Science.gov

Sample records for expandable tubular fixing

  1. Expandable tubulars for use in geologic structures

    DOEpatents

    Spray, Jeffery A.; Svedeman, Steven; Walter, David; Mckeighan, Peter; Siebanaler, Shane; Dewhurst, Peter; Hobson, Steven; Foss, Doug; Wirz, Holger; Sharpe, Aaron; Apostal, Michael

    2014-08-12

    An expandable tubular includes a plurality of leaves formed from sheet material that have curved surfaces. The leaves extend around a portion or fully around the diameter of the tubular structure. Some of the adjacent leaves of the tubular are coupled together. The tubular is compressed to a smaller diameter so that it can be inserted through previously deployed tubular assemblies. Once the tubular is properly positioned, it is deployed and coupled or not coupled to a previously deployed tubular assembly. The tubular is useful for all types of wells and boreholes.

  2. Corrosion behavior of the expandable tubular in formation water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shu-jun; Dong, Chao-fang; Fu, An-qing; Xiao, Kui; Li, Xiao-gang

    2015-02-01

    The corrosion behavior of expandable tubular materials was investigated in simulated downhole formation water environments using a series of electrochemical techniques. The corrosion morphologies in the real downhole environment after three months of application were also observed by stereology microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that, compared with the unexpanded sample, the area of ferrite increases dramatically after a 7.09% expansion. The expanded material shows a higher corrosion current in the polarization curve and a lower corrosion resistance in the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) plot at every studied temperature. The determined critical pitting temperatures (CPT) before and after expansion are 87.5°C and 79.2°C, respectively. SEM observations demonstrate stress corrosion cracks, and CO2 corrosion and H2S corrosion also occur in the downhole environment. Due to additional defects generated during the plastic deformation, the corrosion performance of the expanded tubing deteriorates.

  3. Numerical simulation of a novel expanded metal tubular structure for crashworthiness application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaal, A. H. A.; Tarlochan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Search for new geometries and materials that would serve in crashworthiness applications is a cumulative process. Recent studies investigated the performance of expanded metal tubes and the possible ways to enhance its energy absorption capability. The aim of this work is to investigate the crashworthiness characteristics of new concept is proposed where expanded metal tube is suited into a double-walled tube made of the same material to form one structure. The tube was then numerically tested through a verified model using ABAQUS software. Moreover, the influence of the size of the expanded metal cell was also investigated in the present study. The new concept showed an enhanced energy absorption characteristics related to the change in the mass of the tubular structure. The enhancement was related to both the change in deformation pattern, and the increase in crushed mass.

  4. Advanced Monobore Concept, Development of CFEX Self-Expanding Tubular Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Spray

    2007-09-30

    The Advanced Monobore Concept--CFEX{copyright} Self-Expanding Tubular Technology Development was a successfully executed fundamental research through field demonstration project. This final report is presented as a progression, according to basic technology development steps. For this project, the research and development steps used were: concept development, engineering analysis, manufacturing, testing, demonstration, and technology transfer. The CFEX{copyright} Technology Development--Advanced Monobore Concept Project successfully completed all of the steps for technology development, covering fundamental research, conceptual development, engineering design, advanced-level prototype construction, mechanical testing, and downhole demonstration. Within an approximately two year period, a partially defined, broad concept was evolved into a substantial new technological area for drilling and production engineering applicable a variety of extractive industries--which was also successfully demonstrated in a test well. The demonstration achievement included an actual mono-diameter placement of two self-expanding tubulars. The fundamental result is that an economical and technically proficient means of casing any size of drilling or production well or borehole is indicated as feasible based on the results of the project. Highlighted major accomplishments during the project's Concept, Engineering, Manufacturing, Demonstration, and Technology Transfer phases, are given.

  5. Expanded plug method for developing circumferential mechanical properties of tubular materials

    DOEpatents

    Hendrich, William Ray; McAfee, Wallace Jefferson; Luttrell, Claire Roberta

    2006-11-28

    A method for determining the circumferential properties of a tubular product, especially nuclear fuel cladding, utilizes compression of a polymeric plug within the tubular product to determine strain stress, yield stress and other properties. The process is especially useful in the determination of aging properties such as fuel rod embrittlement after long burn-down.

  6. A fixed-memory moving, expanding window for obtaining scatter corrections in X-ray CT and other stochastic averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.

    2015-11-01

    A simple algorithm for averaging a stochastic sequence of 1D arrays in a moving, expanding window is provided. The samples are grouped in bins which increase exponentially in size so that a constant fraction of the samples is retained at any point in the sequence. The algorithm is shown to have particular relevance for a class of Monte Carlo sampling problems which includes one characteristic of iterative reconstruction in computed tomography. The code is available in the CPC program library in both Fortran 95 and C and is also available in R through CRAN.

  7. Nonequilibrium fixed points in longitudinally expanding scalar theories: Infrared cascade, Bose condensation and a challenge for kinetic theory

    SciTech Connect

    Berges, J.; Schlichting, S.; Boguslavski, K.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-11-05

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061601 (2015)], we reported on a new universality class for longitudinally expanding systems, encompassing strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas and N-component self-interacting scalar field theories. Using classical-statistical methods, we showed that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Here we significantly expand on our previous work and delineate two further self-similar regimes. One of these occurs in the deep infrared (IR) regime of very high occupancies, where the nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The universal IR scaling exponents and the spectral index characterizing the isotropic IR distributions are described by an effective theory derived from a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. Remarkably, this effective theory can be cast as a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The other novel self-similar regime occurs close to the hard physical scale of the theory, and sets in only at later times. In this study, we argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks.

  8. Nonequilibrium fixed points in longitudinally expanding scalar theories: Infrared cascade, Bose condensation, and a challenge for kinetic theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berges, J.; Boguslavski, K.; Schlichting, S.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-11-01

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061601 (2015)], we reported on a new universality class for longitudinally expanding systems, encompassing strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas and N -component self-interacting scalar field theories. Using classical-statistical methods, we showed that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Here we significantly expand on our previous work and delineate two further self-similar regimes. One of these occurs in the deep infrared (IR) regime of very high occupancies, where the nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of a Bose-Einstein condensate. The universal IR scaling exponents and the spectral index characterizing the isotropic IR distributions are described by an effective theory derived from a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. Remarkably, this effective theory can be cast as a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The other novel self-similar regime occurs close to the hard physical scale of the theory, and sets in only at later times. We argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks.

  9. Nonequilibrium fixed points in longitudinally expanding scalar theories: Infrared cascade, Bose condensation and a challenge for kinetic theory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berges, J.; Schlichting, S.; Boguslavski, K.; Venugopalan, R.

    2015-11-05

    In [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 061601 (2015)], we reported on a new universality class for longitudinally expanding systems, encompassing strongly correlated non-Abelian plasmas and N-component self-interacting scalar field theories. Using classical-statistical methods, we showed that these systems share the same self-similar scaling properties for a wide range of momenta in a limit where particles are weakly coupled but their occupancy is high. Here we significantly expand on our previous work and delineate two further self-similar regimes. One of these occurs in the deep infrared (IR) regime of very high occupancies, where the nonequilibrium dynamics leads to the formation of amore » Bose-Einstein condensate. The universal IR scaling exponents and the spectral index characterizing the isotropic IR distributions are described by an effective theory derived from a systematic large-N expansion at next-to-leading order. Remarkably, this effective theory can be cast as a vertex-resummed kinetic theory. The other novel self-similar regime occurs close to the hard physical scale of the theory, and sets in only at later times. In this study, we argue that the important role of the infrared dynamics ensures that key features of our results for scalar and gauge theories cannot be reproduced consistently in conventional kinetic theory frameworks.« less

  10. Proximal renal tubular acidosis

    MedlinePlus

    Renal tubular acidosis - proximal; Type II RTA; RTA - proximal; Renal tubular acidosis type II ... by alkaline substances, mainly bicarbonate. Proximal renal tubular acidosis (Type II RTA) occurs when bicarbonate is not ...

  11. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-01

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels.There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially

  12. Tubular Coupling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system for coupling a vascular overflow graft or cannula to a heart pump. A pump pipe outlet is provided with an external tapered surface which receives the end of a compressible connula. An annular compression ring with a tapered internal bore surface is arranged about the cannula with the tapered internal surface in a facing relationship to the external tapered surface. The angle of inclination of the tapered surfaces is converging such that the spacing between the tapered surfaces decreases from one end of the external tapered surface to the other end thereby providing a clamping action of the tapered surface on a cannula which increases as a function of the length of cannula segment between the tapered surfaces. The annular compression ring is disposed within a tubular locking nut which threadedly couples to the pump and provides a compression force for urging the annular ring onto the cannula between the tapered surfaces. The nut has a threaded connection to the pump body. The threaded coupling to the pump body provides a compression force for the annular ring. The annular ring has an annular enclosure space in which excess cannula material from the compression between the tapered surfaces to "bunch up" in the space and serve as an enlarged annular ring segment to assist holding the cannula in place. The clamped cannula provides a seamless joint connection to the pump pipe outlet where the clamping force is uniformly applied to the cannula because of self alignment of the tapered surfaces. The nut can be easily disconnected to replace the pump if necessary.

  13. Tubular inverse opal scaffolds for biomimetic vessels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ze; Wang, Jie; Lu, Jie; Yu, Yunru; Fu, Fanfan; Wang, Huan; Liu, Yuxiao; Zhao, Yuanjin; Gu, Zhongze

    2016-07-14

    There is a clinical need for tissue-engineered blood vessels that can be used to replace or bypass damaged arteries. The success of such grafts depends strongly on their ability to mimic native arteries; however, currently available artificial vessels are restricted by their complex processing, controversial integrity, or uncontrollable cell location and orientation. Here, we present new tubular scaffolds with specific surface microstructures for structural vessel mimicry. The tubular scaffolds are fabricated by rotationally expanding three-dimensional tubular inverse opals that are replicated from colloidal crystal templates in capillaries. Because of the ordered porous structure of the inverse opals, the expanded tubular scaffolds are imparted with circumferentially oriented elliptical pattern microstructures on their surfaces. It is demonstrated that these tailored tubular scaffolds can effectively make endothelial cells to form an integrated hollow tubular structure on their inner surface and induce smooth muscle cells to form a circumferential orientation on their outer surface. These features of our tubular scaffolds make them highly promising for the construction of biomimetic blood vessels. PMID:27241065

  14. Expanding the regulatory network that controls nitrogen fixation in Sinorhizobium meliloti: elucidating the role of the two-component system hFixL-FxkR.

    PubMed

    Reyes-González, Alma; Talbi, Chouhra; Rodríguez, Susana; Rivera, Patricia; Zamorano-Sánchez, David; Girard, Lourdes

    2016-06-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, nitrogen fixation is regulated in response to oxygen concentration through the FixL-FixJ two-component system (TCS). Besides this conserved TCS, the field isolate SM11 also encodes the hFixL-FxkR TCS, which is responsible for the microoxic response in Rhizobium etli. Through genetic and physiological assays, we evaluated the role of the hFixL-FxkR TCS in S. meliloti SM11. Our results revealed that this regulatory system activates the expression of a fixKf orthologue (fixKa), in response to low oxygen concentration. Null mutations in either hFixL or FxkR promote upregulation of fixK1, a direct target of FixJ. Furthermore, the absence of this TCS translates into higher nitrogen fixation values as well as higher expression of fixN1 in nodules. Individual mutations in each of the fixK-like regulators encoded in the S. meliloti SM11 genome do not completely restrict fixN1 or fixN2 expression, pointing towards redundancy among these regulators. Both copies of fixN are necessary to achieve optimal levels of nitrogen fixation. This work provides evidence that the hFixL-FxkR TCS is activated in response to low oxygen concentration in S. meliloti SM11 and that it negatively regulates the expression of fixK1, fixN1 and nitrogen fixation. PMID:27010660

  15. Tubular hydrogen permeable metal foil membrane and method of fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Paglieri, Stephen N.; Birdsell, Stephen A.; Barbero, Robert S.; Snow, Ronny C.; Smith, Frank M.

    2006-04-04

    A tubular hydrogen permeable metal membrane and fabrication process comprises obtaining a metal alloy foil having two surfaces, coating the surfaces with a metal or metal alloy catalytic layer to produce a hydrogen permeable metal membrane, sizing the membrane into a sheet with two long edges, wrapping the membrane around an elongated expandable rod with the two long edges aligned and overlapping to facilitate welding of the two together, placing the foil wrapped rod into a surrounding fixture housing with the two aligned and overlapping foil edges accessible through an elongated aperture in the surrounding fixture housing, expanding the elongated expandable rod within the surrounding fixture housing to tighten the foil about the expanded rod, welding the two long overlapping foil edges to one another generating a tubular membrane, and removing the tubular membrane from within the surrounding fixture housing and the expandable rod from with the tubular membrane.

  16. Tubular copper thrust chamber design study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Galler, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of copper tubular thrust chambers is particularly important in high performance expander cycle space engines. Tubular chambers have more surface area than flat wall chambers, and this extra surface area provides enhanced heat transfer for additional energy to power the cycle. This paper was divided into two sections: (1) a thermal analysis and sensitivity study; and (2) a preliminary design of a selected thrust chamber configuration. The thermal analysis consisted of a statistical optimization to determine the optimum tube geometry, tube booking, thrust chamber geometry, and cooling routing to achieve the maximum upper limit chamber pressure for a 25,000 pound thrust engine. The preliminary design effort produced a layout drawing of a tubular thrust chamber that is three inches shorter than the Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) milled channel chamber but is predicted to provide a five percent increase in heat transfer. Testing this chamber in the AETB would confirm the inherent advantages of tubular chamber construction and heat transfer.

  17. A supramolecular tubular nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yu

    2014-07-01

    The extremely strong noncovalent complexation between the rigid host of phthalocyanine-bridged β-cyclodextrins and the amphiphilic guest carboxylated porphyrin is employed to construct a hollow tubular structure as a supramolecular nanoreactor. A representative coupling reaction occurs in the hydrophobic interlayers of the tubular walls in pure water at room temperature, leading to an enhancement of ten times higher reaction rate without any adverse effect on catalytic activity and conversion. PMID:24890802

  18. Tubular electric heater with a thermocouple assembly

    DOEpatents

    House, R.K.; Williams, D.E.

    1975-08-01

    This patent relates to a thermocouple or other instrumentation which is installed within the walls of a tubular sheath surrounding a process device such as an electric heater. The sheath comprises two concentric tubes, one or both of which have a longitudinal, concave crease facing the other tube. The thermocouple is fixedly positioned within the crease and the outer tube is mechanically reduced to form an interference fit onto the inner tube. (auth)

  19. Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1992-12-01

    A summary of significant developments and accomplishments which have recently occurred throughout the tubular Solidi Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) program include: Demonstration that thousands of tubular solid oxide fuel cells can be fabricated with consistent and reproducible performance. Continuous operation of a 3 kWe tubular SOFC system for over six months at a customer`s test site. Demonstration of stable performance and lifetime in excess of 5,300 hours for a 3 kWe generator module, operating on desulfurized natural gas without external humidification. Demonstration of stable performance and life times in excess of 30,000 hours in multiple single cell tests. Design, construction and operation of a dedicated cell, module and generator Pre-Pilot Manufacturing Facility (PPMF). Successful 6,840 hour bundle tests of 50 cm. cells produced at the PPMF. Significant improvements in cell performance and life and marked reduction in cell degradation. Design, construction and successful operation of a 20 kWe tubular solid oxide fuel cell generator module. Design, construction, shipment and installation of 25 kWe (40 kWe peak power) field units.

  20. Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, E.R.

    1992-01-01

    A summary of significant developments and accomplishments which have recently occurred throughout the tubular Solidi Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) program include: Demonstration that thousands of tubular solid oxide fuel cells can be fabricated with consistent and reproducible performance. Continuous operation of a 3 kWe tubular SOFC system for over six months at a customer's test site. Demonstration of stable performance and lifetime in excess of 5,300 hours for a 3 kWe generator module, operating on desulfurized natural gas without external humidification. Demonstration of stable performance and life times in excess of 30,000 hours in multiple single cell tests. Design, construction and operation of a dedicated cell, module and generator Pre-Pilot Manufacturing Facility (PPMF). Successful 6,840 hour bundle tests of 50 cm. cells produced at the PPMF. Significant improvements in cell performance and life and marked reduction in cell degradation. Design, construction and successful operation of a 20 kWe tubular solid oxide fuel cell generator module. Design, construction, shipment and installation of 25 kWe (40 kWe peak power) field units.

  1. Tubular Secretion in CKD.

    PubMed

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Laha, Thomas; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Newitt, Rick; Sirich, Tammy L; Meyer, Timothy W; Thummel, Ken E; Yanez, N David; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Weiss, Noel S; Kestenbaum, Bryan R

    2016-07-01

    Renal function generally is assessed by measurement of GFR and urinary albumin excretion. Other intrinsic kidney functions, such as proximal tubular secretion, typically are not quantified. Tubular secretion of solutes is more efficient than glomerular filtration and a major mechanism for renal drug elimination, suggesting important clinical consequences of secretion dysfunction. Measuring tubular secretion as an independent marker of kidney function may provide insight into kidney disease etiology and improve prediction of adverse outcomes. We estimated secretion function by measuring secreted solute (hippurate, cinnamoylglycine, p-cresol sulfate, and indoxyl sulfate) clearance using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assays of serum and timed urine samples in a prospective cohort study of 298 patients with kidney disease. We estimated GFR by mean clearance of creatinine and urea from the same samples and evaluated associations of renal secretion with participant characteristics, mortality, and CKD progression to dialysis. Tubular secretion rate modestly correlated with eGFR and associated with some participant characteristics, notably fractional excretion of electrolytes. Low clearance of hippurate or p-cresol sulfate associated with greater risk of death independent of eGFR (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 4.7; hazard ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 6.1, respectively). Hazards models also suggested an association between low cinnamoylglycine clearance and risk of dialysis, but statistical analyses did not exclude the null hypothesis. Therefore, estimates of proximal tubular secretion function correlate with glomerular filtration, but substantial variability in net secretion remains. The observed associations of net secretion with mortality and progression of CKD require confirmation. PMID:26614381

  2. Method and tool for contracting tubular members by electro-hydraulic forming before hydroforming

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich

    2011-03-15

    A tubular preform is contracted in an electro-hydraulic forming operation. The tubular preform is wrapped with one or more coils of wire and placed in a chamber of an electro-hydraulic forming tool. The electro-hydraulic forming tool is discharged to form a compressed area on a portion of the tube. The tube is then placed in a hydroforming tool that expands the tubular preform to form a part.

  3. Tubular toxicity of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2011-03-01

    Proteinuria is a prognostic indicator of progressive kidney disease and poor cardiovascular outcomes. Abnormally filtered bioactive macromolecules interact with proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs), which results in the development of proteinuric nephropathy. This condition is characterized by alterations in PTEC growth, apoptosis, gene transcription and inflammatory cytokine production as a consequence of dysregulated signaling pathways that are stimulated by proteinuric tubular fluid. The megalin-cubilin complex mediates the uptake of several proteins, including albumin, into PTECs. Megalin might also possess intrinsic signaling properties and the ability to regulate cell signaling pathways and gene transcription after processing regulated intramembrane proteolysis. Megalin could, therefore, link abnormal PTEC albumin exposure with altered growth factor receptor activation, proinflammatory and profibrotic signaling, and gene transcription. Evidence now suggests that other PTEC pathways for protein reabsorption of (patho)physiological importance might be mediated by the neonatal Fc receptor and CD36. PMID:21151210

  4. In vitro hydrodynamic evaluation of a biovalve with stent (tubular leaflet type) for transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation.

    PubMed

    Sumikura, Hirohito; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ohnuma, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Satoru; Takewa, Yoshiaki; Tatsumi, Eisuke

    2015-12-01

    We have been developing an autologous heart valve-shaped tissue with a stent (stent-biovalve) for transcatheter pulmonary valve implantation (TPVI) using "in-body tissue architecture" technology. In this study, the hydrodynamic performance of a stent-biovalve with tubular leaflets was evaluated by changing its leaflet height in an in vitro test in order to determine the appropriate stent-biovalve form for the pulmonary valve. A specially designed, self-expandable, stent-mounted, cylindrical acrylic mold was placed in a dorsal subcutaneous pouch of goat, and the implant was extracted 2 months later. Only the cylindrical acrylic mold was removed from the implant, and a tubular hollow structure of membranous connective tissue impregnated with the stent strut was obtained. Half of tubular tissue was completely folded in half inwards, and 3 commissure parts were connected to form 3 leaflets, resulting in the preparation of a stent-biovalve with tubular leaflets (25-mm ID). The stent-biovalve with adjusting leaflet height (13, 14, 15, 17, 20, and 25 mm) was fixed to a specially designed pulsatile mock circulation circuit under pulmonary valve conditions using 37 °C saline. The mean pressure difference and effective orifice area were better than those of the biological valve. The lowest and highest leaflet heights had a high regurgitation rate due to lack of coaptation or prevention of leaflet movement, respectively. The lowest regurgitation (ca. 11%) was observed at a height of 15 mm. The leaflet height was found to significantly affect the hydrodynamics of stent-biovalves, and the existence of an appropriate leaflet height became clear. PMID:26141924

  5. Tapered, tubular polyester fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lapointe, Donat J. E. (Inventor); Wright, Lawrence T. (Inventor); Vincent, Laurence J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A tapered tubular polyester sleeve is described to serve as the flexible foundation for a spacesuit limb covering. The tube has a large end and a small end with a length to be determined. The ratio of taper is also determined by scale factors. All the warp yarns extend to the large end. A requisite number of warp yarns extend the full length of the sleeve. Other warp yarns extend from the large end but are terminated along the length of the sleeve. It is then woven with a filling yarn which extends in a full circle along the full length of the sleeve to thereby define the tapered sleeve. The sleeve after fabrication is then placed on a mandrel, heated in an oven, and then attached to the arm or other limb of the spacesuit.

  6. Tapered, tubular polyester fabric

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaPointe, Donat J. E. (Inventor); Vincent, Laurence J. (Inventor); Wright, Lawrence T. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A tapered tubular polyester sleeve as set forth. It has a large end 12 and a small end 14 with a length to be determined. The ratio of taper is also determined by scale factors. All the warp yarns extend to the large end 12. A requisite number of warp yarns 16 extend the full length of the sleeve. Other warp yarns exemplified at 18, 22, 26, 28, 30 and 32 extend from the large end but are terminated along the length of the sleeve. It is then woven with a filling yarn 40 which extends in a full circle along the full length of the sleeve to thereby define the tapered sleeve. The sleeve after fabrication is then placed on a mandrel 42, heated in an oven 44 and is thereafter placed on the arm or other limb of a space suit exemplified at 50.

  7. Immobilized tubular fermentor

    SciTech Connect

    Gencer, M.A.; Mutharasan, R.

    1983-09-01

    In this article, a mathematical model describing the kinetics of ethanol fermentation in a whole cell immobilized tubular fermentor is proposed. Experimental results show reasonable agreement with the proposed model. A procedure for treating the fermentation data for determining the ethanol inhibition constants k1 and k2 is described. The ethanol productivity of the immobilized cell fermentor is compared with those of traditional fermentors. Experimental studies indicate that with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (NRRL Y132) culture, ethanol productivity in the range 21.2-83.7 g ethanol/L/h at ethanol concentration of 76-60 g/L can be achieved. This is comparable to or higher than those reported in the literature for yeast. The product yield factor of 0.5 g ethanol/g glucose was obtained. The immobilized cell fermentor does not show washout at dilution rates of 7/h and shows good stability over a 650-h operating period.

  8. Hand-Operated Hydraulic Tube Expander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagan, David W.; Wolff, Edwin D.

    1995-01-01

    Hand-operated tool expands end portion of narrow metal or plastic tube to slightly larger diameter. Used on tubes with original inner diameters as small as 0.060 in. Includes replaceable tip comprising ferrule and tubular expansion sleeve sized for sliding fit into tube to be expanded. Expansion sleeve swells in response to internal hydraulic pressure generated by turning handle and thereby advancing piston.

  9. Device for inserting tubular members together

    SciTech Connect

    Milberger, L.J.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes a well, a lower tubular member with a sealing surface located in the well, an upper tubular member which inserts into engagement with the lower tubular member during running in, the upper and lower tubular members being exposed to well fluid pressure, an improved means for sliding the upper tubular member into engagement with the lower tubular member. It comprises the upper tubular member having a first side and a second side, the second side having a sealing section which mates with the sealing surface of the lower tubular sidewall; axially spaced apart seal means located on the running tool sidewall for sealingly engaging the first side of the upper tubular member above and below the sealing section during running in, for defining a low pressure area between the running tool and the first side which is isolated from the well fluid pressure; the sealing section of the upper tubular member being exposed to well fluid pressure during running in, resulting in a pressure difference across the upper tubular member between the first side of the tubular member and the sealing section, means for eliminating the pressure difference across the upper tubular member between the first side and the sealing section after the upper tubular member has reached its engaged position with the lower tubular member, allowing the sealing section to move radially into engagement with the sealing surface. This patent also describes a method for sliding an upper tubular member into engagement with a sealing surface of a lower tubular member in a well having well fluid pressure, comprising in combination: providing the upper tubular member with a first side and a second side and providing the second side with a sealing section for mating with the sealing surface of the lower tubular member.

  10. A Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudgins, Robert R.; Cayrol, Bertrand

    1981-01-01

    Using the hydrolysis of crystal violet dye by sodium hydroxide as an example, the theory, apparatus, and procedure for a laboratory demonstration of tubular reactor behavior are described. The reaction presented can occur at room temperature and features a color change to reinforce measured results. (WB)

  11. Micro-Tubular Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimble, Michael C.; Anderson, Everett B.; Jayne, Karen D.; Woodman, Alan S.

    2004-01-01

    Micro-tubular fuel cells that would operate at power levels on the order of hundreds of watts or less are under development as alternatives to batteries in numerous products - portable power tools, cellular telephones, laptop computers, portable television receivers, and small robotic vehicles, to name a few examples. Micro-tubular fuel cells exploit advances in the art of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells. The main advantage of the micro-tubular fuel cells over the plate-and-frame fuel cells would be higher power densities: Whereas the mass and volume power densities of low-pressure hydrogen-and-oxygen-fuel plate-and-frame fuel cells designed to operate in the targeted power range are typically less than 0.1 W/g and 0.1 kW/L, micro-tubular fuel cells are expected to reach power densities much greater than 1 W/g and 1 kW/L. Because of their higher power densities, micro-tubular fuel cells would be better for powering portable equipment, and would be better suited to applications in which there are requirements for modularity to simplify maintenance or to facilitate scaling to higher power levels. The development of PEMFCs has conventionally focused on producing large stacks of cells that operate at typical power levels >5 kW. The usual approach taken to developing lower-power PEMFCs for applications like those listed above has been to simply shrink the basic plate-and-frame configuration to smaller dimensions. A conventional plate-and-frame fuel cell contains a membrane/electrode assembly in the form of a flat membrane with electrodes of the same active area bonded to both faces. In order to provide reactants to both electrodes, bipolar plates that contain flow passages are placed on both electrodes. The mass and volume overhead of the bipolar plates amounts to about 75 percent of the total mass and volume of a fuel-cell stack. Removing these bipolar plates in the micro-tubular fuel cell significantly increases the power density.

  12. Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrödinger, E.

    2011-02-01

    Preface; Part I. The de Sitter Universe: 1. Synthetic construction; 2. The reduced model: geodesics; 3. The elliptic interpretation; 4. The static frame; 5. The determination of parallaxes; 6. The Lemaître-Robertson frame; Part II. The Theory of Geodesics: 7. On null geodesics; i. Determination of the parameter for null lines in special cases; ii. Frequency shift; 8. Free particles and light rays in general expanding spaces, flat or hyperspherical; i. Flat spaces; ii. Spherical spaces; iii. The red shift for spherical spaces; Part III. Waves in General Riemannian Space-Time: 9. The nature of our approximation; 10. The Hamilton-Jacobi theory in a gravitational field; 11. Procuring approximate solutions of the Hamilton-Jacobi equation from wave theory; Part IV. Waves in an Expanding Universe: 12. General considerations; 13. Proper vibrations and wave parcels; Bibliography.

  13. Expanding Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aisenberg, Sol

    2005-04-01

    Newton's gravitational constant Gn and Laws of Gravity are based upon observations in our solar system. Mysteries appear when they are used far outside our solar system Apparently, Newton's gravitational constant can not be applied at large distances. Dark matter was needed to explain the observed flat rotational velocity curves of spiral galaxies (Rubin), and of groups of remote galaxies (Zwicky). Our expansion of Newton's gravitational constant Gn as a power series in distance r, is sufficient to explain these observations without using dark matter. This is different from the MOND theory of Milgrom involving acceleration. Also, our Expanded Gravitational Constant (EGC) can show the correct use of the red shift. In addition to the Doppler contribution, there are three other contributions and these depend only upon gravity. Thus, velocity observations only based on the red shift can not be used to support the concept of the expanding universe, the accelerating expansion, or dark energy. Our expanded gravity constant can predict and explain Olbers' paradox (dark sky), and the temperature of the CMB (cosmic microwave background). Thus, CMB may not support the big bang and inflation.

  14. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson's Ratio.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Park, Jeong Hun; Chen, Shaochen; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson's ratio νxy (NPR). NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson's ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts. PMID:27232181

  15. Renal tubular secretion of pramipexole.

    PubMed

    Knop, Jana; Hoier, Eva; Ebner, Thomas; Fromm, Martin F; Müller, Fabian

    2015-11-15

    The dopamine agonist pramipexole is cleared predominantly by the kidney with a major contribution of active renal secretion. Previously the organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) was shown to be involved in the uptake of pramipexole by renal tubular cells, while the mechanism underlying efflux into tubular lumen remains unclear. Cimetidine, a potent inhibitor of multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins 1 (MATE1) and 2-K (MATE2-K), decreases renal pramipexole clearance in humans. We hypothesized that, in addition to OCT2, pramipexole may be a substrate of MATE-mediated transport. Pramipexole uptake was investigated using MDCK or HEK cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K and the respective vector controls (Co). Transcellular pramipexole transport was investigated in MDCK cells single- or double-transfected with OCT2 and/or MATE1 and in Co cells, separating a basal from an apical compartment in a model for renal tubular secretion. Pramipexole uptake was 1.6-, 1.1-, or 1.6-folds in cells overexpressing OCT2, MATE1 or MATE2-K, respectively as compared to Co cells (p<0.05). In transcellular transport experiments, intracellular pramipexole accumulation was 1.7-folds in MDCK-OCT2 (p<0.001), and transcellular pramipexole transport was 2.2- and 4.0-folds in MDCK-MATE1 and MDCK-OCT2-MATE1 cells as compared to Co cells (p<0.001). Transcellular pramipexole transport was pH dependent and inhibited by cimetidine with IC50 values of 12μM and 5.5μM in MATE1 and OCT2-MATE1 cells, respectively. Taken together, coordinate activity of OCT2-mediated uptake and MATE-mediated efflux determines pramipexole renal secretion. Reduced OCT2 or MATE transport activity due to genetic variation or drug-drug interactions may affect pramipexole renal secretion. PMID:26360835

  16. Expanded Yegua

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, R.E.; Grayson, S.; Benes, J.

    1988-01-01

    The upper Eocene Yegua Formation expands dramatically across a regional flexure generally 12-15 km wide. During each of several postulated Yegua sea level drops, this flexure became a focal point for deltaic deposition of good to excellent reservoir-quality sands. From the western edge of the Houston salt dome basin to the San Marcos arch, this trend has yielded, since 1982, at least seven noteworthy discoveries: Toro Grande and Lost Bridge fields in Jackson County, and Black Owl, Shanghai, Shanghai East, El Campo, and Phase Four fields in Wharton County, Texas. El Campo field in Wharton County, Texas, was discovered in December 1985 by Ladd Petroleum Corporation with the drilling of the Ladd Petroleum 1 Popp well. Mud logs acquired while drilling indicated that a very sandy reservoir, with encouraging quantities of natural gas and condensate had been encountered. Subsequent open-hold logging generated more questions than answers about the prospective sand section. Additional open hole logs (EPT/ML,SHDT) were run to identify what turned out to be an extremely laminated sand-shale sequence over 400 ft thick. Subsequent development drilling and the acquisition of a 120 ft whole core provided valuable data in analyzing this prolific, geopressured natural gas and condensate Yegua reservoir. Whole-core data, open-hole logs, and computer logs were integrated to develop petro-physical evaluation procedures and to determine the environment of deposition. El Campo field is believed to represent an extremely thick, delta front slope to distal delta front facies.

  17. Acquired distal renal tubular acidosis in man.

    PubMed

    Better, O S

    1982-10-01

    Distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) may complicate renal transplantation, liver cirrhosis, and obstructive uropathy. Indeed, its occurrence may be an early clue to an episode of rejection of the graft or to obstructive uropathy. The mechanism in most patients with dRTA is impaired distal secretion of protons. In some patients, however, back leak of protons from tubular lumen to blood may abolish distal tubular ability to maintain urine to blood proton gradients. In patients with obstructive uropathy the spectrum of tubular acidosis is widened by the occurrence of additional defects in tubular secretion of potassium and impairment of hydrogen ion secretion secondary to hypoaldosteronism. Hyperkalemia is also seen in "voltage dependent" states such as following the administration of lithium and amiloride. Hyperkalemia per se is conducive to acidosis by a combination of extrarenal and several intrarenal mechanisms. PMID:6755051

  18. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows tubular structures of likely Martian origin. These structures are very similar in size and shape to extremely tiny microfossils found in some Earth rocks. This photograph is part of a report by a NASA research team published in the Aug. 16, 1996, issue of the journal Science. A two-year investigation by the team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller.

  19. Mars Life? - Microscopic Tubular Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    This electron microscope image shows extremely tiny tubular structures that are possible microscopic fossils of bacteria-like organisms that may have lived on Mars more than 3.6 billion years ago. A two-year investigation by a NASA research team found organic molecules, mineral features characteristic of biological activity and possible microscopic fossils such as these inside of an ancient Martian rock that fell to Earth as a meteorite. The largest possible fossils are less than 1/100th the diameter of a human hair in size while most are ten times smaller. The fossil-like structures were found in carbonate minerals formed along pre-existing fractures in the meteorite in a fashion similar to the way fossils occur in limestone on Earth, although on a microscopic scale.

  20. Treatment of well tubulars with gelatin

    SciTech Connect

    Lowther, F.E.

    1992-08-04

    This patent describes a method for treating a tubular in a well. It comprises: passing a mass of gelatin downward through the tubular; and passing the mass of gelating, upward in the well tubular toward the surface. This patent also describes a method of treating tubulars in a cased well having at least one string of tubing therein. It comprises positioning a mass in the annulus formed between the casing and the at least one string of tubing; and passing the mass downward in the annulus and in contact with both the inner wall of the casing and the outer wall of the tubing to deposit a protective layer on each of the walls.

  1. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR FABRICATING TUBULAR UNITS

    DOEpatents

    Haldeman, G.W.

    1959-02-24

    A method and apparatus are described for fabricating tubular assemblies such as clad fuel elements for nuclear reactors. According to this method, a plurality of relatively short cylindrical slug-shaped members are inserted in an outer protective tubular jacket, and the assembly is passed through a reducing die to draw the outer tubular member into tight contact with the slug members, the slugs being automatically spaced with respect to each other and helium being inserted during the drawing operation to fill the spaces. The apparatus includes a pusher rod which functions to space the slugelements equidistantly by pushing on them in the direction of drawing but traveling at a slower rate than that of the tubular member.

  2. An open tubular ion chromatograph.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bingcheng; Zhang, Min; Kanyanee, Tinakorn; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-01

    We describe an open tubular ion chromatograph (OTIC) that uses anion exchange latex coated 5 μm radius silica and 9.8 μm radius poly(methyl methacrylate) tubes and automated time/pressure based hydrodynamic injection for pL-nL scale injections. It is routinely possible to generate 50,000 plates or more (up to 150,000 plates/m, columns between 0.3 and 0.8 m have been used), and as such, fast separations are possible, comparable to or in some cases better than the current practice of IC. With an optimized admittance detector, nonsuppressed detection permits LODs of submicromolar to double digit micromolar for a variety of analytes. However, large volume injections are possible and can significantly improve on this. A variety of eluents, the use of organic modifiers, and variations of eluent pH can be used to tailor a given separation. The approach is discussed in the context of extraterrestrial exploration, especially Mars, where the existence of large amounts of perchlorate in the soil needs to be confirmed. These columns can survive drying and freezing, and small footprint, low power consumption, and simplicity make OTIC a good candidate for such a mission. PMID:25394230

  3. 78 FR 37584 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... Employment and Training Administration U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, Pennsylvania; Notice of Amended... workers of U.S. Steel Tubular Products, McKeesport Tubular Operations Division, a subsidiary of...

  4. Salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Tsimihodimos, Vasilis; Psychogios, Nikolaos; Kakaidi, Varvara; Bairaktari, Eleni; Elisaf, Moses

    2007-09-01

    We describe the case of a 17-year-old girl who was admitted to our clinic for drug poisoning. Twelve hours after the ingestion of 25 tablets of aspirin (12.5 g of acetylsalicylic acid), the patient had a generalized proximal tubular dysfunction characterized by glucosuria (in the face of normal serum glucose levels), proteinuria, and uric acid wasting. Further characterization of the tubular dysfunction using high-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the urine showed a pattern consistent with proximal tubular injury. An important characteristic of the salicylate-induced proximal tubular dysfunction in our patient was its rapid reversibility. A trend toward normalization of fractional excretion values of electrolytes was observed 2 days after ingestion. Determination of serum and urine metabolites and spectroscopy of urine 15 days later showed no evidence of tubular dysfunction. The mechanisms potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of salicylate-induced Fanconi syndrome are discussed and a brief review of the relevant literature is provided. PMID:17720526

  5. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  6. Tubular Colonic Duplication Presenting as Rectovestibular Fistula.

    PubMed

    Karkera, Parag J; Bendre, Pradnya; D'souza, Flavia; Ramchandra, Mukunda; Nage, Amol; Palse, Nitin

    2015-09-01

    Complete colonic duplication is a very rare congenital anomaly that may have different presentations according to its location and size. Complete colonic duplication can occur in about 15% of all gastrointestinal duplications. Double termination of tubular colonic duplication in the perineum is even more uncommon. We present a case of a Y-shaped tubular colonic duplication which presented with a rectovestibular fistula and a normal anus. Radiological evaluation and initial exploration for sigmoidostomy revealed duplicated colons with a common vascular supply. Endorectal mucosal resection of theduplicated distal segment till the colostomy site with division of the septum of the proximal segment and colostomy closure proved curative without compromise of the continence mechanism. Tubular colonic duplication should always be ruled out when a diagnosis of perineal canal is considered in cases of vestibular fistula alongwith a normal anus. PMID:26473141

  7. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell current collector

    DOEpatents

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Sutton, Theodore G.; Armstrong, Timothy R.

    2010-07-20

    An internal current collector for use inside a tubular solid oxide fuel cell (TSOFC) electrode comprises a tubular coil spring disposed concentrically within a TSOFC electrode and in firm uniform tangential electrical contact with the electrode inner surface. The current collector maximizes the contact area between the current collector and the electrode. The current collector is made of a metal that is electrically conductive and able to survive under the operational conditions of the fuel cell, i.e., the cathode in air, and the anode in fuel such as hydrogen, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O or H.sub.2S.

  8. Deployable and retractable telescoping tubular structure development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, M. W.

    1994-01-01

    A new deployable and retractable telescoping boom capable of high deployed stiffness and strength is described. Deployment and retraction functions are controlled by simple, reliable, and fail-safe latches between the tubular segments. The latch and a BI-STEM (Storable Tubular Extendible Member) actuator work together to eliminate the need for the segments to overlap when deployed. This yields an unusually lightweight boom and compact launch configuration. An aluminum space-flight prototype with three joints displays zero structural deadband, low hysteresis, and high damping. The development approach and difficulties are discussed. Test results provide a joint model for sizing flight booms of any diameter and length.

  9. Familial myopathy with tubular aggregates associated with abnormal pupils.

    PubMed

    Shahrizaila, Nortina; Lowe, James; Wills, Adrian

    2004-09-28

    The authors describe familial tubular aggregate myopathy associated with abnormal pupils. Four family members from two generations had myopathy and pupillary abnormalities. The myopathologic findings consisted of tubular aggregates in many fibers but predominantly type I fibers. PMID:15452313

  10. Proximal tubular NHEs: sodium, protons and calcium?

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R. Todd; Dimke, Henrik; Cordat, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Na+/H+ exchange activity in the apical membrane of the proximal tubule is fundamental to the reabsorption of Na+ and water from the filtrate. The role of this exchange process in bicarbonate reclamation and, consequently, the maintenance of acid-base homeostasis has been appreciated for at least half a century and remains a pillar of renal tubular physiology. More recently, apical Na+/H+ exchange, mediated by Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3), has been implicated in proximal tubular reabsorption of Ca2+ and Ca2+ homeostasis in general. Overexpression of NHE3 increased paracellular Ca2+ flux in a proximal tubular cell model. Consistent with this observation, mice with genetic deletion of Nhe3 have a noticable renal Ca2+ leak. These mice also display decreased intestinal Ca2+ uptake and osteopenia. This review highlights the traditional roles of proximal tubular Na+/H+ exchange and summarizes recent novel findings implicating the predominant isoform, NHE3, in Ca2+ homeostasis. PMID:23761670

  11. Comparative physiology of renal tubular transport mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Long, S.; Giebisch, G.

    1979-01-01

    This manuscript discusses current concepts of glomerular filtration and tubular transport of sodium, water, potassium, and urinary acidification by vertebrate kidneys in a comparative context. Work in mammalian and amphibian nephrons receives major emphasis due to our interest in application of new techniques for investigation of cellular mechanisms; when available, data from other vertebrate classes are discussed. Images FIG. 3 PMID:395765

  12. [Hypokalemic pareses secondary to renal tubular acidosis].

    PubMed

    Gøransson, L G; Apeland, T; Omdal, R

    2000-01-30

    A 24 year old woman presented with flaccid paralysis, severe hypokalaemia and hyperchloremia, metabolic acidosis. Immunological tests and labial glandular biopsy indicated primary Sjögren's syndrome as the underlying cause of her distal renal tubular acidosis. The patient recovered after alkali and potassium substitution and was put on oral treatment with potassium citrate. PMID:10827521

  13. Tubular Membrane Plant-Growth Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Hydroponic system controls nutrient solution for growing crops in space. Pump draws nutrient solution along inside of tubular membrane in pipe from reservoir, maintaining negative pressure in pipe. Roots of plants in slot extract nutrient through membrane within pipe. Crop plants such as wheat, rice, lettuce, tomatoes, soybeans, and beans grown successfully with system.

  14. 78 FR 14361 - U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration U.S. Steel Tubular Products, Inc., Mckeesport Tubular Operations Division, Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation, Mckeesport, PA; Notice of Initiation of...) filed on December 20, 2012 on behalf of workers of U.S. Steel Tubular Products, McKeesport...

  15. [Treatment of long tubular bone pseudoarthrosis with revascularized cortical layer of radius].

    PubMed

    Milanov, N O; Trofimov, E I; Umerenkov, A G

    1997-01-01

    The method of osteogenesis without resection of the false joint was employed in the treatment of long tubular bone pseudarthrosis. The authors used a free revascularized radial flap, including the corticoperiosteal layer of the radius as a source of osteogenesis. A thin corticoperiosteal graft was taken from the distal third of the radius with or without a skin flap, if necessary. The graft was placed into the slotted bed of the false joint and fixed by two screws. Final fixation was made by using an Ilizarov apparatus or a metal plate. The authors used this procedure in the treatment of 12 patients with long tubular bone pseudarthrosis who had undergone at two operations on the false joint or fracture. Eight patients suffered from chronic osteomyelitis. Eleven patients completely recovered at postoperative month 12. Radiographic and scintigraphic investigations showed signs of bed-graft adhesion at month 3 after surgery and those of false joint ossification at month 6 postoperatively. PMID:9376741

  16. Renal tubular acidosis complicated with hypokalemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y C; Huang, C C; Chiou, Y Y; Yu, C Y

    1995-07-01

    Three Chinese girls with hypokalemic periodic paralysis secondary to different types of renal tubular acidosis are presented. One girl has primary distal renal tubular acidosis complicated with nephrocalcinosis. Another has primary Sjögren syndrome with distal renal tubular acidosis, which occurs rarely with hypokalemic periodic paralysis in children. The third has an isolated proximal renal tubular acidosis complicated with multiple organ abnormalities, unilateral carotid artery stenosis, respiratory failure, and consciousness disturbance. The diagnostic evaluation and emergent and prophylactic treatment for these three types of renal tubular acidosis are discussed. PMID:7575850

  17. Congenital myasthenic syndrome with tubular aggregates caused by GFPT1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Guergueltcheva, Velina; Müller, Juliane S; Dusl, Marina; Senderek, Jan; Oldfors, Anders; Lindbergh, Christopher; Maxwell, Susan; Colomer, Jaume; Mallebrera, Cecilia Jimenez; Nascimento, Andres; Vilchez, Juan J; Muelas, Nuria; Kirschner, Janbernd; Nafissi, Shahriar; Kariminejad, Ariana; Nilipour, Yalda; Bozorgmehr, Bita; Najmabadi, Hossein; Rodolico, Carmelo; Sieb, Jörn P; Schlotter, Beate; Schoser, Benedikt; Herrmann, Ralf; Voit, Thomas; Steinlein, Ortrud K; Najafi, Abdolhamid; Urtizberea, Andoni; Soler, Doriette M; Muntoni, Francesco; Hanna, Michael G; Chaouch, Amina; Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate; Palace, Jacqueline; Beeson, David; Abicht, Angela; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2012-05-01

    Congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited disorders of the neuromuscular junction. A difficult to diagnose subgroup of CMS is characterised by proximal muscle weakness and fatigue while ocular and facial involvement is only minimal. DOK7 mutations have been identified as causing the disorder in about half of the cases. More recently, using classical positional cloning, we have identified mutations in a previously unrecognised CMS gene, GFPT1, in a series of DOK7-negative cases. However, detailed description of clinical features of GFPT1 patients has not been reported yet. Here we describe the clinical picture of 24 limb-girdle CMS (LG-CMS) patients and pathological findings of 18 of them, all carrying GFPT1 mutations. Additional patients with CMS, but without tubular aggregates, and patients with non-fatigable weakness with tubular aggregates were also screened. In most patients with GFPT1 mutations, onset of the disease occurs in the first decade of life with characteristic limb-girdle weakness and fatigue. A common feature was beneficial and sustained response to acetylcholinesterase inhibitor treatment. Most of the patients who had a muscle biopsy showed tubular aggregates in myofibers. Analysis of endplate morphology in one of the patients revealed unspecific abnormalities. Our study delineates the phenotype of CMS associated with GFPT1 mutations and expands the understanding of neuromuscular junction disorders. As tubular aggregates in context of a neuromuscular transmission defect appear to be highly indicative, we suggest calling this condition congenital myasthenic syndrome with tubular aggregates (CMS-TA). PMID:21975507

  18. Glomerular tubular balance: mediation by luminal hypotonicity.

    PubMed

    Häberle, D A; Müller, U; Nagel, W

    1989-01-01

    Late proximal rat tubular segments were microperfused with slightly hypo- or hypertonic artificial late proximal tubular fluid (ATF) at low (11-13 nl/min) or high (30-38 nl/min) perfusion rates. Volume reabsorption, net chloride and solute reabsorption were measured as a function of length. In addition, the transepithelial resistance and voltage (Vte) were measured as a function of the applied osmotic gradient. Hypertonic solutions equilibrated to isotonicity by solute outflow rather than water influx. With hypertonic ATF the lumen positive Vte was decreased compared with free flow or with hypotonic ATF. The resistance was not significantly different between the different groups. In contrast to hypotonic ATF, hypertonic or isotonic ATF was not significantly reabsorbed. In addition, hypotonic ATF maintained its hypotonicity along the perfused segments. Its reabsorption was flow-dependent. Hypotonicity appeared to enhance solute reabsorption. PMID:2725432

  19. Pattern Selection in Growing Tubular Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Balbi, V.; Kuhl, E.

    2014-12-01

    Tubular organs display a wide variety of surface morphologies including circumferential and longitudinal folds, square and hexagonal undulations, and finger-type protrusions. Surface morphology is closely correlated to tissue function and serves as a clinical indicator for physiological and pathological conditions, but the regulators of surface morphology remain poorly understood. Here, we explore the role of geometry and elasticity on the formation of surface patterns. We establish morphological phase diagrams for patterns selection and show that increasing the thickness or stiffness ratio between the outer and inner tubular layers induces a gradual transition from circumferential to longitudinal folding. Our results suggest that physical forces act as regulators during organogenesis and give rise to the characteristic circular folds in the esophagus, the longitudinal folds in the valves of Kerckring, the surface networks in villi, and the crypts in the large intestine.

  20. Tubular lap joints for wind turbine applications

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Guess, T.R.

    1990-01-01

    A combined analytical/experimental study of the strength of thick- walled, adhesively bonded PMMA-to-aluminum and E-glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum tubular lap joints under axial load has been conducted. Test results include strength and failure mode data. Moreover, strain gages placed along the length of the outer tubular adherend characterize load transfer from one adherend to the other. The strain gage data indicate that load transfer is nonuniform and that the relatively compliant PMMA has the shorter load transfer length. Strains determined by a finite element analysis of the tested joints are in excellent agreement with those measured. Calculated bond stresses are highest in the region of observed failure, and extensive bond yielding is predicted in the E- glass/epoxy composite-to-aluminum joint prior to joint failure. 4 refs., 13 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Tubular Heart Pumping Mechanisms in Ciona Intestinalis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battista, Nicholas; Miller, Laura

    2015-11-01

    In vertebrate embryogenesis, the first organ to form is the heart, beginning as a primitive heart tube. However, many invertebrates have tubular hearts from infancy through adulthood. Heart tubes have been described as peristaltic and impedance pumps. Impedance pumping assumes a single actuation point of contraction, while traditional peristalsis assumes a traveling wave of actuation. In addition to differences in flow, this inherently implies differences in the conduction system. It is possible to transition from pumping mechanism to the other with a change in the diffusivity of the action potential. In this work we consider the coupling between the fluid dynamics and electrophysiology of both mechanisms, within a basal chordate, the tunicate. Using CFD with a neuro-mechanical model of tubular pumping, we discuss implications of the both mechanisms. Furthermore, we discuss the implications of the pumping mechanism on evolution and development.

  2. Latch ring for connecting tubular member

    SciTech Connect

    Milberger, L.J.

    1991-06-04

    This patent describes a device for releasably locking an inner member well bore of a tubular outer member, comprising a combination of a grooved inner member profile formed on the exterior of the inner member; a grooved outer member profile formed in the bore of the outer member; a split ring carried by the inner member the ring having a grooved outer profile on its exterior mates with the outer member profile; and the inner member being axially movable.

  3. Self-Cleaning Tubular-Membrane Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarbolouki, M. N.

    1983-01-01

    Tubular membranes made self-cleaning with aid of flow reversing valve. Sponge balls scrub membrane surfaces as they travel inside membrane tubes. A four-way flow-reversal valve automatically reverses flow in tubes at preset intervals so sponge balls reciprocate along tubes. Baskets at ends of tubes prevent sponges from escaping. Automatic cleaning feature added to existing membrane processing equipment with minimal modifications.

  4. What Expands in an Expanding Universe?

    PubMed

    Pacheco, José A De Freitas

    2015-01-01

    In the present investigation, the possible effects of the expansion of the Universe on systems bonded either by gravitational or electromagnetic forces, are reconsidered. It will be shown that the acceleration (positive or negative) of the expanding background, is the determinant factor affecting planetary orbits and atomic sizes. In the presently accepted cosmology (ΛCDM) all bonded systems are expanding at a decreasing rate that tends to be zero as the universe enters in a de Sitter phase. It is worth mentioning that the estimated expansion rates are rather small and they can be neglected for all practical purposes. PMID:26628035

  5. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    DOEpatents

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  6. A simple auxetic tubular structure with tuneable mechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xin; Shen, Jianhu; Ghaedizadeh, Arash; Tian, Hongqi; Xie, Yi Min

    2016-06-01

    Auxetic materials and structures are increasingly used in various fields because of their unusual properties. Auxetic tubular structures have been fabricated and studied due to their potential to be adopted as oesophageal stents where only tensile auxetic performance is required. However, studies on compressive mechanical properties of auxetic tubular structures are limited in the current literature. In this paper, we developed a simple tubular structure which exhibits auxetic behaviour in both compression and tension. This was achieved by extending a design concept recently proposed by the authors for generating 3D metallic auxetic metamaterials. Both compressive and tensile mechanical properties of the auxetic tubular structure were investigated. It was found that the methodology for generating 3D auxetic metamaterials could be effectively used to create auxetic tubular structures as well. By properly adjusting certain parameters, the mechanical properties of the designed auxetic tubular structure could be easily tuned.

  7. Effect of air flow on tubular solar still efficiency

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An experimental work was reported to estimate the increase in distillate yield for a compound parabolic concentrator-concentric tubular solar still (CPC-CTSS). The CPC dramatically increases the heating of the saline water. A novel idea was proposed to study the characteristic features of CPC for desalination to produce a large quantity of distillate yield. A rectangular basin of dimension 2 m × 0.025 m × 0.02 m was fabricated of copper and was placed at the focus of the CPC. This basin is covered by two cylindrical glass tubes of length 2 m with two different diameters of 0.02 m and 0.03 m. The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. Findings The experimental study was operated with two modes: without and with air flow between inner and outer tubes. The rate of air flow was fixed throughout the experiment at 4.5 m/s. Conclusions On the basis of performance results, the water collection rate was 1445 ml/day without air flow and 2020 ml/day with air flow and the efficiencies were 16.2% and 18.9%, respectively. PMID:23587020

  8. Method and tool for expanding tubular members by electro-hydraulic forming

    DOEpatents

    Golovashchenko, Sergey Fedorovich; Bonnen, John Joseph Francis

    2013-10-29

    An electro-hydraulic forming tool having one or more electrodes for forming parts with sharp corners. The electrodes may be moved and sequentially discharged several times to form various areas of the tube. Alternatively, a plurality of electrodes may be provided that are provided within an insulating tube that defines a charge area opening. The insulating tube is moved to locate the charge area opening adjacent one of the electrodes to form spaced locations on a preform. In other embodiments, a filament wire is provided in a cartridge or supported by an insulative support.

  9. A Tubular Biomaterial Construct Exhibiting a Negative Poisson’s Ratio

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin Woo; Soman, Pranav; Park, Jeong Hun; Chen, Shaochen; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Developing functional small-diameter vascular grafts is an important objective in tissue engineering research. In this study, we address the problem of compliance mismatch by designing and developing a 3D tubular construct that has a negative Poisson’s ratio νxy (NPR). NPR constructs have the unique ability to expand transversely when pulled axially, thereby resulting in a highly-compliant tubular construct. In this work, we used projection stereolithography to 3D-print a planar NPR sheet composed of photosensitive poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate biomaterial. We used a step-lithography exposure and a stitch process to scale up the projection printing process, and used the cut-missing rib unit design to develop a centimeter-scale NPR sheet, which was rolled up to form a tubular construct. The constructs had Poisson’s ratios of -0.6 ≤ νxy ≤ -0.1. The NPR construct also supports higher cellular adhesion than does the construct that has positive νxy. Our NPR design offers a significant advance in the development of highly-compliant vascular grafts. PMID:27232181

  10. Hyaluronan in Tubular and Interstitial Nephrocalcinosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkoelen, Carl F.

    2007-04-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) is the major glycosaminoglycan (GAG) component of the renal medullary interstitium. HA is extremely large (up to 104 kDa) and composed of thousands repeating disaccharides of glucuronic acid (GlcUA) and N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc). HA is synthesized by hyaluronan synthases (HASs) and degraded by hyaluronidases (Hyals). The production of HA by renomedullary interstitial cells is mediated by local osmolality. When excess water needs to be excreted, increased interstitial HA seems to antagonize water reabsorption, while the opposite occurs during water conservation. Hence, papillary interstitial HA is low and Hyal high during anti-diuresis, whereas during diuresis HA is high and Hyal low. The polyanion HA plays a role in the reabsorption of hypotonic fluid by immobilizing cations (Na+) via the carboxylate (COO-) groups of GlcUA. The binding of Ca2+ to anionic HA is probably also responsible for the fact that the papilla does not become a stone despite the extremely high interstitial phosphate and oxalate. HA is also an excellent crystal binding molecule. The expression of HA at the luminal surface of renal tubular cells leads to tubular nephrocalcinosis (tubular NC). Calcium staining methods (Von Kossa, Yasue) demonstrated that crystallization inhibitors cannot avoid the occasional precipitation of calcium phosphate in the papillary interstitium (interstitial NC). These crystals are probably immediately immobilized by the gel-like HA matrix. After ulcerating through the pelvic wall the calcified matrix becomes a Randall's plaque. The attachment of calcium oxalate crystals from the primary urine to plaque may ultimately lead to the development of clinical stones in the renal calyces (nephrolithiasis).

  11. Tubular solid oxide fuel cell development program

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Westinghouse Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) development activities and current program status. The Westinghouse goal is to develop a cost effective cell that can operate for 50,000 to 100,000 hours. Progress toward this goal will be discussed and test results presented for multiple single cell tests which have now successfully exceeded 56,000 hours of continuous power operation at temperature. Results of development efforts to reduce cost and increase power output of tubular SOFCs are described.

  12. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis and Calcium Nephrolithiasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moe, Orson W.; Fuster, Daniel G.; Xie, Xiao-Song

    2008-09-01

    Calcium stones are commonly encountered in patients with congenital distal renal tubular acidosis, a disease of renal acidification caused by mutations in either the vacuolar H+-ATPase (B1 or a4 subunit), anion exchanger-1, or carbonic anhydrase II. Based on the existing database, we present two hypotheses. First, heterozygotes with mutations in B1 subunit of H+-ATPase are not normal but may harbor biochemical abnormalities such as renal acidification defects, hypercalciuria, and hypocitraturia which can predispose them to kidney stone formation. Second, we propose at least two mechanisms by which mutant B1 subunit can impair H+-ATPase: defective pump assembly and defective pump activity.

  13. Advanced beaded and tubular structural panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musgrove, M. D.; Greene, B. E.

    1975-01-01

    A program to develop lightweight beaded and tubular structural panels is described. Applications include external surfaces, where aerodynamically acceptable, and primary structure protected by heat shields. The design configurations were optimized and selected with a computer code which iterates geometric parameters to satisfy strength, stability, and weight constraints. Methods of fabricating these configurations are discussed. Nondestructive testing produced extensive combined compression, shear, and bending test data on local buckling specimens and large panels. The optimized design concepts offer 25 to 30% weight savings compared to conventional stiffened sheet construction.

  14. Tissue-engineered heart valve with a tubular leaflet design for minimally invasive transcatheter implantation.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Ricardo; Velz, Thaddaeus; Alves, Nuno; Gesche, Valentine N; Malischewski, Axel; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Frese, Julia; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Mela, Petra

    2015-06-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of (nonviable) bioprosthetic valves has been proven a valid alternative to conventional surgical implantation in patients at high or prohibitive mortality risk. In this study we present the in vitro proof-of-principle of a newly developed tissue-engineered heart valve for minimally invasive implantation, with the ultimate aim of adding the unique advantages of a living tissue with regeneration capabilities to the continuously developing transcatheter technologies. The tube-in-stent is a fibrin-based tissue-engineered valve with a tubular leaflet design. It consists of a tubular construct sewn into a self-expandable nitinol stent at three commissural attachment points and along a circumferential line so that it forms three coaptating leaflets by collapsing under diastolic back pressure. The tubular constructs were molded with fibrin and human umbilical vein cells. After 3 weeks of conditioning in a bioreactor, the valves were fully functional with unobstructed opening (systolic phase) and complete closure (diastolic phase). Tissue analysis showed a homogeneous cell distribution throughout the valve's thickness and deposition of collagen types I and III oriented along the longitudinal direction. Immunohistochemical staining against CD31 and scanning electron microscopy revealed a confluent endothelial cell layer on the surface of the valves. After harvesting, the valves underwent crimping for 20 min to simulate the catheter-based delivery. This procedure did not affect the valvular functionality in terms of orifice area during systole and complete closure during diastole. No influence on the extracellular matrix organization, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, nor on the mechanical properties was observed. These results show the potential of combining tissue engineering and minimally invasive implantation technology to obtain a living heart valve with a simple and robust tubular design for transcatheter delivery. The effect

  15. Tissue-Engineered Heart Valve with a Tubular Leaflet Design for Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Ricardo; Velz, Thaddaeus; Alves, Nuno; Gesche, Valentine N.; Malischewski, Axel; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Frese, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter aortic valve implantation of (nonviable) bioprosthetic valves has been proven a valid alternative to conventional surgical implantation in patients at high or prohibitive mortality risk. In this study we present the in vitro proof-of-principle of a newly developed tissue-engineered heart valve for minimally invasive implantation, with the ultimate aim of adding the unique advantages of a living tissue with regeneration capabilities to the continuously developing transcatheter technologies. The tube-in-stent is a fibrin-based tissue-engineered valve with a tubular leaflet design. It consists of a tubular construct sewn into a self-expandable nitinol stent at three commissural attachment points and along a circumferential line so that it forms three coaptating leaflets by collapsing under diastolic back pressure. The tubular constructs were molded with fibrin and human umbilical vein cells. After 3 weeks of conditioning in a bioreactor, the valves were fully functional with unobstructed opening (systolic phase) and complete closure (diastolic phase). Tissue analysis showed a homogeneous cell distribution throughout the valve's thickness and deposition of collagen types I and III oriented along the longitudinal direction. Immunohistochemical staining against CD31 and scanning electron microscopy revealed a confluent endothelial cell layer on the surface of the valves. After harvesting, the valves underwent crimping for 20 min to simulate the catheter-based delivery. This procedure did not affect the valvular functionality in terms of orifice area during systole and complete closure during diastole. No influence on the extracellular matrix organization, as assessed by immunohistochemistry, nor on the mechanical properties was observed. These results show the potential of combining tissue engineering and minimally invasive implantation technology to obtain a living heart valve with a simple and robust tubular design for transcatheter delivery. The effect

  16. Functionalized expanded porphyrins

    DOEpatents

    Sessler, Jonathan L; Pantos, Patricia J

    2013-11-12

    Disclosed are functionalized expanded porphyrins that can be used as spectrometric sensors for high-valent actinide cations. The disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins have the advantage over unfunctionalized systems in that they can be immobilized via covalent attachment to a solid support comprising an inorganic or organic polymer or other common substrates. Substrates comprising the disclosed functionalized expanded porphyrins are also disclosed. Further, disclosed are methods of making the disclosed compounds (immobilized and free), methods of using them as sensors to detect high valent actinides, devices that comprise the disclosed compounds, and kits.

  17. Inductor Hardening for Magnetic-Pulse Treatment of Tubular Parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurlaeyv, N. V.; Bobin, K. N.; Ryngach, N. A.; Rakhmyanov, A. Kh.

    2016-04-01

    This paper focuses on the issues of modernization of standardized inductor construction for crimping tubular parts by the pulse electromagnetic field with the aim of increasing reliability of technique and its durability. There is given the description of the pilot model of the composite inductor for crimping tubular parts, as well as the results obtained during its test operation.

  18. 75 FR 3248 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From China

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... the notice in the Federal Register of September 30, 2009 (74 FR 50242). The hearing was held in... COMMISSION Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From China Determination On the basis of the record \\1... oil country tubular goods (``OCTG''), primarily provided for in subheadings 7304.29, 7305.20, and...

  19. Renal tubular acidosis due to the milk-alkali syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rochman, J; Better, O S; Winaver, J; Chaimowitz, C; Barzilai, A; Jacobs, R

    1977-06-01

    A 60-year-old man with a history of excessive ingestion of calcium carbonate presented with azotemia, hypercalcemia and hyperphosphatemia. His acid-base status was initially normal. Following the cessation of calcium carbonate treatment, the hypercalcemia and azotemia disappeared, and the patient was found to be in metabolic acidosis with blunted acid excretion and a urine pH of 6.1. Kidney biopsy showed focal tubular calcification; the tubular damage was apparently caused by hypercalcemia and had resulted in renal tubular acidosis. During the three months of observation since that time there has been a tendecy for spontaneous remission of the renal tubular acidosis. Impaired renal hydrogen ion excretion prevented the development of metabolic alkalosis despite ingestion of alkali initially, and was later responsible for the metabolic acidosis. Renal tubular acidosis occurring as a sequel to the milk-alkali syndrome may aggravate the danger of nephrocalcinosis in this syndrome. PMID:885714

  20. Renal tubular secretion of glutathione (GSH)

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, R.D.; Curthoys, N.P.

    1986-05-01

    The rapid turnover of renal GSH may require its secretion into the tubular lumen. Renal clearance of plasma GSH was measured in rats anesthetized with Inactin and infused with (/sup 3/H)inulin. Renal ..gamma..-glutamyltranspeptidase (..gamma..GT) was then inactivated (> 97%) by infusion of acivicin and samples were collected for 6-7 h. By 4.5 h arterial and urinary GSH increased from 5..mu..M and 1.3 n mol/h to 23 ..mu..M and 2400-7000 nmol/h, respectively. The ratio of urinary GSH to filtered load increased from < 0.01 to 0.7-2.6. When renal GSH was decreased to 30% of normal by pretreating rats with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), the subsequent inactivation of ..gamma..GT caused only a slight increase in arterial GSH and urinary GSH increased to only 400-600 nmol/h (60-70% of filtered load). The amount of GSH filtered by the kidney was reduced by initially treating a rat with acivicin and 3 h later infusing purified ..gamma..GT (0.2 mg/h) to degrade plasma GSH. Just before infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH was 23 ..mu..M and urinary GSH was equal to 90% of the filtered load. At 1 h after infusion of ..gamma..GT, arterial GSH decreased to 0.3 ..mu..M, whereas urinary GSH remained elevated (1200-1800 nmol/h) and now equalled 10-20 times the filtered load. When similar experiments were carried out in BSO treated rats, maximal urinary GSH was reduced to 200 nmol/h, a value that was still 10 times the filtered load. Therefore, secreted GSH constitutes a significant portion of the GSH that is normally catabolized within the tubular lumen.

  1. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, A. Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-30

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  2. Silicon microfabricated beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, A.; Ibrahim, M. N.; Hamzah, I. H.; Sulaiman, A. A.; Ain, M. F.

    2015-03-01

    The feasibility design and development methods of silicon microfabricated beam expander are described. Silicon bulk micromachining fabrication technology is used in producing features of the structure. A high-precision complex 3-D shape of the expander can be formed by exploiting the predictable anisotropic wet etching characteristics of single-crystal silicon in aqueous Potassium-Hydroxide (KOH) solution. The beam-expander consist of two elements, a micromachined silicon reflector chamber and micro-Fresnel zone plate. The micro-Fresnel element is patterned using lithographic methods. The reflector chamber element has a depth of 40 µm, a diameter of 15 mm and gold-coated surfaces. The impact on the depth, diameter of the chamber and absorption for improved performance are discussed.

  3. The determinants of transverse tubular volume in resting skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Jingwei; Fraser, James A

    2014-01-01

    The transverse tubular (t)-system of skeletal muscle couples sarcolemmal electrical excitation with contraction deep within the fibre. Exercise, pathology and the composition of the extracellular fluid (ECF) can alter t-system volume (t-volume). T-volume changes are thought to contribute to fatigue, rhabdomyolysis and disruption of excitation–contraction coupling. However, mechanisms that underlie t-volume changes are poorly understood. A multicompartment, history-independent computer model of rat skeletal muscle was developed to define the minimum conditions for t-volume stability. It was found that the t-system tends to swell due to net ionic fluxes from the ECF across the access resistance. However, a stable t-volume is possible when this is offset by a net efflux from the t-system to the cell and thence to the ECF, forming a net ion cycle ECF→t-system→sarcoplasm→ECF that ultimately depends on Na+/K+-ATPase activity. Membrane properties that maximize this circuit flux decrease t-volume, including PNa(t) > PNa(s), PK(t) < PK(s) and N(t) < N(s) [P, permeability; N, Na+/K+-ATPase density; (t), t-system membrane; (s), sarcolemma]. Hydrostatic pressures, fixed charges and/or osmoles in the t-system can influence the magnitude of t-volume changes that result from alterations in this circuit flux. Using a parameter set derived from literature values where possible, this novel theory of t-volume was tested against data from previous experiments where t-volume was measured during manipulations of ECF composition. Predicted t-volume changes correlated satisfactorily. The present work provides a robust, unifying theoretical framework for understanding the determinants of t-volume. PMID:25384782

  4. The Dynamical Evolution of A Tubular Leonid Persistent Train

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Plane, John M. C.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The dynamical evolution of the persistent train of a bright Leonid meteor was examined for evidence of the source of the luminosity and the physical conditions in the meteor path. The train consisted of two parallel somewhat diffuse luminous tracks, interpreted as the walls of a tube. A general lack of wind shear along the trail allowed these structures to remain intact for nearly 200 s, from which it was possible to determine that the tubular structure expanded at a near constant 10.5 m/s, independent of altitude between 86 and 97 km. An initial fast decrease of train intensity below 90 km was followed by an increase in intensity and then a gradual decrease at longer times, whereas at high attitudes the integrated intensity was nearly constant with time. These results are compared to a model that describes the dynamical evolution of the train by diffusion, following an initial rapid expansion of the hot gaseous trail behind the meteoroid. The train luminosity is produced by O ((sup 1)S) emission at 557 nm, driven by elevated atomic O levels produced by the meteor impact, as well as chemiluminescent reactions of the ablated metals Na and Fe with O3. Ozone is rapidly removed within the train, both by thermal decomposition and catalytic destruction by the metallic species. Hence, the brightest emission occurs at the edge of the train between outwardly diffusing metallic species and inwardly diffusing O3. Although the model is able to account plausibly for a number of characteristic features of the train evolution, significant discrepancies remain that cannot easily be resolved.

  5. The Dynamical Evolution of a Tubular Leonid Persistent Train

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenniskens, Peter; Nugent, David; Plane, John M. C.

    The dynamical evolution of the persistent train of a bright Leonid meteor was examined for evidence of the source of the luminosity and the physical conditions in the meteor path. The train consisted of two parallel somewhat diffuse luminous tracks, interpreted as the walls of a tube. A general lack of wind shear along the trail allowed these structures to remain intact for nearly 200 s, from which it was possible to determine that the tubular structure expanded at a near constant 10.5 ms^-1, independent of altitude between 86 and 97 km. An initial fast decrease of train intensity below 90 km was followed by an increase in intensity and then a gradual decrease at longer times, whereas at high altitudes the integrated intensity was nearly constant with time. These results are compared to a model that describes the dynamical evolution of the train by diffusion, following an initial rapid expansion of the hot gaseous trail behind the meteoroid. The train luminosity is produced by O (^1S) emission at 557 nm, driven by elevated atomic O levels produced by the meteor impact, as well as chemiluminescent reactions of the ablated metals Na and Fe with O_3. Ozone is rapidly removed within the train, both by thermal decomposition and catalytic destruction by the metallic species. Hence, the brightest emission occurs at the edge of the train between outwardly diffusing metallic species and inwardly diffusing O_3. Although the model is able to account plausibly for a number of characteristic features of the train evolution, significant discrepancies remain that cannot casily be resolved.

  6. Tubular optical microcavities of indefinite medium for sensitive liquid refractometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shiwei; Fang, Yangfu; Liu, Zhaowei; Zhou, Lei; Mei, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Optical microcavities enable circulated light to intensively interact with a detecting liquid, thus promising high sensitivity in fluidic refractometers. Based on Mie scattering theory, we propose a tubular metamaterial device for liquid sensing, which utilizes anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion called indefinite media (IM). Besides traditional whispering gallery modes (WGMs), such tubular cavities can support surface plasmon polariton (SPP) WGMs, enabling high sensitivity liquid detection. Three configurations of such metamaterial tubes for sensing are discussed: tube-in-liquid, hollow-tube-in-liquid and liquid-in-tube; these are analyzed using numerical formulas and compared with dielectric and metal materials. Compared with traditional dielectric media (DM), the IM tubular cavity exhibits a higher sensitivity (S), which is close to that of a metal tubular cavity. However, compared with metal media, such an IM cavity can achieve higher quality (Q) factors similar to the DM tubular cavity. Therefore, the IM tubular cavity can offer the highest figures of merit (QS) for the sensing performance among the three types of materials. Our results suggest a novel tubular optofluidic device based on metamaterials, which could be useful for liquid refractometers. PMID:26605851

  7. [Advantages of fixed combinations].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2008-07-01

    Fixed combinations are indicated in the treatment of glaucoma and ocular hypertension when monotherapy does not sufficiently reduce IOP. Fixed combinations show better efficacy than the instillation of each separate component and are at least equivalent to the administration of both components in a separate association. They simplify treatment, increase compliance and quality of life, and decrease exposure to preservatives. Although they are less aggressive for patients when a new drug needs to be added, the use of fixed combinations should not decrease the follow-up. PMID:18957922

  8. [Tubular involvement in glomerular diseases of the kidney (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lubee, G; Balzar, E

    1977-01-21

    An attempt is made in this study to provide an answer to the question whether glomerular diseases are accompanied by tubular disorders. The urinary lysozyme activity was determined by means of a turbidimetric assay method in 10 healthy children as controls, 10 patients with glomerulonephritis, 8 patients with Alport's syndrome (hereditary glomerulonephritis with deafness) and 12 children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome. In most of the cases a significant increase in urinary lysozyme excretion, indicative of tubular damage, was found and this finding correlates well with the tubular morphology of the patients. PMID:320767

  9. Expanded Roles for HRD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on expanded roles for human resource development (HRD). "The Roles of Consultants in Gainsharing Firms: Empirical Results" (Eunsang Cho, Gary N. McLean) reports findings that consultants are moderately involved at the separation, preparation, evaluation, and design stages and have low…

  10. EXPANDED BED BIOLOGICAL TREATMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-year pilot-scale research investigation at the EPA Lebanon Pilot Plant was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of a unique biological secondary treatment process, designated the Expanded Bed Biological Treatment Process (EBBT). The EBBT process is a three-phase (oxygen/...

  11. ExpandED Options: Learning beyond High School Walls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ExpandED Schools, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Through ExpandED Options by TASC, New York City high school students get academic credit for learning career-related skills that lead to paid summer jobs. Too many high school students--including those most likely to drop out--are bored or see classroom learning as irrelevant. ExpandED Options students live the connection between mastering new…

  12. The cardiac surgery-associated neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (CSA-NGAL) score: A potential tool to monitor acute tubular damage.

    PubMed

    de Geus, Hilde R H; Ronco, Claudio; Haase, Michael; Jacob, Laurent; Lewington, Andrew; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI), defined as a rise in serum creatinine (functional AKI), is a frequent complication after cardiac surgery. The expression pattern of acute tubular damage biomarkers such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) has been shown to precede functional AKI and, therefore, may be useful to identify very early tubular damage. The term subclinical AKI represents acute tubular damage in the absence of functional AKI (biomarker positivity without a rise in serum creatinine) and affects hard outcome measures. This potentiates an tubular-damage-based identification of renal injury, which may guide clinical management, allowing for very early preventive-protective strategies. The aim of this paper was to review the current available evidence on NGAL applicability in adult cardiac surgery patients and combine this knowledge with the expert consensus of the authors to generate an NGAL based tubular damage score: The cardiac surgery-associated NGAL Score (CSA-NGAL score). The CSA-NGAL score might be the tool needed to improve awareness and enable interventions to possibly modify these detrimental outcomes. In boldly doing so, it is intended to introduce a different approach in study designs, which will undoubtedly expand our knowledge and will hopefully move the AKI biomarker field forward. PMID:26952930

  13. Radially composite piezoelectric ceramic tubular transducer in radial vibration.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin; Shuaijun, Wang

    2011-11-01

    The radially composite piezoelectric tubular transducer is studied. It is composed of radially poled piezoelectric and a long metal tube. The electro-mechanical equivalent circuit of the radially poled piezoelectric and metal tube in radial vibration is obtained. Based on the force and velocity boundary conditions, the six-port electro-mechanical equivalent circuit for the composite tubular transducer is given and the resonance/anti-resonance frequency equations are obtained. The relationship between the resonance frequency and the dimensions is analyzed. Numerically simulated results obtained by the finite element method are compared with those from the analytical method. Composite piezoelectric tubular transducers are designed and manufactured. The resonance/anti-resonance frequencies are measured, and it is shown that the theoretical results are in good agreement with the simulated and experimental results. It is expected that radially composite piezoelectric tubular transducers can be used as high-power ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic applications, such as ultrasonic liquid processing. PMID:22083782

  14. Distal Renal Tubular Acidosis in Infancy: A Bicarbonate Wasting State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Soriano, J.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Studied were three unrelated infants with distal renal tubular acidosis (a condition characterized by an inability to acidify the urine to minimal pH levels resulting in the loss of bicarbonates). (DB)

  15. Genetics Home Reference: renal tubular acidosis with deafness

    MedlinePlus

    ... a disorder characterized by kidney (renal) problems and hearing loss. The kidneys normally filter fluid and waste products ... In people with renal tubular acidosis with deafness , hearing loss caused by changes in the inner ear (sensorineural ...

  16. Autophagy and Tubular Cell Death in the Kidney.

    PubMed

    Havasi, Andrea; Dong, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    Many common renal insults such as ischemia and toxic injury primarily target the tubular epithelial cells, especially the highly metabolically active proximal tubular segment. Tubular epithelial cells are particularly dependent on autophagy to maintain homeostasis and respond to stressors. The pattern of autophagy in the kidney has a unique spatial and chronologic signature. Recent evidence has shown that there is complex cross-talk between autophagy and various cell death pathways. This review specifically discusses the interplay between autophagy and cell death in the renal tubular epithelia. It is imperative to review this topic because recent discoveries have improved our mechanistic understanding of the autophagic process and have highlighted its broad clinical applications, making autophagy a major target for drug development. PMID:27339383

  17. Atypical presentation of distal renal tubular acidosis in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Tasic, Velibor; Korneti, Petar; Gucev, Zoran; Hoppe, Bernd; Blau, Nenad; Cheong, Hae Il

    2008-07-01

    Primary distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA) is an inherited disease characterized by the inability of the distal tubule to lower urine pH <5.50 during systemic acidosis. We report two male siblings who presented with severe hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis, high urinary pH, nephrocalcinosis, growth retardation, sensorineural hearing loss, and hypokalemic paralysis. Laboratory investigations revealed proximal tubular dysfunction (low molecular weight proteinuria, generalized hyperaminoaciduria, hypophosphatemia with hyperphosphaturia, and hypouricemia with hyperuricosuria). There was significant hyperoxaluria and laboratory evidence for mild rhabdomyolysis. Under potassium and alkali therapy, proximal tubular abnormalities, muscular enzymes, and oxaluria normalized. A homozygous mutation in the ATP6V1B1 gene, which is responsible for dRTA with early hearing loss, was detected in both siblings. In conclusion, proximal tubular dysfunction and hyperoxaluria may be found in children with dRTA and are reversible under appropriate therapy. PMID:18386070

  18. Development of an alternating flat to tubular Kevlar parachute tape

    SciTech Connect

    Ericksen, R.H.; Koch, R.

    1989-01-01

    An alternating flat to tubular Kevlar tape was developed to replace braided suspension lines and woven tape radials on the new crew escape module parachute system for the F-111 aircraft. Weaves were developed which had high strength efficiency and low weight throughout the flat, tubular, and transition sections. A tubular section strength of 535 lbs at a weight of 0.044 oz/yd was achieved. This reduces suspension line weight by 8% compared with that of the most efficient braid which has a strength of 470 lbs and weighs 0.048 oz/yd. Length measuring procedures for production control and inspection were developed. Using these procedures it was possible to produce alternating weave fabric with less than 1% variation in length in the tubular sections. 3 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Numerical Observation of a Tubular Phase in Anisotropic Membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowick, M.; Falcioni, M.; Thorleifsson, G.

    1997-08-01

    We provide the first numerical evidence for the existence of a tubular phase, predicted by Radzihovsky and Toner (RT), for anisotropic tethered membranes without self-avoidance. Incorporating anisotropy into the bending rigidity of a simple model of a tethered membrane with free boundary conditions, we show that the model indeed has two phase transitions corresponding to the flat-to-tubular and tubular-to-crumpled transitions. For the tubular phase we measure the Flory exponent {nu}{sub F} and the roughness exponent {zeta} . We find {nu}{sub F}=0.305(14) and {zeta}=0.895(60) , which are in reasonable agreement with the theoretical predictions of RT; {nu}{sub F}=1/4 and {zeta}=1 . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. Renal tubular vasopressin receptors downregulated by dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I. )

    1988-03-01

    Receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) were characterized in tubular epithelial basolateral membranes (BL membranes) prepared from the kidneys of male Spraque-Dawley rats. Association of ({sup 3}H)AVP was rapid, reversible, and specific. Saturation studies revealed a single class of saturable binding sites with a maximal binding (B{sub max}) of 184 {plus minus} 15 fmol/mg protein. The V{sub 2} receptor antagonist was more than 3,700 times as effective in displacing ({sup 3}H)AVP than was the V{sub 1} antagonist. To investigate the physiological regulation of vasopressin receptors, the effects of elevated levels of circulating AVP on receptor characteristics were studied. Seventy-two-hour water deprivation significantly elevated plasma osmolality and caused an 11.5-fold increase in plasma (AVP). Scatchard analysis revealed a 38% decreased in the number of AVP receptors on the BL membranes from dehydrated animals. The high-affinity binding sites on the BL membranes fit the pharmacological profile for adenylate cyclase-linked vasopressin receptors (V{sub 2}), which mediate the antidiuretic action of the hormone. The authors conclude that physiologically elevated levels of AVP can downregulate vasopressin receptors in the kidney.

  1. Developments in open tubular liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, J.D.; Maskarinec, M.P.; Sepaniak, M.J.

    1984-04-01

    In this report the band broadening introduced by detection flow cell use in open tubular liquid chromatography (OTLC) was thoroughly examined. Serious loss of chromatographic efficiency and resolution can occur if the flow cell size is not properly matched with the ID of the column. Detection in a flow cell was shown to be more sensitive than on-column detection, but at the expense of some loss in chromatographic efficiency. The use of fluorescence as a sensitive detection method for OTLC was presented in detail. The application of the laser as excitation source was developed. The laser based fluorometric system proved to be a sensitive detection method which was relatively easy to operate and optimize. This system allowed on-column detection to be used. An electro-etching procedure for borosilicate glass developed by Jorgenson and Guthrie was modified such that longer columns could be effectively etched. It was shown that the acidification of the etched glass surface significantly increased capacity factor (k') values for bonded phase columns. Soda-lime glass was shown to be the most suitable material for column fabrication. Complex natural samples were separated by OTLC. The alkyl phenol compounds in a coal-derived liquid were separated and tentatively identified. A chromatographic separation of a derivatized sample of coal oil bases is also presented.

  2. Inflatable Tubular Structures Rigidized with Foams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.; Schnell, Andrew R.

    2010-01-01

    Inflatable tubular structures that have annular cross sections rigidized with foams, and the means of erecting such structures in the field, are undergoing development. Although the development effort has focused on lightweight structural booms to be transported in compact form and deployed in outer space, the principles of design and fabrication are also potentially applicable to terrestrial structures, including components of ultralightweight aircraft, lightweight storage buildings and shelters, lightweight insulation, and sales displays. The use of foams to deploy and harden inflatable structures was first proposed as early as the 1960s, and has been investigated in recent years by NASA, the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, industry, and academia. In cases of deployable booms, most of the investigation in recent years has focused on solid cross sections, because they can be constructed relatively easily. However, solid-section foam-filled booms can be much too heavy for some applications. In contrast, booms with annular cross sections according to the present innovation can be tailored to obtain desired combinations of stiffness and weight through choice of diameters, wall thicknesses, and foam densities. By far the most compelling advantage afforded by this innovation is the possibility of drastically reducing weights while retaining or increasing the stiffnesses, relative to comparable booms that have solid foamfilled cross sections. A typical boom according to this innovation includes inner and outer polyimide film sleeves to contain foam that is injected between them during deployment.

  3. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 10(13) W/cm(2) has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  4. Pressure driven flow in porous tubular membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilton, Nils; Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard

    2011-11-01

    We consider the steady laminar flow of a Newtonian incompressible fluid in a porous tubular membrane with pressure-driven transmembrane flow. Due to its fundamental importance to membrane filtration systems, this flow has been studied extensively both analytically and numerically, yet a robust analytic solution has not been found. The problem is challenging due to the coupling between the transmembrane pressure and velocity with the simultaneous coupling between the axial pressure gradient and the axial velocity. We present a robust analytical solution which incorporates Darcy's law on the membrane surface. The solution is in the form of an asymptotic expansion about a small parameter related to the membrane permeability. We verify the analytical solution with comparison to 2-D spectral direct numerical simulations of ultrafiltration and microfiltration systems with typical operating conditions, as well as extreme cases of cross-flow reversal and axial flow exhaustion. In all cases, the agreement between the analytical and numerical results is excellent. Finally, we use the analytical and numerical results to provide guidelines about when common simplifying assumptions about the permeate flow may be made. Specifically, the assumptions of a parabolic axial velocity profile and uniform transmembrane velocity are valid only for small permeabilities.

  5. Cytocompatibility of a silk fibroin tubular scaffold.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiannan; Wei, Yali; Yi, Honggen; Liu, Zhiwu; Sun, Dan; Zhao, Huanrong

    2014-01-01

    Regenerated silk fibroin (SF) materials are increasingly used for tissue engineering applications. In order to explore the feasibility of a novel biomimetic silk fibroin tubular scaffold (SFTS) crosslinked by poly(ethylene glycol) diglycidyl ether (PEG-DE), biocompatibility with cells was evaluated. The novel biomimetic design of the SFTS consisted of three distinct layers: a regenerated SF intima, a silk braided media and a regenerated SF adventitia. The SFTS exhibited even silk fibroin penetration throughout the braid, forming a porous layered tube with superior mechanical, permeable and cell adhesion properties that are beneficial to vascular regeneration. Cytotoxicity and cell compatibility were tested on L929 cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (EA.hy926). DNA content analysis, scanning electron and confocal microscopies and MTT assay showed no inhibitory effects on DNA replication. Cell morphology, viability and proliferation were good for L929 cells, and satisfactory for EA.hy926 cells. Furthermore, the suture retention strength of the SFTS was about 23N and the Young's modulus was 0.2-0.3MPa. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PEG-DE crosslinked SFTS possesses the appropriate cytocompatibility and mechanical properties for use as vascular scaffolds as an alternative to vascular autografts. PMID:24268279

  6. Tubular filamentation for laser material processing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chen; Jukna, Vytautas; Milián, Carles; Giust, Remo; Ouadghiri-Idrissi, Ismail; Itina, Tatiana; Dudley, John M.; Couairon, Arnaud; Courvoisier, Francois

    2015-01-01

    An open challenge in the important field of femtosecond laser material processing is the controlled internal structuring of dielectric materials. Although the availability of high energy high repetition rate femtosecond lasers has led to many advances in this field, writing structures within transparent dielectrics at intensities exceeding 1013 W/cm2 has remained difficult as it is associated with significant nonlinear spatial distortion. This letter reports the existence of a new propagation regime for femtosecond pulses at high power that overcomes this challenge, associated with the generation of a hollow uniform and intense light tube that remains propagation invariant even at intensities associated with dense plasma formation. This regime is seeded from higher order nondiffracting Bessel beams, which carry an optical vortex charge. Numerical simulations are quantitatively confirmed by experiments where a novel experimental approach allows direct imaging of the 3D fluence distribution within transparent solids. We also analyze the transitions to other propagation regimes in near and far fields. We demonstrate how the generation of plasma in this tubular geometry can lead to applications in ultrafast laser material processing in terms of single shot index writing, and discuss how it opens important perspectives for material compression and filamentation guiding in atmosphere. PMID:25753215

  7. Cadmium, metallothionein and renal tubular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, M; Jin, T; Nordberg, G F

    1992-01-01

    Cadmium-induced nephrotoxicity develops at cadmium concentrations in the renal cortex of 10-300 micrograms/g wet weight. The actual concentration at which it develops depends on a number of factors, e.g., exposure route, chemical species of cadmium administered, rate of administration and simultaneous exposure to other metals. The role of these factors can be explained by a mechanism of cadmium nephrotoxicity in which both extracellular and intracellular metallothionein binding play an essential role. In reindeer used for human food, cadmium was shown to be bound to metallothionein-like proteins. If cadmium bound to such proteins enters the blood plasma via the gastrointestinal tract, this is of special toxicological significance. Metallothionein-bound cadmium in the plasma of experimental animals is efficiently transported to the kidney. Tubular dysfunction in the kidney following a normally tubulotoxic dose of cadmium bound to metallothionein was prevented by preinduction of metallothionein synthesis by small non-toxic doses of cadmium. PMID:1303954

  8. Discovering the Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaumer, Harry; Bieri, Lydia; Sandage, Foreword by Allan

    2009-03-01

    Acknowledgments; Foreword; 1. Introduction; 2. Cosmological concepts at the end of the Middle Ages; 3. Nebulae as a new astronomical phenomenon; 4. On the construction of the Heavens; 5. Island universes turn into astronomical facts: a universe of galaxies; 6. The early cosmology of Einstein and de Sitter; 7. The dynamical universe of Friedmann; 8. Redshifts: how to reconcile Slipher and de Sitter?; 9. Lemaître discovers the expanding universe; 10. Hubble's contribution of 1929; 11. The breakthrough for the expanding universe; 12. Hubble's anger about de Sitter; 13. Robertson and Tolman join the game; 14. The Einstein-de Sitter universe; 15. Are Sun and Earth older than the universe?; 16. In search of alternative tracks; 17. The seed for the Big Bang; 18. Summary and Postscript; Appendix; References; Index.

  9. Expandable LED array interconnect

    DOEpatents

    Yuan, Thomas Cheng-Hsin; Keller, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    A light emitting device that can function as an array element in an expandable array of such devices. The light emitting device comprises a substrate that has a top surface and a plurality of edges. Input and output terminals are mounted to the top surface of the substrate. Both terminals comprise a plurality of contact pads disposed proximate to the edges of the substrate, allowing for easy access to both terminals from multiple edges of the substrate. A lighting element is mounted to the top surface of the substrate. The lighting element is connected between the input and output terminals. The contact pads provide multiple access points to the terminals which allow for greater flexibility in design when the devices are used as array elements in an expandable array.

  10. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  11. Electrolyte composition of renal tubular cells in gentamicin nephrotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, O.; Beck, F.X.; Doerge, A.T.; Thurau, K.

    1988-06-01

    The effect of long-term gentamicin administration on sodium, potassium, chloride and phosphorus concentrations was studied in individual rat renal tubular cells using electron microprobe analysis. Histological damage was apparent only in proximal tubular cells. The extent of damage was only mild after 7 days of gentamicin administration (60 mg/kg body wt/day) but much more pronounced after 10 days. GFR showed a progressive decline during gentamicin treatment. In non-necrotic proximal tubular cells, sodium was increased from 14.6 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SEM) in controls to 20.6 +/- 0.4 after 7 and 22.0 +/- 0.8 mmol/kg wet wt after 10 days of gentamicin administration. Chloride concentration was higher only after 10 days (20.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 17.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/kg wet wt). Both cell potassium and phosphorus concentrations were diminished by 6 and 15, and by 8 and 25 mmol/kg wet wt after 7 and 10 days of treatment, respectively. In contrast, no major alterations in distal tubular cell electrolyte concentrations could be observed after either 7 or 10 days of gentamicin administration. As in proximal tubular cells, distal tubular cell phosphorus concentrations were, however, lowered by gentamicin treatment. These results clearly indicate that gentamicin exerts its main effect on proximal tubular cells. Decreased potassium and increased sodium and chloride concentrations were observed in proximal tubular cells exhibiting only mild histological damage prior to the onset of advanced tissue injury. Necrotic cells, on the other hand, showed widely variable intracellular electrolyte concentration patterns.

  12. Straightening tubular flow for side-by-side visualization.

    PubMed

    Angelelli, Paolo; Hauser, Helwig

    2011-12-01

    Flows through tubular structures are common in many fields, including blood flow in medicine and tubular fluid flows in engineering. The analysis of such flows is often done with a strong reference to the main flow direction along the tubular boundary. In this paper we present an approach for straightening the visualization of tubular flow. By aligning the main reference direction of the flow, i.e., the center line of the bounding tubular structure, with one axis of the screen, we are able to natively juxtapose (1.) different visualizations of the same flow, either utilizing different flow visualization techniques, or by varying parameters of a chosen approach such as the choice of seeding locations for integration-based flow visualization, (2.) the different time steps of a time-dependent flow, (3.) different projections around the center line , and (4.) quantitative flow visualizations in immediate spatial relation to the more qualitative classical flow visualization. We describe how to utilize this approach for an informative interactive visual analysis. We demonstrate the potential of our approach by visualizing two datasets from two different fields: an arterial blood flow measurement and a tubular gas flow simulation from the automotive industry. PMID:22034324

  13. Effects of cytokines on potassium channels in renal tubular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Komagiri, You; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2012-02-01

    Renal tubular potassium (K(+)) channels play important roles in the formation of cell-negative potential, K(+) recycling, K(+) secretion, and cell volume regulation. In addition to these physiological roles, it was reported that changes in the activity of renal tubular K(+) channels were involved in exacerbation of renal cell injury during ischemia and endotoxemia. Because ischemia and endotoxemia stimulate production of cytokines in immune cells and renal tubular cells, it is possible that cytokines would affect K(+) channel activity. Although the regulatory mechanisms of renal tubular K(+) channels have extensively been studied, little information is available about the effects of cytokines on these K(+) channels. The first report was that tumor necrosis factor acutely stimulated the single channel activity of the 70 pS K(+) channel in the rat thick ascending limb through activation of tyrosine phosphatase. Recently, it was also reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) modulated the activity of the 40 pS K(+) channel in cultured human proximal tubule cells. IFN-γ exhibited a delayed suppression and an acute stimulation of K(+) channel activity, whereas IL-1β acutely suppressed the channel activity. Furthermore, these cytokines suppressed gene expression of the renal outer medullary potassium channel. The renal tubular K(+) channels are functionally coupled to the coexisting transporters. Therefore, the effects of cytokines on renal tubular transporter activity should also be taken into account, when interpreting their effects on K(+) channel activity. PMID:22042037

  14. Structural Design Considerations for Tubular Power Tower Receivers Operating at 650 Degrees C: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neises, T. W.; Wagner, M. J.; Gray, A. K.

    2014-04-01

    Research of advanced power cycles has shown supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles may have thermal efficiency benefits relative to steam cycles at temperatures around 500 - 700 degrees C. To realize these benefits for CSP, it is necessary to increase the maximum outlet temperature of current tower designs. Research at NREL is investigating a concept that uses high-pressure supercritical carbon dioxide as the heat transfer fluid to achieve a 650 degrees C receiver outlet temperature. At these operating conditions, creep becomes an important factor in the design of a tubular receiver and contemporary design assumptions for both solar and traditional boiler applications must be revisited and revised. This paper discusses lessons learned for high-pressure, high-temperature tubular receiver design. An analysis of a simplified receiver tube is discussed, and the results show the limiting stress mechanisms in the tube and the impact on the maximum allowable flux as design parameters vary. Results of this preliminary analysis indicate an underlying trade-off between tube thickness and the maximum allowable flux on the tube. Future work will expand the scope of design variables considered and attempt to optimize the design based on cost and performance metrics.

  15. Structural studies of tubular discotic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindyuk, Oksana Yaroslavovna

    1999-11-01

    Discotic liquid crystals based on the rigid ring-shaped phenylacetylene macrocycle molecule (PAM) are of great interest due to their potential organization into supramolecular channels. We have used high resolution X-ray diffraction to study the structure of pure and doped PAM and to demonstrate that PAM forms a tubular columnar liquid crystal with an unexpected distortion and doubling of the underlying hexagonal lattice. We have doped PAM with different percentages of silver ions and determined that doping did not change peak positions on the powder diffraction data but significantly altered the intensity of the peaks. This implies that the silver ions were most likely intercalated within the channels formed by the PAM molecules, thus leaving the lattice parameters unaffected. We have also used grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and X-ray reflectivity to study Langmuir films of PAM. PAM adopts an "edge-on" molecular arrangement at the air-water interface. We will discuss the direct observation of the structural reorganization within macromolecular Langmuir films of disc-shaped ionophoric molecules arising from interactions with potassium and cesium ions in the subphase. The columnar order is disrupted by CsCl in the subphase and strongly enhanced by KCl in the subphase, thus effectively tailoring the structural properties of the Langmuir films for potential applications. We have also used X-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GID) to study Langmuir films of another macrocyclic ionophore: torand (tributyldodecahydrohexaazakekulene, "TBDK") molecules. TBDK is a rigid, triangular molecule; it has been investigated as a potential surface-active complexing agent. The system forms a stable monolayer at the air-water interface and exhibits two distinct structural phases at lower and higher pressures.

  16. Clinical profile of distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Jha, Ratan; Muthukrishnan, J; Shiradhonkar, Shekhar; Patro, Kiran; Harikumar, Kvs; Modi, K D

    2011-03-01

    To determine the clinical profile and progression of renal dysfunction in distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), we retrospectively studied 96 consecutive cases of dRTA diagnosed at our center. Patients with unexplained metabolic bone disease, short stature, hypokalemia, re-current renal stones, chronic obstructive uropathy or any primary autoimmune condition known to cause dRTA were screened. Distal RTA was diagnosed on the basis of systemic metabolic acidosis with urine pH >5.5 and positive urine anion gap. In those patients who had fasting urine pH >5.5 with normal baseline systemic pH and bicarbonate levels (incomplete RTA), acid load test with ammonium chloride was done. A cause of dRTA could be established in 53 (54%) patients. Urological defect in children (22/44) and autoimmune disease in adults (11/52) were the commonest causes. Hypokalemic paralysis, proximal muscle weakness and voiding difficulty were the common modes of presentation. Doubling of serum creatinine during the study period was noted in 13 out of 27 patients who had GFR <60 mL/min at presentation whereas in only one of the 70 with initial GFR >60 mL/min (P <0.005). In conclusion, urological disorders were the commonest cause of dRTA in children while autoimmune disorders were the commonest asso-ciation in adults. Worse baseline renal function, longer duration of disease and greater frequency of nephrolithiasis/nephrocalcinosis and urological disorders were noted in those who had wor-sening of renal dysfunction during the study period. PMID:21422623

  17. Fixing Dataset Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Three current search engines are queried for ozone data at the GES DISC. The results range from sub-optimal to counter-intuitive. We propose a method to fix dataset search by implementing a robust relevancy ranking scheme. The relevancy ranking scheme is based on several heuristics culled from more than 20 years of helping users select datasets.

  18. Future Fixed Target Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

    2009-01-01

    We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

  19. Anorexia nervosa, laxative abuse, hypopotassemia and distal renal tubular acidosis.

    PubMed

    Pines, A; Kaplinsky, N; Olchovsky, D; Frankl, O; Goldfarb, D; Iaina, A

    1985-01-01

    A case of anorexia nervosa in a 28-year-old woman with laxative abuse, hypopotassemia and severe metabolic acidosis, is described. The diagnosis of classical renal tubular acidosis, Type I, was confirmed by our inability to decrease urinary pH beyond 5.5 and to increase ammonia excretion during an ammonium chloride loading test. A bicarbonate loading test and normal plasma aldosterone with high renin activity excluded proximal renal tubular acidosis, hyporeninemic-hypoaldosteronemic renal tubular acidosis and Bartter's syndrome. The inability to increase ammonium excretion during severe metabolic acidosis following ammonium chloride loading did not favor the possibility of a transient physiological adaptation of ammoniagenesis at the tubular cell level, related to potassium depletion. Although mental disorder, laxative abuse, abstinence from food intake and severe potassium depletion intermingled in a vicious cycle, we assume that one of the following possibilities may explain the clinical presentation in our patient: either two separated and unrelated disorders, or laxative abuse as the cause of renal tubular acidification impairment. PMID:3972559

  20. Autophagy Induces Prosenescent Changes in Proximal Tubular S3 Segments.

    PubMed

    Baisantry, Arpita; Bhayana, Sagar; Rong, Song; Ermeling, Esther; Wrede, Christoph; Hegermann, Jan; Pennekamp, Petra; Sörensen-Zender, Inga; Haller, Hermann; Melk, Anette; Schmitt, Roland

    2016-06-01

    Evidence suggests that autophagy promotes the development of cellular senescence. Because cellular senescence contributes to renal aging and promotes the progression from AKI to CKD, we investigated the potential effect of tubular autophagy on senescence induction. Compared with kidneys from control mice, kidneys from mice with conditional deletion of autophagy-related 5 (Atg5) for selective ablation of autophagy in proximal tubular S3 segments (Atg5(Δ) (flox/) (Δ) (flox)) presented with significantly less tubular senescence, reduced interstitial fibrosis, and superior renal function 30 days after ischemia/reperfusion injury. To correlate this long-term outcome with differences in the early injury process, kidneys were analyzed 2 hours and 3 days after reperfusion. Notably, compared with kidneys of control mice, Atg5(Δ) (flox/) (Δ) (flox) kidneys showed more cell death in outer medullary S3 segments at 2 hours but less tubular damage and inflammation at day 3. These data suggest that the lack of autophagy prevents early survival mechanisms in severely damaged tubular cells. However, if such compromised cells persist, then they may lead to maladaptive repair and proinflammatory changes, thereby facilitating the development of a senescent phenotype and CKD. PMID:26487561

  1. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, Richard F.

    1983-01-01

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluidtight barrier. A counterrotation removes the barrier.

  2. Mechanically expandable annular seal

    DOEpatents

    Gilmore, R.F.

    1983-07-19

    A mechanically expandable annular reusable seal assembly to form an annular hermetic barrier between two stationary, parallel, and planar containment surfaces is described. A rotatable ring, attached to the first surface, has ring wedges resembling the saw-tooth array of a hole saw. Matching seal wedges are slidably attached to the ring wedges and have their motion restricted to be perpendicular to the second surface. Each seal wedge has a face parallel to the second surface. An annular elastomer seal has a central annular region attached to the seal wedges' parallel faces and has its inner and outer circumferences attached to the first surface. A rotation of the ring extends the elastomer seal's central region perpendicularly towards the second surface to create the fluid tight barrier. A counter rotation removes the barrier. 6 figs.

  3. Expanding hollow metal rings

    DOEpatents

    Peacock, Harold B.; Imrich, Kenneth J.

    2009-03-17

    A sealing device that may expand more planar dimensions due to internal thermal expansion of a filler material. The sealing material is of a composition such that when desired environment temperatures and internal actuating pressures are reached, the sealing materials undergoes a permanent deformation. For metallic compounds, this permanent deformation occurs when the material enters the plastic deformation phase. Polymers, and other materials, may be using a sealing mechanism depending on the temperatures and corrosivity of the use. Internal pressures are generated by either rapid thermal expansion or material phase change and may include either liquid or solid to gas phase change, or in the gaseous state with significant pressure generation in accordance with the gas laws. Sealing material thickness and material composition may be used to selectively control geometric expansion of the seal such that expansion is limited to a specific facing and or geometric plane.

  4. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  5. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2014-09-16

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of K-dimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. Furthermore, the persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  6. Open–closed switching of synthetic tubular pores

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yongju; Kang, Jiheong; Shen, Bowen; Wang, Yanqiu; He, Ying; Lee, Myongsoo

    2015-01-01

    While encouraging progress has been made on switchable nanopores to mimic biological channels and pores, it remains a great challenge to realize long tubular pores with a dynamic open–closed motion. Here we report μm-long, dynamic tubular pores that undergo rapid switching between open and closed states in response to a thermal signal in water. The tubular walls consist of laterally associated primary fibrils stacked from disc-shaped molecules in which the discs readily tilt by means of thermally regulated dehydration of the oligoether chains placed on the wall surfaces. Notably, this pore switching mediates a controlled water-pumping catalytic action for the dehydrative cyclization of adenosine monophosphate to produce metabolically active cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We believe that our work may allow the creation of a variety of dynamic pore structures with complex functions arising from open–closed motion. PMID:26456695

  7. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2014-09-16

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of K-dimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. Furthermore, themore » persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  8. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore » tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  9. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    SciTech Connect

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T.; Kuroishi, M.

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  10. Klinefelter's syndrome with renal tubular acidosis: impact on height.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, F; Paul, T V; Spurgeon, R; Abraham, S; Jacob, J J

    2010-02-01

    A 19-year-old Indian man presented with a history of proximal muscle weakness, knock knees and gynaecomastia. On examination he had features of rickets and bilateral small testes. Karyotyping revealed a chromosomal pattern of 47,XXX, confirming the diagnosis of Klinefelter's syndrome. He was also found to have hyperchloraemic metabolic acidosis with hypokalaemia, hypophosphataemia, phosphaturia and glycosuria, which favoured a diagnosis of proximal renal tubular acidosis. Patients with Klinefelter's syndrome typically have a tall stature due to androgen deficiency, resulting in unfused epiphyses and an additional X chromosome. However, this patient had a short stature due to associated proximal renal tubular acidosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second case of Klinefelter's syndrome with short stature due to associated renal tubular acidosis reported in the literature. This report highlights the need to consider other causes when patients with Klinefelter's syndrome present with a short stature. PMID:20358137

  11. Mechanisms of albumin uptake by proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N

    2001-01-01

    The likely role of albumin in the induction tubulo-interstitial injury in proteinuria has stimulated considerable interest in the entry of albumin into the proximal tubule and its subsequent uptake by proximal tubular cells. Currently, there is considerable controversy over the degree of glomerular permeability to albumin. After filtration, however, albumin binds to megalin and cubulin, two giant receptors in the apical membrane of proximal tubular cells. Albumin is subsequently re-absorbed by proximal tubular cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process subject to complex regulation. The interaction of albumin with proximal tubule cells also leads to the generation of intracellular signals. The understanding of these pathways may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of renal scarring in proteinuria. PMID:11158855

  12. Hot fire test results of subscale tubular combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced, subscale, tubular combustion chambers were built and test fired with hydrogen-oxygen propellants to assess the increase in fatigue life that can be obtained with this type of construction. Two chambers were tested: one ran for 637 cycles without failing, compared to a predicted life of 200 cycles for a comparable smooth-wall milled-channel liner configuration. The other chamber failed at 256 cycles, compared to a predicted life of 118 cycles for a comparable smooth-wall milled-channel liner configuration. Posttest metallographic analysis determined that the strain-relieving design (structural compliance) of the tubular configuration was the cause of this increase in life.

  13. Expander chunked codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Yang, Shenghao; Ye, Baoliu; Yin, Yitong; Lu, Sanglu

    2015-12-01

    Chunked codes are efficient random linear network coding (RLNC) schemes with low computational cost, where the input packets are encoded into small chunks (i.e., subsets of the coded packets). During the network transmission, RLNC is performed within each chunk. In this paper, we first introduce a simple transfer matrix model to characterize the transmission of chunks and derive some basic properties of the model to facilitate the performance analysis. We then focus on the design of overlapped chunked codes, a class of chunked codes whose chunks are non-disjoint subsets of input packets, which are of special interest since they can be encoded with negligible computational cost and in a causal fashion. We propose expander chunked (EC) codes, the first class of overlapped chunked codes that have an analyzable performance, where the construction of the chunks makes use of regular graphs. Numerical and simulation results show that in some practical settings, EC codes can achieve rates within 91 to 97 % of the optimum and outperform the state-of-the-art overlapped chunked codes significantly.

  14. The Artful Universe Expanded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrow, John D.

    2005-07-01

    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe , Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in subtle and unexpected ways. Why do we like certain types of art or music? What games and puzzles do we find challenging? Why do so many myths and legends have common elements? In this eclectic and entertaining survey, Barrow answers these questions and more as he explains how the landscape of the Universe has influenced the development of philosophy and mythology, and how millions of years of evolutionary history have fashioned our attraction to certain patterns of sound and color. Barrow casts the story of human creativity and thought in a fascinating light, considering such diverse topics as our instinct for language, the origins and uses of color in nature, why we divide time into intervals as we do, the sources of our appreciation of landscape painting, and whether computer-generated fractal art is really art. Drawing on a wide variety of examples, from the theological questions raised by St. Augustine and C.S. Lewis to the relationship between the pure math of Pythagoras and the music of the Beatles, The Artful Universe Expanded covers new ground and enters a wide-ranging debate about the meaning and significance of the links between art and science.

  15. Fixed and Sunk Costs Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, X. Henry; Yang, Bill Z.

    2001-01-01

    Attempts to clarify the concepts of, and the link between, fixed costs and sunk costs. Argues that the root of confusion is the inconsistency in defining the term fixed costs. Consistently defines fixed and sunk costs, and describes how instructors must teach under these definitions. (RLH)

  16. Rapid magnetic cell delivery for large tubular bioengineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Molina, J; Riegler, J; Southern, P; Ortega, D; Frangos, C C; Angelopoulos, Y; Husain, S; Lythgoe, M F; Pankhurst, Q A; Day, R M

    2012-11-01

    Delivery of cells into tubular tissue constructs with large diameters poses significant spatial and temporal challenges. This study describes preliminary findings for a novel process for rapid and uniform seeding of cells onto the luminal surface of large tubular constructs. Fibroblasts, tagged with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION), were directed onto the luminal surface of tubular constructs by a magnetic field generated by a k4-type Halbach cylinder device. The spatial distribution of attached cells, as measured by the mean number of cells, was compared with a conventional, dynamic, rotational cell-delivery technique. Cell loading onto the constructs was measured by microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging. The different seeding techniques employed had a significant effect on the spatial distribution of the cells (p < 0.0001). The number of attached cells at defined positions within the same construct was significantly different for the dynamic rotation technique (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant differences in the number of cells attached to the luminal surface were found between the defined positions on the construct loaded with the Halbach cylinder. The technique described overcomes limitations associated with existing cell-delivery techniques and is amenable to a variety of tubular organs where rapid loading and uniform distribution of cells for therapeutic applications are required. PMID:22696487

  17. An Improved Design of a Simple Tubular Reactor Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asfour, Abdul-Fattah A.

    1985-01-01

    Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided for an experiment which: (1) examines the effect of residence time on conversion in a tubular flow reactor; and (2) compares the experimental conversions with those obtained from plug-flow and laminar-flow reactor models. (JN)

  18. Urinary Markers of Tubular Injury in Early Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Fiseha, Temesgen; Tamir, Zemenu

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common and serious complication of diabetes associated with adverse outcomes of renal failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. Early and accurate identification of DN is therefore of critical importance to improve patient outcomes. Albuminuria, a marker of glomerular involvement in early renal damage, cannot always detect early DN. Thus, more sensitive and specific markers in addition to albuminuria are needed to predict the early onset and progression of DN. Tubular injury, as shown by the detection of tubular injury markers in the urine, is a critical component of the early course of DN. These urinary tubular markers may increase in diabetic patients, even before diagnosis of microalbuminuria representing early markers of normoalbuminuric DN. In this review we summarized some new and important urinary markers of tubular injury, such as neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), alpha-1 microglobulin (A1M), beta 2-microglobulin (B2-M), and retinol binding protein (RBP) associated with early DN. PMID:27293888

  19. Urinary Markers of Tubular Injury in Early Diabetic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Fiseha, Temesgen; Tamir, Zemenu

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a common and serious complication of diabetes associated with adverse outcomes of renal failure, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality. Early and accurate identification of DN is therefore of critical importance to improve patient outcomes. Albuminuria, a marker of glomerular involvement in early renal damage, cannot always detect early DN. Thus, more sensitive and specific markers in addition to albuminuria are needed to predict the early onset and progression of DN. Tubular injury, as shown by the detection of tubular injury markers in the urine, is a critical component of the early course of DN. These urinary tubular markers may increase in diabetic patients, even before diagnosis of microalbuminuria representing early markers of normoalbuminuric DN. In this review we summarized some new and important urinary markers of tubular injury, such as neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL), kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1), liver-type fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG), alpha-1 microglobulin (A1M), beta 2-microglobulin (B2-M), and retinol binding protein (RBP) associated with early DN. PMID:27293888

  20. Coiled sheet metal strip opens into tubular configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, J. J.

    1966-01-01

    Copper alloy is converted into a spring material that can be rolled into a compact coil which will spontaneously open to form a tube in the long direction of the strip. The copper alloy is passed through a furnace at a prescribed temperature while restraining the strip in the desired tubular configuration.

  1. Hemodynamic and Tubular Changes Induced by Contrast Media

    PubMed Central

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI. PMID:24678510

  2. Hemodynamic and tubular changes induced by contrast media.

    PubMed

    Caiazza, Antonella; Russo, Luigi; Sabbatini, Massimo; Russo, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of acute kidney injury induced by contrast media (CI-AKI) is the third cause of AKI in hospitalized patients. Contrast media cause relevant alterations both in renal hemodynamics and in renal tubular cell function that lead to CI-AKI. The vasoconstriction of intrarenal vasculature is the main hemodynamic change induced by contrast media; the vasoconstriction is accompanied by a cascade of events leading to ischemia and reduction of glomerular filtration rate. Cytotoxicity of contrast media causes apoptosis of tubular cells with consequent formation of casts and worsening of ischemia. There is an interplay between the negative effects of contrast media on renal hemodynamics and on tubular cell function that leads to activation of renin-angiotensin system and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) within the kidney. Production of ROS intensifies cellular hypoxia through endothelial dysfunction and alteration of mechanisms regulating tubular cells transport. The physiochemical characteristics of contrast media play a critical role in the incidence of CI-AKI. Guidelines suggest the use of either isoosmolar or low-osmolar contrast media rather than high-osmolar contrast media particularly in patients at increased risk of CI-AKI. Older age, presence of atherosclerosis, congestive heart failure, chronic renal disease, nephrotoxic drugs, and diuretics may multiply the risk of CI-AKI. PMID:24678510

  3. Gene expression profiling reveals sequential changes in gastric tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Hee; Bang, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Seung-Koo; Song, Kyu-Young; Lee, In-Chul

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the expression profiles of premalignant and/or preclinical lesions of gastric cancers. METHODS: We analyzed the expression profiles of normal gastric pit, tubular adenoma and carcinoma in situ using microdissected cells from routine gastric biopsies. For the DNA microarray analysis of formalin-fixed samples, we developed a simple and reproducible RNA extraction and linear amplification procedure applying two polymerase-binding sites. The amplification procedure took only 8 h and yielded comparable DNA microarray data between formalin-fixed tissues and unfixed controls. RESULTS: In comparison with normal pit, adenoma/carcinoma showed 504 up-regulated and 29 down-regulated genes at the expected false significance rate 0.15%. The differential expression between adenoma and carcinoma in situ was subtle: 50 and 22 genes were up-, and down-regulated in carcinomas at the expected false significance rate of 0.61%, respectively. Differentially expressed genes were grouped according to patterns of the sequential changes for the the ‘tendency analysis’ in the gastric mucosa-adenoma-carcinoma sequence. CONCLUSION: Groups of genes are shown to reflect the sequential expression changes in the early carcinogenic steps of stomach cancer. It is suggested that molecular carcinogenic pathways could be analyzed using routinely processed biopsies. PMID:15800983

  4. Advanced expander test bed engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high pressure expander cycle concept, study system interactions, and conduct studies of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  5. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, A. I.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine technology component technology for the next space engine. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced missions focused components and new health monitoring techniques. The split-expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust.

  6. Apparatus for fixing latency

    DOEpatents

    Hall, David R.; Bartholomew, David B.; Moon, Justin; Koehler, Roger O.

    2009-09-08

    An apparatus for fixing computational latency within a deterministic region on a network comprises a network interface modem, a high priority module and at least one deterministic peripheral device. The network interface modem is in communication with the network. The high priority module is in communication with the network interface modem. The at least one deterministic peripheral device is connected to the high priority module. The high priority module comprises a packet assembler/disassembler, and hardware for performing at least one operation. Also disclosed is an apparatus for executing at least one instruction on a downhole device within a deterministic region, the apparatus comprising a control device, a downhole network, and a downhole device. The control device is near the surface of a downhole tool string. The downhole network is integrated into the tool string. The downhole device is in communication with the downhole network.

  7. [Fixed-dose combination].

    PubMed

    Nagai, Yoshio

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus(T2DM) do not achieve satisfactory glycemic control by monotherapy alone, and often require multiple oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). Combining OHAs with complementary mechanisms of action is fundamental to the management of T2DM. Fixed-dose combination therapy(FDC) offers a method of simplifying complex regimens. Efficacy and tolerability appear to be similar between FDC and treatment with individual agents. In addition, FDC can enhance adherence and improved adherence may result in improved glycemic control. Four FDC agents are available in Japan: pioglitazone-glimepiride, pioglitazone-metformin, pioglitazone-alogliptin, and voglibose-mitiglinide. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these four combinations are identified and discussed. PMID:25812374

  8. Fixed Access Network Sharing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornaglia, Bruno; Young, Gavin; Marchetta, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Fixed broadband network deployments are moving inexorably to the use of Next Generation Access (NGA) technologies and architectures. These NGA deployments involve building fiber infrastructure increasingly closer to the customer in order to increase the proportion of fiber on the customer's access connection (Fibre-To-The-Home/Building/Door/Cabinet… i.e. FTTx). This increases the speed of services that can be sold and will be increasingly required to meet the demands of new generations of video services as we evolve from HDTV to "Ultra-HD TV" with 4k and 8k lines of video resolution. However, building fiber access networks is a costly endeavor. It requires significant capital in order to cover any significant geographic coverage. Hence many companies are forming partnerships and joint-ventures in order to share the NGA network construction costs. One form of such a partnership involves two companies agreeing to each build to cover a certain geographic area and then "cross-selling" NGA products to each other in order to access customers within their partner's footprint (NGA coverage area). This is tantamount to a bi-lateral wholesale partnership. The concept of Fixed Access Network Sharing (FANS) is to address the possibility of sharing infrastructure with a high degree of flexibility for all network operators involved. By providing greater configuration control over the NGA network infrastructure, the service provider has a greater ability to define the network and hence to define their product capabilities at the active layer. This gives the service provider partners greater product development autonomy plus the ability to differentiate from each other at the active network layer.

  9. Downregulation of renal tubular Wnt/β-catenin signaling by Dickkopf-3 induces tubular cell death in proteinuric nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Wong, D W L; Yiu, W H; Wu, H J; Li, R X; Liu, Y; Chan, K W; Leung, J C K; Chan, L Y Y; Lai, K N; Tang, S C W

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in different forms of kidney disease have yielded discrepant results. Here, we report the biphasic change of renal β-catenin expression in mice with overload proteinuria in which β-catenin was upregulated at the early stage (4 weeks after disease induction) but abrogated at the late phase (8 weeks). Acute albuminuria was observed at 1 week after bovine serum albumin injection, followed by partial remission at 4 weeks that coincided with overexpression of renal tubular β-catenin. Interestingly, a rebound in albuminuria at 8 weeks was accompanied by downregulated tubular β-catenin expression and heightened tubular apoptosis. In addition, there was an inverse relationship between Dickkopf-3 (Dkk-3) and renal tubular β-catenin expression at these time points. In vitro, a similar trend in β-catenin expression was observed in human kidney-2 (HK-2) cells with acute (upregulation) and prolonged (downregulation) exposure to albumin. Induction of a proapoptotic phenotype by albumin was significantly enhanced by silencing β-catenin in HK-2 cells. Finally, Dkk-3 expression and secretion was increased after prolonged exposure to albumin, leading to the suppression of intracellular β-catenin signaling pathway. The effect of Dkk-3 on β-catenin signaling was confirmed by incubation with exogenous Dkk-3 in HK-2 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that downregulation of tubular β-catenin signaling induced by Dkk-3 has a detrimental role in chronic proteinuria, partially through the increase in apoptosis. PMID:27010856

  10. [Primary distal renal tubular acidosis: a case report].

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Jihene Ben; Charfeddine, Bassem; Braham, Imen; Neffati, Souhir; Othmen, Leila Ben; Letaief, Affef; Smach, Mohamed Ali; Bourfifa, Zoheier; Dridi, Hedi; Limem, Khalifa

    2011-01-01

    The primary distal renal tubular acidosis is characterized biochemically by the inability of the kidney to produce appropriately acid urine in the presence of systemic metabolic acidosis or after acid loading (e.g. ammonium chloride). It is secondary to defective excretion of H(+) by the cells of the collecting duct. We report the observation of the child MC, 4-year-old, for whom the association of polyuria-polydipsia syndrome, a failure to thrive, nephrolithiasis, hypercalciuria, and especially a high urine pH in the presence of metabolic acidosis did evoke diagnosis of distal renal tubular acidosis. An urine acidification test with ammonium chloride was performed, the urinary pH was always higher than 5.5, thus confirming the diagnosis. PMID:21464016

  11. Dynamic model of microalgal production in tubular photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Fernández, I; Acién, F G; Fernández, J M; Guzmán, J L; Magán, J J; Berenguel, M

    2012-12-01

    A dynamic model for microalgal culture is presented. The model takes into account the fluid-dynamic and mass transfer, in addition to biological phenomena, it being based on fundamental principles. The model has been calibrated and validated using data from a pilot-scale tubular photobioreactor but it can be extended to other designs. It can be used to determine, from experimental measurements, the values of characteristic parameters. The model also allows a simulation of the system's dynamic behaviour in response to solar radiation, making it a useful tool for design and operation optimization of photobioreactors. Moreover, the model permits the identification of local pH gradients, dissolved oxygen and dissolved carbon dioxide; that can damage microalgae growth. In addition, the developed model can map the different characteristic time scales of phenomena inside microalgae cultures within tubular photobioreactors, meaning it is a valuable tool in the development of advanced control strategies for microalgae cultures. PMID:23073105

  12. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Guess, T.R.; Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Slavin, A.M.

    1993-11-01

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  13. Testing composite-to-metal tubular lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guess, T. R.; Reedy, E. D., Jr.; Slavin, A. M.

    Procedures were developed to fabricate, nondestructively evaluate, and mechanically test composite-to-metal tubular joints. The axially loaded tubular lap joint specimen consisted of two metal tubes bonded within each end of a fiberglass composite tube. Joint specimens with both tapered and untapered aluminum adherends and a plain weave E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension, compression, and flexure. Other specimens with tapered and untapered steel adherends and a triaxially reinforced E-glass/epoxy composite were tested in tension and compression. Test results include joint strength and failure mode data. A finite element analysis of the axially loaded joints explains the effect of adherend geometry and material properties on measured joint strength. The flexural specimen was also analyzed; calculated surface strains are in good agreement with measured values, and joint failure occurs in the region of calculated peak peel stress.

  14. Buckling characteristics of hypersonic aircraft wing tubular panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Shideler, John L.; Fields, Roger A.

    1986-01-01

    The buckling characteristics of Rene 41 tubular panels installed as wing panels on a hypersonic wing test structure (HWTS) were determined nondestructively through use of a force/stiffness technique. The nondestructive buckling tests were carried out under different combined load conditions and different temperature environments. Two panels were subsequently tested to buckling failure in a universal tension compression testing machine. In spite of some data scattering because of large extrapolations of data points resulting from termination of the test at a somewhat low applied load, the overall test data correlated fairly well with theoretically predicted buckling interaction curves. The structural efficiency of the tubular panels was slightly higher than that of the beaded panels which they replaced.

  15. Phyllotactic transformations as plastic deformations of tubular crystals with defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, Daniel; Nelson, David

    Tubular crystals are 2D lattices in cylindrical topologies, which could be realized as assemblies of colloidal particles, and occur naturally in biological microtubules and in single-walled carbon nanotubes. Their geometry can be understood in the language of phyllotaxis borrowed from botany. We study the mechanics of plastic deformations in tubular crystals in response to tensile stress, as mediated by the formation and separation of dislocation pairs in a triangular lattice. Dislocation motion allows the growth of one phyllotactic arrangement at the expense of another, offering a low-energy, stepwise mode of plastic deformation in response to external stresses. Through theory and simulation, we examine how the tube's radius and helicity affects, and is in turn altered by, dislocation glide. The crystal's bending modulus is found to produce simple but important corrections to the tube's deformation mechanics.

  16. An early Cambrian agglutinated tubular lophophorate with brachiopod characters

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z.-F.; Li, G.-X.; Holmer, L. E.; Brock, G. A.; Balthasar, U.; Skovsted, C. B.; Fu, D.-J.; Zhang, X.-L.; Wang, H.-Z.; Butler, A.; Zhang, Z.-L.; Cao, C.-Q.; Han, J.; Liu, J.-N.; Shu, D.-G.

    2014-01-01

    The morphological disparity of lophotrochozoan phyla makes it difficult to predict the morphology of the last common ancestor. Only fossils of stem groups can help discover the morphological transitions that occurred along the roots of these phyla. Here, we describe a tubular fossil Yuganotheca elegans gen. et sp. nov. from the Cambrian (Stage 3) Chengjiang Lagerstätte (Yunnan, China) that exhibits an unusual combination of phoronid, brachiopod and tommotiid (Cambrian problematica) characters, notably a pair of agglutinated valves, enclosing a horseshoe-shaped lophophore, supported by a lower bipartite tubular attachment structure with a long pedicle with coelomic space. The terminal bulb of the pedicle provided anchorage in soft sediment. The discovery has important implications for the early evolution of lophotrochozoans, suggesting rooting of brachiopods into the sessile lophotrochozoans and the origination of their bivalved bauplan preceding the biomineralization of shell valves in crown brachiopods. PMID:24828016

  17. Molecular interactions between albumin and proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N J

    1998-01-01

    In glomerular diseases the filtration of excess proteins into the proximal tubule, together with their subsequent reabsorption may represent an important pathological mechanism underlying progressive renal scarring. The most prominent protein in glomerular filtrate, albumin, is reabsorbed by receptor-mediated endocytosis by proximal tubular cells. It binds both to scavenger-type receptors and to megalin in the proximal tubule. Some of these receptors appear to be shared with other cell types, particularly endothelial cells. The endocytic uptake of albumin is subjected to complex hormonal and enzymatic regulation. In addition to being reabsorbed in the proximal tubule, albumin may act as a signalling molecule in these cells, and may induce the expression of numerous pro-inflammatory genes. Modulation of the interaction of albumin with proximal tubular cells may eventually prove to be of therapeutic importance in the treatment of renal diseases. PMID:9807019

  18. Evacuated, displacement compression mold. [of tubular bodies from thermosetting plastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heier, W. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A process of molding long thin-wall tubular bodies from thermosetting plastic molding compounds is described wherein the tubular body lengths may be several times the diameters. The process is accomplished by loading a predetermined quantity of molding compound into a female mold cavity closed at one end by a force mandrel. After closing the other end of the female mold with a balance mandrel, the loaded cavity is evacuated by applying a vacuum of from one-to-five mm pressure for a period of fifteen-to-thirty minutes. The mold temperature is raised to the minimum temperature at which the resin constituent of the compound will soften or plasticize and a pressure of 2500 psi is applied.

  19. Elastomer liners for geothermal tubulars Y267 EPDM Liner Program:

    SciTech Connect

    Hirasuna, A.R.; Davis, D.L.; Flickinger, J.E.; Stephens, C.A.

    1987-12-01

    The elastomer, Y267 EPDM, has been identified as a hydrothermally stable material which can operate at temperatures in excess of 320/sup 0/C. The goal of the Y267 Liner Program was to demonstrate the feasibility of using this material as a liner for mild steel tubulars to prevent or mitigate corrosion. If successful, the usage of EPDM lined pipe by the geothermal community may have a significant impact on operating costs and serve as a viable alternative to the use of alloyed tubulars. Tooling procedures were developed under this program to mold a 0.64 cm (0.25'') thick Y267 EPDM liner into a tubular test section 61 cm (2') in length and 19.1 cm (7.5'') in diameter (ID). A successful effort was made to identify a potential coupling agent to be used to bond the elastomer to the steel tubular wall. This agent was found to withstand the processing conditions associated with curing the elastomer at 288/sup 0/C and to retain a significant level of adhesive strength following hydrothermal testing in a synthetic brine at 260/sup 0/C for a period of 166 hours. Bonding tests were conducted on specimens of mild carbon steel and several alloys including Hastelloy C-276. An objective of the program was to field test the lined section of pipe mentioned above at a geothermal facility in the Imperial Valley. Though a test was conducted, problems encountered during the lining operation precluded an encouraging outcome. The results of the field demonstration were inconclusive. 6 refs., 13 figs., 13 tabs

  20. Inorganic fluoride. Divergent effects on human proximal tubular cell viability.

    PubMed Central

    Zager, R. A.; Iwata, M.

    1997-01-01

    Fluoride (F) is a widely distributed nephrotoxin with exposure potentially resulting from environmental pollution and from fluorinated anesthetic use (eg, isoflurane). This study sought to characterize some of the subcellular determinants of fluoride cytotoxicity and to determine whether subtoxic F exposure affects tubular cell vulnerability to superimposed ATP depletion and nephrotoxic attack. Human proximal tubular cells (HK-2) were cultured with differing amounts of NaF (0 to 20 mmol/L, overlapping with clinically relevant intrarenal/urinary levels after fluorinated anesthetic use). After completing 24-hour exposures, cell injury was determined (vital dye uptake). Fluoride effects on cell deacylation ([3]H-C20:4 release) and PLA2 activity were also assessed. To determine whether subtoxic F exposure alters tubular cell susceptibility to superimposed injury, cells were exposed to subtoxic NaF doses for 0 to 24 hours and then challenged with simulated ischemia (ATP depletion plus Ca2+ overload) or a clinically relevant nephrotoxic insult (myoglobin exposure). NaF induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity (up to approximately 90% vital dye uptake and increased [3H]C20:4 release). Extracellular Ca2+ chelation (EGTA) and PLA2 inhibitor therapy (aristolochic acid, dibucaine, or mepacrine) each conferred significant protective effects. When subtoxic NaF doses were applied, partial cytosolic PLA2 depletion rapidly developed (approximately 85% within 3 hours, determined on cell extracts). These partially PLA2-depleted cells were markedly resistant to ATP depletion/Ca2+ ionophore injury and to myoglobin-induced attack (approximately 50% decrease in cell death). We conclude that 1) F induces dose-dependent cytotoxicity in cultured human proximal tubular cells, 2) this occurs, in part, via Ca(2+)- and PLA2-dependent mechanism(s), 3) partial cytosolic PLA2 depletion subsequently results, and 4) subtoxic fluoride exposure can acutely increase cell resistance to further attack

  1. Tissue cell assisted fabrication of tubular catalytic platinum microengines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Moo, James Guo Sheng; Pumera, Martin

    2014-09-01

    We report a facile platform for mass production of robust self-propelled tubular microengines. Tissue cells extracted from fruits of banana and apple, Musa acuminata and Malus domestica, are used as the support on which a thin platinum film is deposited by means of physical vapor deposition. Upon sonication of the cells/Pt-coated substrate in water, microscrolls of highly uniform sizes are spontaneously formed. Tubular microengines fabricated with the fruit cell assisted method exhibit a fast motion of ~100 bodylengths per s (~1 mm s-1). An extremely simple and affordable platform for mass production of the micromotors is crucial for the envisioned swarms of thousands and millions of autonomous micromotors performing biomedical and environmental remediation tasks.We report a facile platform for mass production of robust self-propelled tubular microengines. Tissue cells extracted from fruits of banana and apple, Musa acuminata and Malus domestica, are used as the support on which a thin platinum film is deposited by means of physical vapor deposition. Upon sonication of the cells/Pt-coated substrate in water, microscrolls of highly uniform sizes are spontaneously formed. Tubular microengines fabricated with the fruit cell assisted method exhibit a fast motion of ~100 bodylengths per s (~1 mm s-1). An extremely simple and affordable platform for mass production of the micromotors is crucial for the envisioned swarms of thousands and millions of autonomous micromotors performing biomedical and environmental remediation tasks. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Related video. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03720k

  2. Optimal startup control of a jacketed tubular reactor.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, D. R.; Fan, L. T.; Hwang, C. L.

    1971-01-01

    The optimal startup policy of a jacketed tubular reactor, in which a first-order, reversible, exothermic reaction takes place, is presented. A distributed maximum principle is presented for determining weak necessary conditions for optimality of a diffusional distributed parameter system. A numerical technique is developed for practical implementation of the distributed maximum principle. This involves the sequential solution of the state and adjoint equations, in conjunction with a functional gradient technique for iteratively improving the control function.

  3. Tubular space truss structure for SKITTER 2 robot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beecham, Richard; Dejulio, Linda; Delorme, Paul; Eck, Eric; Levy, Avi; Lowery, Joel; Radack, Joe; Sheffield, Randy; Stevens, Scott

    1988-01-01

    The Skitter 2 is a three legged transport vehicle designed to demonstrate the principle of a tripod walker in a multitude of environments. The tubular truss model of Skitter 2 is a proof of principal design. The model will replicate the operational capabilities of Skitter 2 including its ability to self-right itself. The project's focus was on the use of light weight tubular members in the final structural design. A strong design for the body was required as it will undergo the most intense loading. Triangular geometry was used extensively in the body, providing the required structural integrity and eliminating the need for cumbersome shear panels. Both the basic femur and tibia designs also relied on the strong geometry of the triangle. An intense literature search aided in the development of the most suitable weld techniques, joints, linkages, and materials required for a durable design. The hinge design features the use of spherical rod end bearings. In order to obtain a greater range of mobility in the tibia, a four-bar linkage was designed which attaches both to the femur and the tibia. All component designs, specifically the body, femur, and the tibia were optimized using the software package IDEAS 3.8A Supertab. The package provided essential deformation and stress analysis information on each component's design. The final structure incurred only a 0.0544 inch deflection in a maximum (worst case) loading situation. The highest stress experienced by any AL6061-T6 tubular member was 1920 psi. The structural integrity of the final design facilitated the use of Aluminum 6061-T6 tubing. The tubular truss structure of Skitter 2 is an effective and highly durable design. All facets of the design are structurally sound and cost effective.

  4. A tubular flux-switching permanent magnet machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Wang, W.; Clark, R.; Atallah, K.; Howe, D.

    2008-04-01

    The paper describes a novel tubular, three-phase permanent magnet brushless machine, which combines salient features from both switched reluctance and permanent magnet machine technologies. It has no end windings and zero net radial force and offers a high power density and peak force capability, as well as the potential for low manufacturing cost. It is, therefore, eminently suitable for a variety of applications, ranging from free-piston energy converters to active vehicle suspensions.

  5. Mechanical models for the self-organization of tubular patterns

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Organogenesis, such as long tubule self-organization, requires long-range coordination of cell mechanics to arrange cell positions and to remodel the extracellular matrix. While the current mainstream in the field of tissue morphogenesis focuses primarily on genetics and chemical signaling, the influence of cell mechanics on the programming of patterning cues in tissue morphogenesis has not been adequately addressed. Here, we review experimental evidence and propose quantitative mechanical models by which cells can create tubular patterns. PMID:23719257

  6. A permanent magnet tubular linear generator for wave energy conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Liu, Chunyuan; Yuan, Bang; Hu, Minqiang; Huang, Lei; Zhou, Shigui

    2012-04-01

    A novel three-phase permanent magnet tubular linear generator (PMTLG) with Halbach array is proposed for the sea wave energy conversion. Non-linear axi-symmetrical finite element method (FEM) is implemented to calculate the magnetic fields along air-gap for different Halbach arrays of PMTLGs. The PMTLG characteristics are analyzed and the simulation results are validated by the experiment. An assistant tooth is implemented to greatly minimize the end and cogging effects which cause the oscillatory detent force.

  7. Tubular biomarkers to assess progression of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Gianfranco; Kanwar, Yashpal S

    2011-05-01

    Despite aggressive management, many patients with diabetic nephropathy still develop end-stage renal disease. Accompanying tubulointerstitial damage is important in the progression of diabetic nephropathy. Markers of tubular damage, such as NGAL, KIM-1, and LFABP, have been proposed for monitoring the effectiveness of therapy. However, Nielsen et al. report a lack of an independent correlation between these biomarkers and glomerular filtration rate. Therefore, these markers seem to offer no improvement in the management of diabetic nephropathy. PMID:21527942

  8. Tubular space truss structure for SKITTER 2 robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beecham, Richard; Dejulio, Linda; Delorme, Paul; Eck, Eric; Levy, Avi; Lowery, Joel; Radack, Joe; Sheffield, Randy; Stevens, Scott

    1988-05-01

    The Skitter 2 is a three legged transport vehicle designed to demonstrate the principle of a tripod walker in a multitude of environments. The tubular truss model of Skitter 2 is a proof of principal design. The model will replicate the operational capabilities of Skitter 2 including its ability to self-right itself. The project's focus was on the use of light weight tubular members in the final structural design. A strong design for the body was required as it will undergo the most intense loading. Triangular geometry was used extensively in the body, providing the required structural integrity and eliminating the need for cumbersome shear panels. Both the basic femur and tibia designs also relied on the strong geometry of the triangle. An intense literature search aided in the development of the most suitable weld techniques, joints, linkages, and materials required for a durable design. The hinge design features the use of spherical rod end bearings. In order to obtain a greater range of mobility in the tibia, a four-bar linkage was designed which attaches both to the femur and the tibia. All component designs, specifically the body, femur, and the tibia were optimized using the software package IDEAS 3.8A Supertab. The package provided essential deformation and stress analysis information on each component's design. The final structure incurred only a 0.0544 inch deflection in a maximum (worst case) loading situation. The highest stress experienced by any AL6061-T6 tubular member was 1920 psi. The structural integrity of the final design facilitated the use of Aluminum 6061-T6 tubing. The tubular truss structure of Skitter 2 is an effective and highly durable design. All facets of the design are structurally sound and cost effective.

  9. HCaRG Accelerates Tubular Repair after Ischemic Kidney Injury

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Hiroyuki; Lavoie, Julie L.; Gaboury, Louis; Hamet, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    The repair of the kidney after ischemia/reperfusion injury involves proliferation of proximal tubular epithelial cells as well as cell migration and differentiation. Immediately after reperfusion, expression of hypertension-related calcium-regulated gene (HCaRG/COMMD5) decreases, but its expression increases even higher than baseline during repair. HCaRG inhibits proliferation and accelerates wound healing and differentiation in cultured cells, but whether HCaRG can stimulate renal repair after ischemia/reperfusion injury is unknown. Here, transgenic mice overexpressing human HCaRG survived longer and recovered renal function faster than littermate controls after ischemia/reperfusion (64% versus 25% survival at 7 days). Proliferation of proximal tubular epithelial cells stopped earlier after ischemia/reperfusion injury, E-cadherin levels recovered more rapidly, and vimentin induction abated faster in transgenic mice. HCaRG overexpression also reduced macrophage infiltration and inflammation after injury. Taken together, these data suggest that HCaRG accelerates repair of renal proximal tubules by modulating cell proliferation of resident tubular epithelial cells and by facilitating redifferentiation. PMID:21921141

  10. The rebirth of interest in renal tubular function.

    PubMed

    Lowenstein, Jerome; Grantham, Jared J

    2016-06-01

    The measurement of glomerular filtration rate by the clearance of inulin or creatinine has evolved over the past 50 years into an estimated value based solely on plasma creatinine concentration. We have examined some of the misconceptions and misunderstandings of the classification of renal disease and its course, which have followed this evolution. Furthermore, renal plasma flow and tubular function, which in the past were estimated by the clearance of the exogenous aryl amine, para-aminohippurate, are no longer measured. Over the past decade, studies in experimental animals with reduced nephron mass and in patients with reduced renal function have identified small gut-derived, protein-bound uremic retention solutes ("uremic toxins") that are poorly filtered but are secreted into the lumen by organic anion transporters (OATs) in the proximal renal tubule. These are not effectively removed by conventional hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. Residual renal function, urine produced in patients with advanced renal failure or undergoing dialysis treatment, may represent, at least in part, secretion of fluid and uremic toxins, such as indoxyl sulfate, mediated by proximal tubule OATs and might serve as a useful survival function. In light of this new evidence of the physiological role of proximal tubule OATs, we suggest that measurement of renal tubular function and renal plasma flow may be of considerable value in understanding and managing chronic kidney disease. Data obtained in normal subjects indicate that renal plasma flow and renal tubular function might be measured by the clearance of the endogenous aryl amine, hippurate. PMID:26936872

  11. Pediatric Tubular Pulmonary Heart Valve from Decellularized Engineered Tissue Tubes

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Jay M.; Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Haynie, Bee H.T.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric patients account for a small portion of the heart valve replacements performed, but a pediatric pulmonary valve replacement with growth potential remains an unmet clinical need. Herein we report the first tubular heart valve made from two decellularized, engineered tissue tubes attached with absorbable sutures, which can meet this need, in principle. Engineered tissue tubes were fabricated by allowing ovine dermal fibroblasts to replace a sacrificial fibrin gel with an aligned, cell-produced collagenous matrix, which was subsequently decellularized. Previously, these engineered tubes became extensively recellularized following implantation into the sheep femoral artery. Thus, a tubular valve made from these tubes may be amenable to recellularization and, ideally, somatic growth. The suture line pattern generated three equi-spaced “leaflets” in the inner tube, which collapsed inward when exposed to back pressure, per tubular valve design. Valve testing was performed in a pulse duplicator system equipped with a secondary flow loop to allow for root distention. All tissue-engineered valves exhibited full leaflet opening and closing, minimal regurgitation (< 5%), and low systolic pressure gradients (< 2.5 mmHg) under pulmonary conditions. Valve performance was maintained under various trans-root pressure gradients and no tissue damage was evident after 2 million cycles of fatigue testing. PMID:26036175

  12. Gage for measuring fluted oil field tubular members

    SciTech Connect

    Case, W.A.; Burt, J.R.

    1987-03-17

    A gage is described for measuring the nominal diameter of an elongated tubular member having circumferentially spaced apart radially outwardly extending flutes and for calibrating the amount of wear to the flutes and predicting the future wear life of the tubular member. The gage comprises: a first gage part including a pair of spaced apart colinear elongated first handlebar halves with a generally semi-circular first half ring positioned between the first handlebar halves. The first half ring includes at least one flute engaging surface which includes stepped arcuate flute engaging portions positioned at radii from the center of the first ring half corresponding to different diameters to be measured; a second gage part including a pair of spaced apart colinear elongated second handlebar halves with a generally semicircular second half ring positioned between the second handlebar halves. The second half ring includes at least one flute engaging surface which includes stepped arcuate flute engaging portions positioned a radii from the center of the second ring half corresponding to different diameters to be measured. The number of flute engaging surfaces of the first and second ring halves is equal to the number of flutes on the tubular member; and a hinge pivotally connecting together one handlebar half of the first gage part to one handlebar half of the second gage part.

  13. Band gap in tubular pillar phononic crystal plate.

    PubMed

    Shu, Fengfeng; Liu, Yongshun; Wu, Junfeng; Wu, Yihui

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a phononic crystal (PC) plate with tubular pillars is presented and investigated. The band structures and mode displacement profiles are calculated by using finite element method. The result shows that a complete band gap opens when the ratio of the pillar height to the plate thickness is about 1.6. However, for classic cylinder pillar structures, a band gap opens when the ratio is equal or greater than 3. A tubular pillar design with a void room in it enhances acoustic multiple scattering and gives rise to the opening of the band gap. In order to verify it, a PC structure with double tubular pillars different in size (one within the other) is introduced and a more than 2times band gap enlargement is observed. Furthermore, the coupling between the resonant mode and the plate mode around the band gap is characterized, as well as the effect of the geometrical parameters on the band gap. The behavior of such structure could be utilized to design a pillar PC with stronger structural stability and to enlarge band gaps. PMID:27376841

  14. Helium permeation through a silicalite-1 tubular membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, M. G.; Salinas-Rodríguez, E.; Gómez, S. A.; Roa-Neri, J. A. E.; Alfaro, S.; Valdés-Parada, F. J.

    2015-06-01

    A silicalite-1 tubular membrane was prepared on the inner surface of a porous α-alumina support. Helium permeation at different feed volumetric flows (11-41 mL/min) with different sweep flow rates (9-90 mL/min) at STP conditions was measured. The molar fraction was obtained as a function of the residence time ratio. The influences of the geometric parameters of the tubular system and the feed flow rates on the permeation through the membrane were investigated. The dependence of the permeances with the residence time ratio was experimentally obtained and we propose that this dependence is a useful design criterion for tubular membrane permeation systems. The best results in this work were obtained for Q He, in / Q N2, in = 0.22 for V SS / V TS = 7.3. Also, the data showed that an appropriate combination of the flows and the area sections of the system resulted in an optimum value for the Péclet number of 0.3. The experimental data were reproduced by numerically solving the Maxwell-Stefan equations under the assumption that transport across the membrane can be modeled in terms of a Robin-type boundary condition.

  15. Developmental changes in renal tubular transport-an overview.

    PubMed

    Gattineni, Jyothsna; Baum, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The adult kidney maintains a constant volume and composition of extracellular fluid despite changes in water and salt intake. The neonate is born with a kidney that has a small fraction of the glomerular filtration rate of the adult and immature tubules that function at a lower capacity than that of the mature animal. Nonetheless, the neonate is also able to maintain a constant extracellular fluid volume and composition. Postnatal renal tubular development was once thought to be due to an increase in the transporter abundance to meet the developmental increase in glomerular filtration rate. However, postnatal renal development of each nephron segment is quite complex. There are isoform changes of several transporters as well as developmental changes in signal transduction that affect the capacity of renal tubules to reabsorb solutes and water. This review will discuss neonatal tubular function with an emphasis on the differences that have been found between the neonate and adult. We will also discuss some of the factors that are responsible for the maturational changes in tubular transport that occur during postnatal renal development. PMID:24253590

  16. Method and apparatus for forming flues on tubular stock

    DOEpatents

    Beck, D.E.; Carson, C.

    1979-12-21

    The present invention is directed to a die mechanism utilized for forming flues on long, relatively narrow tubular stock. These flues are formed by displacing a die from within the tubular stock through perforations previously drilled through the tubular stock at selected locations. The drawing of the die upsets the material to form the flue of the desired configuration. The die is provided with a lubricating system which enables the lubricant to be dispensed uniformly about the entire periphery of the die in contact with the material being upset so as to assure the formation of the flues. Further, the lubricant is dispensed from within the die onto the peripheral surface of the latter at pressures in the range of about 2000 to 10,000 psi so as to assure the adequate lubrication of the die during the drawing operation. By injecting the lubricant at such high pressures, low viscosity liquid, such as water and/or alcohol, may be efficiently used as a lubricant and also provides a mechanism by which the lubricant may be evaporated from the surface of the flues at ambient conditions so as to negate the cleansing operations previously required prior to joining the flues to other conduit mechanisms by fusion welding and the like.

  17. Tubular transport and metabolism of cimetidine in chicken kidneys

    SciTech Connect

    Rennick, B.; Ziemniak, J.; Smith, I.; Taylor, M.; Acara, M.

    1984-02-01

    Renal tubular transport and renal metabolism of (/sup 14/C)cimetidine (CIM) were investigated by unilateral infusion into the renal portal circulation in chickens (Sperber technique). (/sup 14/C)CIM was actively transported at a rate 88% that of simultaneously infused p-aminohippuric acid, and its transport was saturable. The following organic cations competitively inhibited the tubular transport of (/sup 14/C)CIM with decreasing potency: CIM, ranitidine, thiamine, procainamide, guanidine and choline. CIM inhibited the transport of (/sup 14/C)thiamine, (/sup 14/C)amiloride and (/sup 14/C)tetraethylammonium. During CIM infusion, two renal metabolites, CIM sulfoxide and hydroxymethylcimetidine, were found in urine. When CIM sulfoxide was infused, its transport efficiency was 32% and not saturable. CIM sulfoxide did ot inhibit the simultaneous renal tubular transport of p-aminohippuric acid or tetraethylammonium. CIM is transported by the organic cation transport system and the kidney metabolizes CIM. Transport of CIM and other cationic drugs could produce a drug interaction to alter drug excretion.

  18. Advanced expander test bed program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riccardi, D. P.; Mitchell, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Expander Test Bed (AETB) is a key element in NASA's Space Chemical Engine Technology Program for development and demonstration of expander cycle oxygen/hydrogen engine and advanced component technologies applicable to space engines as well as launch vehicle upper stage engines. The AETB will be used to validate the high-pressure expander cycle concept, investigate system interactions, and conduct investigations of advanced mission focused components and new health monitoring techniques in an engine system environment. The split expander cycle AETB will operate at combustion chamber pressures up to 1200 psia with propellant flow rates equivalent to 20,000 lbf vacuum thrust. Contract work began 27 Apr. 1990. During 1992, a major milestone was achieved with the review of the final design of the oxidizer turbopump in Sep. 1992.

  19. Expanded bed adsorption of an alkaline lipase from Pseudomona cepacia.

    PubMed

    da Silva Padilha, Giovana; Curvelo-Santana, José Carlos; Alegre, Ranulfo Monte; Tambourgi, Elias Basile

    2009-02-15

    An extracellular lipase was isolated from Pseudomona cepacia by expanded bed adsorption on an Amberlite 410 ion-exchange resin. Enzyme characterization and hydrodynamic study of a chromatography column were done. Enzyme purification was done at three condition of expanded bed height (H): at one and half (6cm), at two (8cm) and at three (12cm) times the fixed bed height (H(0)=4cm). The results showed that the experimental data was fitted to the Richardson and Zaki equation, and the comparison between the experimental and calculated terminal velocities showed low relative error. In enzyme purification for better condition, a purification factor of about 80 times was found at 6cm of expanded bed height, or 1.5 times of expansion degree. Purified lipase had an optimal pH and a temperature of 8 and 37 degrees C, respectively. PMID:19162572

  20. Ileal bladder substitute: antireflux nipple or afferent tubular segment?

    PubMed

    Studer, U E; Spiegel, T; Casanova, G A; Springer, J; Gerber, E; Ackermann, D K; Gurtner, F; Zingg, E J

    1991-01-01

    Spheroidal bladder substitutes made from double-folded ileal segments, similar to Goodwin's cup-patch technique, are devoid of major coordinated wall contractions. This, together with the reservoir's direct anastomosis to the membranous urethra, prevents major intraluminal pressure peaks and assures a residue-free voiding of sterile urine. In order to determine whether, under these conditions, an afferent tubular isoperistaltic ileal segment of 20-cm length protects the upper urinary tract as efficiently as an antireflux nipple, 60 male patients who were subjected to radical cystectomy were prospectively randomised to groups in which a bladder substitute was formed together with either of these 2 antireflux devices. An analysis of the results obtained in 20 patients from each group who could be followed for more than 1 year (median observation time 30 and 36 months) showed no differences between the groups in metabolic disturbances, kidney size, reservoir capacity, diurnal and nocturnal urinary continence, the incidence of urinary tract infection or episodes of acute pyelonephritis. Later than 1 year postoperatively, intravenous urograms of the renoureteral units of 25% of the patients with antireflux nipples showed persistent but generally slight dilatation of the upper urinary tracts. This observation was significantly more frequent than it was in patients with afferent tubular segments. Urodynamic and radiographic studies showed that the competence of the antireflux nipples was secured by the raised surrounding intravesical pressure. This, however, also resulted in a transient functional obstruction, and a gradual rise of the basal pressure in the upper urinary tracts was recorded. In patients with afferent ileal tubular segments, contrast medium could be forced upwards into the renal pelvis when the bladder substitutes were overfilled. However, despite raised intravesical pressures, peristalsis in the isoperistaltic afferent tubular segment gradually returned

  1. Link and subgraph likelihoods in random undirected networks with fixed and partially fixed degree sequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jacob G.; Foster, David V.; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2007-10-01

    The simplest null models for networks, used to distinguish significant features of a particular network from a priori expected features, are random ensembles with the degree sequence fixed by the specific network of interest. These “fixed degree sequence” (FDS) ensembles are, however, famously resistant to analytic attack. In this paper we introduce ensembles with partially-fixed degree sequences (PFDS) and compare analytic results obtained for them with Monte Carlo results for the FDS ensemble. These results include link likelihoods, subgraph likelihoods, and degree correlations. We find that local structural features in the FDS ensemble can be reasonably well estimated by simultaneously fixing only the degrees of a few nodes, in addition to the total number of nodes and links. As test cases we use two protein interaction networks (Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the internet on the autonomous system (AS) level, and the World Wide Web. Fixing just the degrees of two nodes gives the mean neighbor degree as a function of node degree, ⟨k'⟩k , in agreement with results explicitly obtained from rewiring. For power law degree distributions, we derive the disassortativity analytically. In the PFDS ensemble the partition function can be expanded diagrammatically. We obtain an explicit expression for the link likelihood to lowest order, which reduces in the limit of large, sparse undirected networks with L links and with kmax≪L to the simple formula P(k,k')=kk'/(2L+kk') . In a similar limit, the probability for three nodes to be linked into a triangle reduces to the factorized expression PΔ(k1,k2,k3)=P(k1,k2)P(k1,k3)P(k2,k3) .

  2. A comparison of adaptive and fixed schedules of practice.

    PubMed

    Mettler, Everett; Massey, Christine M; Kellman, Philip J

    2016-07-01

    Understanding and optimizing spacing during learning is a central topic for research in learning and memory and has substantial implications for real-world learning. Spacing memory retrievals across time improves memory relative to massed practice-the well-known spacing effect. Most spacing research has utilized fixed (predetermined) spacing intervals. Some findings indicate advantages of expanding over equal spacing (e.g., Landauer & Bjork, 1978); however, evidence is mixed (e.g., Karpicke & Roediger, 2007), and the field has lacked an integrated explanation. Learning may instead depend on interactions of spacing with an underlying variable of learning strength that varies for learners and items, and it may be better optimized by adaptive adjustments of spacing to learners' ongoing performance. Two studies investigated an adaptive spacing algorithm, Adaptive Response-Time-based Sequencing or ARTS (Mettler, Massey & Kellman, 2011) that uses response-time and accuracy to generate spacing. Experiment 1 compared adaptive scheduling with fixed schedules having either expanding or equal spacing. Experiment 2 compared adaptive schedules to 2 fixed "yoked" schedules that were copied from adaptive participants, equating average spacing across conditions. In both experiments, adaptive scheduling outperformed fixed conditions at immediate and delayed tests of retention. No evidence was found for differences between expanding and equal spacing. Yoked conditions showed that learning gains were due to adaptation to individual items and learners. Adaptive spacing based on ongoing assessments of learning strength yields greater learning gains than fixed schedules, a finding that helps to understand the spacing effect theoretically and has direct applications for enhancing learning in many domains. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27123574

  3. The molecular interactions between filtered proteins and proximal tubular cells in proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Baines, Richard J; Brunskill, Nigel J

    2008-01-01

    Proteinuria is associated with progressive chronic kidney disease and poor cardiovascular outcomes. Exposure of proximal tubular epithelial cells to excess proteins leads to the development of proteinuric nephropathy with tubular atrophy, interstitial inflammation and scarring. Numerous signalling pathways are activated in proximal tubular epithelial cells under proteinuric conditions resulting in gene transcription, altered growth and the secretion of inflammatory and profibrotic mediators. Megalin, the proximal tubular scavenger receptor for filtered macromolecules, has intrinsic signalling functions and may also link albumin to growth factor receptor signalling via regulated intramembrane proteolysis. It now seems that endocytosis is not always a prerequisite for albumin-evoked alterations in proximal tubular cell phenotype. Recent evidence shows the presence of other potential receptors for proteins, such as the neonatal Fc receptor and CD36, in the proximal tubular epithelium. PMID:18849618

  4. Macrophage matrix metalloproteinase-9 mediates epithelial-mesenchymal transition in vitro in murine renal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Thian Kui; Zheng, Guoping; Hsu, Tzu-Ting; Wang, Ying; Lee, Vincent W S; Tian, Xinrui; Wang, Yiping; Cao, Qi; Wang, Ya; Harris, David C H

    2010-03-01

    As a rich source of pro-fibrogenic growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), macrophages are well-placed to play an important role in renal fibrosis. However, the exact underlying mechanisms and the extent of macrophage involvement are unclear. Tubular cell epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important contributor to renal fibrosis and MMPs to induction of tubular cell EMT. The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of macrophages and MMPs to induction of tubular cell EMT. The murine C1.1 tubular epithelial cell line and primary tubular epithelial cells were cultured in activated macrophage-conditioned medium (AMCM) derived from lipopolysaccharide-activated J774 macrophages. MMP-9, but not MMP-2 activity was detected in AMCM. AMCM-induced tubular cell EMT in C1.1 cells was inhibited by broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor (GM6001), MMP-2/9 inhibitor, and in AMCM after MMP-9 removal by monoclonal Ab against MMP-9. AMCM-induced EMT in primary tubular epithelial cells was inhibited by MMP-2/9 inhibitor. MMP-9 induced tubular cell EMT in both C1.1 cells and primary tubular epithelial cells. Furthermore, MMP-9 induced tubular cell EMT in C1.1 cells to an extent similar to transforming growth factor-beta. Transforming growth factor-beta-induced tubular cell EMT in C1.1 cells was inhibited by MMP-2/9 inhibitor. Our in vitro study provides evidence that MMPs, specifically MMP-9, secreted by effector macrophages can induce tubular cell EMT and thereby contribute to renal fibrosis. PMID:20075196

  5. Models for coupling of salt and water transport; Proximal tubular reabsorption in Necturus kidney.

    PubMed

    Sackin, H; Boulpaep, E L

    1975-12-01

    Models for coupling of salt and water transport are developed with two important assumptions appropriate for leaky epithelia. (a) The tight junction is permeable to both sale and water. (b) Active Na transport into the lateral speces is assumed to occur uniformly along the length of the channel. The proposed models deal specifically with the intraepithelial mechanism of proximal tubular resbsorption in the Necturus kidney although they have implications for epithelial transport in the gallbladder and small intestine as well. The first model (continuous version) is similar to the standing gradient model devised by Diamond and Bossert but used different boundary conditions. In contrast to Diamond and Bossert's model, the predicted concentration profiles are relatively flat with no sizable gradients along the interspace. The second model (compartment version) expands Curran's model of epithelial salt and water transport by including additional compartments and considering both electrical and chemical driving forces for individual Na and Cl ions as well as hydraulic and osmotic driving forces for water. In both models, ion and water fluxes are investigated as a function of the transport parameters. The behavior of the models is consistent with previously suggested mechanisms for the control of net transport, particularly during saline diuresis. Under all conditions the predicted ratio of net solute to solvent flux, or emergent concentration, deviates from exact isotonicity (except when the basement membrane has an appreciable salt reflection coefficient). However, the degree of hypertonicity may be small enough to be experimentally indistinguishable from isotonic transport. PMID:1104761

  6. Phase diagram of a tubular vesicle adhering between two parallel rigid planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiaohua; Zhao, Shumin; Zhai, Xiaobo; Zhang, Kai; Chen, Huawei; Zhang, Shengli

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we propose a two-dimensional (2D) theoretical model to explore the adhesion behavior of a tubular vesicle adhering between two rigid planes, which are constrained by a couple of forces. Based upon the free-energy functional of the system, the equations for the equilibrium shape are derived. The general solution for the system with zero pressure is obtained analytically and the stability of the corresponding equilibrium shapes is tested by numerical simulation. With the volume constraint, three kinds of typical stable shapes are obtained through scanning the parameter space numerically. The phase diagram is obtained and it is occupied mostly by nonsymmetrical shapes. The force-displacement curves obtained for our model are in agreement with experimental results. The catastrophe of force is found at a critical state, which reveals a huge expanding force will act on the two planes by the vesicle. It also implies that vesicles can spontaneously squeeze into a slit only due to adhesion.

  7. Progressive vascular remodeling and reduced neointimal formation after placement of a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent in an experimental model.

    PubMed

    Carter, A J; Scott, D; Laird, J R; Bailey, L; Kovach, J A; Hoopes, T G; Pierce, K; Heath, K; Hess, K; Farb, A; Virmani, R

    1998-06-01

    Despite the improvements afforded by intracoronary stenting, restenosis remains a significant problem. The optimal physical properties of a stent have not been defined. We compared the vascular response to a thermoelastic self-expanding nitinol stent with a balloon-expandable tubular slotted stainless steel stent in normal porcine coronary arteries. Twenty-two stents (11 nitinol and 11 tubular slotted) were implanted in 11 miniature swine. The nitinol stents were deployed using the intrinsic thermal properties of the metal, without adjunctive balloon dilation. The tubular slotted stents were implanted using a noncompliant balloon with a mean inflation pressure of 12 atm. Intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and histology were used to evaluate the vascular response to the stents. The mean cross-sectional area (CSA) of the nitinol stents (mm2) as measured by IVUS increased from 8.13 +/- 1.09 at implant to 9.10 +/- 0.99 after 28 days (P = 0.038), while the mean CSA of the tubular slotted stents was unchanged (7.84 +/- 1.39 mm2 vs. 7.10 +/- 1.07 mm2, P = 0.25). On histology at 3 days, the tubular slotted stents had more inflammatory cells adjacent to the stent wires (5.7 +/- 1.5 cells/0.1 mm2) than the nitinol (3.9 +/- 1.3 cells/0.1 mm2, P = 0.016). The tubular slotted also had increased thrombus thickness (83 +/- 85 microm) than the nitinol stents (43 +/- 25 microm, P = 0.0014). After 28 days, the vessel injury score was similar for the nitinol (0.6 +/- 0.3) and the tubular slotted (0.5 +/- 0.1, P = 0.73) designs. The mean neointimal area (0.97 +/- 0.46 mm2 vs. 1.96 +/- 0.34 mm2, P = 0.002) and percent area stenosis (15 +/- 7 vs. 33 +/- 7, P = 0.003) were significantly lower in the nitinol than in the tubular slotted stents, respectively. We conclude that a thermoelastic nitinol stent exerts a more favorable effect on vascular remodeling, with less neointimal formation, than a balloon-expandable design. Progressive intrinsic stent expansion after implant does not appear to

  8. Expression of the Troponin C at 41C Gene in Adult Drosophila Tubular Muscles Depends upon Both Positive and Negative Regulatory Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Chechenova, Maria B.; Maes, Sara; Cripps, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Most animals express multiple isoforms of structural muscle proteins to produce tissues with different physiological properties. In Drosophila, the adult muscles include tubular-type muscles and the fibrillar indirect flight muscles. Regulatory processes specifying tubular muscle fate remain incompletely understood, therefore we chose to analyze the transcriptional regulation of TpnC41C, a Troponin C gene expressed in the tubular jump muscles, but not in the fibrillar flight muscles. We identified a 300-bp promoter fragment of TpnC41C sufficient for the fiber-specific reporter expression. Through an analysis of this regulatory element, we identified two sites necessary for the activation of the enhancer. Mutations in each of these sites resulted in 70% reduction of enhancer activity. One site was characterized as a binding site for Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2. In addition, we identified a repressive element that prevents activation of the enhancer in other muscle fiber types. Mutation of this site increased jump muscle-specific expression of the reporter, but more importantly reporter expression expanded into the indirect flight muscles. Our findings demonstrate that expression of the TpnC41C gene in jump muscles requires integration of multiple positive and negative transcriptional inputs. Identification of the transcriptional regulators binding the cis-elements that we identified will reveal the regulatory pathways controlling muscle fiber differentiation. PMID:26641463

  9. The dental management of troublesome twos: renal tubular acidosis and rampant caries

    PubMed Central

    B, Sandhyarani; Huddar, Dayanand; Patil, Anil; Sankeshwari, Banashree

    2013-01-01

    Renal tubular acidosis is a group of disorders in which there is metabolic acidosis due to defect in renal tubular acidification mechanism to maintain normal plasma bicarbonate and blood pH. Irrespective of organ system involved, oral cavity often reflects the disease occurring anywhere in the body. Thus congenital chronic renal diseases, causing acid–base disturbances affects development and structure of the teeth. Chronic renal tubular acidosis causes enamel defects, dental caries, oral candidiasis, angular cheilitis, etc. We hereby present an unusual case report of a 4-year-old boy suffering from renal tubular acidosis associated with rampant caries, whose full mouth rehabilitation has been done. PMID:23667245

  10. Reconstruction of Female Urethra with Tubularized Anterior Vaginal Flap

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin; Bansal, Sumit; Kapadnis, Lomesh; Savalia, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Female urethral injury is a rare disease. Causes of urethral injuries are prolonged obstructed labour, gynaecological surgeries like vaginoplasty and post traumatic urethral injuries. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcome of female urethral reconstruction using tubularized anterior vaginal wall flap covered with fibroadipose martius flap and autologous fascia sling in patients with urethral loss. Aim Aim of study was to evaluate outcome of reconstruction of female urethra with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all the patients with complete urethral loss was done from August 2008 to July 2015. Total seven patients were included in study. All patients presenting with total urethral loss were included. These patients were treated with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Neourethra was covered with Martius labial flap and autologous fascia lata or rectus abdominis fascia sling. Most common cause of urethral loss was obstructed labour (57.1%). Postoperatively patients were assessed for continence, urine flow rate, ultrasound for upper urinary tract and post void residue. Results Mean operative time was 180 minutes (160-200 minutes) and Intraoperative blood loss was 220ml (170-260 ml). Mean postoperative hospital stay was eight days (seven to nine days) Mean post surgery maximum urine flow rate was more than 15ml/sec (6.7-18.2ml/sec) and mean post void residual urine was 22.5ml (10-50ml). Median follow-up time was 35 months. All patients were catheter free and continent post three weeks of surgery except one patient who developed mild stress urinary incontinence. One patient developed urethral stenosis which was managed by intermittent serial urethral dilatation. Conclusion Female neourethral reconstruction with tabularized anterior vaginal flap and autologous pubovaginal sling is feasible in patients of total urethral loss with success rate of approximately 86%. It should be considered in

  11. High temperature helical tubular receiver for concentrating solar power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Nazmul

    In the field of conventional cleaner power generation technology, concentrating solar power systems have introduced remarkable opportunity. In a solar power tower, solar energy concentrated by the heliostats at a single point produces very high temperature. Falling solid particles or heat transfer fluid passing through that high temperature region absorbs heat to generate electricity. Increasing the residence time will result in more heat gain and increase efficiency. A novel design of solar receiver for both fluid and solid particle is approached in this paper which can increase residence time resulting in higher temperature gain in one cycle compared to conventional receivers. The helical tubular solar receiver placed at the focused sunlight region meets the higher outlet temperature and efficiency. A vertical tubular receiver is modeled and analyzed for single phase flow with molten salt as heat transfer fluid and alloy625 as heat transfer material. The result is compared to a journal paper of similar numerical and experimental setup for validating our modeling. New types of helical tubular solar receivers are modeled and analyzed with heat transfer fluid turbulent flow in single phase, and granular particle and air plug flow in multiphase to observe the temperature rise in one cyclic operation. The Discrete Ordinate radiation model is used for numerical analysis with simulation software Ansys Fluent 15.0. The Eulerian granular multiphase model is used for multiphase flow. Applying the same modeling parameters and boundary conditions, the results of vertical and helical receivers are compared. With a helical receiver, higher temperature gain of heat transfer fluid is achieved in one cycle for both single phase and multiphase flow compared to the vertical receiver. Performance is also observed by varying dimension of helical receiver.

  12. Tubular Overexpression of Gremlin Induces Renal Damage Susceptibility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Droguett, Alejandra; Krall, Paola; Burgos, M. Eugenia; Valderrama, Graciela; Carpio, Daniel; Ardiles, Leopoldo; Rodriguez-Diez, Raquel; Kerr, Bredford; Walz, Katherina; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesus; Mezzano, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of patients are recognized worldwide to have chronic kidney disease. Glomerular and interstitial fibrosis are hallmarks of renal progression. However, fibrosis of the kidney remains an unresolved challenge, and its molecular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Gremlin is an embryogenic gene that has been shown to play a key role in nephrogenesis, and its expression is generally low in the normal adult kidney. However, gremlin expression is elevated in many human renal diseases, including diabetic nephropathy, pauci-immune glomerulonephritis and chronic allograft nephropathy. Several studies have proposed that gremlin may be involved in renal damage by acting as a downstream mediator of TGF-β. To examine the in vivo role of gremlin in kidney pathophysiology, we generated seven viable transgenic mouse lines expressing human gremlin (GREM1) specifically in renal proximal tubular epithelial cells under the control of an androgen-regulated promoter. These lines demonstrated 1.2- to 200-fold increased GREM1 expression. GREM1 transgenic mice presented a normal phenotype and were without proteinuria and renal function involvement. In response to the acute renal damage cause by folic acid nephrotoxicity, tubule-specific GREM1 transgenic mice developed increased proteinuria after 7 and 14 days compared with wild-type treated mice. At 14 days tubular lesions, such as dilatation, epithelium flattening and hyaline casts, with interstitial cell infiltration and mild fibrosis were significantly more prominent in transgenic mice than wild-type mice. Tubular GREM1 overexpression was correlated with the renal upregulation of profibrotic factors, such as TGF-β and αSMA, and with increased numbers of monocytes/macrophages and lymphocytes compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, our results suggest that GREM1-overexpressing mice have an increased susceptibility to renal damage, supporting the involvement of gremlin in renal damage progression. This

  13. Type 4 renal tubular acidosis in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Manjunath

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 66-year-old diabetic patient who presented with muscle weakness 2 weeks after kidney transplantation. Her immunosuppressive regimen included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroids. She was found to have hyperkalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Tacrolimus levels were in therapeutic range. All other drugs such as beta blockers and trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole were stopped. She did not respond to routine antikalemic measures. Further evaluation revealed type 4 renal tubular acidosis. Serum potassium levels returned to normal after starting sodium bicarbonate and fludrocortisone therapy. Though hyperkalemia is common in kidney transplant recipients, determining exact cause can guide specific treatment. PMID:27105603

  14. Tubular Unimolecular Transmembrane Channels: Construction Strategy and Transport Activities.

    PubMed

    Si, Wen; Xin, Pengyang; Li, Zhan-Ting; Hou, Jun-Li

    2015-06-16

    Lipid bilayer membranes separate living cells from their environment. Membrane proteins are responsible for the processing of ion and molecular inputs and exports, sensing stimuli and signals across the bilayers, which may operate in a channel or carrier mechanism. Inspired by these wide-ranging functions of membrane proteins, chemists have made great efforts in constructing synthetic mimics in order to understand the transport mechanisms, create materials for separation, and develop therapeutic agents. Since the report of an alkylated cyclodextrin for transporting Cu(2+) and Co(2+) by Tabushi and co-workers in 1982, chemists have constructed a variety of artificial transmembrane channels by making use of either the multimolecular self-assembly or unimolecular strategy. In the context of the design of unimolecular channels, important advances have been made, including, among others, the tethering of natural gramicidin A or alamethicin and the modification of various macrocycles such as crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, and cucurbiturils. Many of these unimolecular channels exhibit high transport ability for metal ions, particularly K(+) and Na(+). Concerning the development of artificial channels based on macrocyclic frameworks, one straightforward and efficient approach is to introduce discrete chains to reinforce their capability to insert into bilayers. Currently, this approach has found the widest applications in the systems of crown ethers and calixarenes. We envisioned that for macrocycle-based unimolecular channels, control of the arrangement of the appended chains in the upward and/or downward direction would favor the insertion of the molecular systems into bilayers, while the introduction of additional interactions among the chains would further stabilize a tubular conformation. Both factors should be helpful for the formation of new efficient channels. In this Account, we discuss our efforts in designing new unimolecular artificial channels from

  15. Distal renal tubular acidosis and amelogenesis imperfecta: A rare association.

    PubMed

    Ravi, P; Ekambaranath, T S; Arasi, S Ellil; Fernando, E

    2013-11-01

    Renal tubular acidosis (RTA) is characterized by a normal anion gap with hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis. Primary distal RTA (type I) is the most common RTA in children. Childhood presentation of distal RTA includes vomiting, failure to thrive, metabolic acidosis, and hypokalemia. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) represents a condition where the dental enamel and oral tissues are affected in an equal manner resulting in the hypoplastic or hypopigmented teeth. We report a 10-year-old girl, previously asymptomatic presented with the hypokalemic paralysis and on work-up found out to have type I RTA. The discoloration of teeth and enamel was diagnosed as AI. PMID:24339526

  16. Excitation of symmetric surface wavesby electron tubular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, Yu A.; Olefir, V. P.; Azarenkov, N. A.

    2006-08-01

    The nonlinear theory of symmetric surface wave excitation by a low-density electron tubular beam in a cylindrical plasma-vacuum-metal waveguide is presented. A set of nonlinear equations is derived that describes the time evolution of the plasma-beam interaction. The influence of the beam and waveguide structure parameters on the saturation amplitude and excitation efficiency of the surface wave is investigated both numerically and analytically. Thermalization of the electron beam in the wave-fields is studied as well.

  17. Ibuprofen-related renal tubular acidosis in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mallett, Andrew; Lynch, Matthew; John, George T; Healy, Helen; Lust, Karin

    2011-01-01

    Ibuprofen-related renal tubular acidosis (RTA) has not been previously described in pregnancy but its occurrence outside of pregnancy is being increasingly described. In this case, a 34-year-old woman presented in the third trimester of pregnancy with Type 1 or distal RTA related to ibuprofen and codeine abuse. It was complicated by acute on chronic renal dysfunction and hypokalemia. Delivery at 37 weeks gestation due to concerns of evolving preeclampsia resulted in the birth of a healthy neonate. RTA and hypokalemia were remediated and ibuprofen and codeine abuse ceased. Some renal dysfunction however continued. Thorough and repeated history taking as well as vigilance for this condition is suggested.

  18. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-11-17

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  19. Expanding the Universe of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Definitions of "education" and "rural" are debunked and expanded. The three major tasks of rural education are educating people to understand their own needs, the unavoidable changes that will transform rural Australia within their lifetimes, and the range of technologies that can enhance their well-being. Presents a strategy for educating…

  20. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2013-01-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  1. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-02-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  2. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G

    2015-02-03

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  3. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  4. Emotional Giftedness: An Expanded View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piechowski, Michael M.

    This paper discusses an expanded definition of the concept of emotional giftedness in children as defined by Annemarie Roeper. In contrast to examples of academic and artistic prodigies, cases are reviewed that illustrate less tangibly measured examples of children's giftedness, such as expressions of compassion, moral sensitivity, positive…

  5. Common Ground: Expanding Our Horizons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDevitt, Michele J.

    In "Common Ground: Dialogue, Understanding, and the Teaching of Composition," Kurt Spellmeyer seeks to familiarize students and teachers with the linguistic and cultural no-man's-land separating them. Reinstating the value of two writing conventions often used by traditional students--expressive and commonplaces--can help expand on the horizons of…

  6. Paul Hanna and "Expanding Communities"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared R.

    2004-01-01

    The development and promotion of the "expanding communities" curriculum design model for teaching elementary school social studies was a crucial episode in the history of social studies. This article profiles how the model developed in the mind of its most effective promoter, Paul Robert Hanna. Paul Hanna understood early in his career the…

  7. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-12-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  8. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2009-10-27

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  9. Expanding the eukaryotic genetic code

    DOEpatents

    Chin, Jason W.; Cropp, T. Ashton; Anderson, J. Christopher; Schultz, Peter G.

    2010-09-14

    This invention provides compositions and methods for producing translational components that expand the number of genetically encoded amino acids in eukaryotic cells. The components include orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases and unnatural amino acids. Proteins and methods of producing proteins with unnatural amino acids in eukaryotic cells are also provided.

  10. Funding human services: fixed utility versus fixed budget.

    PubMed

    McCready, D J; Rahn, S L

    1986-01-01

    It is argued in this paper that government allocations for human services based on inputs rather than outcomes, reduce efficiency in social and health service provision. An alternative system of budgeting or contracting on the basis of cost-per-closed case and case outcome is discussed. An interdependency between fixed budget and fixed utility models of allocation is affirmed. The locus of decision-making for operationalizing this interdependency is seen as the program and budget review panel to which operating agencies and government departments must submit financial and program accounting information from year to year. In isolation, the fixed budget approach degenerates into routine allocation or contract renewal with a focus on such input and output variables as volume of service and unit cost, and the fixed utility approach, into political stalemate. Simulated examples are given to demonstrate how allocation on the basis of inputs and outputs alone provides an incentive to inefficiency, and a fixed utility orientation to efficiency. PMID:10311890

  11. Carbon dioxide uptake efficiency by outdoor microalgal cultures in tubular airlift photobioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Sobczuk, T.M.; Camacho, F.G.; Rubio, F.C.; Fernandez, F.G.A.; Grima, E.M.

    2000-02-20

    The influence of solar irradiance and carbon dioxide molar fraction of injected CO{sub 2}-air mixtures on the behavior of outdoor continuous cultures of the microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum in tubular airlift photobioreactors was analyzed. instantaneous solar irradiance, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, biomass concentration, and the mass flow rates of both the inlet and outlet oxygen and carbon with both the liquid and gas phases were measured. In addition, elemental analysis of the biomass and the cell-free culture medium was performed. The oxygen production rate and carbon dioxide consumption rate increased hyperbolically with the incident solar irradiance on the reactor surface. Carbon losses showed a negative correlation with the daily variation of the carbon dioxide consumption rate. The maximum CO{sub 2} uptake efficiency was 63% of the CO{sub 2} supplied when the CO{sub 2} concentration in the gas supplied was 60% v/v. Carbon losses were > 100% during the night, due to CO{sub 2} production by respiration, and hyperbolically decreased to values of 10% to 20% in the midday hours. An increase in the carbon fixed in the biomass with the solar cycle was observed. A slight daily decrease of carbon content of the cell-free culture medium indicated the existence of carbon accumulation in the culture. A decrease in CO{sub 2} molar fraction in the injected gas had a double benefit: first, the biomass productivity of the system was enhanced from 2.05 to 2.47 g L{sup {minus}1} day{sup {minus}1} by reduction of CO{sub 2} inhibition and/or pH gradients; and second, the carbon losses during the daylight period were reduced by 60%. The fluid dynamics in the reactor also influenced the carbon losses: the higher the liquid flow rate the higher the carbon losses. By using a previous mass transfer model the experimental results were simulated and the usefulness of this method in the evaluation and scale-up of tubular photobioreactors was established.

  12. Numerical investigation of cavitation performance on bulb tubular turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, L. G.; Guo, P. C.; Zheng, X. B.; Luo, X. Q.

    2016-05-01

    The cavitation flow phenomena may occur in the bulb tubular turbine at some certain operation conditions, which even decrease the performance of units and causes insatiably noise and vibration when it goes worse. A steady cavitating flow numerical simulations study is carried out on the bulb tubular unit with the same blade pitch angle and different guide vane openings by using the commercial code ANSYS CFX in this paper. The phenomena of cavitation induction areas and development process are obtained and draws cavitation performance curves. The numerical results show that the travelling bubble cavity is the main types of cavitation development over a wide operating range of discharge and this type of cavitation begins to sensitive to the value of cavitation number when the discharge exceeding a certain valve, in this condition, it can lead to a severe free bubble formation with the gradually decrement of cavitation number. The reported cavitation performance curves results indicate that the flow blockage incident would happen because of a mount of free bubble formation in the flow passage when the cavity developed to certain extend, which caused head drop behavior and power broken dramatically and influenced the output power.

  13. Parallel, fluorous open-tubular chromatography using microstructured fibers.

    PubMed

    Daley, Adam B; Wright, Ramin D; Oleschuk, Richard D

    2011-04-01

    Although commonly used in gas chromatography, open-tubular columns for liquid chromatography have seen their development hindered by a number of factors both theoretical and practical. Requiring small diameters, great lengths and specialized detection systems to achieve a proper chromatographic response, columns of this sort have largely been ignored despite the highly desirable column performance an optimized system would provide. Here, we introduce the use of microstructured fibers (MSFs) as a platform for the development of multiplexed open-tubular liquid chromatography (OTLC) columns. The multiple, parallel silica channels presented by the MSF act as a promising substrate for an OTLC column, as they have diameters near the ideal range for interactions (1-3 μm), minimize flow-induced backpressure through their many uniform paths, and increase the loading capacity compared to a single capillary channel of similar size. Additionally, with outer diameters comparable to regular fused silica capillaries, MSFs can easily be employed in conventional chromatographic systems, eliminating the need for specialized equipment. Finally, MSF columns of this type can be functionalized using silane coupling techniques to allow the introduction of a wide variety of stationary phase chemistries. While in this report we explore the potential and limitations of fluorine-functionalized MSFs as OTLC columns, other stationary phase materials could easily be substituted by choosing appropriate silanization reagents. Particular attention here will be paid to the physical and performance characteristics of the fabricated columns, as well as avenues for their improvement and implementation. PMID:21435484

  14. Understanding shape and morphology of unusual tubular starch nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gong, Bei; Liu, Wenxia; Tan, Hua; Yu, Dehai; Song, Zhaoping; Lucia, Lucian A

    2016-10-20

    Starch nanocrystals (SNC) are aptly described as the insoluble degradation byproducts of starch granules that purportedly display morphologies that are platelet-like, round, square, and oval-like. In this work, we reported the preparation of SNC with unprecedented tubular structures through sulfuric acid hydrolysis of normal maize starch, subsequent exposure to ammonia and relaxation at 4°C. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy observation clearly proved that the SNCs possess tubular nanostructures with polygonal cross-section. After further reviewing the transformations of SNC by acid hydrolysis, ammonia treatment, and curing time at 4°C, a mechanism for T-SNC formation is suggested. It is conjectured that T-SNC gradually self-assembles by combination of smaller platelet-like/square nanocrystals likely loosely aggregated by starch molecular chains from residual amorphous regions. This work paves the way for the pursuit of new approaches for the preparation of starch-based nanomaterials possessing unique morphologies. PMID:27474612

  15. Nano-Tubular Cellulose for Bioprocess Technology Development

    PubMed Central

    Koutinas, Athanasios A.; Sypsas, Vasilios; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Michelis, Andreas; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kordulis, Christos; Lycourghiotis, Alexis; Banat, Ibrahim M.; Nigam, Poonam; Marchant, Roger; Giannouli, Myrsini; Yianoulis, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Delignified cellulosic material has shown a significant promotional effect on the alcoholic fermentation as yeast immobilization support. However, its potential for further biotechnological development is unexploited. This study reports the characterization of this tubular/porous cellulosic material, which was done by SEM, porosimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry. The results showed that the structure of nano-tubular cellulose (NC) justifies its suitability for use in “cold pasteurization” processes and its promoting activity in bioprocessing (fermentation). The last was explained by a glucose pump theory. Also, it was demonstrated that crystallization of viscous invert sugar solutions during freeze drying could not be otherwise achieved unless NC was present. This effect as well as the feasibility of extremely low temperature fermentation are due to reduction of the activation energy, and have facilitated the development of technologies such as wine fermentations at home scale (in a domestic refrigerator). Moreover, NC may lead to new perspectives in research such as the development of new composites, templates for cylindrical nano-particles, etc. PMID:22496794

  16. Tubular bamboo charcoal for anode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jun; Ye, Dingding; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2014-12-01

    The anode material plays a significant role in determining the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, the bamboo charcoal tube is proposed as a novel anode substrate by carbonizing the natural bamboo. Its surface functional groups, biocompatibility and internal resistance are thoroughly investigated. Performance of the MFCs with a conventional graphite tube anode and a bamboo charcoal tube anode is also compared. The results indicate that the tubular bamboo charcoal anode exhibits advantages over the graphite tube anode in terms of rougher surface, superior biocompatibility and smaller total internal resistance. Moreover, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis for the bamboo charcoal reveals that the introduced C-N bonds facilitate the electron transfer between the biofilm and electrodes. As a result, the MFC with a bamboo charcoal tube anode achieves a 50% improvement in the maximum power density over the graphite tube case. Furthermore, scale-up of the bamboo charcoal tube anode is demonstrated by employing a bundle of tubular bamboo charcoal to reach higher power output.

  17. Tubular dielectric elastomer actuator for active fluidic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoul, David; Pei, Qibing

    2015-10-01

    We report a novel low-profile, biomimetic dielectric elastomer tubular actuator capable of actively controlling hydraulic flow. The tubular actuator has been established as a reliable tunable valve, pinching a secondary silicone tube completely shut in the absence of a fluidic pressure bias or voltage, offering a high degree of resistance against fluidic flow, and able to open and completely remove this resistance to flow with an applied low power actuation voltage. The system demonstrates a rise in pressure of ∼3.0 kPa when the dielectric elastomer valve is in the passive, unactuated state, and there is a quadratic fall in this pressure with increasing actuation voltage, until ∼0 kPa is reached at 2.4 kV. The device is reliable for at least 2000 actuation cycles for voltages at or below 2.2 kV. Furthermore, modeling of the actuator and fluidic system yields results consistent with the observed experimental dependence of intrasystem pressure on input flow rate, actuator prestretch, and actuation voltage. To our knowledge, this is the first actuator of its type that can control fluid flow by directly actuating the walls of a tube. Potential applications may include an implantable artificial sphincter, part of a peristaltic pump, or a computerized valve for fluidic or pneumatic control.

  18. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, Franklin D.; Middlebrooks, Willis B.; DeMario, Edmund E.

    1994-01-01

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube.

  19. Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member

    DOEpatents

    Obermeyer, F.D.; Middlebrooks, W.B.; DeMario, E.E.

    1994-10-18

    Vibration dampener for dampening vibration of a tubular member, such as an instrumentation tube of the type found in nuclear reactor pressure vessels is disclosed. The instrumentation tube is received in an outer tubular member, such as a guide thimble tube. The vibration dampener comprises an annular sleeve which is attachable to the inside surface of the guide thimble tube and which is sized to surround the instrumentation tube. Dimples are attached to the interior wall of the sleeve for radially supporting the instrumentation tube. The wall of the sleeve has a flexible spring member, which is formed from the wall, disposed opposite the dimples for biasing the instrumentation tube into abutment with the dimples. Flow-induced vibration of the instrumentation tube will cause it to move out of contact with the dimples and further engage the spring member, which will flex a predetermined amount and exert a reactive force against the instrumentation tube to restrain its movement. The amount by which the spring member will flex is less than the unrestrained amplitude of vibration of the instrumentation tube. The reactive force exerted against the instrumentation tube will be sufficient to return it to its original axial position within the thimble tube. In this manner, vibration of the instrumentation tube is dampened so that in-core physics measurements are accurate and so that the instrumentation tube will not wear against the inside surface of the guide thimble tube. 14 figs.

  20. Glutamatergic Signaling Maintains the Epithelial Phenotype of Proximal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bozic, Milica; de Rooij, Johan; Parisi, Eva; Ortega, Marta Ruiz; Fernandez, Elvira

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) contributes to the progression of renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis. The N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), which is present in proximal tubular epithelium, is a glutamate receptor that acts as a calcium channel. Activation of NMDAR induces actin rearrangement in cells of the central nervous system, but whether it helps maintain the epithelial phenotype of the proximal tubule is unknown. Here, knockdown of NMDAR1 in a proximal tubule cell line (HK-2) induced changes in cell morphology, reduced E-cadherin expression, and increased α-SMA expression. Induction of EMT with TGF-β1 led to downregulation of both E-cadherin and membrane-associated β-catenin, reorganization of F-actin, expression of mesenchymal markers de novo, upregulation of Snail1, and increased cell migration; co-treatment with NMDA attenuated all of these changes. Furthermore, NMDA reduced TGF-β1–induced phosphorylation of Erk1/2 and Akt and the activation of Ras, suggesting that NMDA antagonizes TGF-β1–induced EMT by inhibiting the Ras-MEK pathway. In the unilateral ureteral obstruction model, treatment with NMDA blunted obstruction-induced upregulation of α-SMA, FSP1, and collagen I and downregulation of E-cadherin. Taken together, these results suggest that NMDAR plays a critical role in preserving the normal epithelial phenotype and modulating tubular EMT. PMID:21597037

  1. Nano-tubular cellulose for bioprocess technology development.

    PubMed

    Koutinas, Athanasios A; Sypsas, Vasilios; Kandylis, Panagiotis; Michelis, Andreas; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kourkoutas, Yiannis; Kordulis, Christos; Lycourghiotis, Alexis; Banat, Ibrahim M; Nigam, Poonam; Marchant, Roger; Giannouli, Myrsini; Yianoulis, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    Delignified cellulosic material has shown a significant promotional effect on the alcoholic fermentation as yeast immobilization support. However, its potential for further biotechnological development is unexploited. This study reports the characterization of this tubular/porous cellulosic material, which was done by SEM, porosimetry and X-ray powder diffractometry. The results showed that the structure of nano-tubular cellulose (NC) justifies its suitability for use in "cold pasteurization" processes and its promoting activity in bioprocessing (fermentation). The last was explained by a glucose pump theory. Also, it was demonstrated that crystallization of viscous invert sugar solutions during freeze drying could not be otherwise achieved unless NC was present. This effect as well as the feasibility of extremely low temperature fermentation are due to reduction of the activation energy, and have facilitated the development of technologies such as wine fermentations at home scale (in a domestic refrigerator). Moreover, NC may lead to new perspectives in research such as the development of new composites, templates for cylindrical nano-particles, etc. PMID:22496794

  2. Recent progress in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1997-12-31

    The tubular design of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and the materials used therein have been validated by successful, continuous electrical testing over 69,000 h of early technology cells built on a calcia-stabilized zirconia porous support tube (PST). In the latest technology cells, the PST has been eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite air electrode tube. These air electrode supported (AES) cells have shown a power density increase of about 33% with a significantly improved performance stability over the previously used PST type cells. These cells have also demonstrated the ability to thermally cycle over 100 times without any mechanical damage or performance loss. In addition, recent changes in processes used to fabricate these cells have resulted in significant cost reduction. This paper reviews the fabrication and performance of the state-of-the-art AES tubular cells. It also describes the materials and processing studies that are underway to further reduce the cell cost, and summarizes the recently built power generation systems that employed state-of-the-art AES cells.

  3. Advances in tubular solid oxide fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, S.C.

    1996-12-31

    The design, materials and fabrication processes for the earlier technology Westinghouse tubular geometry cell have been described in detail previously. In that design, the active cell components were deposited in the form of thin layers on a ceramic porous support tube (PST). The tubular design of these cells and the materials used therein have been validated by successful electrical testing for over 65,000 h (>7 years). In these early technology PST cells, the support tube, although sufficiently porous, presented an inherent impedance to air flow toward air electrode. In order to reduce such impedance to air flow, the wall thickness of the PST was first decreased from the original 2 mm (the thick-wall PST) to 1.2 mm (the thin-wall PST). The calcia-stabilized zirconia support tube has now been completely eliminated and replaced by a doped lanthanum manganite tube in state-of-the-art SOFCs. This doped lanthanum manganite tube is extruded and sintered to about 30 to 35 percent porosity, and serves as the air electrode onto which the other cell components are fabricated in thin layer form. These latest technology cells are designated as air electrode supported (AES) cells.

  4. A Polymeric Nanomedicine Diminishes Inflammatory Events in Renal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Salceda, Carlos; Sancho, Mónica; Orzáez, Mar; Messeguer, Angel; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Egido, Jesús; Vicent, María J.; Ortiz, Alberto; Ramos, Adrián M.

    2013-01-01

    The polyglutamic acid/peptoid 1 (QM56) nanoconjugate inhibits apoptosis by interfering with Apaf-1 binding to procaspase-9. We now describe anti-inflammatory properties of QM56 in mouse kidney and renal cell models. In cultured murine tubular cells, QM56 inhibited the inflammatory response to Tweak, a non-apoptotic stimulus. Tweak induced MCP-1 and Rantes synthesis through JAK2 kinase and NF-κB activation. Similar to JAK2 kinase inhibitors, QM56 inhibited Tweak-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity and chemokine expression, despite failing to inhibit NF-κB-p65 nuclear translocation and NF-κB DNA binding. QM56 prevented JAK2 activation and NF-κB-p65(Ser536) phosphorylation. The anti-inflammatory effect and JAK2 inhibition by QM56 were observed in Apaf-1−/− cells. In murine acute kidney injury, QM56 decreased tubular cell apoptosis and kidney inflammation as measured by down-modulations of MCP-1 and Rantes mRNA expression, immune cell infiltration and activation of the JAK2-dependent inflammatory pathway. In conclusion, QM56 has an anti-inflammatory activity which is independent from its role as inhibitor of Apaf-1 and apoptosis and may have potential therapeutic relevance. PMID:23300960

  5. Thermal conductivity modeling of core-shell and tubular nanowires.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ronggui; Chen, Gang; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    The heteroepitaxial growth of crystalline core-shell nanostructures of a variety of materials has become possible in recent years, allowing the realization of various novel nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. The increased surface or interface area will decrease the thermal conductivity of such nanostructures and impose challenges for the thermal management of such devices. In the meantime, the decreased thermal conductivity might benefit the thermoelectric conversion efficiency. In this paper, we present modeling results on the lattice thermal conductivity of core-shell and tubular nanowires along the wire axis direction using the phonon Boltzmann equation. We report the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the surface conditions and the core-shell geometry for silicon core-germanium shell and tubular silicon nanowires at room temperature. The results show that the effective thermal conductivity changes not only with the composition of the constituents but also with the radius of the nanowires and nanopores due to the nature of the ballistic phonon transport. The results in this work have implications for the design and operation of a variety of nanoelectronic devices, optoelectronic devices, and thermoelectric materials and devices. PMID:15943452

  6. Toward automated cochlear implant insertion using tubular manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granna, Josephine; Rau, Thomas S.; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Lenarz, Thomas; Majdani, Omid; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    During manual cochlear implant electrode insertion the surgeon is at risk to damage the intracochlear fine-structure, as the electrode array is inserted through a small opening in the cochlea blindly with little force-feedback. This paper addresses a novel concept for cochlear electrode insertion using tubular manipulators to reduce risks of causing trauma during insertion and to automate the insertion process. We propose a tubular manipulator incorporated into the electrode array composed of an inner wire within a tube, both elastic and helically shaped. It is our vision to use this manipulator to actuate the initially straight electrode array during insertion into the cochlea by actuation of the wire and tube, i.e. translation and slight axial rotation. In this paper, we evaluate the geometry of the human cochlea in 22 patient datasets in order to derive design requirements for the manipulator. We propose an optimization algorithm to automatically determine the tube set parameters (curvature, torsion, diameter, length) for an ideal final position within the cochlea. To prove our concept, we demonstrate that insertion can be realized in a follow-the-leader fashion for 19 out of 22 cochleas. This is possible with only 4 different tube/wire sets.

  7. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  8. Helical DNA origami tubular structures with various sizes and arrangements.

    PubMed

    Endo, Masayuki; Yamamoto, Seigi; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Morone, Nobuhiro; Heuser, John E; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-07-14

    We developed a novel method to design various helical tubular structures using the DNA origami method. The size-controlled tubular structures which have 192, 256, and 320 base pairs for one turn of the tube were designed and prepared. We observed the formation of the expected short tubes and unexpected long ones. Detailed analyses of the surface patterns of the tubes showed that the short tubes had mainly a left-handed helical structure. The long tubes mainly formed a right-handed helical structure and extended to the directions of the double helical axes as structural isomers of the short tubes. The folding pathways of the tubes were estimated by analyzing the proportions of short and long tubes obtained at different annealing conditions. Depending on the number of base pairs involved in one turn of the tube, the population of left-/right-handed and short/long tubes changed. The bending stress caused by the stiffness of the bundled double helices and the non-natural helical pitch determine the structural variety of the tubes. PMID:24888699

  9. Surface and interfacial creases in a bilayer tubular soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, Mir Jalil; Pidaparti, Ramana; Wang, Xianqiao

    2016-08-01

    Surface and interfacial creases induced by biological growth are common types of instability in soft biological tissues. This study focuses on the criteria for the onset of surface and interfacial creases as well as their morphological evolution in a growing bilayer soft tube within a confined environment. Critical growth ratios for triggering surface and interfacial creases are investigated both analytically and numerically. Analytical interpretations provide preliminary insights into critical stretches and growth ratios for the onset of instability and formation of both surface and interfacial creases. However, the analytical approach cannot predict the evolution pattern of the model after instability; therefore nonlinear finite element simulations are carried out to replicate the poststability morphological patterns of the structure. Analytical and computational simulation results demonstrate that the initial geometry, growth ratio, and shear modulus ratio of the layers are the most influential factors to control surface and interfacial crease formation in this soft tubular bilayer. The competition between the stretch ratios in the free and interfacial surfaces is one of the key driving factors to determine the location of the first crease initiation. These findings may provide some fundamental understanding in the growth modeling of tubular biological tissues such as esophagi and airways as well as offering useful clues into normal and pathological functions of these tissues.

  10. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, R.

    1982-03-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  11. Seal-less cryogenic expander

    SciTech Connect

    Faria, L.E.; Christopher, E.H.

    1987-12-08

    In an expander for use in a split Stirling cycle refrigeration system of the type wherein a displacer moves with reciprocating motion inside an expander housing, and wherein a plunger force and a regenerator force are formed on the displacer, the plunger force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum plunger force amplitude, and the regenerator force cyclically varying and having a time of minimum and maximum regenerator force amplitude, the improvement is described comprising: (a) means for maintaining displacer forces, such that the maximum plunger force amplitude is substantially equal to the maximum regenerator force amplitude; and (b) means for adjusting a time difference, the time difference being the time between the time of maximum plunger force and the time of maximum regenerator force such that a measure of the cooling power of the refrigeration system is maximized.

  12. Helical screw expander evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, R.

    1982-01-01

    A one MW helical rotary screw expander power system for electric power generation from geothermal brine was evaluated. The technology explored in the testing is simple, potentially very efficient, and ideally suited to wellhead installations in moderate to high enthalpy, liquid dominated field. A functional one MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing, operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000 kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

  13. Responses of Proximal Tubular Cells to Injury in Congenital Renal Disease: Fight or Flight

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, Robert L.; Forbes, Michael S.; Galarreta, Carolina I.; Thornhill, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Most chronic kidney disease in children results from congenital or inherited disorders, which can be studied in mouse models. Following 2 weeks of unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) in the adult mouse, nephron loss is due to proximal tubular mitochondrial injury and cell death. In neonatal mice, proximal tubular cell death is delayed beyond 2 weeks of complete UUO, and release of partial UUO allows remodeling of remaining nephrons. Progressive cyst expansion develops in polycystic kidney disease (PKD), a common inherited renal disorder. The PCY mutant mouse (which develops late-onset PKD) develops thinning of the glomerulotubular junction in parallel with growth of cysts in adulthood. Renal insufficiency in nephropathic cystinosis, a rare inherited renal disorder, results from progressive tubular cystine accumulation. In the Ctns knock out mouse (a model of cystinosis), proximal tubular cells become flattened, with loss of mitochondria and thickening of tubular basement membrane. In each model, persistent obstructive or metabolic stress leads ultimately to the formation of atubular glomeruli. The initial “fight” response (proximal tubular survival) switches to a “flight” response (proximal tubular cell death) with ongoing oxidative injury and mitochondrial damage. Therapies should be directed at reducing proximal tubular mitochondrial oxidative injury to enhance repair and regeneration. PMID:23949631

  14. Optimization of production conditions and material characteristics of tubular stabilizer bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhr, R.

    1983-08-01

    Weight reduction of car tubular stabilizer bars is studied. Optimization of prematerial, forming and tempering procedures, and surface treatment are discussed. Steel qualities and production conditions were examined for feasibility with sample stabilizer bars. It is concluded that tubular stabilizer bars can be manufactured and practically used in cars. Tube diameters must not be too small, otherwise the weight saving is minimal.

  15. Primary gradient defect distal renal tubular acidosis presenting as hypokalaemic periodic paralysis.

    PubMed

    Koul, P A; Wahid, A; Bhat, F A

    2005-07-01

    A 45 year old man presented with recurrent hypokalaemic paralysis. Laboratory investigations revealed renal tubular acidosis as the cause of the hypokalaemia, and dynamic tubular studies suggested a gradient defect as the underlying cause. The patient had associated dextrocardia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of this condition. PMID:15983101

  16. 78 FR 52213 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-22

    ... Commission, Washington, DC, and by publishing the notice in the Federal Register of July 10, 2013 (78 FR... COMMISSION Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From India, Korea, the Philippines, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan..., and Vietnam of certain oil country tubular goods, provided for primarily in subheadings 7304.29,...

  17. Electrospinning of small diameter 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations for vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huijun; Fan, Jintu; Chu, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jun

    2010-12-01

    The control of nanofiber orientation in nanofibrous tubular scaffolds can benefit the cell responses along specific directions. For small diameter tubular scaffolds, however, it becomes difficult to engineer nanofiber orientation. This paper reports a novel electrospinning technique for the fabrication of 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with controllable nanofiber orientations. Synthetic absorbable poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) was used as the model biomaterial to demonstrate this new electrospinning technique. Electrospun 3-D PCL nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of 4.5 mm in diameter with different nanofiber orientations (viz. circumferential, axial, and combinations of circumferential and axial directions) were successfully fabricated. The degree of nanofiber alignment in the electrospun 3-D tubular scaffolds was quantified by using the fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis. The results indicated that excellent circumferential nanofiber alignment could be achieved in the 3-D nanofibrous PCL tubular scaffolds. The nanofibrous tubular scaffolds with oriented nanofibers had not only directional mechanical property but also could facilitate the orientation of the endothelial cell attachment on the fibers. Multiple layers of aligned nanofibers in different orientations can produce 3-D nanofibrous tubular scaffolds of different macroscopic properties. PMID:20890639

  18. 78 FR 77420 - Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From the Republic of Turkey: Preliminary Negative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Duty Investigations, 78 FR 45505 (July 29, 2013). \\2\\ Maverick Tube Corporation, United States Steel... International Trade Administration Certain Oil Country Tubular Goods From the Republic of Turkey: Preliminary... tubular goods (OCTG) from the Republic of Turkey (Turkey). The period of investigation is January 1,...

  19. Tubular lysosome morphology and distribution within macrophages depend on the integrity of cytoplasmic microtubules

    SciTech Connect

    Swanson, J.; Bushnell, A.; Silverstein, S.C.

    1987-04-01

    Pinocytosis of the fluorescent dye lucifer yellow labels elongated, membrane-bound tubular organelles in several cell types, including cultured human monocytes, thioglycolate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages, and the macrophage-like cell line J774.2. These tubular structures can be identified as lysosomes by acid phosphatase histochemistry and immunofluorescence localization of cathepsin L. The abundance of tubular lysosomes is markedly increased by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. When labeled by pinocytosis of microperoxidase and examined by electron microscopic histochemistry, the tubular lysosomes have an outside diameter of approx. = 75 nm and a length of several micrometers; they radiate from the cell's centrosphere in alignment with cytoplasmic microtubules and intermediate filaments. Incubation of phorbol myristate acetate-treated macrophages at 4/sup 0/C or in medium containing 5 ..mu..M colchicine or nocodazole at 37/sup 0/C leads to disassembly of microtubules and fragmentation of the tubular lysosomes. Return of the cultures to 37/sup 0/C or removal of nocodazole from the medium leads to reassembly of microtubules and the reappearance of tubular lysosomes within 10-20 min. The authors conclude that microtubules are essential for the maintenance of tubular lysosome morphology and that, in macrophages, a significant proportion of the lysosomal compartment is contained within these tubular structures.

  20. Low gas prices and rig count cut business for makers of oil country tubular goods

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    After years of scavenging used drill pipe and trying everything they could think of to make existing pipe last, contractors in the petroleum industry are buying more new pipe. Although supplies of tubular goods are growing tighter, the supply and demand curves haven`t met. However, while the market for drill pipe may be increasing, the market for other tubular goods is decreasing.

  1. Proximal tubular renal dysfunction or damage in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Del Palacio, María; Romero, Sara; Casado, José L

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral-associated toxicity, especially in the case of tenofovir plus boosted protease inhibitors, could affect different functions of the proximal renal tubule. Considering the long-term use of antiretroviral therapy and the concomitant presence of other risk factors, several degrees of proximal tubular toxicity, from chronic subclinical renal dysfunction to Fanconi syndrome, could be observed in HIV-infected patients. However, the clinical significance of isolated tubular dysfunction, in the short and long term, remains unclear. In addition, primary tubular abnormalities, even severe, may be missed until they affect the glomerular function. Therefore, there is a need for new biomarkers, not only based in serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rates, that might help to identify tubular cell toxicity and predict the clinical outcome in HIV-infected patients. Increased values of urinary beta-2-microglobulin and retinol-binding protein, observed in up to 70% of patients, have been associated to tenofovir-associated mitochondrial dysfunction. Together with other tubular parameters or in isolation, both biomarkers could be useful for diagnosing proximal tubular toxicity. Other molecules, such as urinary kidney injury molecule- 1, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, or N-acetyl-b-D-glucosaminidase, could help to distinguish between tubular cell damage and dysfunction. Here, we review the current knowledge on tubular toxicity in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22833061

  2. Evidence of the big fix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Kawana, Kiyoharu

    2014-06-01

    We give an evidence of the Big Fix. The theory of wormholes and multiverse suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the total entropy at the late stage of the universe is maximized, which we call the maximum entropy principle. In this paper, we discuss how it can be confirmed by the experimental data, and we show that it is indeed true for the Higgs vacuum expectation value vh. We assume that the baryon number is produced by the sphaleron process, and that the current quark masses, the gauge couplings and the Higgs self-coupling are fixed when we vary vh. It turns out that the existence of the atomic nuclei plays a crucial role to maximize the entropy. This is reminiscent of the anthropic principle, however it is required by the fundamental law in our case.

  3. Outflow Propagation in Collapsars: Collimated Jets And Expanding Outflows

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, A.; Yamasaki, T.; Nagataki, S.; Mineshige, S.; /Kyoto U., Yukawa Inst., Kyoto /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-06-08

    We investigate the outflow propagation in the collapsar in the context of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with 2D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. We vary the specific internal energy and bulk Lorentz factor of the injected outflow from non-relativistic regime to relativistic one, fixing the power of the outflow to be 10{sup 51}erg s{sup -1}. We observed the collimated outflow, when the Lorentz factor of the injected outflow is roughly greater than 2. To the contrary, when the velocity of the injected outflow is slower, the expanding outflow is observed. The transition from collimated jet to expanding outflow continuously occurs by decreasing the injected velocity. Different features of the dynamics of the outflows would cause the difference between the GRBs and similar phenomena, such as, X-ray flashes.

  4. Renal Function in Diabetic Disease Models: The Tubular System in the Pathophysiology of the Diabetic Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Vallon, Volker; Thomson, Scott C.

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus affects the kidney in stages. At the onset of diabetes mellitus, in a subset of diabetic patients the kidneys grow large, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) becomes supranormal, which are risk factors for developing diabetic nephropathy later in life. This review outlines a pathophysiological concept that focuses on the tubular system to explain these changes. The concept includes the tubular hypothesis of glomerular filtration, which states that early tubular growth and sodium-glucose cotransport enhance proximal tubule reabsorption and make the GFR supranormal through the physiology of tubuloglomerular feedback. The diabetic milieu triggers early tubular cell proliferation, but the induction of TGF-β and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors causes a cell cycle arrest and a switch to tubular hypertrophy and a senescence-like phenotype. Although this growth phenotype explains unusual responses like the salt paradox of the early diabetic kidney, the activated molecular pathways may set the stage for tubulointerstitial injury and diabetic nephropathy. PMID:22335797

  5. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains. PMID:26619807

  6. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharoar, Md. Golam; Shi, Qi; Ge, Yingying; He, Wanxia; Hu, Xiangyou; Perry, George; Zhu, Xiongwei; Yan, Riqiang

    2015-01-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer’s brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from AD brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains PMID:26619807

  7. [What are the effects of fixed-dose combination of candesartan and amlodipine].

    PubMed

    Vítovec, Jiří; Špinar, Jindřich

    2016-04-01

    We are presenting a current view on a fixed-dose combination of amlodipine and candesartan in the treatment of hypertension. Major studies on the individual preparations as well as studies examining their combination are included. This fixed-dose combination expands our possibilities with regard to attaining the blood pressure target values, in particular in patients with risk factors or patients with comorbidities. Finally, the benefit mainly consists in the greater compliance of the patient with a minimum adverse effects. PMID:27250611

  8. Full and partial gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Shirzad, A.

    2007-08-15

    Gauge fixing may be done in different ways. We show that using the chain structure to describe a constrained system enables us to use either a full gauge, in which all gauged degrees of freedom are determined, or a partial gauge, in which some first class constraints remain as subsidiary conditions to be imposed on the solutions of the equations of motion. We also show that the number of constants of motion depends on the level in a constraint chain in which the gauge fixing condition is imposed. The relativistic point particle, electromagnetism, and the Polyakov string are discussed as examples and full or partial gauges are distinguished.

  9. The Double Fixed Charge Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Coster, H. G. L.

    1973-01-01

    An analysis is made of the AC characteristics of a membrane consisting of two fixed charge regions of opposite sign, in contact. It is shown that the equivalent parallel capacitance and conductance of such a membrane undergo a strong dispersion at low frequencies. The dielectric dispersion is a result of polarization effects in the diffusion of coions in each of the two fixed charge lattices. This, at low frequencies, gives rise to a very large diffusion capacitance. The form of the dispersion characteristics is very similar to those observed for synthetic-fused anion-cation membranes and various cellular membranes. PMID:4702011

  10. Efficiency of sunlight utilization: tubular versus flat photobioreactors

    PubMed

    Tredici; Zittelli

    1998-01-20

    The light saturation effect imposes a serious limitation on the efficiency with which solar energy can be utilized in outdoor algal cultures. One solution proposed to reduce the intensity of incident solar radiation and overcome the light saturation effect is "spatial dilution of light" (i.e., distribution of the impinging photon flux on a greater photosynthetic surface area), but consistent experimental data supporting a significant positive influence of spatial light dilution on the productivity and the photosynthetic efficiency of outdoor algal cultures have never been reported. We used a coiled tubular reactor and compared a near-horizontal straight tubular reactor and a near-horizontal flat panel in outdoor cultivation of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira (Spirulina) platensis under defined operating conditions for optimum productivity. The photosynthetic efficiency achieved in the tubular systems was significantly higher because their curved surface "diluted" the impinging solar radiation and thus reduced the light saturation effect. This interpretation was supported by the results of experiments carried out in the laboratory under continuous artificial illumination using both a flat and a curved chamber reactor. The study also showed that, when the effect of light saturation is eliminated or reduced, productivity and solar irradiance are linearly correlated even at very high diurnal irradiance values, and supported findings that outdoor algal cultures are light-limited even during bright summer days. It was also observed that, besides improving the photosynthetic efficiency of the culture, spatial dilution of light also leads to higher growth rates and lowers the cellular content of accessory pigments; that is, it reduces mutual shading in the culture. The inadequacy of using volumetric productivity as the sole criterion for comparing reactors of different surface-to-volume ratio and of the areal productivity for evaluating the performance of elevated