Science.gov

Sample records for expanding laser plasmas

  1. Plasma species dynamics in a laser produced carbon plasma expanding in low pressure neutral gas background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, H. M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Bhuyan, H.; Chuaqui, H.; Wyndham, E.

    2012-06-01

    We present time and space resolved spectroscopic observations of a laser produced carbon plasma, in an argon background. An Nd:YAG laser pulse, 370 mJ, 3.5 ns, at 1.06 μm, with a fluence of 6.8 J/cm2, is used to produce a plasma from a solid graphite target, at a base pressure of 0.5 mTorr, and with 80 mTorr Argon background. The spectral emission in the visible is recorded with 15 ns time resolution. 20 ns time resolution plasma imagining, filtered at characteristic carbon species emission wavelengths, is used to study the dynamics of the expanding plasma. Two different fronts with ionic or molecular compositions are seen to detach from de laser target plasma.

  2. Dynamics of a pulsed laser generated tin plasma expanding in an oxygen atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreca, F.; Fazio, E.; Neri, F.; Barletta, E.; Trusso, S.; Fazio, B.

    2005-10-01

    Semiconducting tin oxide can be successfully deposited by means of the laser ablation technique. In particular by ablating metallic tin in a controlled oxygen atmosphere, thin films of SnOx have been deposited. The partial oxygen pressure at which the films are deposited strongly influences both the stoichiometry and the structural properties of the films. In this work, we present a study of the expansion dynamics of the plasma generated by ablating a tin target by means of a pulsed laser using time and space resolved optical emission spectroscopy and fast photography imaging of the expanding plasma. Both Sn I and Sn II optical emission lines have been observed from the time-integrated spectroscopy. Time resolved-measurements revealed the dynamics of the expanding plasma in the ambient oxygen atmosphere. Stoichiometry of the films has been determined by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and correlated to the expansion dynamics of the plasma.

  3. Nonlinear propagation of a randomized laser beam through an expanding plasma.

    PubMed

    Myatt, J; Pesme, D; Hüller, S; Maximov, A; Rozmus, W; Capjack, C E

    2001-12-17

    We present simulations of the interaction of a random phase plate laser beam with an underdense, expanding plasma for conditions typical of recent LULI experiments. We use a new code that describes the paraxial propagation of the laser, accounting for the nonlinear evolution of the plasma in an isothermal fluid description with weakly collisional electrons. The transmitted light, in excellent agreement with experiment, is shown to be strongly redshifted as a result of self-phase modulation due to self-focusing. PMID:11736585

  4. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Boundary instability of an erosion laser plasma expanding into a background gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Grishina, V. G.; Derkach, O. N.; Kanevskiĭ, M. F.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1993-12-01

    The stability of the contact region in the system consisting of an erosion plasma and a gas has been determined experimentally under conditions such that the length of the applied laser pulse is longer than the rise time of the instability, and the expansion of the erosion plume is accompanied by breakdown of the background gas. The evolution of perturbations of the plasma front following the introduction of initial perturbations with a fixed spatial period has been studied. It is possible to model the injection of plasma bunches into a low-pressure gas by studying the dynamics of the vaporization at moderate laser-light intensities, characteristic of technological applications.

  5. Emission dynamics of an expanding ultrafast-laser produced Zn plasma under different ambient pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Smijesh, N.; Philip, Reji

    2013-09-07

    We report time and space resolved spectral measurements of neutral Zn emission from an ultrafast laser produced plasma, generated by the irradiation of a Zn target with laser pulses of 100 femtoseconds duration, carried out in a broad ambient pressure range of 0.05 to 100 Torr. The measurement is done for three different axial positions in the expanding plume. The spectra are rich in neutral Zn (Zn I) emissions at 334.5 nm, 468 nm, 472 nm, 481 nm, and 636 nm, respectively, depicting the characteristic triplet structure of Zn. Fast as well as slow peaks are observed in the time of flight data of 481 nm emission, which arise from recombination and atomic contributions, respectively, occurring at different time scales. Average speeds of the fast atomic species do not change appreciably with ambient pressure. The plasma parameters (electron temperature and number density) are evaluated from the measured optical emission spectra. The rates of ionization and recombination can be enhanced by a double-pulse excitation configuration in which optical energy is coupled to the ultrafast plasma through a delayed laser pulse.

  6. Study of mechanisms for magnetic field diffusion into an expanding laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Bessarab, A. V.; Bondarenko, G. A.; Dolgoleva, G. V.; Zhmailo, V. A.; Kunin, A. V.; Nikitin, I. N.; Novikova, E. A.; Statsenko, V. P.; Sungatullin, R. R.

    2007-10-15

    The interaction of plasma clouds generated during laser irradiation of a spherical target in a background gas with a magnetic field was studied on the MKV-4 test bench of the Iskra-5 facility. The dynamics of the plasma cloud expansion in a 300- to 500-Oe magnetic field was investigated using magnetic and probe diagnostics. The results obtained are compared with calculations by different models of laser plasma diffusion in a magnetic field.

  7. Stimulated Brillouin scattering reduction induced by self-focusing for a single laser speckle interacting with an expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Depierreux, S.; Loiseau, P.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Labaune, Ch.; Bandulet, H.

    2014-03-15

    The origin of the low level of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) observed in laser-plasma experiments carried out with a single laser speckle is investigated by means of three-dimensional simulations and modeling in the limit when the laser beam power P is well above the critical power for ponderomotive self-focusing We find that the order of magnitude of the time averaged reflectivities, together with the temporal and spatial SBS localization observed in our simulations, are correctly reproduced by our modeling. It is observed that, after a short transient stage, SBS reaches a significant level only (i) as long as the incident laser pulse is increasing in amplitude and (ii) in a single self-focused speckle located in the low-density front part of the plasma. In order to describe self-focusing in an inhomogeneous expanding plasma, we have derived a new Lagrangian density describing this process. Using then a variational approach, our model reproduces the position and the peak intensity of the self-focusing hot spot in the front part of the plasma density profile as well as the local density depletion in this hot spot. The knowledge of these parameters then makes it possible to estimate the spatial amplification of SBS as a function of the laser beam power and consequently to explain the experimentally observed SBS reflectivity, considerably reduced with respect to standard theory in the regime of large laser beam power.

  8. Detailed Hydrodynamic and X-Ray Spectroscopic Analysis of a Laser-Produced Rapidly-Expanding Aluminum Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Glenzer, S H; Hawreliak, J; Wolfrum, E; Gouveia, A; Lee, R W; Marjoribanks, R S; Renner, O; Sondhauss, P; Topping, S; Young, P E; Pinto, P A; Wark, J S

    2001-04-03

    We present a detailed analysis of K-shell emission from laser-produced rapidly-expanding aluminum plasmas. This work forms part of a series of experiments performed at the Vulcan laser facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. 1-D planar expansion was obtained by over-illuminating Al-microdot targets supported on CH plastic foils. The small size of the Al-plasma ensured high spatial and frequency resolution of the spectra, obtained with a single crystal spectrometer, two vertical dispersion variant double crystal spectrometers, and a vertical dispersion variant Johann Spectrometer. The hydrodynamic properties of the plasma were measured independently by spatially and temporally resolved Thomson scattering, utilizing a 4{omega} probe beam. This enabled sub- and super- critical densities to be probed relative to the 1{omega} heater beams. The deduced plasma hydrodynamic conditions are compared with those generated from the 1-D hydro-code Medusa, and the significant differences found in the electron temperature discussed. Synthetic spectra generated from the detailed term collisional radiative non-LTE atomic physics code Fly are compared with the experimental spectra for the measured hydrodynamic parameters, and for those taken from Medusa. Excellent agreement is only found for both the H- and He-like Al series when careful account is taken of the temporal evolution of the electron temperature.

  9. Simulating Time-Dependent Energy Transfer Between Crossed Laser Beams in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hittinger, J F; Dorr, M R; Berger, R L; Williams, E A

    2004-10-11

    A coupled mode system is derived to investigate a three-wave parametric instability leading to energy transfer between co-propagating laser beams crossing in a plasma flow. The model includes beams of finite width refracting in a prescribed transverse plasma flow with spatial and temporal gradients in velocity and density. The resulting paraxial light equations are discretized spatially with a Crank-Nicholson-type scheme, and these algebraic constraints are nonlinearly coupled with ordinary differential equations in time that describe the ion acoustic response. The entire nonlinear differential-algebraic system is solved using an adaptive, backward-differencing method coupled with Newton's method. A numerical study is conducted in two dimensions that compares the intensity gain of the fully time-dependent coupled mode system with the gain computed under the further assumption of a strongly-damped ion acoustic response. The results demonstrate a time-dependent gain suppression when the beam diameter is commensurate with the velocity gradient scale length. The gain suppression is shown to depend on time-dependent beam refraction and is interpreted as a time-dependent frequency shift.

  10. Investigation of the optical characteristics of a laser-produced plasma cloud expanding into a background gas

    SciTech Connect

    Annenkov, A I; Bessarab, A V; Galakhov, I V; Garanin, Sergey G; Gusakov, A V; Zhidkov, N V; Zhmailo, V A; Izgorodin, V M; Kovalenko, V P; Krotov, V A; Mis'ko, V V; Novikova, E A; Starodubtsev, V A; Starodubtsev, K V; Statsenko, V P; Sungatullin, R R; Tachaev, G V; Sheremet'ev, Yu N

    2010-12-09

    An investigation is made of the dynamics and visible-range luminosity of the plasma cloud produced behind the front of a shock wave in air at a pressure of 1 Torr. The shock wave was produced on introducing the radiation of the twelve-channel Iskra-5 laser facility with a total energy of {approx}2300 J into a hollow spherical plastic target of mass {approx}10{sup -4} g. Experimental data are compared with simulations. (laser plasma)

  11. Nonlinear dynamics in expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sack, Ch.; Schamel, H.

    1985-07-01

    The expansion of a plasma occupying initially a half-space is investigated numerically and, by means of a novel description of the ion fluid, also analytically. A simple wave structure is found in the collisionless approximation. Stabilized by dissipation, the associated ion bunching gives rise to a fast ion component, similar to the ion blow-off in laser fusion. Three nonstationary regimes of this strongest nonlinear and inhomogeneous dynamical system are distinguished and discussed. For large t the ion front propagates with a speed proportional to the square root of t-t(1), where t(1) is a reference time. A simple picture emerges, explaining the diverse experimental data.

  12. Rayleigh scattering of a Gaussian laser beam from expanding clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, V. K.

    2009-12-15

    Rayleigh scattering of an intense laser with Gaussian temporal and radial profiles from clustered gases is examined. The laser quickly converts the clusters into plasma balls with electron cloud of each ball executing large excursions about the ion sphere. The laser also heats the electrons. As the clusters expand under hydrodynamic pressure, plasma frequency of the cluster electrons omega{sub pe} decreases. The temporal rate of decrease in omega{sub pe} is maximum on laser axis and falls off with r. As the electron density of a cluster approaches plasma resonance, omega{sub pe}=omegasq root(3) (where omega is the frequency of the laser) the oscillatory electron cloud of the cluster produces resonantly enhanced Rayleigh scattering. This resonant enhancement first occurs in clusters on laser axis and afterward in farther clusters. The diffraction divergence of the laser limits the length of the cluster plasma, hence the Rayleigh scattering.

  13. Measurements of an expanding surface flashover plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.

    2014-05-21

    A better understanding of vacuum surface flashover and the plasma produced by it is of importance for electron and ion sources, as well as advanced accelerators and other vacuum electronic devices. This article describes time-of-flight and biased-probe measurements made on the expanding plasma generated from a vacuum surface flashover discharge. The plasma expanded at velocities of 1.2–6.5 cm/μs, and had typical densities of 10{sup 10}–10{sup 12} cm{sup −3}. The expansion velocity of the plasma leading edge often exhibited a sharp increase at distances of about 50 mm from the discharge site. Comparison with biased-probe data suggests that, under most conditions, the plasma leading edge was dominated by negative ions, with the apparent increase in velocity being due to fast H{sup −} overtaking slower, heavier ions. In some cases, biased-probe data also showed abrupt discontinuities in the plasma energy distribution co-located with large changes in the intercepted plasma current, suggesting the presence of a shock in the leading edge of the expanding plasma.

  14. Ion acceleration in expanding ionospheric plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Schunk, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma expansion along the ambient magnetic field in regions of density gradients provides a mechanism for accelerating ions. A brief review of the basic phenomenon of plasma expansion is given. Estimates of the energies of the accelerated ions in an expanding ionospheric plasma along geomagnetic flux tubes are obtained by solving the time-dependent hydrodynamic equations. It is found that, over certain altitude ranges, each ion species can be the most energetic; the maximum energies of the different ions are found to be limited to less than about 10 eV for H(+), 5 eV for He(+), and less than about 1.5 eV for O(+).

  15. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.; Gary, S.P.

    1989-01-01

    The growth and evolution of short wavelength (plasma expanding across an ambient magnetic field have been actively studied in recent years, both by means of experiments in the laboratory as well as in space and through numerical simulations. We review the relevant observations and simulations results, discuss the instability mechanism and related linear theory, and describe recent work to bring experiments and theory into better agreement. 30 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Expanded mode lasers for telecommunications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lealman, Ian F.

    This thesis describes the development of a long wavelength (1.55 μm) expanded mode semiconductor laser. The increased spot size of the laser improves both the coupling efficiency to cleaved fibre and fibre alignment tolerances and reduces packaging cost. In this type of device the strength of the waveguide is gradually reduced towards the front facet allowing the mode to adiabatically expand so that the laser mode is better matched in size to that of a cleaved fibre. This can be achieved by either reducing the refractive index of the guide or reducing the amount of material in the core. The structure chosen was a buried heterostructure laser that utilised a twin guide consisting of an upper higher refractive index guide (the active region of the laser) above a weak passive guide. The width of the active region was reduced along part of the device allowing the mode to expand into the weak underlying guide. The guide structure was optimised using a variable grid finite difference mode solver, and the taper length calculated by an approximation to Love's method. Detailed results are presented for the measured light-current characteristic, farfield and coupling loss to cleaved fibre. These coupling losses were compared to the calculated data thus allowing the waveguide design to be optimised. Several iterations in the design of the device were undertaken, with the aim of reducing the coupling loss to cleaved single mode fibre without significantly compromising the laser performance. The final device design had extremely low coupling losses as low as 1.2 dB to cleaved fibre. Finally, the positive impact this device had on passive alignment using a silicon motherboard is examined, and the application this technology to a range of other optoelectronic components is discussed.

  17. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  18. Measuring the Plasma Density of a Ferroelectric Plasma Source in an Expanding Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    A. Dunaevsky; N.J. Fisch

    2003-10-02

    The initial density and electron temperature at the surface of a ferroelectric plasma source were deduced from floating probe measurements in an expanding plasma. The method exploits negative charging of the floating probe capacitance by fast flows before the expanding plasma reaches the probe. The temporal profiles of the plasma density can be obtained from the voltage traces of the discharge of the charged probe capacitance by the ion current from the expanding plasma. The temporal profiles of the plasma density, at two different distances from the surface of the ferroelectric plasma source, could be further fitted by using the density profiles for the expanding plasma. This gives the initial values of the plasma density and electron temperature at the surface. The method could be useful for any pulsed discharge, which is accompanied by considerable electromagnetic noise, if the initial plasma parameters might be deduced from measurements in expanding plasma.

  19. Short wavelength striations on expanding plasma clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winske, D.; Gary, S. P.

    1990-01-01

    The present evaluation of current understanding of the growth and evolution of less-than-1 ion gyroradius 'flute modes' on a plasma as it expands across and ambient magnetic field notes that the mechanism by which the instability is generated, and its approximate linear theory (encompassing nonlocal, finite-beta, and collisional effects), have reached a satisfactory degree of development. AMPTE Ba releases have been the bases of most of the observational studies. Substantial progress is also noted in the development of a nonlinear mode-coupling theory which can resolve remaining differences between theory and observation.

  20. Modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering in expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüller, S.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Pesme, D.; Labaune, C.; Bandulet, H.

    2008-05-01

    Numerical simulations of mm-size expanding plasmas have been performed in comparison with recent experiments at the LULI facility. The features of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS) are studied for an intense mono-speckle laser beam in continuation of previous work on optically smoothed laser beams. Very good agreement between the theoretical-numerical modeling and the experimental results is found, in particular concerning the SBS activity in the plasma and the backscatter level. The results underline the importance of nonlocal transport effects affecting the onset of self-focusing for temperatures below 1keV. The simulations with the monospeckle beam allow to identify the resonant filament instability [1] and the subsequent loss of coherence of the laser beam as the reason of the observed low-level backscatter levels measured in the experiments. To achieve reliable numerical modeling, a good characterisation of the plasma profiles and the timing with respect to the laser pulse shape, prior to simulations, proves to be extremely important.

  1. Measurement of Debye length in laser-produced plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.

    1973-01-01

    The Debye length of an expanded plasma created by placing an evacuated chamber with an entrance slit in the path of a freely expanding laser produced plasma was measured, using the slab geometry. An independent measurement of electron density together with the observed value for the Debye length also provided a means for evaluating the plasma electron temperature. This temperature has applications in ascertaining plasma conductivity and magnetic field necessary for confinement of the laser produced plasma. Also, the temperature obtained would be useful in analyzing electron-ion recombination rates in the expanded plasma and the dynamics of the cooling process of the plasma expansion.

  2. Development of flute modes on expanding plasma clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Winske, D.

    1989-09-01

    Structuring that results from plasma streaming at sub-Alfvenic speeds across an external magnetic field is considered. Previously, it has been proposed the lower hybrid drift instability enhanced by the deceleration of the plasma by the field produces the flute modes observed on the surface of expanding laser produced plasmas and the AMPTE magnetotail releases (Eos (Trans) /bold 63/, 843 (1982)). An appropriate dispersion equation to describe the properties of the unstable waves has been derived and particle simulations carried out to show the growth and evolution of the instability. The salient features of this earlier work are reviewed here, and then additions and refinements to the theory and simulations are described. In particular, the scaling of the wave properties with the ratio of the ion gyroradius to the magnetic confinement radius is discussed and the nonlinear evolution of the instability is investigated more thoroughly. The consequences of these results, both for the laser experiments and for AMPTE, are also considered. To this end, a comparison of the linear and nonlinear properties of the waves observed in the simulations with those seen in the experiments is carried out. While there is considerable discrepancy between the observed and predicted wavelengths of the modes, the effects considered here are in the direction of reducing the disagreement.

  3. Experimental investigation of double layers in expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Plihon, N.; Chabert, P.; Corr, C. S.

    2007-01-15

    Double layers (DLs) have been observed in a plasma reactor composed of a source chamber attached to a larger expanding chamber. Positive ion beams generated across the DL were characterized in the low plasma potential region using retarding field energy analyzers. In electropositive gases, DLs were formed at very low pressures (between 0.1 and 1 mTorr) with the plasma expansion forced by a strongly diverging magnetic field. The DL remains static, robust to changes in boundary conditions, and its position is related to the magnetic field lines. The voltage drop across the DL increases with decreasing pressure; i.e., with increasing electron temperature (around 20 V at 0.17 mTorr). DLs were also observed in electronegative gases without a magnetic field over a greater range of pressure (0.5 to 10 mTorr). The actual profile of the electronegative DL is very sensitive to external parameters and intrusive elements, and they propagate at high negative ion fraction. Electrostatic probes measurements and laser-induced photodetachment show discontinuities in all plasma parameters (electron density, electron temperature, negative ion fraction) at the DL position. The voltage drop across the electronegative DL is about 8 V, is independent of the gas pressure and therefore of the electron temperature.

  4. Relativistic plasma shutter for ultraintense laser pulses

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Stephen A.; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Bulanov, Stepan; Tampo, Motonobu; Chvykov, Vladimir; Kalintchenko, Galina; Rousseau, Pascal; Yanovsky, Victor; Kodama, Ryousuke; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Krushelnick, Karl; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2009-01-01

    A relativistic plasma shutter technique is proposed and tested to remove the sub-100 ps pedestal of a high-intensity laser pulse. The shutter is an ultrathin foil placed before the target of interest. As the leading edge of the laser ionizes the shutter material it will expand into a relativistically underdense plasma allowing for the peak pulse to propagate through while rejecting the low intensity pedestal. An increase in the laser temporal contrast is demonstrated by measuring characteristic signatures in the accelerated proton spectra and directionality from the interaction of 30 TW pulses with ultrathin foils along with supporting hydrodynamic and particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:19654882

  5. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore

    2004-12-01

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  6. Laser Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malka, Victor

    The continuing development of powerful laser systems has permitted to extend the interaction of laser beams with matter far into the relativistic domain, and to demonstrate new approaches for producing energetic particle beams. The extremely large electric fields, with amplitudes exceeding the TV/m level, that are produced in plasma medium are of relevance particle acceleration. Since the value of this longitudinal electric field, 10,000 times larger than those produced in conventional radio-frequency cavities, plasma accelerators appear to be very promising for the development of compact accelerators. The incredible progresses in the understanding of laser plasma interaction physic, allows an excellent control of electron injection and acceleration. Thanks to these recent achievements, laser plasma accelerators deliver today high quality beams of energetic radiation and particles. These beams have a number of interesting properties such as shortness, brightness and spatial quality, and could lend themselves to applications in many fields, including medicine, radio-biology, chemistry, physics and material science,security (material inspection), and of course in accelerator science.

  7. Interpenetration and stagnation in colliding laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Shboul, K. F.; Harilal, S. S. Hassan, S. M.; Hassanein, A.; Costello, J. T.; Yabuuchi, T.; Tanaka, K. A.; Hirooka, Y.

    2014-01-15

    We have investigated plasma stagnation and interaction effects in colliding laser-produced plasmas. For generating colliding plasmas, two split laser beams were line-focused onto a hemi-circular target and the seed plasmas so produced were allowed to expand in mutually orthogonal directions. This experimental setup forced the expanding seed plasmas to come to a focus at the center of the chamber. The interpenetration and stagnation of plasmas of candidate fusion wall materials, viz., carbon and tungsten, and other materials, viz., aluminum, and molybdenum were investigated in this study. Fast-gated imaging, Faraday cup ion analysis, and optical emission spectroscopy were used for diagnosing seed and colliding plasma plumes. Our results show that high-Z target (W, Mo) plasma ions interpenetrate each other, while low-Z (C, Al) plasmas stagnate at the collision plane. For carbon seed plasmas, an intense stagnation was observed resulting in longer plasma lifetime; in addition, the stagnation layer was found to be rich with C{sub 2} dimers.

  8. Origin of 'energetic' ions from laser-produced plasmas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehler, W.; Linlor, W. I.

    1973-01-01

    A fast-ion current peak, measured with an ion collector placed in the path of an expanding laser-produced plasma, was identified as carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen contaminants which originated from a tungsten target surface.

  9. Progress on laser plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.

    1986-04-01

    Several laser plasma accelerator schemes are reviewed, with emphasis on the Plasma Beat Wave Accelerator (PBWA). Theory indicates that a very high acceleration gradient, of order 1 GeV/m, can exist in the plasma wave driven by the beating lasers. Experimental results obtained on the PBWA experiment at UCLA confirms this. Parameters related to the PBWA as an accelerator system are derived, among them issues concerning the efficiency and the laser power and energy requirements are discussed.

  10. Laser propagation in underdense plasmas: Scaling arguments

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, J.C.

    1993-05-01

    The propagation of an intense laser beam in the underdense plasma is modelled by treating the plasma as a relativistic, zero temperature, charged fluid. For paraxial propagation and a sufficiently underdense plasma ({omega}p/{omega} {much_lt} 1), a multiple-scales technique is used to expand the exact equations in powers of the small parameter {theta} {equivalent_to} {omega}p/{omega}. The zeroth order equations are used in a critical examination of previous work on this problem, and to derive a scaling law for the threshold power required for cavitation.

  11. Dynamics of Relativistic Transparency and Optical Shuttering in Expanding Overdense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniyappan, Sasi

    2012-10-01

    Overdense plasmas are usually opaque to incident laser light. But when the light is of sufficient intensity to drive electrons in the plasma to near light speeds, the plasma becomes transparent. In the physical picture, as the electrons reach near light speeds their mass increases due to relativistic effect. The increase in electron mass in turn slows their motion such that they can no-longer shield the plasma from the incident laser, making the plasma subsequently transparent to the incident laser. This process -- known as relativistic transparency (RT) -- takes just a tenth of a picosecond. Yet all studies of RT to date have been restricted to measurements collected over time-scales much longer than this, limiting our understanding of the dynamics of this process. Here we present optical signatures of relativistic transparency by measuring the time-resolved electric fields and temporal phases (with temporal resolution ˜50 fs) of the light, initially reflected from, and subsequently transmitted through, an expanding overdense plasma due to temporal evolution of RT. These measurements are done using a single-shot Frequency-Resolved-Optical-Gating (FROG) technique. The measured electric fields show the temporal chopping nature of RT in expanding overdense plasma from nanofoils. In addition the temporal phases of the corresponding electric fields record the plasma critical surface movement via Doppler-shift in reflection and plasma refractive index in transmission. Our result provides insight into the dynamics of the transparent-overdense-regime (TOR) of relativistic plasmas, which should be useful in the development of laser-driven particle accelerators, x-ray sources, and techniques for controlling the shape and contrast of intense laser pulses.

  12. Plasma ignition for laser propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Askew, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    For a specific optical system a pulsed carbon dioxide laser having an energy output of up to 15 joules was used to initiate a plasma in air at one atmosphere pressure. The spatial and temporal development of the plasma were measured using a multiframe image converter camera. In addition the time dependent velocity of the laser supported plasma front which moves opposite to the direction of the laser pulse was measured in order to characterize the type of wavefront developed. Reliable and reproducible spark initiation was achieved. The lifetime of the highly dense plasma at the initial focal spot was determined to be less than 100 nanoseconds. The plasma front propagates toward the laser at a variable speed ranging from zero to 1.6 x 1,000,000 m/sec. The plasma front propagates for a total distance of approximately five centimeters for the energy and laser pulse shape employed.

  13. Tunable Infrared Lasers: Preparing for Expanded use in Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Killinger, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The literature on the use of tunable infrared lasers, for atmospheric trace gas detection and monitoring is about 25 years of age. However, this field, whith its myriad of potential application areas, has always been driven by the available laser technology. As new or improved laser devices become available, with characteristics which lend themselves to operation in compact, nearly autonomous instruments, their application to atmospheric science and environmental measurements expands.

  14. Light source employing laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Yezheng; Tillack, Mark S

    2013-09-17

    A system and a method of generating radiation and/or particle emissions are disclosed. In at least some embodiments, the system includes at least one laser source that generates a first pulse and a second pulse in temporal succession, and a target, where the target (or at least a portion the target) becomes a plasma upon being exposed to the first pulse. The plasma expand after the exposure to the first pulse, the expanded plasma is then exposed to the second pulse, and at least one of a radiation emission and a particle emission occurs after the exposure to the second pulse. In at least some embodiments, the target is a solid piece of material, and/or a time period between the first and second pulses is less than 1 microsecond (e.g., 840 ns).

  15. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (˜1015-16 W.cm-2) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  16. Effects of laser polarization in the expansion of plasma waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Geada, J.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-10-15

    We experimentally demonstrate that a column of hydrogen plasma generated by an ultra-short (sub-picosecond), moderate intensity (∼10{sup 15–16} W.cm{sup –2}) laser, radially expands at a higher velocity when using a circularly polarized laser beam instead of a linearly polarized beam. Interferometry shows that after 1 ns there is a clear shock structure formed, that can be approximated to a cylindrical blast wave. The shock velocity was measured for plasmas created with linearly and circularly polarized laser beams, indicating an approximately 20% higher velocity for plasmas generated with a circularly polarized laser beam, thus implying a higher plasma electron temperature. The heating mechanism was determined to be the Above Threshold Ionization effect. The calculated electrum energy spectrum for a circularly polarized laser beam was broader when compared to the one generated by a linearly polarized laser beam, leading to a higher plasma temperature.

  17. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering performed on expanding thermal arc plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meulenbroeks, R. F. G.; Engeln, R. A. H.; van der Mullen, J. A. M.; Schram, D. C.

    1996-05-01

    The expanding plasma emanating from a thermal arc plasma source that can be used for deposition of thin films is studied using laser spectroscopic techniques. The argon-hydrogen plasma is characterized by very fast recombination that cannot be explained by atomic processes. To explore this phenomenon, which has been related to wall association of hydrogen atoms and recirculation, CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) is performed on (argon-)hydrogen plasmas. The periphery of the plasma appears to be rich in hydrogen molecules, in accordance with the recirculation model. No highly rovibrationally excited states are detected in the periphery, in spite of the spectrometer's very good sensitivity (0.1 Pa H2 at 300 K). For the plasma, rotational and vibrational temperatures as well as absolute H2 densities are measured. A simple model for the observed (non-Boltzmann) rotational populations is developed.

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering performed on expanding thermal arc plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenbroeks, R.F.; Engeln, R.A.; van der Mullen, J.A.; Schram, D.C.

    1996-05-01

    The expanding plasma emanating from a thermal arc plasma source that can be used for deposition of thin films is studied using laser spectroscopic techniques. The argon-hydrogen plasma is characterized by very fast recombination that cannot be explained by atomic processes. To explore this phenomenon, which has been related to wall association of hydrogen atoms and recirculation, CARS (coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering) is performed on (argon-)hydrogen plasmas. The periphery of the plasma appears to be rich in hydrogen molecules, in accordance with the recirculation model. No highly rovibrationally excited states are detected in the periphery, in spite of the spectrometer{close_quote}s very good sensitivity (0.1 Pa H{sub 2} at 300 K). For the plasma, rotational and vibrational temperatures as well as absolute H{sub 2} densities are measured. A simple model for the observed (non-Boltzmann) rotational populations is developed. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Blast Wave Formation by Laser-Sustained Nonequilibrium Plasma in the Laser-Driven In-Tube Accelerator Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, Yousuke; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Sawada, Keisuke; Sasoh, Akihiro

    2006-05-02

    Understanding the dynamics of laser-produced plasma is essentially important for increasing available thrust force in a gas-driven laser propulsion system such as laser-driven in-tube accelerator. A computer code is developed to explore the formation of expanding nonequilibrium plasma produced by laser irradiation. Various properties of the blast wave driven by the nonequilibrium plasma are examined. It is found that the blast wave propagation is substantially affected by radiative cooling effect for lower density case.

  20. Investigation of Nd:YAG laser produced tin droplet plasma expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ziqi; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo; Lu, Peixiang; Wang, Junwu

    2016-05-01

    The present work reports an investigation of plasma expansion produced by Nd:YAG laser irradiating tin droplets. An intensified charged coupled device camera was used to record the plasma plume images, and the temporal evolution of the plasma plume was studied at various laser intensities. Our results demonstrate that the shape of the plasma plume develops from an approximate circle to an ellipse. The temporal evolutions of plasma boundary and plasma centroid were calculated by the secondary moment of plasma image intensity. The angle distributions of the plasma expanding velocity were obtained; the results show that the plasma expanding velocity decreases with increase of the angle to the incoming laser axis. In addition, the eccentricity of the plasma ellipse decreases with time. Meanwhile, we found that the centroid of plasma clusters moves toward the laser incoming direction during the expansion stage and the velocity of this motion is independent of laser intensity.

  1. Alfvén Waves Generated by Expanding Plasmas in the Laboratory and in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W.; Vanzeeland, M.; Vincena, S.; Pribyl, P.

    2002-12-01

    There are many situations, which occur in space (coronal mass ejections, supernovas), or are man-made (upper atmospheric detonations) in which a dense plasma expands into a background magnetized plasma, that can support Alfvén waves. The LArge Plasma Device (LAPD) is a machine, at UCLA, in which Alfvén waves propagation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas has been studied. These will be briefly reviewed. Then a new class of experiments which involve the expansion of a dense (initially, n/no>>1) laser-produced plasma into an ambient highly magnetized background plasma capable of supporting Alfvén waves will be presented. The 150 MW laser is pulsed at the same 1 Hz repetition rate as the plasma in a highly reproducible experiment. The laser beam impacts a solid target such that the initial plasma burst is directed either along or across the magnetic field. The interaction results in the production of intense shear and compressional Alfvén waves, as well as large density perturbations. The waves propagate away from the target and are observed to become plasma column resonances. The magnetic fields of the waves are obtained with a 3-axis inductive probe. Spatial patterns of the magnetic fields associated with the waves and density perturbations are measured at over {10}4 locations and will be shown in dramatic movies. These are used to estimate the coupling efficiency of the laser energy and kinetic energy of the dense plasma into wave energy. The wave generation mechanism is due to field aligned return currents, which replace fast electrons escaping the initial blast. Work supported by ONR, DOE, and NSF

  2. Laser Assisted Plasma Arc Welding

    SciTech Connect

    FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.

    1999-10-05

    Experiments have been performed using a coaxial end-effecter to combine a focused laser beam and a plasma arc. The device employs a hollow tungsten electrode, a focusing lens, and conventional plasma arc torch nozzles to co-locate the focused beam and arc on the workpiece. Plasma arc nozzles were selected to protect the electrode from laser generated metal vapor. The project goal is to develop an improved fusion welding process that exhibits both absorption robustness and deep penetration for small scale (< 1.5 mm thickness) applications. On aluminum alloys 6061 and 6111, the hybrid process has been shown to eliminate hot cracking in the fusion zone. Fusion zone dimensions for both stainless steel and aluminum were found to be wider than characteristic laser welds, and deeper than characteristic plasma arc welds.

  3. Picosecond strain pulses generated by a supersonically expanding electron-hole plasma in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, E. S. K.; Akimov, A. V.; Campion, R. P.; Kent, A. J.; Gusev, V.

    2012-10-01

    Strain pulses with picosecond duration are generated directly in GaAs by optical excitation from a femtosecond laser. The photons are absorbed in a 15-nm layer near the surface, creating the electron-hole plasma, which diffusively expands into the bulk of the GaAs. At an early time, the drift velocity of the expanding plasma exceeds the speed of longitudinal sound, and the generated strain pulses cannot escape the plasma cloud. Such supersonic generation of strain pulses results in specific temporal and spatial shapes of the generated strain pulses, where the compression part has a much lower amplitude than the tensile part. This phenomenon is studied experimentally at low temperatures and analyzed theoretically based on the wave and diffusion equations for strain and plasma density, respectively. Two mechanisms, deformation potential and thermoelasticity, are responsible for the experimental observations. The relative contributions from these mechanisms are governed by the nonradiative recombination rate in the plasma and depend on the optical excitation density, inducing such nonlinear optoacoustic effects as shortening of the leading strain front and a superlinear/quadratic increase in its amplitude with the rise of pump laser fluence.

  4. Modeling parametric scattering instabilities in large-scale expanding plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Hüller, S.; Pesme, D.; Casanova, M.; Loiseau, P.; Labaune, Ch.

    2006-06-01

    We present results from two-dimensional simulations of long scale-length laser-plasma interaction experiments performed at LULI. With the goal of predictive modeling of such experiments with our code Harmony2D, we take into account realistic plasma density and velocity profiles, the propagation of the laser light beam and the scattered light, as well as the coupling with the ion acoustic waves in order to describe Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). Laser pulse shaping is taken into account to follow the evolution ofthe SBS reflectivity as close as possible to the experiment. The light reflectivity is analyzed by distinguishing the backscattered light confined in the solid angle defined by the aperture of the incident light beam and the scattered light outside this cone. As in the experiment, it is observed that the aperture of the scattered light tends to increase with the mean intensity of the RPP-smoothed laser beam. A further common feature between simulations and experiments is the observed localization of the SBS-driven ion acoustic waves (IAW) in the front part of the target (with respect to the incoming laser beam).

  5. Dielectric properties in microwave remote plasma sustained in argon: Expanding plasma conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Jauberteau, J. L.; Jauberteau, I.

    2012-11-15

    This work is devoted to the study of the relative permittivity in argon expanding plasma produced below a microwave discharge sustained in a quartz tube and working at 2.45 GHz. We discuss results and explain the microwave propagation within the reactor, outside the quartz tube. It is shown that at low pressures (133 Pa) and at powers ranging from 100 W to 400 W, the wave frequency remains lower than the plasma frequency anywhere in the expanding plasma. Under these conditions, the real part of the relative permittivity is negative and the wave is reflected. Surprisingly, in these conditions, the plasma is produced inside and outside the quartz tube, below the wave launcher. This effect can be explained considering a surface wave propagating at the surface of the quartz tube then into the reactor, on the external surface of the expanding plasma below the quartz tube.

  6. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  7. Laser-plasma ion beams-experiments towards charge transfer x-ray laser

    SciTech Connect

    Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Fill, E.E. ); Bruch, R. ); Schneider, D. )

    1993-06-05

    Laser plasmas produced at intensities of up to 10[sup 14] W/cm[sup 2] expand towards a secondary target a few millimeters away. The intense x-ray emission during the interaction plasma-target was recorded spectrally, spatially and time-resolved. A number of processes, like recombination and charge transfer may account for this strong radiation. The implications of these experiments to the design of a charge transfer x-ray laser are discussed.

  8. Laser-plasma-based linear collider using hollow plasma channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, C. B.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-09-01

    A linear electron-positron collider based on laser-plasma accelerators using hollow plasma channels is considered. Laser propagation and energy depletion in the hollow channel is discussed, as well as the overall efficiency of the laser-plasma accelerator. Example parameters are presented for a 1-TeV and 3-TeV center-of-mass collider based on laser-plasma accelerators.

  9. Spectroscopic measurements of ablation plasma generated with laser-driven intense extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, N.; Hane, K.; Shikata, H.; Masuda, M.; Nagatomi, K.; Sunahara, A.; Yoshida, M.; Fujioka, S.; Nishimura, H.

    2016-03-01

    Material ablation by a focused Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light is studied by comparing expanding ion properties and plasma parameters with laser ablation. The kinetic energy distributions of expanding ions from EUV and laser ablation showed different spectra implying different geometries of plasma expansion. The calculation results of plasma parameters showed that EUV energy is mostly deposited in high electron density region close to the solid density, while laser energy is deposited in low energy density region. Plasma parameters experimentally obtained from visible spectra did not show noticeable difference between EUV and laser ablation due to the corresponding low cut off density.

  10. Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Skoric, Milos M.

    2009-11-10

    Ever since the much acclaimed paper of Akhiezer and Polovin plasma theorists have been attempting to comprehend complex dynamics related to the propagation of high and ultra-high intensity electromagnetic (EM) radiation through a plasma. This topic was successfully revisited a number of years later by Kaw and Dawson whose analysis threw more light on the propagation of coupled longitudinal-transverse waves of arbitrary intensity. The high phase velocity case was soon solved exactly by Max and Perkins, (early review). The problem of relativistic laser-plasma interactions is of particular interest concerning the fast ignition concept, relevant to contemporary laser inertial confinement fusion research. Moreover, the understanding of relativistic laser pulse evolution in a plasma is basic to many new applications, including optical-field-ionized x-ray lasers, plasma-based electron accelerator schemes, as well as, interpretation of some astrophysical phenomena, and references, therein). From a text given in two tutorial lectures, in a limited space, we mainly focus on an important paradigm of stimulated Raman scattering.

  11. Laser frequency modulation with electron plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgess, T. J.; Latorre, V. R.

    1972-01-01

    When laser beam passes through electron plasma its frequency shifts by amount proportional to plasma density. This density varies with modulating signal resulting in corresponding modulation of laser beam frequency. Necessary apparatus is relatively inexpensive since crystals are not required.

  12. Plane and hemispherical potential structures in magnetically expanding plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Igarashi, Yuichi; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-07-26

    Two-dimensional potential structures are measured for different gas pressure in expanding argon plasma using permanent magnets, where the magnetic field is about 100 G in the source and several gauss in the diffusion chamber. The plane potential drop is observed near the source exit for 0.35 mTorr, while the potential structure becomes hemispherical when increasing up to 1 mTorr; the hemispherical structure results in the radial divergence of the ion beam. It is found that the trajectories of the accelerated ions and the electrons overcoming the potential drop are dominated by the potential structure and magnetic-field lines, respectively.

  13. Collisional coupling in counterstreaming laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koopman, D. W.; Goforth, R. R.

    1974-01-01

    The collisional processes which transfer momentum between counterstreaming plasmas are reviewed and applied to the example of a laser-produced plasma expanding into a partially ionized background. Experimental measurements of the dependence of the ion flow field on collisional momentum transfer demonstrate the validity of the simplified treatment of collision processes which have been adopted. A numerical model which simulates the laser-plasma interaction with the background confirms the importance of collisions in previous experimental studies of momentum coupling, and provides some insight into the distinction between collisional and collisionless flow regimes.

  14. Bulk viscosity of anisotropically expanding hot QCD plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, Vinod

    2011-11-01

    The bulk viscosity, {zeta} and its ratio with the shear viscosity, {zeta}/{eta} have been studied in an anisotropically expanding pure glue plasma in the presence of turbulent color fields. It has been shown that the anisotropy in the momentum distribution function of gluons, which has been determined from a linearized transport equation eventually leads to the bulk viscosity. For the isotropic (equilibrium) state, a recently proposed quasiparticle model of pure SU(3) lattice QCD equation of state has been employed where the interactions are encoded in the effective fugacity. It has been argued that the interactions present in the equation of state, significantly contribute to the bulk viscosity. Its ratio with the shear viscosity is significant even at 1.5T{sub c}. Thus, one needs to take in account the effects of the bulk viscosity while studying the hydrodynamic expansion of quark-gluon plasma in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the Large Hadron Collider.

  15. Plasma-based XUV lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klisnick, A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture is an introduction to the generation of plasma-based XUV lasers and their use as a source for scientific applications. We first discuss the main conditions required to create population inversions and amplify XUV radiation. We give an overview of the main properties of the different types of XUV lasers beams that are currently operational worldwide, while comparing them to other ultrashort, high-brightness sources existing in the same spectral range. We discuss recent demonstrations of applications of plasma-based XUV lasers to high-resolution imaging and interaction with matter at high intensity. Finally we conclude with current prospects for extending these sources to shorter wavelength and higher output intensity.

  16. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  17. EDITORIAL: Laser and plasma accelerators Laser and plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingham, Robert

    2009-02-01

    This special issue on laser and plasma accelerators illustrates the rapid advancement and diverse applications of laser and plasma accelerators. Plasma is an attractive medium for particle acceleration because of the high electric field it can sustain, with studies of acceleration processes remaining one of the most important areas of research in both laboratory and astrophysical plasmas. The rapid advance in laser and accelerator technology has led to the development of terawatt and petawatt laser systems with ultra-high intensities and short sub-picosecond pulses, which are used to generate wakefields in plasma. Recent successes include the demonstration by several groups in 2004 of quasi-monoenergetic electron beams by wakefields in the bubble regime with the GeV energy barrier being reached in 2006, and the energy doubling of the SLAC high-energy electron beam from 42 to 85 GeV. The electron beams generated by the laser plasma driven wakefields have good spatial quality with energies ranging from MeV to GeV. A unique feature is that they are ultra-short bunches with simulations showing that they can be as short as a few femtoseconds with low-energy spread, making these beams ideal for a variety of applications ranging from novel high-brightness radiation sources for medicine, material science and ultrafast time-resolved radiobiology or chemistry. Laser driven ion acceleration experiments have also made significant advances over the last few years with applications in laser fusion, nuclear physics and medicine. Attention is focused on the possibility of producing quasi-mono-energetic ions with energies ranging from hundreds of MeV to GeV per nucleon. New acceleration mechanisms are being studied, including ion acceleration from ultra-thin foils and direct laser acceleration. The application of wakefields or beat waves in other areas of science such as astrophysics and particle physics is beginning to take off, such as the study of cosmic accelerators considered

  18. Magnetic plasma confinement for laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Okamura, M; Adeyemi, A; Kanesue, T; Tamura, J; Kondo, K; Dabrowski, R

    2010-02-01

    A laser ion source (LIS) can easily provide a high current beam. However, it has been difficult to obtain a longer beam pulse while keeping a high current. On occasion, longer beam pulses are required by certain applications. For example, more than 10 micros of beam pulse is required for injecting highly charged beams to a large sized synchrotron. To extend beam pulse width, a solenoid field was applied at the drift space of the LIS at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The solenoid field suppressed the diverging angle of the expanding plasma and the beam pulse was widened. Also, it was observed that the plasma state was conserved after passing through a few hundred gauss of the 480 mm length solenoid field. PMID:20192365

  19. Collimation of laser-produced plasmas using axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Harilal, Sivanandan S.; Hassan, Syed M.; Endo, Akira; Mocek, Tomas; Hassanein, A.

    2015-06-01

    We investigated the expansion dynamics of laser-produced plasmas expanding into an axial magnetic field. Plasmas were generated by focusing 1.064 µm Nd:YAG laser pulses onto a planar tin target in vacuum and allowed to expand into a 0.5 T magnetic-filed where field lines were aligned along the plume expansion direction. Gated images employing intensified CCD showed focusing of the plasma plume, which were also compared with results obtained using particle-in-cell modelling methods. The estimated density and temperature of the plasma plumes employing emission spectroscopy revealed significant changes in the presence and absence of the 0.5T magnetic field. In the presence of the field, the electron temperature is increased with distance from the target, while the density showed opposite effects.

  20. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON LASER PLASMAS: Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskiĭ, Yu M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskiĭ, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic and optical characteristics of the laser plasma produced during the application of a CO2 laser pulse to a target have been studied as a function of the ambient air pressure. The changes in the surface roughness of the sample after bombardment were studied as a function of the air pressure. It is concluded from the results that a transition from an air plasma to an erosion plasma occurs at a residual air pressure on the order of 1 torr. The experiment data support the existing picture of the process by which a plasma is produced near the surface of a target in air by laser pulses.

  1. Double Layers in Expanding Plasmas and Their Relevance to the Auroral Plasma Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    When a dense plasma consisting of a cold and a sufficiently warm electron population expands, a rarefaction shock forms. In the expansion of the polar wind in the magnetosphere, it has been previously shown that when a sufficiently warm electron population also exists, in addition to the usual cold ionospheric one, a discontinuity forms in the electrostatic potential distribution along the magnetic field lines. Despite the lack of spatial resolution and the assumption of quasi-neutrality in the polar wind models, such discontinuities have been called double layers (DLs). Recently similar discontinuities have been invoked to partly explain the auroral acceleration of electrons and ions in the upward current region. By means of one-dimensional Vlasov simulations of expanding plasmas, for the first time we make here the connection between (i) the rarefaction shocks, (ii) the discontinuities in the potential distributions, and (iii) DLs. We show that when plasmas expand from opposite directions into a deep density cavity with a potential drop across it and when the plasma on the high-potential side contains two electron populations, the temporal evolution of the potential and the plasma. distribution generates evolving multiple double layers with an extended density cavity between them. One of the DLs is the rarefaction-shock (RFS) and it forms by the reflections of the cold electrons coming from the high-potential side; it supports a part of the potential drop approximately determined by the hot electron temperature.

  2. Surface plasma wave excitation via laser irradiated overdense plasma foil

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pawan; Tripathi, V. K.

    2012-04-09

    A laser irradiated overdense plasma foil is seen to be susceptible to parametric excitation of surface plasma wave (SPW) and ion acoustic wave (IAW) on the ion plasma period time scale. The SPW is localised near the front surface of the foil while IAW extends upto the rear. The evanescent laser field and the SPW exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the IAW. The density perturbation associated with the latter beats with the laser induced oscillatory electron velocity to drive the SPW. At relativistic laser intensity, the growth rate is of the order of ion plasma frequency.

  3. Visualization of expanding warm dense gold and diamond heated uniformly by laser-generated ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bang, W.; Albright, B. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Palaniyappan, S.; Vold, E. L.; Santiago Cordoba, M. A.; Hamilton, C. E.; Fernández, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    With a laser-generated beam of quasi-monoenergetic ions, a solid density target can be heated uniformly and isochorically. On the LANL Trident laser facility, we have used a beam of quasi-monoenergetic aluminum ions to heat gold and diamond foils. We visualized directly the expanding warm dense gold and diamond with an optical streak camera. Furthermore, we present a new technique to determine the initial temperatures of these heated samples from the measured expansion speeds of gold and diamond into vacuum. These temperatures are in good agreement with the expected temperatures calculated using the total deposited energy into the cold targets and SESAME equation-of-state tables at solid densities. We anticipate the uniformly heated solid density target will allow for direct quantitative measurements of equation-of-state, conductivity, opacity, and stopping power of warm dense matter, benefiting plasma physics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. *This work is sponsored by the LANL LDRD Program.

  4. Operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-12-21

    The operational plasma density and laser parameters for future colliders based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. Beamstrahlung limits the charge per bunch at low plasma densities. Reduced laser intensity is examined to improve accelerator efficiency in the beamstrahlung-limited regime.

  5. Electron dynamics and ion acceleration in expanding-plasma thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafleur, T.; Cannat, F.; Jarrige, J.; Elias, P. Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-12-01

    In most expanding-plasma thrusters, ion acceleration occurs due to the formation of ambipolar-type electric fields; a process that depends strongly on the electron dynamics of the discharge. The electron properties also determine the heat flux leaving the thruster as well as the maximum ion energy, which are important parameters for the evaluation of thruster performance. Here we perform an experimental and theoretical investigation with both magnetized, and unmagnetized, low-pressure thrusters to explicitly determine the relationship between the ion energy, E i , and the electron temperature, T e0. With no magnetic field a relatively constant value of {{E}i}/{{T}e0}≈ 6 is found for xenon, while when a magnetic nozzle is present, {{E}i}/{{T}e0} is between about 4-5. These values are shown to be a function of both the magnetic field strength, as well as the electron energy distribution function, which changes significantly depending on the mass flow rate (and hence neutral gas pressure) used in the thruster. The relationship between the ion energy and electron temperature allows estimates to be made for polytropic indices of use in a number of fluid models, as well as estimates of the upper limits to the performance of these types of systems, which for xenon and argon result in maximum specific impulses of about 2500 s and 4500 s respectively.

  6. Nonlinear laser energy depletion in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Shadwick, B.A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.

    2009-04-03

    Energy depletion of intense, short-pulse lasers via excitation of plasma waves is investigated numerically and analytically. The evolution of a resonant laser pulse proceeds in two phases. In the first phase, the pulse steepens, compresses, and frequency red-shifts as energy is deposited in the plasma. The second phase of evolution occurs after the pulse reaches a minimum length at which point the pulse rapidly lengthens, losing resonance with the plasma. Expressions for the rate of laser energy loss and rate of laser red-shifting are derived and are found to be in excellent agreement with the direct numerical solution of the laser field evolution coupled to the plasma response. Both processes are shown to have the same characteristic length-scale. In the high intensity limit, for nearly-resonant Gaussian laser pulses, this scale length is shown to be independent of laser intensity.

  7. Effects of laser plasma on damage in optical glass induced by pulsed lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jinghua; Li, Yaguo; He, Changtao; Zhang, Qiuhui; Niu, Ruihua; Yang, Liming; Feng, Guoying

    2012-12-01

    Laser-induced plasma can expedite the deposition of incident laser energy and the laser-induced damage in optical glass is considerably affected by the magnitude and distribution of the plasma shock wave. The spatial distribution of energy deposition and expansion pressure of the laser plasma shock wave is analyzed based on the moving breakdown model. Furthermore, damage morphologies are discussed in light of the spatial distribution of pressure and glass properties. It was found that with the increase of laser pulse energy, the shock wave expands rapidly in the direction opposite to the incident laser, resulting in that the damage morphologies transform from sphere to spindle gradually. The laser energy deposits mostly in a narrow plasma channel. The diffusion of the plasma with high temperature and pressure leads to the shock wave; the intensity of which decreases sharply with the axial distance from the centerline. As a consequence, the glass near the centerline fractures and melts, and the refractive index also changes near the end of cracks.

  8. Laboratory experiments on Alfvén waves caused by rapidly expanding plasmas and their relationship to space phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gekelman, W.; van Zeeland, M.; Vincena, S.; Pribyl, P.

    2003-07-01

    There are many situations which naturally occur in space (coronal mass ejections, supernovas) or are man-made (upper atmospheric detonations) in which a dense plasma expands into a background magnetized plasma that can support Alfvén waves. The Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA is a machine in which Alfvén wave propagation in homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas has been studied. A new class of experiments which involve the expansion of a dense (initially nlaser-produced/nbackground ≫ 1) laser-produced plasma into an ambient highly magnetized plasma capable of supporting Alfvén waves will be presented. The 150 MW laser is pulsed at the same 1 Hz repetition rate as the plasma in a highly reproducible experiment. The laser beam impacts a solid target such that the initial plasma burst is directed across the ambient magnetic field. The interaction results in the production of intense shear and compressional Alfvén waves, as well as large density perturbations. The waves propagate away from the target and are observed to become plasma column resonances. The magnetic fields of the waves are measured with a 3-axis inductive probe. Spatial patterns of the magnetic fields associated with the waves and density perturbations are acquired at over 10,000 spatial locations and as a function of time. Measurements are used to estimate the coupling efficiency of the laser energy and kinetic energy of the dense plasma into wave energy. The shear wave generation mechanism is due to field-aligned return currents, which replace fast electrons escaping the initial blast.

  9. Control of laser plasma instabilities in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1996-12-01

    Laser plasma instabilities are an important constraint on the operating regime for inertial fusion. Many techniques have been developed to control the various laser-driven instabilities. Experiments with long scale length plasmas are testing these instability levels, the nonlinear regimes, and the control mechanisms.

  10. Filamentation of laser in an inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ranjeet; Tripathi, V. K.

    2011-02-15

    Filamentation of an intense short pulse laser in an inhomogeneous plasma is investigated when laser propagates along the direction of density gradient and nonlinearity arises due to the relativistic mass variation and ponderomotive force. The ion motion is neglected; however, the effect of dielectric swelling is included. The inhomogeneity in the density profile introduces dielectric swelling of the pump intensity enhancing the plasma permittivity and the growth rate of the instability. The perturbation in laser amplitude grows faster than exponential as the laser penetrates deeper into the denser plasma.

  11. Double Layers in Expanding Plasmas and Their Relevance to the Auroral Plasma Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Nagendra; Khazanov, George

    2003-01-01

    When a dense plasma consisting of a cold and a sufficiently warm electron population expands, a rarefaction shock forms [Bezzerides et al., 1978]. In the expansion of the polar wind in the magnetosphere, it has been previously shown that when a sufficiently warm electron population also exists, in addition to the usual cold ionospheric one, a discontinuity forms in the electrostatic potential distribution along the magnetic field lines [Barakat and Schunk, 1984]. Despite the lack of spatial resolution and the assumption of quasi-neutrality in the polar wind models, such discontinuities have been called double layers (DLs). Recently similar discontinuities have been invoked to partly explain the auroral acceleration of electrons and ions in the upward current region [Ergun et al., 2000]. By means of one-dimensional Vlasov simulations of expanding plasmas, for the first time we make here the connection between (1) the rarefaction shocks, (2) the discontinuities in the potential distributions, and (3) DLs. We show that when plasmas expand from opposite directions into a deep density cavity with a potential drop across it and when the plasma on the high-potential side contains hot and cold electron populations, the temporal evolution of the potential and the plasma distribution generates evolving multiple double layers with an ,extended density cavity between them. One of the DLs is the rarefaction-shock (RFS) and it forms by the reflections of the cold electrons coming from the high-potential side; it supports a part of the potential drop approximately determined by the hot electron temperature. The other DLs evolve from charge separations arising either from reflection of ions coming from the low-potential side or stemming from plasma instabilities; they support the rest of the potential drop. The instabilities forming these additional double layers involve electron-ion (e-i) Buneman or ion-ion (i-i) two-stream interactions. The electron-electron two

  12. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm-2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations.

  13. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D A; Mori, W B; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 10(16) W cm(-2) to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  14. Plasma optical modulators for intense lasers

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lu-Le; Zhao, Yao; Qian, Lie-Jia; Chen, Min; Weng, Su-Ming; Sheng, Zheng-Ming; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Mori, W. B.; Zhang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Optical modulators can have high modulation speed and broad bandwidth, while being compact. However, these optical modulators usually work for low-intensity light beams. Here we present an ultrafast, plasma-based optical modulator, which can directly modulate high-power lasers with intensity up to 1016 W cm−2 to produce an extremely broad spectrum with a fractional bandwidth over 100%, extending to the mid-infrared regime in the low-frequency side. This concept relies on two co-propagating laser pulses in a sub-millimetre-scale underdense plasma, where a drive laser pulse first excites an electron plasma wave in its wake while a following carrier laser pulse is modulated by the plasma wave. The laser and plasma parameters suitable for the modulator to work are based on numerical simulations. PMID:27283369

  15. Laser plasma at low air pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vas'kovskii, Iu. M.; Moiseev, V. N.; Rovinskii, R. E.; Tsenina, I. S.

    1993-01-01

    The ambient-pressure dependences of the dynamic and optical characteristics of a laser plasma generated by CO2-laser irradiation of an obstacle are investigated experimentally. The change of the sample's surface roughness after irradiation is investigated as a function of air pressure. It is concluded that the transition from the air plasma to the erosion plasma takes place at an air pressure of about 1 mm Hg. The results confirm the existing theory of plasma formation near the surface of an obstacle under the CO2-laser pulse effect in air.

  16. Plasma laser accelerator: longitudinal dynamics, the plasma/laser interaction, and a qualitative design

    SciTech Connect

    Ruth, R.D.; Chao, A.W.

    1982-04-01

    In this paper we present our studies on a plasma laser accelerator. First we look at the longitudinal dynamics and the trapping of particles in the potential well due to the longitudinal electric field in a plasma density wave. Next we study the plasma/laser interaction to obtain power requirements. Lastly, we qualitatively design a plasma/laser accelerator with parameters somewhat more modest than existing suggestions.

  17. A side-injected-laser plasma accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Katsouleas, T.; Dawson, J.M.; Sultana, D.; Yun, Y.T.

    1985-10-01

    A new method for driving relativistic plasma waves capable of ultra-high acceleration gradients (order 1GeV/cm) is presented. By injecting a single laser frequency from the side, rather than colinearly with the accelerated particles, both pump depletion and particle dephasing may be avoidable. The coupling of the side injected laser to the relativistic plasma wave via a pre-formed density ripple in the plasma is modelled analytically and with computer simulation.

  18. Laser-plasma instability in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    A gas-filled hohlraum designed so as to approach plasma conditions expected in future ignition hohlraums has been fielded at the Nova laser. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of these Nova hohlraums predicts reasonably well the measured plasma parameters. The measured reflectivity of a probe beam by Stimulated Brillouin scattering is modest. Some observed dependencies of reflectivity on laser and plasma parameters are understood theoretically, while others are not.

  19. Heating dynamics and extreme ultraviolet radiation emission of laser-produced Sn plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yuspeh, S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2010-06-28

    The impact of 1.064 mum laser absorption depth on the heating and in-band (2% bandwidth) 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet emissions in Sn plasmas is investigated experimentally and numerically. In-band emission lasting longer than the laser pulse and separation between the laser absorption and in-band emission region are observed. Maximum efficiency is achieved by additional heating of the core of the plasma to allow the optimal temperature to expand to a lower and more optically thin density. This leads to higher temperature plasma that emits less in-band light as compared to CO{sub 2} produced plasma sources for the same application.

  20. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Huifeng; Yuan, Hong; Tang, Zhiping

    2013-01-01

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  1. Simulation of laser interaction with ablative plasma and hydrodynamic behavior of laser supported plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Tong Huifeng; Yuan Hong; Tang Zhiping

    2013-01-28

    When an intense laser beam irradiates on a solid target, ambient air ionizes and becomes plasma, while part of the target rises in temperature, melts, vaporizes, ionizes, and yet becomes plasma. A general Godunov finite difference scheme WENO (Weighted Essentially Non-Oscillatory Scheme) with fifth-order accuracy is used to simulate 2-dimensional axis symmetrical laser-supported plasma flow field in the process of laser ablation. The model of the calculation of ionization degree of plasma and the interaction between laser beam and plasma are considered in the simulation. The numerical simulations obtain the profiles of temperature, density, and velocity at different times which show the evolvement of the ablative plasma. The simulated results show that the laser energy is strongly absorbed by plasma on target surface and that the velocity of laser supported detonation (LSD) wave is half of the ideal LSD value derived from Chapman-Jouguet detonation theory.

  2. Laser guiding for GeV laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Tóth, Csaba

    2006-03-15

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short-term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators. PMID:16483950

  3. Laser Guiding for GeV Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Csaba

    2005-06-06

    Guiding of relativistically intense laser beams in preformed plasma channels is discussed for development of GeV-class laser accelerators. Experiments using a channel guided laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) at LBNL have demonstrated that near mono-energetic 100 MeV-class electron beams can be produced with a 10 TW laser system. Analysis, aided by particle-in-cell simulations, as well as experiments with various plasma lengths and densities, indicate that tailoring the length of the accelerator, together with loading of the accelerating structure with beam, is the key to production of mono-energetic electron beams. Increasing the energy towards a GeV and beyond will require reducing the plasma density and design criteria are discussed for an optimized accelerator module. The current progress and future directions are summarized through comparison with conventional accelerators, highlighting the unique short term prospects for intense radiation sources based on laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  4. Reducing wall plasma expansion with gold foam irradiated by laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lu; Ding, Yongkun Jiang, Shaoen Yang, Jiamin; Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Lin, Zhiwei; Jing, Longfei; Li, Liling; Deng, Bo; Yuan, Zheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Guanghui; Tan, Xiulan; Li, Ping

    2015-11-15

    The experimental study on the expanding plasma movement of low-density gold foam (∼1% solid density) irradiated by a high power laser is reported in this paper. Experiments were conducted using the SG-III prototype laser. Compared to solid gold with 19.3 g/cc density, the velocities of X-ray emission fronts moving off the wall are much smaller for gold foam with 0.3 g/cc density. Theoretical analysis and MULTI 1D simulation results also show less plasma blow-off, and that the density contour movement velocities of gold foam are smaller than those of solid gold, agreeing with experimental results. These results indicate that foam walls have advantages in symmetry control and lowering plasma fill when used in ignition hohlraum.

  5. Reducing wall plasma expansion with gold foam irradiated by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Lin, Zhiwei; Jing, Longfei; Li, Liling; Deng, Bo; Yuan, Zheng; Chen, Tao; Yuan, Guanghui; Tan, Xiulan; Li, Ping

    2015-11-01

    The experimental study on the expanding plasma movement of low-density gold foam (˜1% solid density) irradiated by a high power laser is reported in this paper. Experiments were conducted using the SG-III prototype laser. Compared to solid gold with 19.3 g/cc density, the velocities of X-ray emission fronts moving off the wall are much smaller for gold foam with 0.3 g/cc density. Theoretical analysis and MULTI 1D simulation results also show less plasma blow-off, and that the density contour movement velocities of gold foam are smaller than those of solid gold, agreeing with experimental results. These results indicate that foam walls have advantages in symmetry control and lowering plasma fill when used in ignition hohlraum.

  6. Laser Diagnostics for Plasma Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Serguei Victor

    The time transients of vibrational/rotational excitation up to v = 7 vibrational level of the ground electronic state of nitrogen were measured in a positive column during the 1-10 mus pulsed electric discharges, and in the afterglow. Current densities were up to 25 A/cm^2, and pressures up to 6 Torr. It is shown that initially energy is being transferred, primarily into vibrational levels above v = 1, resulting in a highly non Boltzmann distribution. The redistribution between vibrational levels takes place within 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Beyond 100 mus the vibrational populations resemble closely Boltzmann distribution. Significant rotational heating was observed in the afterglow and is attributed to energy transfer from vibration to rotation via collisions with electrons. The rotational temperature was as high as 3500 K and reached maximum values between 80 and 100 mus after the discharge pulse. Standard, Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (CARS) was employed in all measurements. A novel laser interferometric system has been developed for real time in situ monitoring of the etch rate during the plasma etching. The two-beam-two-path optical set-up provides continuous etch rate measurements while plasma parameters are changing.

  7. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-01

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world. Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called "dream beams on a table top", which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  8. Progress of Laser-Driven Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2007-07-11

    There is a great interest worldwide in plasma accelerators driven by ultra-intense lasers which make it possible to generate ultra-high gradient acceleration and high quality particle beams in a much more compact size compared with conventional accelerators. A frontier research on laser and plasma accelerators is focused on high energy electron acceleration and ultra-short X-ray and Tera Hertz radiations as their applications. These achievements will provide not only a wide range of sciences with benefits of a table-top accelerator but also a basic science with a tool of ultrahigh energy accelerators probing an unknown extremely microscopic world.Harnessing the recent advance of ultra-intense ultra-short pulse lasers, the worldwide research has made a tremendous breakthrough in demonstrating high-energy high-quality particle beams in a compact scale, so called ''dream beams on a table top'', which represents monoenergetic electron beams from laser wakefield accelerators and GeV acceleration by capillary plasma-channel laser wakefield accelerators. This lecture reviews recent progress of results on laser-driven plasma based accelerator experiments to quest for particle acceleration physics in intense laser-plasma interactions and to present new outlook for the GeV-range high-energy laser plasma accelerators.

  9. The magnetic-field-induced transition from an expanding plasma to a double layer containing expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2007-11-12

    The magnetic-field-induced transition from a simple expansion to a double layer is experimentally investigated in an argon low pressure radio frequency helicon source plasma. When the magnetic field is increased from 30 to 140 G in the plasma source, an abrupt increase in the plasma density and upstream potential is measured at 50 G. In the downstream plasma, the plasma density and potential show a small decrease with increasing magnetic field and no abrupt change. When the upstream jump is measured, simultaneous measurements in the downstream plasma show an ion beam characteristic of a double layer near the source exit.

  10. Plasma expansion into a waveguide created by a linearly polarized femtosecond laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, N.; Grismayer, T.; Cardoso, L.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2013-06-15

    We demonstrate the efficient generation of 4 mm and 8 mm long plasma waveguides in hydrogen and helium. These waveguides have matching spots sizes for 13 to 34 μm laser beams. The plasma waveguides are created by ultra-short laser pulses (sub-picosecond) of moderate intensities, ∼10{sup 15}–10{sup 16} W cm{sup −2}, that heat the plasma to initial temperatures of tens of eV in order to create a hot plasma column that will expand into a plasma waveguide. We have determined that the main heating mechanism when using fs laser pulses and plasma densities ∼10{sup 18–19} cm{sup −3} is Above Threshold Ionization. Detailed time and space electron density measurements are presented for the laser produced plasma waveguides.

  11. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  12. Laser hosing in relativistically hot plasmas.

    PubMed

    Li, G; Mori, W B; Ren, C

    2013-04-12

    Electron response in an intense laser is studied in the regime where the electron temperature is relativistic. Equations for laser envelope and plasma density evolution, both in the electron plasma wave and ion acoustic wave regimes, are rederived from the relativistic fluid equations to include relativistic plasma temperature effect. These equations are used to study short-pulse and long-pulse laser hosing instabilities using a variational method approach. The analysis shows that relativistic electron temperatures reduce the hosing growth rates and shift the fastest-growing modes to longer wavelengths. These results resolve a long-standing discrepancy between previous nonrelativistic theory and simulations or experiments on hosing. PMID:25167277

  13. Laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers, and considers their implications for laser fusion. The experiments used 1.06, 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 ..mu..m light to produce relatively large, warm, planar plasmas and to study the effect of laser wavelength and density-gradient scale length on the Stimulated Raman Scattering and on the scattering of light at frequencies near the incident laser frequency by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering or other processes. The results of these experiments suggest that some laser wavelength between 0.2 and 0.6 ..mu..m will be required for high-gain laser fusion.

  14. Studies of Magnetic Reconnection in Colliding Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Novel images of magnetic fields and measurements of electron and ion temperatures have been obtained in the magnetic reconnection region of high- β, laser-produced plasmas. Experiments using laser-irradiated foils produce expanding, hemispherical plasma plumes carrying MG Biermann-battery magnetic fields, which can be driven to interact and reconnect. Thomson-scattering measurements of electron and ion temperatures in the interaction region of two colliding, magnetized plasmas show no thermal enhancement due to reconnection, as expected for β ~ 8 plasmas. Two different proton radiography techniques used to image the magnetic field structures show deformation, pileup, and annihilation of magnetic flux. High-resolution images reveal unambiguously reconnection-induced jets emerging from the interaction region and show instabilities in the expanding plasma plumes and supersonic, hydrodynamic jets due to the plasma collision. Quantitative magnetic flux data show that reconnection in experiments with asymmetry in the scale size, density, temperature, and plasma flow across the reconnection region occurs less efficiently than in similar, symmetric experiments. This result is attributed to disruption of the Hall mechanism mediating collisionless reconnection. The collision of plasmas carrying parallel magnetic fields has also been probed, illustrating the deformation of magnetic field structures in high-energy-density plasmas in the absence of reconnection. These experiments are particularly relevant to high- β reconnection environments, such as the magnetopause. This work was performed in collaboration with C. Li, F. Séguin, A. Zylstra, H. Rinderknecht, H. Sio, J. Frenje, and R. Petrasso (MIT), I. Igumenshchev, V. Glebov, C. Stoeckl, and D. Froula (LLE), J. Ross and R. Town (LLNL), W. Fox (UNH), and A. Nikroo (GA), and was supported in part by the NLUF, FSC/UR, U.S. DOE, LLNL, and LLE.

  15. Multiple pulse resonantly enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Corner, L.; Walczak, R.; Nevay, L. J.; Dann, S.; Hooker, S. M.; Bourgeois, N.; Cowley, J.

    2012-12-21

    We present an outline of experiments being conducted at Oxford University on multiple-pulse, resonantly-enhanced laser plasma wakefield acceleration. This method of laser plasma acceleration uses trains of optimally spaced low energy short pulses to drive plasma oscillations and may enable laser plasma accelerators to be driven by compact and efficient fibre laser sources operating at high repetition rates.

  16. Reinjection of transmitted laser light into laser-produced plasma for efficient laser ignition.

    PubMed

    Endo, Takuma; Takenaka, Yuhei; Sako, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Tomohisa; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Namba, Shinichi

    2016-02-10

    For improving the laser absorption efficiency in laser ignition, the transmitted laser light was returned to the laser-produced plasma by using a corner cube. In the experiments, the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma at different times. The laser absorption efficiency was found to be substantially improved when the transmitted light was reinjected into the plasma after adequate plasma expansion. Furthermore, through visualization experiments on gas-dynamics phenomena, it was found that the reinjection of the transmitted light affected not only the laser absorption efficiency but also the gas dynamics after breakdown, and thereby the initial flame kernel development. PMID:26906388

  17. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Durrant, S.F.

    1996-07-01

    Laser ablation for solid sample introduction to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for bulk and spatially-resolved elemental analysis is briefly reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Physics of Laser-driven plasma-based acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, Eric; Schroeder, Carl B.

    2003-06-30

    The physics of plasma-based accelerators driven by short-pulse lasers is reviewed. This includes the laser wake-field accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wake-field accelerator, and plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse direction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, as well as beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and plasmas with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Recent experimental results are summarized.

  19. Non Equilbrium Vibrational Kinetics in Expanding Plasma Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Gianpiero

    2008-12-31

    The supersonic expansion of a plasma is a system of interest for aerospace applications, ranging from propulsion to hypersonic wind tunnels. Under these conditions the plasma shows significant departures from chemical and thermal equilibrium, similarly to post-discharge conditions. The multitemperature description is not adequate because the internal level distributions show tails overpopulated with respect to a Boltzmann distribution. The state-to-state approach has to be used, including the interaction with free electrons which follow non-maxwellian distributions.

  20. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  1. Characteristics of the soft X-ray emission from laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Arai, Goki; Kondo, Yoshiki; Dinh, Thanh-Hung; Dunne, Padraig; O’Sullivan, Gerry; Ejima, Takeo; Hatano, Tadashi; Jiang, Weihua; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sasaki, Akira; Sunahara, Atsushi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    We characterized the spectral structure of the soft X-ray emission and determined the plasma parameters in laser-produced highly charged platinum plasmas. The spectral structure observed originated from Pt21+ to Pt34+ ions, emissions from which overlapped to produce a high output flux in the carbon-window soft X-ray spectral region. Using dual laser pulse irradiation, we observed the maximum output flux, which was 20% larger than that obtained under single-laser irradiation, and the evolution of a strongly absorbed spectral structure, which was attributed to the effects of both opacity and long-scale length of the expanding pre-plasma.

  2. Laser-Plasma Density and Temperature Measurements with Triple Langmuir Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, A.; Quiros, N.; Khanal, V.; Wan, W. C.; Meineke, J.; Kugland, N. L.; Morita, T.; Gregori, G.; Park, H.-S.; Presura, R.

    2013-10-01

    Experiments to investigate shocks produced by the explosive expansion of a laser-plasma plume against a gas background were performed on the Titan laser (LLNL). Knowledge of density and temperature is essential for understanding the underlying processes. Triple Langmuir probes (TLP) were used for measuring these quantities as function of time at a given location in the plasma. In the experiment, laser ablation plasma from a carbon rod expanded in hydrogen, helium, or argon ambient gas. Density and temperature jumps in the TLP measurements can be correlated with shocks detected by interferometry and proton deflectometry. This work was supported by the US DOE/OFES grant DE-SC0008829.

  3. Interaction of plasmas with intense lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, William L.

    2000-06-01

    The interaction of plasmas with intense lasers is an excellent example of how different fields of physics are interconnected. Invention of the laser and its ongoing development has allowed the creation and study of high temperature, dense matter in the laboratory. The results both advance the underlying plasma science and are relevant to many fields ranging from astrophysics to fusion and nonlinear physics. A brief overview of the interaction physics is given. Selected topics are discussed to illustrate the exciting progress in experimental, theoretical, and computational investigations with focused laser intensities up to 10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Relativistic plasma astrophysics with intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramitsu, Yasuhiro; Chu, Hsu-Hsin; Hau, Lin-Ni; Chen, Shih-Hung; Liu, Yao-Li; Hsieh, Chia-Ying; Sakawa, Youichi; Hideaki, Takabe; Wang, Jyhpyng

    2015-12-01

    Recent progresses of laser technologies enable us to investigate space and astrophysical phenomena in laboratories. In space plasmas the local observations by spacecrafts provide us the microscopic information of the plasma and electric/magnetic fields, however, it is difficult to obtain the global structures of the phenomena. In astrophysical plasmas, in contrast, global images provide us the macroscopic information, although there is no local observation and thus no microscopic information. Laboratory experiments on space and astrophysical phenomena provide us the local and global information simultaneously. We have investigated so far mostly non-relativistic phenomena in the universe with long laser pulses. Now we extend our research from non-relativistic to relativistic regime with an ultra intense laser, the 100 TW laser facility at National Central University. We introduce our facility and model relativistic phenomena in laboratory, focusing on the magnetic field generation and the magnetic reconnection in the universe.

  5. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, Steven J.; Jones, Roger D.

    1990-06-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g. lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g. kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g. laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  6. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gitomer, S. J.; Jones, R. D.

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. Those areas of laser medicine are examined in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. Examples are examined for the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  7. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J. ); Jones, R.D. . Applied Theoretical Physics Div.)

    1991-12-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photodynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper the authors examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation), and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented, along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included.

  8. Laser-produced plasmas in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Gitomer, S.J.; Jones, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The laser has found numerous applications in medicine, beginning with uses in ophthalmology in the 1960's. Today, lasers are used in tissue cutting, blood coagulation, photo-dynamic cancer therapy, arterial plaque removal, dental drilling, etc. In this paper, we examine those areas of laser medicine in which plasmas (ionized gases) are produced. In fact, the presence of a plasma is essential for the application at hand to succeed. We consider examples of the plasmas produced in ophthalmology (e.g., lens membrane destruction following cataract surgery), in urology and gastroenterology (e.g., kidney and gall stone ablation and fragmentation) and in cardiology and vascular surgery (e.g., laser ablation and removal of fibro-fatty and calcified arterial plaque). Experimental data are presented along with some results from computer simulations of the phenomena. Comments on future directions in these areas are included. 63 refs.

  9. Enhanced laser beam coupling to a plasma

    DOEpatents

    Steiger, Arno D.; Woods, Cornelius H.

    1976-01-01

    Density perturbations are induced in a heated plasma by means of a pair of oppositely directed, polarized laser beams of the same frequency. The wavelength of the density perturbations is equal to one half the wavelength of the laser beams. A third laser beam is linearly polarized and directed at the perturbed plasma along a line that is perpendicular to the direction of the two opposed beams. The electric field of the third beam is oriented to lie in the plane containing the three beams. The frequency of the third beam is chosen to cause it to interact resonantly with the plasma density perturbations, thereby efficiently coupling the energy of the third beam to the plasma.

  10. Staging of laser-plasma accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinke, S.; van Tilborg, J.; Benedetti, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Daniels, J.; Swanson, K. K.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Shaw, B. H.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2016-05-01

    We present results of an experiment where two laser-plasma-accelerator stages are coupled at a short distance by a plasma mirror. Stable electron beams from the first stage were used to longitudinally probe the dark-current-free, quasi-linear wakefield excited by the laser of the second stage. Changing the arrival time of the electron beam with respect to the second stage laser pulse allowed reconstruction of the temporal wakefield structure, determination of the plasma density, and inference of the length of the electron beam. The first stage electron beam could be focused by an active plasma lens to a spot size smaller than the transverse wake size at the entrance of the second stage. This permitted electron beam trapping, verified by a 100 MeV energy gain.

  11. Laser diode arrays for expanded mine detection capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosby, Frank J.; Holloway, John H., Jr.; Petee, Danny A.; Stetson, Suzanne P.; Suiter, Harold R.; Tinsley, Ken R.

    2002-08-01

    A tactical unmanned aerial vehicle-size illumination system for enhanced mine detection capabilities has been designed, developed, integrated, and tested at the Coastal Systems Station. Airborne test flights were performed from June 12, 2001 to February 1, 2002. The Airborne Laser Diode Array Illuminator uses a single-wavelength compact laser diode array stack to provide illumination and is coupled with a pair of intensified CCD video cameras. The cameras were outfitted with various lenses and polarization filters to determine the benefits of each of the configurations. The first airborne demonstration of a laser diode illumination system is described and its effectiveness to perform nighttime mine detection operations is shown.

  12. Charged Particle Acceleration by Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C. S.; Tripathi, V. K.

    2007-07-11

    Several physical processes of laser electron acceleration in plasmas are revisited. A laser beam can drive plasma waves which in turn can accelerate resonant electrons. If these plasma waves can reach amplitude limited only by wave breaking alone, then the corresponding accelerating gradient in the plasma wave is of the order of electron rest mass energy per plasma skin depth, typically about GEV per centimeter. This is several orders of magnitudes higher than the conventional RF field gradient, giving rise to the possibility of compact accelerators needed for high energy physics research as well as medical and other applications. The chirped short pulse laser, with intensity exceeding the threshold for relativistic self focusing, can generate ion bubble in its wake by expelling electrons. The electrons at the bubble boundary, surge toward the stagnation point and pile up there. As the pile acquires a critical size, these electrons are injected into the bubble and accelerated by the combined fields of ion space charge and the plasma wave to Gev in energy. Most remarkably these electrons are bunched in phase space while being accelerated to high energy, resulting in near mono-energetic electron beam of high beam quality, with narrow energy spread. We review also other processes related to laser electron acceleration, such as acceleration in plasma wave assisted by ponderomotive force and betatron acceleration.

  13. Double-layer ion acceleration triggered by ion magnetization in expanding radiofrequency plasma sources

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W.; Fujiwara, Tamiya

    2010-10-04

    Ion energy distribution functions downstream of the source exit in magnetically expanding low-pressure plasmas are experimentally investigated for four source tube diameters ranging from about 5 to 15 cm. The magnetic-field threshold corresponding to a transition from a simple expanding plasma to a double layer-containing plasma is observed to increase with a decrease in the source tube diameter. The results demonstrate that for the four geometries, the double layer and the accelerated ion beam form when the ion Larmour radius in the source becomes smaller than the source tube radius, i.e., when the ions become magnetized in the source tube.

  14. Supra-plasma expanders: the future of treating blood loss and anemia without red cell transfusions?

    PubMed

    Tsai, Amy G; Vázquez, Beatriz Y Salazar; Hofmann, Axel; Acharya, Seetharama A; Intaglietta, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen delivery capacity during profoundly anemic conditions depends on blood's oxygen-carrying capacity and cardiac output. Oxygen-carrying blood substitutes and blood transfusion augment oxygen-carrying capacity, but both have given rise to safety concerns, and their efficacy remains unresolved. Anemia decreases oxygen-carrying capacity and blood viscosity. Present studies show that correcting the decrease of blood viscosity by increasing plasma viscosity with newly developed plasma expanders significantly improves tissue perfusion. These new plasma expanders promote tissue perfusion, increasing oxygen delivery capacity without increasing blood oxygen-carrying capacity, thus treating the effects of anemia while avoiding the transfusion of blood. PMID:25871869

  15. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  16. Relativistic laser pulse compression in magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yun; Sang, Hai-Bo Wan, Feng; Lv, Chong; Xie, Bai-Song

    2015-07-15

    The self-compression of a weak relativistic Gaussian laser pulse propagating in a magnetized plasma is investigated. The nonlinear Schrödinger equation, which describes the laser pulse amplitude evolution, is deduced and solved numerically. The pulse compression is observed in the cases of both left- and right-hand circular polarized lasers. It is found that the compressed velocity is increased for the left-hand circular polarized laser fields, while decreased for the right-hand ones, which is reinforced as the enhancement of the external magnetic field. We find a 100 fs left-hand circular polarized laser pulse is compressed in a magnetized (1757 T) plasma medium by more than ten times. The results in this paper indicate the possibility of generating particularly intense and short pulses.

  17. Plume Dynamics of Laser-Produced Swine Muscle Tissue Plasma.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Joaquin J; Diaz, Luis; Marin-Roldan, Alicia; Moncayo, Samuel; Caceres, Jorge O

    2016-07-01

    We report on the plume dynamics of the plasma induced by laser ablation of a swine skeletal muscle tissue sample in different vacuum conditions. Pulses from a transversely excited atmospheric CO2 laser were focused onto a target sample and the induced plasma was allowed to expand in different air pressures. The expansion features were studied using fast photography of the overall visible emission by using a gated intensified charged coupled device. Free expansion and plume splitting were observed at different pressure levels. The expansion of the plasma plume front was analyzed using various expansion models and the velocity of the plume front was estimated. The effect of the number of accumulated laser shots on the crater volume at different ambient air pressures and an elemental analysis of the sample were performed using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis. The surface morphology of the irradiated surface showed that increasing the pressure of the ambient gas decreased the ablated mass, or in other words it reduced significantly the laser-target coupling. PMID:27301327

  18. Current new applications of laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.A.; Forslund, D.W.; McKinstrie, C.J.; Wark, J.S.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Hamil, R.A.; Kindel, J.M.

    1988-09-01

    This report describes several new applications of laser-produced plasmas that have arisen in the last few years. Most of the applications have been an outgrowth of the active research in laser/matter interaction inspired by the pursuit of laser fusion. Unusual characteristics of high-intensity laser/matter interaction, such as intense x-ray and particle emission, were noticed early in the field and are now being employed in a significant variety of applications outside the fusion filed. Applications range from biology to materials science to pulsed-power control and particle accelerators. 92 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidding, B.; Königstein, T.; Karsch, S.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-01

    The concept of driving a driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) with quasimonoenergetic double electron bunches from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is studied. In the quasimonoenergetic LWFA/SMLWFA (self-modulated LWFA) regime, it is possible to generate multiple quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with durations of only a few fs and distances of only a few tens of fs with a comparably simple experimental setup. In a subsequent high-density plasma afterburner stage the witness bunch energy can be boosted in the plasma wakefield generated by the driver. Such a hybrid system can increase the maximum energy output of a laser wakefield accelerator and is well suited to study driver/witness plasma accelerator phenomena and can be used as a cost-effective test-bed for future high-energy plasma-based accelerators.

  20. Hybrid Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Hidding, B.; Koenigstein, T.; Willi, O.; Pretzler, G.; Karsch, S.; Rosenzweig, J. B.

    2010-11-04

    The concept of driving a driver/witness-type plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) with quasimonoenergetic double electron bunches from a laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) is studied. In the quasimonoenergetic LWFA/SMLWFA (self-modulated LWFA) regime, it is possible to generate multiple quasimonoenergetic electron bunches with durations of only a few fs and distances of only a few tens of fs with a comparably simple experimental setup. In a subsequent high-density plasma afterburner stage the witness bunch energy can be boosted in the plasma wakefield generated by the driver. Such a hybrid system can increase the maximum energy output of a laser wakefield accelerator and is well suited to study driver/witness plasma accelerator phenomena and can be used as a cost-effective test-bed for future high-energy plasma-based accelerators.

  1. Observation of the Decay Dynamics and Instabilities of Megagauss Field Structures in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Rygg, J. R.; Petrasso, R. D.; Town, R. P. J.; Amendt, P. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Landen, O. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Patel, P. K.; Tabak, M.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2007-07-06

    Monoenergetic proton radiography was used to make the first measurements of the long-time-scale dynamics and evolution of megagauss laser-plasma-generated magnetic field structures. While a 1-ns 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} laser beam is on, the field structure expands in tandem with a hemispherical plasma bubble, maintaining a rigorous 2D cylindrical symmetry. With the laser off, the bubble continues to expand as the field decays; however, the outer field structure becomes distinctly asymmetric, indicating instability. Similarly, localized asymmetry growth in the bubble interior indicates another kind of instability. 2D LASNEX hydrosimulations qualitatively match the cylindrically averaged post-laser plasma evolution but even then it underpredicts the field dissipation rate and of course completely misses the 3D asymmetry growth.

  2. Synthesis and Deposition of Nanoparticles Using a Hypersonically Expanded Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hafiz, Jami; Wang Xiaoliang; Mukherjee, Rajesh; McMurry, Peter H.; Heberlein, Joachim V.R.; Girshick, Steven L.

    2005-10-31

    Si-Ti-N nanostructured coatings were synthesized by inertial impaction of nanoparticles using a process called hypersonic plasma particle deposition (HPPD). Transmission electron microscopy on samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling show TiN nanocrystallites in an amorphous matrix. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicate the presence of amorphous Si3N4 in similar films. In-situ particle size distribution measurements show that particle size distributions peak around 14 nm under typical operating conditions.

  3. Expanding the plasmonic response of bimetallic nanoparticles by laser seeding.

    PubMed

    Peláez, R J; Rodríguez, C E; Afonso, C N

    2016-03-11

    This work explores a cost-effective route to enhance the tuning range of the optical response of metal nanostructures on substrates beyond the ranges that are achievable through the nanostructure dimensions, composition or dewetting processes. The new route (laser seeding) uses single nanosecond laser pulses to induce dewetting in regions of a metal layer deposited on a glass substrate followed by the deposition of a second metal layer, both layers being deposited by pulsed laser deposition. In order to show the possibilities of this new route, we have chosen that the two metals were different, namely Ag and Au. The comparison of the optical response of these regions to those that were laser irradiated after deposition of the second metal layer shows that while nanoalloyed nanoparticles (NPs) are formed in the latter case, the NPs produced in the former case have a heterogeneous structure. The interface between the two metals is either sharp or a narrow region where they have mixed depending on the laser fluence used. While the nanoalloyed NPs exhibit a single, narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the heterogeneous NPs show broader SPRs that peak in the near infrared and depending on conditions exhibit even two clear SPRs. The laser seeding approach in the conditions used in this work allows for the expansion of the tuning range of the color to the blue-green region, i.e. beyond the region that can be achieved through nanoalloyed NPs (yellow-red region). In addition, the results presented foresee the laser seeding route as a means to produce round and almost isolated NPs in an enhanced range of diameters. PMID:26866902

  4. Expanding the plasmonic response of bimetallic nanoparticles by laser seeding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peláez, R. J.; Rodríguez, C. E.; Afonso, C. N.

    2016-03-01

    This work explores a cost-effective route to enhance the tuning range of the optical response of metal nanostructures on substrates beyond the ranges that are achievable through the nanostructure dimensions, composition or dewetting processes. The new route (laser seeding) uses single nanosecond laser pulses to induce dewetting in regions of a metal layer deposited on a glass substrate followed by the deposition of a second metal layer, both layers being deposited by pulsed laser deposition. In order to show the possibilities of this new route, we have chosen that the two metals were different, namely Ag and Au. The comparison of the optical response of these regions to those that were laser irradiated after deposition of the second metal layer shows that while nanoalloyed nanoparticles (NPs) are formed in the latter case, the NPs produced in the former case have a heterogeneous structure. The interface between the two metals is either sharp or a narrow region where they have mixed depending on the laser fluence used. While the nanoalloyed NPs exhibit a single, narrow surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the heterogeneous NPs show broader SPRs that peak in the near infrared and depending on conditions exhibit even two clear SPRs. The laser seeding approach in the conditions used in this work allows for the expansion of the tuning range of the color to the blue-green region, i.e. beyond the region that can be achieved through nanoalloyed NPs (yellow-red region). In addition, the results presented foresee the laser seeding route as a means to produce round and almost isolated NPs in an enhanced range of diameters.

  5. Laser welding control by monitoring of plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chmelickova, Hana; Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Rihakova, Lenka; Nozka, Libor

    2013-04-01

    Deep penetration welding is a typical industrial application of high power lasers, where plasma can be generated above the keyhole. Thanks to the plasma plume presence welding process can be controlled on-line by means of the plasma intensity measurements. Various on-line monitoring methods have been developed in research centers all over the world. Goal of them is to enable promptly operator action to avoid enormous economical looses if un-expected defect is detected. Our laboratory was participated in project CLET - "Closed loop control of the laser welding process through the measurement of plasma" as a responsible partner for developed system testing both in the laboratory with pulsed Nd:YAG laser and in the real welding facility with high power continual CO2 laser. Control system is based on the electron temperature computation from the relative intensities of couple of emission lines belong to certain metal ion present in plasma plume. Our experiment was realized using Ocean Optics HR2000+ spectrometer within the stainless steel tube longitudinal welding. Several couples of emission lines were tested to acquire a good signal at actual welding conditions. Then power calibration was made to obtain the electron temperature dependence on increasing power. Samples were prepared for microanalysis and measured by laser confocal scanning microscope to find optimal power range for full penetrations achieving without thermal distortion of the tube or weld humping. Numerical model of the remelted area cross section was made to display temperature distribution dependence on increasing power.

  6. Laser pulse modulation instabilities in plasma channels

    PubMed

    Sprangle; Hafizi; Penano

    2000-04-01

    In this paper the modulational instability associated with propagation of intense laser pulses in a partially stripped, preformed plasma channel is analyzed. In general, modulation instabilities are caused by the interplay between (anomalous) group velocity dispersion and self-phase modulation. The analysis is based on a systematic approach that includes finite-perturbation-length effects, nonlinearities, group velocity dispersion, and transverse effects. To properly include the radial variation of both the laser field and plasma channel, the source-dependent expansion method for analyzing the wave equation is employed. Matched equilibria for a laser beam propagating in a plasma channel are obtained and analyzed. Modulation of a uniform (matched) laser beam equilibrium in a plasma channel leads to a coupled pair of differential equations for the perturbed spot size and laser field amplitude. A general dispersion relation is derived and solved. Surface plots of the spatial growth rate as a function of laser beam power and the modulation wave number are presented. PMID:11088236

  7. Laser-driven Acceleration in Clustered Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, X.; Wang, X.; Shim, B.; Downer, M. C.

    2009-01-22

    We propose a new approach to avoid dephasing limitation of laser wakefield acceleration by manipulating the group velocity of the driving pulse using clustered plasmas. We demonstrated the control of phase velocity in clustered plasmas by third harmonic generation and frequency domain interferometry experiments. The results agree with a numerical model. Based on this model, the group velocity of the driving pulse in clustered plasmas was calculated and the result shows the group velocity can approach the speed of light c in clustered plasmas.

  8. Quantitative shadowgraphy for laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boné, A.; Lemos, N.; Figueira, G.; Dias, J. M.

    2016-04-01

    A new all optic non-perturbative diagnostic for measuring densities of long plasma structures is presented. A model based on the refraction of a laser beam crossing a cylindrical column of plasma with a Gaussian density profile is derived and used to measure plasma electronic densities. The model shows good agreement with the performed ray tracing simulations. Experimental measurements of the electronic density of plasma columns ranging from 2 to 8× {{10}18} cm-3 are presented and show good agreement when compared to interferometry measurements.

  9. Laser propagation and channel formation in laser-produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, P. E.

    1996-05-01

    The understanding of laser beam propagation through underdense plasmas is of vital importance to inertial confinement fusion schemes, as well as being a fundamental physics issue. Formation of plasma channels has numerous applications including table-top x-ray lasers and laser-plasma induced particle accelerators. The fast ignitor concept (M. Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1), 1626 (1994)., for example, requires the formation of an evacuated channel through a large, underdense plasma. Scaled experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 63), 2812 (1989). (S. Wilks et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73), 2994 (1994). (P.E. Young et al, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2825 (1995). have shown that the axial extent of a channel formed by a 100 ps pulse is limited by the onset of the filamentation instability (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 61), 2336 (1988).. We have obtained quantitative comparison between filamentation theory and experiment (P.E. Young, Phys. Plasmas 2), 2815 (1995).. More recent experiments (P.E. Young et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 75), 1082 (1995). have shown that by increasing the length of the channel-forming pulse, the filamentation instability is overcome and the channel forms at higher densities. This result has important implications for the fast ignitor design and the understanding of time-dependent beam dynamics. In addition, we will present measurements of ion energies ejected by the ponderomotive force which is a measurement of the peak laser intensity in the plasma; the ion energies indicate filamented laser intensities above 1.5× 10^17 W/cm^2. * Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract W-7405-ENG-48. ^ In collaboration with S. Wilks, J. Hammer, W. Kruer, M. Foord, G. Guethlein, and M. Tabak.

  10. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy expands into industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noll, Reinhard; Fricke-Begemann, Cord; Brunk, Markus; Connemann, Sven; Meinhardt, Christoph; Scharun, Michael; Sturm, Volker; Makowe, Joachim; Gehlen, Christoph

    This paper presents R&D activities in the field of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for industrial applications and shows novel LIBS systems running in routine operation for inline process control tasks. Starting with a comparison of the typical characteristics of LIBS with XRF and spark-discharge optical emission spectrometry, the principal structure of LIBS machines embedded for inline process monitoring will be presented. A systematic requirement analysis for LIBS systems following Ishikawa's scheme was worked out. Stability issues are studied for laser sources and Paschen-Runge spectrometers as key components for industrial LIBS systems. Examples of industrial applications range from handheld LIBS systems using a fiber laser source, via a set of LIBS machines for inline process control tasks, such as scrap analysis, coal analysis, liquid slag analysis and finally monitoring of drill dust.

  11. Evolution of an expanding dusty plasma with negative ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kechouri, B.; Djebli, M.

    2006-11-15

    The dusty plasma radial expansion is studied in the case of a spherical as well as cylindrical configuration. The effect of negative ions is introduced through the dust charge fluctuation equation. Electrons, positive, and negative ions are modelled by the Boltzmann distribution function and the dust grains by fluid equations. Using the self-similar theory, the nonlinear set of differential equations is solved numerically. It is found that the dust charge presents a critical value which depends on the negative ion species type. It is also found that the dust expansion ends earlier and the lighter particle densities profiles depend on the dust initial charge.

  12. Trends in laser-plasma-instability experiments for laser fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1991-06-06

    Laser-plasma instability experiments for laser fusion have followed three developments. These are advances in the technology and design of experiments, advances in diagnostics, and evolution of the design of high-gain targets. This paper traces the history of these three topics and discusses their present state. Today one is substantially able to produce controlled plasma conditions and to diagnose specific instabilities within such plasmas. Experiments today address issues that will matter for future laser facilities. Such facilities will irradiate targets with {approx}1 MJ of visible or UV light pulses that are tens of nanoseconds in duration, very likely with a high degree of spatial and temporal incoherence. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Preliminary characterization of a laser-generated plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiter, P. A.; Malamud, G.; Trantham, M.; Fein, J.; Davis, J.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We present the results from recent experiments to create a flowing plasma sheet. Two groups of three laser beams with nominally 1.5 kJ of energy per group were focused to separate pointing locations, driving a shock into a wedge target. As the shock breaks out of the wedge, the plasma is focused on center, creating a sheet of plasma. Measurements at 60 ns indicate the plasma sheet has propagated 2825 microns with an average velocity of 49 microns/ns. These experiments follow previous experiments [Krauland et al. 2013], which are aimed at studying similar physics as that found in the hot spot region of cataclysmic variables. Krauland et al. created a flowing plasma, which represents the flowing plasma from the secondary star. This flow interacted with a stationary object, which represented the disk around the white dwarf. A reverse shock is a shock formed when a freely expanding plasma encounters an obstacle. Reverse shocks can be generated by a blast wave propagating through a medium. They can also be found in binary star systems where the flowing gas from a companion star interacts with the accretion disk of the primary star.

  14. Laser Plasma and Hydrodynamics Experiments with KrF Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, James

    2006-10-01

    The proposed Fusion Test Facility (FTF) will exploit the unique features of Krypton Fluoride (KrF) lasers to achieve ignition and substantial gain (>20) at <500 kJ laser energies using direct drive.[1] The strategy uses highly uniform, high bandwidth, 248 nm KrF laser illumination at intensities near 2 x 10^15 W/cm^2 to accelerate low-aspect ratio pellets to implosion velocities of 400 km/s. Higher than usual implosion velocity allows ignition at substantially reduced laser energy. Amplitudes of both hydrodynamic instability during the pellet implosion and deleterious laser plasma instability (LPI) in the corona must be kept sufficiently low if one is to achieve ignition and gain. Increased laser intensity reduces hydrodynamic instability because it allows acceleration of thicker, low aspect ratio pellets, but is also more likely to produce deleterious LPI. The deep UV wavelength of KrF should allow use of these higher intensities. Studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and laser plasma instabilities (LPI) are the subject of ongoing experiments at the 2-3 kJ Nike KrF laser. The Nike laser has demonstrated highly uniform UV irradiation of planar targets at moderate laser intensities (I˜10^14 W/cm^2), including the recent addition of short duration ``spike'' prepulses for hydrodynamic stability studies. A new effort in LPI physics is underway at the Nike facility where the peak intensity is being extended above 10^15 W/cm^2 by a combination of smaller focal diameters and shorter pulse lengths. This talk will discuss progress in the ongoing experiments at Nike in support of the FTF design. [1] S. P. Obenschain, et al., Phys. Plasmas 13 056329 (2006).

  15. Plasma channel guided laser wakefield accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    2005-11-01

    High quality electron beams (several 109 electrons above 80 MeV energy with percent energy spread and low divergence) have been produced for the first time in a compact, high gradient, all-optical laser accelerator by extending the interaction distance using a pre-formed plasma density channel to guide the drive laser pulse. Laser-driven accelerators, in which particles are accelerated by the electric field of a plasma wave (wake) driven by the radiation pressure of an intense laser, have over the past decade demonstrated accelerating fields thousands of times greater than those achievable in conventional radio-frequency accelerators. This has spurred interest in them as compact next-generation sources of energetic electrons and radiation. To date, however, acceleration distances have been severely limited by the lack of a controllable method for extending the propagation distance of the focused laser pulse. The ensuing short acceleration distance resulted in low-energy beams with 100 percent electron energy spread, which has limited potential applications. Optical guiding of relativistically intense (>1018 W/cm 2) laser pulses over distances greater than 10 diffraction lengths is demonstrated herein using plasma channels, which have a density minimum on the axis of propagation, formed by hydrodynamic shock. Laser modes with peak powers of up to 4 TW---twice the self-guiding threshold---were guided without aberration by tuning the plasma density profile. The transmitted optical spectrum showed that the pulse remained in the channel over the entire length, and no accelerated electrons were observed at these powers. Simulations indicated that a large plasma wave was driven by the 4 TW pulse, indicating a possible dark current free structure for a laser wakefield accelerator using controlled injection. The presence of a large plasma wave was verified by increasing laser power and observing electron acceleration. At a guided drive pulse power of 9 TW (500 mJ in 50 fs

  16. Formation of Expanded Austenite on a Cold-Sprayed AISI 316L Coating by Low-Temperature Plasma Nitriding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Shinichiro; Ueda, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    Low-temperature plasma nitriding at temperatures below 450 °C is commonly applied to austenitic stainless steels to enhance wear resistance, while maintaining corrosion resistance, by forming expanded austenite (known as the S-phase). In this work, low-temperature plasma nitriding of cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings was examined. A cold-spray technique was developed to produce metal coatings with less oxidation. However, the cold-sprayed AISI 316L coating obtained by use of nitrogen gas as propellant contained many interconnected pores and cracks, and was, consequently, unsuitable as an anticorrosive coating. Therefore, laser post-treatment was used to modify the coating and increase its density to similar to that of bulk steel. The anticorrosive performance of this coating on a carbon steel substrate in NaCl solution was substantially improved. Subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding enhanced the wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. It is concluded that cold-sprayed AISI 316L coatings treated by laser post-treatment and subsequent low-temperature plasma nitriding could be used as protective coatings under severe wear and corrosion conditions.

  17. Design and development of 24 times high-power laser beam expander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhao-heng; Gong, Xiu-ming; Wu, Shi-bin; Tan, Yi; Jing, Hong-wei; Wei, Zhong-wei

    2013-09-01

    As currently, laser calibration, laser radar, laser ranging and the relative field raised up the demand for high magnification laser beam expander. This article intends to introduce a high-energy laser beam expander research and design, large- diameter, wide-band, high-magnification and small obscuration ratio are the main features. By using Cassegrain reflective optical system, this laser beam expander achieves 24 times beam expand, and outgoing effective limiting aperture is Φ600 mm, band scope between 0.45μm to 5μm, single-pulse laser damage threshold greater than 1J/cm2, continuous-wave laser damage threshold greater than 200W/cm2 and obscuration ratio 1:10. Primary mirror underside support uses 9 points float supporting, lateral support mainly depends on mercury belt support and assists by mandrel ball head positioning support. An analyzing base on finite element analysis software ANSYS, and primary mirror deformation status analysis with debug mode and operativemode, when inputs four groups of Angle 170°, 180°, 210° and 240° , mercury belt under each group of angle load-bearing is 65%, 75% , 85% and 100% respectively, totally 16 workingcondition analyze results. At last, the best way to support primary mirror is finalized. Through design of secondary mirror to achieve a five-dimensional precision fine-tune. By assembling and debugging laser beam expander, Zygo interferometer detection system proof image quality (RMS) is 0.043λ (λ=632.8nm), stability (RMS) is 0.007λ (λ=632.8nm), and effective transmission hit 94%, meets the requirements of practical application completely.

  18. High amplitude waves in the expanding solar wind plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, J. M.; Velli, M.; Grappin, R.

    1996-07-20

    We simulated the 1 D nonlinear time-evolution of high-amplitude Alfven, slow and fast magnetoacustic waves in the solar wind propagating outward at different angles to the mean magnetic (spiral) field, using the expanding box model. The simulation results for Alfven waves and fast magnetoacustic waves fit the observational constraints in the solar wind best, showing decreasing trends for energies and other rms-quantities due to expansion and the appearance of inward propagating waves as minor species in the wind. Inward propagating waves are generated by reflection of Alfven waves propagating at large angles to the magnetic field or they coincide with the occurrence of compressible fluctuations. It is the generation of sound due to ponderomotive forces of the Alfven wave which we can detect in the latter case. For slow magnetoacustic waves we find a kind of oscillation of the character of the wave between a sound wave and an Alfven wave. This is the more, the slow magnetoacustic wave is close to a sound wave in the beginning. On the other hand, fast magnetoacustic waves are much more dissipated than the other wave-types and their general behaviour is close to the Alfven. The normalized cross-helicity {sigma}{sub c} is close to one for Alfven-waves and this quantity is decreasing slightly when density-fluctuations are generated. {sigma}{sub c} decreases significantly when the waves are close to perpendicular propagation. Then, the waves are close to quasi-static structures.

  19. Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research

    SciTech Connect

    Key, M

    2006-01-13

    In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umstadter, Donald

    2003-04-01

    By focusing petawatt peak power laser light to intensities up to 1021 W cm-2, highly relativistic plasmas can now be studied. The force exerted by light pulses with this extreme intensity has been used to accelerate beams of electrons and protons to energies of a million volts in distances of only microns. This acceleration gradient is a thousand times greater than in radio-frequency-based accelerators. Such novel compact laser-based radiation sources have been demonstrated to have parameters that are useful for research in medicine, physics and engineering. They might also someday be used to ignite controlled thermonuclear fusion. Ultrashort pulse duration particles and x-rays that are produced can resolve chemical, biological or physical reactions on ultrafast (femtosecond) timescales and on atomic spatial scales. These energetic beams have produced an array of nuclear reactions, resulting in neutrons, positrons and radioactive isotopes. As laser intensities increase further and laser-accelerated protons become relativistic, exotic plasmas, such as dense electron-positron plasmas, which are of astrophysical interest, can be created in the laboratory. This paper reviews many of the recent advances in relativistic laser-plasma interactions.

  1. Ion beams from laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. H.; Anderson, R. J.; Gray, L. G.; Rosenfeld, J. P.; Manka, C. K.; Carruth, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes the space-charge-limited beams produced by the plasma blowoffs generated by 20-MW bursts of 1.06-micron radiation from an active Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Laser power densities near 10 to the 11th/sq cm on solid targets generate thermalized plasma plumes which drift to a 15-kV gridded extraction gap where the ions are extracted, accelerated, and electrostatically focused; the spatially defined ion beams are then magnetically analyzed to determine the charge state content in the beams formed from carbon, aluminum, copper, and lead targets. This technique preserves time-of-flight (TOF) information in the plasma drift region, which permits plasma ion temperatures and mass flow velocities to be determined from the Maxwellian ion curve TOF shapes for the individual charge species.

  2. Terahertz radiation from a laser plasma filament.

    PubMed

    Wu, H-C; Meyer-Ter-Vehn, J; Ruhl, H; Sheng, Z-M

    2011-03-01

    By the use of two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we clarify the terahertz (THz) radiation mechanism from a plasma filament formed by an intense femtosecond laser pulse. The nonuniform plasma density of the filament leads to a net radiating current for THz radiation. This current is mainly located within the pulse and the first cycle of the wakefield. As the laser pulse propagates, a single-cycle and radially polarized THz pulse is constructively built up forward. The single-cycle shape is mainly due to radiation damping effect. PMID:21517604

  3. Laser-PlasmaWakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C.G.R.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Cary, J.R.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  4. Laser-Plasma Wakefield Acceleration with Higher Order Laser Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Geddes, C. G. R.; Schroeder, C. B.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mullowney, P.; Paul, K.; Esarey, E.; Cary, J. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-04

    Laser-plasma collider designs point to staging of multiple accelerator stages at the 10 GeV level, which are to be developed on the upcoming BELLA laser, while Thomson Gamma source designs use GeV stages, both requiring efficiency and low emittance. Design and scaling of stages operating in the quasi-linear regime to address these needs are presented using simulations in the VORPAL framework. In addition to allowing symmetric acceleration of electrons and positrons, which is important for colliders, this regime has the property that the plasma wakefield is proportional to the transverse gradient of the laser intensity profile. We demonstrate use of higher order laser modes to tailor the laser pulse and hence the transverse focusing forces in the plasma. In particular, we show that by using higher order laser modes, we can reduce the focusing fields and hence increase the matched electron beam radius, which is important to increased charge and efficiency, while keeping the low bunch emittance required for applications.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of laser ablated silicon plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeel, Hira; Mumtaz, M.; Shahzada, S.; Nadeem, A.; Haq, S. U.

    2014-06-01

    We report plasma parameters of laser ablated silicon plasma using the fundamental (1064 nm) and second harmonics (532 nm) of a Nd : YAG laser. The electron temperature and electron number density are evaluated using the Boltzmann plot method and Stark broadened line profile, respectively. The electron temperature and electron number density are deduced using the same laser irradiance 2-16 GW cm-2 for 1064 nm and 532 nm as 6350-7000 K and (3.42-4.44) × 1016 cm-3 and 6000-6400 K and (4.20-5.72) × 1016 cm-3, respectively. The spatial distribution of plasma parameters shows a decreasing trend of 8200-6300 K and (4.00-3.60) × 1016 cm-3 for 1064 nm and 6400-5500 K and (5.10-4.50) × 1016 cm-3 for 532 nm laser ablation. Furthermore, plasma parameters are also investigated at low pressure from 45 to 550 mbar, yielding the electron temperature as 4580-5535 K and electron number density as (1.51-2.12) × 1016 cm-3. The trend of the above-mentioned results is in good agreement with previous investigations. However, wavelength-dependent studies and the spatial evolution of plasma parameters have been reported for the first time.

  6. Laser-based profilometry -- Ever-expanding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    Over the past ten years, laser-based profilometry has evolved from a near-novelty to a reliable and cost-effective NDE technology. Employing miniature optics, high-speed digital signal processing electronics, and computer-graphic data presentation, systems have been developed for a broad spectrum of NDE and QC applications. These tools are not only capable of providing a high-resolution three-dimensional profile of the test surface but also a monochrome laser-video image of the surface. These devices are now being used for the inspection of tubular goods less than 5 mm in diameter, rifled gun tubes, and process piping. In addition, the technology has been extended to operation underwater and to the profiling of complex surfaces such as nuclear recirculation nozzles and solid rocket motors. This paper presents an overview of this rapidly growing NDE method and provides examples of recent industrial applications.

  7. Dependence of laser-plasma interaction physics on laser wavelength and plasma scalelength

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, E.M.

    1984-04-09

    We discuss the dependence of many features of laser-plasma interaction physics on both the laser wavelength and plasma dimensions. Experimental results that are presented include absorption, stimulated Brillouin scattering, suprathermal electron production, and optical signatures of the two plasmon decay and stimulated Raman instabilities. While the experiments show beneficial effects of decreasing laser wavelength on the coupling physics, the mix and efficiency of the various interaction processes is shown to be strongly dependent on the size of the underdense plasma. 42 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Production of plasmas by long-wavelength lasers

    DOEpatents

    Dawson, J.M.

    1973-10-01

    A long-wavelength laser system for heating low-density plasma to high temperatures is described. In one embodiment, means are provided for repeatedly receiving and transmitting long-wavelength laser light in successive stages to form a laser-light beam path that repeatedly intersects with the equilibrium axis of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma column for interacting the laser light with the plasma for providing controlled thermonuclear fusion. Embodiments for heating specific linear plasmas are also provided. (Official Gazette)

  9. X-ray lasers for plasma diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Da Silva, L.B.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Cauble, R.; Celliers, P.; Kalantar, D.H.; Snavely, R.; Trebes, J.E.; Wan, A.S.; Weber, F.

    1997-12-31

    Soft x-ray lasers have evolved from the early demonstration phase to becoming reliable xuv sources. They operate over a wide wavelength range extending from 35 to 400 {angstrom} and have output energies as high as 10 mJ in 150 ns pulses. The beam divergence of these lasers is less than 15 mrad and they have a typical linewidth of {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 10{sup {minus}4} making them the brightest xuv sources available. In this talk the authors describe their use of x-ray lasers to probe high density plasmas using a variety of diagnostic techniques. Taking advantage of recently developed multilayer beam splitters they have constructed and sued a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating at 155 {angstrom} to probe 1--3 mm size laser produced plasmas. They have also used x-ray lasers and a multilayer mirror imaging system to study hydrodynamic imprinting of laser speckle pattern on directly driven thin foils with 1--2 {micro}m spatial resolution. They are now planning a moire deflectometry to measure the electron density profile in ICF hohlraums. The results of these experiments and the limitations of these techniques will be presented. The prospects for short wavelength (10 {angstrom}) x-ray lasers which are better suited to higher density probing will also be discussed.

  10. Space-resolved spectra of laser-produced plasmas in the XUV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Prinz, D. K.; Nagel, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    The design and imaging properties of an XUV (extreme ultraviolet, 200-550 A) normal-incidence slitless spectrograph, the spectrum obtained from laser-generated plasmas, and the monochromatic plasma images are described. The electron temperature of the plasmas, electron density as a function of position in the plasma, and the thickness of material penetrated by the laser pulse are determined. Elements from Z = 6 to Z = 28 were investigated, in addition to Nb. Secondary plasma-emission regions were observed 2-3 mm from the flat (thick or thin) targets. Time-integrated photographs of the expanding plasmas were recorded by the slitless spectrograph. A technique for obtaining time-resolved images of the plasmas in picosecond time intervals is proposed, and problems in the design of a stigmatic XUV spectrograph are discussed.

  11. Mapping return currents in laser-generated Z-pinch plasmas using proton deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Manuel, M. J.-E.; Sinenian, N.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J. A.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Petrasso, R. D.; Beg, F. N.

    2012-05-14

    Dynamic return currents and electromagnetic field structure in laser-generated Z-pinch plasmas have been measured using proton deflectometry. Experiments were modeled to accurately interpret deflections observed in proton radiographs. Current flow is shown to begin on axis and migrate outwards with the expanding coronal plasma. Magnetic field strengths of {approx}1 T are generated by currents that increase from {approx}2 kA to {approx}7 kA over the course of the laser pulse. Proton deflectometry has been demonstrated to be a practical alternative to other magnetic field diagnostics for these types of plasmas.

  12. Design of laser beam expander in underwater high-repetition-rate range-gated imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei; Zhang, Xiaohui

    2015-10-01

    Active underwater imaging systems, using an artificial light source for underwater target illumination, have preferable practical value in military and civil domain. Back-scattering of water impacts imaging system performance by reducing image contrast, and this is especially bad when the light source is close to the camera. Range-gated technique can effectively rejecting the back-scattering of water and improve the range of underwater target detection, while it can only collect image at certain distance for every laser impulse. High-repetition-rate green laser is a better light source in underwater range-gated imaging system. It has smaller pulse energy, while it can improve the imaging result. In order to illuminate the proper area underwater according to the different distance between the laser source and targets, there must be a magnifying-ratio variable beam expander to adjust the divergent angle of the laser. Challenges associated with magnifying-ratio computation and designing of beam expander are difficult to overcome due to the obvious refraction and forward-scattering of water. An efficiency computing method is presented to obtain the magnifying-ratio of beam expander. The illuminating area of laser beam can be computed according to the refraction index and beam spread function (BSF) which has already considered forward-scattering process. The magnifying-ratio range of beam expander should be 0.925~3.09 in order to obtain about φ1m illuminating area when the distance between laser and target is 10~40m. A magnifying-ratio variable beam expander is designed according to computation. Underwater experiments show that this beam expander plays an effective role on illuminating in underwater high-repetition-rate range-rated Imaging system.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimura, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H.

    2008-12-31

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction ({alpha}) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease {alpha} value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Plasma Behavior in a Magnetic Nozzle of a Laser-plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajimura, Y.; Matsuda, N.; Hayashida, K.; Maeno, A.; Nakashima, H.

    2008-12-01

    Numerical simulations of plasma behavior in a magnetic nozzle of a Laser-Plasma Driven Nuclear Electric Propulsion System are conducted. The propellant is heated and accelerated by the laser and expanded isotropically. The magnetic nozzle is a combination of solenoidal coils and used to collimate and guide the plasma to produce thrust. Simulation calculations by a three-dimensional hybrid code are conducted to examine the plasma behaviors in the nozzle and to estimate the thrust efficiency. We also estimate a fraction (α) of plasma particles leaking in the forward (spacecraft) direction. By a combination of a few coils, we could decrease α value without degrading the thrust efficiency. Finally, the shaped propellant is proposed to increase the thrust efficiency.

  15. LASER-PLASMA-ACCELERATOR-BASED GAMMA GAMMA COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Toth, Cs.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-05-04

    Design considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed, and a laser-plasma-accelerator-based gamma-gamma collider is considered. An example of the parameters for a 0.5 TeV laser-plasma-accelerator gamma gamma collider is presented.

  16. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma-based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma-based collider is presented.

  17. Design considerations for a laser-plasma linear collider

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Toth, Cs.; Leemans, W. P.

    2008-08-01

    Design considerations for a next-generation electron-positron linear collider based on laser-plasma-accelerators are discussed. Several of the advantages and challenges of laser-plasma based accelerator technology are addressed. An example of the parameters for a 1 TeV laser-plasma based collider is presented.

  18. Laser-driven electron acceleration in an inhomogeneous plasma channel

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Rong; Cheng, Li-Hong; Xue, Ju-Kui

    2015-12-15

    We study the laser-driven electron acceleration in a transversely inhomogeneous plasma channel. We find that, in inhomogeneous plasma channel, the developing of instability for electron acceleration and the electron energy gain can be controlled by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of plasma channel. That is, we can short the accelerating length and enhance the energy gain in inhomogeneous plasma channel by adjusting the laser polarization angle and inhomogeneity of the plasma channel.

  19. Wavelength scaling of laser plasma coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1983-11-03

    The use of shorter wavelength laser light both enhances collisional absorption and reduces deleterious collective plasma effects. Coupling processes which can be important in reactor-size targets are briefly reviewed. Simple estimates are presented for the intensity-wavelength regime in which collisional absorption is high and collective effects are minimized.

  20. Plasma mirrors for short pulse lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Yanovksy, V.P.; Perry, M.D.; Brown, C.G.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.

    1997-06-11

    We show experimentally and theoretically that plasmas created by a sufficiently (1014 1015 2 short (<500 fs) intense W/cm ) laser pulse on the surface of dielectric material act as nearly perfect mirrors: reflecting p to 90% of the incident radiation with a wavefront quality equal to that of the initial solid surface.

  1. Laser Initiated, RF Sustained Air Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharer, John; Giar, Ryan; Hummelt, Jason; Way, Jesse

    2009-11-01

    Measurements and analysis of air breakdown processes by focusing 193 nm, 260 mJ, 10 MW high power UV laser radiation to 18 cm and 1.3 cm zones are examined. Quantum resonant multi-photon (REMPI) and collisional cascade ionization processes affect the breakdown and plasma formation. Our spectroscopic measurements show that REMPI (2+1) processes on nitrogen play a substantial role at lower pressures due to the high photon energy (6.4 eV). The REMPI process yields high density air plasmas (5 x 10^16/cc) for the 18 cm focus with the laser flux three orders of magnitude below the classical breakdown threshold intensity. Measurements of the f = 1.3 cm core laser plasma density (8x10^17/cc) and electron temperature decay via two color laser interferometry are made. The 18 cm focal length lens and its ionizing shock wave front are utilized to produce air seed plasma to initiate a large volume (500 cc) RF sustainment discharge coupled by means of a 6 cm diameter helical coil at up to 10 kW power levels.

  2. PRECISE CHARGE MEASUREMENT FOR LASER PLASMA ACCELERATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Kei; Gonsalves, Anthony; Lin, Chen; Sokollik, Thomas; Shiraishi, Satomi; Tilborg, Jeroen van; Osterhoff, Jens; Donahue, Rich; Rodgers, David; Smith, Alan; Byrne, Warren; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-19

    Cross-calibrations of charge diagnostics are conducted to verify their validity for measuring electron beams produced by laser plasma accelerators (LPAs). Employed diagnostics are a scintillating screen, activation based measurement, and integrating current transformer. The diagnostics agreed within {+-}8 %, showing that they can provide accurate charge measurements for LPAs provided they are used properly.

  3. Mode-expanded semiconductor laser with tapered-rib adiabatic-following fiber coupler

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, G.A.; Smith, R.E.; Hou, H.; Wendt, J.R.

    1996-12-01

    Expanded-mode semiconductor lasers are of great interest due to the benefits of reduced far-field divergence and improved coupling efficiency to optical fiber. The authors present a new diode laser using a Tapered-Rib Adiabatic-Following Fiber Coupler (TRAFFiC) to achieve 2D mode expansion without epitaxial regrowth or sharply-defined tips on tapered waveguides. The expanded mode size would allow 0.25 to 1 dB coupling loss to standard telecommunications fiber making smaller-core specialty fibers unnecessary, increasing misalignment tolerance, and eliminating the need for coupling optics.

  4. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  5. Higher-order paraxial theory of the propagation of ring rippled laser beam in plasma: Relativistic ponderomotive regime

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, Gunjan Rawat, Priyanka; Chauhan, Prashant; Mahmoud, Saleh T.

    2015-05-15

    This article presents higher-order paraxial theory (non-paraxial theory) for the ring ripple formation on an intense Gaussian laser beam and its propagation in plasma, taking into account the relativistic-ponderomotive nonlinearity. The intensity dependent dielectric constant of the plasma has been determined for the main laser beam and ring ripple superimposed on the main laser beam. The dielectric constant of the plasma is modified due to the contribution of the electric field vector of ring ripple. Nonlinear differential equations have been formulated to examine the growth of ring ripple in plasma, self focusing of main laser beam, and ring rippled laser beam in plasma using higher-order paraxial theory. These equations have been solved numerically for different laser intensities and plasma frequencies. The well established experimental laser and plasma parameters are used in numerical calculation. It is observed that the focusing of the laser beams (main and ring rippled) becomes fast in the nonparaxial region by expanding the eikonal and other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r. The splitted profile of laser beam in the plasma is observed due to uneven focusing/defocusing of the axial and off-axial rays. The growths of ring ripple increase when the laser beam intensity increases. Furthermore, the intensity profile of ring rippled laser beam gets modified due to the contribution of growth rate.

  6. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    SciTech Connect

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Cormier-Michel, E.

    2010-11-04

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA). In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  7. Colliding Laser Pulses for Laser-Plasma Accelerator Injection Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plateau, G. R.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Mittelberger, D. E.; Nakamura, K.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2010-11-01

    Decoupling injection from acceleration is a key challenge to achieve compact, reliable, tunable laser-plasma accelerators (LPA) [1, 2]. In colliding pulse injection the beat between multiple laser pulses can be used to control energy, energy spread, and emittance of the electron beam by injecting electrons in momentum and phase into the accelerating phase of the wake trailing the driver laser pulse [3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. At LBNL, using automated control of spatiotemporal overlap of laser pulses, two-pulse experiments showed stable operation and reproducibility over hours of operation. Arrival time of the colliding beam was scanned, and the measured timing window and density of optimal operation agree with simulations [8]. The accelerator length was mapped by scanning the collision point.

  8. Damage-controlled high power lasers and plasma mirror application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiriyama, Hiromitsu; Ochi, Yoshihiro; Nishikino, Masaharu; Nagashima, Keisuke; Kawachi, Tetsuya; Itakura, Ryoji; Sugiyama, Akira; Kando, Masaki; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nishiuchi, Mamiko; Bulanov, Sergei V.; Kondo, Kimonori; Kato, Yoshiaki

    2015-07-01

    Following three different types of high power lasers at Kansai Photon Science Institute are overviewed and controlling the laser damages in these laser systems are described: (1) PW-class Ti:sapphire laser for high field science, (2) zig-zag slab Nd:glass laser for x-ray laser pumping, and (3) high-repetition Yb:YAG thin-slab laser for THz generation. Also reported is the use of plasma mirror for characterization of short-wavelength ultrashort laser pulses. This new method will be useful to study evolution of plasma formation which leads to laser damages.

  9. Ion beam control in laser plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, S.; Izumiyama, T.; Sato, D.; Nagashima, T.; Takano, M.; Barada, D.; Gu, Y. J.; Ma, Y. Y.; Kong, Q.; Wang, P. X.; Wang, W. M.

    2016-03-01

    By a two-stage successive acceleration in laser ion acceleration, our 2.5-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations demonstrate a remarkable increase in ion energy by a few hundreds of MeV; the maximum proton energy reaches about 250MeV. The ions are accelerated by the inductive continuous post-acceleration in a laser plasma interaction together with the target normal sheath acceleration and the breakout afterburner mechanism. An intense short-pulse laser generates a strong current by high-energy electrons accelerated, when an intense short- pulse laser illuminates a plasma target. The strong electric current creates a strong magnetic field along the high-energy electron current in the plasma. During the increase phase in the magnetic field strength, the moving longitudinal inductive electric field is induced by the Faraday law, and accelerates the forward-moving ions continously. The multi-stage acceleration provides a unique controllability in the ion energy and its quality.

  10. Nuclear Powered Laser Driven Plasma Propulsion System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammash, T.

    A relativistic plasma thruster that could open up the solar system to near-term human exploration is presented. It is based on recent experimental and theoretical research, which show that ultrafast (very short pulse length) lasers can accelerate charged particles to relativistic speeds. In table top-type experiments charge-neutral proton beams containing more than 1014 particles with mean energies of tens of MeV's have been produced when high intensity lasers with femtosecond (10-15 s) pulse lengths are made to strike thin solid targets. When viewed from a propulsion standpoint such systems can produce specific impulses of several million seconds albeit at modest thrusts and require nuclear power systems to drive them. Several schemes are proposed to enhance the thrust and make these systems suitable for manned interplanetary missions. In this paper we set forth the physics principles that make relativistic plasma driven by ultrafast lasers particularly attractive for propulsion applications. We introduce the “Laser Accelerated Plasma Propulsion System” LAPPS, and demonstrate its potential propulsive capability by addressing an interstellar mission to the Oort Cloud, and a planetary mission to Mars. We show that the first can be carried out in a human's lifetime and the second in a matter of months. In both instances we identify the major technological problems that must be addressed if this system is to evolve into a leading contender among the advance propulsion concepts currently under consideration.

  11. Flame zone of a composite propellant expanded by a laser source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, R.; Hertzberg, M.; Mc Hale, E.; Von Elbe, G.

    1971-01-01

    Technique scales flame structure linearly with gas kinetic mean free path, which increases two to three orders of magnitude as pressure decreases like amount. Kinetic and transport time scales expand in proportion so that regression rates for laser-induced flames are two to three orders of magnitude slower.

  12. Laser-Beam Smoothing Induced by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering in an Inhomogeneous Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Loiseau, P.; Morice, O.; Teychenne, D.; Casanova, M.; Hueller, S.; Pesme, D.

    2006-11-17

    We present results of two-dimensional simulations of the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) of an optically smoothed laser beam propagating in an expanding plasma. In the weak damping limit, both backscattered and transmitted light waves exhibit an additional spatiotemporal incoherence, which is shown to be induced by SBS taking place in an inhomogeneous plasma. This mechanism is not related to laser-beam self-focusing and is thus complementary to plasma-induced smoothing [A. J. Schmitt and B. B. Afeyan, Phys. Plasmas 5, 503 (1998)]. The incoherence induced by SBS in the entrance part of the plasma could reduce the growth of parametric instabilities developing further inside the plasma and is able to significantly enlarge the spreading angle of the transmitted light. The angular width of the backscattered light is also found to be significantly larger than the aperture angle of the incident beam.

  13. Role of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents in colorectal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chennupati, Raja S.; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Metallic stents are effective in relieving colorectal obstruction in more than 80% of cases. Self expanding metallic stents allow for decompression of the proximal colon and preoperative bowel cleansing. Hence, emergent surgery for large bowel obstruction with its associated high morbidity and mortality might be avoided. Endoscopic laser photoablation and stent placement may successfully palliate inoperable colorectal cancer patients by maintaining luminal patency and avoiding the need for a colostomy. Major complications associated with metallic stents include pressure necrosis, perforation, bleeding and migration. The effectiveness of expandable metallic stents in obstructive colorectal carcinoma is critically reviewed. The authors present a concise review of the effectiveness of endoscopic laser photoablation and expandable metal stent placement.

  14. Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, A. J.; Fiuza, F.; Debayle, A.; Johzaki, T.; Mori, W. B.; Patel, P. K.; Sentoku, Y.; Silva, L. O.

    2014-05-01

    In the electron-driven fast-ignition (FI) approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser-plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to FI. Increases in computational and modelling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modelling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modelling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the comparison of simulation results with experimental observables. In particular, we address the question of surrogacy of today's experiments for the full-scale FI problem.

  15. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  16. Electromagnetically Induced Guiding of Counter-propagating Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = G. Shvets; A. Pukhov

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of counter-propagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counter-propagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  17. Lasing effects in a laser-induced plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We have studied coherent emission from optically pumped preliminarily created laser induced plasma and demonstrate the possibility to create laser sources based on laser plasma as an active medium. The effect was studied in detail with Al plasma, and preliminary but promising results were also obtained with other atoms from the 13th and 14th groups of the periodic table. These lasers may be used as coherent light sources in a variety of optical applications.

  18. Control of laser-ablation plasma potential with external electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Fumika Nakajima, Mitsuo; Hasegawa, Jun; Kawamura, Tohru; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-15

    The potential of a laser-ablation plasma was controlled stably up to +2 kV by using external ring electrodes. A stable electron sheath was formed between the plasma and the external electrodes by placing the ring electrodes away from the boundary of the drifting plasma. The plasma kept the potential for a few μs regardless of the flux change of the ablation plasma. We also found that the plasma potential changed with the expansion angle of the plasma from the target. By changing the distance between the plasma boundary and the external electrodes, we succeeded in controlling the potential of laser-ablation plasma.

  19. Pulse evolution and plasma-wave phase velocity in channel-guided laser-plasma accelerators.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, C; Rossi, F; Schroeder, C B; Esarey, E; Leemans, W P

    2015-08-01

    The self-consistent laser evolution of an intense, short-pulse laser exciting a plasma wave and propagating in a preformed plasma channel is investigated, including the effects of pulse steepening and energy depletion. In the weakly relativistic laser intensity regime, analytical expressions for the laser energy depletion, pulse self-steepening rate, laser intensity centroid velocity, and phase velocity of the plasma wave are derived and validated numerically. PMID:26382537

  20. Laser plasma in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kondo,K.; Kanesue, T.; Tamura, J.; Dabrowski, R.; Okamura, M.

    2009-09-20

    Laser Ion Source (LIS) is a candidate among various heavy ion sources. A high density plasma produced by Nd:YAG laser with drift velocity realizes high current and high charge state ion beams. In order to obtain higher charged particle ions, we had test experiments of LIS with a magnetic field by which a connement effect can make higher charged beams. We measured total current by Faraday Cup (FC) and analyzed charge distribution by Electrostatic Ion Analyzer (EIA). It is shown that the ion beam charge state is higher by a permanent magnet.

  1. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  2. Laser-heated emissive plasma probe.

    PubMed

    Schrittwieser, Roman; Ionita, Codrina; Balan, Petru; Gstrein, Ramona; Grulke, Olaf; Windisch, Thomas; Brandt, Christian; Klinger, Thomas; Madani, Ramin; Amarandei, George; Sarma, Arun K

    2008-08-01

    Emissive probes are standard tools in laboratory plasmas for the direct determination of the plasma potential. Usually they consist of a loop of refractory wire heated by an electric current until sufficient electron emission. Recently emissive probes were used also for measuring the radial fluctuation-induced particle flux and other essential parameters of edge turbulence in magnetized toroidal hot plasmas [R. Schrittwieser et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 50, 055004 (2008)]. We have developed and investigated various types of emissive probes, which were heated by a focused infrared laser beam. Such a probe has several advantages: higher probe temperature without evaporation or melting and thus higher emissivity and longer lifetime, no deformation of the probe in a magnetic field, no potential drop along the probe wire, and faster time response. The probes are heated by an infrared diode laser with 808 nm wavelength and an output power up to 50 W. One probe was mounted together with the lens system on a radially movable probe shaft, and radial profiles of the plasma potential and of its oscillations were measured in a linear helicon discharge. PMID:19044350

  3. Laser Plasma instability reduction by coherence disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W l; Amendt, P A; Meezan, N; Suter, L J

    2006-04-19

    The saturation levels of stimulated scattering of intense laser light in plasmas and techniques to reduce these levels are of great interest. A simple model is used to highlight the dependence of the reflectivity on the coherence length for the density fluctuations producing the scattering. Sometimes the coherence lengths can be determined nonlinearly. For NIF hohlraum plasmas, a reduction in the coherence lengths might be engineered in several ways. Finally, electron trapping in ion sound waves is briefly examined as a potentially important effect for the saturation of stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  4. Structure of an exploding laser-produced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Collette, A.; Gekelman, W.

    2011-05-15

    Currents and instabilities associated with an expanding dense plasma embedded in a magnetized background plasma are investigated by direct volumetric probe measurements of the magnetic field and floating potential. A diamagnetic cavity is formed and found to collapse rapidly compared to the expected magnetic diffusion time. The three-dimensional current density within the expanding plasma includes currents along the background magnetic field, in addition to the diamagnetic current. Correlation measurements reveal that flutelike structures at the plasma surface translate with the expanding plasma across the magnetic field and extend into the current system that sustains the diamagnetic cavity, possibly contributing to its collapse.

  5. Excitation of nuclear isomers by X rays from laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, Aleksandr A; Karpeshin, F; Trzhaskovskaya, M B; Platonov, Konstantin Yu; Rozhdestvenskii, Yu V

    2010-06-23

    The possibility of obtaining isomer nuclei is studied by the example of the molybdenum isomer {sup 93}Mo upon irradiation of a niobium {sup 93}Nb target by {approx}50-J, 100-fs laser pulses. It is shown that the modern laser technique allows production of isomer nuclei by accelerated protons and radiative de-excitation of isomer nuclear states by thermal or line X-rays from laser plasma. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  6. Hydrogen alpha laser ablation plasma diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Parigger, C G; Surmick, D M; Gautam, G; El Sherbini, A M

    2015-08-01

    Spectral measurements of the H(α) Balmer series line and the continuum radiation are applied to draw inferences of electron density, temperature, and the level of self-absorption in laser ablation of a solid ice target in ambient air. Electron densities of 17 to 3.2×10(24) m(-3) are determined from absolute calibrated emission coefficients for time delays of 100-650 ns after generation of laser plasma using Q-switched Nd:YAG radiation. The corresponding temperatures of 4.5-0.95 eV were evaluated from the absolute spectral radiance of the continuum at the longer wavelengths. The redshifted, Stark-broadened hydrogen alpha line emerges from the continuum radiation after a time delay of 300 ns. The electron densities inferred from power law formulas agree with the values obtained from the plasma emission coefficients. PMID:26258326

  7. Weak collisionless shocks in laser-plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, R. A.; Bingham, R.; Trines, R. G. M.; Norreys, P.

    2015-04-01

    We obtain a theory describing laminar shock-like structures in a collisionless plasma and examine the parameter limits, in terms of the ion sound Mach number and the electron/ion temperature ratio, within which these structures exist. The essential feature is the inclusion of finite ion temperature with the result that some ions are reflected from a potential ramp. This destroys the symmetry between upstream and downstream regions that would otherwise give the well-known ion solitary wave solution. We have shown earlier (Cairns et al 2014 Phys. Plasmas 21 022112) that such structures may be relevant to problems such as the existence of strong, localized electric fields observed in laser compressed pellets and laser acceleration of ions. Here we present results on the way in which these structures may produce species separation in fusion targets and suggest that it may be possible to use shock ion acceleration for fast ignition.

  8. Dynamics of intense laser propagation in underdense plasma: Polarization dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, D. K.; Fiuza, F.; Silva, L. O.; Davies, J. R.; Sarri, G.

    2012-07-15

    We present a comprehensive numerical study of the dynamics of an intense laser pulse as it propagates through an underdense plasma in two and three dimensions. By varying the background plasma density and the polarization of the laser beam, significant differences are found in terms of energy transport and dissipation, in agreement with recently reported experimental results. Below the threshold for relativistic self-focusing, the plasma and laser dynamics are observed to be substantially insensitive to the initial laser polarization, since laser transport is dominated by ponderomotive effects. Above this threshold, relativistic effects become important, and laser energy is dissipated either by plasma heating (p-polarization) or by trapping of electromagnetic energy into plasma cavities (s-polarization) or by a combination of both (circular polarization). Besides the fundamental interest of this study, the results presented are relevant to applications such as plasma-based accelerators, x-ray lasers, and fast-ignition inertial confinement fusion.

  9. Summary Report of Working Group 6: Laser-Plasma Acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Leemans, Wim P.; Downer, Michael; Siders, Craig

    2006-07-01

    A summary is given of presentations and discussions in theLaser-Plasma Acceleration Working Group at the 2006 Advanced AcceleratorConcepts Workshop. Presentation highlights include: widespreadobservation of quasi-monoenergetic electrons; good agreement betweenmeasured and simulated beam properties; the first demonstration oflaser-plasma acceleration up to 1 GeV; single-shot visualization of laserwakefield structure; new methods for measuring<100 fs electronbunches; and new methods for "machining" laser-plasma acceleratorstructures. Discussion of future direction includes: developing a roadmapfor laser-plasma acceleration beyond 1 GeV; a debate over injection andguiding; benchmarking simulations with improved wake diagnostics;petawatt laser technology for future laser-plasmaaccelerators.

  10. Carbon Multicharged Ion Generation from Laser Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balki, Oguzhan; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.

    2014-10-01

    Multicharged ions (MCI) have potential uses in different areas such as microelectronics and medical physics. Carbon MCI therapy for cancer treatment is considered due to its localized energy delivery to hard-to-reach tumors at a minimal damage to surrounding tissues. We use a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser with 40 ns pulse width operated at 1064 nm to ablate a graphite target in ultrahigh vacuum. A time-of-flight energy analyzer followed by a Faraday cup is used to characterize the carbon MCI extracted from the laser plasma. The MCI charge state and energy distribution are obtained. With increase in the laser fluence, the ion charge states and ion energy are increased. Carbon MCI up to C+9 are observed along with carbon clusters. When an acceleration voltage is applied between the carbon target and a grounded mesh, ion extraction is observed to increase with the applied voltage. National Science Foundation.

  11. Density and temperature distributions in the plasma expanding from an exploded wire in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.; Shashurin, A.; Baksht, R. B.; Oreshkin, V.

    2009-02-01

    The plasma expansion from an exploded wire with characteristic times of energy deposition in the wire of tens of microseconds was studied. The probe method was used to measure the plasma temperature and plasma density distributions. Tungsten wires 25, 50, 75, and 125 μm in diameter and a copper wire 100 μm in diameter were used. The waveforms of discharge voltage Ud, discharge current Id, and floating potential showed that Ud was close to a constant, while Id decreased, indicating that the wire resistance increased until plasma appeared. Immediately after the appearance of plasma, Id was observed to peak, while the voltage decreased stepwise from ˜110 to about 70 V. A relatively high electron temperature (about 12 eV) was observed in the expanding plasma even at r =2 cm from the wire axis. The plasma density was a maximum of 2×1013 cm-3 at r =2 cm, and it decreased with increasing r. For r <2 cm, unusual electrical parameters were observed, indicating the probe activity and a significantly increased plasma density in the region close to the wire core.

  12. In situ mechanical spectroscopy of laser deposited films using plasma plume excited reed

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Thorsten; Krebs, Hans-Ulrich

    2006-09-15

    We show a new approach to in situ measure the mechanical properties of pulsed laser deposited thin films by plasma plume excited reed with high accuracy. A vibrating reed, consisting of a Si substrate, is mounted into a pulsed laser deposition chamber. After deposition of the polymer film for investigation, the Si substrate is excited by the energy of the expanding laser plasma coming from a Ag target. The oscillations of the reed and their damping are measured using a diode laser reflected at the back side of the substrate, by observing the reflections with a position sensitive detector. Data collection as well as the coordination with the deposition setup are done computer controlled. Temperature dependent measurements of the damping of the reed oscillations then allow us to perform mechanical spectroscopy investigations of laser deposited polymer films.

  13. Improving sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using laser plasmas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.; Nagorny, Ivan G.; Bulanov, Alexey V.

    2006-11-01

    Laser plasmas interaction and spectral characteristics of plasma were investigated at a laser breakdown in a normal atmosphere with the purpose of improving laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensitivity. Colliding plasmas interaction was investigated depending on mechanism of absorption wave of laser radiation and distance between foci. Laser supported detonation wave, breakdown wave and fast wave of ionization are absorption wave observed in experiment. It was shown that seed electrons for cascade breakdown in front of fast wave of ionization is occurred due to oxygen molecules photoionization. Molecular emission and collapse of intensity of plasma continuum during the initial moments of laser plasma expansion were registered. The line/continuum ratio was essentially increased in case of laser plasmas interaction. Thus laser plasmas interaction improves sensitivity of LIBS.

  14. Dynamics of Converging Laser-Created Plasmas in Semi-Cylindrical Cavities Studied using Soft X-Ray Laser Interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Filevich, J; Marconi, M; Dunn, J; Moon, S J; Shlyaptsev, V N; Jankowska, E; Rocca, J J

    2007-09-19

    The evolution of dense aluminum and carbon plasmas produced by laser irradiation of 500 {micro}m diameter semi-cylindrical targets was studied using soft x-ray laser interferometry. Plasmas created heating the cavity walls with 120 picosecond duration optical laser pulses of {approx} 1 x 10{sup 12} W cm{sup -2} peak intensity were observed to expand and converge on axis to form a localized high density plasma region. Electron density maps were measured using a 46.9 nm wavelength tabletop capillary discharge soft x-ray laser probe in combination with an amplitude division interferometer based on diffraction gratings. The measurements show that the plasma density on axis exceeds 1 x 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}. The electron density profiles are compared with simulations conducted using the hydrodynamic code HYDRA, which show that the abrupt density increase near the axis is dominantly caused by the convergence of plasma generated at the bottom of the groove during laser irradiation.

  15. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  16. Development of High-Density Plasma Photonic Crystals Using High-Power Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colon Quinones, Roberto; Wang, Benjamin; Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Cappelli, Mark

    2015-09-01

    A plasma photonic crystal (PPC) is an array of plasma structures that interacts with electromagnetic (EM) waves in ways not possible with natural materials. 2D PPCs can be used for generating a band gap, which is a range of wave frequencies in which no waves are transmitted through the structure. Such gap forms when an EM wave travels through a 2D PPC with spacing equal to half the wavelength of the wave and plasma frequency (ωp) on the order of the frequency of the wave. Until recently, research on PPCs has been limited to ωp < 30 GHz, which is equivalent to a plasma density of ne <1013 cm-3 . Over the last year, PPCs of ne >1015 cm-3 have been generated at Stanford through the use of high-power lasers. The PPCs are generated by expanding the laser beam from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser through a Galilean beam expander and subsequently focusing the beam through an optical micro-lens array. The intense photoionization of air that occurs at the focus of the individual lenses leads to the formation of a 2D array of very dense plasma spots. Photomultiplier measurements show a plasma lifetime of ~150 ns during which the plasma array functions as a PPC, representing a first step towards advancing the field forward into the low THz regime. Sponsored by the AFOSR MURI and DoD NDSEG.

  17. Laser ablation of electronic materials including the effects of energy coupling and plasma interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong

    2004-12-10

    Many laser ablation applications such as laser drilling and micromachining generate cavity structures. The study of laser ablation inside a cavity is of both fundamental and practical significance. In this dissertation, cavities with different aspect ratios (depth/diameter) were fabricated in fused silica by laser micromachining. Pulsed laser ablation in the cavities was studied and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. The formation of laser-induced plasmas in the cavities and the effects of the cavities on the ablation processes were investigated. The temperatures and electron number densities of the resulting laser-induced plasmas in the cavities were determined from spectroscopic measurements. Reflection and confinement effects by the cavity walls and plasma shielding were discussed to explain the increased temperature and electron number density with respect to increasing cavity aspect ratio. The temporal variations of the plasma temperature and electron number density inside the cavity decreased more rapidly than outside the cavity. The effect of laser energy on formation of a plasma inside a cavity was also investigated. Propagation of the shock wave generated during pulsed laser ablation in cavities was measured using laser shadowgraph imaging and compared with laser ablation on a flat surface. It is found that outside the cavity, after about 30 ns the radius of the expanding shock wave was proportional to t2/5, which corresponds to a spherical blast wave. The calculated pressures and temperatures of the shocked air outside of the cavities were higher than those obtained on the flat surface. Lasers with femtosecond pulse duration are receiving much attention for direct fabrication of microstructures due to their capabilities of high-precision ablation with minimal damage to the sample. We have also performed experimental studies of pulsed femtosecond laser ablation on the flat surface of silicon samples and compared results with pulsed nanosecond

  18. External magnetic field influence on properties of high-power laser-produced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołowski, J.; Kasperczuk, A.; Pisarczyk, T.

    1996-03-01

    The paper presents results of formation of expanding plasma by combining laser-produced plasma with an external strong magnetic field. The plasma was generated by means of a Nd-glass laser which was focused on a solid target located on the axis of a single-turn coil providing magnetic field of up to 50 T. Spatial characteristics of the dynamics of interaction of the plasma with the magnetic field were registered by means of a three-frame interferometry. For registration and analysis of interferograms, CCD cameras and a multichannel image acquisition system were used. An interesting influence of the strong magnetic field on the plasma dynamics and shape was observed. Preliminary results of numerical modelling are compared with the experimental data.

  19. Pushing the Limits of Plasma Length in Inertial-Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; London, R. A.; Michel, P.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Neumayer, P.; Ross, J. S.; Wallace, R.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I<5×1014Wcm-2 greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3ω, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te=2.5keV), high-density (ne=5×1020cm-3) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  20. Instabilities observed at the bubble edge of a laser produced plasma during its expansion in an ambient tenuous plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Clark, S. E.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Niemann, C.

    2014-10-01

    The Raptor kJ class 1053 nm Nd:Glass laser in the Phoenix laser laboratory at University of California, Los Angeles, is used to ablate a dense debris plasma from a graphite or plastic target embedded in a tenuous, uniform, and quiescent ambient magnetized plasma in the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) which provides a peak plasma density of ni ~ 1013 cm-3. Its background magnetic field can vary between 200 and 1200 G. Debris ions from laser produced plasma expand out conically with super-Alfvénic speed (MA ~ 2) and expel the background magnetic field and ambient ions to form a diamagnetic bubble. The debris plasma interacts with the ambient plasma and the magnetic field and acts as a piston which can create collisionless shocks. Flute-type instabilities, which are probably large Larmor radius Rayleigh Taylor instabilities or lower hybrid drift instabilities, are developed at the bubble edge and also observed in the experiment. The amplitude and wavelength dependence of the instabilities, which might be a strong function of debris to ambient mass to charge ratio, is studied and the experimental results are compared to the two dimensional hybrid simulations. the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft in the framework of the Excellence Initiative Darmstadt Graduate School of Energy Science and Engineering (GSC1070).

  1. Physics of laser-driven plasma-based electron accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Esarey, E.; Schroeder, C. B.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-07-15

    Laser-driven plasma-based accelerators, which are capable of supporting fields in excess of 100 GV/m, are reviewed. This includes the laser wakefield accelerator, the plasma beat wave accelerator, the self-modulated laser wakefield accelerator, plasma waves driven by multiple laser pulses, and highly nonlinear regimes. The properties of linear and nonlinear plasma waves are discussed, as well as electron acceleration in plasma waves. Methods for injecting and trapping plasma electrons in plasma waves are also discussed. Limits to the electron energy gain are summarized, including laser pulse diffraction, electron dephasing, laser pulse energy depletion, and beam loading limitations. The basic physics of laser pulse evolution in underdense plasmas is also reviewed. This includes the propagation, self-focusing, and guiding of laser pulses in uniform plasmas and with preformed density channels. Instabilities relevant to intense short-pulse laser-plasma interactions, such as Raman, self-modulation, and hose instabilities, are discussed. Experiments demonstrating key physics, such as the production of high-quality electron bunches at energies of 0.1-1 GeV, are summarized.

  2. Tapered plasma channels to phase-lock accelerating and focusing forces in laser-plasma accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Rittershofer, W.; Schroeder, C.B.; Esarey, E.; Gruner, F.J.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-05-17

    Tapered plasma channels are considered for controlling dephasing of a beam with respect to a plasma wave driven by a weakly-relativistic, short-pulse laser. Tapering allows for enhanced energy gain in a single laser plasma accelerator stage. Expressions are derived for the taper, or longitudinal plasma density variation, required to maintain a beam at a constant phase in the longitudinal and/or transverse fields of the plasma wave. In a plasma channel, the phase velocities of the longitudinal and transverse fields differ, and, hence, the required tapering differs. The length over which the tapered plasma density becomes singular is calculated. Linear plasma tapering as well as discontinuous plasma tapering, which moves beams to adjacent plasma wave buckets, are also considered. The energy gain of an accelerated electron in a tapered laser-plasma accelerator is calculated and the laser pulse length to optimize the energy gain is determined.

  3. Focusing of Intense Laser via Parabolic Plasma Concave Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weimin; Gu, Yuqiu; Wu, Fengjuan; Zhang, Zhimeng; Shan, Lianqiang; Cao, Leifeng; Zhang, Baohan

    2015-12-01

    Since laser intensity plays an important role in laser plasma interactions, a method of increasing laser intensity - focusing of an intense laser via a parabolic plasma concave surface - is proposed and investigated by three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. The geometric focusing via a parabolic concave surface and the temporal compression of high harmonics increased the peak intensity of the laser pulse by about two orders of magnitude. Compared with the improvement via laser optics approaches, this scheme is much more economic and appropriate for most femtosecond laser facilities. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11174259, 11175165), and the Dual Hundred Foundation of China Academy of Engineering Physics

  4. Measurements of laser-induced plasma temperature field in deep penetration laser welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Genyu; Zhang, Mingjun; Zhao, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Li, Shichun

    2013-02-01

    Laser-induced plasma in deep penetration laser welding is located inside or outside the keyhole, namely, keyhole plasma or plasma plume, respectively. The emergence of laser-induced plasma in laser welding reveals important information of the welding technological process. Generally, electron temperature and electron density are two important characteristic parameters of plasma. In this paper, spectroscopic measurements of electron temperature and electron density of the keyhole plasma and plasma plume in deep penetration laser welding conditions were carried out. To receive spectra from several points separately and simultaneously, an Optical Multi-channel Analyser (OMA) was developed. On the assumption that the plasma was in local thermal equilibrium, the temperature was calculated with the spectral relative intensity method. The spectra collected were processed with Abel inversion method to obtain the temperature fields of keyhole plasma and plasma plume.

  5. Accelerated Bone Repair After Plasma Laser Corticotomies

    PubMed Central

    Leucht, Philipp; Lam, Kentson; Kim, Jae-Beom; Mackanos, Mark A.; Simanovskii, Dmitrii M.; Longaker, Michael T.; Contag, Christopher H.; Schwettman, H Alan; Helms, Jill A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To reveal, on a cellular and molecular level, how skeletal regeneration of a corticotomy is enhanced when using laser-plasma mediated ablation compared with conventional mechanical tissue removal. Summary Background Data: Osteotomies are well-known for their most detrimental side effect: thermal damage. This thermal and mechanical trauma to adjacent bone tissue can result in the untoward consequences of cell death and eventually in a delay in healing. Methods: Murine tibial corticotomies were performed using a conventional saw and a Ti:Sapphire plasma-generated laser that removes tissue with minimal thermal damage. Our analyses began 24 hours after injury and proceeded to postsurgical day 6. We investigated aspects of wound repair ranging from vascularization, inflammation, cell proliferation, differentiation, and bone remodeling. Results: Histology of mouse corticotomy sites uncovered a significant difference in the onset of bone healing; whereas laser corticotomies showed abundant bone matrix deposition at postsurgical day 6, saw corticotomies only exhibited undifferentiated tissue. Our analyses uncovered that cutting bone with a saw caused denaturation of the collagen matrix due to thermal effects. This denatured collagen represented an unfavorable scaffold for subsequent osteoblast attachment, which in turn impeded deposition of a new bony matrix. The matrix degradation induced a prolonged inflammatory reaction at the cut edge to create a surface favorable for osteochondroprogenitor cell attachment. Laser corticotomies were absent of collagen denaturation, therefore osteochondroprogenitor cell attachment was enabled shortly after surgery. Conclusion: In summary, these data demonstrate that corticotomies performed with Ti:Sapphire lasers are associated with a reduced initial inflammatory response at the injury site leading to accelerated osteochondroprogenitor cell migration, attachment, differentiation, and eventually matrix deposition. PMID:17592303

  6. PLASMA WAKE EXCITATION BY LASERS OR PARTICLE BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Plasma accelerators may be driven by the ponderomotive force of an intense laser or the space-charge force of a charged particle beam. Plasma wake excitation driven by lasers or particle beams is examined, and the implications of the different physical excitation mechanisms for accelerator design are discussed. Plasma-based accelerators have attracted considerable attention owing to the ultrahigh field gradients sustainable in a plasma wave, enabling compact accelerators. These relativistic plasma waves are excited by displacing electrons in a neutral plasma. Two basic mechanisms for excitation of plasma waves are actively being researched: (i) excitation by the nonlinear ponderomotive force (radiation pressure) of an intense laser or (ii) excitation by the space-charge force of a dense charged particle beam. There has been significant recent experimental success using lasers and particle beam drivers for plasma acceleration. In particular, for laser-plasma accelerators (LPAs), the demonstration at LBNL in 2006 of high-quality, 1 GeV electron beams produced in approximately 3 cm plasma using a 40 TW laser. In 2007, for beam-driven plasma accelerators, or plasma-wakefield accelerators (PWFAs), the energy doubling over a meter to 42 GeV of a fraction of beam electrons on the tail of an electron beam by the plasma wave excited by the head was demonstrated at SLAC. These experimental successes have resulted in further interest in the development of plasma-based acceleration as a basis for a linear collider, and preliminary collider designs using laser drivers and beam drivers are being developed. The different physical mechanisms of plasma wave excitation, as well as the typical characteristics of the drivers, have implications for accelerator design. In the following, we identify the similarities and differences between wave excitation by lasers and particle beams. The field structure of the plasma wave driven by lasers or particle beams is discussed, as well as the

  7. A Langmuir Probe Diagnostic for Use in Inhomogeneous, Time-Varying Plasmas Produced by High-Energy Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J R; Emig, J A; Fournier, K B; Jenkins, P P; Trautz, K M; Seiler, S W; Davis, J F

    2012-05-01

    Langmuir probes (LP) are used extensively to characterize plasma environments produced by radio frequency, pulsed plasma thrusters, and laser ablation. We discuss here the development of a LP diagnostic to examine high-density, high-temperature inhomogeneous plasmas such as those that can be created at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility. We have configured our diagnostic to examine the velocity of the plasma expanding from the target. We observe velocities of approximately 16-17 cm/{micro}s, with individual LP currents displaying complex structures, perhaps due to the multiple atomic species and ionization states that exist.

  8. Efficacy of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents for esophageal carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandar, Gowra; Trowers, Eugene A.

    2000-05-01

    Malignant dysphagia is a serious condition in which 70% of patients die within one year, regardless of the treatment received. It provokes a rapid deterioration of a patient's physical condition and a significant worsening of quality of life. The surgical treatment of dysphagia is frequently complicated with technical difficulties, and often the tumors cannot be excised because of extensive invasion into adjacent structures. Furthermore, many patients are considered inoperable due to advanced age, associated diseases and malnutrition. Laser photoablative therapy coupled with expandable metal stents restores luminal patency in more than 80% of patients allowing them to eat liquids and soft foods. The efficacy of laser photoablative therapy and expandable metal stents for the palliation esophageal carcinoma will be critically reviewed.

  9. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2011-06-15

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  10. Tailoring the air plasma with a double laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shneider, M. N.; Zheltikov, A. M.; Miles, R. B.

    2011-06-01

    We present a comprehensive model of plasma dynamics that enables a detailed understanding of the ways the air plasma induced in the atmosphere in the wake of a laser-induced filament can be controlled by an additional laser pulse. Our model self-consistently integrates plasma-kinetic, Navier-Stokes, electron heat conduction, and electron-vibration energy transfer equations, serving to reveal laser-plasma interaction regimes where the plasma lifetime can be substantially increased through an efficient control over plasma temperature, as well as suppression of attachment and recombination processes. The model is used to quantify the limitations on the length of uniform laser-filament heating due to the self-defocusing of laser radiation by the radial profile of electron density. The envisaged applications include sustaining plasma guides for long-distance transmission of microwaves, standoff detection of impurities and potentially hazardous agents, as well as lightning control and protection.

  11. Coherent microwave radiation from a laser induced plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shneider, M. N.; Miles, R. B.

    2012-12-24

    We propose a method for generation of coherent monochromatic microwave/terahertz radiation from a laser-induced plasma. It is shown that small-scale plasma, located in the interaction region of two co-propagating plane-polarized laser beams, can be a source of the dipole radiation at a frequency equal to the difference between the frequencies of the lasers. This radiation is coherent and appears as a result of the so-called optical mixing in plasma.

  12. Study of plasma parameters in expanders of the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soldatkina, E.; Korzhavina, M.; Dunaevsky, A.; Prikhodko, V.; Savkin, V.; Bagryansky, P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in GDT demonstrate the possibility of electron temperatures (Te) of above 1 KeV in mirror machines. Such high Te can be reached if electron heat losses to end walls are limited. Understanding plasma parameters and potential distribution in expanders, common features in GDT and advanced FRCs at Tri Alpha Energy, is crucial for their efficiency. This poster reviews studies of plasma parameters in GDT expanders at on-axis Te of 300-600 eV. Diagnostics includes Langmuir probes, emissive probes, RPAs, and bolometers. Within few centimeters of the end plates, electron energies of ~ 25eV and plasma potentials of several volts are observed. High potential drops are absent in the sheaths, indicative of the role of cold trapped electrons on the potential profiles. New results agree with prior studies at substantially lower on-axis Te. Scaling of plasma parameters with on-axis Te will be reported. This work was supported by the Ministry of Education and Science of Russia (project RFMEFI61914X0003).

  13. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  14. Laser diagnostics of plasma assisted combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Xing

    In this study, a microwave re-entrant cavity discharge system and a direct current (DC) plasmatron are used to investigate flame enhancement and nitric oxide (NO) formation using laser and optical diagnostics. The uniqueness of this study lies in the direct coupling concept, a novel highly efficient strategy used here for the first time. To investigate combustion dynamics of direct microwave coupled combustion, an atmospheric high-Q re-entrant cavity applicator is used to couple microwave (2.45 GHz) electromagnetic energy directly into the reaction zone of a premixed laminar methane-oxygen flame using a compact torch. When microwave energy increases, a transition from electric field enhancement to microwave plasma discharge is observed. At 6 to 10 Watts, ionization and eventually break-down occurs. 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging of hydroxyl radicals (OH) and carbon monoxide (CO) is conducted in the reaction zone over this transition, as well as spectrally resolved flame emission measurements. These measurements serve to monitor excited state species and derive rotational temperatures using OH chemiluminescence for a range of equivalence ratios (both rich and lean) and total flow rates. Combustion dynamics is also investigated for plasma enhanced methane-air flames in premixed and nonpremixed configurations using a transient arc DC plasmatron. Results for OH and CO PLIF also indicate the differences in stability mechanism, and energy consumption for premixed and nonpremixed modes. It is shown that both configurations are significantly influenced by in-situ fuel reforming at higher plasma powers. Parametric studies are conducted in a plasma assisted methane/air premixed flame for quantitative NO production using a DC plasmatron with PLIF imaging. Quantitative measurements of NO are reported as a function of gas flow rate (20 to 50 SCFH), plasma power (100 to 900 mA, 150 to 750 W) and equivalence ratio (0.7 to 1.3). NO PLIF images and single point NO

  15. Accurate Alignment of Plasma Channels Based on Laser Centroid Oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Lin, Chen; Osterhoff, Jens; Shiraishi, Satomi; Schroeder, Carl; Geddes, Cameron; Toth, Csaba; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2011-03-23

    A technique has been developed to accurately align a laser beam through a plasma channel by minimizing the shift in laser centroid and angle at the channel outptut. If only the shift in centroid or angle is measured, then accurate alignment is provided by minimizing laser centroid motion at the channel exit as the channel properties are scanned. The improvement in alignment accuracy provided by this technique is important for minimizing electron beam pointing errors in laser plasma accelerators.

  16. Observation of Laser-Pulse Shortening in Nonlinear Plasma Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Faure, J.; Glinec, Y.; Santos, J.J.; Ewald, F.; Rousseau, J.-P.; Malka, V.; Kiselev, S.; Pukhov, A.; Hosokai, T.

    2005-11-11

    We have measured the temporal shortening of an ultraintense laser pulse interacting with an underdense plasma. When interacting with strongly nonlinear plasma waves, the laser pulse is shortened from 38{+-}2 fs to the 10-14 fs level, with a 20% energy efficiency. The laser ponderomotive force excites a wakefield, which, along with relativistic self-phase modulation, broadens the laser spectrum and subsequently compresses the pulse. This mechanism is confirmed by 3D particle in cell simulations.

  17. Observation of laser-pulse shortening in nonlinear plasma waves.

    PubMed

    Faure, J; Glinec, Y; Santos, J J; Ewald, F; Rousseau, J-P; Kiselev, S; Pukhov, A; Hosokai, T; Malka, V

    2005-11-11

    We have measured the temporal shortening of an ultraintense laser pulse interacting with an underdense plasma. When interacting with strongly nonlinear plasma waves, the laser pulse is shortened from 38 +/- 2 fs to the 10-14 fs level, with a 20% energy efficiency. The laser ponderomotive force excites a wakefield, which, along with relativistic self-phase modulation, broadens the laser spectrum and subsequently compresses the pulse. This mechanism is confirmed by 3D particle in cell simulations. PMID:16384066

  18. Laser plasma plume structure and dynamics in the ambient air: The early stage of expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirisan, M.; Jouvard, J. M.; Lavisse, L.; Hallo, L.; Oltra, R.

    2011-05-01

    Laser ablation plasma plume expanding into the ambient atmosphere may be an efficient way to produce nanoparticles. From that reason it would be interesting to study the properties of these laser induced plasmas formed under conditions that are known to be favorable for nanoparticles production. In general, plume behavior can be described as a two-stage process: a "violent" plume expansion due to the absorption of the laser beam energy (during the laser pulse) followed by a fast adiabatic expansion in the ambient gas (after the end of the laser pulse). Plasma plume may last a few microseconds and may have densities 10-6 times lower than the solid densities at temperatures close to the ambient temperature. Expansion of the plasma plume induced by the impact of a nanosecond laser beam (λ = 1064 nm) on the surface of metallic samples in the open air has been investigated by means of fast photography. Spatio-temporal evolution of the plume at the early stage of its expansion (first 330 ns) has been recorded. Structure and dynamics of the plasma plume have been investigated and compared to numerical simulations obtained with a hydro-code, as well as some scaling laws. In addition, measurements using different sample materials (Al, Fe, and Ti) have been performed in order to analyze the influence of target material on plume expansion.

  19. Physics considerations for laser-plasma linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2010-06-11

    Physics considerations for a next-generation linear collider based on laser-plasma accelerators are discussed. The ultra-high accelerating gradient of a laser-plasma accelerator and short laser coupling distance between accelerator stages allows for a compact linac. Two regimes of laser-plasma acceleration are discussed. The highly nonlinear regime has the advantages of higher accelerating fields and uniform focusing forces, whereas the quasi-linear regime has the advantage of symmetric accelerating properties for electrons and positrons. Scaling of various accelerator and collider parameters with respect to plasma density and laser wavelength are derived. Reduction of beamstrahlung effects implies the use of ultra-short bunches of moderate charge. The total linac length scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density, whereas the total power scales proportional to the square root of the density. A 1 TeV center-of-mass collider based on stages using a plasma density of 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} requires tens of J of laser energy per stage (using 1 {micro}m wavelength lasers) with tens of kHz repetition rate. Coulomb scattering and synchrotron radiation are examined and found not to significantly degrade beam quality. A photon collider based on laser-plasma accelerated beams is also considered. The requirements for the scattering laser energy are comparable to those of a single laser-plasma accelerator stage.

  20. Fissioning uranium plasmas and nuclear-pumped lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, R. T.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Current research into uranium plasmas, gaseous-core (cavity) reactors, and nuclear-pumped lasers is discussed. Basic properties of fissioning uranium plasmas are summarized together with potential space and terrestrial applications of gaseous-core reactors and nuclear-pumped lasers. Conditions for criticality of a uranium plasma are outlined, and it is shown that the nonequilibrium state and the optical thinness of a fissioning plasma can be exploited for the direct conversion of fission fragment energy into coherent light (i.e., for nuclear-pumped lasers). Successful demonstrations of nuclear-pumped lasers are described together with gaseous-fuel reactor experiments using uranium hexafluoride.

  1. Numerical modeling of plasma plume evolution against ambient background gas in laser blow off experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, Bhavesh G.; Das, Amita; Kaw, Predhiman; Singh, Rajesh; Kumar, Ajai

    2012-07-15

    Two dimensional numerical modelling based on simplified hydrodynamic evolution for an expanding plasma plume (created by laser blow off) against an ambient background gas has been carried out. A comparison with experimental observations shows that these simulations capture most features of the plasma plume expansion. The plume location and other gross features are reproduced as per the experimental observation in quantitative detail. The plume shape evolution and its dependence on the ambient background gas are in good qualitative agreement with the experiment. This suggests that a simplified hydrodynamic expansion model is adequate for the description of plasma plume expansion.

  2. Colliding laser-produced plasmas: a new tool for nuclear astrophysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascali, D.; Tudisco, S.; Bonanno, A.; Gambino, N.; Ivanovski, S.; Anzalone, A.; Gammino, S.; Miracoli, R.; Musumeci, F.

    2010-10-01

    Laser-generated plasmas, formed when a high power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid target, have been used since the 1960s. At higher power densities (>109-1010 W/cm2), such non-equilibrium plasmas expand in vacuum with supersonic velocities. Hydrodynamic simulations and experimental data show that at the beginning of the expansion the plasma temperature may reach several hundreds of eV, while the density is in the order of 1016 cm-3 or higher. Colliding laser-produced plasmas have constituted a largely unexplored and unexploited research domain until quite recent times, either for applications in materials or energy science. In this article, we propose the use of colliding laser-produced plasmas as an unique opportunity for nuclear astrophysics studies. We present a series of calculations about fusion reaction rates in laser-produced plasmas where the electron screening puzzle is taken into account. The numerical simulations have been carried out using the hydro code ZEUSMP2, while Monte Carlo codes have been used to simulate the fusion reaction rates according to the plume density and temperature evolution predicted by the simulations. We think that this type of investigation can be important in understanding the efficiency of nuclear reaction rates during the red giant phase of stellar evolution, as a significant part of the produced energy is dissipated in the low-density radiative envelope by shock waves.

  3. Diagnostics of laser plasma plume dynamics within an electrically biased confining cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Kennedy, E. T.

    2011-09-15

    The dynamics of laser generated plasma plumes expanding within confining surfaces display a two-phase nature. Early phase enhancement due to hydrodynamic containment results in higher temperatures, densities, and average charges states in comparison to freely expanding plasma plumes. Later phase dynamics result in rapid decay of the plasma plume due to lossy plasma--surface interactions. This paper examines laser plasma generation and expansion within rectangular aluminium cavities biased to high voltages (V{sub bias} = {+-}9 kV). ''Hydro-electro-dynamic'' confinement of the laser plasma plumes and the expansion dynamics were studied via space and time resolved visible emission spectroscopy. The charged confining cavities displayed enhanced emission, higher electron densities (N{sub e}) and longer emission durations compared to those of an unbiased cavity. This behavior is attributed to the influence of the electric fields in the cavity on the charged particle dynamics within the cavity volume. The degree of enhancement depended strongly on the applied polarity.

  4. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  5. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  6. Collaborative Research: Instability and transport of laser beam in plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Harvey Arnold; Lushnikov, Pavel

    2014-11-18

    Our goal was to determine the onset of laser light scattering due to plasma wave instabilities. Such scatter is usually regarded as deleterious since laser beam strength is thereby diminished. While this kind of laser-plasma-instability (LPI) has long been understood for the case of coherent laser light, the theory of LPI onset for a laser beam with degraded coherence is recent. Such a laser beam fills plasma with a mottled intensity distribution, which has large fluctuations. The key question is: do the exceptionally large fluctuations control LPI onset or is it controlled by the relatively quiescent background laser intensity? We have answered this question. This is significant because LPI onset power in the former case is typically small compared to that of the latter. In addition, if large laser intensity fluctuations control LPI onset, then nonlinear effects become significant for less powerful laser beams than otherwise estimated.

  7. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  8. High density collimated beams of relativistic ions produced by petawatt laser pulses in plasmas

    PubMed

    Sentoku; Liseikina; Esirkepov; Califano; Naumova; Ueshima; Vshivkov; Kato; Mima; Nishihara; Pegoraro; Bulanov

    2000-11-01

    Under optimal interaction conditions ions can be accelerated up to relativistic energies by a petawatt laser pulse in both underdense and overdense plasmas. Two-dimensional particle in cell simulations show that the laser pulse drills a channel through an underdense plasma slab due to relativistic self-focusing. Both ions and electrons are accelerated in the head region of the channel. However, ion acceleration is more effective at the end of the slab. Here electrons from the channel expand in vacuum and are followed by the ions dragged by the Coulomb force arising from charge separation. A similar mechanism of ion acceleration occurs when a superintense laser pulse interacts with a thin slab of overdense plasma and the pulse ponderomotive pressure moves all the electrons away from a finite-diameter spot. PMID:11102086

  9. Aluminium plasma production at high laser intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2014-02-28

    Thick and thin films of Al targets were irradiated in vacuum with iodine laser at 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration at a maximum intensity of about 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} by varying the pulse energy and focal position. The laser-generated plasma was monitored in forward and backward directions by using ion collectors, SiC detectors, Thomson parabola spectrometer, and X-ray streak camera. Ion emission shows maximum proton energy of about 4 MeV in self-focusing conditions and a maximum Al ion energy of about 50 MeV. An evaluation of the electric field driving ions in conditions of target normal sheath acceleration is given.

  10. Railgun system using a laser-induced plasma armature

    SciTech Connect

    Onozuka, M.; Oda, Y.; Azuma, K.

    1996-05-01

    Development of an electromagnetic railgun system that utilizes a laser-induced plasma armature formation has been conducted to investigate the application of the railgun system for high-speed pellet injection into fusion plasmas. Using the laser-induced plasma formation technique, the required breakdown voltage was reduced by one-tenth compared with that for the spark-discharged plasma. The railgun system successfully accelerated the laser-induced plasma armature by an electromagnetic force that accelerated the pellet. The highest velocity of the solid hydrogen pellets, obtained so far, was 2.6 km/sec using a 2m-long railgun. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. Modelling of relativistic laser-plasma interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berwick, Stuart James

    In order to characterise the propagation and stability of linearly polarised laser pulses of arbitrary intensity interacting with underdense plasma, a one-dimensional, fully relativistic, covariant electron fluid model is derived. As a first step, the model is Lorentz transformed into a frame moving with the group velocity of the laser pulse. A linear instability analysis is undertaken which generates an infinite hierarchy of homogeneous mode-coupling equations describing the decay of the laser pump via stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS), stimulated Raman back scattering (SRBS) and the relativistic modulational instability (RMI). SRFS and RMI are seen to merge into a hybrid instability at high intensities (1>1018Wcm-2) and a 6-wave analysis (rather than the conventional 3 or 4-wave) is required to accurately predict growth. Next, an Eulerian fluid code is developed in order to evolve the full non- linear equations. The method of characteristics is used to integrate the electromagnetic wave equation and a predictor-corrector algorithm is used to integrate the equations of continuity and momentum. After testing, this code is used to simulate the propagation and stability of ultra-short (<200fs), 'table-top' and cos2 modulated laser pulses of relativistic intensities in underdense plasma. Comparison is made to the predictions of the dispersion relation and growth rates obtained in each case are reconciled. The spatiotemporal behaviour is discussed with reference to the results of a 3-wave WKB model of the interaction. The importance of seeding mechanisms, pulse shape and relativity on the evolution of the instabilities is also discussed.

  12. Laser produced plasma light source for EUVL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomenkov, Igor V.; Ershov, Alex I.; Partlo, William N.; Myers, David W.; Brown, Daniel; Sandstrom, Richard L.; La Fontaine, Bruno; Bykanov, Alexander N.; Vaschenko, Georgiy O.; Khodykin, Oleh V.; Böwering, Norbert R.; Das, Palash; Fleurov, Vladimir B.; Zhang, Kevin; Srivastava, Shailendra N.; Ahmad, Imtiaz; Rajyaguru, Chirag; De Dea, Silvia; Hou, Richard R.; Dunstan, Wayne J.; Baumgart, Peter; Ishihara, Toshihiko; Simmons, Rod D.; Jacques, Robert N.; Bergstedt, Robert A.; Brandt, David C.

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes the development of laser-produced-plasma (LPP) extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) source architecture for advanced lithography applications in high volume manufacturing. EUV lithography is expected to succeed 193 nm immersion technology for sub-22 nm critical layer patterning. In this paper we discuss the most recent results from high qualification testing of sources in production. Subsystem performance will be shown including collector protection, out-of-band (OOB) radiation measurements, and intermediate-focus (IF) protection as well as experience in system use. This presentation reviews the experimental results obtained on systems with a focus on the topics most critical for an HVM source.

  13. Plasma detector for TEA CO2 laser pulse measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Y.; Yamanaka, M.; Mitsuishi, A.; Fujita, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamanaka, C.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Iwasaki, T.; Takai, M.

    1983-10-01

    Laser-pulse evolution can be detected by measuring the emf generated by fast electrons in a laser-produced plasma when the laser radiation is focused onto a solid metal target in a vacuum. Using this phenomenon a 'plasma detector' is constructed, and its characteristics for the TEA CO2 laser radiation of intensity 10 to the 9th to 10 to the 10th W/sq cm are investigated experimentally. The plasma detector operates at room temperature and is strong against laser damages. For the evacuated plasma detector down to 0.1 torr, a maximum output voltage of 90 V and a rise time shorter than 1 ns are observed. The plasma detector, therefore, can be used as a power monitor for laser pulses and as a trigger voltage source.

  14. Anions in laser-induced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabanov, S. V.; Gornushkin, I. B.

    2016-07-01

    The equation of state for plasmas containing negative atomic and molecular ions (anions) is modeled. The model is based on the assumption that all ionization processes and chemical reactions are at local thermal equilibrium and the Coulomb interaction in the plasma is described by the Debye-Hückel theory. In particular, the equation of state is obtained for plasmas containing the elements Ca, Cl, C, Si, N, and Ar. The equilibrium reaction constants are calculated using the latest experimental and ab initio data of spectroscopic constants for the molecules CaCl_2, CaCl, Cl_2, N_2, C_2, Si_2, CN, SiN, SiC, and their positive and negative ions. The model is applied to laser-induced plasmas (LIPs) by including the equation of state into a fluid dynamic numerical model based on the Navier-Stokes equations describing an expansion of LIP plumes into an ambient gas as a reactive viscous flow with radiative losses. In particular, the formation of anions Cl-, C-, Si-, {{Cl}}2^{ - }, {{Si}}2^{ - }, {{C}}2^{ - }, CN-, SiC-, and SiN- in LIPs is investigated in detail.

  15. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the availablemore » experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.« less

  16. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Bang, W

    2015-07-01

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10(16)W/cm(2)) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We present an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10-keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10ns. PMID:26274289

  17. Disassembly time of deuterium-cluster-fusion plasma irradiated by an intense laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Bang, W.

    2015-07-02

    Energetic deuterium ions from large deuterium clusters (>10 nm diameter) irradiated by an intense laser pulse (>10¹⁶ W/cm²) produce DD fusion neutrons for a time interval determined by the geometry of the resulting fusion plasma. We show an analytical solution of this time interval, the plasma disassembly time, for deuterium plasmas that are cylindrical in shape. Assuming a symmetrically expanding deuterium plasma, we calculate the expected fusion neutron yield and compare with an independent calculation of the yield using the concept of a finite confinement time at a fixed plasma density. The calculated neutron yields agree quantitatively with the available experimental data. Our one-dimensional simulations indicate that one could expect a tenfold increase in total neutron yield by magnetically confining a 10 - keV deuterium fusion plasma for 10 ns.

  18. Interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding of magnesium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liming; Chen, Minghua

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents the results of the investigation on the interactions between laser and arc plasma during laser-arc hybrid welding on magnesium alloy AZ31B using the spectral diagnose technique. By comparably analyzing the variation in plasma information (the shape, the electron temperature and density) of single tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding with the laser-arc hybrid welding, it is found that the laser affects the arc plasma through the keyhole forming on the workpiece. Depending on the welding parameters there are three kinds of interactions taking place between laser and arc plasma.

  19. Experimental observation of the ion energy spectra of Al, Co, and Cu laser produced plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imanol Apiñaniz, Jon; Peralta Conde, Alvaro; Martínez Perez de Mendiola, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that nanosecond laser produced plasmas (LPPs) produce high kinetic energy ions when they expand to vacuum. The acceleration process is nowadays accepted to be due to the formation of a sharp double layer (DL) in the plasma-vacuum boundary. With the purpose of studying this acceleration process, kinetic energy spectra of the plasma ions are measured for each charge state separately. Experimental results are obtained by irradiating planar targets of Cu, Co and Al at a laser wavelength of 532 nm and fluences up to 58.1 J cm-2. The obtained results show two new insights in the ion energy spectra. Firstly, they are non-maxwellian despite the widely accepted local thermal equilibrium in these type of plasmas. Secondly they show non-expected bicomponents distributions. The average energy of each species does not vary linearly with the charge state, suggesting complex acceleration processes.

  20. Emission and afterglow properties of an expanding RF plasma with nonuniform neutral gas density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplin, Vernon H.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-08-01

    We describe some notable aspects of the light emission and afterglow properties in pulsed, high-density ( 1018-1020 m-3 ) argon inductively coupled discharges initiated following fast gas injection. The plasma was created in a long, narrow discharge tube and then expanded downstream of the radiofrequency (RF) antenna into a large chamber. Fast camera images of the expanding plasma revealed a multi-phase time-dependent emission pattern that did not follow the ion density distribution. Dramatic differences in visible brightness were observed between discharges with and without an externally applied magnetic field. These phenomena were studied by tracking excited state populations using passive emission spectroscopy and are discussed in terms of the distinction between ionizing and recombining phase plasmas. Additionally, a method is presented for inferring the unknown neutral gas pressure in the discharge tube from the time-dependent visible and infrared emission measured by a simple photodiode placed near the antenna. In magnetized discharges created with fast gas injection, the downstream ion density rose by Δni˜1018 m-3 in the first ˜100 μs after the RF power was turned off. The conditions conducive to this afterglow density rise are investigated in detail, and the effect is tentatively attributed to pooling ionization.

  1. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.; Takahashi, K.

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  2. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  3. Extending laser plasma accelerators into the mid-IR spectral domain with a next-generation ultra-fast CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorelsky, I. V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Polyanskiy, M. N.; Skaritka, J.; Tresca, O.; Dover, N. P.; Najmudin, Z.; Lu, W.; Cook, N.; Ting, A.; Chen, Y.-H.

    2016-03-01

    Expanding the scope of relativistic plasma research to wavelengths longer than the λ/≈   0.8-1.1 μm range covered by conventional mode-locked solid-state lasers would offer attractive opportunities due to the quadratic scaling of the ponderomotive electron energy and critical plasma density with λ. Answering this quest, a next-generation mid-IR laser project is being advanced at the BNL ATF as a part of the user facility upgrade. We discuss the technical approach to this conceptually new 100 TW, 100 fs, λ  =   9-11 μm CO2 laser BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) that encompasses several innovations applied for the first time to molecular gas lasers. BESTIA will enable new regimes of laser plasma accelerators. One example is shock-wave ion acceleration (SWA) from gas jets. We review ongoing efforts to achieve stable, monoenergetic proton acceleration by dynamically shaping the plasma density profile from a hydrogen gas target with laser-produced blast waves. At its full power, 100 TW BESTIA promises to achieve proton beams at an energy exceeding 200 MeV. In addition to ion acceleration in over-critical plasma, the ultra-intense mid-IR BESTIA will open up new opportunities in driving wakefields in tenuous plasmas, expanding the landscape of laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) studies into the unexplored long-wavelength spectral domain. Simple wavelength scaling suggests that a 100 TW CO2 laser beam will be capable of efficiently generating plasma ‘bubbles’ a thousand times greater in volume compared with a near-IR solid state laser of an equivalent power. Combined with a femtosecond electron linac available at the ATF, this wavelength scaling will facilitate the study of external seeding and staging of LWFAs.

  4. Plasma undulator based on laser excitation of wakefields in a plasma channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Carl; Rykovanov, Sergey; Esarey, Eric; Geddes, Cameron; Leemans, Wim

    2015-11-01

    A novel plasma undulator based on the wakefields excited by a laser pulse in a plasma channel is described. Generation of the undulator fields is achieved by inducing centroid oscillations of the laser pulse in the channel. The period of such a plasma undulator is proportional to the Rayleigh length of the laser pulse and can be sub-millimeter, with an effective undulator strength parameter of order unity. The undulator period can further be controlled and reduced by beating laser modes or using multiple colors. Analytic expressions for the electron trajectories in the plasma undulator and the synchrotron radiation are compared to numerical modeling. Examples of short-period laser-driven plasma undulators are presented based on available laser and plasma channel parameters. Work supported by the U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  5. Shock Wave Mediated Plume Chemistry for Molecular Formation in Laser Ablation Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Harilal, Sivanandan S; Brumfield, Brian E; Cannon, Bret D; Phillips, Mark C

    2016-02-16

    Although it is relatively straightforward to measure the ionic, atomic, molecular, and particle emission features from laser ablation plumes, the associated kinetic and thermodynamic development leading to molecular and nanocluster formation remain one of the most important topics of analytical chemistry and material science. Very little is known, for instance, about the evolutionary paths of molecular and nanocluster formation and its relation to laser plume hydrodynamics. This is, to a large extent; due to the complexity of numerous physical processes that coexist in a transient laser-plasma system. Here, we report the formation mechanisms of molecules during complex interactions of a laser-produced plasma plume expanding from a high purity aluminum metal target into ambient air. It is found that the plume hydrodynamics plays a great role in redefining the plasma thermodynamics and molecular formation. Early in the plasma expansion, the generated shock wave at the plume edge acts as a barrier for the combustion process and molecular formation is prevalent after the shock wave collapse. The temporally and spatially resolved contour mapping of atoms and molecules in laser ablation plumes highlight the formation routes and persistence of species in the plasma and their relation to plume hydrodynamics. PMID:26732866

  6. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers.

    PubMed

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested. PMID:27587094

  7. Plasma mirrors for short pulse KrF lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilicze, Barnabás; Barna, Angéla; Kovács, Zsolt; Szatmári, Sándor; Földes, István B.

    2016-08-01

    It is demonstrated for the first time that plasma mirrors can be successfully applied for KrF laser systems. High reflectivity up to 70% is achieved by optimization of the beam quality on the plasma mirror. The modest spectral shift and the good reflected beam quality allow its applicability for high power laser systems for which a new arrangement is suggested.

  8. On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, E A

    2005-10-21

    In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

  9. Electromagnetically induced guiding of counterpropagating lasers in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Shvets, G.; Pukhov, A.

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of counterpropagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order of the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counterpropagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Electron density and temperature measurements in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyte-González, R.; Palomares, J. M.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report measurements of electron densities, ne, and temperatures, Te, in a magnetized expanding hydrogen plasma performed using Thomson scattering. The effects of applying an axial magnetic field and changing the background pressure in the plasma vessel on ne and Te along the expansion axis are reported. Magnetic field strengths (B field) up to 170 mT were applied, which are one order of magnitude larger than previously reported. The main effect of the applied B field is the plasma confinement, which leads to higher ne. At B fields larger than 88 mT the electron density along the expansion axis does not depend strongly on the magnetic field strength. However, Te is susceptible to the B field and reaches at 170 mT a maximum of 2.5 eV at a distance of 1.5 cm from the exit of the cascaded arc. To determine also the effect of the arc current through the arc, measurements were performed with arc currents of 45, 60, and 75 A at background pressures of 9.7 and 88.3 Pa. At constant magnetic field ne decreases from the exit of the arc along the expansion axis when the arc current is decreased. At 88.3 Pa ne shows a higher value close to the exit of the arc, but a faster decay along the expansion axis with respect to the 9.7 Pa case. Te is overall higher at lower pressure reaching a maximum of 3.2 eV at the lower arc current of 45 A. The results of this study complement our understanding and the characterization of expanding hydrogen plasmas.