent to treat a biliary stricture secondary to chronic pancreatitis complicated by recurrent cholangitis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Yoshinobu; Ishida, Yusuke; Sasaki, Yu; Ushijima, Tomoyuki; Sugiyama, Gen; Tsuruta, Osamu

    2012-05-01

    The patient was a 69 year old man who had been diagnosed with alcoholic chronic pancreatitis and lower common bile duct (CBD) stricture. He subsequently developed cholangitis 2-3 times a year, and we replaced the endoscopic biliary stent (EBS) each time. In April 2010, he was admitted because of complication by a liver abscess and acute cholangitis. We performed percutaneous transhepatic liver abscess drainage. The inflammatory findings then rapidly improved, but the patient developed acute cholangitis due to the sludge and the stones. Then, we placed a partially covered self-expandable metallic stent (C-SEMS) in the lower CBD and performed endoscopic lithotripsy through the C-SEMS, and the cholangitis subsequently improved. Two weeks after, we removed the C-SEMS endoscopically and replaced it with a 10 Fr plastic stent; since then there have been no recurrences of cholangitis. Our experience in this case suggested that when a plastic stent is placed long-term to treat a biliary stricture associated with chronic pancreatitis, it might be useful to also control biliary sludge and stones using a C-SEMS. PMID:22533753

  5. Stent

    MedlinePlus

    ... kinds of stents. Most are made of a metal or plastic mesh-like material. However, stent grafts are made of fabric. They are used in larger arteries. An intraluminal coronary artery ... self-expanding, metal mesh tube. It is placed inside a coronary ...

  6. Endoscopic treatment of large pancreatic fluid collections (PFC) using self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) – a two-center experience

    PubMed Central

    Chaves, Dalton Marques; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Carneiro, Fred; Medrado, Bruno; dos Santos, Marcos; Wodak, Stephanie; Reimão, Sílvia; Sakai, Paulo; de Moura, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Background/study aim: During the last several years, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided pancreatic fluid collections’ (PFC) drainage has evolved into the preferred drainage technique. Recently, self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) have been used as an alternative to double pigtail stents, with the advantage of providing a larger diameter fistula, thereby decreasing the risk of early obstruction and also allowing for direct endoscopic exploration of the cavity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the technical and clinical success, safety, and outcome of patients undergoing EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS. Patients/materials and methods: The study was conducted at two tertiary hospitals from January 2010 to January 2013. All patients with PFC referred for endoscopic drainage were enrolled in a prospective database. The inclusion criteria were: (1) patients with pseudocysts or walled-off necrosis based on the revised Atlanta classification; (2) symptomatic patients with thick PFC; (3) PFC that persisted more than 6 weeks; and (4) large PFC diameter (≥ 9 cm). The exclusion criteria consisted of coagulation disorders, PFC bleeding or infection, and failure-to-inform written consent. Results: A total of 16 patients (9 females, 7 males; mean age 52.6, range 20 – 82) underwent EUS drainage with SEMS. There were 14 cases of pseudocysts and 2 cases of walled-off necrosis. The etiologies of the PFC were mainly gallstones (8 of 16 patients, 50 %) and alcohol (5 of 16 patients, 31 %). Technical success was achieved in 100 % of the cases. All patients had a complete resolution of the PFC. Conclusion: Transmural EUS-guided drainage of complex PFC using SEMS is feasible, appears safe, and is efficacious. However, the exchange of the UC (uncovered)-SEMS for plastic stents is mandatory within 1 week. Future prospective studies, preferably multicenter studies, comparing SEMS versus traditional plastic stents for the drainage of PFC are

  7. Evaluation of the compressive mechanical properties of endoluminal metal stents.

    PubMed

    Schrader, S C; Beyar, R

    1998-06-01

    The mechanical properties of metal stents are important parameters in the consideration of stent design, matched to resist arterial recoil and vascular spasm. The purpose of this study was to develop a system for a standardized quantitative evaluation of the mechanical characteristics of various coronary stents. Several types of stents were compressed by external hydrostatic pressure. The stent diameter was assessed by placing a pair of small ultrasonic sono-crystals on the stent. From pressure-strain diagrams the ultimate strength and radial stiffness for each stent were determined. For all stents, except the MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent, the diameter decreased homogeneously until an ultimate compressive strength was exceeded, causing an abrupt collapse. Expanded to 3 mm, the mechanical behavior of the beStent, the Crown and the Palmaz-Schatz stent (PS153-series) were comparable. The spiral articulated Palmaz-Schatz stent showed twice the strength (1.26 atm) of the PS-153 (0.65 atm). The NIR stent yielded a maximum strength of 1.05 atm. The MICRO-II and the Wiktor stent did not collapse abruptly but rather showed a continuous decline of diameter with increasing external pressure. The Cardiocoil stent behaved in a fully elastic manner and showed the largest radial stiffness. Difference in mechanical properties between stents were documented using a new device specifically developed for that purpose. These mechanical stent parameters may have important clinical implications. PMID:9637441

  8. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A.; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  9. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided placement of the lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent for gallbladder drainage: a promising technique.

    PubMed

    Patil, Rashmee; Ona, Mel A; Papafragkakis, Charilaos; Anand, Sury; Duddempudi, Sushil

    2016-01-01

    Acute cholecystitis and other clinical problems requiring gallbladder removal or drainage have conventionally been treated with surgery, endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography or percutaneous transhepatic drainage of the gallbladder and/or extrahepatic bile duct. Patients unable to undergo these procedures due to functional status or anatomical anomalies are candidates for endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided gallbladder drainage with stent placement. The aim of this review was to evaluate the technical feasibility and efficacy of EUS-guided placement of the recently developed lumen-apposing self-expandable metallic stent (LASEMS). A literature review was performed to identify the studies describing this technique. In this review article we have summarized case series or reports describing EUS-guided LASEMS placement. The indications, techniques, limitations and complications reported are discussed. A total of 78 patients were included across all studies described thus far in the literature. Studies have reported near 100% technical and clinical success rates in selected cases. No major complications were reported. EUS-guided gallbladder drainage and LASEMS placement can be a safe and effective alternative approach in the management of selected patients. PMID:27065728

  10. A Case of Aorto-Bronchial Fistula After Insertion of Left Main Bronchial Self-Expanding Metallic Stent in a Patient with Recurrent Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Hiroshi Kuriyama, Kengo; Komiyama, Takafumi; Tanaka, Shiho; Marino, Kan; Tsukamoto, Tatsuaki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2004-09-15

    We report a case of aorto-bronchial fistula (ABF) caused by a self-expanding metallic stent (EMS) 51 days after insertion into the left main bronchus. The patient presented with left main bronchial stenosis caused by post-operative local recurrence of esophageal cancer. Post-operative radio therapy totaling 40 Gy and post-recurrence radiotherapy totaling 34 Gy were administered, with daily fractions of 2 Gy. Stenosis of the left main bronchus improved slightly, and was followed with insertion of EMS to prevent re-stenosis. The patient experienced massive hemoptysis for 3 days before sudden death. Autopsy revealed the EMS edge perforating the descending aortic lumen. Tumor infiltration and bacterial infection were observed on the wall of the left bronchus, and atherosclerosis was present on the aortic wall around the fistula. It should be noted that the left main bronchus was at considerable risk of ABF after insertion of EMS for malignant stenosis, and prophylactic stent insertion into the bronchus without imperative need must be avoided.

  11. [Metallic biomaterials for coronary stents].

    PubMed

    Fischer, A; Wieneke, H; Brauer, H; Erbel, R

    2001-04-01

    The introduction of coronary stents is a milestone in interventional cardiology. Two landmark studies have shown that stainless steel stents significantly decrease the restenosis rate as compared to balloon angioplasty. This fact led to a marked increase of stent implantation since the first stent implantation by Jacques Puel in 1986. Although the concept of coronary stenting significantly improved the interventional therapy of coronary artery disease, restenosis remains a major unsolved drawback of this technique. In addition to procedure and disease related factors like implantation pressure and plaque burden, data suggest that the stent as a medical implant plays a crucial role in the process of neointima formation. Since its introduction in cardiology, more than 50 different stents of different configuration and material have been developed. Although recent publications report of promising results using biodegradable materials, almost all coronary stents commercially available at the moment are made of metallic alloys. Whereas first generation stents were made exclusively from stainless steel and only minor interest was focussed on the stent material in the manufacture of coronary stents, recent studies strongly suggest that the metallic alloy used has a direct impact on the extent of neointima formation. Thus, metallic alloys differ not only with respect to mechanical features, but also by their biocompatible properties. These two factors are of major importance in the induction of vessel wall injury, inflammatory processes and cell proliferation. In the first part, the present paper reviews the metallurgic characteristics of metallic materials, which are currently used or under investigation in the production of coronary stents. In the second part, clinical and experimental results are summarized with respect to their biocompatibility and impact on the process of restenosis formation. PMID:11381573

  12. Developments in metallic biodegradable stents.

    PubMed

    Hermawan, H; Dubé, D; Mantovani, D

    2010-05-01

    Interest in metallic degradable biomaterials research has been growing in the last decade. Both scientific journals and patent databases record a high increase in publications in this area. Biomedical implants with temporary function, such as coronary stents, are the targeted applications for this novel class of biomaterials. It is expected that stents made of degradable biomaterials, named biodegradable stents, will provide a temporary opening into a narrowed arterial vessel until the vessel remodels and will progressively disappear thereafter. Biodegradable stents made of metal have recently been progressed into preclinical tests in humans after their first introduction in early 2000s. By referring to patents and journal publications, this paper reviews the developments in biodegradable stents, with emphasis on those made of metals, starting from the first design ideas to validation testing. PMID:19815097

  13. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt using the FLUENCY expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qinghua; Jiang, Jianwei; He, Yujie; Jiang, Tianpeng; Zhou, Shi

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts using FLUENCY expanded polytetraf luoroethylene (PTFE)-covered stents and the effect on the patency rate. A total of 114 cirrhotic patients who were treated by transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) placement using a FLUENCY expanded, PTFE-covered stent were enrolled in the present study. Of the patients, 15 underwent an additional bare metal stent implantation on the portal side of the covered stent, simultaneously. Patients underwent Doppler sonography during the follow-up. Mean portal venous pressure dropped from 2.499±0.588 cmHg to 1.764±0.294 cmHg. The cumulative patency rates for one and two years were 86.7% and 75.2%, respectively. The results demonstrate the feasibility of TIPS placement with the FLUENCY expanded PTFE-covered stent. TIPS placement with the FLUENCY expanded PTFE-covered stent was able to improve patency when compared with the use of conventional bare-metal stents. PMID:23251280

  14. [An Analysis of Placement of a Self-Expanding Metallic Stent as Bridge to Surgery for Surgical Resection of StageⅣ Obstructive Colorectal Cancers].

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Yohei; Terada, Itsuro; Terai, Shiro; Watanabe, Toshifumi; Amaya, Koji; Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kaji, Masahide; Maeda, Kiichi; Shimizu, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    In our institution, placement of a self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) for obstructive colorectal cancer to avoid emergency operations, namely as a bridge to surgery (BTS), was introduced in April 2012. Here, we assess the efficacy and safety of pre-operative SEMS placement for treatment of Stage Ⅳ obstructive colorectal cancer. We analyzed a total of 44 cases of Stage Ⅳ colorectal cancer, which consisted of 13 obstructive cases that were surgically resected following SEMS placement as BTS (BTS group), and 31 cases that were resected in elective operations without pre-operative SEMS placement (Ope group), from April 2012 to August 2014. None of the patients had any adverse events during the SEMS procedure or after SEMS placement, and all patients of BTS group could undergo the planned operations after sufficient decompression. In the postoperative period, 1 patient of BTS group (7.7%) had anastomosis bleeding, but no other complications, including anastomosis leakage, were observed in BTS group. However more progressive primary tumors were resected in BTS group (p=0.0115), there were no significant differences for post-operative course between the 2 groups; this indicated avoiding high-risk emergency operations contributed to adequate short-term outcomes in BTS group comparable to those in Ope group. SEMS placement as BTS could be performed safely for Stage Ⅳ obstructive colorectal cancer cases, and was 1 of the effective strategies for local treatment. PMID:26805087

  15. In situ cooling with ice water for the easier removal of self-expanding nitinol stents

    PubMed Central

    Merkel, Daniel; Brinkmann, Eckhard; Wiens, Daniel; Derwahl, Karl-Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is yet to be determined what effects temperature has on the properties of nitinol in order to simplify the process of removing nitinol self-expanding metal stents (SEMS). Materials and methods: We describe the procedure for removal of SEMS in a total of 11 cases with 9 patients. A study involving cooling of nitinol stents in situ with ice water just before their removal was attempted. Results: All stents were removed successfully. In partially covered and in fully covered stents, the stent rigidity was noticeably reduced following cooling. Stent removal was performed by inversion, which was achieved by pulling on the stent from its distal end. No adverse events were observed during this trial. Conclusion: The higher pliability of the stents after ice-water cooling facilitates stent removal. With this method, a mobilization of all stents by the invagination technique was achieved. The separation of the uncoated stent ends from the intestinal wall by the invagination technique, as well as the mucosal vasoconstriction resulting from the cooling, lead to an easier SEMS removal and may serve to prevent severe bleeding of the mucosal wall during this process. PMID:26134772

  16. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations—such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen—recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  17. Past, Present, and Future of Gastrointestinal Stents: New Endoscopic Ultrasonography-Guided Metal Stents and Future Developments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee Seung; Chung, Moon Jae

    2016-03-01

    Innovations in stent technology and technological advances in endoscopic ultrasonography have led to rapid expansion of their use in the field of gastrointestinal diseases. In particular, endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stent insertion has been used for the management of pancreatic fluid collection, bile duct drainage, gallbladder decompression, and gastric bypass. Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided drainage of intra-abdominal fluid collections using a plastic or metal stent is well established. Because of the various limitations-such as stent migration, injury and bleeding in the lumen-recently developed, fully covered self-expanding metal stents or lumen-apposing metal stents have been introduced for those fluids management. This article reviews the recent literature on newly developed endoscopic ultrasonography-guided metal stents and the efficacy thereof. PMID:27000424

  18. Stenting for malignant ureteral obstruction: Tandem, metal or metal-mesh stents.

    PubMed

    Elsamra, Sammy E; Leavitt, David A; Motato, Hector A; Friedlander, Justin I; Siev, Michael; Keheila, Mohamed; Hoenig, David M; Smith, Arthur D; Okeke, Zeph

    2015-07-01

    Extrinsic malignant compression of the ureter is not uncommon, often refractory to decompression with conventional polymeric ureteral stents, and frequently associated with limited survival. Alternative options for decompression include tandem ureteral stents, metallic stents and metal-mesh stents, though the preferred method remains controversial. We reviewed and updated our outcomes with tandem ureteral stents for malignant ureteral obstruction, and carried out a PubMed search using the terms "malignant ureteral obstruction," "tandem ureteral stents," "ipsilateral ureteral stents," "metal ureteral stent," "resonance stent," "silhouette stent" and "metal mesh stent." A comprehensive review of the literature and summary of outcomes is provided. The majority of studies encountered were retrospective with small sample sizes. The evidence is most robust for metal stents, whereas only limited data exists for tandem or metal-mesh stents. Metal and metal-mesh stents are considerably more expensive than tandem stenting, but the potential for less frequent stent exchanges makes them possibly cost-effective over time. Urinary tract infections have been associated with all stent types. A wide range of failure rates has been published for all types of stents, limiting direct comparison. Metal and metal-mesh stents show a high incidence of stent colic, migration and encrustation, whereas tandem stents appear to produce symptoms equivalent to single stents. Comparison is difficult given the limited evidence and heterogeneity of patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. It is clear that prospective, randomized studies are necessary to effectively scrutinize conventional, tandem, metallic ureteral and metal-mesh stents for their use in malignant ureteral obstruction. PMID:25950837

  19. Experimental Research on Balloon-expandable Endovascular Stent Expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexuan; Yi, Hong; Ni, Zhonghua

    2005-01-01

    The application background and experimental research overview of medical endovascular stent are presented. Based on the analytical comparison of the current research achievements, the life cycle of medical vascular stent, which is composed of three phases of mounting, deployment and long-term in vivo service, is pointed out and the characteristics of stent expansion process in the life cycle are emphasized on. The experimental scheme of in vitro stent expansion based on the machine vision technology in LabVIEW is presented. The selected component devices and measurement program for experiment are expatiated. A special drug-loading stent was expanded on the assembled platform of selected equipments and experimental results are analyzed. The experimental scheme presented in the paper provides powerful experimental support for the computer simulation of stent expansion process by the finite element analysis. PMID:17282686

  20. Role of metallic stents in benign esophageal stricture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, Chan Sup

    2012-10-01

    Simple esophageal strictures, which are focal, straight, and large in diameter, usually require 1 - 3 dilation sessions to relieve symptoms. However, complex strictures, which are long, tortuous, or associated with a severely compromised luminal diameter, are usually more difficult to treat with conventional bougie or balloon dilation techniques, and often have high recurrence rates. Although the permanent placement of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) has been used to manage refractory benign esophageal strictures, this procedure is associated with additional problems, such as stricture from tissue hyperplasia, stent migration, and fistula formation. Thus, several new types of stents have been developed, including temporary SEMS, self-expandable plastic stents (SEPS), and biodegradable stents. The use of these new products has produced varied results. Temporary SEMS that have been used to relieve benign esophageal conditions have caused granulation tissue at both ends of the stent because of contact between the mucosa and the exposed metal components of the stent, thus hindering stent removal. We examined the tissue response to two new types of SEMS, a flange-type and a straighttype, each coated with a silicone membrane on the outside of the metal mesh. These two SEMS were evaluated individually and compared with a conventional control stent in animal experiments. Although the newly designed stents resulted in reduced tissue hyperplasia, and were thus more easily separated from the esophageal tissue, some degree of tissue hyperplasia did occur. We suggest that newly designed DES (drug-eluting stents) may provide an alternative tool to manage refractory benign esophageal stricture.

  1. Self-expanding stents in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt: experience with nitinol Strecker stents.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Bezzi, M; Salvatori, F M; Broglia, L; Maccioni, F; Pizzi, G; Abbondanza, S; Bonomo, G

    1996-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the performance and efficacy of a new self-expanding stent (nitinol Strecker stent) in the transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) procedure. We have successfully placed 64 nitinol Strecker stents in 48 patients. The average portosystemic gradient decreased from 22 to 11 mm Hg. Balloon dilatation was necessary in 12 of 35 angiographically controlled cases at 5 days (34%), because of incomplete stent expansion, small thrombi within the stent or obstruction. At 1-6 months stent malfunctions occurred in 8 of 23 patients who underwent control angiography (34%) and at 6-24 months in 6 of 7 patients (85%). Rebleeding occurred in 2 of 39 patients (follow-up > 1 month) (5%) and temporary crises of de novo encephalopathy were observed in 11 of 48 patients (23%). Refractory ascites completely resolved in 4 of 6 patients (66%) and improved in the remaining 2 cases. Compared with other self-expanding stents, nitinol Strecker stents seem to be equally effective in TIPS; no increase in complication rate was observed, either clinical or stent-related. PMID:8934143

  2. Photodynamic therapy for occluded biliary metal stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Joseph V. E.; Krasner, Neville; Sturgess, R.

    1999-02-01

    In this abstract we describe the use of photodynamic therapy (PDT) to recanalize occluded biliary metal stents. In patients with jaundice secondary to obstructed metal stents PDT was carried out 72 hours after the administration of m THPC. Red laser light at 652 nm was delivered endoscopically at an energy intensity of 50 J/cm. A week later endoscopic retrograde cholangiogram showed complete recanalization of the metal stent.

  3. In Vitro Comparison of Self-Expanding Versus Balloon-Expandable Stents in a Human Ex Vivo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Grenacher, Lars Rohde, Stefan Gaenger, Ellen; Deutsch, Jochen; Kauffmann, Guenter W.; Richter, Goetz M.

    2006-04-15

    The objective was to compare the radial strength and expansile precision of self-expanding stents and balloon-expandable stents in a human cadaver bifurcation model. Seven different self-expanding (LUMINEXX, JOSTENT SelfX, JOSTENT SelfX hrf, Sinus-Repo, Sinus SuperFlex, Easy Wallstent, SMART) and four different balloon-expandable stent models (Palmaz, Sinus Stent, SAXX Medium, JOSTENT peripheral), each type 10 stents (total n = 110 stents) were implanted into the common iliac arteries of human cadaver corpses. The maximum stent diameter was 10 mm for all models. After stent implantation, the specimens were filled with silicone caoutchouc. After 24 h, the vascular walls including the stents were removed from the hardened casts. Diameters were taken and the weight of the cast cylinders was measured in air and in purified water to calculate the volume of the bodies (according to Archimedes Law) as a relative but precise degree for the radial strength of the implanted stents. The cylindrical casts of the self-expanding stents showed lower mean diameters (8.2 {+-} 1.0 mm) and mean volumes (0.60 {+-} 0.14 ml/cm) than in the balloon-expandable stent group (10.1 {+-} 0.3 mm and 0.71 {+-} 0.04 ml/cm, respectively; p < 0.01). The nominal maximum diameter of 10 mm was not achieved in any of the self-expanding stents, but this was achieved in more than 70% (29/40) of the balloon-expandable stent specimens (p < 0.05). The variation between achieved volumes was significantly larger in self-expanding (range: 0.23-0.78 ml/cm) than in balloon-expandable stents (range: 0.66-0.81 ml/cm; p < 0.05). Self-expanding stents presented considerably lower radial expansion force and lower degree of precision than balloon-expandable stents.

  4. In vitro comparison of self-expanding versus balloon-expandable stents in a human ex vivo model.

    PubMed

    Grenacher, Lars; Rohde, Stefan; Gänger, Ellen; Deutsch, Jochen; Kauffmann, Günter W; Richter, Götz M

    2006-01-01

    The objective was to compare the radial strength and expansile precision of self-expanding stents and balloon-expandable stents in a human cadaver bifurcation model. Seven different self-expanding (LUMINEXX, JOSTENT SelfX, JOSTENT SelfX hrf, Sinus-Repo, Sinus SuperFlex, Easy Wallstent, SMART) and four different balloon-expandable stent models (Palmaz, Sinus Stent, SAXX Medium, JOSTENT peripheral), each type 10 stents (total n = 110 stents) were implanted into the common iliac arteries of human cadaver corpses. The maximum stent diameter was 10 mm for all models. After stent implantation, the specimens were filled with silicone caoutchouc. After 24 h, the vascular walls including the stents were removed from the hardened casts. Diameters were taken and the weight of the cast cylinders was measured in air and in purified water to calculate the volume of the bodies (according to Archimedes Law) as a relative but precise degree for the radial strength of the implanted stents. The cylindrical casts of the self-expanding stents showed lower mean diameters (8.2 +/- 1.0 mm) and mean volumes (0.60 +/- 0.14 ml/cm) than in the balloon-expandable stent group (10.1 +/- 0.3 mm and 0.71 +/- 0.04 ml/cm, respectively; p < 0.01). The nominal maximum diameter of 10 mm was not achieved in any of the self-expanding stents, but this was achieved in more than 70% (29/40) of the balloon-expandable stent specimens (p < 0.05). The variation between achieved volumes was significantly larger in self-expanding (range: 0.23-0.78 ml/cm) than in balloon-expandable stents (range: 0.66-0.81 ml/cm; p < 0.05). Self-expanding stents presented considerably lower radial expansion force and lower degree of precision than balloon-expandable stents. PMID:16328696

  5. Treatment of Benign Tracheal Stenosis Utilizing Self-Expanding Nitinol Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Sesterhenn, Andreas M. Wagner, Hans-Joachim; Alfke, Heiko; Werner, Jochen A.; Lippert, Burkard M.

    2004-08-15

    We assessed the results of self-expanding metallic stent insertion into benign proximal tracheal stenosis in patients not appropriate or unfit for surgical repair. Proximal benign tracheal stenoses had occurred in 11 patients (7 men, 4 women, mean age 68.8 years) after long-time intubation (n = 6), tracheostomy (n = 4), or chondropathia (n = 1). Fourteen self-expanding nitinol stents were placed in the patients under general anesthesia with endoscopical and fluoroscopical guidance. Stent insertion was successful in all cases and led to immediate relief of the morphological and functional airway obstruction. No immediate complications were noted. During the mean follow-up period of 67.5 weeks we observed one recurrent dyspnea 3 months after implantation and granuloma formation at the stent insertion site in another patient. Both complications were successfully treated with additional stent insertion in one case and laser resection of granulomas in the other. Self-expanding nitinol stents should be considered for the treatment of benign proximal tracheal obstruction in selected patients for whom surgical repair is contraindicated.

  6. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunting (TIPS) with balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents: Technical and clinical aspects after 3 1/2 years' experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesdal, I. Kaare; Jaschke, Werner; Buehler, Mathias; Adamus, Ralf; Filser, Thomas; Holm, Eggert; Georgi, Max

    1997-01-15

    Purpose. To evaluate prospectively our experience with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) using four different metallic stents. Methods. Between November 1991 and April 1995, 57 patients (41 men and 16 women; age 35-72 years, mean 54 years) underwent the TIPS procedure. Techniques for portal vein localization before and during TIPS were fluoroscopy, computed tomography (CT) studies, wedged hepatic venography, arterial portography, and ultrasound. After predilation we deployed balloon-expandable (n=48) and self-expanding (n=45) metallic stents. Fifteen patients underwent variceal embolization. Initial follow-up angiograms (mean 6.9 months, range 3-24 months) were obtained in 39 of these patients. Results. Fifty-three patients (93%) had successful TIPS placement. The mean decrease in portal pressure was 42.7%. Besides fluoroscopy, the most helpful techniques for portal vein localization were venography and CT. Residual stenosis (n=1) and late shortening (n=4) of Wallstents resulted in shunt dysfunction. The technical problems encountered with the Palmaz stent resulted from its lack of flexibility. We combined balloon-expandable and self-expanding stents in 12 patients. The 30-day and late follow-up (mean 11.9 months) percutaneous reintervention rates were 11.3% and 64.2%, respectively. There were no clinically significant complications related to the TIPS insertions. Conclusion. An ideal stent does not exist for TIPS, and the authors recommend combining a Palmaz stent with a flexible self-expanding stent.

  7. Stent Fracture and Reocclusion After Placement of a Single Self-Expanding Stent in the Common Iliac Artery and Endovascular Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Higashiura, Wataru Sakaguchi, Shoji; Morimoto, Kengo; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2008-09-15

    We present a case of fracture of a single self-expanding stent placed in the common iliac artery (CIA). An 80-year-old woman underwent placement of a self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion. Stent fracture and reocclusion were detected after 18 months. Successful revascularization was achieved using a stent-in-stent maneuver. The possibility of stent fracture with reocclusion should be considered following treatment with a single self-expanding stent for CIA occlusion.

  8. Very Late Bare Metal Stent Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto Herrera, Mariana; Restrepo, José A.; Felipe Buitrago, Andrés; Gómez Mejía, Mabel; Díaz, Jesús H.

    2013-01-01

    Very late stent thrombosis is a rare and not-well-understood complication after bare metal stent implantation. It usually presents as an ST elevation acute coronary syndrome and it is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Pathophysiologic mechanisms are not well defined; nevertheless, recent studies have proposed a neoatherosclerotic process as the triggering mechanism. We present the case of a patient with bare metal very late stent thrombosis 12 years after implantation. PMID:24829831

  9. Bare-metal stent thrombosis two decades after stenting.

    PubMed

    Acibuca, Aynur; Gerede, Demet Menekse; Vurgun, Veysel Kutay

    2015-01-01

    Very late bare-metal stent (BMS) thrombosis is unusual in clinical practice. To the best of our knowledge, the latest that the thrombosis of a BMS has been reported is 14 years after implantation. Here, we describe a case of BMS thrombosis that occurred two decades after stenting. A 68-year-old male patient was admitted with acute anterior myocardial infarction. This patient had a history of BMS implantation in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) 20 years previously. Immediate coronary angiography demonstrated acute thrombotic occlusion of the stent in the LAD. With this case, we are recording the latest reported incidence of BMS thrombosis after implantation. PMID:26407330

  10. Structural Evaluation of Radially Expandable Cardiovascular Stents Encased in a Polyurethane Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trigwell, Steve; De, Samiran; Sharma, Rajesh; Mazumder, Malay K.; Mehta, Jawahar L.

    2004-01-01

    A method of encasing cardiovascular stents with an expandable polyurethane coating has been developed to provide a smooth homogeneous inner wall allowing for a confluent growth of endothelial cells. In this design, the metal wire stent structure is completely covered by the polyurethane film minimizing biocorrosion of the metal (stainless steel or nitinol), and providing a homogeneous surface for surface treatment and incorporation of various eluting drugs to prevent platelet aggregation while supporting endothelialization. The polyurethane surface was treated with a helium plasma for sterilization and promotes growth of cells. The paper details the performance of the coated film to expand with the metal stent up to 225 % during deployment. We present stress/strain behavior of polyurethane films, and subsequent plasma treatment of the surface and the adhesion of the coating to the stent structure upon expansion. A film of less than 25 tm was found to be sufficient for corrosion resistance and flexibility without producing any excess stress on the stent structure. Straining the film to 225 % and plasma modification did not affect the mechanical and surface properties while allowing for improved biocompatibility as determined by the critical surface tension, surface chemistry, and roughness.

  11. Structural evaluation of radially expandable cardiovascular stents encased in a polyurethane film.

    PubMed

    Trigwell, Steve; De, Samiran; Sharma, Rajesh; Mazumder, Malay K; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2006-02-01

    A method of encasing cardiovascular stents with an expandable polyurethane coating has been developed to provide a smooth homogeneous inner wall allowing for a confluent growth of endothelial cells. In this design, the metal wire stent structure is completely covered by the polyurethane film, minimizing biocorrosion of the metal (stainless steel or nitinol), and providing a homogeneous surface for surface treatment and incorporation of various eluting drugs to prevent platelet aggregation while supporting endothelialization. The polyurethane surface was treated with a helium plasma for sterilization and promotes growth of cells. The article details the performance of the coated film to expand with the metal stent up to 225% during deployment. Stress/strain behavior of polyurethane films, subsequent plasma treatment of the surface, and the adhesion of the coating to the stent structure upon expansion are presented. A film of less than 25 microm was found to be sufficient for corrosion resistance and flexibility without producing any excess stress on the stent structure. Straining the film to 225% and plasma modification did not affect the mechanical and surface properties, but allowed for improved biocompatibility as determined by the critical surface tension, surface chemistry, and roughness. PMID:16080158

  12. Stent-in-Stent Technique for the Treatment of Proximal Bronchial Restenosis after Insertion of Metallic Stents: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Bondue, Benjamin; Schlossmacher, Pascal; Knoop, Christiane; Etienne, Isabelle; Luce, Sylvie; Sokolow, Youri; Leduc, Dimitri

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic treatment of a bronchial restenosis previously treated by insertion of a partially covered self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) can be difficult. Classically, after recanalization of the bronchus, the stent is removed and replaced by a more adapted one. We report on two cases of proximal bronchial restenosis treated by insertion of an additional stent inside the lumen of the previously inserted stent using the stent-in-stent (SIS) technique. The indications for the initial stent were malignancy in Patient 1 and posttransplant bronchial stenosis in Patient 2. Restenosis occurred at the proximal end of the stent within months in both cases. Stent removal and insertion of a new stent were considered, but this option was discarded because of an excessive risk of bronchial perforation and preference towards an alternative approach. In both cases, a second customized SEMS was placed using the SIS technique after ablation of the proximal end stenosis of the stent by argon plasma coagulation and/or dilation with a balloon. Recanalization of the bronchus was achieved in both cases without complications. The SIS technique is a valuable alternative to removal of SEMS in case of proximal bronchial restenosis. PMID:27110422

  13. Miniaturized Self-Expanding Drug-Eluting Stent in Small Coronary Arteries: Late Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavio Roberto Azevedo; Mattos, Luiz Alberto Piva e; Abizaid, Alexandre; Abizaid, Andrea S.; Costa, J. Ribamar; Costa, Ricardo; Staico, Rodolfo; Botelho, Roberto; Sousa, J. Eduardo; Sousa, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Background Small vessels represent a risk factor for restenosis in percutaneous coronary angioplasty (PCA). The Sparrow® self-expanding drug-eluting stent, which has a lower profile than the current systems, has never been tested in this scenario. Objectives To evaluate the late effectiveness of the Sparrow® drug-eluting stent, regarding in-stent late lumen loss (LLL). Methods Patients with ischemia, symptomatic or documented, were submitted to PCA in vessels with reference diameter < 2.75 mm, divided into two groups regarding Sparrow® stent type: group 1: Sparrow® drug-eluting stent (DES), group 2: Sparrow® bare metal stent (BMS). Clinical follow-up duration was 12 months. Evaluation using quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) was performed immediately and at 8 months. A decrease of over 65% of in-stent LLL with DES was estimated to calculate sample size. IBM® SPSS software, release 19 (Chicago, Illinois, USA) was used for the statistical analysis. Results A total of 24 patients were randomized, 12 in each group. The DES and BMS groups were similar in age (63.25 ± 10.01 vs. 64.58 ± 11.54, p = 0.765), male gender (58.3% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.412), risk factors and all angiographs aspects. Immediate results were satisfactory in both groups. At 8 months in-stent late lumen loss was significantly lower in DES than in BMS group (DES vs. BMS 0.25 ± 0.16 0.97 ± 0.76, p = 0.008). Conclusion In small-vessel PCA, the Sparrow® DES determined significant reduction in in-stent LLL, when compared to Sparrow® BMS. PMID:24100691

  14. Palliative Treatment of Malignant Colorectal Strictures with Metallic Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Diaz, Laura; Pinto Pabon, Isabel; Fernandez Lobato, Rosa; Montes Lopez, Carmen

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To assess the effectiveness and safety of self-expanding metallic stents as a primary palliative treatment for inoperable malignant colorectal strictures. Methods: Under radiological guidance 20 self-expanding metallic Wallstents were implanted in 16 consecutive patients with colorectal stenoses caused by malignant neoplasms, when surgical treatment of the condition had been ruled out. The patients were followed up clinically for 1-44 months, until death or termination of this study. Results: The stents were successfully implanted in all cases and resolved the clinical obstruction in all the patients except one, who underwent subsequent colostomy. During follow-up of the remaining 15 patients, clinical complications arising from the procedure were pain (two patients), minor rectal bleeding (one patient), and severe rectal bleeding (one patient) (26%). There were three cases of stent migration and three cases of stent occlusion, and reintervention by us was necessary in 20% of cases (3/15). The mean life span following the procedure was 130 days, and none of the patients exhibited clinical symptoms of obstruction at the time of death (12 patients) or termination of the study (3 patients). Conclusion: Deployment of metallic stents under radiologic guidance is an effective alternative as a primary palliative measure in malignant colorectal obstruction, though the possible clinical complications and need for repeat intervention during follow-up should be taken into account.

  15. Primary Stent Placement for Recanalization of Iliac Artery Occlusions: Using a Self-Expanding Spiral Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae-Kyu; Kim, Yun-Hyeon; Chung, Sang-Yeung; Kang, Heoung-Keun

    1999-07-15

    Purpose: To report the clinical results for recanalizations of an occluded iliac artery by a self-expanding spiral stent. Methods: We attempted to recanalize 36 iliac artery occlusions in 34 patients [33 men, 1 woman, aged 51-75 years (average 61.6 years)]. The average lesion length was 6.92 cm (range 1-14 cm). The patients' chief complaints were intermittent claudication and resting pain. Fontaine classification was assigned before and after the procedure. Technical and clinical success were also analyzed. Results: Forty-five stents were successfully deployed in 34 patients. All 36 lesions (13 in the external iliac artery, 12 in the common iliac artery, and 11 in both) were patently recanalized on angiography. The follow-up period ranged from 6 months to 36 months (mean 11.9 months). Fourteen stents (39%) with incomplete expansion were dilated with a balloon catheter. Good technical (100%) and clinical (94%) results were obtained. The only complication was one hematoma at the puncture site. Reocclusions were noted in two lesions (5%) at 1 week and 15 months, respectively. Conclusion: A self-expanding spiral stent is a safe and effective device for recanalization of an iliac artery occlusion as the primary stent without any previous intervention.

  16. Endoscopic extra-cavitary drainage of pancreatic necrosis with fully covered self-expanding metal stents (fcSEMS) and staged lavage with a high-flow water jet system

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ioana B.; Gutierrez, Juan P.; Ramesh, Jayapal; Wilcox, C. Mel; Mönkemüller, Klaus E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To present a novel, less-invasive method of endoscopic drainage (ED) for walled-off pancreatic necrosis (WON).We describe the feasibility, success rate, and complications of combined ED extra-cavitary lavage and debridement of WON using a biliary catheter and high-flow water jet system (water pump). Patients and methods: Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided drainage was performed with insertion of two 7-Fr, 4-cm double pigtail stents. Subsequently a fully covered self-expanding metal stent (fcSEMS) was placed. The key aspect of the debridement was the insertion of a 5-Fr biliary catheter through or along the fcSEMS into the cavity, with ensuing saline lavage using a high-flow water jet system. The patients were then brought back for repeated, planned endoscopic lavages of the WON. No endoscopic intra-cavitary exploration was performed. Results: A total of 17 patients (15 men, 2 women; mean age 52.6, range 24 – 69; mean American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] score of 3) underwent ED of WON with this new method. The mean initial WON diameter was 9.5 cm, range 8 to 26 cm. The total number of ED was 84, range 2 to 13. The mean stenting period was 42.5 days. The mean follow-up was 51 days, range 3 to 370. A resolution of the WON was achieved in 14 patients (82.3 %). There were no major complications associated with this method. Conclusion: ED of complex WON with fcSEMS followed by repeated endoscopic extra-cavitary lavage and debridement using a biliary catheter and high-flow water jet system is a minimally invasive, feasible method with high technical and clinical success and minimal complications. PMID:26135660

  17. Differences in Endothelial Injury After Balloon Angioplasty, Insertion of Balloon-Expanded Stents or Release of Self-Expanding Stents: An Electron Microscopic Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Harnek, Jan; Zoucas, Evita; Carlemalm, Erik; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    1999-01-15

    Purpose: To evaluate which of six different commonly available stents inserted into an artery without percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) causes the least endothelial damage. To compare the degree of endothelial injury after insertion of such a stent with injury caused by PTA. Methods: Twelve healthy pigs were used in the experiments. In the first part of the study six different types of stents were inserted into the common iliac arteries. In the second part of the study self-expanding stents with large spaces between the wires were used. PTA was performed in the contralateral iliac artery. The pigs were killed immediately after the procedure and resected specimens examined after fixation, using scanning electron microscopy. Results: All procedures but two were accomplished successfully. More endothelium was preserved after insertion of self-expanding stents with large spaces between the wires, compared with stents with small spaces and balloon-expanded stents. After insertion of self-expanding stents with large spaces, 50.1% {+-} 16.4% of the endothelium remained intact, compared with only 5.6% {+-} 7.7% after PTA. The difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Self-expanding stents with large spaces between the wires, inserted without PTA, cause less damage to the endothelium than other stents and significantly less damage than PTA.

  18. Performance of self-expanding nitinol stent in a curved artery: impact of stent length and deployment orientation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shijia; Gu, Linxia; Froemming, Stacey R

    2012-07-01

    The primary aim of this work was to investigate the performance of self-expanding Nitinol stents in a curved artery through finite element analysis. The interaction between a PROTÉGÉ™ GPS™ self-expanding Nitinol stent and a stenosed artery, as well as a sheath, was characterized in terms of acute lumen gain, stent underexpansion, incomplete stent apposition, and tissue prolapse. The clinical implications of these parameters were discussed. The impact of stent deployment orientation and the stent length on the arterial wall stress distribution were evaluated. It was found that the maximum principal stress increased by 17.46%, when the deployment orientation of stent was varied at a 5 deg angle. A longer stent led to an increased contact pressure between stent and underlying tissue, which might alleviate the stent migration. However, it also caused a severe hinge effect and arterial stress concentration correspondingly, which might aggravate neointimal hyperplasia. The fundamental understanding of the behavior of a self-expanding stent and its clinical implications will facilitate a better device design. PMID:24763629

  19. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.; Imrich, Kenneth J.

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  20. Topic controversies in the endoscopic management of malignant hilar strictures using metal stent: side-by-side versus stent-in-stent techniques.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong Ho; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Kogure, Hirofumi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Endoscopic management of unresectable hilar malignant biliary stricture (MBS) is currently challenging, and the best approach is still controversial. Liver volume is the key to adequate biliary drainage in hilar MBS and multiple stenting is mandatory to drain over 50% of liver volume in most cases. The self-expandable metallic stent (SEMS) has shown superior patency to plastic stents in recent reports. There are two methods of multiple stenting for hilar MBS: stent-in-stent (SIS) and side-by-side (SBS). Advantages of SIS include multiple SEMS placement in one stent caliber at the common bile duct (CBD), which is considered physiologically ideal. The through-the-mesh (TTM) technique with guidewires and the SEMS delivery system can be technically difficult in SIS, although the recent development of dedicated SEMSs having a loose portion facilitating the TTM technique makes SIS technically feasible both at stent deployment and re-interventions. Conversely, the SBS technique, if placed across the papilla, is technically simple at initial placement and re-intervention at stent occlusion. However, SBS has potential disadvantages of overexpansion of the CBD because of parallel placement of multiple SEMS, which can lead to portal vein thrombosis. Given the limited evidence available, a well-designed randomized controlled trial comparing these two techniques is warranted. PMID:26136361

  1. In vitro evaluation of stent patency and in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents using MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Hamer, O W; Borisch, I; Paetzel, C; Nitz, W R; Seitz, J; Feuerbach, S; Zorger, N

    2006-08-01

    In vitro study to investigate the suitability of contrast enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CEMRA) for determination of stent patency and grading of in-stent stenoses in 10 metallic stents. The Acculink carotid, DynaLink, Easy Wallstent, JostentSelfX XF, Luminexx, Omnilink, sinus-SuperFlex, SMART, Symphony and ZA stent were separately placed in a vascular phantom. Dedicated stenoses inside the stents generated a concentric lumen narrowing of 50%. CEMRA was performed for each stent. Signal loss inside the stents and artificial lumen narrowing were assessed objectively using the evaluation software of the MR imager. Moreover, three blinded observers determined visibility of stent patency and in-stent stenoses subjectively on a 3-point scale and graded in-stent stenoses. Loss of signal intensity within the stent lumen ranged between 90% (Wallstent) and 5% (ZA), artificial lumen narrowing between 56% (Symphony) and 22% (ZA). For the Symphony and Wallstent, visibility of patency and in-stent stenoses was impaired and the observers' grading exaggerated the degree of stenoses (by 23% and 33%, respectively). For the remainder of stents, patency and stenoses were visible and stenoses were graded accurately (less than 10% discrepancy from reference standard). In this in vitro study, eight of 10 stents presented with MRI characteristics which enabled determination of stent patency and accurate grading of clinically relevant in-stent stenoses. PMID:16641417

  2. Air cholangiography in endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent placement of metallic stents for malignant hilar biliary obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Min; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jang, Dong Kee; Chung, Kwang Hyun; Park, Jin Myung; Paik, Woo Hyun; Lee, Jun Kyu; Ryu, Ji Kon; Kim, Yong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although endoscopic bilateral stent-in-stent (SIS) placement of self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) is one of the major palliative treatments for unresectable malignant hilar biliary obstruction, post-endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) cholangitis can occur frequently due to inadequate drainage, especially after contrast injection into the biliary tree. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of air cholangiography-assisted stenting. Methods: This study included 47 patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction who underwent endoscopic bilateral SEMS placement using the SIS technique. They were divided into two groups, air (n = 23) or iodine contrast (n = 24) cholangiography. We retrospectively compared comprehensive clinical and laboratory data of both groups. Results: There were no significant differences found between the two groups with respect to technical success (87% versus 87.5%, air versus contrast group, respectively), functional success (95% versus 95.2%), 30-day mortality (8.3% versus 8.7%) and stent patency. Post-ERCP adverse events occurred in 5 (21.7%) of the patients in the air group and 8 (33.3%) of the patients in the contrast group. Among these, the rate of cholangitis was significantly lower in the air group (4.8% versus 29.2%, p = 0.048). In multivariate analysis, air cholangiography, technical success and a shorter procedure time were significantly associated with a lower incidence of post-ERCP cholangitis. Conclusions: Air cholangiography-assisted stenting can be a safe and effective method for endoscopic bilateral SIS placement of SEMS in patients with malignant hilar biliary obstruction. PMID:26929781

  3. Carotid Artery Stenting Using a Novel Self-Expanding Braided Nickel-Titanium Stent: Feasibility and Safety Porcine Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Ahlhelm, Frank Kaufmann, Ralf; Ahlhelm, Dirk Ong, Mai Fang; Roth, Christian Reith, Wolfgang

    2009-09-15

    We studied the deliverability and safety of a braided, self-expanding, closed-cell nickel-titanium (NiTi) stent (E-volution, Jotec GmbH, Hechingen, Germany) especially designed for the endovascular treatment of carotid artery bifurcation stenosis with special regard to in-stent stenosis and thrombosis compared with a laser-cut reference nitinol stent in a porcine model of percutaneous vascular interventions. We aimed to assess histopathologic response in minipig carotid and subclavian arteries. Eight minipigs received a total of 42 stents: 14 reference stents and 28 E-volution stents. Eleven of the E-volution stents were additionally coated with heparin. Control angiography was obtained immediately before and after vascular intervention as well as 4 weeks after the procedure. Primary endpoints were 28 days of angiographic analyses as well as histomorphometric analysis, including injury score, inflammation score, luminal diameter, vessel diameter, maximal neointimal thickness, and area of in-stent stenosis. Secondary end points were procedural success, 28-day mortality, and stent thrombosis. All stents could be delivered successfully without procedural complications, morbidity, or mortality during our observation time. As confirmed by histology, no in-stent thrombosis was observed. Compared with common carotid arteries, subclavian arteries are significantly more vulnerable to developing in-stent stenosis caused by neointima proliferation (p < 0.05). Compared with the use of 1 single stent/artery, serial application of two stents leads to a more excessive but not significantly different neointimal proliferation (p > 0.05). The E-volution stent, especially when heparin coated, is in line with the comparison to the laser-cut reference stent displaying similar results of angiographic, histologic, and histomorphometric analyses (p > 0.05). Compared with the reference laser-cut stent, the self-expanding nitinol stent (E-volution) with its advanced braiding technology is

  4. Hepatocellular Carcinoma Complicated by Gastroduodenal Obstruction: Palliative Treatment with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ye Jin; Kim, Jin Hyoung Song, Ho-Young; Park, Jung-Hoon; Na, Han Kyu; Kim, Pyeong Hwa; Fan, Yong

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of self-expandable metallic stents in seven patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction caused by inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: Seven patients with gastroduodenal obstruction caused by advanced HCC underwent metallic stent placement from 2003 to 2010. These patients had total dysphagia (n = 5) or were able to eat only liquids (n = 2) before stent placement. Patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance scores of 2 or 3, and Child-Pugh classification B or C. Results: Stent placement was technically successful in all seven patients (100%) and clinically successful in six (86%). Five patients could eat a soft diet, and one patient tolerated regular diet after stent placement. Stent-related obstructive jaundice occurred in one patient. One patient had hematemesis 11 days after stent placement. Overall mean survival was 51 days (range, 10-119 days). Stent patency was preserved in six patients with clinical success until death. Conclusion: Placement of a covered self-expandable metallic stent may offer good palliation in patients with gastroduodenal obstruction due to advanced HCC.

  5. Metallic Stents for Tracheobronchial Pathology Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Carolina; Laborda, Alicia; Lozano, Juan M.; Caballero, Hugo; Sebastian, Antonio; Lopera, Jorge; Gregorio, Miguel Angel de

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present the 7-year experience of the treatment of benign and malignant tracheobronchial stenoses using metallic stents. Patients and Methods: One hundred twenty-three stents were inserted in 86 patients (74 benign and 12 malignant stenoses). Ninety-seven stents were placed in the trachea and 26 in the bronchi. The procedures were performed under fluoroscopic and flexible bronchoscopic guidance with the patient under light sedation. In cases of severe stenotic lesions or obstructions, laser resection was performed before stent placement. Clinical and functional pulmonary data were recorded before and 3 months after the procedure. Follow-up involved clinical data and radiographic techniques at 48 h and at 1-, 3-, 6-, and 12-month intervals. Results: The technical success was 100 %. Dyspnea disappearance, forced expiratory volume in the first second, and pulmonary functional data improvement was observed in all patients (p < 0.001). Complications were detected in 23 patients (26.7 %). Mean follow-up time was 6.3 {+-} 1.2 months in patients with malignant lesions and 76.2 {+-} 2.3 months patients with in benign lesions. By the end of the study, 100 % of patients with malignant pathology and 6.7 % of patients with benign lesions had died. Conclusion: Endoluminal treatment of tracheobronchial stenosis with metallic stents is a therapeutic alternative in patients who are poor candidates for surgery. In unresectable malignant lesions, the benefit of metallic stenting is unquestionable. In benign lesions, the results are satisfactory, but sometimes other interventions are required to treat complications. New stent technology may improve these results.

  6. Insertion of Self-Expandable Nitinol Stents Without Previous Balloon Angioplasty Reduces Restenosis Compared with PTA Prior to Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Harnek, Jan; Zoucas, Evita; Stenram, Unne; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To compare the development of intimal hyperplasia after deployment of a self-expanding nitinol stent with and without previous percutaneous transluminal balloon angioplasty (PTA), with the results after PTA alone. Methods: In nine healthy pigs, the iliac arteries were divided into three groups: group 1 (n = 6 arteries) was treated with PTA; group 2 n 6)with insertion of self-expanding stents after PTA; and group 3 (n = 6) with stent insertion without previous PTA. After 8 weeks the vessels were examined with intravascular ultrasonography,histologic examination and morphometric analysis. Results: Although the injury index in group 1 (0.17{+-} 0.57) was lower (p <0.05) than in group 2 (0.26 {+-} 0.06) and group 3 (0.26 {+-} 0.08), PTA-treated arteries showed significantly (p <0.05) reduced mean luminal gain (0.53 {+-} 2.84) compared with arteries treated with PTA prior to stenting (2.58 {+-} 1.38) and compared with stenting alone (4.65 {+-}5.34). Stenting after PTA resulted in a higher (p<0.05) restenosis index (2.63 {+-} 1.06) compared with stenting without PTA (1.35 {+-} 0.59). Group 2 also had a significantly thicker intimap <0.05) and 83% and 74% higher intima/mediaratio (p <0.05) compared with groups 1 and 3, respectively. Conclusion: Insertion of a self-expandable nitinol stent without previous PTA results in less intimalhyperplasia than if PTA is performed prior to stenting, suggesting that direct stenting can be used in angioplasty sessions with a favorable outcome.

  7. Trimming a Metallic Biliary Stent Using an Argon Plasma Coagulator

    SciTech Connect

    Rerknimitr, Rungsun Naprasert, Pisit; Kongkam, Pradermchai; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2007-06-15

    Background. Distal migration is one of the common complications after insertion of a covered metallic stent. Stent repositioning or removal is not always possible in every patient. Therefore, trimming using an argon plasma coagulator (APC) may be a good alternative method to solve this problem. Methods. Metallic stent trimming by APC was performed in 2 patients with biliary Wallstent migration and in another patient with esophageal Ultraflex stent migration. The power setting was 60-100 watts with an argon flow of 0.8 l/min. Observations. The procedure was successfully performed and all distal parts of the stents were removed. No significant collateral damage to the nearby mucosa was observed. Conclusions. In a patient with a distally migrated metallic stent, trimming of the stent is possible by means of an APC. This new method may be applicable to other sites of metallic stent migration.

  8. Oversizing and Restenosis with Self-Expanding Stents in Iliofemoral Arteries

    SciTech Connect

    Saguner, Ardan M. Traupe, Tobias; Raeber, Lorenz; Hess, Nina; Banz, Yara; Saguner, Arhan R.; Diehm, Nicolas; Hess, Otto M.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Uncoated self-expanding nitinol stents (NS) are commonly oversized in peripheral arteries. In current practice, 1-mm oversizing is recommended. Yet, oversizing of NS may be associated with increased restenosis. To provide further evidence, NS were implanted in porcine iliofemoral arteries with a stent-to-artery-ratio between 1.0 and 2.3. Besides conventional uncoated NS, a novel self-expanding NS with an antiproliferative titanium-nitride-oxide (TiNOX) coating was tested for safety and efficacy. Methods: Ten uncoated NS and six TiNOX-coated NS (5-6 mm) were implanted randomly in the iliofemoral artery of six mini-pigs. After implantation, quantitative angiography (QA) was performed for calculation of artery and minimal luminal diameter. Follow-up was performed by QA and histomorphometry after 5 months. Results: Stent migration, stent fracture, or thrombus formation were not observed. All stents were patent at follow-up. Based on the location of the stent (iliac/femoral) and the stent-to-artery-ratio, stent segments were divided into 'normal-sized' (stent-to-artery-ratio < 1.4, n = 12) and 'oversized' (stent-to-artery-ratio {>=} 1.4, n = 9). All stent segments expanded to their near nominal diameter during follow-up. Normal-sized stent segments increased their diameter by 6% and oversized segments by 29%. A significant correlation between oversizing and restenosis by both angiography and histomorphometry was observed. Restenosis rates were similar for uncoated NS and TiNOX-coated NS. Conclusions: TiNOX-coated NS are as safe and effective as uncoated NS in the porcine iliofemoral artery. All stents further expand to near their nominal diameter during follow-up. Oversizing is linearly and positively correlated with neointimal proliferation and restenosis, which may not be reduced by TiNOX-coating.

  9. Use of nitinol self-expandable stents in 26 dogs with tracheal collapse.

    PubMed

    Beranek, J; Jaresova, H; Rytz, U

    2014-02-01

    A study was designed to describe a novel approach to the treatment of tracheal collapse (TC) in dogs using self-expandable nitinol stents. Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for 26 client owned dogs in which nitinol stents were deployed. The entire length of trachea was supported independently of the extent of TC. Two overlapping stents were used instead of one in cases where one stent was not spanning the entire trachea adequately. The diameter of the cranial radiolucent portion of trachea, just behind the cricoid cartilage, was measured as a specific landmark to select the appropriate size of the stent. Two self-expandable nitinol stents were inserted in 9 of 26 dogs; the trachea in the rest of the cases was supported with only one stent. A follow up tracheoscopy was performed in 10 of 26 cases with recurrent clinical signs. Secondary tracheal stenosis in these cases was caused by stent fracture, granuloma or excessive stent shortening. Additional stents were placed successfully to expand the stenotic lumen. A support of the entire trachea may decrease risk of nitinol fracture at the end of the implant. Long term clinical improvement (25 of 26 dogs, 96 %) is comparable with the results of other studies. PMID:24463323

  10. Covered metal stents in endoscopic therapy of biliary complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantù, Paolo; Tenca, Andrea; Parzanese, Ilaria; Penagini, Roberto

    2016-08-01

    There is growing interest in using covered self-expandable metal stents for the treatment of benign biliary conditions, and the presence of anastomotic biliary strictures and leaks after liver transplantation provide a valuable opportunity for testing them. The performance of the stents is encouraging, and the technical success rate is high. They provide larger diameter dilation and are easily removed, and can potentially limit costs by reducing the number of procedures needed to treat anastomotic biliary strictures. However, drawbacks such as sub-optimal tolerability and migration may affect both patient management and costs. New stent designs are currently being evaluated. Randomized controlled trials and cost-effectiveness analyses comparing covered metal stents with multiple plastic stent endotherapy are warranted in order to define the role of the former as first-line or rescue treatment. PMID:27238164

  11. Self-expanding stents and aortoiliac occlusive disease: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bekken, Joost A; Jongsma, Hidde; de Vries, Jean-Paul PM; Fioole, Bram

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of symptomatic aortoiliac occlusive disease has shifted from open to endovascular repair. Both short- and long-term outcomes after percutaneous angioplasty and stenting rival those after open repair and justify an endovascular-first approach. In this article, we review the current endovascular treatment strategies in patients with aortoiliac occlusive disease, indications for primary and selective stenting in the iliac artery, and physical properties and future perspectives of self-expanding stents. PMID:24833925

  12. Comparison of a New Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Metallic Stent to a Noncovered Stent in Canine Ureters

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon Lee, Seung Hwa; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Hong Suk; Kim, Young Sik; Kang, Byung Chul; Frisoli, Joan K.; Razavi, Mahmood K.

    2008-05-15

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of using a newly designed polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered metallic stent in the ureter by comparing its effectiveness with that of the noncovered stent in a canine model. We placed 14 stents in the ureters of seven mongrel dogs that weighed 30-40 kg each. The covered and noncovered stents were deployed in the right and left ureters, respectively, of six dogs. In the seventh dog, a covered stent and a double-J catheter were inserted in the right ureter, and a covered stent only was inserted in the left ureter. The first six dogs were sacrificed at 5, 10, and 15 weeks after deployment of the stents (two for each follow-up period), and the seventh dog was sacrificed at 30 weeks. There was no migration or poor expansion of any of the stents observed on plain radiography. On intravenous pyelogram and retrograde pyelogram, all of the covered stents at each follow-up period had patent lumens at the stented segments without hydronephrosis, and the passage of contrast material through it was well preserved. The noncovered stents in the dogs sacrificed at 5 and 10 weeks and one of the two dogs sacrificed at 15 weeks showed near-complete occlusion of the stent lumen due to ingrowth of the soft tissue, and severe hydronephrosis was also noted. The noncovered stent in the other dog sacrificed at 15 weeks showed the passage of contrast material without hydronephrosis, but the lumen of the stent was still nearly occluded by the soft tissue. There was no evidence of hydronephrosis or passage disturbance of the contrast material in both ureters of the dog sacrificed at 30 weeks. We conclude that the newly designed PTFE-covered stent effectively prevented the luminal occlusion caused by urothelial hyperplasia compared to the near-total occlusion of the noncovered stents, and no migration of the covered stents was noted.

  13. Initial Experience with the Resonance Metallic Stent for Antegrade Ureteric Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Wah, Tze M. Irving, Henry C.; Cartledge, Jon

    2007-07-15

    Background and purpose. We describe our initial experience with a new metallic ureteric stent which has been designed to provide long-term urinary drainage in patients with malignant ureteric strictures. The aim is to achieve longer primary patency rates than conventional polyurethane ureteric stents, where encrustation and compression by malignant masses limit primary patency. The Resonance metallic double-pigtail ureteric stent (Cook, Ireland) is constructed from coiled wire spirals of a corrosion-resistant alloy designed to minimize tissue in-growth and resist encrustation, and the manufacturer recommends interval stent change at 12 months. Methods. Seventeen Resonance stents were inserted via an antegrade approach into 15 patients between December 2004 and March 2006. The causes of ureteric obstruction were malignancies of the bladder (n = 4), colon (n = 3), gynecologic (n = 5), and others (n = 3). Results. One patient had the stent changed after 12 months, and 3 patients had their stents changed at 6 months. These stents were draining adequately with minimal encrustation. Four patients are still alive with functioning stents in situ for 2-10 months. Seven patients died with functioning stents in place (follow-up periods of 1 week to 8 months). Three stents failed from the outset due to bulky pelvic malignancy resulting in high intravesical pressure, as occurs with conventional plastic stents. Conclusion. Our initial experience with the Resonance metallic ureteric stent indicates that it may provide adequate long-term urinary drainage (up to 12 months) in patients with malignant ureteric obstruction but without significantly bulky pelvic disease. This obviates the need for regular stent changes and would offer significant benefit for these patients with limited life expectancy.

  14. Progressive vascular remodeling and reduced neointimal formation after placement of a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Carter, A J; Scott, D; Laird, J R; Bailey, L; Kovach, J A; Hoopes, T G; Pierce, K; Heath, K; Hess, K; Farb, A; Virmani, R

    1998-06-01

    Despite the improvements afforded by intracoronary stenting, restenosis remains a significant problem. The optimal physical properties of a stent have not been defined. We compared the vascular response to a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent with a balloon-expandable tubular slotted stainless steel stent in normal porcine coronary arteries. Twenty-two stents (11 nitinol and 11 tubular slotted) were implanted in 11 miniature swine. The nitinol stents were deployed using the intrinsic thermal properties of the metal, without adjunctive balloon dilation. The tubular slotted stents were implanted using a noncompliant balloon with a mean inflation pressure of 12 atm. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and histology were used to evaluate the vascular response to the stents. The mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of the nitinol stents (mm2) as measured by IVUS increased from 8.13 +/- 1.09 at implant to 9.10 +/- 0.99 after 28 days (P = 0.038), while the mean CSA of the tubular slotted stents was unchanged (7.84 +/- 1.39 mm2 vs. 7.10 +/- 1.07 mm2, P = 0.25). On histology at 3 days, the tubular slotted stents had more inflammatory cells adjacent to the stent wires (5.7 +/- 1.5 cells/0.1 mm2) than the nitinol (3.9 +/- 1.3 cells/0.1 mm2, P = 0.016). The tubular slotted also had increased thrombus thickness (83 +/- 85 microm) than the nitinol stents (43 +/- 25 microm, P = 0.0014). After 28 days, the vessel injury score was similar for the nitinol (0.6 +/- 0.3) and the tubular slotted (0.5 +/- 0.1, P = 0.73) designs. The mean neointimal area (0.97 +/- 0.46 mm2 vs. 1.96 +/- 0.34 mm2, P = 0.002) and percent area stenosis (15 +/- 7 vs. 33 +/- 7, P = 0.003) were significantly lower in the nitinol than in the tubular slotted stents, respectively. We conclude that a thermoelastic nitinol stent exerts a more favorable effect on vascular remodeling, with less neointimal formation, than a balloon-expandable design. Progressive intrinsic stent expansion after implant does not appear to

  15. In-situ investigation of stress conditions during expansion of bare metal stents and PLLA-coated stents using the XRD sin(2)ψ-technique.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Wolfgang; Dammer, Markus; Bakczewitz, Frank; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Grabow, Niels; Kessler, Olaf

    2015-09-01

    Drug eluting stents (DES) consist of platform, coating and drug. The platform often is a balloon-expandable bare metal stent made of the CoCr alloy L-605 or stainless steel 316 L. The function of the coating, typically a permanent polymer, is to hold and release the drug, which should improve therapeutic outcome. Before implantation, DES are compressed (crimped) to allow implantation in the human body. During implantation, DES are expanded by balloon inflation. Crimping, as well as expansion, causes high stresses and high strains locally in the DES struts, as well as in the polymer coating. These stresses and strains are important design criteria of DES. Usually, they are calculated numerically by finite element analysis (FEA), but experimental results for validation are hardly available. In this work, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) sin(2)ψ-technique is applied to in-situ determination of stress conditions of bare metal L-605 stents, and Poly-(L-lactide) (PLLA) coated stents. This provides a realistic characterization of the near-surface stress state and a validation option of the numerical FEA. XRD-results from terminal stent struts of the bare metal stent show an increasing compressive load stress in tangential direction with increasing stent expansion. These findings correlate with numerical FEA results. The PLLA-coating also bears increasing compressive load stress during expansion. PMID:25974098

  16. Polyurethane-Covered Self-expandable Nitinol Stent for Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Young-Min; Hwang, Seung-Bae; Lee, Soo-Teik; Lee, Jeong-Min; Chung, Gyung-Ho

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the immediate and long-term results in ten patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a polyurethane-covered, self-expandable nitinol stent.Methods: A nitinol stent, fully covered with high-elasticity polyurethane, with an unconstrained diameter of 10 mm and a total length of 60-80 mm, was placed transhepatically under fluoroscopic guidance in ten patients. The length of the biliary obstruction varied between 30-50 mm. The follow-up examination included a clinical assessment, serum bilirubin measurement, and ultrasound examinations at one-month intervals in all patients. Results: Initial stent deployment was successful in eight patients. Two patients experienced proximal migration,which was solved by insertion of two, uncovered Wallstents. One patient had the stent removed after two weeks because of severe nausea and vomiting. One patient had delayed migration of the covered stent after 40 weeks. The follow-up duration was 3-40 weeks (Mean: 16.9 weeks). Seven patients died(3-26 weeks) and three patients survived (24-40 weeks). The bilirubin measurements in all patients had significantly decreased one week after stent insertion. The levels of amylase and lipase had did not increase after stent insertion. Conclusions: Apolyurethane-covered, self-expandable nitinol stent can be used effectively and safely in the treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. The preliminary results are favorable, but there is a need for further large studies to determine both long-term survival and patency.

  17. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stent Application: Interests and New Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Moravej, Maryam; Mantovani, Diego

    2011-01-01

    During the last decade, biodegradable metallic stents have been developed and investigated as alternatives for the currently-used permanent cardiovascular stents. Degradable metallic materials could potentially replace corrosion-resistant metals currently used for stent application as it has been shown that the role of stenting is temporary and limited to a period of 6–12 months after implantation during which arterial remodeling and healing occur. Although corrosion is generally considered as a failure in metallurgy, the corrodibility of certain metals can be an advantage for their application as degradable implants. The candidate materials for such application should have mechanical properties ideally close to those of 316L stainless steel which is the gold standard material for stent application in order to provide mechanical support to diseased arteries. Non-toxicity of the metal itself and its degradation products is another requirement as the material is absorbed by blood and cells. Based on the mentioned requirements, iron-based and magnesium-based alloys have been the investigated candidates for biodegradable stents. This article reviews the recent developments in the design and evaluation of metallic materials for biodegradable stents. It also introduces the new metallurgical processes which could be applied for the production of metallic biodegradable stents and their effect on the properties of the produced metals. PMID:21845076

  18. Self-expanding stent effects on radiation dosimetry in esophageal cancer.

    PubMed

    Francis, Samual R; Anker, Christopher J; Wang, Brian; Williams, Greg V; Cox, Kristen; Adler, Douglas G; Shrieve, Dennis C; Salter, Bill J

    2013-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to evaluate how self-expanding stents (SESs) affect esophageal cancer radiation planning target volumes (PTVs) and dose delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients were evaluated, for whom a SES was placed before radiation. A computed tomography (CT) scan obtained before stent placement was fused to the post-stent CT simulation scan. Three methods were used to represent pre-stent PTVs: 1) image fusion (IF), 2) volume approximation (VA), and 3) diameter approximation (DA). PTVs and OARs were contoured per RTOG 1010 protocol using Eclipse Treatment Planning software. Post-stent dosimetry for each patient was compared to approximated pre-stent dosimetry. For each of the three pre-stent approximations (IF, VA, and DA), the mean lung and liver doses and the estimated percentages of lung volumes receiving 5 Gy, 10 Gy, 20 Gy, and 30 Gy, and heart volumes receiving 40 Gy were significantly lower (p-values < 0.02) than those estimated in the post-stent treatment plans. The lung V5, lung V10, and heart V40 constraints were achieved more often using our pre-stent approximations. Esophageal SES placement increases the dose delivered to the lungs, heart, and liver. This may have clinical importance, especially when the dose-volume constraints are near the recommended thresholds, as was the case for lung V5, lung V10, and heart V40. While stents have established benefits for treating patients with significant dysphagia, physicians considering stent placement and radiation therapy must realize the effects stents can have on the dosimetry. PMID:23835387

  19. An Update to Hepatobiliary Stents

    PubMed Central

    Moy, Brian T.; Birk, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic stent placement is a common primary management therapy for benign and malignant biliary strictures. However, continuous use of stents is limited by occlusion and migration. Stent technology has evolved significantly over the past two decades to reduce these problems. The purpose of this article is to review current guidelines in managing malignant and benign biliary obstructions, current endoscopic techniques for stent placement, and emerging stent technology. What began as a simple plastic stent technology has evolved significantly to include uncovered, partially covered, and fully covered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) as well as magnetic, bioabsorbable, drug-eluting, and antireflux stents.1 PMID:26357636

  20. Non-polymeric coatings to control drug release from metallic coronary stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Celia Edith Macias

    Percutaneous transluminal coronary angiography (PTCA) is a procedure used to re-open narrowed coronary arteries. During PTCA, a coronary stent is expanded inside a diseased vessel and serves as a scaffold to keep the artery open. The major drawback of stenting is restenosis---a re-narrowing of the vessel resulting from the hyperproliferation of smooth muscle cells. Drug eluting stents (DES) reduce the rate of restenosis compared to bare metal stents. Paclitaxel (PAT) is commonly used in DES for its ability to prevent restenosis. However, DES have been associated with thrombosis due to the polymer carrier that controls drug delivery. Therefore, there is a need to change the drug delivery mechanisms to eliminate the need of polymers. The goal of this dissertation is to develop a novel polymer-free drug eluting stent that controls drug release using nanoscale metal coatings. The coating was designed to release PAT as the metal slowly degrades in biological conditions. Once all the Paclitaxel has eluted from the surface, the coating will continue to degrade until the final result is a bare metal stent. The results of this study include a novel non-polymeric drug delivery system using nanoscale coatings that release Paclitaxel at a rate similar to commercial stents, as well as the biocompatibility and efficacy of these coatings. The non-polymeric drug delivery system described here achieved a Paclitaxel release profile equivalent to clinically available Paclitaxel-eluting stents and effectively inhibits smooth muscle cell proliferation, thereby completely eliminating the need for polymers to control drug release from coronary stents.

  1. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-03-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  2. Mechanisms of Biliary Plastic Stent Occlusion and Efforts at Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Lehman, Glen A.

    2016-01-01

    Biliary stenting via endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography has greatly improved the quality of patient care over the last 30 years. Plastic stent occlusion limits the life span of such stents. Attempts to improve plastic stent patency duration have mostly failed. Metal stents (self-expandable metal stents [SEMSs]) have therefore replaced plastic stents, especially for malignant biliary strictures. SEMS are at least 10 times more expensive than plastic stents. In this focused review, we will discuss basic mechanisms of plastic stent occlusion, along with a systematic summary of previous efforts and related studies to improve stent patency and potential new techniques to overcome existing limitations. PMID:27000422

  3. Successful endoscopic ultrasound-guided overstenting biliary drainage through a pre-existing proximal migrated metal biliary stent.

    PubMed

    Artifon, E L A; Takada, J; Okawa, L; Ferreira, F; Santos, M; Moura, E G H; Otoch, J P; Sakai, P

    2011-01-01

    Biliary endoscopic drainage using metallic self-expanded stents has become a well-established method for palliative treatment of malignant biliary obstruction. However, its occlusion, mainly by tumor overgrowth, is still the main complication without a standard treatment. We here describe a new method of treatment for biliary metallic stent occlusion, through the echo guided biliary drainage. We present a 68-year-old patient with metastatic pancreatic cancer previously treated for jaundice with ERCP and self-expandable metallic stent insertion. Four weeks later, the patient developed jaundice and symptoms of gastric outlet obstruction. A new ERCP confirmed obstruction of the second portion of the duodenum, due to diffuse tumor growth. EUS was performed, and the previous metal biliary stent was seen occluded at the distal portion in the common bile duct. A EUS-guided choledocododenostomy was performed and then, an overlapping self-expanding metal enteral stent was placed through the malignant obstruction. There were no early complications and the procedure was also clinically effective in relieving jaundice and gastric outlet obstruction symptoms. If ERCP fails in the management of occluded biliary metallic stents, EUS biliary drain can provide effective biliary decompression and should be considered an alternative to other endoscopic techniques. PMID:22041320

  4. Crush implantation of a self-expanding interwoven stent over a subintimally recanalized standard stent in a TASC D lesion of the superficial femoral artery.

    PubMed

    Vogel, B; Strothmeyer, A; Cebola, R; Katus, H; Blessing, E

    2012-11-01

    We demonstrate feasibility of implantation of a self-expanding interwoven nitinol stent in a claudicant, where recanalization attempt of a heavily calcified, occluded superficial femoral artery (TASC D lesion) was complicated by a previously implanted, fractured standard stent. Wire passage through the occlusion and beyond the fractured stent could only be achieved through the subintimal space. A dedicated reentry device was used to allow distal wire entry into the true lumen at the level of the popliteal artery. Despite crushing of the fractured stent with a series of increasingly sized standard balloons, a significant recoil remainded in the area of the crushed stent. To secure patency of the femoro-popliteal artery we therefore decided to implant the novel self-expanding interwoven nitinol stent (Supera Veritas (TM), IDEV), whose unique feature is an exceptional high radial strength. Patient presented asymptomatic without any impairment of his walking capacity at three month follow up and duplex ultrasound confirmed patency of the stent. Subintimal recanalizations can be complicated by previously implanted stents, in particular in the presence of stent fracture, where intraluminal wire passage often can not be achieved. Considering the high radial strength and fracture resistance, interwoven nitinol stents represent a good treatment option in those challenging cases and they can be used to crush standard nitinol and ballonexpandable stents. PMID:23129042

  5. DISCOVER: Dutch Iliac Stent trial: COVERed balloon-expandable versus uncovered balloon-expandable stents in the common iliac artery: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Iliac artery atherosclerotic disease may cause intermittent claudication and critical limb ischemia. It can lead to serious complications such as infection, amputation and even death. Revascularization relieves symptoms and prevents these complications. Historically, open surgical repair, in the form of endarterectomy or bypass, was used. Over the last decade, endovascular repair has become the first choice of treatment for iliac arterial occlusive disease. No definitive consensus has emerged about the best endovascular strategy and which type of stent, if any, to use. However, in more advanced disease, that is, long or multiple stenoses or occlusions, literature is most supportive of primary stenting with a balloon-expandable stent in the common iliac artery (Jongkind V et al., J Vasc Surg 52:1376-1383,2010). Recently, a PTFE-covered balloon-expandable stent (Advanta V12, Atrium Medical Inc., Hudson, NH, USA) has been introduced for the iliac artery. Covering stents with PTFE has been shown to lead to less neo-intimal hyperplasia and this might lower restenosis rates (Dolmatch B et al. J Vasc Interv Radiol 18:527-534,2007, Marin ML et al. J Vasc Interv Radiol 7:651-656,1996, Virmani R et al. J Vasc Interv Radiol 10:445-456,1999). However, only one RCT, of mediocre quality has been published on this stent in the common iliac artery (Mwipatayi BP et al. J Vasc Surg 54:1561-1570,2011, Bekken JA et al. J Vasc Surg 55:1545-1546,2012). Our hypothesis is that covered balloon-expandable stents lead to better results when compared to uncovered balloon-expandable stents. Methods/Design This is a prospective, randomized, controlled, double-blind, multi-center trial. The study population consists of human volunteers aged over 18 years, with symptomatic advanced atherosclerotic disease of the common iliac artery, defined as stenoses longer than 3 cm and occlusions. A total of 174 patients will be included. The control group will undergo endovascular dilatation or

  6. Fracture and Collapse of Balloon-Expandable Stents in the Bilateral Common Iliac Arteries Due to Shiatsu Massage

    SciTech Connect

    Ichihashi, Shigeo Higashiura, Wataru; Itoh, Hirofumi; Sakaguchi, Shoji; Kichikawa, Kimihiko

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of stent fracture and collapse of balloon-expandable stents caused by shiatsu massage. A 76-year-old man presented with complaints of intermittent claudication of the right lower extremity. Stenoses of the bilateral common iliac arteries (CIAs) were detected. Balloon-expandable stents were deployed in both CIAs, resulting in resolution of symptoms. Five months later, pelvis x-ray showed collapse of both stents. Despite the stent collapse, the patient was asymptomatic, and his ankle brachial index values were within the normal range. Further history showed that the patient underwent daily shiatsu therapy in the umbilical region, which may have triggered collapse of the stent. Physicians should advise patients to avoid compression of the abdominal wall after implantation of a stent in the iliac artery.

  7. Ureteric access sheath aided insertion of resonance metal ureteric stent

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Matthew; Strahan, Stephen; Wines, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Ureteral obstruction caused by malignancy is a challenging and often complicated problem for urologists. We present a novel technique of ureteric access sheath aided insertion of a Resonance metal ureteric stent in the setting of a difficult obstruction. PMID:24879725

  8. Outcomes of the Use of Fully Covered Esophageal Self-Expandable Stent in the Management of Colorectal Anastomotic Strictures and Leaks

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Chad J.; Morales, Angel; Othman, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture is a dreaded complication leading to significant morbidity and mortality. The novel use of self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) in the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures can avoid surgical reintervention. Methods. Retrospective study with particular attention to the indications, operative or postoperative complications, and clinical outcomes of SEMS placement for patients with either a colorectal anastomotic stricture or leak. Results. Eight patients had SEMS (WallFlex stent) for the management of postoperative colorectal anastomotic leak or stricture. Five had a colorectal anastomotic stricture and 3 had a colorectal anastomotic leak. Complete resolution of the anastomotic stricture or leak was achieved in all patients. Three had recurrence of the anastomotic stricture on 3-month flexible sigmoidoscopy follow-up after the initial stent was removed. Two of these patients had a stricture that was technically too difficult to place another stent. Stent migration was noted in 2 patients, one at day 3 and the other at day 14 after stent placement that required a larger 23 mm stent to be placed. Conclusions. The use of SEMS in the management of colorectal anastomotic leaks or strictures is feasible and is associated with high technical and clinical success rate. PMID:25587210

  9. Modeling smooth muscle cell proliferation of coronary artery expanded with a drug eluting stent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Suping

    2010-03-01

    The drug eluting coronary stent is for the treatment of narrowed coronary artery. A high strength balloon is used to open the narrowed vessel and leave behind a tiny metal mesh, or stent, to mechanically prevent the vessel from re-narrowing and biologically slow down proliferation of the smooth muscle cells. However, the drug eluting stents that had better performance also more seriously prevented the healing processes of the vessels, which could cause serious thrombotic reactions. In this study, we assume the healing process is controlled by proper proliferation of smooth cells. We also assume that the inflammation reactions and mechanical traction drive the smooth muscle cells to proliferate while the drug loaded in the stents drives the processes at the opposite direction. Numerical calculation was applied to the system. The drug distribution and elution durations, inflammation reactions and mechanical traction were discussed.

  10. Self-expandable and highly flexible nitinol stent: immediate and long-term results in dogs.

    PubMed

    Grenadier, E; Shofti, R; Beyar, M; Lichtig, H; Mordechowitz, D; Globerman, O; Markiewicz, W; Beyar, R

    1994-11-01

    We sought to investigate the acute and long-term patency rates and the histologic response of coronary arteries to a self-expandable nitinol coil stent. Twenty-two stents were implanted. Angiographic patency was demonstrated acutely in all but one dog, in which the stent was released in a small branch (1 mm); mismatch in stent-to-artery diameters resulted in vessel closure. Two dogs died from anesthesia overdose and two from bleeding within 24 hours. All dogs were treated with aspirin (80 mg/day) and warfarin (2.5 mg/day) for up to 1 month. Sixteen dogs were monitored for 1 to 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year and underwent subsequent angiography and histopathologic examination. Angiographic artery dimensions measured immediately after stent implantation (2.72 +/- 0.4 mm) did not differ from those noted at follow-up (2.68 +/- 0.44 mm, p not significant). Histologic examination showed outward stent pressure compressing the internal elastic membrane and media in most cases. Intimal hyperplasia started at 2 weeks and was most apparent at 3 and 6 months. Mean intimal thickness was 30.7 +/- 10.9 mu, 141.8 +/- 105.4 mu, 227.1 +/- 104.1 mu, 211.8 +/- 99.1 mu, and 170.1 +/- 42.7 mu at 1 to 2 weeks and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months, respectively. Therefore the nitinol self-expandable stent provokes a moderate cellular proliferative response that reaches its maximum in 3 to 6 months without further progression. PMID:7942477

  11. Life-threatening common carotid artery blowout: rescue treatment with a newly designed self-expanding covered nitinol stent.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Lee, D H; Kim, H J; Kim, S J; Kim, W; Kim, S Y; Suh, D C

    2006-03-01

    Carotid blowout is a devastating complication in patients with head and neck malignancy. A covered stent offers an alternative to treatment of a carotid blowout patient thought to be at high risk for surgery or carotid occlusion. Stent placement in the common carotid artery or carotid bulb is a technical challenge because of large luminal diameter and luminal calibre discrepancy between internal carotid artery and common carotid artery. We present four patients with common carotid rupture and massive bleeding who were treated with self-expanding covered stents, among them, two cases were treated with newly designed self-expanding polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stents. PMID:16498035

  12. Early Experience With a Thermo-Expandable Stent (Memokath) for the Management of Recurrent Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyun Su; Kim, Joon Woo; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To report our early experience with thermo-expandable urethral stents (Memokath) for the management of recurrent urethral stricture and to assess the efficacy of urethral stents. Materials and Methods Between March 2012 and February 2013, 13 patients with recurrent urethral stricture after several attempts with direct visual internal urethrotomy (DVIU) or failed urethroplasty underwent DVIU with thermally expandable, nickel-titanium alloy urethral stent (Memokath) insertion. Follow-up study time points were at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after stent insertion. Follow-up evaluation included uroflowmetry, retrograde urethrogram, plain radiography, and urinalysis. Results The mean patient age was 47.7 years (range, 18 to 74 years). The mean urethral stricture length was 5.54 cm (range, 1 to 12 cm). There were six patients with bulbar, four patients with proximal penile, one patient with distal penile, and two patients with whole penile urethral strictures, respectively. The overall success rate was 69% (9/13) and the mean postoperative peak flow rate was 17.7 mL/s (range, 6 to 28 mL/s). Major complications occurred in four patients including one patient (7.7%) with urethrocutaneous fistula induced by the stent and three patients with urethral hyperplasia. The mean follow-up duration was 8.4 months. Conclusions Our initial clinical experience indicates that thermo-expandable stents can be another temporary management option for recurrent urethral stricture patients who are unfit for or refuse urethroplasty. Distal or whole penile urethral stricture can be factors predicting poor results. PMID:24363867

  13. Bare Metal Stenting for Endovascular Exclusion of Aortic Arch Thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Mahnken, Andreas H.; Hoffman, Andras; Autschbach, Ruediger; Damberg, Anneke L. M.

    2013-08-01

    BackgroundAortic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch are rare but are associated with a relevant risk of major stroke or distal embolization. Although stent grafting is commonly used as a treatment option in the descending aorta, only a few case reports discuss stenting of the aortic arch for the treatment of a thrombus. The use of bare metal stents in this setting has not yet been described.MethodsWe report two cases of ascending and aortic arch thrombus that were treated by covering the thrombus with an uncovered stent. Both procedures were performed under local anesthesia via a femoral approach. A femoral cutdown was used in one case, and a total percutaneous insertion was possible in the second case.ResultsBoth procedures were successfully performed without any periprocedural complications. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. In both cases, no late complications or recurrent embolization occurred at midterm follow-up, and control CT angiography at 1 respectively 10 months revealed no stent migration, freely perfused supra-aortic branches, and no thrombus recurrence.ConclusionTreating symptomatic thrombi in the ascending aorta or aortic arch with a bare metal stent is feasible. This technique could constitute a minimally invasive alternative to a surgical intervention or complex endovascular therapy with fenestrated or branched stent grafts.

  14. Short- and long-term histopathologic evaluation of stenting using a self-expanding nitinol stent in pig carotid and iliac arteries.

    PubMed

    Verheye, S; Salame, M Y; Robinson, K A; Post, M J; Carrozza, J P; Baim, D S; Sigwart, U; King, S B; Chronos, N A

    1999-11-01

    Stenting is increasingly being used to treat carotid artery disease. However, complications including distal embolization, stent thrombosis, stent collapse from external compression, the need for high-pressure inflation with increased neointimal response, or balloon rupture during stent expansion and stent loss are all potential problems and of concern. To address each of these specific concerns, a new stent was designed, which is self-expandable, made of nitinol, with temperature-dependent superelastic properties, and with high vessel wall surface coverage. Since this device has a number of novel characteristics, we aimed to assess the short- and long-term histopathologic response in pig carotid and iliac arteries. Single stents were deployed in pig carotid and iliac arteries after overstretch balloon injury. Angiograms were performed pre- and poststenting and prior to sacrifice. Intravascular ultrasound was used before implantation to determine vessel size. Vessels were examined histologically at 1 month (n = 6) and 6 months (n = 6) for morphometric analysis, hemorrhage and thrombus, endothelialization, and inflammatory and fibrotic responses. There was a 100% angiographic success rate at implantation. In one case, it was determined histologically that a single stent was implanted in a dissection plane of a pig's left iliac artery and was occluded by organized thrombus, with the true lumen being patent. At 6-month follow-up, this was the only evidence of a single stent occlusion, with flow adjacent to the stent in the true lumen. In the other vessels, the stents showed good vessel wall-stent apposition and the lumens were patent with a concentric and thin neointima. Inflammatory cells were rare and there were no mural thrombi. Coverage of the vessel wall by endothelial-like cells was complete at 1 month. The novel nitinol EndoStent appears to have favorable biocompatibility with minimal thrombus deposition or inflammatory response, and its use is feasible for

  15. The safety and efficacy of a new self-expandable intratracheal nitinol stent for the tracheal collapse in dogs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joon-young; Han, Hyun-jung; Yun, Hun-young; Lee, Bora; Jang, Ha-young; Eom, Ki-dong; Park, Hee-myung; Jeong, Soon-wuk

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate the potential utility of a self-expandable intratracheal nitinol stent with flared ends for the treatment of tracheal collapse in dogs, endotracheal stenting therapy was performed under fluoroscopic guidance in four dogs with severe tracheal collapse. During the 4 to 7 month followup, after stent implantation, clinical signs, including dyspnea and respiratory distress, dramatically improved in all dogs. The radiographs showed that the implanted stents improved the tracheal collapse, and there were no side effects such as collapse, shortening or migration of the stents. In conclusion, the self-expandable intratracheal nitinol stents provided adequate stability to the trachea and were effective for attenuating the clinical signs associated with severe tracheal collapse. PMID:18296893

  16. Malignant Ureteral Obstruction: Functional Duration of Metallic versus Polymeric Ureteral Stents

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Po-Ming; Chiang, I-Ni; Chen, Chia-Yen; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Jui-Shan; Wang, Shuo-Meng; Lee, Yuan-Ju; Yu, Hong-Jeng; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Huang, Chao-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Ureteral obstruction caused by extrinsic compression is often associated with intra-abdominal cancers. Internal drainage with ureteral stents is typically the first-line therapy to relieve such obstructions. Novel designs of ureteral stents made of different materials have been invented to achieve better drainage. In this study, we described the functional outcomes of a Resonance metallic ureteral stent (Cook Medical, Bloomington, Indiana, USA) in patients with malignant ureteral obstruction and compare the functional duration of Resonance stents with regular polymeric stents in the same cohort. Methods Cancer patients who received polymeric stents and subsequent Resonance stents for ureteral obstruction between July 2009 and November 2012 were included in a chart review. Stent failure was detected by clinical symptoms, imaging studies, and renal function tests. The functional durations of each stent were calculated, and possible factors affecting stent patency were investigated. Results A total of 50 stents were successfully inserted into 50 ureteral units in 42 patients with malignant ureteral obstruction. There were 7 antegrade stents and 43 retrograde stents. There were no major complications. Stent-related symptoms were similar in both kinds of stents. After polymeric stents were replaced with Resonance metallic stents, hydronephrosis subsided or remained stable in 90% (45/50) of the ureteral units. Serum creatinine decreased or remained stable in 90% (38/42) of these patients. The Resonance stent exhibited a mean increase in functional duration of 4 months compared with the polymeric stents (p<0.0001), and 50% (25/50) of the Resonance stents exhibited a significant increase in functional duration (more than 3 months). Pre-operative serum creatinine < 2 was associated with a substantial increase in stent duration. Conclusions Resonance stents are effective and safe in relieving malignant ureteral obstructions after polymeric stents failure

  17. Mechanical Characteristics of Composite Knitted Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, Takanori Shomura, Yuzo; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Komemushi, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Sawada, Satoshi

    2009-09-15

    We used metal wires and fibers to fabricate a composite knitted stent and then compare the mechanical characteristics of this stent with those of a pure metallic stent of the same construction in order to develop a stent that offers a comparable degree of expandability as metallic stents but can be used for highly curved lesions that cannot be treated using metallic stents. We fabricated two types of composite knitted stent (N-Z stents), using nitinol wire with a diameter of 0.12 mm and polypara-phenylene-benzobisoxazole (PBO) multifilament fiber (Zyron AS; Toyobo, Osaka, Japan). Stents were knitted into a cylindrical shape using the same textile pattern as a Strecker stent. Two loop lengths (L) of nitinol wire were used in the N-Z stents: L = 1.84 mm (N-Z stent L = 1.84) and L = 2.08 mm (N-Z stent L = 2.08). For the sake of comparison, we fabricated a metallic stent of nitinol using the same textile pattern (N-N stent L = 1.92). We applied a radial compression force diametrically to each stent and applied a bending force diametrically at the free end of a stent with one end fixed in order to evaluate the relationship between stent elasticity and load values. In addition, we macroscopically evaluated the generation of kinks when the stent was bent 180{sup o}. The radial compressive force when the stent diameter was reduced by 53% was 6.44 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 1.84, 6.14 N in the case of N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 4.96 N in the case of N-N stent L = 1.92 mm. The composite stent had a radial compressive force higher than that of a metallic stent. The restoring force to longitudinal direction at a 90{sup o} bending angle was 0.005 N for N-Z stent L = 1.84, 0.003 N for N-Z stent L = 2.08, and 0.034 N for N-N stent L = 1.92. The restoring force of the composite stent was significantly lower. Finally, the composite stent generated no definitive kinks at a bending angle of 180{sup o}, regardless of loop length. However, the N-N stent clearly produced kinks, causing

  18. Self-Expanding Nitinol Renal Artery Stents: Comparison of Safety and Efficacy of Bare Versus Polyzene-F Nanocoated Stents in a Porcine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kurz, P.; Stampfl, U.; Christoph, P.; Henn, C.; Satzl, S.; Radeleff, B.; Berger, I.; Richter, G. M.

    2011-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the safety and efficacy of a Polyzene-F nanocoat on new low-profile self-expandable nitinol stents in minipig renal arteries. Materials and Methods: Ten bare nitinol stents (BNS) and 10 stents coated with a 50 nm-thin Polyzene-F coating were randomly implanted into renal arteries of 10 minipigs (4- and 12-week follow-up, 5 animals/group). Thrombogenicity, on-stent surface endothelialization, vessel wall injury, late in-stent stenosis, and peristrut vessel wall inflammation were determined by quantitative angiography and postmortem histomorphometry. Results: In 6 of 10 BNS, >50% stenosis was found, but no stenosis was found in stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating. Histomorphometry showed a statistically significant (p < 0.05) different average maximum luminal loss of 55.16% {+-} 8.43% at 12 weeks in BNS versus 39.77% {+-} 7.41% in stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating. Stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating had a significantly (p < 0.05) lower inflammation score after 12 weeks, 1.31 {+-} 1.17 versus 2.17 {+-} 0.85 in BNS. The results for vessel wall injury (0.6 {+-} 0.58 for Polyzene-F-coated stents; 0.72 {+-} 0.98 for BNS) and re-endothelialization, (1.16 {+-} 0.43 and 1.23 {+-} 0.54, respectively) were not statistically significant at 12-week follow-up. No thrombus deposition was observed on the stents at either follow-up time point. Conclusion: Nitinol stents with a nanothin Polyzene-F coating successfully decreased in-stent stenosis and vessel wall inflammation compared with BNS. Endothelialization and vessel wall injury were found to be equal. These studies warrant long-term pig studies ({>=}120 days) because 12 weeks may not be sufficient time for complete healing; thereafter, human studies may be warranted.

  19. Management of Failing Prosthetic Bypass Grafts with Metallic Stent Placement

    SciTech Connect

    Siskin, Gary P.; Stainken, Brian F.; Mandell, Valerie S.; Darling, R. Clement; Dowling, Kyran; Herr, Allen

    1999-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of metallic stents in treating stenoses involving prosthetic arterial bypass grafts. Methods: Patients undergoing stent placement within a failing prosthetic bypass graft, during a 41-month period, were reviewed for treatment outcome and complications. The indications for stent placement in 15 patients included severe claudication (n= 3), rest pain (n= 9), and minor or major tissue loss (n= 3). Lesions were at the proximal anastomosis (n= 6), the distal anastomosis (n= 3), or within the graft (n= 6). Results: Treatment with metallic stents was successful in all patients. There was one acute stent thrombosis, successfully treated with thrombolytic therapy. Follow-up data are available for a mean duration of 12.3 months. The mean duration of primary patency was 9.4 months with 6- and 12-month primary patency rates of 51.9% and 37.0%, respectively. The mean duration of secondary patency was 12.1 months with 6- and 12-month secondary patency rates of 80.0% and 72.7%, respectively. Two patients with discontinuous runoff and preexisting gangrene required a below-knee amputation. Six patients were revised surgically after stent placement (at a mean of 10.8 months). Three late deaths occurred during follow-up. Conclusion: Given the mortality risks of surgical revision and the reduced life expectancy of this patient population, metallic stent placement represents a viable, short-term treatment option for stenoses within or at the anastomoses of prosthetic grafts. Further evaluation is warranted to compare intragraft stent placement with surgical graft revision.

  20. Aortic Bifurcation Reconstruction: Use of the Memotherm Self-Expanding Nitinol Stent for Stenoses and Occlusions

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J. Graeme; McCollum, Peter T.; Stonebridge, Peter A.; Raza, Zahid; Shaw, J. William

    1999-03-15

    Purpose: To assess the technical success, initial clinical outcome, and intermediate follow-up of the Memotherm nitinol self-expanding stent in aortic bifurcation reconstruction. Methods: Thirty-three patients (13 male, 20 female), mean age 64 years, were treated, who had symptoms classified by the Surgical Vascular Society/International Society of Cardiovascular Surgery (SVS/ICVS) classification as grade 2 in 11 (33%), grade 3 in 19 (58%) and grade 4 in 3 (9%) patients. Lesions were classified according to severity and type. Indications for placement of a Memotherm nitinol self-expanding stent were failed angioplasty in 14 (42%), chronic occlusions in 12 (37%), and complex stenoses in seven (21%) patients. Results: Sixty-seven stents were technically successfully placed in 66 aorto-iliac segments in 33 patients, with one major complication. Initial clinical outcome was improvement in 25 (81%), no change in four (13%), and a worsening in two (6%) patients by Rutherford criteria. Mean early ankle/brachial pressure index (ABI) gain was 0.27 for occlusions and 0.05 for stenoses. Clinical follow-up was obtained in all patients, with retrospective angiographic follow-up in 28 (85%) at a mean of 16 months (range 12-26 months). The decrease in ABI and the decrease in angiographic luminal diameter at follow-up was determined as the 'late loss.' The mean ABI late losses were -0.06, 0.00, and 0.09, and the mean angiographic late losses were 6.7%, 10% and 14% for occlusions, stenoses, and normal segments respectively. Primary clinical patency was 96%, primary angiographic patency was 89%, and secondary angiographic patency was 93%. Conclusion: The high technical success of stent placement, the low complication rates for aortic bifurcation reconstruction using the Memotherm self-expanding stent, and high clinical and angiographic patency maintained at intermediate follow-up support their use in aortic bifurcation reconstruction.

  1. Endoscopic management of unresectable malignant gastroduodenal obstruction with a nitinol uncovered metal stent: A prospective Japanese multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Reina; Sakai, Yuji; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Nishikawa, Takao; Fujimoto, Tatsuya; Mikami, Shigeru; Sugiyama, Harutoshi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the safety and efficacy of endoscopic duodenal stent placement in patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction. METHODS: This prospective, observational, multicenter study included 39 consecutive patients with malignant gastric outlet obstruction. All patients underwent endoscopic placement of a nitinol, uncovered, self-expandable metal stent. The primary outcome was clinical success at 2 wk after stent placement that was defined as improvement in the Gastric Outlet Obstruction Scoring System score relative to the baseline. RESULTS: Technical success was achieved in all duodenal stent procedures. Procedure-related complications occurred in 4 patients (10.3%) in the form of mild pneumonitis. No other morbidities or mortalities were observed. The clinical success rate was 92.3%. The mean survival period after stent placement was 103 d. The mean period of stent patency was 149 d and the patency remained acceptable for the survival period. Stent dysfunction occurred in 3 patients (7.7%) on account of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic management using duodenal stents for patients with incurable malignant gastric outlet obstruction is safe and improved patients’ quality of life. PMID:27076769

  2. Long-Term Results after Placement of Aortic Bifurcation Self-Expanding Stents: 10 Year Mortality, Stent Restenosis, and Distal Disease Progression

    SciTech Connect

    Houston, J. Graeme Bhat, Raj; Ross, Rose; Stonebridge, Peter A.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To retrospectively evaluate the 10 year follow-up results in patients who had 'kissing' self-expanding stent aortic bifurcation reconstruction. Methods. Forty-three patients were treated with 'kissing' self-expanding stents for aortoiliac occlusive disease. Early follow-up with clinical and ankle brachial pressure indices (ABPI) was performed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months and with intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography at 12-24 months; clinical and angiographic follow-up was performed for symptom recurrence up to 10 years after treatment. Retrospective record review was performed to assess mortality, clinical patency, angiographic patency, and secondary assisted patency of both stents and downstream peripheral vessels at 5 and 10 years follow-up. Results. The 2 year primary angiographic and secondary assisted stent patencies were 89% and 93%, respectively. At 10 years follow-up in 40 patients the mortality was 38% (due to myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic renal failure, malignancy, and liver failure). At 5 and 10 years follow-up the primary clinical stent patency was 82% and 68%, and the secondary assisted stent patency 93% and 86%, respectively. At 5 and 10 years, the distal vessel patency was 86% and 72%, and the secondary assisted distal vessel patency treated by surgical or endovascular techniques was 94% and 88%, respectively. At 10 years there was no limb loss. Conclusion. The long-term (10 year) results of aortic bifurcation arterial self-expanding stent placement in patients with arterial occlusive disease show a 10 year primary stent patency rate of 68% but a secondary assisted patency rate of 86%. In addition there is a high overall mortality due to other cardiovascular causes and the rate of distal disease progression and loss of patency is similar to the loss of stent patency rate.

  3. Stents for colorectal obstruction: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eui Joo; Kim, Yoon Jae

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of uncovered self-expanding metal stents (SEMS) in the 1990s, endoscopic stents have evolved dramatically. Application of new materials and new designs has expanded the indications for enteral SEMS. At present, enteral stents are considered the first-line modality for palliative care, and numerous types of enteral stents are under development for extended clinical usage, beyond a merely palliative purpose. Herein, we will discuss the current status and the future development of lower enteral stents. PMID:26811630

  4. Primary Self-Expandable Nitinol Stent Placement in Focal Lesions of Infrarenal Abdominal Aorta: Long Term Results

    SciTech Connect

    Lastovickova, Jarmila Peregrin, Jan H.

    2008-01-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the technical and clinical success, safety and long term results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty/self-expandable nitinol stent placement of infrarenal abdominal aorta focal lesions. Materials and Methods. Eighteen patients underwent PTA of focal atherosclerotic occlusive disease of distal abdominal aorta. Two symptomatic occlusions and 16 stenoses in 10 male and 8 female patients (mean age 68.2 years) were treated with primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement. Results. Primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement was technically successful in all 18 procedures; clinical success was achieved in 100% of patients. No complications associated with the procedure occurred. During the 49.4 months of mean follow up (range 3-96, 4 months) all treated aortic segments remained patent. Conclusions. Endovascular treatment (primary self-expandable nitinol stent placement) of focal atherosclerotic lesions of distal abdominal aorta is a safe method with excellent primary technical and clinical success rates and favourable Long term results.

  5. ALD mediated heparin grafting on nitinol for self-expanded carotid stents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Xiumian; Leng, Bing; Guo, Xin; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Carotid-artery atherosclerosis is a common cause of ischemic stroke. Carotid-artery stenting (CAS) is one of the most effective treatments. However, In-stent restenosis (ISR) and re-endothelialization delay are two major issues of intravascular stent which affect clinical safety and reduce effects. In this study, atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology was applied to deposit a layer (10nm) of Al2O3 on Nitinol surface as an intermediate functional layer. The alumina covered surface was then modified with a coupling agent 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APS) and heparin sequentially in order to improve the hemocompatibility of Nitinol stents. The successful graft of APS and heparin onto Nitinol was proven by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Furthermore, the predicted improvement in the biocompatibilities of modified Nitinol was confirmed by water contact angle measurement, protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, and plasma recalcification time determination. The results of hemolysis assay, cell proliferation and cytotoxicity tests revealed that the grafting of heparin on NiTi kept the original positive performance of nitinol material. The results indicate that ALD technology is of great potential for the manufacture of medical devices, especially for surface modifications and functionalization. ALD technology can help with modifications of inert metallic surfaces and therefore benefit implantable medical devices, especially intravascular stents. PMID:27022879

  6. Covered Metallic Stents With an Anti-Migration Design vs. Uncovered Stents for the Palliation of Malignant Gastric Outlet Obstruction: A Multicenter, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyuk; Min, Byung-Hoon; Lee, Jeong Hoon; Shin, Cheol Min; Kim, Younjoo; Chung, Hyunsoo; Lee, Sang Hyub

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Previous studies reported comparable stent patency between covered self-expandable metallic stents (SEMS) and uncovered SEMS (UCS) for palliation of malignant gastric outlet obstruction (GOO). The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the newly developed WAVE-covered SEMS (WCS), which has an anti-migration design, compared with UCS in gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO. METHODS: A total of 102 inoperable gastric cancer patients with symptomatic GOO were prospectively enrolled from five referral centers and randomized to undergo UCS or WCS placement. Stent patency and recurrence of obstructive symptoms were assessed at 8 weeks and 16 weeks after stent placement. RESULTS: At the 8-week follow-up, both stent patency rates (72.5% vs. 62.7%) and re-intervention rates (19.6% vs. 19.6%) were comparable between the WCS and the UCS groups. Both stent stenosis (2.4% vs. 8.1%) and migration rates (9.5% vs. 5.4%) were comparable between WCS and UCS groups. At the 16-week follow-up, however, the WCS group had a significantly higher stent patency rate than the UCS group (68.6% vs. 41.2%). Re-intervention rates in the WCS and UCS groups were 23.5% and 39.2%, respectively. Compared with the UCS group, the WCS group had a significantly lower stent restenosis rate (7.1% vs. 37.8%) and a comparable migration rate (9.5% vs. 5.4%). Overall stent patency was significantly longer in the WCS group than in the UCS group. No stent-associated significant adverse events occurred in either the WCS or UCS groups. In the multivariate analysis, WCS placement and chemotherapy were identified as independent predictors of 16-week stent patency. CONCLUSIONS: WCS group showed comparable migration rate and significantly more durable long-term stent patency compared with UCS group for the palliation of GOO in patients with inoperable gastric cancer. PMID:26372507

  7. Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience.

    PubMed

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Bhatia, Shivank S; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-10-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt-Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment. PMID:26629289

  8. Successful technical and clinical outcome using a second generation balloon expandable coronary stent for transplant renal artery stenosis: Our experience

    PubMed Central

    Salsamendi, Jason; Pereira, Keith; Baker, Reginald; Bhatia, Shivank S; Narayanan, Govindarajan

    2015-01-01

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a vascular complication frequently seen because of increase in the number of renal transplantations. Early diagnosis and management is essential to optimize a proper graft function. Currently, the endovascular treatment of TRAS using angioplasty and/or stenting is considered the treatment of choice with the advantage that it does not preclude subsequent surgical correction. Treatment of TRAS with the use of stents, particularly in tortuous transplant renal anatomy presents a unique challenge to an interventional radiologist. In this study, we present three cases from our practice highlighting the use of a balloon-expandable Multi-Link RX Ultra coronary stent system (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, Illinois, USA) for treating high grade focal stenosis along very tortuous renal arterial segments. Cobalt–Chromium alloy stent scaffold provides excellent radial force, whereas the flexible stent design conforms to the vessel course allowing for optimal stent alignment. PMID:26629289

  9. Randomized trial in malignant biliary obstruction: Plastic vs partially covered metal stents

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Peter L; AlNaamani, Khalid M; Barkun, Alan N; Gordon, Stuart R; Mitty, Roger D; Branch, M Stanley; Kowalski, Thomas E; Martel, Myriam; Adam, Viviane

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To compare efficacy and complications of partially covered self-expandable metal stent (pcSEMS) to plastic stent (PS) in patients treated for malignant, infrahilar biliary obstruction. METHODS: Multicenter prospective randomized clinical trial with treatment allocation to a pcWallstent® (SEMS) or a 10 French PS. Palliative patients aged ≥ 18, for infrahilar malignant biliary obstruction and a Karnofsky performance scale index > 60% from 6 participating North American university centers. Primary endpoint was time to stent failure, with secondary outcomes of death, adverse events, Karnofsky performance score and short-form-36 scale administered on a three-monthly basis for up to 2 years. Survival analyses were performed for stent failure and death, with Cox proportional hazards regression models to determine significant predictive characteristics. RESULTS: Eighty-five patients were accrued over 37 mo, 42 were randomized to the SEMS group and 83 patients were available for analyses. Time to stent failure was 385.3 ± 52.5 d in the SEMS and 153.3 ± 19.8 d in the PS group, P = 0.006. Time to death did not differ between groups (192.3 ± 23.4 d for SEMS vs 211.5 ± 28.0 d for PS, P = 0.70). The only significant predictor was treatment allocation, relating to the time to stent failure (P = 0.01). Amongst other measured outcomes, only cholangitis differed, being more common in the PS group (4.9% vs 24.5%, P = 0.029). The small number of patients in follow-up limits longitudinal assessments of performance and quality of life. From an initially planned 120 patients, only 85 patients were recruited. CONCLUSION: Partially covered SEMS result in a longer duration till stent failure without increased complication rates, yet without accompanying measurable benefits in survival, performance, or quality of life. PMID:24379581

  10. Mechanical Interaction of an Expanding Coiled Stent with a Plaque-Containing Arterial Wall: A Finite Element Analysis.

    PubMed

    Welch, Tré R; Eberhart, Robert C; Banerjee, Subhash; Chuong, Cheng-Jen

    2016-03-01

    Wall injury is observed during stent expansion within atherosclerotic arteries, related in part to stimulation of the inflammatory process. Wall stress and strain induced by stent expansion can be closely examined by finite element analysis (FEA), thus shedding light on procedure-induced sources of inflammation. The purpose of this work was to use FEA to examine the interaction of a coiled polymer stent with a plaque-containing arterial wall during stent expansion. An asymmetric fibrotic plaque-containing arterial wall model was created from intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) images of a diseased artery. A 3D model for a coil stent at unexpanded state was generated in SolidWorks. They were imported into ANSYS for FEA of combined stent expansion and fibrotic plaque-distortion. We simulated the stent expansion in the plaqued lumen by increasing balloon pressure from 0 to 12 atm in 1 atm step. At increasing pressure, we examined how the expanding stent exerts forces on the fibrotic plaque and vascular wall components, and how the latter collectively resist and balance the expansive forces from the stent. Results show the expanding coiled stent creates high stresses within the plaque and the surrounding fibrotic capsule. Lower stresses were observed in adjacent medial and adventitial layers. High principal strains were observed in plaque and fibrotic capsule. The results suggest fibrotic capsule rupture might occur at localized regions. The FEA/IVUS method can be adapted for routine examination of the effects of the expansion of selected furled stents against IVUS-reconstructed diseased vessels, to improve stent deployment practices. PMID:26621671

  11. Preprocedural Albumin Levels and Risk of In-Stent Restenosis After Coronary Stenting With Bare-Metal Stent.

    PubMed

    Celik, Ibrahim Etem; Yarlioglues, Mikail; Kurtul, Alparslan; Duran, Mustafa; Koseoglu, Cemal; Oksuz, Fatih; Aksoy, Ozlem; Murat, Sani Namik

    2016-05-01

    In-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a significant clinical problem in patients with coronary artery disease treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Decreased serum albumin (SA) level is related to an increased risk of cardiovascular events. The aim of the present study was to assess whether SA levels at admission are an independent predictor of ISR in patients undergoing bare-metal stent (BMS) implantation. A total of 341 patients (aged 61 ± 11, 65.4% men) with a history of BMS implantation and a further control coronary angiography due to stable angina pectoris (SAP) were included. The study population was classified into 2 groups: patients with and without ISR. The ISR was observed in 140 (41.1%) patients. We found significantly lower SA levels in patients who developed ISR than in those who did not (3.69 ± 0.41 vs 4.07 ± 0.35 mg/dL,P< .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that SA level (odds ratio 0.109, 95% confidence interval 0.017-0.700,P= .020), stent diameter, reason for stent implantation, and body mass index were independent risk factors for the development of ISR. The SA level at admission is inversely associated with ISR in patients with SAP. PMID:26243483

  12. Feasibility study for the investigation of Nitinol self-expanding stents by neutron techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogante, M.; Pasquini, U.; Rosta, L.; Lebedev, V.

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, neutron techniques - in particular, small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron diffraction (ND) - are considered for the non-destructive characterization of Nitinol artery stents. This roughly equiatomic (50Ni-50Ti at%) shape memory alloy (SMA) exhibits significant properties of superelasticity and biocompatibility that make it suitable to be typically used as smart material for medical implants and devices. Nitinol self-expanding artery stents, as permanent vascular support structures, supply an ideal option to bypass surgery, but they are submitted for the whole of patient's life to the dynamical stress of the artery pulsation and the aggression from the biological environment. These stents, consequently, can suffer from wear and fracture occurrence likely due to a variety of cyclic fatigue, overload conditions and residual stresses. Neutrons have recently become a progressively more important probe for various materials and components and they allow achieving information complementary to those obtained from the traditional microstructural analyses. The outputs from the preliminary works already carried out in this field consent to consider neutron techniques capable to contribute to the development of these crucial medical implants. The achievable results can yield trends adoptable in monitoring of the stent features.

  13. Future developments in biliary stenting

    PubMed Central

    Hair, Clark D; Sejpal, Divyesh V

    2013-01-01

    Biliary stenting has evolved dramatically over the past 30 years. Advancements in stent design have led to prolonged patency and improved efficacy. However, biliary stenting is still affected by occlusion, migration, anatomical difficulties, and the need for repeat procedures. Multiple novel plastic biliary stent designs have recently been introduced with the primary goals of reduced migration and improved ease of placement. Self-expandable bioabsorbable stents are currently being investigated in animal models. Although not US Food and Drug Administration approved for benign disease, fully covered self-expandable metal stents are increasingly being used in a variety of benign biliary conditions. In malignant disease, developments are being made to improve ease of placement and stent patency for both hilar and distal biliary strictures. The purpose of this review is to describe recent developments and future directions of biliary stenting. PMID:23837001

  14. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-06-28

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  15. Successful biliary drainage using a metal stent through the gastric stoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Kazuyuki; Kato, Hironari; Tsutsumi, Koichiro; Akimoto, Yutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Tomoda, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Noma, Yasuhiro; Horiguchi, Shigeru; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of biliary drainage for malignant stricture using a metal stent with an ultrathin endoscope through the gastric stoma. A 78-year-old female was referred to our hospital for jaundice and fever. She had undergone percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) for esophageal obstruction after radiation therapy for cancer of the pharynx. Abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a 3-cm enhanced mass in the middle bile duct and dilatation of the intra-hepatic bile duct. We initially performed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) with a trans-oral approach. However, neither the side-viewing endoscope nor the ultrathin endoscope passed through the esophageal orifice. Thus, we eventually performed ERCP via the PEG stoma using an ultrathin endoscope. We performed biliary drainage with a 6F introducer self-expanding metal stent. The cytology findings obtained by brush cytology showed malignancy. Her laboratory results were restored to normal levels after drainage and no complication occurred. PMID:26140009

  16. The Integrity bare-metal stent made by continuous sinusoid technology.

    PubMed

    Turco, Mark A

    2011-05-01

    The Integrity Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular, CA, USA) is a low-profile, open-cell, cobalt-chromium-alloy advanced bare-metal iteration of the well-known Driver/Micro-Driver Coronary Stent System (Medtronic Vascular). The Integrity stent is made with a process called continuous sinusoid technology. This process allows stent construction via wrapping a single thin strand of wire around a mandrel in a sinusoid configuration, with laser fusion of adjacent crowns. The wire-forming process and fusion pattern provide the stent with a continuous preferential bending plane, intended to allow easier access to, and smoother tracking within, distal and tortuous vessels while radial strength is maintained. Continuous sinusoid technology represents innovation in the design of stent platforms and will provide a future stent platform for newer technology, including drug-eluting stent platforms, drug-filled stents and core wire stents. PMID:21542702

  17. A finite element study of balloon expandable stent for plaque and arterial wall vulnerability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Alireza; Navidbakhsh, Mahdi; Razaghi, Reza

    2014-07-01

    The stresses induced within plaque tissues and arterial layers during stent expansion inside an atherosclerotic artery can be exceeded from the yield stresses of those tissues and, consequently, lead to plaque or arterial layer rupture. The distribution and magnitude of the stresses in each component involved in stenting might be clearly different for different plaque types and different arterial layers. In this study, a nonlinear finite element simulation was employed to investigate the effect of plaque composition (calcified, cellular, and hypocellular) on the stresses induced in the arterial layers (intima, media, and adventitia) during implantation of a balloon expandable coronary stent into a stenosed artery. The atherosclerotic artery was assumed to consist of a plaque and normal/healthy arterial tissues on its outer side. The results indicated a significant influence of plaque types on the maximum stresses induced within the plaque wall and arterial layers during stenting but not when computing maximum stress on the stent. The stress on the stiffest calcified plaque wall was in the fracture level (2.38 MPa), whereas cellular and hypocellular plaques remain stable owing to less stress on their walls. Regardless of plaque types, the highest von Mises stresses were observed on the stiffest intima layer, whereas the lowest stresses were seen to be located in less stiff media layer. The computed stresses on the intima layer were found to be high enough to initiate a rupture in this stiff layer. These findings suggest a higher risk of arterial vascular injury for the intima layer, while a lower risk of arterial injury for the media and adventitia layers.

  18. Finite Element Modeling of A Novel Self-Expanding Endovascular Stent Method in Treatment of Aortic Aneurysms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arokiaraj, Mark C.; Palacios, Igor F.

    2014-01-01

    A novel large self-expanding endovascular stent was designed with strut thickness of 70 μm × 70 μm width. The method was developed and investigated to identify a novel simpler technique in aortic aneurysm therapy. Stage 1 analysis was performed after deploying it in a virtual aneurysm model of 6 cm wide × 6 cm long fusiform hyper-elastic anisotropic design. At cell width of 9 mm, there was no buckling or migration of the stent at 180 Hg. Radial force of the stents was estimated after parametric variations. In stage 2 analysis, a prototype 300 μm × 150 μm stent with a cell width of 9 mm was chosen, and it was evaluated similarly after embedding in the aortic wall, and also with a tissue overgrowth of 1 mm over the stent. The 300/150 μm stent reduced the peak wall stress by 70% in the aneurysm and 50% reduction in compliance after embedding. Stage 3 analysis was performed to study the efficacy of stents with struts (thickness/width) 70/70, 180/100 and 300/150 μm after embedding and tissue overgrowth. The adjacent wall stresses were very minimal in stents with 180/100 and 70/70 μm struts after embedding. There is potential for a novel stent method in aortic aneurysm therapy.

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Peripheral Artery Disease with Expanded PTFE-Covered Nitinol Stents: Interim Analysis from a Prospective Controlled Study

    SciTech Connect

    Duda, S.H.; Bosiers, M.; Pusich, B.; Huettl, K.; Oliva, V.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.; Bray, A.; Luz, O.; Remy, C.; Hak, J.B.; Beregi, J.-P.

    2002-10-15

    Purpose: Current covered peripheral stent designs have significant drawbacks in terms of stent delivery characteristics and flexibility. The aim of this study was to analyze the technical performance, safety and initial clinical efficacy of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-covered nitinol stents for arteriosclerotic peripheral artery disease. Methods:Eighty-two patients underwent implantation of PTFE-covered nitinol stents for iliac and/or femoral obstructions. The study was conducted prospectively in seven European centers and one Canadian center. Patients were controlled clinically and by duplex ultrasound follow-up. Data up to discharge were collected in 79 patients. Seventy-four patients have thus far received 1 month follow-up and 32 patients, 6 month follow-up examinations. Results: The average lesion length measured 47 mm for the common and external iliac arteries and 50 mm for the femoral arteries. The mean severity of the stenoses was reduced from 94% to 4% in the iliac arteries and from 98% to 7% in the femoral arteries after stent placement and dilatation. One device deviation (inadvertent stent misplacement) and one puncture-related severe adverse event with formation of a pseudoaneurysm occurred. There were occlusions of the stent in five patients. No infections were noticed. Conclusion: The interim analysis of this trial using PTFE-covered nitinol stents indicates that a strategy using primary implantation of this stent type is technically feasible, has an acceptable safety profile and is effective from a short-term perspective.

  20. Removal of displaced double flanged metal stent in walled-off necrosis by endoscopic ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jintao; Liu, Zhijun; Sun, Siyu; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS)-guided walled-off necrosis drainage using a double flanged metal stent was reported for satisfactory drainage and endoscopic necrosectomy. High complication rates related to stent migration are reported. This is the first report of the removal of a displaced, double flanged metal stent in walled-off necrosis by EUS. The patient was a 62-year-old male who was suffering from mild midepigastric abdominal pain. A double flanged metal stent had been placed in our endoscopy center 8 weeks before presentation. Computed tomography demonstrated complete resolution of the walled-off necrosis; however, the stent migrated into the cyst. We dislodged the stent using forceps with real-time endosonography. In conclusion, Follow-up is important for patients with a double flanged metal stent, specifically with regards to postprocedural stent migration. PMID:27080613

  1. The Results of Self-Expandable Kissing Stents in Aortic Bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jae Young; Hwang, Hong Pil; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Yu, Hee Chul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Kissing stent reconstruction is a widely used technique for the management of aortoiliac occlusive disease involving the aortic bifurcation or proximal common iliac arteries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of self-expandable kissing stents in the aortic bifurcation. Materials and Methods: We reviewed medical records of the patients treated with a kissing stent retrospectively from January 2007 to December 2012. The primary and secondary patencies were determined with Kaplan-Meier analysis, and Cox regression was used to determine the factors associated with patency. Results: A total of 21 patients were included, and all were male (median age 53±15 years, range 48–78 years). Major symptoms were claudication (n=16, 61.9%), rest pain (n=5, 23.8%) and gangrene (n=5, 23.8%). Tans-Atlantic Inter-Society Consensus for the Management of Peripheral Arterial Disease (TASC) II classification was A 2 (9.5%), B 5 (23.8%), C 7 (33.3%) and D 8 (38%). The mean follow-up was 40.7 months. Major complication occurred in only one case which consisted of distal limb ischemia by emboli. Six patients developed symptomatic restenosis or occlusion. There was no major amputation, but minor amputation occurred in 3 patients. There were 2 mortalities not associated with the procedure (lung cancer and intracranial hemorrhage). Primary patency was 89.6% at 1 year, 74.7% at 3 years and 64.0% at 5 years. Secondary patency was 94.1% at 1 year, 88.2% at 3 years and 68.6% at 5 years. No risk factors for restenosis or occlusion were identified. Conclusion: Self-expandable kissing stents can be used successfully with comparable patency for endovascular treatment of symptomatic atherosclerotic occlusive lesions in the aortic bifurcation area. PMID:26217639

  2. Gastrointestinal Stent Update

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The use of self-expanding metallic stents in the upper gastrointestinal tract, placed under radiologic imaging or endoscopic guidance, is the current treatment of choice for the palliation of malignant gastrointestinal outlet obstructions. Advances in metallic stent design and delivery systems have progressed to the stage where this treatment is now considered a minimally invasive therapy. Metallic stent placement will broaden further into the field of nonsurgical therapy for the gastrointestinal tract. To date, metallic stents placed in the esophagus, gastric outlet, colorectum, and bile ducts are not intended to be curative, but rather to provide a palliative treatment for obstructions. The evolution of metallic stent technology will render such procedures not only palliative but also therapeutic, by enabling local drug delivery, and the use of biodegradable materials will reduce procedure-related complications. PMID:21103290

  3. The use of cold sprayed alloys for metallic stents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    AL-Mangour, Bandar

    With the invention of the coronary stent, which is a wire metal mesh tube designed to keep the arteries open in the treatment of heart diseases, promising clinical outcomes were generated. However, the long term successes of stents have been delayed by significant in-stent restenosis (blockages) and stent fracture. In this research work, it has been proposed to use Cold Gas Dynamic Spraying (CGDS) coating material as an alternative choice to manufacture metallic stent. In CGDS, fine particles are accelerated to a high velocity and undergo solid-state plastic deformation upon impact on the substrate, which leads to particle-particle bonding. The feature of CGDS distinct from other thermal spray techniques is that the processing gas temperature is below the melting point of the feedstock. Therefore, unwanted effects of high temperatures, such as oxidation, grain growth and thermal stresses, are absent. In response to the fact that the majority of stents are made from stainless steel (316L) or Co-Cr alloy (L605), this study specifically addresses the development and characterization of 316L and 316L mixed with L605 coatings produced by the CGDS process. Scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to investigate the microstructural changes of these coatings before and after annealing. The effect of gas type on the microstructure of 316L coatings and the role of post-heat treatment in the microstructure and properties are also studied. Of particular interest are grain refinement, heat treatment, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of the cold sprayed material.

  4. Percutaneous Unilateral Biliary Metallic Stent Placement in Patients with Malignant Obstruction of the Biliary Hila and Contralateral Portal Vein Steno-Occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Son, Rak Chae; Ko, Heung Kyu; Kim, Jong Woo; Ko, Gi-Young

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the outcomes of percutaneous unilateral metallic stent placement in patients with a malignant obstruction of the biliary hila and a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion. Materials and Methods Sixty patients with a malignant hilar obstruction and unilobar portal vein steno-occlusion caused by tumor invasion or preoperative portal vein embolization were enrolled in this retrospective study from October 2010 to October 2013. All patients were treated with percutaneous placement of a biliary metallic stent, including expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered stents in 27 patients and uncovered stents in 33 patients. Results A total of 70 stents were successfully placed in 60 patients. Procedural-related minor complications, including self-limiting hemobilia (n = 2) and cholangitis (n = 4) occurred in six (10%) patients. Acute cholecystitis occurred in two patients. Successful internal drainage was achieved in 54 (90%) of the 60 patients. According to a Kaplan-Meier analysis, median survival time was 210 days (95% confidence interval [CI], 135-284 days), and median stent patency time was 133 days (95% CI, 94-171 days). No significant difference in stent patency was observed between covered and uncovered stents (p = 0.646). Stent dysfunction occurred in 16 (29.6%) of 54 patients after a mean of 159 days (range, 65-321 days). Conclusion Unilateral placement of ePTFE-covered and uncovered stents in the hepatic lobe with a patent portal vein is a safe and effective method for palliative treatment of patients with a contralateral portal vein steno-occlusion caused by an advanced hilar malignancy or portal vein embolization. No significant difference in stent patency was detected between covered and uncovered metallic stents. PMID:25995688

  5. Prevention of Intracranial In-stent Restenoses: Predilatation with a Drug Eluting Balloon, Followed by the Deployment of a Self-Expanding Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, Zsolt Guethe, Thomas Perez, Marta Aguilar Kurre, Wiebke; Schmid, Elisabeth Baezner, Hansjoerg; Henkes, Hans

    2013-04-15

    Stenting in intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD) is increasingly debated, due to issues of procedural safety, technical efficacy, and in-stent recurrent stenoses (ISR). In the present study, feasibility, safety, and efficacy of angioplasty using a drug-eluting balloon (DEB) followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise) were evaluated for the treatment of ICAD lesions. Fifty-two patients (median age: 71 years; range: 54-86 years; male/female ratio 37:15) underwent stenting of high-grade ICAD lesions between February 2010 and November 2011 in a single center. Angioplasty using a paclitaxel coated SeQuent Please (B. Braun, Germany) or DIOR (Eurocor, Germany) coronary PTCA balloon, followed by the implantation of a self-expanding stent (Enterprise, Codman, USA) was performed in 54 lesions. Angiographic and clinical follow-up was performed at 6 and 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months, and yearly thereafter. Technical success rate, periprocedural complications, occurrence of recurrent ischemic symptoms, and the development of an ISR were analyzed. Angioplasty using a DEB followed by stent implantation was successfully performed in 44 (81 %) cases. DEB insertion failed in 19 % of the cases and angioplasty was finally performed using a conventional PTCA balloon. The combined procedure related permanent neurologic morbidity and mortality rate (stroke, ICH, and subarachnoid hemorrhage) at 30 days and beyond was 5 %. Angiographic and clinical follow-up were obtained in 33 (61 %) lesions in 32 patients. Recurrent stenosis was seen in one (3 %) lesion. Angioplasty and stenting using a DEB is safe and yields encouragingly low ISR rates. Further technical developments to improve lesion accessibility are, nevertheless, mandatory.

  6. Surface modification of implanted cardiovascular metal stents: from antithrombosis and antirestenosis to endothelialization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Liu, Tao; Li, Jing-An; Chen, Jun-Ying; Wang, Jian; Huang, Nan

    2014-02-01

    Driven by the complications occurring with bare metal stents and drug-eluting stents, concerns have been raised over strategies for long-term safety, with respect to preventing or inhibiting stent thrombosis, restenosis, and in-stent restenosis in particularly. Surface modification is very important in constructing a buffer layer at the interface of the organic and inorganic materials and in ultimately obtaining long-term biocompatibility. In this review, we summarize the developments in surface modification of implanted cardiovascular metal stents. This review focuses on the modification of metal stents via coating drugs or biomolecules to enhance antithrombosis, antirestenosis, and/or endothelialization. In addition, we indicate the probable future work involving the modification of the metallic blood-contacting surfaces of stents and other cardiovascular devices that are under development. PMID:23520056

  7. Stent thrombosis in real-world patients: a comparison of drug-eluting with bare metal stents

    PubMed Central

    de Man, F.H.; Stella, P.R.; Nathoe, H.; Kirkels, H.; Hamer, B.; Meijburg, H.W.; Doevendans, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Background Although the introduction of drugeluting stents (DES) has been associated with an impressive reduction in target vessel revascularisation, there has been concern about the safety profile. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of stent thrombosis in real-world patients and evaluate the contribution of drug-eluting stents. Methods A prospective observational cohort study was conducted at a high-volume centre in Utrecht, the Netherlands. All patients who underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) between 1 January and 31 December 2005 were evaluated. The patients were pretreated with aspirin and clopidogrel, which was continued for six months in bare metal stents (BMS) and 12 months in DES. Results In 2005, 1309 patients underwent a percutaneous coronary intervention procedure with stent implantation. After a median follow-up of nine months, 1.8% (n=23) of the patients had suffered from stent thrombosis. Two cases could be attributed to incorrect use of antiplatelet agents. In 8/23 cases, a technical reason was found such as an unrecognised dissection or stent underexpansion. The timing of stent thrombosis was acute in 1/23 patients, subacute in 20/23 patients and late in 2/23 patients. In both cases of late stent thrombosis, a BMS had been used. There were no differences in stent thrombosis rates between DES and BMS (1.4 vs. 1.9%, ns.). This is remarkable since DES were used in more complex and longer lesions. Conclusion The use of DES in routine daily practice does not appear to be associated with a higher rate of stent thrombosis than BMS. (Neth Heart J 2007;15:382-6.18176640Neth Heart J 2007;15:382-6). PMID:18176640

  8. A new polymer-free drug-eluting stent with nanocarriers eluting sirolimus from stent-plus-balloon compared with bare-metal stent and with biolimus A9 eluting stent in porcine coronary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Galon, Micheli Z.; Gutierrez, Paulo S.; Sojitra, Prakash; Vyas, Ashwin; Doshi, Manish; Lemos, Pedro A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Permanent polymers in first generation drug-eluting stent (DES) have been imputed to be a possible cause of persistent inflammation, remodeling, malapposition and late stent thrombosis. We aim to describe the in vivo experimental result of a new polymer-free DES eluting sirolimus from stent-plus-balloon (Focus np stent, Envision Scientific) compared with a bare-metal stent (BMS) (Amazonia CroCo, Minvasys) and with a biolimus A9 eluting stent (Biomatrix, Biosensors). Methods In 10 juvenile pigs, 23 coronary stents were implanted in the coronary arteries (8 Amazonia CroCo, 8 Focus np, and 7 Biomatrix). At 28-day follow-up, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and histology were used to evaluate neointimal hyperplasia and healing response. Results According to OCT analysis, Focus np stents had a greater lumen area and less neointimal hyperplasia response than BMS and Biomatrix had. Histomorphometry results showed less neointimal hyperplasia in Focus np than in BMS. Histology showed a higher fibrin deposition in Biomatrix stent compared to Focus np and BMS. Conclusions The new polymer-free DES with sirolimus eluted from stent-plus-balloon demonstrated safety and reduced neointimal proliferation compared with the BMS and Biomatrix stents at 28-day follow-up in this porcine coronary model. This new polymer-free DES is promising and warrants further clinical studies. PMID:25984451

  9. Study of the Behavior of a Bell-Shaped Colonic Self-Expandable NiTi Stent under Peristaltic Movements

    PubMed Central

    Puértolas, José A.; López, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    Managing bowel obstruction produced by colon cancer requires an emergency intervention to patients usually in poor conditions, and it requires creating an intestinal stoma in most cases. Regardless of that the tumor may be resectable, a two-stage surgery is mandatory. To avoid these disadvantages, endoscopic placement of self-expanding stents has been introduced more than 10 years ago, as an alternative to relieve colonic obstruction. It can be used as a bridge to elective single-stage surgery avoiding a stoma or as a definitive palliative solution in patients with irresectable tumor or poor estimated survival. Stents must be capable of exerting an adequate radial pressure on the stenosed wall, keeping in mind that stent must not move or be crushed, guaranteeing an adequate lumen when affected by peristaltic waves. A finite element simulation of bell-shaped nitinol stent functionality has been done. Catheter introduction, releasing at position, and the effect of peristaltic wave were simulated. To check the reliability of the simulation, a clinical experimentation with porcine specimens was carried out. The stent presented a good deployment and flexibility. Stent behavior was excellent, expanding from the very narrow lumen corresponding to the maximum peristaltic pressure to the complete recovery of operative lumen when the pressure disappears. PMID:23841067

  10. Malignant tracheal-mediastinal-parenchymal-pleural fistula after chemoradiation plus bevacizumab: management with a Y-silicone stent inside a metallic covered stent.

    PubMed

    Machuzak, Michael S; Santacruz, Jose F; Jaber, Wissam; Gildea, Thomas R

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal or bronchial-mediastinal fistulas are a rare entity associated to high mortality. We report a case of a 58-year-old man with an unresectable non-small cell carcinoma of the lung, treated with chemoradiation followed by bevacizumab. Approximately, 6 weeks after starting bevacizumab he developed a severe cough with copious secretions He could not lie supine due to the feeling of drowning. Investigations revealed a large tracheo-mediastinal-parenchymal-pleural fistula. Palliative management was offered with interventional bronchoscopic techniques. He was found to have a large central airway defect that obliterated almost 40% of the trachea. Under general anesthesia and positive pressure ventilation, a unique approach was used to rebuild an eroded tracheal and right main stem bronchial wall. A self-expanding metallic stent (SEMS) was placed to provide a scaffold of support, whereas a Dumon Y-stent was placed inside the SEMS. This combination allowed for a patent, stable airway; recreating the normal anatomy in a minimally invasive manner walling off the fistula. The patient was discharged 2 days after the bronchoscopic intervention, with significant palliation of his symptomatology. Eighteen months later, the upper lobe cavity persists with a stable airway and stents perfectly positioned with clinically insignificant evidence of stent related granulation in the upper trachea. PMID:25590491

  11. Clinical utility of platinum chromium bare-metal stents in coronary heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Jorge, Claudia; Dubois, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Coronary stents represent a key development for the treatment of obstructive coronary artery disease since the introduction of percutaneous coronary intervention. While drug-eluting stents gained wide acceptance in contemporary percutaneous coronary intervention practice, further developments in bare-metal stents remain crucial for patients who are not candidates for drug-eluting stents, or to improve metallic platforms for drug elution. Initially, stent platforms used biologically inert stainless steel, restricting stent performance due to limitations in flexibility and strut thickness. Later, cobalt chromium stent alloys outperformed steel as the material of choice for stents, allowing latest generation stents to be designed with significantly thinner struts, while maintaining corrosion resistance and radial strength. Most recently, the introduction of the platinum chromium alloy refined stent architecture with thin struts, high radial strength, conformability, and improved radiopacity. This review will provide an overview of the novel platinum chromium bare-metal stent platforms available for coronary intervention. Mechanical properties, clinical utility, and device limitations will be summarized and put into perspective. PMID:26345228

  12. Placement of multiple metal stents for malignant intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy fistula.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Dai; Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Nakai, Yousuke; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Takagi, Kaoru; Mizuno, Suguru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound-guided choledochoduodenostomy (EUS-CDS) using a fully-covered self-expandable metal stent (SEMS) is increasingly used as an alternative to failed endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. An EUS-CDS fistula can provide endoscopists with a new approach route for intrahepatic bile ducts. Here, we present successful placement of multiple SEMS for intrahepatic biliary obstruction via an EUS-CDS fistula. PMID:26462843

  13. Portal vein occlusion after biliary metal stent placement in hilar cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Woo, Kyung Hee; Kim, Jin Bae; Chang, Yoon Jung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Baek, Il Hyun; Ko, Jin Seok; Woo, Ji Young; Kim, Hong Dae; Lee, Myung Seok

    2008-06-01

    Acute symptomatic portal vein obstruction related to biliary stenting is an extremely rare but life-threatening complication. This usually occurs in patients with either tumor invasion into the portal vein or pre-existing portal vein thrombus. Therefore, the portal vein should be carefully evaluated before placing a biliary metallic stent in such patients. We describe a case of acute portal vein obstruction after placing metallic biliary stents in a patient with a periductal-infiltrating type of hilar cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:20485610

  14. Bronchobiliary Fistula Treated by Self-expanding ePTFE-Covered Nitinol Stent-Graft

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Tisone, Giuseppe; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Anselmo, Alessandro; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2005-12-15

    A 71-year-old man, who had undergone right hepatectomy extended to the caudate lobe with terminolateral Roux-en-Y left hepatojejunostomy for a Klatskin tumor, developed bilioptysis 3 weeks postoperatively due to bronchobiliary fistula. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography revealed a non-dilated biliary system with contrast medium extravasation to the right subphrenic space through a resected anomalous right posterior segmental duct. After initial unsuccessful internal-external biliary drainage, the fistula was sealed with a VIATORR covered self-expanding nitinol stent-graft placed with its distal uncovered region in the hepatojejunal anastomosis and the proximal ePTFE-lined region in the left hepatic duct. A 10-month follow-up revealed no recurrence of bilioptysis and confirmed the complete exclusion of the bronchobiliary fistula.

  15. Biodegradable Metals for Cardiovascular Stents: from Clinical Concerns to Recent Zn-Alloys.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Patrick K; Shearier, Emily R; Zhao, Shan; Guillory, Roger J; Zhao, Feng; Goldman, Jeremy; Drelich, Jaroslaw W

    2016-05-01

    Metallic stents are used to promote revascularization and maintain patency of plaqued or damaged arteries following balloon angioplasty. To mitigate the long-term side effects associated with corrosion-resistant stents (i.e., chronic inflammation and late stage thrombosis), a new generation of so-called "bioabsorbable" stents is currently being developed. The bioabsorbable coronary stents will corrode and be absorbed by the artery after completing their task as vascular scaffolding. Research spanning the last two decades has focused on biodegradable polymeric, iron-based, and magnesium-based stent materials. The inherent mechanical and surface properties of metals make them more attractive stent material candidates than their polymeric counterparts. A third class of metallic bioabsorbable materials that are based on zinc has been introduced in the last few years. This new zinc-based class of materials demonstrates the potential for an absorbable metallic stent with the mechanical and biodegradation characteristics required for optimal stent performance. This review compares bioabsorbable materials and summarizes progress towards bioabsorbable stents. It emphasizes the current understanding of physiological and biological benefits of zinc and its biocompatibility. Finally, the review provides an outlook on challenges in designing zinc-based stents of optimal mechanical properties and biodegradation rate. PMID:27094868

  16. [Assessment of the course of ischemic heart disease after placement of stents with drug covering and uncovered metal stents: data of 3 years follow-up].

    PubMed

    Buza, V V; Karpov, Iu A; Samko, A N; Deev, A D; Lopukhova, V V; Levitskiĭ, I V; Sozykin, A V

    2009-01-01

    The placement of sirolimus-eluting stents decreases the frequency of repeat revascularization procedures in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in randomized clinical trials. However, there is uncertainty about the effectiveness of sirolimus-eluting stents, and increasing concern about their safety in routine clinical practice. From the prof. Samko PCI laboratory in Moscow, Russia, we identified 426 patients, who received either bare-metal stents alone or sirolimus-eluting stents alone during an index PCI procedure between March 1, 2002, and September 31, 2004.The primary outcomes of the study were the rates of target-lesion revascularization, myocardial infarction, death, late stent thrombosis. The 3-year rate of target-lesion revascularization was significantly lower among patients who received sirolimus-eluting stents than among those who received bare-metal stents (3.1% vs. 19 %, p=0.001). The 3-year mortality rate was not different between the bare-metal stent group and the sirolimus eluting stent group (5.9% vs. 7.2%, p=0.68), the 3-year rate of all ARC late stent thrombosis was similar in the two groups (5.9% and 7.2%, respectively; p=0.95). Sirolimus-eluting stents are effective in reducing the need for target-vessel revascularization without significantly increased rates of death, late stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction. PMID:19166395

  17. Use of intravascular ultrasound vs. optical coherence tomography for mechanism and patterns of in-stent restenosis among bare metal stents and drug eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Muzina

    2016-01-01

    This article is a perspective responses to the “Mechanisms and Patterns of Intravascular Ultrasound In-Stent Restenosis Among Bare Metal Stents and First- and Second-Generation Drug-Eluting Stents” by Goto et al., The above mentioned article outlines the use of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) in visualizing the patterns and mechanisms of in-stent restenosis (ISR) post percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Although IVUS is an appropriate method of choice for this scenario, IVUS has certain limitations which can be overcome by using optical coherent tomography (OCT). OCT is not only able to overcome IVUS’s limitations but is also able to provide additional information to enhance the understanding of in-stent restenotic lesions. This article also outlines the future directions for OCT both in clinical and investigation settings. PMID:26904234

  18. Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe R.

    2004-10-05

    A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

  19. Choledochoduodenal Fistula after the Placement of a Partially Covered Metal Stent for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Daisuke; Ogura, Takeshi; Imoto, Akira; Onda, Saori; Sano, Tatsushi; Takagi, Wataru; Okuda, Atsushi; Takeuchi, Toshihisa; Fukunishi, Shinya; Inoue, Takuya; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    A 75-year-old Japanese man with type 2 diabetes mellitus suffered from unresectable pancreatic head cancer and was admitted to our institution due to acute cholangitis. A partially covered metal stent was placed at that time. 11 months later, he was readmitted for acute cholangitis. Upper endoscopy revealed complete stent distal migration and a small hole on the oral side of the ampulla. While attempting cannulation into the hole, an upstream biliary tract was revealed. Accordingly, we diagnosed the patient to have a choledochoduodenal fistula. After metal stent removal and balloon dilation, we placed two 7 Fr plastic stents, which successfully relieved the patient's cholangitis. PMID:27301511

  20. Metal or plastic stent for malignant biliary obstruction: what's got the most bang for your buck?

    PubMed

    Moparty, Bhavani; Carr-Locke, David L

    2007-12-01

    Malignant biliary obstruction is most commonly managed by the endoscopist. Various plastic and metal stents are currently available. It is important to be aware of the pros and cons of each. The identifying factors that determine the prognosis for the patient might also help determine which type of stent to place. This month's article by Moss et al., is a meta-analysis of seven randomized controlled trials analyzing the cost-effectiveness of plastic and metal stents. This meta-analysis helps guide the endoscopist in deciding what type of stent would be most beneficial and cost effective for their patients. PMID:17998825

  1. Removal of metallic tracheobronchial stents in lung transplantation with flexible bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Airway complications are among the most challenging problems after lung transplantation, and Self-Expandable Metallic Stents (SEMS) are used to treat airway complications such as stenosis or malacia at the bronchial anastomosis sites. Several transplantation centers are reluctant to use SEMS since their removal is sometimes needed and usually requires the use of rigid bronchoscopy under general anesthesia. The objective of the current report is to describe our experience in SEMS retrieval by flexible bronchoscopy under conscious sedation. Methods A retrospective review was done of patients requiring tracheobronchial stent placement after lung transplantation in which the SEMS had to be removed. The retrieval procedure was done by flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care ambulatory basis. Results Between January 2004 and January 2010, out of 305 lung transplantation patients, 24 (7.8%) underwent SEMS placement. Indications included bronchial stenosis in 20 and bronchomalacia in 4. In six patients (25%) the SEMS had to be removed due to excessive granulation tissue formation and stent obstruction. The average time from SEMS placement to retrieval was 30 months (range 16-48 months). The stent was completely removed in five patients and partially removed in one patient; no major complications were encountered, and all patients were discharged within 3 hours of the procedure. In all procedures, new SEMS was successfully re-inserted thereafter. Conclusions The retrieval of SEMS in patients that underwent lung transplantation can be effectively and safely done under conscious sedation using flexible bronchoscopy on a day-care basis, this observation should encourage increasing usage of SEMS in highly selected patients. PMID:20831830

  2. Outcomes of Prosthetic Hemodialysis Grafts after Deployment of Bare Metal versus Covered Stents at the Venous Anastomosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Charles Y. Tandberg, Daniel J.; Rosenberg, Michael D.; Miller, Michael J.; Suhocki, Paul V.; Smith, Tony P.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare postintervention patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents across the venous anastomosis of prosthetic arteriovenous (AV) grafts. Methods: Review of our procedural database over a 6 year period revealed 377 procedures involving stent deployment in an AV access circuit. After applying strict inclusion criteria, our study group consisted of 61 stent deployments in 58 patients (median age 58 years, 25 men, 33 women) across the venous anastomosis of an upper extremity AV graft circuit that had never been previously stented. Both patent and thrombosed AV access circuits were retrospectively analyzed. Within the bare metal stent group, 20 of 32 AV grafts were thrombosed at initial presentation compared to 18 of 29 AV grafts in the covered stent group. Results: Thirty-two bare metal stents and 29 covered stents were deployed across the venous anastomosis. The 3, 6, and 12 months primary access patency rates for bare metal stents were not significantly different than for covered stents: 50, 41, and 22 % compared to 59, 52, and 29 %, respectively (p = 0.21). The secondary patency rates were also not significantly different: 78, 78, and 68 % for bare metal stents compared to 76, 69, and 61 % for covered stents, respectively (p = 0.85). However, covered stents demonstrated a higher primary stent patency rate than bare metal stents: 100, 85, and 70 % compared to 75, 67, and 49 % at 3, 6, and 12 months (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The primary and secondary access patency rates after deployment of bare metal versus covered stents at the venous anastomosis were not significantly different. However, bare metal stents developed in-stent stenoses significantly sooner.

  3. Hemodynamic study of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention to aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Sun, Anqiang; Zhan, Fan; Luan, Jingyuan; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the hemodynamic performance of overlapping bare-metal stents intervention treatment to thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAA), three simplified TAA models, representing, no stent, with a single stent and 2 overlapped stents deployed in the aneurismal sac, were studied and compared in terms of flow velocity, wall shear stress (WSS) and pressure distributions by means of computational fluid dynamics. The results showed that overlapping stents intervention induced a flow field of slow velocity near the aneurismal wall. Single stent deployment in the sac reduced the jet-like flow formed prior to the proximal neck of the aneurysm, which impinged on the internal wall of the aneurysm. This jet-like flow vanished completely in the overlapping double stents case. Overlapping stents intervention led to an evident decrease in WSS; meanwhile, the pressure acting on the wall of the aneurysm was reduced slightly and presented more uniform distribution. The results therefore indicated that overlapping stents intervention may effectively isolate the thoracic aortic aneurysm, protecting it from rupture. In conclusion, overlapping bare-metal stents may serve a purpose similar to that of the multilayer aneurysm repair system (MARS) manufactured by Cardiatis SA (Isnes, Belgium). PMID:25262876

  4. Intraductal radiofrequency ablation of tumour ingrowth into an uncovered metal stent used for inoperable cholangiocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lui, K L; Li, K K

    2013-12-01

    A 91-year-old woman diagnosed to have an inoperable cholangiocarcinoma had an uncovered metal stent inserted for palliative drainage. About 1.5 years later, tumour ingrowth into the metal stent caused cholangitis. Intraductal radiofrequency ablation was applied to create local coagulative tumour necrosis and the necrotic tissue was removed via a balloon catheter. A plastic stent was inserted to empirically treat any ensuing potential bile duct injury. The patient was discharged without complication with good palliative drainage. Intraductal radiofrequency ablation is a new technique for the treatment of metal stent occlusion due to tumour ingrowths. This is the first case report of this relatively safe and feasible new technique for the treatment of tumour ingrowth into a metal stent used as palliation for malignant biliary obstruction. PMID:24310661

  5. Neoatherosclerosis in Very Late Stenosis of Bare Metal Stent by Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Iskandar, Aline

    2016-01-01

    Bare metal stents (BMS) continue to be widely used in patients with coronary artery disease undergoing percutaneous revascularization. Progressive luminal renarrowing has been reported late after BMS implantation resulting in a significant rate of stent failure events. We present a case of very late BMS failure due to in-stent restenosis where optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to demonstrate neoatherosclerosis as the underlying mechanism. We provide a brief review of neoatherosclerosis and showcase salient features on OCT evaluation. PMID:27034852

  6. Acute coronary syndrome due to complete bare metal stent fracture in the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Bilen, Emine; Saatci Yasar, Ayse; Bilge, Mehmet; Karakas, Fatih; Kırbas, Ozgur; Ipek, Gokturk

    2010-03-18

    Stent fracture (SF) was suggested to be an unusual cause of restenosis after drug eluting-stent implantation. However, angiographically visible complete SF after bare metal stent (BMS) implantation is extremely rare. Here we report a case of SF of a BMS representing with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). To our knowledge, this is the first report of early fracture of a BMS in the right coronary artery, resulting in ACS. PMID:19042043

  7. Acute coronary syndrome due to bare metal stent fracture in the right coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Şatiroğlu, Ömer; Bostan, Mehmet; Bozkur, Engin

    2011-01-01

    Stent fracture (SF) has been suggested to be an unusual cause of restenosis after drug eluting-stent implantation. However, angiographically visible SF after bare metal stent (BMS) implantation is extremely rare. We present a case of a 58 year-old male patient who presented with unstable angina secondary to a SF of a BMS within two months of elective percutaneous coronary intervention for right coronary artery associated with a muscle bridge and atherosclerotic stenosis. PMID:21850640

  8. Esophageal stents: when and how.

    PubMed

    Kachaamy, Toufic; Pannala, Rahul

    2016-06-01

    Esophageal stents are devices used to alleviate dysphagia and treat leaks and perforations. Successful esophageal stenting requires definition of the abnormal anatomy such as stricture length or location of the leak, proper stent selection and deployment. This requires detailed knowledge of characteristics of the currently available stents. Self-expanding metal stents whether fully or partially covered have become the mainstay of treatment of esophageal cancer-related dysphagia as they provide quick relief of symptoms and have a favorable safety and efficacy profile, compared to other modalities such as radiation, laser, and argon plasma coagulation. They are also the initial treatment of choice for both malignant and benign fistulae. Stents are also used in benign refractory strictures but long-term stricture resolution rates are low in this setting. Fully covered metal stents are relatively easier to remove compared to partially covered stents; optimal time interval for removal depends on the indication for stenting and the clinical status of the patient. Stent related adverse events include chest pain, reflux, migration, and recurrent obstruction. Serious adverse events occur in less than 5% with procedure-related mortality of less than 2%. Techniques such as placement of hemostatic clips, Over The Scope clips, and endoscopic suturing are being used to decrease the migration risk but the optimal approach has not been defined. Antireflux measures are needed when a stent is placed across the gastroesophageal junction. Stents with antireflux designs do not appear to offer additional benefit compared to the conventional stent designs. Newer stent designs including biodegradable, drug eluting and radioactive stents are currently being investigated. PMID:26824424

  9. Development of a polymer stent with shape memory effect as a drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Wache, H M; Tartakowska, D J; Hentrich, A; Wagner, M H

    2003-02-01

    The article presents a new concept for vascular endoprothesis (stent). Almost all commercially available stents are made of metallic materials. A common after effect of stent implantation is restenosis. Several studies on metal stents coated with drug show, that the use of a drug delivery system may reduce restenosis. The purpose of this work is to develop a new stent for the drug delivery application. The shape memory properties of thermoplastic polyurethane allow to design a new fully polymeric self-expandable stent. The possibility to use the stent as a drug delivery system is described. PMID:15348481

  10. Spectral Analysis Related to Bare-Metal and Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent Implantation

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Rose Mary Ferreira Lisboa; Silva, Carlos Augusto Bueno; Greco, Otaviano José; Moreira, Maria da Consolação Vieira

    2014-01-01

    Background The autonomic nervous system plays a central role in cardiovascular regulation; sympathetic activation occurs during myocardial ischemia. Objective To assess the spectral analysis of heart rate variability during stent implantation, comparing the types of stent. Methods This study assessed 61 patients (mean age, 64.0 years; 35 men) with ischemic heart disease and indication for stenting. Stent implantation was performed under Holter monitoring to record the spectral analysis of heart rate variability (Fourier transform), measuring the low-frequency (LF) and high-frequency (HF) components, and the LF/HF ratio before and during the procedure. Results Bare-metal stent was implanted in 34 patients, while the others received drug-eluting stents. The right coronary artery was approached in 21 patients, the left anterior descending, in 28, and the circumflex, in 9. As compared with the pre-stenting period, all patients showed an increase in LF and HF during stent implantation (658 versus 185 ms2, p = 0.00; 322 versus 121, p = 0.00, respectively), with no change in LF/HF. During stent implantation, LF was 864 ms2 in patients with bare-metal stents, and 398 ms2 in those with drug-eluting stents (p = 0.00). The spectral analysis of heart rate variability showed no association with diabetes mellitus, family history, clinical presentation, beta-blockers, age, and vessel or its segment. Conclusions Stent implantation resulted in concomitant sympathetic and vagal activations. Diabetes mellitus, use of beta-blockers, and the vessel approached showed no influence on the spectral analysis of heart rate variability. Sympathetic activation was lower during the implantation of drug-eluting stents. PMID:25029473

  11. Mid-Term Follow-Up of Drug-Eluting Stenting for In-Stent Restenosis: Bare-Metal Stents versus Drug-Eluting Stents

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Negar; Salarifar, Mojtaba; Kassaian, Seyed Ebrahim; Zeinali, Ali Mohammad Haji; Alidoosti, Mohammad; Pourhoseini, Hamidreza; Nematipour, Ebrahim; Mousavi, Mohammad Reza; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza

    2013-01-01

    Background: Despite major advances in percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), in-stent restenosis (ISR) remains a therapeutic challenge. We sought to compare the mid-term clinical outcomes after treatment with repeat drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation (“DES sandwich” technique) with DES placement in the bare-metal stent (DES-in-BMS) in a “real world” setting. Methods: We retrospectively identified and analyzed clinical and angiographic data on 194 patients previously treated with the DES who underwent repeat PCI for ISR with a DES or a BMS. ISR was defined, by visual assessment, as a luminal stenosis greater than 50% within the stent or within 5 mm of its edges. We recorded the occurrence of major adverse cardiac events (MACE), defined as cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, and the need for target vessel revascularization (TVR). Results: Of the 194 study participants, 130 were men (67.0%) and the mean ± SD of age was 57.0 ± 10.4 years, ranging from 37 to 80 years. In-hospital events (death and Q-wave myocardial infarction) occurred at a similar frequency in both groups. Outcomes at twelve months were also similar between the groups with cumulative clinical MACE at one-year follow-up of 9.6% and 11.3% in the DES-in-BMS and the DES-in-DES groups, respectively (p value = 0.702). Although not significant, there was a trend toward a higher TVR rate in the intra-DES ISR group as compared to the intra-BMS ISR group (0.9% BMS vs. 5.2% DES; p value = 0.16). Conclusion: Our study suggests that the outcome of the patients presenting with ISR did not seem to be different between the two groups of DES-in-DES and DES-in-BMS at one-year follow-up, except for a trend toward more frequent TVR in the DES-in-DES group. Repeat DES implantation for DES restenosis could be feasible and safe with a relatively low incidence of MACE at mid-term follow-up. PMID:23646043

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience

    PubMed Central

    Tyberg, Amy; Perez-Miranda, Manuel; Sanchez-Ocaña, Ramon; Peñas, Irene; de la Serna, Carlos; Shah, Janak; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Gaidhane, Monica; Grimm, Ian; Baron, Todd; Kahaleh, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical gastrojejunostomy and enteral self-expanding metal stents are efficacious for the management of gastric outlet obstruction but limited by high complication rates and short-term efficacy. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy (EUS-GJ) is a novel alternative option. Patients and methods: Patients who underwent EUS-GJ between March 2014 and September 2015 as part of a prospective multicenter registry at four academic centers in two countries were included. Technical success was defined as successful placement of a gastrojejunal lumen-apposing metal stent. Clinical success was defined as the ability of the patient to tolerate an oral diet. Post-procedural adverse events were recorded. Results: The study included 26 patients, of whom 11 (42 %) were male. Technical success was achieved in 24 patients (92 %). Clinical success was achieved in 22 patients (85 %). Of the 4 patients in whom clinical success was not achieved, 2 had persistent nausea and vomiting despite a patent EUS-GJ and required enteral feeding for nutrition, 1 died before the initiation of an oral diet, and 1 underwent surgery for suspected perforation. Adverse events, including peritonitis, bleeding, and surgery, occurred in 3 patients (11.5 %). Conclusion: EUS-GJ is an emerging procedure that has efficacy and safety comparable with those of current therapies and should hold a place as a new minimally invasive option for patients with gastric outlet obstruction. Clinical trial identification number: NCT01522573 PMID:27004243

  13. Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization of a Mycotic Renal Artery Aneurysm by Use of a Self-Expanding Neurointerventional Stent

    SciTech Connect

    Rabellino, Martin; Garcia-Nielsen, Luis; Zander, Tobias Baldi, Sebastian; Llorens, Rafael; Maynar, Manuel

    2011-02-15

    Mycotic aneurysms are uncommon, especially those located in visceral arteries. We present a case of a patient with two visceral mycotic aneurysms due to bacterial endocarditis, one located in right upper pole renal artery and the second in the splenic artery. Both aneurysms were treated as endovascular embolization using microcoils. In the aneurysm located at the renal artery, the technique of stent-assisted coils embolization was preferred to avoid coils migration due to its wide neck. The stent used was the Solitaire AB, which was designed for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms and was used recently in acute stroke as a mechanical thrombectomy device. Complete embolization of the aneurysm was achieved, preserving all the arterial branches without nephrogram defects in the final angiogram.

  14. Combined Arterial Infusion and Stent Implantation Compared with Metal Stent Alone in Treatment of Malignant Gastroduodenal Obstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhongmin; Chen Kemin; Gong Ju; Zheng Yunfeng; Wang Tianxiang

    2009-09-15

    Many patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction have an unresectable primary lesion and distant metastases, which may prompt palliative management to allow the patient to eat and to improve the quality of life. Intraluminal metallic stent implantation (MSI) under fluoroscopic guidance has been reported to be an effective option for symptomatic relief in these patients, with a good safety record. An alternative, dual interventional therapy (DIT), has been used during the last decade, in which prosthesis insertion is followed by intra-arterial chemotherapy via the tumor-feeding arteries. The aim of this study was to compare success rates, complication rates, and survival time between MSI and DIT in patients who presented with gastroduodenal obstruction from advanced upper gastrointestinal tract cancer. All consecutive patients with malignant gastroduodenal obstruction seen at our center between October 2002 and August 2007 were retrospectively studied. Patients were treated palliatively by either MSI or DIT by the patient's or the next of kin's decision. Outcomes included technical and clinical success, complication rates, and survival. Of the 164 patients with malignant gastric and duodenal outlet obstructions, 80 (49%) underwent stent insertion as the primary therapy, while the remaining 84 (51%) received DIT. Clinical characteristics were similar between the two groups. In the MSI cohort initial stent implantation was successful in 73 patients (91%), two stents were used in 5 patients, and delayed additional stent insertion for stent obstruction related to tumor overgrowth was required in 3 patients during follow-up. In the DIT cohort the technical success rate was 94%, 3 patients required two stents, and stent obstruction occurred in 2 patients after initial stent placement. Early postprocedural clinical success, indicated by average dysphagia score, improved significantly in both groups: MSI group, from 4.56 to 1.51 (P < 0.01); and DIT group, from 4

  15. Self expandable stent application to prevent limb occlusion in external iliac artery during endovascular aneurysm repair

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Iliac extension of stent-graft during endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) increases the incidence of limb occlusion (LO). Hypothetically, adjunctive iliac stent (AIS) could offer some additional protection to overcome this anatomic hostility. But still there is no consensus in terms of effective stent characteristics or configuration. We retrospectively reviewed our center's experience to offer a possible answer to this question. Methods Our study included 30 patients (38 limbs) with AIS placed in the external iliac artery (EIA) from January 2010 to December 2013. We classified iliac tortuosity based on anatomic characteristics. AIS's were deployed in EIA with a minimum 5-mm stick-out configuration from the distal edge of the stent-graft. Results According to the iliac artery tortuosity index, grade 0, grade 1, and grade 2 were 5 (13.2%), 30 (78.9%), and 3 (7.9%), respectively. The diameter of all AIS was 12 mm, which was as large as or larger than the diameter of the stent-graft distal limb. SMART stents were preferred in 34 limbs (89.5%) and stents with 60-mm length were usually used (89.5%). During a mean follow-up of 9.13 ± 10.78 months, ischemic limb pain, which could be the sign of LO, was not noticed in any patients. There was no fracture, kinking, migration, in-stent restenosis, or occlusion of AIS. Conclusion The installation of AIS after extension of stent-graft to EIA reduced the risk of LO without any complications. AIS should be considered as a preventive procedure of LO if stent-graft needs to be extended to EIA during EVAR. PMID:27617255

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Platinum-Enhanced Radiopaque Stainless Steel (PERSS®) for Dilation-Baloon Expandable Coronary Stents

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, Jr., Bernard S.; Craig, Charles H.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Margaret; Jablonski, Paul D.; Turner, Paul C.; Radisch, Jr., Herbert R.; Gokcen, Nev A.; Friend, Clifford M.; Edwards, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Dilation-balloon expandable coronary stents are commonly made of implant grade stainless steels conforming to ASTM F138/F139, e.g., Biodur? 316LS (UNS S31673). Typical of such stents is the Boston Scientific/Interventional Technologies? (BS/IVT) LP-StentTM. In 2000, BS/IVT determined that the addition of 5 to 6 wt % platinum to Biodur 316LS produced a stainless steel with enhanced radiopacity to make their stents more visible radiographically and thus more effective clinically. A goal of the program was to ensure platinum additions would not adversely affect the corrosion resistance of Biodur 316LS. The corrosion resistance of 5-6 wt % PERSS? alloys and Biodur 316LS was determined using electrochemical tests for general, pitting, crevice and intergranular corrosion. Experimental methods included ASTM A262E, F746, F2129, and potentiodynamic polarization. The 6 wt % PERSS? alloy (IVT 78) had a resistance to pitting, crevice and intergranular corrosion that was similar to the Biodur 316LS base material. IVT 78 was a single-phase austenitic alloy with no evidence of inclusions or precipitates. It was more resistant to pitting corrosion than 5 wt % PERSS? alloys. Performance of the PERSS? alloys was not a function of alloy oxygen content in the range 0.01 to 0.03 wt %.

  17. Common bile duct perforation sealed with a metal fully-covered stent.

    PubMed

    García-Cano, Jesús; Ferri-Bataller, Ramón; Gómez-Ruiz, Carmen Julia

    2016-08-01

    A common bile duct perforation due to sphincteroplasty is reported. It was managed by temporary insertion of a metal fully covered stent with good outcomes. Images from the procedure are provided. PMID:27554382

  18. Ferromagnetic Bare Metal Stent for Endothelial Cell Capture and Retention.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid endothelialization of cardiovascular stents is needed to reduce stent thrombosis and to avoid anti-platelet therapy which can reduce bleeding risk. The feasibility of using magnetic forces to capture and retain endothelial outgrowth cells (EOC) labeled with super paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) has been shown previously. But this technique requires the development of a mechanically functional stent from a magnetic and biocompatible material followed by in-vitro and in-vivo testing to prove rapid endothelialization. We developed a weakly ferromagnetic stent from 2205 duplex stainless steel using computer aided design (CAD) and its design was further refined using finite element analysis (FEA). The final design of the stent exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of the material during mechanical crimping and expansion. One hundred stents were manufactured and a subset of them was used for mechanical testing, retained magnetic field measurements, in-vitro cell capture studies, and in-vivo implantation studies. Ten stents were tested for deployment to verify if they sustained crimping and expansion cycle without failure. Another 10 stents were magnetized using a strong neodymium magnet and their retained magnetic field was measured. The stents showed that the retained magnetism was sufficient to capture SPION-labeled EOC in our in-vitro studies. SPION-labeled EOC capture and retention was verified in large animal models by implanting 1 magnetized stent and 1 non-magnetized control stent in each of 4 pigs. The stented arteries were explanted after 7 days and analyzed histologically. The weakly magnetic stents developed in this study were capable of attracting and retaining SPION-labeled endothelial cells which can promote rapid healing. PMID:26436434

  19. An Efficient Finite Element Framework to Assess Flexibility Performances of SMA Self-Expandable Carotid Artery Stents

    PubMed Central

    Ferraro, Mauro; Auricchio, Ferdinando; Boatti, Elisa; Scalet, Giulia; Conti, Michele; Morganti, Simone; Reali, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Computer-based simulations are nowadays widely exploited for the prediction of the mechanical behavior of different biomedical devices. In this aspect, structural finite element analyses (FEA) are currently the preferred computational tool to evaluate the stent response under bending. This work aims at developing a computational framework based on linear and higher order FEA to evaluate the flexibility of self-expandable carotid artery stents. In particular, numerical simulations involving large deformations and inelastic shape memory alloy constitutive modeling are performed, and the results suggest that the employment of higher order FEA allows accurately representing the computational domain and getting a better approximation of the solution with a widely-reduced number of degrees of freedom with respect to linear FEA. Moreover, when buckling phenomena occur, higher order FEA presents a superior capability of reproducing the nonlinear local effects related to buckling phenomena. PMID:26184329

  20. Improved vascular healing after the successful treatment of very late sirolimus-eluting stent thrombosis with a bare metal stent implantation - A serial optical coherence tomography study.

    PubMed

    Bouki, Konstantina P; Vlad, Delia; Riga, Maria; Stergiouli, Ifigenia; Toutouzas, Konstantinos P

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a patient with non-ST-elevated myocardial infarction due to very late stent thrombosis 2 years after a sirolimus-eluting stent implantation (SES). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging identified vessel wall destruction of the whole stented coronary segment with multiple cavity formations along the entire stent length, severe strut malapposition and thrombi. The patient was treated successfully with the implantation of a bare metal stent (BMS). Follow-up OCT imaging at 12 months revealed the improvement of vascular healing with complete re-endothelialization of the distal parts of the new BMS, while the stent body remained partly uncovered, suggesting vascular toxicity due to the old SES. PMID:27445030

  1. Application of memory metallic stents to urinary tract disorders in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kamata, Shinkichi; Usui, Noriaki; Kamiyama, Masafumi; Yoneda, Akihiro; Tazuke, Yuko; Ooue, Takaharu

    2005-03-01

    The use of memory metallic stents for the urinary tract in pediatric patients has not been reported. The authors report on 2 patients with urinary tract disorders who were successfully treated with a memory metallic stent. A thermoexpandable, nickel-titanium alloy stent was placed at the urethroureteral junction of a 4-year-old boy with ureteral stenosis associated with cloacal exstrophy for 18 months and at the urethra of a 2-year-old girl with ischuria after a repair of cloacal anomaly for 6 months. Temporary insertion of a memory metallic stent is a safe and effective alternative for organic stricture or functional obstruction of the urinary tract in pediatric patients. PMID:15793713

  2. Cost effectiveness of drug-eluting stents as compared with bare metal stents in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Wisløff, Torbjørn; Atar, Dan; Sønbø Kristiansen, Ivar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the incremental cost effectiveness of replacing bare metal stents (BMS) by drug-eluting stents (DES) when using trial data and registry data. We developed a Markov model (model of cost effectiveness of coronary artery disease) in which 60-year-old patients started by undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention for acute or subacute coronary artery disease. The patients are followed until death or 100 years of age. Data on the occurrence of events (revascularization, acute myocardial infarction, and death) were based on Scandinavian registry data. Separate analyses were conducted with data on effectiveness based on randomized controlled trials and patient registries. On using trial data, it was found that sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) yield 0.003 greater life expectancy and $3300 lower costs than do BMS (dominant strategy). Paclitaxel-eluting stents (PES) yield 0.148 more life years than do SES at additional lifetime costs of $2800 ($21,400 per life year gained). On using registry data, the cost per life year gained was found to be $4900 when replacing BMS with DES. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses, on the other hand, indicate that PES only has a 50%-75% probability of being cost effective, regardless of the type of effectiveness data. DESs are cost effective with current willingness to pay for life year gains. Whether PES or SES is the most effective DES remains uncertain. PMID:21822114

  3. Venous Recanalization by Metallic Stents After Failure of Balloon Angioplasty or Surgery: Four-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Nazarian, Gwen K.; Austin, William R.; Wegryn, Scott A.; Bjarnason, Haraldur; Stackhouse, Daniel J.; Castaneda-Zuniga, Wilfrido R.; Hunter, David W.

    1996-04-15

    Purpose: This retrospective study describes our updated experience in treating venous stenoses and occlusions with metallic endovascular stents. Methods: Gianturco, Palmaz, and Wallstent stents were placed in 55 patients over a 4-year period. Stent sites included the subclavian veins (9), innominate veins (3), superior vena cava (4), inferior vena cava (3), iliac veins (29), femoral veins (5), and portal veins (6). The most common indications for stent placement were malignant stenoses and chronic pelvic venous occlusions. Venoplasty and/or urokinase were used as ancillary therapy. Patients were anticoagulated for 3-6 months. Follow-up included clinical assessment and duplex ultrasound. Results: Lifetable analysis shows 59%, 63%, and 72% primary, primary assisted, and secondary 1-year patency rates, respectively. The 4-year primary patency rates were the same. Duration of patency depended on the venous site. Death was a complication of stent placement in 2 patients and 12 patients died within 6 months after stent placement from primary disease progression. Although early failures were more common in stents placed across occlusions than stenoses, 1-year secondary patency rates were comparable. Primary patency rates were only slightly lower in patients with malignant obstruction than in patients with benign disease. Conclusion: Endovascular stent placement provides a nonsurgical alternative for reestablishment of venous flow and symptomatic relief in patients with benign as well as malignant venous obstruction.

  4. Baclofen-responsive hiccups after esophageal stenting for malignancy-related dysphagia

    PubMed Central

    De, Arka; Lamoria, Sandeep; Lamba, Brinder Mohan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Hiccups can have multiple causes, including esophageal lesions. Hiccups after insertion of self-expanding metallic stents have been reported occasionally following stenting for lesions of the gastroesophageal junction. We report a patient who developed hiccups after insertion of a stent for squamous cell carcinoma of the proximal esophagus. The hiccups responded only to the initiation of baclofen therapy. PMID:27034549

  5. Baclofen-responsive hiccups after esophageal stenting for malignancy-related dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vishal; De, Arka; Lamoria, Sandeep; Lamba, Brinder Mohan Singh

    2016-04-01

    Hiccups can have multiple causes, including esophageal lesions. Hiccups after insertion of self-expanding metallic stents have been reported occasionally following stenting for lesions of the gastroesophageal junction. We report a patient who developed hiccups after insertion of a stent for squamous cell carcinoma of the proximal esophagus. The hiccups responded only to the initiation of baclofen therapy. PMID:27034549

  6. Simulations of Self-Expanding Braided Stent Using Macroscopic Model of NiTi Shape Memory Alloys Covering R-Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, M.; Sedlák, P.; Kruisová, A.; Landa, M.

    2014-07-01

    Self-expanding stents or stentgrafts made from Nitinol superelastic alloy are widely used for a less invasive treatment of disease-induced localized flow constriction in the cardiovascular system. The therapy is based on insertion of a stent into a blood vessel to maintain the inner diameter of the vessel; it provides highly effective results at minimal cost and with reduced hospital stays. However, since stent is an external mechanical healing tool implemented into human body for quite a long time, information on the mechanical performance of it is of fundamental importance with respect to patient's safety and comfort. Advantageously, computational structural analysis can provide valuable information on the response of the product in an environment where in vivo experimentation is extremely expensive or impossible. With this motivation, a numerical model of a particular braided self-expanding stent was developed. As a reasonable approximation substantially reducing computational demands, the stent was considered to be composed of a set of helical springs with specific constrains reflecting geometry of the structure. An advanced constitutive model for NiTi-based shape memory alloys including R-phase transition was employed in analysis. Comparison to measurements shows a very good match between the numerical solution and experimental results. Relation between diameter of the stent and uniform radial pressure on its surface is estimated. Information about internal phase and stress state of the material during compression loading provided by the model is used to estimate fatigue properties of the stent during cyclic loading.

  7. In-Graft Endovascular Stenting Repair for Supravalvular Stenosis From Aortic Rupture After Balloon-Expanding Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Nobuyuki; Scholtz, Werner; Haas, Nikolaus; Ensminger, Stephan; Gummert, Jan; Börgermann, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    An 81-year-old man with high-grade aortic valve stenosis and status post-coronary artery bypass grafting and supracoronary replacement of the ascending aorta was referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. He was in New York Heart Association class III and had dyspnea. After appropriate screening, we implanted a 29-mm SAPIEN XT valve (Edwards Lifesciences, Irvine, CA USA) through a transapical approach because of severe peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Postinterventional aortography revealed correct positioning and function of the valve and free coronary ostia but contrast extravasation in the vicinity of the interposed vascular prosthesis, resulting in severe luminal narrowing. We chose to manage the stenosis with an endovascular stent. After stenting, extravascular compression was markedly reduced, and the pressure gradient disappeared. The patient was discharged home on the 20th postoperative day. Three months later, computed tomography depicted correct positioning of both grafts. The patient's general health is good, and he is now in New York Heart Association class II. This case illustrates a complication of transcatheter aortic valve implantation specific for patients with an ascending aortic graft. Although stenting may be a good solution, as depicted by this case, self-expanding transcatheter aortic valves should be preferred in patients with ascending aortic grafts to avoid the described complication. PMID:26355692

  8. Identification of independent risk factors for restenosis following bare-metal stent implantation: Role of bare-metal stents in the era of drug-eluting stents

    PubMed Central

    PARK, CHANG-BUM; PARK, HOON-KI

    2013-01-01

    In the era of drug-eluting stents (DESs), the ability of clinicians to predict which patients have a low risk of coronary restenosis following bare-metal stent (BMS) implantion is likely to be of benefit. The study population consisted of 2,711 patients who underwent BMS implantation in 3,770 lesions between 1995 and 2004. With clinical and 6 month follow-up angiographic data, we retrospectively sought to identify the independent risk predictors of restenosis, applied a previously proposed prediction model and assessed the characteristics of patients with a low likelihood of coronary restenosis within 6 months of BMS implantation. A 6-month follow-up coronary angiography was performed in 65.0% of the patients who had undergone the BMS implantation and the rate of restenosis was 26.6%. Using multivariate analysis, diabetes [odds ratio (OR), 1.294; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.094–1.483; P=0.005], current smoking (OR, 1.294; 95% CI, 1.094–1.483; P=0.002), a reference vessel diameter of <3.25 mm (OR, 1.238; 95% CI, 1.021–1.501; P<0.001), a lesion length of >30 mm (OR, 1.645; 95% CI, 1.336–2.026; P<0.001), ostial lesion (OR, 1.858; 95% CI, 1.437–2.402; P<0.001), post-stenting minimal luminal diameter (OR, 0.576; 95% CI, 0.484–0.685; P<0.001) and bifurcation lesion (OR, 1.353; 95% CI, 1.070–1.711; P=0.012) were identified as significant independent predictors of restenosis. However, the accuracy of the prediction obtained with the current model, which used the clinical and angiographic variables correlated with the risk of restenosis, was poor. Various clinical and angiographic independent risk variables were revealed to be correlated with the risk of restenosis following BMS implantation in the present large dataset. Certain groups of patients with a relatively low risk of restenosis may be considered for BMS implantation as an alternative to DESs. However, the prediction models used at present are incomplete and further studies are required. PMID

  9. An overview on laser microfabrication of bicompatible metallic stent for medical therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kathuria, Yash P.

    2004-04-01

    With the established technique of laser in precision micromaterial processing, the fabrication of cardiovascular metallic stent with high quality has now become feasible. From the actual CAD design and FEM analysis of the stent fabrication, the need for the surface modification properties becomes essential in enduring its extended life duration. This paper describes the current status as well as fabrication of such metallic stent of length 20 mm and dia. 2.1 mm with an annular tube thickness of 0.2 mm, by using the short pulse Nd-YAG laser. Fine structures with slit width of 0.1 mm and pitch better than 0.2 mm are created with sharpness and low roughness in the cut surface. Some features on improving the surface characteristics of the cut surfaces of the stent, excimer laser coronary angioplasty and ultrasound ablation of plaque as well as a few techniques on preventing restenosis are well documented.

  10. The Influence of a Metal Stent on the Distribution of Thermal Energy during Irreversible Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    van den Bos, Willemien; Neal, Robert E.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Besselink, Marc G. H.; van Gemert, Martin J. C.; van der Geld, Cees W. M.; Meijerink, Martijn R.; Klaessens, John H.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Irreversible electroporation (IRE) uses short duration, high-voltage electrical pulses to induce cell death via nanoscale defects resulting from altered transmembrane potential. The technique is gaining interest for ablations in unresectable pancreatic and hepatobiliary cancer. Metal stents are often used for palliative biliary drainage in these patients, but are currently seen as an absolute contraindication for IRE due to the perceived risk of direct heating of the metal and its surroundings. This study investigates the thermal and tissue viability changes due to a metal stent during IRE. Methods IRE was performed in a homogeneous tissue model (polyacrylamide gel), without and with a metal stent placed perpendicular and parallel to the electrodes, delivering 90 and 270 pulses (15–35 A, 90 μsec, 1.5 cm active tip exposure, 1.5 cm interelectrode distance, 1000–1500 V/cm, 90 pulses/min), and in-vivo in a porcine liver (4 ablations). Temperature changes were measured with an infrared thermal camera and with fiber-optic probes. Tissue viability after in-vivo IRE was investigated macroscopically using 5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) vitality staining. Results In the gel, direct stent-heating was not observed. Contrarily, the presence of a stent between the electrodes caused a higher increase in median temperature near the electrodes (23.2 vs 13.3°C [90 pulses]; p = 0.021, and 33.1 vs 24.8°C [270 pulses]; p = 0.242). In-vivo, no temperature difference was observed for ablations with and without a stent. Tissue examination showed white coagulation 1mm around the electrodes only. A rim of vital tissue remained around the stent, whereas ablation without stent resulted in complete tissue avitality. Conclusion IRE in the vicinity of a metal stent does not cause notable direct heating of the metal, but results in higher temperatures around the electrodes and remnant viable tissue. Future studies should determine for which clinical indications IRE in the

  11. Role of stents and laser therapy in biliary strictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2001-05-01

    The most frequent primary cancers causing malignant obstructive jaundice were pancreatic cancer (57%), hilar biliary cancer (19% including metastatic disease), nonhilar biliary cancer (14%) and papillary cancer (10%). Endoscopic stenting has widely replaced palliative surgery for malignant biliary obstruction because of its lower risk and cost. Self-expandable metal stents are the preferred mode of palliation for hilar malignancies. Plastic stents have a major role in benign biliary strictures. Major complications and disadvantages associated with metallic stents include high cost, cholangitis. malposition, migration, unextractability, and breakage of the stents, pancreatitis and stent dysfunction. Dysfunction due to tumor ingrowth can be relieved by thermal methods (argon plasma coagulator therapy). We present a concise review of the efficacy of metallic stents for palliation of malignant strictures.

  12. Design and validation of a novel ferromagnetic bare metal stent capable of capturing and retaining endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Uthamaraj, Susheil; Tefft, Brandon J; Klabusay, Martin; Hlinomaz, Ota; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Dragomir-Daescu, Dan

    2014-12-01

    Rapid healing of vascular stents is important for avoiding complications associated with stent thrombosis, restenosis, and bleeding related to antiplatelet drugs. Magnetic forces can be used to capture iron-labeled endothelial cells immediately following stent implantation, thereby promoting healing. This strategy requires the development of a magnetic stent that is biocompatible and functional. We designed a stent from the weakly ferromagnetic 2205 stainless steel using finite element analysis. The final design exhibited a principal strain below the fracture limit of 30% during crimping and expansion. Ten stents were fabricated and validated experimentally for fracture resistance. Another 10 stents magnetized with a neodymium magnet showed a magnetic field in the range of 100-750 mG. The retained magnetism was sufficiently strong to capture magnetically-labeled endothelial cells on the stent surfaces during in vitro studies. Magnetically-labeled endothelial cell capture was also verified in vivo after 7 days following coronary implantation in 4 pigs using histological analysis. Images of the stented blood vessels showed uniform endothelium formation on the stent surfaces. In conclusion, we have designed a ferromagnetic bare metal stent from 2205 stainless steel that is functional, biocompatible, and able to capture and retain magnetically-labeled endothelial cells in order to promote rapid stent healing. PMID:25138164

  13. Development of a Novel Biodegradable Metallic Stent Based on Microgalvanic Effect.

    PubMed

    Frattolin, Jennifer; Barua, Rajib; Aydin, Huseyin; Rajagopalan, Sriraman; Gottellini, Luca; Leask, Richard; Yue, Stephen; Frost, David; Bertrand, Olivier F; Mongrain, Rosaire

    2016-02-01

    The implementation of biodegradable stents has the potential to revolutionize obstructive coronary artery disease treatment. Limitations still currently exist, however, that prevent biodegradable stents from replacing permanent metallic stents in the global market. The ideal combination of stent properties, including sufficient mechanical strength, controlled degradation, and biocompatibility, has yet to be realized. A novel manufacturing process is proposed that utilizes cold gas-dynamic spraying to fabricate a metal structure with significantly reduced grain size. Iron and stainless steel 316L are combined to form a novel amalgamate with enhanced mechanical strength and a controllable degradation rate, due to the resulting microgalvanic reaction. Flat specimens composed of iron and 316L are fabricated in various compositions, and mechanical and degradation tests were conducted. Femto laser techniques are utilized to produce stents composed of 80% Fe and 20% stainless steel 316L. The in vitro degradation behaviour of the stent is investigated using static and dynamic corrosion tests. It is shown that the corrosion rate can be adjusted to desired values, by varying the weight percentage of iron and stainless steel 316L within the amalgamate. PMID:26384666

  14. Use of the Viatorr Expanded Polytetrafluoroethylene-Covered Stent-Graft for Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation in Children: Initial Clinical Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Mermuys, Koen; Maleux, Geert Heye, Sam; Lombaerts, Rita; Nevens, Frederik

    2008-07-15

    Four children, three boys and one girl, with a median age of 9 years 8 months, underwent transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt creation with an expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (e-PTFE)-covered nitinol stent. The stent-graft was successfully placed in all four patients without any complication. Clinical and biochemical improvement was noted in all four patients during follow-up. Radiological follow-up with use of duplex ultrasound showed a recurrent stenosis of the shunt 180 days after stent-graft implantation in one patient. This was treated with placement of an additional stent-graft, re-expanding completely the recurrent stenosis. In the other three patients, the stent-graft remained fully patent until the end of the study or until orthotopic liver transplantation. These preliminary results suggest that use of the Viatorr ePTFE-covered stent-graft in children is safe and feasible, with potentially the same high patency rate and improved clinical outcome as reported in adult patients.

  15. Influence of metal alloy and the profile of coronary stents in patients with multivessel coronary disease

    PubMed Central

    Maurício de Abreu Filho, Luciano; da Cruz Forte, Antonio Artur; Kiyoshi Sumita, Marcos; Favarato, Desidério; César Ximenes Meireles, George

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Brazil, despite the recommendations of the Brazilian Society of Hemodynamics and Interventional Cardiology, the National Health System has not yet approved the use of drug-eluting stents. In percutaneous coronary interventions performed in the public and part of the private health care system, bare metal stents are used as the only option. Therefore, new information on bare metal stents is of great importance. The primary endpoint was to evaluate the influence of the alloy and the profile of coronary stents on late loss and restenosis rates 6 months after implantation in patients with multivessel coronary disease. METHODS: Single center, randomized and prospective study comparison of cobalt–chromium versus stainless steel stent implantation in 187 patients with multivessel coronary disease. At least one cobalt–chromium and one stainless steel stent were implanted per patient. RESULTS: Mean age of patients was 59.5±10.1 years with a prevalence of males (66.3%) and patients with acute coronary syndrome (56%). Baseline clinical characteristics were similar with hypertension in 146 (78%), dyslipidemia in 85 (45.5%) and diabetes in 68 (36.4%). Two hundred and twenty-nine cobalt–chromium and 284 stainless steel stents were implanted. Angiographic variables showed no statistically significant difference. Angiographic follow-up to 6 months after implantation showed similar late loss and restenosis rates. CONCLUSION: The use of two different alloys, stainless steel and cobalt–chrome stents, in the same patient and in the same vessel produced similar 6-month restenosis and late loss rates. PMID:21808863

  16. Percutaneous Intraductal Radiofrequency Ablation for Clearance of Occluded Metal Stent in Malignant Biliary Obstruction: Feasibility and Early Results

    SciTech Connect

    Pai, Madhava; Valek, Vlastimil; Tomas, Andrasina; Doros, Attila; Quaretti, Pietro; Golfieri, Rita; Mosconi, Cristina; Habib, Nagy

    2013-07-11

    PurposeThe major complication occurring with biliary stents is stent occlusion, frequently seen because of tumour in-growth, epithelial hyperplasia, and sludge deposits, resulting in recurrent jaundice and cholangitis. We report a prospective study with the results of first in man percutaneous intraductal radiofrequency (RF) ablation to clear the blocked metal stents in patients with malignant biliary obstruction using a novel bipolar RF catheter.MethodsNine patients with malignant biliary obstruction and blocked metal stents were included. These patients underwent intraductal biliary RF ablation through the blocked metal stent following external biliary decompression with an internal–external biliary drainage.ResultsAll nine patients had their stent patency restored successfully without the use of secondary stents. Following this intervention, there was no 30-day mortality, haemorrhage, bile duct perforation, bile leak, or pancreatitis. Of the nine patients, six are alive and three patients are dead with a median follow-up of 122 (range 50–488) days and a median stent patency of 102.5 (range 50–321) days. Six patients had their stent patent at the time of last follow-up or death. Three patients with stent blockage at 321, 290, and 65 days postprocedure underwent percutaneous transhepatic drain insertion and repeat ablation.ConclusionsIn this selective group of patients, it appears that this new approach is safe and feasible. Efficacy remains to be proven in future, randomized, prospective studies.

  17. Inductive antenna stent: design, fabrication and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi Mohammadi, Abdolreza; Ali, Mohamed Sultan Mohamed; Lappin, Derry; Schlosser, Colin; Takahata, Kenichi

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes the design, fabrication, and electromechanical characteristics of inductive stents developed for intelligent stent applications. The stents, fabricated out of 316L stainless-steel tubes using laser machining, are patterned to have zigzag loops without bridge struts, and when expanded, become a helix-like structure. Highly conductive metals such as copper and gold are coated on the stents to improve their inductive/antenna function. The Q-factor of the stent is shown to increase by a factor of 7 at 150 MHz with copper coating. The expansion of the stent from 2 to 4 mm diameter results in a 3.2× increase in the inductance, obtaining ˜1 µH at a similar frequency. The stent passivated by Parylene-C film is used to characterize its resonance in different media including saline. The copper-coated inductive stent exhibits a 2.4× radial stiffness for 1 mm strain as well as a 16× bending compliance compared with a commercial stent, each of which is potentially beneficial in preventing/mitigating stent failures such as recoil as well as enabling easier navigation through intricate blood vessels. The mechanical stiffness may be tailored by adjusting stent-wire thickness while maintaining necessary coating thickness to achieve particular mechanical requirements and high inductive performance simultaneously.

  18. [An animal experiment on arterial wall reaction to stents coated with gold, silver and copper].

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, N; Sawada, S; Koyama, T; Kobayashi, M; Iwamiya, T; Saito, S; Fujiwara, Y; Yoshida, K; Ohta, Y

    1991-10-25

    Expandable metallic stents coated with gold, silver, and copper, and bare stainless steel stents were implanted into the abdominal aorta of eight dogs to determine their effect on the vessel wall. The animals were observed for two weeks. Abdominal angiograms were taken every week. The dogs were then killed for macroscopic and histopathological examination. The results were as follows. (1) The stents coated with gold and the noncoated stainless steel stents showed less histopathologic change than the other stents. (2) The stents coated with copper were associated with severe erosion of the vessel wall and marked thrombus formation. PMID:1766817

  19. Purulent pericardial effusion and mycotic pseudoaneurysm following insertion of a bare metal stent.

    PubMed

    Kataoka, Go; Nakano, Kiyoharu; Asano, Ryota; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kodera, Kojiro; Tatsuishi, Wataru

    2015-05-01

    A 65-year-old male was diagnosed with purulent pericarditis, caused by Staphylococcus aureus five weeks after bare metal stenting for a 90% stenosis of the right coronary artery ostium. Subsequently, he developed a pseudoaneurysm in the right coronary sinus of Valsalva (CSV) requiring surgical intervention during the treatment of the pericarditis. Bacteremia after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) occurs in < 1% of patients and usually has insignificant clinical sequelae. We present an infected coronary bare metal stent of the proximal right coronary artery after PCI that resulted in a purulent pericardial effusion and mycotic pseudoaneurysm of the right coronary sinus of Valsalva (CSV). The patient successfully underwent surgical treatment. PMID:25783563

  20. Serial insertion of bilateral uncovered metal stents for malignant hilar obstruction using an 8 Fr biliary system: a case series of 17 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Jennifer; Thosani, Amar; Grunwald, Matthew; Nagula, Satish; Bucobo, Juan Carlos; Buscaglia, Jonathan M

    2015-10-01

    Controversy exists over the need for unilateral versus bilateral stent placement in patients with malignant obstruction at the biliary hilum. Placement of bilateral uncovered self-expanding metal stent (UCSEMS) at this location is technically challenging, and generally associated with lower rates of procedural success. Serial insertion of side-by-side UCSEMS may be especially difficult when simultaneous deployment is not possible using larger stent delivery catheters. In this single-center, retrospective case series of all patients who underwent bilateral placement of uncovered Wallflex(TM) biliary stents between July 2008 and July 2014, we evaluate the feasibility, technical success, and safety of patients undergoing serial insertion of bilateral UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system for malignant hilar obstruction. A total of 17 patients were included. Primary cholangiocarcinoma, Bismuth IV, was the most common diagnosis. Mean procedure time was 54.4 minutes. Overall procedural technical success was achieved in 17/17 patients. Stricture dilation was necessary prior to Wallflex(TM) insertion in 8/17 patients (47.1%). Transpapillary extension of two stents was performed in all patients. There were no cases of stent deployment malfunction, or inability to insert or deploy the 2(nd) stent. Nine of 17 patients (52.9%) required inpatient hospitalization following ERCP; the most common indications were abdominal pain and need for IV antibiotics. There was one case of ERCP-related cholangitis otherwise; there were no other major complications. Bilateral, serial insertion of UCSEMS using the 8 Fr Wallflex(TM) biliary system in malignant hilar obstruction is feasible with an excellent technical success profile. Using this device for side-by-side deployment of UCSEMS appears to be safe in the majority of patients. PMID:26605283

  1. Dislodgement of coronary stent due to rupture of stent balloon.

    PubMed

    Ayça, Burak; Okuyan, Ertuğrul; Şahin, İrfan; Dinçkal, Mustafa Hakan

    2015-01-01

    Rare stent complications, including dislodgement of stent, unexpanded stent, stent fracture and stent loss etc. can occur during percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). We present a semi-expanded and dislodged stent due to rupture of stent balloon during primary PCI in this case report. An interventional cardiologist should be aware of the possibility of rare complications, such as in this case, and have enough experience and knowledge to handle them. PMID:25655859

  2. Randomized controlled trial to investigate the effect of metal clips on early migration during stent implantation for malignant esophageal stricture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changxiong; Lou, Cui

    2015-01-01

    Background The rate of stent migration, especially in the short term after implantation, is high in the treatment process. We sought to explore an effective method for preventing early migration after stent implantation for malignant esophageal stricture and to provide the basis for clinical treatment. Methods We conducted a prospective, open-label, parallel-assignment randomized controlled trial with patients undergoing stent implantation for malignant esophageal stricture. The proximal segments of stents in the treatment group were fixed with 2 metal clips during the perioperative period of esophageal stent implantation, while no treatment was used in the control group. All patients underwent radiography at 3 and 7 days and 1 and 3 months after placement to assess the stent migration. Results There were 83 patients in our study. Demographic characteristics were similar between the groups. There was no stent migration observed in the treatment group within 2 weeks of the operation, while stent migration was observed in 6 of 41 (14.6%) cases in the control group, occurring at 3 and 7 days after placement. There were no perioperative complications. Conclusion Perioperative fixation of the proximal segments of stents with metal clips is effective in preventing early stent migration. PMID:26574828

  3. Antireflux metal stent with an antimigration system for distal malignant biliary obstruction: a feasibility pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Nakai, Yousuke; Togawa, Osamu; Kogure, Hirofumi; Takahara, Naminatsu; Mohri, Dai; Sasaki, Takashi; Matsubara, Saburo; Yamamoto, Natsuyo; Hirano, Kenji; Tada, Minoru; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2015-06-01

    An antireflux metal stent (ARMS) for distal malignant biliary obstruction has been reported to be useful, but the effectiveness of a flared-end structure to prevent migration on ARMS remains unclear. To evaluate the feasibility of a newly designed ARMS with both ends flared, 8 patients with covered metal stent occlusion due to sludge or food impaction were enrolled. ARMS were placed successfully after endoscopic removal of the occluded stents in all patients, and no procedure-related complication was observed. The median time to recurrent biliary obstruction was 71 days. ARMS occlusion occurred in 3 (38%) patients (sludge in 2 patients and hemobilia in 1). ARMS migration occurred in 1 (13%) patient. As a late complication, cholecystitis occurred in 1 (13%) patient. In conclusion, our newly designed ARMS with an antimigration system was technically feasible and safe, and a further investigation is warranted to evaluate the effectiveness of the current antimigration system. PMID:25856131

  4. TIPS for refractory ascites: a 6-year single-center experience with expanded polytetrafluoroethylene-covered stent-grafts.

    PubMed

    Bercu, Zachary L; Fischman, Aaron M; Kim, Edward; Nowakowski, F Scott; Patel, Rahul S; Schiano, Thomas D; Chang, Charissa Y; Lookstein, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. This single-center study evaluated the use of expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE)-covered stent-grafts for transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) placement to manage portal hypertension-related refractory ascites. MATERIALS AND METHODS. One hundred patients at a single tertiary care center in a major metropolitan hospital underwent TIPS placement with an ePTFE-covered stent-graft (Viatorr TIPS Endoprosthesis). Patients with portal hypertension-related ascites and preexisting hepatocellular carcinoma or liver transplant were excluded from the analysis. Records were reviewed for demographic characteristics, technical success of the TIPS procedures, and stent follow-up findings. Clinical results were assessed at 90- and 180-day intervals. RESULTS. Immediate technical success of the TIPS procedure was 100%. Of the 61 patients with documented follow-up, 55 (90.2%) had a partial or complete ascites response to TIPS creation. Of these 55 patients, nine experienced severe encephalopathy. Six of 61 patients (9.8%) did not experience a significant ascites response. Overall survival was 78.7% at 365-day follow-up. The 365-day survival was 84.2% for patients with a model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score of less than 15, 67.0% for those with a score of 15-18, and 53.8% for those with a score of greater than 18 (p = 0.01). For patients with a MELD score of less than 18, the 365-day survival was 88.0% for those with an albumin value of 3 mg/dL or greater and 72.8% for those with an albumin value of less than 3 mg/dL (p = 0.04). CONCLUSION. TIPS placement using an ePTFE-covered stent-graft is an efficacious therapy for refractory ascites. Patients with preserved liver function-characterized by a MELD score of less than 15 or a MELD score of less than 18 and an albumin value of 3 mg/dL or greater-experience the greatest survival benefit. PMID:25714299

  5. A novel biodegradable esophageal stent: results from mechanical and animal experiments

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin; Shang, Liang; Liu, Jiyong; Qin, Chengyong

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable esophageal stents eliminate stent retrieval, but usually induce hyperplasia. This study investigated the properties of a novel biodegradable stent in vitro and in vivo. The degradation of the novel stent was observed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 8 weeks. The radial forces, pH values, morphology, and retention rate of the intrinsic viscosity (R[η]) of the new biodegradable stent were all evaluated. In vitro, the pH values remained constant for 4 weeks and declined from weeks 4 to 8. The biodegradable threads degraded and ruptured at 6 weeks. Consequently, the radial force of the stent decreased to zero at that time. The curve of R[η] decreased with time linearly in PBS. To study the stents in vivo, we used a stricture model in which the middle esophagus of rabbits was damaged by alkali burn. Stents were inserted 2 weeks after injury and observed for 8 weeks. We assessed complications related to stent insertion, degradation of the stent, and survival of the rabbits. Two stents migrated, and one rabbit died. In the other rabbits, two stents degraded and moved into the stomach during the sixth week, five during the seventh week and one during the eighth week, respectively. One stent remained in position until the end of the study. In conclusion, our newly designed stent retained the strong radial force of self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) and maintained the biodegradable properties of biodegradable (BD) stents. PMID:27158397

  6. A novel biodegradable esophageal stent: results from mechanical and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Shang, Liang; Liu, Jiyong; Qin, Chengyong

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable esophageal stents eliminate stent retrieval, but usually induce hyperplasia. This study investigated the properties of a novel biodegradable stent in vitro and in vivo. The degradation of the novel stent was observed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) for 8 weeks. The radial forces, pH values, morphology, and retention rate of the intrinsic viscosity (R[η]) of the new biodegradable stent were all evaluated. In vitro, the pH values remained constant for 4 weeks and declined from weeks 4 to 8. The biodegradable threads degraded and ruptured at 6 weeks. Consequently, the radial force of the stent decreased to zero at that time. The curve of R[η] decreased with time linearly in PBS. To study the stents in vivo, we used a stricture model in which the middle esophagus of rabbits was damaged by alkali burn. Stents were inserted 2 weeks after injury and observed for 8 weeks. We assessed complications related to stent insertion, degradation of the stent, and survival of the rabbits. Two stents migrated, and one rabbit died. In the other rabbits, two stents degraded and moved into the stomach during the sixth week, five during the seventh week and one during the eighth week, respectively. One stent remained in position until the end of the study. In conclusion, our newly designed stent retained the strong radial force of self-expandable metal stents (SEMSs) and maintained the biodegradable properties of biodegradable (BD) stents. PMID:27158397

  7. Treatment of left main coronary artery stenosis with the STENTYS self-expandable drug-eluting stent – a pilot registry

    PubMed Central

    Wańha, Wojciech; Roleder, Tomasz; Pluta, Aleksandra; Ochała, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) of the left main coronary artery (LMCA) for revascularization after stenosis is still considered controversial therapy. Previous studies were performed with balloon-expandable drug-eluting stents (DES). Balloon-expandable stents presented a challenge because they were not able to adapt effectively to variation in the vessel lumen. There are limited data on LMCA therapy with self-expandable DES for treatment of medial and distal lesions. The advantages of a self-apposing stent are adaptation to vessel size, vessel tapering, stent sizing, and good apposition. This was a pilot study to determine safety and device success rate in patients with middle and distal LMCA stenosis treated with the STENTYS self-expanding coronary DES stent. The primary endpoints were device success, acute procedural success and in-hospital and 30-day MACE. Twenty-four patients were included. Median logistic EuroSCORE was 1.6% (1.1–2.6%). Median Syntax score was 20.0 (20.0–27.2) points. Significant stenosis according to the anatomical region was in the middle of the LMCA in 5 cases (21%) and the distal part in 19 (79%). Stent sizes used were: 3.0 × 3.5 mm in 9 (37.5%); 3.5 × 4.0 mm in 3 (12.5%); 3.5 × 4.5 mm in 12 (50%). Device success and acute procedural success were achieved in 23 patients (95.8%), with no edge dissection in any patient. In 1 patient the proximal end of the stent protruded into the aorta. In all patients during their hospitalization and 30-day follow-up there were no adverse events. The data compiled from this small, single-center pilot study suggest that the STENTYS self-expanding coronary stent may be a reasonable approach to treat lesions within the LMCA. These results warrant a larger future clinical trial. PMID:25489314

  8. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  9. Endoscopic multiple metal stenting for the treatment of enteral leaks near the biliary orifice: A novel effective rescue procedure.

    PubMed

    Mutignani, Massimiliano; Dioscoridi, Lorenzo; Dokas, Stefanos; Aseni, Paolo; Carnevali, Pietro; Forti, Edoardo; Manta, Raffaele; Sica, Mariano; Tringali, Alberto; Pugliese, Francesco

    2016-08-10

    Between April 2013 and October 2015, 6 patients developed periampullary duodenal or jejunal/biliary leaks after major abdominal surgery. In all patients, percutaneous drainage of the collection or re-operation with primary surgical repair was attempted at first but failed. A fully covered enteral metal stent was placed in all patients to seal the leak. Subsequently, we cannulated the common bile duct and, in some cases, and the main pancreatic duct inserting hydrophilic guidewires through the stent after dilating the stent mesh with a dilatation balloon or breaking the meshes with Argon Plasma Beam. Finally, we inserted a fully covered biliary metal stent to drain the bile into the lumen of the enteral stent. In cases of normal proximal upper gastrointestinal anatomy, a pancreatic plastic stent was also inserted. Oral food intake was initiated when the abdominal drain outflow stopped completely. Stent removal was scheduled four to eight weeks later after a CT scan to confirm the complete healing of the fistula and the absence of any perilesional residual fluid collection. The leak resolved in five patients. One patient died two days after the procedure due to severe, pre-existing, sepsis. The stents were removed endoscopically in four weeks in four patients. In one patient we experienced stent migration causing small bowel obstruction. In this case, the stents were removed surgically. Four patients are still alive today. They are still under follow-up and doing well. Bilio-enteral fully covered metal stenting with or without pancreatic stenting was feasible, safe and effective in treating postoperative enteral leaks near the biliopancreatic orifice in our small series. This minimally invasive procedure can be implemented in selected patients as a rescue procedure to repair these challenging leaks. PMID:27606045

  10. Conversion of Percutaneous Cholecystostomy to Internal Transmural Gallbladder Drainage Using an Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided, Lumen-Apposing Metal Stent.

    PubMed

    Law, Ryan; Grimm, Ian S; Stavas, Joseph M; Baron, Todd H

    2016-03-01

    Patients with acute cholecystitis sometimes require placement of percutaneous cholecystostomy catheters, either as a bridge to surgery or as primary therapy. In patients who cannot undergo surgery, subsequent removal of the catheter can lead to recurrence of cholecystitis, whereas leaving the drain in place can cause adverse events. We investigated internalization of percutaneous cholecystostomy drainage catheters, using endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided placement of lumen-apposing metal stents (LAMS) as an alternative treatment strategy. Seven patients (median age, 57 years; 6 men) underwent EUS-guided cholecystoenterostomy for internalization of gallbladder drainage with EUS-guided placement of a 10- or 15-mm LAMS. All had initially been treated with placement of a percutaneous cholecystostomy catheter for cholecystitis and were later deemed unfit for cholecystectomy. Technical success was achieved in all patients in 1 endoscopic session, with subsequent removal of all percutaneous drains. Two patients required placement of self-expandable metal stents within the LAMS to successfully bridge the gallbladder and gastrointestinal lumen. No adverse events occurred after a median follow-up of 2.5 months. EUS-guided cholecystoenterostomy using a LAMS is therefore a viable option for internal gallbladder drainage in patients who have a percutaneous cholecystostomy catheter and are poor candidates for cholecystectomy. PMID:26528802