Science.gov

Sample records for experience structured interactions

  1. C-SIDE: The control-structure interaction demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohl, James B.; Davis, Hugh W.

    1993-01-01

    The Control-Structure Interaction Demonstration Experiment (C-SIDE) is sponsored by the Electro-Optics and Cryogenics Division of Ball Aerospace Systems Group. Our objective is to demonstrate methods of solution to structure control problems utilizing currently available hardware in a system that is an extension of our corporate experience. The larger space structures with which Ball has been associated are the SEASAT radar antenna, Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) -A, -B and -C antennas and the Radarsat spacecraft. The motivation for the C-SIDE configuration is to show that integration of active figure control in the radar's system-level design can relieve antenna mechanical design constraints. This presentation is primarily an introduction to the C-SIDE testbed. Its physical and functional layouts, and major components are described. The sensor is of special interest as it enables direct surface figure measurements from a remote location. The Remote Attitude Measurement System (RAMS) makes high-rate, unobtrusive measurements of many locations, several of which may be collocated easily with actuators. The control processor is a 386/25 executing a reduced order model-based algorithm with provision for residual mode filters to compensate for structure interaction. The actuators for the ground demonstration are non-contacting, linear force devices. Results presented illustrate some basic characteristics of control-structure interaction with this hardware. The testbed will be used for evaluation of current technologies and for research in several areas. A brief indication of the evolution of the C-SIDE is given at the conclusion.

  2. Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelke, Christopher Robert

    2013-01-01

    Technically Speaking: On the Structure and Experience of Interaction Involving Augmentative Alternative Communications examines the ways that communication is structured and experienced by looking at interactions involving augmented communicators--people with severe speech disabilities who use forms of assistive technology in order to communicate…

  3. Remote Manipulator System (RMS)-based Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) flight experiment feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of an experiment which will provide an on-orbit validation of Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology, was investigated. The experiment will demonstrate the on-orbit characterization and flexible-body control of large flexible structure dynamics using the shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) with an attached payload as a test article. By utilizing existing hardware as well as establishing integration, operation and safety algorithms, techniques and procedures, the experiment will minimize the costs and risks of implementing a flight experiment. The experiment will also offer spin-off enhancement to both the Shuttle RMS (SRMS) and the Space Station RMS (SSRMS).

  4. Spatial memories of virtual environments: how egocentric experience, intrinsic structure, and extrinsic structure interact.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Jonathan W; McNamara, Timothy P

    2008-04-01

    Previous research has uncovered three primary cues that influence spatial memory organization:egocentric experience, intrinsic structure (object defined), and extrinsic structure (environment defined). In the present experiments, we assessed the relative importance of these cues when all three were available during learning. Participants learned layouts from two perspectives in immersive virtual reality. In Experiment 1, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were in conflict, and learning occurred from two perspectives, each aligned with either the intrinsic or the extrinsic structure. Spatial memories were organized around a reference direction selected from the first perspective, regardless of its alignment with intrinsic or extrinsic structures. In Experiment 2, axes defined by intrinsic and extrinsic structures were congruent, and spatial memories were organized around reference axes defined by those congruent structures, rather than by the initially experienced view. The findings are discussed in the context of spatial memory theory as it relates to real and virtual environments. PMID:18488647

  5. Nonlinear soil-structure interaction calculations simulating the SIMQUAKE experiment using STEALTH 2D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, H. T.; Hofmann, R.; Yee, G.; Vaughan, D. K.

    1980-01-01

    Transient, nonlinear soil-structure interaction simulations of an Electric Power Research Institute, SIMQUAKE experiment were performed using the large strain, time domain STEALTH 2D code and a cyclic, kinematically hardening cap soil model. Results from the STEALTH simulations were compared to identical simulations performed with the TRANAL code and indicate relatively good agreement between all the STEALTH and TRANAL calculations. The differences that are seen can probably be attributed to: (1) large (STEALTH) vs. small (TRANAL) strain formulation and/or (2) grid discretization differences.

  6. New Ionospheric Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheerin, J. P.

    2004-11-01

    Current upgrades to both the HF transmitter and diagnostic capabilities at the HAARP facility near Gakona, AK will permit a new generation ionospheric interaction experiments. We explore some of the new phenomena accessible with significantly increased ERP. Large-scale long-lived density structures induced by the HF pump in the ionospheric plasma are investigated. Long-lived density structures which convect with the ambient ionosphere, may serve as tracers for ionospheric flows and fields. Recent advances in HF and VHF radar diagnostics available for HAARP experiments, permit plasma wave detection and monitoring. We survey the mode structures expected with the next generation of high intensity experiments. Together with existing complementary diagnostics such as stimulated HF emissions and optical effects, these data will provide unprecedented views of highly nonlinear phenomena induced by high intensity RF radiation in the ionosphere.

  7. Experiences with nonlinear dynamics of panels and membranes considering fluid-structure interaction and acoustic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Ferman, M.A.

    1994-12-31

    A collection of some highlights of the Author`s experiences with nonlinear dynamics in analyses and tests of Panels and Membranes encountered over the past 40 years is given. The primary focus is placed on a major block of his work since the early 70`s, involving work with fluid-structure interaction with Panels and Membranes, and with efforts in Acoustic Fatigue of Panels. While the Author had encountered nonlinear problems throughout Ins career involving flutter, vibration in general, and dynamic thrust instability; it was the more recent work with panels and membranes that greatly expanded his experience. This was triggered by the advent of highly maneuverable aircraft, powered by large powerful, noisy engines, and new materials in the mid 70`s. The significance of nonlinearity for these applications is most obvious from the results shown here-it simply cannot be ignored for optimal, safe design.

  8. Structure and interactions in fluids of prolate colloidal ellipsoids: comparison between experiment, theory, and simulation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A P; Janai, E; Rapaport, D C; Schofield, A B; Sloutskin, E

    2012-11-14

    The microscopic structure of fluids of simple spheres is well known. However, the constituents of most real-life fluids are non-spherical, leading to a coupling between the rotational and translational degrees of freedom. The structure of simple dense fluids of spheroids - ellipsoids of revolution - was only recently determined by direct experimental techniques [A. P. Cohen, E. Janai, E. Mogilko, A. B. Schofield, and E. Sloutskin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 238301 (2011)]. Using confocal microscopy, it was demonstrated that the structure of these simple fluids cannot be described by hard particle models based on the widely used Percus-Yevick approximation. In this paper, we describe a new protocol for determining the shape of the experimental spheroids, which allows us to expand our previous microscopy measurements of these fluids. To avoid the approximations in the theoretical approach, we have also used molecular dynamics simulations to reproduce the experimental radial distribution functions g(r) and estimate the contribution of charge effects to the interactions. Accounting for these charge effects within the Percus-Yevick framework leads to similar agreement with the experiment. PMID:23163381

  9. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S. )

    1991-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

  10. A synthesis of predictions and correlation studies of the Lotung soil- structure interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjian, A.H. )

    1991-10-01

    Unnecessary conservatism is seismic design and licensing acceptance criteria is largely due to the lack of field data to validate the analytical methods used. EPRI and the Taiwan Power Company (TPC) constructed the Lotung large-scale seismic test (LSST) facility in Taiwan to collect forced-vibration and seismic response data for soil-structure interaction (SSI) methods evaluation. To date, more than 30 earthquakes have been recorded. EPRI, TPC, and NRC cosponsored a round-robin evaluation program to test the response prediction capability of the existing SSI models and analysis practices. The results were reported at a workshop in December 1987. Since then, EPRI has conducted additional post-earthquake studies to further evaluate, understand, and correlate SSI responses. The LSST results synthesis has yielded significant insights and findings with respect to the validity of SSI analysis methodologies for earthquake responses. The differences in response predictions among the commonly used SSI methodologies are due more to the modeling of the soil-structure systems than the calculation techniques. The more advanced methodologies, such as SASSI and CLASSI, generally yield better correlation results. The simple soil-spring approach and the two-dimensional FLUSH method should be used with care, considering their limitations. The synthesis of results also confirms the adequacy of the vertical wave-propagation assumption and the significance of strain-dependent soil property variations for the SSI analysis. 19 refs., 26 figs., 12 tabs.

  11. USNRC/ANL participation in the Lotung, Taiwan Large-Scale Soil-Structure-Interaction experiment: Validation of analysis methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Costello, J.F.

    1987-01-01

    As part of an overall effort on the validation of seismic calculational methods, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Research (NRC/RES) is participating in a number of international cooperative experimental programs including the Large Scale Soil-Structure-Interaction (SSI) Experiment conducted in Lotung, Taiwan by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Taiwan Power Company (Taipower). Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on behalf of NRC/RES coordinates the EPRI-NRC collaboration in these experiments. The primary objective for both NRC and EPRI in the Large Scale SSI experiment is the validation/evaluation of SSI analysis methods. In addition NRC/ANL also sponsored and carried out the vibration testing of the 1/4-scale containment model. This report presents the highlights of the NRC/ANL program approach for the validation of SSI methods which differs slightly in its implementation details from the approach taken by EPRI. Also described are the vibration experiments of the 1/4-scale containment and the results of a modal analysis of the test data. Finally an effort to determine the dynamic characteristics of the soil-structure system from the earthquake response data is outlined and preliminary results are discussed. 9 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Flow structure interaction around an axial-flow hydrokinetic turbine: Experiments and CFD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, S.; Chamorro, L.; Hill, C.; Arndt, R.; Sotiropoulos, F.

    2014-12-01

    We carry out large-eddy simulation of turbulent flow past a complete hydrokinetic turbine mounted on the bed of a straight rectangular open channel. The complex turbine geometry, including the rotor and all stationary components, is handled by employing the curvilinear immersed boundary (CURVIB) method [1], and velocity boundary conditions near all solid surfaces are reconstructed using a wall model based on solving the simplified boundary layer equations [2]. In this study we attempt to directly resolve flow-blade interactions without introducing turbine parameterization methods. The computed wake profiles of velocities and turbulent stresses agree well with the experimentally measured values.

  13. Analysis of ground response data at Lotung large-scale soil- structure interaction experiment site. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.Y.; Mok, C.M.; Power, M.S.

    1991-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in cooperation with the Taiwan Power Company (TPC), constructed two models (1/4-scale and 1/2-scale) of a nuclear plant containment structure at a site in Lotung (Tang, 1987), a seismically active region in northeast Taiwan. The models were constructed to gather data for the evaluation and validation of soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis methodologies. Extensive instrumentation was deployed to record both structural and ground responses at the site during earthquakes. The experiment is generally referred to as the Lotung Large-Scale Seismic Test (LSST). As part of the LSST, two downhole arrays were installed at the site to record ground motions at depths as well as at the ground surface. Structural response and ground response have been recorded for a number of earthquakes (i.e. a total of 18 earthquakes in the period of October 1985 through November 1986) at the LSST site since the completion of the installation of the downhole instruments in October 1985. These data include those from earthquakes having magnitudes ranging from M{sub L} 4.5 to M{sub L} 7.0 and epicentral distances range from 4.7 km to 77.7 km. Peak ground surface accelerations range from 0.03 g to 0.21 g for the horizontal component and from 0.01 g to 0.20 g for the vertical component. The objectives of the study were: (1) to obtain empirical data on variations of earthquake ground motion with depth; (2) to examine field evidence of nonlinear soil response due to earthquake shaking and to determine the degree of soil nonlinearity; (3) to assess the ability of ground response analysis techniques including techniques to approximate nonlinear soil response to estimate ground motions due to earthquake shaking; and (4) to analyze earth pressures recorded beneath the basemat and on the side wall of the 1/4 scale model structure during selected earthquakes.

  14. Adaptive Structures Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Maurice

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  15. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  16. Structural control interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R. S.; Mowery, D. K.; Winder, S. W.; Worley, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The basic guidance and control concepts that lead to structural control interaction and structural dynamic loads are identified. Space vehicle ascent flight load sources and the load relieving mechanism are discussed, along with the the characteristics and special problems of both present and future space vehicles including launch vehicles, orbiting vehicles, and the Space Shuttle flyback vehicle. The special dynamics and control analyses and test problems apparent at this time are summarized.

  17. Modal interactions due to friction in the nonlinear vibration response of the "Harmony" test structure: Experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, M.; Sinou, J.-J.; Lambelin, J.-P.; Todeschini, R.

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear vibration response of an assembly with friction joints - named "Harmony" - is studied both experimentally and numerically. The experimental results exhibit a softening effect and an increase of dissipation with excitation level. Modal interactions due to friction are also evidenced. The numerical methodology proposed groups together well-known structural dynamic methods, including finite elements, substructuring, Harmonic Balance and continuation methods. On the one hand, the application of this methodology proves its capacity to treat a complex system where several friction movements occur at the same time. On the other hand, the main contribution of this paper is the experimental and numerical study of evidence of modal interactions due to friction. The simulation methodology succeeds in reproducing complex form of dynamic behavior such as these modal interactions.

  18. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.

    1988-01-01

    A system study to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector on the Space Station was accomplished by the Boeing Aerospace Company for NASA's Langley Research Center. The objective of the study was to use a Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration as the basis for focusing an experiment definition, so that the resulting accommodation requirements and interface constraints could be used as part of the mission requirements data base for Space Station. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of an optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments, and alignment of the optical components, would occur on a second experiment. The structure would then be moved to the payload point system for pointing, optical control, and scientific optical measurement for a third experiment. Experiment 1 will deploy the primary support truss while it is attached to the instrument module structure. The ability to adjust the mirror attachment points and to attach several dummy primary mirror segments with a robotic system will also be demonstrated. Experiment 2 will be achieved by adding new components and equipment to experiment one. Experiment 3 will demonstrate advanced control strategies, active adjustment of the primary mirror alignment, and technologies associated with optical sensing.

  19. Interaction of curcumin with Al(III) and its complex structures based on experiments and theoretical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Teng; Wang, Long; Zhang, Sui; Sun, Ping-Chuan; Ding, Chuan-Fan; Chu, Yan-Qiu; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Curcumin has been recognized as a potential natural drug to treat the Alzheimer's disease (AD) by chelating baleful metal ions, scavenging radicals and preventing the amyloid β (Aβ) peptides from the aggregation. In this paper, Al(III)-curcumin complexes with Al(III) were synthesized and characterized by liquid-state 1H, 13C and 27Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectroscopy (MS), ultraviolet spectroscopy (UV) and generalized 2D UV-UV correlation spectroscopy. In addition, the density functional theory (DFT)-based UV and chemical shift calculations were also performed to view insight into the structures and properties of curcumin and its complexes. It was revealed that curcumin could interact strongly with Al(III) ion, and form three types of complexes under different molar ratios of [Al(III)]/[curcumin], which would restrain the interaction of Al(III) with the Aβ peptide, reducing the toxicity effect of Al(III) on the peptide.

  20. LDR structural experiment definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, Richard A.; Gates, Richard M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was performed to develop the definition of a structural flight experiment for a large precision segmented reflector that would utilize the Space Station. The objective of the study was to use the Large Deployable Reflector (LDR) baseline configuration for focusing on experiment definition activity which would identify the Space Station accommodation requirements and interface constraints. Results of the study defined three Space Station based experiments to demonstrate the technologies needed for an LDR type structure. The basic experiment configurations are the same as the JPL baseline except that the primary mirror truss is 10 meters in diameter instead of 20. The primary objectives of the first experiment are to construct the primary mirror support truss and to determine its structural and thermal characteristics. Addition of the optical bench, thermal shield and primary mirror segments and alignment of the optical components occur on the second experiment. The structure will then be moved to the payload pointing system for pointing, optical control and scientific optical measurement for the third experiment.

  1. Control Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Layman, W. E.

    1989-01-01

    Control Structures Interaction (CSI) technology for control of space structures is being developed cooperatively by JPL, LaRC and MSFC for NASA OAST/RM. The mid-'90s goal of JPL's CSI program is to demonstrate with analysis, ground and flight tests, the super quiet structures needed for large diffraction-limited instruments such as optical stellar interferometers and large advanced successors to the Hubble Space Telescope. Microprecision CSI technology is intended as a new "building block" for use by the designers of large optical systems. The thrust of the microprecision CSI technology effort is to achieve nanometer-levels of space structure stability/accuracy with designs which employ otherwise conventional spacecraft technologies. JPL design experiences have indicated the following CSI technology development areas are especially applicable to large optical system projects: (1) Active structural members; (2) Control/structures design methods; (3) Microdynamic effects characterization; and (4) Ground and flight test validation of CSI methods.

  2. Structural interaction with control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, R. B.; Zvara, J.

    1971-01-01

    A monograph which assesses the state of the art of space vehicle design and development is presented. The monograph presents criteria and recommended practices for determining the structural data and a mathematical structural model of the vehicle needed for accurate prediction of structure and control-system interaction; for design to minimize undesirable interactions between the structure and the control system; and for determining techniques to achieve the maximum desirable interactions and associated structural design benefits. All space vehicles are treated, including launch vehicles, spacecraft, and entry vehicles. Important structural characteristics which affect the structural model used for structural and control-system interaction analysis are given.

  3. Structural assembly demonstration experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    The experiment is of an operational variety, designed to assess crew capability in Large Space System (LSS) assembly. The six Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment objectives include: (1) the establishment of a quantitative correlation between LSS neutral buoyancy simulation and on-orbit assembly operations in order to enhance the validity of those assembly simulations; (2) the quantitative study of the capabilities and mechanics of human assembly in an Extravehicular Activity environment; (3) the further corroboration of the LSS Assembly Analysis cost algorithm through the obtainment of hard data base information; (4) the verification of LSS assembly techniques and timeless, as well as the identification of crew imposed loads and assembly aid requirements and concepts; (5) verification of a Launch/Assembly Platform structure concept for other LSS missions; and (6) lastly, to advance thermal control concepts through a flexible heat pipe.

  4. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) experiment design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, D. L.; Bowden, M. L.

    1982-01-01

    The Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment concept is to erect a hybrid deployed/assembled structure as an early space experiment in large space structures technology. The basic objectives can be broken down into three generic areas: (1) by performing assembly tasks both in space and in neutral buoyancy simulation, a mathematical basis will be found for the validity conditions of neutral buoyancy, thus enhancing the utility of water as a medium for simulation of weightlessness; (2) a data base will be established describing the capabilities and limitations of EVA crewmembers, including effects of such things as hardware size and crew restraints; and (3) experience of the M.I.T. Space Systems Lab in neutral buoyancy simulation of large space structures assembly indicates that the assembly procedure may create the largest loads that a structure will experience during its lifetime. Data obtained from the experiment will help establish an accurate loading model to aid designers of future space structures.

  5. Experiments in interactive panoramic cinema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Scott S.; Anderson, Steve; Ruiz, Susana; Naimark, Michael; Hoberman, Perry; Bolas, Mark; Weinberg, Richard

    2005-03-01

    For most of the past 100 years, cinema has been the premier medium for defining and expressing relations to the visible world. However, cinematic spectacles delivered in darkened theaters are predicated on a denial of both the body and the physical surroundings of the spectators who are watching it. To overcome these deficiencies, filmmakers have historically turned to narrative, seducing audiences with compelling stories and providing realistic characters with whom to identify. This paper describes several research projects in interactive panoramic cinema that attempt to sidestep the narrative preoccupations of conventional cinema and instead are based on notions of space, movement and embodied spectatorship rather than traditional storytelling. Example projects include interactive works developed with the use of a unique 360 degree camera and editing system, and also development of panoramic imagery for a large projection environment with 14 screens on 3 adjacent walls in a 5-4-5 configuration with observations and findings from an experiment projecting panoramic video on 12 of the 14, in a 4-4-4 270 degree configuration.

  6. Screening Outside the Catalytic Site: Inhibition of Macromolecular Inter-actions Through Structure-Based Virtual Ligand Screening Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Olivier; Miteva, Maria A; Segers, Kenneth; Nicolaes, Gerry A. F; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2008-01-01

    During these last 15 years, drug discovery strategies have essentially focused on identifying small molecules able to inhibit catalytic sites. However, other mechanisms could be targeted. Protein-protein interactions play crucial roles in a number of biological processes, and, as such, their disruption or stabilization is becoming an area of intense activity. Along the same line, inhibition of protein-membrane could be of major importance in several disease indications. Despite the many challenges associated with the development of such classes of interaction modulators, there has been considerable success in the recent years. Importantly, through the existence of protein hot-spots and the presence of druggable pockets at the macromolecular interfaces or in their vicinities, it has been possible to find small molecule effectors using a variety of screening techniques, including combined virtual ligand-in vitro screening strategy. Indeed such in silico-in vitro protocols emerge as the method of choice to facilitate our quest of novel drug-like compounds or of mechanistic probes aiming at facilitating the understanding of molecular reactions involved in the Health and Disease process. In this review, we comment recent successes of combined in silico-in vitro screening methods applied to modulating macromolecular interactions with a special emphasis on protein-membrane interactions. PMID:18949072

  7. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  8. Tethered poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline) chains: temperature effects on layer structure and interactions probed by AFM experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    An, Junxue; Liu, Xiaoyan; Linse, Per; Dėdinaitė, Andra; Winnik, Françoise M; Claesson, Per M

    2015-03-17

    Thermoresponsive polymer layers on silica surfaces have been obtained by utilizing electrostatically driven adsorption of a cationic-nonionic diblock copolymer. The cationic block provides strong anchoring to the surface for the nonionic block of poly(2-isopropyl-2-oxazoline), referred to as PIPOZ. The PIPOZ chain interacts favorably with water at low temperatures, but above 46 °C aqueous solutions of PIPOZ phase separate as water becomes a poor solvent for the polymer. We explore how a change in solvent condition affects interactions between such adsorbed layers and report temperature effects on both normal forces and friction forces. To gain further insight, we utilize self-consistent lattice mean-field theory to follow how changes in temperature affect the polymer segment density distributions and to calculate surface force curves. We find that with worsening of the solvent condition an attraction develops between the adsorbed PIPOZ layers, and this observation is in good agreement with predictions of the mean-field theory. The modeling also demonstrates that the segment density profile and the degree of chain interpenetration under a given load between two PIPOZ-coated surfaces rise significantly with increasing temperature. PMID:25686020

  9. Precision experiments in electroweak interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Swartz, M.L.

    1990-03-01

    The electroweak theory of Glashow, Weinberg, and Salam (GWS) has become one of the twin pillars upon which our understanding of all particle physics phenomena rests. It is a brilliant achievement that qualitatively and quantitatively describes all of the vast quantity of experimental data that have been accumulated over some forty years. Note that the word quantitatively must be qualified. The low energy limiting cases of the GWS theory, Quantum Electrodynamics and the V-A Theory of Weak Interactions, have withstood rigorous testing. The high energy synthesis of these ideas, the GWS theory, has not yet been subjected to comparably precise scrutiny. The recent operation of a new generation of proton-antiproton (p{bar p}) and electron-positron (e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}) colliders has made it possible to produce and study large samples of the electroweak gauge bosons W{sup {plus minus}} and Z{sup 0}. We expect that these facilities will enable very precise tests of the GWS theory to be performed in the near future. In keeping with the theme of this Institute, Physics at the 100 GeV Mass Scale, these lectures will explore the current status and the near-future prospects of these experiments.

  10. Numerical simulations of shake-table experiment for dynamic soil-pile-structure interaction in liquefiable soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liang; Maula, Baydaa Hussain; Ling, Xianzhang; Su, Lei

    2014-03-01

    A shake-table experiment on pile foundations in liquefiable soils composed of liquefiable sand and overlying soft clay is studied. A three-dimensional (3D) effective stress finite element (FE) analysis is employed to simulate the experiment. A recently developed multi-surface elasto-plastic constitutive model and a fully coupled dynamic inelastic FE formulation ( u- p) are used to model the liquefaction behavior of the sand. The soil domains are discretized using a solid-fl uid fully coupled ( u- p) 20-8 noded brick element. The pile is simulated using beam-column elements. Upon careful calibration, very good agreement is obtained between the computed and the measured dynamic behavior of the ground and the pile. A parametric analysis is also conducted on the model to investigate the effect of pile-pinning, pile diameter, pile stiffness, ground inclination angle, superstructure mass and pile head restraints on the ground improvement. It is found that the pile foundation has a noticeable pinning effect that reduces the lateral soil displacement. It is observed that a larger pile diameter and fixed pile head restraints contribute to decreasing the lateral pile deformation; however, a higher ground inclination angle tends to increase the lateral pile head displacements and pile stiffness, and superstructure mass seems to effectively influence the lateral pile displacements.

  11. Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Mills, Raymond A.; Bowden, Mary L.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the Structural Assembly Demonstration Experiment (SADE) was to create a near-term Shuttle flight experiment focusing on the deployment and erection of structural truss elements. The activities of the MIT Space Systems Laboratory consist of three major areas: preparing and conducting neutral buoyancy simulation test series; producing a formal SADE Experiment plan; and studying the structural dynamics issues of the truss structure. Each of these areas is summarized.

  12. ISE structural dynamic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, Malcolm H.; Clark, S. Y.

    1988-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: directed energy systems - vibration issue; Neutral Particle Beam Integrated Space Experiment (NPB-ISE) opportunity/study objective; vibration sources/study plan; NPB-ISE spacecraft configuration; baseline slew analysis and results; modal contributions; fundamental pitch mode; vibration reduction approaches; peak residual vibration; NPB-ISE spacecraft slew experiment; goodbye ISE - hello Zenith Star Program.

  13. Control-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Joseph K.; Ianculescu, George D.; Kenney, Charles S.; Laub, Alan J.; Ly, Jason H. Q.; Papadopoulos, Philip M.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of using conventional proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control and an alternative optimal control to perform the pointing and tracking functions of the Space Station solar dynamic power module is investigated. A very large state model of 6 rigid body modes and 272 flexible modes is used in conjunction with classical linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG) optimal control to produce a full-order controller that satisfies the requirements. The results are compared with a classically designed PID controller that was implemented for a much smaller (6 rigid body, 40 flexible modes) model. The conventional control design approach is shown to be very much influenced by the order reduction of the plant model, i.e., the number of retained elastic modes from the full-order model, suggesting that for a complex, large space structure, such as the Space Station Freedom solar dynamic module, application of conventional control system design methods may not be adequate. The use of LQG control is recommended, and method for solving the large matrix. Riccati equation that arises from the optimal formulation is provided.

  14. Interactive Screen Experiments with Single Photons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bronner, Patrick; Strunz, Andreas; Silberhorn, Christine; Meyn, Jan-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Single photons are used for fundamental quantum physics experiments as well as for applications. Originally being a topic of advance courses, such experiments are increasingly a subject of undergraduate courses. We provide interactive screen experiments (ISE) for supporting the work in a real laboratory, and for students who do not have access to…

  15. Structural verification for GAS experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peden, Mark Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assist the Get Away Special (GAS) experimenter in conducting a thorough structural verification of its experiment structural configuration, thus expediting the structural review/approval process and the safety process in general. Material selection for structural subsystems will be covered with an emphasis on fasteners (GSFC fastener integrity requirements) and primary support structures (Stress Corrosion Cracking requirements and National Space Transportation System (NSTS) requirements). Different approaches to structural verifications (tests and analyses) will be outlined especially those stemming from lessons learned on load and fundamental frequency verification. In addition, fracture control will be covered for those payloads that utilize a door assembly or modify the containment provided by the standard GAS Experiment Mounting Plate (EMP). Structural hazard assessment and the preparation of structural hazard reports will be reviewed to form a summation of structural safety issues for inclusion in the safety data package.

  16. Experiences with Interactive Multi-touch Tables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fikkert, Wim; Hakvoort, Michiel; van der Vet, Paul; Nijholt, Anton

    Interactive multi-touch tables can be a powerful means of communication for collaborative work as well as an engaging environment for competition. Through enticing gameplay we have evaluated user experience on competitive gameplay, collaborative work and musical expression. In addition, we report on our extensive experiences with two types of interactive multi-touch tables and we introduce a software framework that abstracts from their technical differences.

  17. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE) is to investigate, by means of a shuttle-based flight experiment and relevant ground-based testing, the arcing and current collection behavior of materials and geometries likely to be exposed to the LEO plasma on high-voltage space power systems, in order to minimize adverse environmental interactions. An overview of the SAMPIE program is presented in outline and graphical form.

  18. Design for Engaging Experience and Social Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harteveld, Casper; ten Thij, Eleonore; Copier, Marinka

    2011-01-01

    One of the goals of game designers is to design for an engaging experience and for social interaction. The question is how. We know that games can be engaging and allow for social interaction, but how do we achieve this or even improve on it? This article provides an overview of several scientific approaches that deal with this question. It…

  19. Validation of seismic soil-structure interaction analysis methods: EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute)/NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) cooperation in Lotung, Taiwan, experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.; Tang, Y.K.; Kassawara, R.P.

    1986-10-31

    The cooperative program between NRC/ANL and EPRI on the validation of soil-structure interaction analysis methods with actual seismic response data is described. A large scale-model of a containment building has been built by EPRI/Taipower in a highly seismic region of Taiwan. Vibration tests were performed, first on the basemat before the superstructure was built and then on the completed structure. Since its completion, the structure has experienced many earthquakes. The site and structural response to these earthquakes have been recorded with field (surface and downhole) and structural instrumentation. The validation program involves blind predictions of site and structural response during vibration tests and a selected seismic event, and subsequent comparison between the predictions and measurements. The predictive calculations are in progress. The results of the correlation are expected to lead to the evaluation of the methods as to their conservatisms and sensitivities.

  20. Organizational Learning from Cross-Cultural Experiences: An Ethnomethodological Case Study Examining the Relative Importance of Social Structure and Cultural Values during Dynamic Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waldecker, Gary T.

    2011-01-01

    This study explored how social structure and cultural values dynamically interact in collective learning between two religious organizations cooperating in a joint project. It further explored the enablers of and impediments to collective learning in this context. The study employed the theoretical framework provided by the Organizational Learning…

  1. Controls-structures-electromagnetics interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grantham, William L.; Bailey, Marion C.; Belvin, Wendell K.; Williams, Jeffrey P.

    1987-01-01

    A technology development program is described involving Controls Structures Electromagnetics Interaction (CSEI) for large space structures. The CSEI program was developed as part of the continuing effort following the successful kinematic deployment and RF tests of the 15 meter Hoop/Column antenna. One lesson learned was the importance of making reflector surface adjustment after fabrication and deployment. Given are program objectives, ground based test configuration, Intelsat adaptive feed, reflector shape prediction model, control experiment concepts, master schedule, and Control Of Flexible Structures-II (COFS-II) baseline configuration.

  2. Peptide-Lipid Interactions: Experiments and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Cantisani, Marco; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between peptides and lipids are of fundamental importance in the functioning of numerous membrane-mediated cellular processes including antimicrobial peptide action, hormone-receptor interactions, drug bioavailability across the blood-brain barrier and viral fusion processes. Moreover, a major goal of modern biotechnology is obtaining new potent pharmaceutical agents whose biological action is dependent on the binding of peptides to lipid-bilayers. Several issues need to be addressed such as secondary structure, orientation, oligomerization and localization inside the membrane. At the same time, the structural effects which the peptides cause on the lipid bilayer are important for the interactions and need to be elucidated. The structural characterization of membrane active peptides in membranes is a harsh experimental challenge. It is in fact accepted that no single experimental technique can give a complete structural picture of the interaction, but rather a combination of different techniques is necessary. PMID:24036440

  3. Acoustoelasticity. [sound-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, E. H.

    1977-01-01

    Sound or pressure variations inside bounded enclosures are investigated. Mathematical models are given for determining: (1) the interaction between the sound pressure field and the flexible wall of a Helmholtz resonator; (2) coupled fluid-structural motion of an acoustic cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall; (3) acoustic natural modes in multiple connected cavities; and (4) the forced response of a cavity with a flexible and/or absorbing wall. Numerical results are discussed.

  4. Structure and interactions of biological helices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Lee, Dominic J.; Leikin, Sergey; Wynveen, Aaron

    2007-07-01

    Helices are essential building blocks of living organisms, be they molecular fragments of proteins ( α -helices), macromolecules (DNA and collagen), or multimolecular assemblies (microtubules and viruses). Their interactions are involved in packing of meters of genetic material within cells and phage heads, recognition of homologous genes in recombination and DNA repair, stability of tissues, and many other processes. Helical molecules form a variety of mesophases in vivo and in vitro. Recent structural studies, direct measurements of intermolecular forces, single-molecule manipulations, and other experiments have accumulated a wealth of information and revealed many puzzling physical phenomena. It is becoming increasingly clear that in many cases the physics of biological helices cannot be described by theories that treat them as simple, unstructured polyelectrolytes. The present article focuses on the most important and interesting aspects of the physics of structured macromolecules, highlighting various manifestations of the helical motif in their structure, elasticity, interactions with counterions, aggregation, and poly- and mesomorphic transitions.

  5. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment

    PubMed Central

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-01-01

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves—the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for ‘open’ surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a ‘unity’ of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and

  6. Affective loop experiences: designing for interactional embodiment.

    PubMed

    Höök, Kristina

    2009-12-12

    Involving our corporeal bodies in interaction can create strong affective experiences. Systems that both can be influenced by and influence users corporeally exhibit a use quality we name an affective loop experience. In an affective loop experience, (i) emotions are seen as processes, constructed in the interaction, starting from everyday bodily, cognitive or social experiences; (ii) the system responds in ways that pull the user into the interaction, touching upon end users' physical experiences; and (iii) throughout the interaction the user is an active, meaning-making individual choosing how to express themselves-the interpretation responsibility does not lie with the system. We have built several systems that attempt to create affective loop experiences with more or less successful results. For example, eMoto lets users send text messages between mobile phones, but in addition to text, the messages also have colourful and animated shapes in the background chosen through emotion-gestures with a sensor-enabled stylus pen. Affective Diary is a digital diary with which users can scribble their notes, but it also allows for bodily memorabilia to be recorded from body sensors mapping to users' movement and arousal and placed along a timeline. Users can see patterns in their bodily reactions and relate them to various events going on in their lives. The experiences of building and deploying these systems gave us insights into design requirements for addressing affective loop experiences, such as how to design for turn-taking between user and system, how to create for 'open' surfaces in the design that can carry users' own meaning-making processes, how to combine modalities to create for a 'unity' of expression, and the importance of mirroring user experience in familiar ways that touch upon their everyday social and corporeal experiences. But a more important lesson gained from deploying the systems is how emotion processes are co-constructed and experienced

  7. An experiment with interactive planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beville, J.; Wagner, J. H.; Zannetos, Z. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments on decision making in planning problems are described. Executives were tested in dealing with capital investments and competitive pricing decisions under conditions of uncertainty. A software package, the interactive risk analysis model system, was developed, and two controlled experiments were conducted. It is concluded that planning models can aid management, and predicted uses of the models are as a central tool, as an educational tool, to improve consistency in decision making, to improve communications, and as a tool for consensus decision making.

  8. Interactive Video Networks: Experiences, Issues and Challenges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahl, Bil

    1993-01-01

    Discusses multipoint interactive video networks and describes experiences with two networks in North Carolina, the MCNC CONCERT (COmmunications network of North Carolina for Education, Research, and Technology) and the Vision Carolina network. Digital video is explained, and issues concerning various components of the telecommunications industry…

  9. Young Children as Explorers: Interactive Learning Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Best Practices in Early Childhood Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This curriculum, designed for young children ages 3-6, focuses on math, science, and social studies and includes integrated activities to use with over 30 software titles. Young Children as Explorers: Interactive Learning Experiences addresses learning standards established by the National Council for Teachers of Mathematics, National Research…

  10. NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments, and concepts.

  11. NASA'S controls-structures interaction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1989-01-01

    A NASA program is about to start which has the objective to advance Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. Because of the close interrelationships between the structure, the control hardware, and the analysis/design, a highly interdisciplinary activity is defined in which structures, dynamics, controls, computer and electronics engineers work together on a daily basis and are co-located to a large extent. Methods will be developed which allow the controls and structures analysis and design functions to use the same mathematical models. Hardware tests and applications are emphasized and will require development of concepts and test methods to carry out. Because of a variety of mission application problem classes, several time-phased, focus ground test articles are planned. They will be located at the Langley Researdh Center (LaRC), the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). It is anticipated that the ground tests will be subject to gravity and other environmental effects to the extent that orbital flights tests will be needed for verification of some technology items. The need for orbital flight experiments will be quantified based on ground test results and mission needs. Candidate on-orbit experiments will be defined and preliminary design/definition and cost studies will be carried out for one or more high-priority experiments.

  12. Control/structure interaction design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Layman, William E.

    1989-01-01

    The Control Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts (such as active structure) and new tools (such as a combined structure and control optimization algorithm) and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. The new CSI design methodology is centered around interdisciplinary engineers using new tools that closely integrate structures and controls. Verification is an important CSI theme and analysts will be closely integrated to the CSI Test Bed laboratory. Components, concepts, tools and algorithms will be developed and tested in the lab and in future Shuttle-based flight experiments. The design methodology is summarized in block diagrams depicting the evolution of a spacecraft design and descriptions of analytical capabilities used in the process. The multiyear JPL CSI implementation plan is described along with the essentials of several new tools. A distributed network of computation servers and workstations was designed that will provide a state-of-the-art development base for the CSI technologies.

  13. Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, N. T.; Stevens, N. J.

    1979-01-01

    An auxiliary payload package called PIX (plasma interaction experiment) was launched on March 5, 1978, on the LANDSAT 3 launch vehicle to study interactions between the space charged-particle environment and surfaces at high applied positive and negative voltages. Three experimental surfaces were used in this package: a plain disk to act as a control, a disk on a Kapton sheet to determine the effect of surrounding insulation on current collection, and a small solar-array segment to evaluate the effect of distributing biased surfaces among an array of insulators. Only half of the results from the 4 hours of PIX operations were recovered. The results did verify effects found in ground simulation testing. The results of this experiment are discussed in detail.

  14. QCD structure of nuclear interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granados, Carlos G.

    The research presented in this dissertation investigated selected processes involving baryons and nuclei in hard scattering reactions. These processes are characterized by the production of particles with large energies and transverse momenta. Through these processes, this work explored both, the constituent (quark) structure of baryons (specifically nucleons and Delta-Isobars), and the mechanisms through which the interactions between these constituents ultimately control the selected reactions. The first of such reactions is the hard nucleon-nucleon elastic scattering, which was studied here considering the quark exchange between the nucleons to be the dominant mechanism of interaction in the constituent picture. In particular, it was found that an angular asymmetry exhibited by proton-neutron elastic scattering data is explained within this framework if a quark-diquark picture dominates the nucleon's structure instead of a more traditional SU(6) three quarks picture. The latter yields an asymmetry around 90o center of mass scattering with a sign opposite to what is experimentally observed. The second process is the hard breakup by a photon of a nucleon-nucleon system in light nuclei. Proton-proton (pp) and proton-neutron (pn) breakup in 3He, and DeltaDelta-isobars production in deuteron breakup were analyzed in the hard rescattering model (HRM), which in conjunction with the quark interchange mechanism provides a Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) description of the reaction. Through the HRM, cross sections for both channels in 3He photodisintegration were computed without the need of a fitting parameter. The results presented here for pp breakup show excellent agreement with recent experimental data. In DeltaDelta-isobars production in deuteron breakup, HRM angular distributions for the two DeltaDelta channels were compared to the pn channel and to each other. An important prediction fromthis study is that the Delta++Delta- channel consistently dominates Delta+Delta0

  15. Structural interaction of cytoskeletal components.

    PubMed

    Schliwa, M; van Blerkom, J

    1981-07-01

    interactions with other cytoskeletal elements. A structural and biochemical comparison of whole cells and cytoskeletons demonstrates that the former show a more inticate three-dimensional network and a more complex biochemical composition than the latter. An analysis of the time course of detergent extraction strongly suggests that the cytoskeleton forms a structural backbone with which a large number of proteins of the cytoplasmic ground substance associate in an ordered fashion to form the characteristic image of the "microtrabecular network" (J.J. Wolosewick and K.R. Porter. 1979. J. Cell Biol. 82: 114-139). PMID:7019221

  16. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A workshop on structural dynamics and control interaction of flexible structures was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamics and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. Issues and areas of emphasis were identified in structure-control interaction for the next generation of flexible systems.

  17. Discovery & Interaction in Astro 101 Laboratory Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, Frank Patrick; Maurone, Philip; DeWarf, Laurence E.

    2016-01-01

    The availability of low-cost, high-performance computing hardware and software has transformed the manner by which astronomical concepts can be re-discovered and explored in a laboratory that accompanies an astronomy course for arts students. We report on a strategy, begun in 1992, for allowing each student to understand fundamental scientific principles by interactively confronting astronomical and physical phenomena, through direct observation and by computer simulation. These experiments have evolved as :a) the quality and speed of the hardware has greatly increasedb) the corresponding hardware costs have decreasedc) the students have become computer and Internet literated) the importance of computationally and scientifically literate arts graduates in the workplace has increased.We present the current suite of laboratory experiments, and describe the nature, procedures, and goals in this two-semester laboratory for liberal arts majors at the Astro 101 university level.

  18. Ice interaction with offshore structures

    SciTech Connect

    Cammaert, A.B.; Muggeridge, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    Oil platforms and other offshore structures being built in the arctic regions must be able to withstand icebergs, ice islands, and pack ice. This reference explain the effect ice has on offshore structures and demonstrates design and construction methods that allow such structures to survive in harsh, ice-ridden environments. It analyzes the characteristics of sea ice as well as dynamic ice forces on structures. Techniques for ice modeling and field testing facilitate the design and construction of sturdy, offshore constructions. Computer programs included.

  19. Stand By for Fun: Experience and Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crockford, Douglas

    1986-01-01

    This paper explores interactivity, and considers what should be done to create a mass market for interactive media. It is suggested that one way to do so is to examine the video game phenomenon, and a model of interactivity is proposed. The model, a "home interactive theater," would involve interaction in the telling of a story, with the…

  20. The TOYSAT structural control experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breakwell, J. A.; Chambers, G. J.

    1983-01-01

    The Lockheed TOYSAT experiment is described. The experiment was designed to test hypothesis concerning the application of optimal control theory to flexible spacecraft. The theory is presented, and results described.

  1. Thermosphere-ionosphere coupling - An experiment in interactive modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Roble, Raymond G.

    1990-01-01

    Using the NCAR thermosphere general circulation model, a series of controlled experiments is performed to investigate the interactive coupling between ionospheric plasma densities and thermospheric neutral winds. The interaction is accomplished by parameterizing the F layer peak height, h(m)F2, in an empirical ionospheric model in terms of the meridional wind, v(south), and by forcing the h(m)F2 and the v(south) parameters to remain mutually coupled in a dynamical calculation. It was found that mutual coupling between forcing and meridional wind is weak during the daytime when the F layer exhibits a broad vertical structure. At night, when the F2 layer is more localized, the neutral dynamical structure is dependent on whether forcing is significantly above or below the altitude (about 275-300 km) at which ion drag effectively competes with viscosity in the neutral momentum balance.

  2. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  3. Jet-Supercavity Interaction: Insights from Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeny, M. J.; Krane, M. H.; Kirschner, I. N.; Kinzel, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An experimental study was performed to evaluate some of the claims of Paryshev (2006) regarding changes to ventilated cavity behavior caused by the interaction of a jet with the cavity closure region. The experiments, conducted in the 1.22m dia. Garfield Thomas Water Tunnel, were performed for EDD to tunnel diameter of 0.022, Fr = 14.5 and 26.2. The model consisted of a converging-section nozzle mounted to the base of a 27.9mm 37° cone cavitator placed on the tunnel centerline at the end of a 138.4mm long streamlined strut. A ventilated cavity was formed over the model, then an air jet, issuing from a converging nozzle, was initiated. Changes to cavity behavior were quantified in terms of cavitation number, thrust-to- drag ratio, and stagnation pressure ratio at the jet nozzle. The results show that, while the overall trends predicted by Paryshev were observed, the data did not fully collapse, suggesting that many of the effects neglected by Paryshev's model have measureable effect.

  4. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Huang, Fenix W D; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-07-01

    The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist for fixed genus only finitely many irreducible shadows. This implies that, for fixed genus, there are only finitely many classes of interaction structures. In particular, the simplest case of genus zero already provides the formalism for certain types of structures that occur in nature and are not covered by other filtrations. This case of genus zero interaction structures is already of practical interest, is studied here in detail, and is found to be expressed by a multiple context-free grammar that extends the usual one for RNA secondary structures. We show that, in O(n(6)) time and O(n(4)) space complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partition function and base pairing probabilities. PMID:22731621

  5. The Effects of Magnetic Anomalies Discovered at Mars on the Structure of the Martian Ionosphere and the Solar Wind Interaction as Follows from Radio Occultation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Acuna, M. H.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Cloutier, P.; Kliore, A. J.; Breus, T. K.; Krymskii, A. M.; Bauer, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The electron density distribution in the ionosphere of nonmagnetic (or weakly magnetized) planet depends not only on the solar ultraviolet intensity, but also on the nature of the SW interaction with this planet. Two scenarios previously have been developed based on the observations of the bow shock crossings and on the electron density distribution within the ionosphere. According to one of them Mars has an intrinsic magnetosphere produced by a dipole magnetic field and the Martian ionosphere is protected from the SW flow except during "overpressure conditions, when the planetary magnetic field can not balance the SW dynamic pressure. In the second scenario the Martian intrinsic magnetic dipole field is so weak that Mars has mainly an induced magnetosphere and a Venus-like SW/ionosphere interaction. Today the possible existence of a sufficiently strong global magnetic field that participates in the SW/Mars interaction can no longer be supported. The results obtained by the Mars-Global-Surveyor (MGS) space-craft show the existence of highly variable, but also very localized magnetic fields of crustal origin at Mars as high as 400-1500 nT. The absence of the large-scale global magnetic field at Mars makes it similar to Venus, except for possible effects of the magnetic anomalies associated with the remnant crustal magnetization. However the previous results on the Martian ionosphere obtained mainly by the radio occultation methods show that there appears to be a permanent existence of a global horizontal magnetic field in the Martian ionosphere. Moreover the global induced magnetic field in the Venus ionosphere is not typical at the solar zenith angles explored by the radio occultation methods. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  6. Computes Generalized Electromagnetic Interactions Between Structures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1999-02-20

    Object oriented software for computing generalized electromagnetic interactions between structures in the frequency domains. The software is based on integral equations. There is also a static integral equation capability.

  7. Creating Learning Experiences through Interactive Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    In this small-scale study, the use of a simple interactive device was designed and studied ethnographically to discover how groups visiting a museum as part of a guided tour interacted with the device as viewed from the perspective of the group tour guides. As the emphasis placed on utilizing interactive devices in museums is increasing, one can…

  8. Cation-π interactions in lipocalins: structural and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Gasymov, Oktay K; Abduragimov, Adil R; Glasgow, Ben J

    2012-04-10

    The cation-π interaction impacts protein folding, structural stability, specificity, and molecular recognition. Cation-π interactions have been overlooked in the lipocalin family. To fill this gap, these interactions were analyzed in the 113 crystal and solution structures from the lipocalin family. The cation-π interactions link previously identified structurally conserved regions and reveal new motifs, which are beyond the reach of a sequence alignment algorithm. Functional and structural significance of the interactions were tested experimentally in human tear lipocalin (TL). TL, a prominent and promiscuous lipocalin, has a key role in lipid binding at the ocular surface. Ligand binding modulation through the loop AB at the "open" end of the barrel has been erroneously attributed solely to electrostatic interactions. Data revealed that the interloop cation-π interaction in the pair Phe28-Lys108 contributes significantly to stabilize the holo-conformation of the loop AB. Numerous energetically significant and conserved cation-π interactions were uncovered in TL and throughout the lipocalin family. Cation-π interactions, such as the highly conserved Trp17-Arg118 pair in TL, were educed in low temperature experiments of mutants with Trp to Tyr substitutions. PMID:22439821

  9. Cation-π Interactions in Lipocalins: Structural and Functional Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gasymov, Oktay K.; Abduragimov, Adil R.; Glasgow, Ben J.

    2013-01-01

    The cation-π interaction impacts protein folding, structural stability, specificity, and molecular recognition. Cation-π interactions have been overlooked in the lipocalin family. To fill this gap, these interactions were analyzed in the 113 crystal and solution structures from the lipocalin family. The cation-π interactions link previously identified structurally conserved regions and reveal new motifs, which are beyond the reach of a sequence alignment algorithm. Functional and structural significance of the interactions were tested experimentally in human tear lipocalin (TL). TL, a prominent and promiscuous lipocalin, has a key role in lipid binding at the ocular surface. Ligand binding modulation through the loop AB at the “open” end the barrel has been erroneously attributed solely to electrostatic interactions. Data revealed that the interloop cation-π interaction in the pair Phe28-Lys108 contributes significantly to stabilize the holo-conformation of the loop AB. Numerous energetically significant and conserved cation-π interactions were uncovered in TL and throughout the lipocalin family. Cation-π interactions, such as the highly conserved Trp17-Arg118 pair in TL, were educed in low temperature experiments of mutants with Trp to Tyr substitutions. PMID:22439821

  10. Generalized Structured Component Analysis with Latent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwang, Heungsun; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Lee, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Generalized structured component analysis (GSCA) is a component-based approach to structural equation modeling. In practice, researchers may often be interested in examining the interaction effects of latent variables. However, GSCA has been geared only for the specification and testing of the main effects of variables. Thus, an extension of GSCA…

  11. Some Experiments in Atomic Structure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Kent R.

    1974-01-01

    The role of spectral color slides in laboratory situations is discussed, then experiments for secondary school students concerning color and wave length, evidence of quantization, and the ionization energy of the hydrogen atom are outlined. Teaching guidelines for creating a set of spectrograms and photographic specifications are provided. (DT)

  12. Proceedings: Avian Interactions with Utility Structures. International Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The first international workshop on Avian Interactions with Utility Structures featured an exchange of information on the impact of utility structures on avian populations. EPRI cosponsored the workshop with the Avian Power Line Interaction Committee (APLIC), formed in 1988 and designed to share data and experience regarding avian interactions with utility structures. The workshop -- held September 13--16, 1992 in Miami-welcomed engineers, scientists, academic researchers, and representatives from conservation and special interest groups. Attendees from 10 countries presented 28 papers that provide a basis for understanding and establishing new research directions to reduce bird mortality due to collisions and electrocutions. Papers highlighted advances in technology and analysis tools, the geographic extent of the problem, and regulatory needs of utilities and other interested parties involved in preventing and mitigating avian/power line interaction problems.

  13. Structural assembly demonstration experiment, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akin, David L.; Bowden, Mary L.; Miller, Rene H.

    1983-01-01

    The goal of this phase of the structural assembly and demonstration experiment (SADE) program was to begin to define a shuttle flight experiment that would yield data to compare on-orbit assembly operations of large space structures with neutral buoyancy simulations. In addition, the experiment would be an early demonstration of structural hardware and human capabilities in extravehicular activity (EVA). The objectives of the MIT study, as listed in the statement of work, were: to provide support in establishing a baseline neutral buoyancy testing data base, to develop a correlation technique between neutral buoyancy test results and on-orbit operations, and to prepare the SADE experiment plan (MSFC-PLAN-913).

  14. Joint Optics Structures Experiment (JOSE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Founds, David

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the JOSE program is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate active vibration suppression techniques for Directed Energy Weapons (DEW). DEW system performance is highly influenced by the line-of-sight (LOS) stability and in some cases by the wave front quality. The missions envisioned for DEW systems by the Strategic Defense Initiative require LOS stability and wave front quality to be significantly improved over any current demonstrated capability. The Active Control of Space Structures (ACOSS) program led to the development of a number of promising structural control techniques. DEW structures are vastly more complex than any structures controlled to date. They will be subject to disturbances with significantly higher magnitudes and wider bandwidths, while holding higher tolerances on allowable motions and deformations. Meeting the performance requirements of the JOSE program requires upgrading the ACOSS techniques to meet new more stringent requirements, the development of requisite sensors and acturators, improved control processors, highly accurate system identification methods, and the integration of hardware and methodologies into a successful demonstration.

  15. Structural Basis of Latrophilin-FLRT Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Verity A.; del Toro, Daniel; Carrasquero, Maria; Roversi, Pietro; Harlos, Karl; Klein, Rüdiger; Seiradake, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Summary Latrophilins, receptors for spider venom α-latrotoxin, are adhesion type G-protein-coupled receptors with emerging functions in synapse development. The N-terminal region binds the endogenous cell adhesion molecule FLRT, a major regulator of cortical and synapse development. We present crystallographic data for the mouse Latrophilin3 lectin and olfactomedin-like (Olf) domains, thereby revealing the Olf β-propeller fold and conserved calcium-binding site. We locate the FLRT-Latrophilin binding surfaces by a combination of sequence conservation analysis, point mutagenesis, and surface plasmon resonance experiments. In stripe assays, we show that wild-type Latrophilin3 and its high-affinity interactor FLRT2, but not the binding-impaired mutants we generated, promote HeLa cell adhesion. In contrast, cortical neurons expressing endogenous FLRTs are repelled by wild-type Latrophilin3 and not by the binding-impaired mutant. Taken together, we present molecular level insights into Latrophilin structure, its FLRT-binding mechanism, and a role for Latrophilin and FLRT that goes beyond a simply adhesive interaction. PMID:25728924

  16. Interactional and Structural Characteristics of Communication and Social Interactions during Computer-Mediated Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, William J.; Bernas, Roman S.

    2008-01-01

    This study used precepts of social network theory to examine the interactional and structural characteristics of communication in peer-mentoring conferences. Twelve discussion conferences were set up to support students during a teaching practicum experience. The conferences were governed by students with minimal instructor involvement. It was…

  17. Experiments on shock/vortex interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cattafesta, L. N., III; Settles, G. S.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction between a shock wave and a supersonic streamwise vortex is a fundamental fluid-dynamics problem with numerous practical applications. This paper describes an experimental study of this phenomenon. In particular, supersonic streamwise vortices of varying strength and Mach number were generated and measured using five-hole and total-temperature probes. In addition, the interactions between a vortex and either an oblique or a normal shock wave were visualized using schlieren and planar-laser-scattering techniques. The mean-flow measurements show both similarities and differences between the supersonic streamwise vortex and its incompressible counterpart, while the flow-visualization results show that the shock/vortex interaction is always unsteady and that, under certain conditions, the vortex can burst. The conditions necessary for supersonic vortex breakdown are presented.

  18. Peer Interaction: The Experience of Distance Students at University Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates how university students on distance learning courses experience interaction with their peers. Students on two distance learning courses at The Open University (UK) were interviewed, to investigate learners' experience of interaction on these courses. The analysis, using a grounded-theory approach, reveals disparities…

  19. Intermolecular potentials from shock structure experiments. [for monatomic gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturtevant, B.; Steinhilper, E. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ground-state intermolecular interaction potentials determined from shock structure experiments with four monatomic gases are reported. These potentials are assessed for self-consistency, using the law of corresponding states, and their suitability for engineering applications in rarefied gas dynamics is discussed.

  20. Working Smart Workbook. An Interactive Learning Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Angeles Unified School District, CA. Div. of Adult and Occupational Education.

    This workbook accompanies an interactive videodisc used in the Working Smart workplace literacy project prepared for the hotel and food services industry in the Los Angeles, California area. The first instructional unit addresses preparing the work area, including stocking supplies and cleaning the work area. The second instructional unit covers…

  1. The structural implications of interactive creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadabe, Joel

    2002-05-01

    The functioning of any particular electronic musical instrument can be placed somewhere along a line that extends from deterministic to indeterministic. Although deterministic instruments may offer more powerful controls than traditional instruments, they typically put a performer in the traditional situation of making a gesture and expecting a predictable effect. Indeterministic instruments, on the other hand, put a performer in an interactive role of improvising relative to an unpredictable output. The unique advantage of such interactive instruments is that they foster ``interactive creativity.'' The design of a traditional instrument is fundamentally different from the design of an interactive instrument. A traditional instrument is structured as a single cause and effect, articulated as a synchronous linear path through a hierarchy of controls from a performer operating an input device to the multiple variables of a sound generator. An interactive instrument, on the other hand, is structured as a network of many causes and effects at various levels of importance, with a performer's input as only one of the causes of the instrument's output in sound. The author will present several historical examples of interactive electronic musical instruments and offer some speculations on the future.

  2. RANS Modeling of Benchmark Shockwave / Boundary Layer Interaction Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgiadis, Nick; Vyas, Manan; Yoder, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This presentation summarizes the computations of a set of shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interaction (SWTBLI) test cases using the Wind-US code, as part of the 2010 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) shock / boundary layer interaction workshop. The experiments involve supersonic flows in wind tunnels with a shock generator that directs an oblique shock wave toward the boundary layer along one of the walls of the wind tunnel. The Wind-US calculations utilized structured grid computations performed in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode. Three turbulence models were investigated: the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model, the Menter Shear Stress Transport wavenumber-angular frequency two-equation model, and an explicit algebraic stress wavenumber-angular frequency formulation. Effects of grid resolution and upwinding scheme were also considered. The results from the CFD calculations are compared to particle image velocimetry (PIV) data from the experiments. As expected, turbulence model effects dominated the accuracy of the solutions with upwinding scheme selection indicating minimal effects.!

  3. Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Chrien, R.E.; Bartsch, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments.

  4. Fundamental Structure of Matter and Strong Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2011-11-01

    More than 99% of the visible matter in the universe are the protons and neutrons. Their internal structure is mostly governed by the strong interaction. Understanding their internal structure in terms of fundamental degrees-of-freedom is one of the most important subjects in modern physics. Worldwide efforts in the last few decades have lead to numerous surprises and discoveries, but major challenges still remain. An overview of the progress will be presented with a focus on the recent studies of the proton and neutron's electromagnetic and spin structure. Future perspectives will be discussed.

  5. Flow Interaction With Highly Flexible Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoele, Kourosh

    Studying the interaction between fluid and structure is an essential step towards the understanding of many engineering and physical problems, from the flow instability of structures to the biolocomotion of insects, birds and fishes. The simulation of such problems is computationally challenging. This justifies the attempts to develop more sophisticated and more efficient numerical models of fluid-solid interactions. In this dissertation, we proposed numerical models both in potential flow and fully viscous flow for the interaction of immersed structure with a strongly unsteady flow. In particular we have developed efficient approaches to study two groups of problems, the flow interaction with skeleton-reinforced fish fins and flow interaction with highly flexible bluff bodies. Fins of bony fishes are characterized by a skeleton-reinforced membrane structure consisting of a soft collagen membrane strengthened by embedded flexible rays. Morphologically, each ray is connected to a group of muscles so that the fish can control the rotational motion of each ray individually, enabling multi-degree of freedom control over the fin motion and deformation. We have developed fluid-structure interaction models to simulate the kinematics and dynamic performance of a structurally idealized fin. The first method includes a boundary-element model of the fluid motion and a fully-nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam model of the embedded rays. In the second method, we use an improved immersed boundary approach. Using these models, we study thrust generation and propulsion efficiency of the fin at different combinations of parameters at both high-Re and intermediate-Re flow. Effects of kinematic as well as structural properties are examined. It has been illustrated that the fish's capacity to control the motion of each individual ray, as well as the anisotropic deformability of the fin determined by distribution of the rays (especially the detailed distribution of ray stiffness), is

  6. Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1998-08-01

    Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions addresses an increasingly important branch of fluid mechanics--the absorption of noise and vibration by fluid flow. This subject, which offers numerous challenges to conventional areas of acoustics, is of growing concern in places where the environment is adversely affected by sound. Howe presents useful background material on fluid mechanics and the elementary concepts of classical acoustics and structural vibrations. Using examples, many of which include complete worked solutions, he vividly illustrates the theoretical concepts involved. He provides the basis for all calculations necessary for the determination of sound generation by aircraft, ships, general ventilation and combustion systems, as well as musical instruments. Both a graduate textbook and a reference for researchers, Acoustics of Fluid-Structure Interactions is an important synthesis of information in this field. It will also aid engineers in the theory and practice of noise control.

  7. Coulomb Interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss Experiments with Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shen, Kan

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation examines the effect of Coulomb interactions in Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) type experiments with electrons. HBT experiments deal with intensity interference, which is related to the second-order correlation function of the particle field. This is an extension of the usual amplitude interference experiment, such as Young's…

  8. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    PubMed

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  9. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES–ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES’ ‘hijacking’ of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  10. On some structure-turbulence interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maekawa, S.; Lin, Y. K.

    1976-01-01

    The interactions between a turbulent flow structure; responding to its excitation were studied. The turbulence was typical of those associated with a boundary layer, having a cross-spectral density indicative of convection and statistical decay. A number of structural models were considered. Among the one-dimensional models were an unsupported infinite beam and a periodically supported infinite beam. The fuselage construction of an aircraft was then considered. For the two-dimensional case a simple membrane was used to illustrate the type of formulation applicable to most two-dimensional structures. Both the one-dimensional and two-dimensional structures studied were backed by a cavity filled with an initially quiescent fluid to simulate the acoustic environment when the structure forms one side of a cabin of a sea vessel or aircraft.

  11. Laser Mode Structure Experiments for Undergraduate Laboratories.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Richard A.; Gehrz, Robert D.

    Experiments dealing with laser mode structure are presented which are suitable for an upper division undergraduate laboratory. The theory of cavity modes is summarized. The mode structure of the radiation from a helium-neon laser is measured by using a photodiode detector and spectrum analyzer to detect intermode beating. Off-axial modes can be…

  12. Microscopic Approaches to Nuclear Structure: Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ormand, W E

    2007-09-21

    The configuration interaction (CI) approach to solving the nuclear many-body problem, also known as the interacting shell model, has proven to be powerful tool in understanding the structure of nuclei. The principal criticism of past applications of the shell model is the reliance on empirical tuning to interaction matrix elements. If an accurate description of nuclei far from the valley of stability, where little or no data is available, a more fundamental approach is needed. This starts with recent ab initio approaches with effective interactions in the no-core shell model (NCSM). Using effective-field theory for guidance, fully ab initio descriptions of nuclei up to {sup 16}O with QCD based NN, NNN, and NNNN interactions will be possible within the next five years. An important task is then to determine how to use these NCSM results to develop effective interactions to describe heavier nuclei without the need to resort to an empirical retuning with every model space. Thus, it is likely that more traditional CI applications utilizing direct diagonalization and more fundamental interactions will be applicable to nuclei with perhaps up to one hundred constituents. But, these direct diagonalization CI applications will always be computationally limited due to the rapid increase in the number of configurations with particle number. Very recently, the shifted-contour method has been applied to the Auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the Shell Model (AFMCSM), and preliminary applications exhibit a remarkable taming of the notorious sign problem. If the mitigation of the sign problem holds true, the AFMCSM will offer a method to compute quantum correlations to mean-field applications for just about all nuclei; giving exact results for CI model spaces that can approach 10{sup 20-25}. In these lectures, I will discuss modern applications of CI to the nuclear many-body problem that have the potential to guide nuclear structure theory into the next decade.

  13. Intraflagellar transport complex structure and cargo interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport (IFT) is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia, as well as the proper function of ciliary motility and signaling. IFT is powered by molecular motors that move along the axonemal microtubules, carrying large complexes of IFT proteins that travel together as so-called trains. IFT complexes likely function as adaptors that mediate interactions between anterograde/retrograde motors and ciliary cargoes, facilitating cargo transport between the base and tip of the cilium. Here, we provide an up-to-date review of IFT complex structure and architecture, and discuss how interactions with cargoes and motors may be achieved. PMID:23945166

  14. A Formative Experiment to Enhance Teacher-Child Language Interactions in a Preschool Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Barbara A.; Reinking, David

    2011-01-01

    A formative experiment investigated how two strategies aimed at increasing the quality and quantity of language interactions could be integrated into a preschool classroom. Strategies for enriching language interactions were introduced during book sharing, semi-structured group activities, and mealtimes. Mixed methods revealed factors that…

  15. Rigel: An interactive structured grid generation system

    SciTech Connect

    Hachfeld, W.D.; Khamayseh, A.K.; Hansen, G.A.

    1998-02-01

    An interactive structured grid generation application that facilitates the construction of complex, discretized, simulation models directly from the original CAD geometry specifications is presented. The application, named Rigel, reads physical model descriptions generated by modern CAD packages. Rigel includes a suite of interactive geometry editing functions to assist the user in the construction of a topologically correct geometry from the original CAD specification. Once a topologically correct geometry is created, an interactively steered grid generation capability is provided to facilitate the construction of an appropriate discretization for the simulation. Grid quality enhancement is supported with the application of user-directed elliptic smoothing, refinement, and coarsening operators. After a grid is completed, various output filters are supplied to write an input file for the target simulation code. This paper is intended to provide an overview of the mechanics of this process and to highlight some of the novel algorithms and techniques employed.

  16. Structural interaction with transportation and handling systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Problems involved in the handling and transportation of finished space vehicles from the factory to the launch site are presented, in addition to recommendations for properly accounting for in space vehicle structural design, adverse interactions during transportation. Emphasis is given to the protection of vehicle structures against those environments and loads encountered during transportation (including temporary storage) which would exceed the levels that the vehicle can safely withstand. Current practices for verifying vehicle safety are appraised, and some of the capabilities and limitations of transportation and handling systems are summarized.

  17. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  18. Structural insights into microtubule doublet interactions inaxonemes

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, Kenneth H.; Sui, Haixin

    2007-06-06

    Coordinated sliding of microtubule doublets, driven by dynein motors, produces periodic beating of the axoneme. Recent structural studies of the axoneme have used cryo-electron tomography to reveal new details of the interactions among some of the multitude of proteins that form the axoneme and regulate its movement. Connections among the several sets of dyneins, in particular, suggest ways in which their actions may be coordinated. Study of the molecular architecture of isolated doublets has provided a structural basis for understanding the doublet's mechanical properties that are related to the bending of the axoneme, and has also offered insight into its potential role in the mechanism of dynein activity regulation.

  19. Interactive and Versatile Navigation of Structural Databases.

    PubMed

    Korb, Oliver; Kuhn, Bernd; Hert, Jérôme; Taylor, Neil; Cole, Jason; Groom, Colin; Stahl, Martin

    2016-05-12

    We present CSD-CrossMiner, a novel tool for pharmacophore-based searches in crystal structure databases. Intuitive pharmacophore queries describing, among others, protein-ligand interaction patterns, ligand scaffolds, or protein environments can be built and modified interactively. Matching crystal structures are overlaid onto the query and visualized as soon as they are available, enabling the researcher to quickly modify a hypothesis on the fly. We exemplify the utility of the approach by showing applications relevant to real-world drug discovery projects, including the identification of novel fragments for a specific protein environment or scaffold hopping. The ability to concurrently search protein-ligand binding sites extracted from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and small organic molecules from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) using the same pharmacophore query further emphasizes the flexibility of CSD-CrossMiner. We believe that CSD-CrossMiner closes an important gap in mining structural data and will allow users to extract more value from the growing number of available crystal structures. PMID:26745458

  20. Structural investigation of the interactions of biotinylruthenocene with avidin.

    PubMed

    Strzelczyk, Paweł; Bujacz, Anna; Plażuk, Damian; Zakrzewski, Janusz; Bujacz, Grzegorz

    2013-06-25

    The crystal structure of avidin, a protein from hen egg white, was determined in the form of a complex with biotinylruthenocene. This biotin-derived organometallic ligand is a potential anticancer agent for targeted therapy based upon avidin-biotin technology. Isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, involving avidin complexes with biotin (vitamin H or B7) derivatives, show differences in their affinity to the protein in comparison to its avidin-biotin complex, the strongest known biochemical interaction in Nature. The crystal structure of the first complex of avidin with biotinylruthenocene, determined at 2.5Å resolution (PDB: 4I60), shows unique interactions of the ruthenocene moiety with avidin. Biotin derivatives exhibit weaker affinity to avidin then biotin, which allows their wider use in biotechnology. The specific properties of biotinylruthenocene and the knowledge of its interactions with avidin may be useful in biochemical, medical, and nanotechnological applications. PMID:23603015

  1. Soil/Structure Interactions in Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. W.; Moore, R. K.; Yoo, C. H.; Bush, Thomas D., Jr.; Stallings, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    In effort to improve design of Earthquake-resistant structures, mathematical study undertaken to simulate interactions among soil, foundation, and superstructure during various kinds of vibrational excitation. System modeled as three lumped masses connected vertically by springs, with lowest mass connected to horizontal vibrator (representing ground) through springs and dashpot. Behavior of springs described by elastic or elastoplastic force/deformation relationships. Relationships used to approximate nonlinear system behavior and soil/foundation-interface behavior.

  2. Joint Air Sea Interaction (JASIN) experiment, Northwest coast of Scotland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Businger, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The joint air sea interaction (JASIN) experiment took place off the Northwest coast of Scotland. Sea surface and boundary layer parameters were measured. The JASIN data was used as ground truth for various sensors on the SEASAT satellite.

  3. Solvent-Ion Interactions in Salt Water: A Simple Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willey, Joan D.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a procedurally quick, simple, and inexpensive experiment which illustrates the magnitude and some effects of solvent-ion interactions in aqueous solutions. Theoretical information, procedures, and examples of temperature, volume and hydration number calculations are provided. (JN)

  4. Experiments In Characterizing Vibrations Of A Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Yeung; Hadaegh, Fred Y.; Bayard, David S.

    1993-01-01

    Report discusses experiments conducted to test methods of identification of vibrational and coupled rotational/vibrational modes of flexible structure. Report one in series that chronicle development of integrated system of methods, sensors, actuators, analog and digital signal-processing equipment, and algorithms to suppress vibrations in large, flexible structure even when dynamics of structure partly unknown and/or changing. Two prior articles describing aspects of research, "Autonomous Frequency-Domain Indentification" (NPO-18099), and "Automated Characterization Of Vibrations Of A Structure" (NPO-18141).

  5. Self-Structure and Emotional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ditzfeld, Christopher P.; Showers, Carolin J.

    2013-01-01

    Two studies examine individual differences in affective reactivity by linking emotional experience to cognitive self-structure. Consistent with the view that individuals with an evaluatively compartmentalized self-structure are emotionally reactive, we find that evaluative compartmentalization is associated with the experience of, and desire for, high-arousal positive affect, whereas evaluative integration is associated with the experience of low-arousal positive and negative affect and the desire for low-arousal positive affect. Although compartmentalized individuals are less granular in their tendency to report experiencing both high- and low-arousal affect (cf. Feldman Barrett, 2004), they are strongly differentiated in their perceptions of high-arousal states as positive and low-arousal states as negative. Thus, compartmentalized individuals’ reactivity may be explained by their preference for high-arousal positive states and the “breadth” of their emotionality (e.g., the tendency to experience sadness and nervousness at the same time). PMID:24125479

  6. Development of an active structure flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, R. A.; Wyse, R. E.; Schubert, S. R.

    1993-02-01

    The design and development of the Air Force and TRW's Advanced Control Technology Experiment (ACTEX) flight experiment is described in this paper. The overall objective of ACTEX is to provide an active structure trailblazer which will demonstrate the compatibility of active structures with operational spacecraft performance and lifetime measures. At the heart of the experiment is an active tripod driven by a digitally-programmable analog control electronics subsystem. Piezoceramic sensors and actuators embedded in a graphite epoxy host material provide the sensing and actuation mechanism for the active tripod. Low noise ground-programmable electronics provide a virtually unlimited number of control schemes that can be implemented in the space environment. The flight experiment program provides the opportunity to gather performance, reliability, adaptability, and lifetime performance data on vibration suppression hardware for the next generation of DoD and NASA spacecraft.

  7. Controls, astrophysics, and structures experiment in space ground test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bukley, Angelia P.; Jones, Victoria L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the initial configuration of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Controls/Structures Interaction Advanced Development Facility (CSI ADF), which is a ground test facility (GTF) for the proposed Controls, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES). The laboratory has been developed for the purpose of implementing, testing, and evaluating CSI modeling, control system design, failure analysis, and system identification techniques on a representative large space structure. The facility has been configured to represent as closely as possible an actual flight article.

  8. Modal representations in control/structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blelloch, Paul A.; Young, Jeffrey W.; Carney, Kelly S.

    1989-01-01

    When control/structure interaction problems are examined, a standard method for representing the structure is to choose a truncated set of normal modes calculated from either a finite-element or a distributed-parameter model. However, the normal modes can neglect important static information about the structure. Using a set of fixed interface modes results in a much more accurate closed-loop model, even when relatively low-bandwidth controllers are used. The fixed interface modes are calculated with control input degrees of freedom held fixed, and standard finite-element software can be used. Illustrative examples include a simple hinged beam and a complex model of the phase-I Space Station configuration.

  9. Canadian experience with structured clinical examinations.

    PubMed Central

    Grand'Maison, P; Lescop, J; Brailovsky, C A

    1993-01-01

    The use of structured clinical examinations to improve the evaluation of medical students and graduates has become significantly more common in the past 25 years. Many Canadian medical educators have contributed to the development of this technique. The Canadian experience is reviewed from the introduction of simulated-standardized patients and objective-structured clinical examinations to more recent developments and the use of such examinations for licensure and certification. PMID:8477384

  10. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming. PMID:26869954

  11. Structural Priming and Frequency Effects Interact in Chinese Sentence Comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hang; Dong, Yanping; Boland, Julie E.; Yuan, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Previous research in several European languages has shown that the language processing system is sensitive to both structural frequency and structural priming effects. However, it is currently not clear whether these two types of effects interact during online sentence comprehension, especially for languages that do not have morphological markings. To explore this issue, the present study investigated the possible interplay between structural priming and frequency effects for sentences containing the Chinese ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 in a self-paced reading experiment. The sentences were disambiguated to either the more frequent/preferred NP structure or the less frequent VP structure. Each target sentence was preceded by a prime sentence of three possible types: NP primes, VP primes, and neutral primes. When the ambiguous construction V NP1 de NP2 was disambiguated to the dispreferred VP structure, participants experienced more processing difficulty following an NP prime relative to following a VP prime or a neutral baseline. When the ambiguity was resolved to the preferred NP structure, prime type had no effect. These results suggest that structural priming in comprehension is modulated by the baseline frequency of alternative structures, with the less frequent structure being more subject to structural priming effects. These results are discussed in the context of the error-based, implicit learning account of structural priming. PMID:26869954

  12. Quantifying human subjective experience and social interaction using the eXperience Induction Machine.

    PubMed

    Bernardet, Ulysses; Väljamäe, Aleksander; Inderbitzin, Martin; Wierenga, Sytse; Mura, Anna; Verschure, Paul F M J

    2011-06-30

    With the advance of novel brain imaging technology more correlations between complex human properties and the neuronal substrate can be assessed. However, thus far, not many well-validated paradigms exist that would allow for a systematic and quantitative exploration of these phenomena. For instance, despite the rapid technological advances in the domain of mixed and virtual reality systems, a fundamental issue remains how we can define and quantify "presence". A standard approach has been to use questionnaires and self-report measures. However, it has been well established that humans' capabilities to access and externalize their internal states are limited. Hence, we have investigated the question whether other less subjective measures can be devised that can corroborate subjective self-reports on presence. In particular, we have developed a quantitative recollection task that assesses the ability of human subjects (N=40) to recollect the factual structure and organization of a structured and fully controlled experience in a human accessible mixed reality space, the eXperience Induction Machine (XIM). In this structured experience - referred to as the "Autodemo"--a virtual guide explains the key elements and properties of XIM while the user is able to freely move around in the space. To evaluate the users' experience and the amount of factual information retained about the Autodemo, we used the ITC-SOPI questionnaire and a recall test specifically designed for the Autodemo. We found significant correlations between spatial presence and engagement factors of ITC-SOPI and recall performance. Moreover we observed an interaction with the participants' gender. Our results show that we can assess correlates of "presence" by focusing on other dependent measures such as those related to memory and performance. Additionally, our work exemplifies how virtual and mixed reality systems provide new ways to address fundamental questions in psychology and cognitive neuroscience

  13. Flow Experiences of Children in an Interactive Social Game Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inal, Yavuz; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2007-01-01

    This study examines children's flow experiences in an interactive social game environment. A total of 33 children aged from 7 to 9 years participated in the study for 6 weeks. Data were collected through observations and interviews. In order to measure the flow experiences of the children, items of a flow scale were administered to the children…

  14. Fluid-structure interaction of reticulated porous wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Elizabeth; Jawed, Mohammad; Reis, Pedro

    Insects of the orders Neuroptera and Hymenoptera locomote via flapping flight with reticulated wings that have porous structures that confers them with remarkable lightweight characteristics. Yet these porous wings still perform as contiguous plates to provide the necessary aerodynamic lift and drag required for flight. Even though the fluid flow past the bulk of these insects may be in high Reynolds conditions, viscosity can dominate over inertia in the flow through the porous sub-features. Further considering the flexibility of these reticulated wings yields a highly nonlinear fluid-structure interaction problem. We perform a series of dynamically-scaled precision model experiments to gain physical insight into this system. Our experiments are complemented with computer simulations that combine the Discrete Elastic Rods method and a model for the fluid loading that takes into account the `leakiness' through the porous structure. Our results are anticipated to find applications in micro-air vehicle aerodynamics.

  15. INSPIRE - Premission. [Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  16. Apollo experience report: Spacecraft structural windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pigg, O. E.; Weiss, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    The window structural design and verification experience is presented for the Apollo command and lunar modules. This report presents window design philosophy, design criteria, hardware description, and qualification and acceptance test programs and discusses the problems encountered and solutions developed in these areas. The structural characteristics of glass are not generally well understood by designers. The optics and instrument glass covers were not considered to be structural components and thus were not normally subjected to the design, qualification, and acceptance standards necessary to preclude failures. These two factors contributed significantly to window problems on both Apollo spacecraft.

  17. Effects of backlight structure on absorption experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A

    2004-11-08

    The impact of spectral details in the backlight of absorption spectroscopy experiments is considered. It is shown that experimentally unresolved structure in the backlight spectrum can introduce significant errors in the inferred transmission. Furthermore, it is shown that a valuable experimental procedure previously used to test the accuracy of the data fails to reveal these errors.

  18. Seismic Soil-Foundation-Structure Interaction in Urban Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetta, Nicholas Wade

    The interactions between a structure, its foundation, and the surrounding soil during an earthquake are referred to as soil-foundation-structure interaction (SFSI). The interactions between multiple structures, and their foundations, through the surrounding soil are collectively known as structure-soil-structure interaction (SSSI). Modern design codes in use in the United States, and abroad, provide guidance for considering SFSI during the seismic design of structural systems. However, these same codes do not provide any guidance for considering SSSI. This situation is a direct result of the current paucity of research into the effects of SSSI on structural performance. This dissertation describes the results of four centrifuge experiments designed to study the influence of SSSI on the seismic performance of building-foundation systems. Following these experiments, numerical models were developed and their efficiency at reproducing measured response evaluated. The experimental program involved two pairs of tests. During Test-1 and Test-2, the SFSI and SSSI-influenced responses of two three-dimensional inelastic frame structures were recorded. During Test-3 and Test-4, the interactions between an inelastic frame structure and an elastic rocking wall arranged in a variety of orientations were recorded. In each of the pair of test series, one configuration was devoted to the evaluation of the response of the model frame structures far from any neighboring structure. Ultimately, the experimental results demonstrate that when structures are placed next to each other, the seismic demands in inelastic frame structures can increase. As such, seismic structural performance may be negatively impacted by SSSI. The tests reveal that footings of buildings placed nearest to other buildings can be physically restrained when loaded towards the other building -- a physical mechanism that had not previously been observed. This asymmetrical physical restraint resulted in a stiffened

  19. PrP charge structure encodes interdomain interactions

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Javier; Sánchez, Rosa; Castellanos, Milagros; Makarava, Natallia; Aguzzi, Adriano; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Gasset, María

    2015-01-01

    Almost all proteins contain charged residues, and their chain distribution is tailored to fulfill essential ionic interactions for folding, binding and catalysis. Among proteins, the hinged two-domain chain of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) exhibits a peculiar charge structure with unclear consequences in its structural malleability. To decipher the charge design role, we generated charge-reverted mutants for each domain and analyzed their effect on conformational and metabolic features. We found that charges contain the information for interdomain interactions. Use of dynamic light scattering and thermal denaturation experiments delineates the compaction of the α-fold by an electrostatic compensation between the polybasic 23–30 region and the α3 electronegative surface. This interaction increases stability and disfavors fibrillation. Independently of this structural effect, the N-terminal electropositive clusters regulate the α-cleavage efficiency. In the fibrillar state, use of circular dichroism, atomic-force and fluorescence microscopies reveal that the N-terminal positive clusters and the α3 electronegative surface dictate the secondary structure, the assembly hierarchy and the growth length of the fibril state. These findings show that the PrP charge structure functions as a code set up to ensure function and reduce pathogenic routes. PMID:26323476

  20. Structural Biology by NMR: Structure, Dynamics, and Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Markwick, Phineus R. L.; Malliavin, Thérèse; Nilges, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The function of bio-macromolecules is determined by both their 3D structure and conformational dynamics. These molecules are inherently flexible systems displaying a broad range of dynamics on time-scales from picoseconds to seconds. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has emerged as the method of choice for studying both protein structure and dynamics in solution. Typically, NMR experiments are sensitive both to structural features and to dynamics, and hence the measured data contain information on both. Despite major progress in both experimental approaches and computational methods, obtaining a consistent view of structure and dynamics from experimental NMR data remains a challenge. Molecular dynamics simulations have emerged as an indispensable tool in the analysis of NMR data. PMID:18818721

  1. Optimal Force Generation with Fluid-Structure Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Diing-wen

    Typical computational and experimental methods are unsuitable for studying large scale optimization problems involving complex fluid structure interactions, primarily due to their time-consuming nature. A novel experimental approach is proposed here that provides a high-fidelity and efficient alternative to discover optimal parameters arising from the passive interaction between structural elasticity and fluid dynamic forces. This approach utilizes motors, force transducers, and active controllers to emulate the effects of elasticity, eliminating the physical need to replace structural components in the experiment. A clustering genetic algorithm is then used to tune the structural parameters to achieve desired optimality conditions, resulting in approximated global optimal regions within the search bound. A prototype fluid-structure interaction experiment inspired by the lift generation of flapping wing insects is presented to highlight the capabilities of this approach. The experiment aims to maximize the average lift on a sinusoidally translating plate, by optimizing the damping ratio and natural frequency of the plate's elastic pitching dynamics. Reynolds number, chord length, and stroke length are varied between optimizations to explore their relationships to the optimal structural parameters. The results reveal that only limited ranges of stroke lengths are conducive to lift generation; there also exists consistent trends between optimal stroke length, natural frequency, and damping ratio. The measured lift, pitching angle, and torque on the plate for optimal scenarios exhibit the same frequency as the translation frequency, and the phase angles of the optimal structural parameters at this frequency are found to be independent of the stroke length. This critical phase can be then characterized by a linear function of the chord length and Reynolds number. Particle image velocimetry measurements are acquired for the kinematics generated with optimal and

  2. Control/structure interaction conceptual design tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1990-01-01

    The JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program is developing new analytical methods for designing micro-precision spacecraft with controlled structures. One of these, the Conceptual Design Tool, will illustrate innovative new approaches to the integration of multi-disciplinary analysis and design methods. The tool will be used to demonstrate homogeneity of presentation, uniform data representation across analytical methods, and integrated systems modeling. The tool differs from current 'integrated systems' that support design teams most notably in its support for the new CSI multi-disciplinary engineer. The design tool will utilize a three dimensional solid model of the spacecraft under design as the central data organization metaphor. Various analytical methods, such as finite element structural analysis, control system analysis, and mechanical configuration layout, will store and retrieve data from a hierarchical, object oriented data structure that supports assemblies of components with associated data and algorithms. In addition to managing numerical model data, the tool will assist the designer in organizing, stating, and tracking system requirements.

  3. Fluid/structure interactions. Internal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, D. S.

    1991-05-01

    Flow-induced vibrations are found wherever structures are exposed to high velocity fluid flows. Internal flows are usually characterized by the close proximity of solid boundaries. There are surfaces against which separated flows may reattach, or from which pressure disturbances may be reflected resulting in acoustic resonance. When the fluid is a liquid, the close proximity of solid boundaries to a vibrating component can produce very high added mass effects. This paper presents three different experimental studies of flow-induced vibration problems associated with internal flows. The emphasis was on experimental techniques developed for understanding excitation mechanisms. In difficult flow-induced vibration problems, a useful experimental technique is flow visualization using a large scale model and strobe light triggered by the phenomenon being observed. This should be supported by point measurements of velocity and frequency spectra. When the flow excitation is associated with acoustic resonance, the sound can be fed back to enhance or eliminate the instability. This is potentially a very useful tool for studying and controlling fluid-structure interaction problems. Some flow-induced vibration problems involve a number of different excitation mechanisms and care must be taken to ensure that the mechanisms are properly identified. Artificially imposing structural vibrations or acoustic fields may induce flow structures not naturally present in the system.

  4. Advanced Accelerating Structures and Their Interaction with Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gai Wei

    2009-01-22

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  5. Advanced accelerating structures and their interaction with electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Gai, W.; High Energy Physics

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we give a brief description of several advanced accelerating structures, such as dielectric loaded waveguides, photonic band gap, metamaterials and improved iris-loaded cavities. We describe wakefields generated by passing high current electron beams through these structures, and applications of wakefields to advanced accelerator schemes. One of the keys to success for high gradient wakefield acceleration is to develop high current drive beam sources. As an example, the high current RF photo injector at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator, passed a {approx}80 nC electron beam through a high gradient dielectric loaded structure to achieve a 100 MV/m gradient. We will summarize recent related experiments on beam-structure interactions and also discuss high current electron beam generation and propagation and their applications to wakefield acceleration.

  6. Code System for Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2001-05-30

    Version 00 PELE-IC is a two-dimensional semi-implicit Eulerian hydrodynamics program for the solution of incompressible flow coupled to flexible structures. The code was developed to calculate fluid-structure interactions and bubble dynamics of a pressure-suppression system following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The fluid, structure, and coupling algorithms have been verified by calculation of benchmark problems and air and steam blowdown experiments. The code is written for both plane and cylindrical coordinates. The coupling algorithm is generalmore » enough to handle a wide variety of structural shapes. The concepts of void fractions and interface orientation are used to track the movement of free surfaces, allowing great versatility in following fluid-gas interfaces both for bubble definition and water surface motion without the use of marker particles.« less

  7. Structure and Interactions in Neurofilament Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna; Ojeda-Lopez, Miguel; Safinya, Cyrus

    2004-03-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are a major constituent of myelinated axons of nerve cells, which assemble from three subunit proteins of low, medium, and high molecular weight to form a 10 nm diameter rod with sidearms radiating from the center. The sidearm interactions impart structural stability and result in an oriented network of NFs running parallel to the axon. Over or under expression of NF subunits is related to abnormal NF-networks, which are known hallmarks of motor neuron diseases (ALS). Here, we reassemble NFs from subunit proteins purified from bovine spinal cord. We demonstrate the formation of the NF network in vitro where synchrotron x-ray scattering (SSRL) reveals a well-defined interfilament spacing while the defect structure in polarized optical microcopy shows the liquid crystalline nature. The spacing varies depending on subunit molar ratios and salt conditions and we relate this change to the mechanical stability of the lattice. This change in lattice spacing yields insight into the stabilizing interactions between the NF sidearms. Supported by NSF DMR- 0203755, CTS-0103516, and NIH GM-59288.

  8. User experience interaction design for digital educational games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Zhang, Wenting; Xing, Ruonan

    2014-04-01

    Leading the elements of games into education is the newest teaching concepts in the field of educational technology, which is by using healthy games to impel and preserve the learner's motivation, improve the learning efficiency and bring one experience in learning something by playing games. First of all, this article has introduced the concept of Digital Game and User Experience and brought the essence of Digital Game to light to construct the frame of user experience interaction design for digital educational games and offer one design idea for the development of related products and hoping that Digital Game will bring us continuous innovation experience.

  9. Resonance Structure with Polarization Experiments at MAMI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, Hans-Juergen

    2011-10-21

    The Mainz Microtron MAMI is an ideal facility to study the hadron structure with the electromagnetic probe. With the new accelerator stage, the Harmonic Double-Sided Microtron (HDSM), which is in operation since 2007, high-intensity polarized electron and photon beams with energies up to 1.6 GeV are delivered to the experiments. Polarized proton, deuteron, {sup 3}He targets, and recoil proton polarimeters are available to allow a broad range of polarization observables for low-mass nucleon resonances to be measured. In this talk, an overview over selected recent double polarization experiments at MAMI is given.

  10. Solar Array Module Plasma Interaction Experiment (SAMPIE): Technical requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillard, G. Barry; Ferguson, Dale C.

    1992-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a NASA shuttle space flight experiment scheduled for launch in early 1994. The SAMPIE experiment will investigate plasma interactions of high voltage space power systems in low earth orbit. Solar cell modules, representing several technologies, will be biased to high voltages to characterize both arcing and plasma current collection. Other solar modules, specially modified in accordance with current theories of arcing and breakdown, will demonstrate the possibility of arc suppression. Finally, several test modules will be included to study the basic nature of these interactions. The science and technology goals for the project are defined in the Technical Requirements Document (TRD) which is presented here.

  11. The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) description and test program. [electrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma interaction experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the LANDSAT-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  12. Inquiry style interactive virtual experiments: a case on circular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaona; Han, Jing; Pelz, Nathaniel; Wang, Xiaojun; Peng, Liangyu; Xiao, Hua; Bao, Lei

    2011-11-01

    Interest in computer-based learning, especially in the use of virtual reality simulations is increasing rapidly. While there are good reasons to believe that technologies have the potential to improve teaching and learning, how to utilize the technology effectively in teaching specific content difficulties is challenging. To help students develop robust understandings of correct physics concepts, we have developed interactive virtual experiment simulations that have the unique feature of enabling students to experience force and motion via an analogue joystick, allowing them to feel the applied force and simultaneously see its effects. The simulations provide students learning experiences that integrate both scientific representations and low-level sensory cues such as haptic cues under a single setting. In this paper, we introduce a virtual experiment module on circular motion. A controlled study has been conducted to evaluate the impact of using this virtual experiment on students' learning of force and motion in the context of circular motion. The results show that the interactive virtual experiment method is preferred by students and is more effective in helping students grasp the physics concepts than the traditional education method such as problem-solving practices. Our research suggests that well-developed interactive virtual experiments can be useful tools in teaching difficult concepts in science.

  13. Direct neutrino mass experiments and exotic charged current interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludl, Patrick Otto; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-06-01

    We study the effect of exotic charged current interactions on the electron energy spectrum in tritium decay, focussing on the KATRIN experiment and a possible modified setup that has access to the full spectrum. Both sub-eV and keV neutrino masses are considered. We perform a fully relativistic calculation and take all possible new interactions into account, demonstrating the possible sizable distortions in the energy spectrum.

  14. Ten years of experience from interactive ergonomics projects.

    PubMed

    Eklund, J; Karltun, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper highlights experiences from ergonomics projects, applying an interactive research approach. The aim of this paper is to summarise experiences from seven interactive ergonomics projects with the aim to improve ergonomics and organizational performance jointly. Results from these seven projects were analysed with a model for assessing sustainable change, including the factors active ownership, professional management, competent project leadership, and involved participants. All factors were found giving support to impact and sustainability of the change projects. However, the role of the researcher is difficult and demanding. PMID:22317471

  15. Solar array experiments on the SPHINX satellite. [Space Plasma High voltage INteraction eXperiment satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, N. J.

    1974-01-01

    The Space Plasma, High Voltage Interaction Experiment (SPHINX) is the name given to an auxiliary payload satellite scheduled to be launched in January 1974. The principal experiments carried on this satellite are specifically designed to obtain the engineering data on the interaction of high voltage systems with the space plasma. The classes of experiments are solar array segments, insulators, insulators with pin holes and conductors. The satellite is also carrying experiments to obtain flight data on three new solar array configurations: the edge illuminated-multijunction cells, the teflon encased cells, and the violet cells.

  16. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields.

  17. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science.

    PubMed

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  18. Simulated Interactive Research Experiments as Educational Tools for Advanced Science

    PubMed Central

    Tomandl, Mathias; Mieling, Thomas; Losert-Valiente Kroon, Christiane M.; Hopf, Martin; Arndt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Experimental research has become complex and thus a challenge to science education. Only very few students can typically be trained on advanced scientific equipment. It is therefore important to find new tools that allow all students to acquire laboratory skills individually and independent of where they are located. In a design-based research process we have investigated the feasibility of using a virtual laboratory as a photo-realistic and scientifically valid representation of advanced scientific infrastructure to teach modern experimental science, here, molecular quantum optics. We found a concept based on three educational principles that allows undergraduate students to become acquainted with procedures and concepts of a modern research field. We find a significant increase in student understanding using our Simulated Interactive Research Experiment (SiReX), by evaluating the learning outcomes with semi-structured interviews in a pre/post design. This suggests that this concept of an educational tool can be generalized to disseminate findings in other fields. PMID:26370627

  19. Modeling ultrafast shadowgraphy in laser-plasma interaction experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siminos, E.; Skupin, S.; Sävert, A.; Cole, J. M.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Kaluza, M. C.

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast shadowgraphy is a new experimental technique that uses few-cycle laser pulses to image density gradients in a rapidly evolving plasma. It enables structures that move at speeds close to the speed of light, such as laser driven wakes, to be visualized. Here we study the process of shadowgraphic image formation during the propagation of a few cycle probe pulse transversely through a laser-driven wake using three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. In order to construct synthetic shadowgrams a near-field snapshot of the ultrashort probe pulse is analyzed by means of Fourier optics, taking into account the effect of a typical imaging setup. By comparing synthetic and experimental shadowgrams we show that the generation of synthetic data is crucial for the correct interpretation of experiments. Moreover, we study the dependence of synthetic shadowgrams on various parameters such as the imaging system aperture, the position of the object plane and the probe pulse delay, duration and wavelength. Finally, we show that time-dependent information from the interaction can be recovered from a single shot by using a broadband, chirped probe pulse and subsequent spectral filtering.

  20. Interaction and the structures of coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opaprakasit, Pakorn

    The origin of a decrease in the amount of soluble material from coal upon a reflux treatment has been investigated in an attempt to obtain insight into the nature of the interaction in the macromolecular network structure of coal. This decrease in the extractable material is a result of an increase in the amount of physical cross-links associated with secondary interactions. The alternate possibility of covalent cross-link formation by ether linkage was found to be unlikely because the coal hydroxyl content remains unchanged upon heat treatment. The functional groups responsible for forming these physical cross-links and their contents vary from coal to coal with coal rank. Carboxylate/cation complexes, similar to those found in ionomers, dominate in low rank coal. In high rank coal, the clusters involving pi-cation interactions were observed. Both mechanisms seem to play a role in mid rank coals. These physical cross-links are responsible for a lowering of the extraction yield of coal, but are disrupted by a treatment with acid solution, resulting in an increase in the extraction yield. As a consequence, the cross-links in coal structure should be classified into two types; a "permanent" covalent cross-link, which break under extreme conditions such as chemical reaction and pyrolysis, and "reversible" cross-links, largely associated with ionomer-like structure and pi-cation interactions. The interaction between a "magic" solvent of N-methylpyrollidone and carbon disulfide (NMP/CS2) and its role in the unusual extractability enhancement of Upper Freeport coal has also been investigated. The results strongly suggest that NMP/CS2 mixed solvents form complexes with cations. These mixed solvents are capable of forming a solid complex with cations from NaOH and some simple salts, such as NaCl and LiCl. Given that Upper Freeport coal contains a large amount of mineral matter, it is not surprising that these types of complexes could be formed in the present of the mixed

  1. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  2. Statistically designed experiments to screen chemical mixtures for possible interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Groten, J P; Tajima, O; Feron, V J; Schoen, E D

    1998-01-01

    For the accurate analysis of possible interactive effects of chemicals in a defined mixture, statistical designs are necessary to develop clear and manageable experiments. For instance, factorial designs have been successfully used to detect two-factor interactions. Particularly useful for this purpose are fractionated factorial designs, requiring only a fraction of all possible combinations of a full factorial design. Once the potential interaction has been detected with a fractionated design, a more accurate analysis can be performed for the particular binary mixtures to ensure and characterize these interactions. In this paper this approach is illustrated using an in vitro cytotoxicity assay to detect the presence of mixtures of Fusarium mycotoxins in contaminated food samples. We have investigated interactions between five mycotoxin species (Trichothecenes, Fumonisins, and Zearalenone) using the DNA synthesis inhibition assay in L929 fibroblasts. First, a central composite design was applied to identify possible interactive effects between mycotoxins in the mixtures (27 combinations from 5(5) possible combinations). Then two-factor interactions of particular interest were further analyzed by the use of a full factorial design (5 x 5 design) to characterize the nature of those interactions more precisely. Results show that combined exposure to several classes of mycotoxins generally results in effect addition with a few minor exceptions indicating synergistic interactions. In general, the nature of the interactions characterized in the full factorial design was similar to the nature of those observed in the central composite design. However, the magnitude of interaction was relatively small in the full factorial design. PMID:9860893

  3. Coastal scale operational oceanography with structural interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; García León, Manuel; Gracia, Vicente; Pau Sierra, Joan; Espino, Manuel; Grifoll, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Operational oceanography predictions are now starting to include coupled wind, wave and current fields for open ocean and shelf domains. However the same product for coastal scales, including a) the non-linearity of coastal processes, b) the effect of continental rain driven discharge and c) the interaction with coastal structures are still in an early stage of development, both for the physical and numerical aspects. In this paper we shall explore a coupled wind-wave-current model based on the COWAST system but including also the continental discharge and the effect of coastal structures, in particular shore parallel detached breakwaters. We shall apply such a pre-operational code to a test case near Barcelona, where the concept of transient coastal defences is being considered. The available in-situ and remote observations should also allow a robust calibration. The operational oceanography simulations will be used to support the activation of these transient coastal defences and therefore illustrate the challenges required by coastal scales under rapid storm development such as is commonly found in the Western Mediterranean. The benefits of applying a robust and high resolution coupled hydro-dynamic system will become apparent from the stand point of transient coastal defence deployment and risk mitigation in heavily populated coastal areas.

  4. Forces and interactions between nanoparticles for controlled structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Paul R.

    In recent years, structured nanomaterials have started to demonstrate their full potential in breakthrough technologies. However, in order to fulfill the expectations held for the field, it is necessary to carefully design these structures depending upon the targeted application. This tailoring process suggests that a feedback between theory and experiment could potentially allow us to obtain a structure as near optimum as possible. This thesis seeks to describe the theory and experiment needed to understand and control the interactions among nanoparticles to build a functional device for the efficient conversion of sunlight into energy. This thesis will discuss a simulation built from the existing theories explaining nanoparticle interactions and will present how its outcomes can be employed to describe real systems. The forces and dynamics of the nanoparticle system control the way their structure is formed. Thus, in order to understand and predict the formation of organized nanostructures, simulation of forces and dynamics and their corroboration with experimental results are necessary. These simulations will be extended to more complex systems, and the results will be used to provide a basis for the design of a specific nanoparticle structure, namely a linked linear chain. The envisioned application of the results achieved with the approach described is the design of a nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic cell where linear chains of nanoparticles are tethered to the back of the device and then surrounded by a conducting polymer matrix to generate percolation pathways and improve light collection and scattering, and thus efficiency, of the device. To tether the chains in the cell, a foundation is needed to provide structure and control spacing. This foundation is designed and constructed by depositing gold nanoparticles on a substrate patterned using block-copolymer lithography to form a hexagonal array upon which the linear chains will be grown.

  5. Interactive Plasma Physics Education Using Data from Fusion Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calderon, Brisa; Davis, Bill; Zwicker, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    The Internet Plasma Physics Education Experience (IPPEX) website was created in 1996 to give users access to data from plasma and fusion experiments. Interactive material on electricity, magnetism, matter, and energy was presented to generate interest and prepare users to understand data from a fusion experiment. Initially, users were allowed to analyze real-time and archival data from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) experiment. IPPEX won numerous awards for its novel approach of allowing users to participate in ongoing research. However, the latest revisions of IPPEX were in 2001 and the interactive material is no longer functional on modern browsers. Also, access to real-time data was lost when TFTR was shut down. The interactive material on IPPEX is being rewritten in ActionScript3.0, and real-time and archival data from the National Spherical Tokamak Experiment (NSTX) will be made available to users. New tools like EFIT animations, fast cameras, and plots of important plasma parameters will be included along with an existing Java-based ``virtual tokamak.'' Screenshots from the upgraded website and future directions will be presented.

  6. MINER{nu}A, a Neutrino--Nucleus Interaction Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Solano Salinas, C. J.; Chamorro, A.; Romero, C.

    2007-10-26

    With the fantastic results of KamLAND and SNO for neutrino physics, a new generation of neutrino experiments are being designed and build, specially to study the neutrino oscillations to resolve most of the incognita still we have in the neutrino physics. At FERMILAB we have the experiments MINOS and, in a near future, NO{nu}A, to study this kind of oscillations. One big problem these experiments will have is the lack of a good knowledge of the Physics of neutrino interactions with matter, and this will generate big systematic errors. MINER{nu}A, also at FERMILAB, will cover this space studying with high statistics and great precision the neutrino--nucleus interactions.

  7. A survey of experiments and experimental facilities for active control of flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Horner, Garnett C.; Juang, Jer-Nan; Klose, Gerhard

    1989-01-01

    A brief survey of large space structure control related experiments and facilities was presented. This survey covered experiments performed before and up to 1982, and those of the present period (1982-...). Finally, the future planned experiments and facilities in support of the control-structure interaction (CSI) program were reported. It was stated that new, improved ground test facilities are needed to verify the new CSI design techniques that will allow future space structures to perform planned NASA missions.

  8. VLF wave-wave interaction experiments in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D. C. D.

    1978-01-01

    VLF wave-wave interaction experiments were carried out by injecting various forms of VLF pulses into the magnetosphere from a 21.2 km dipole antenna at Siple, Antarctica. The injected signals propagate along a geomagnetic field line and often interact strongly with energetic electrons trapped in the radiation belts near the equator. Signals may be amplified and trigger emissions. These signals may then interact with one another through these energetic electrons. This report is divided into three parts. In the first part, simulations of VLF pulses propagating in the magnetosphere are carried out. In the second part, it is found for the first time that a 10 ms gap in a triggering wave can induce emission, which may then interact with the post-gap signals. In the third part, sideband triggering is reported for the first time.

  9. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-06-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  10. Early steps towards quarks and their interactions using neutrino beams in CERN bubble chamber experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Don H.

    2016-05-01

    Results from neutrino experiments at CERN in the1970's, using bubble chamber detectors filled with heavy liquids, gave early evidence for the existence of quarks and gluons as real dynamical objects. In detail, the measured moments of the non-singlet structure functions provided crucial support for the validity of the present theory of the strong inter-quark interactions, quantum chromodynamics.

  11. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wald, Lawrence W.; Bibyk, Irene K.

    1995-01-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology. The IN-STEP Program is sponsored by the Office of Space Access and Technology (OSAT).

  12. Telescience operations with the solar array module plasma interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Wald, L.W.; Bibyk, I.K.

    1995-09-01

    The Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment (SAMPIE) is a flight experiment that flew on the Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-62) in March 1994, as part of the OAST-2 mission. The overall objective of SAMPIE was to determine the adverse environmental interactions within the space plasma of low earth orbit (LEO) on modern solar cells and space power system materials which are artificially biased to high positive and negative direct current (DC) voltages. The two environmental interactions of interest included high voltage arcing from the samples to the space plasma and parasitic current losses. High voltage arcing can cause physical damage to power system materials and shorten expected hardware life. Parasitic current losses can reduce power system efficiency because electric currents generated in a power system drain into the surrounding plasma via parasitic resistance. The flight electronics included two programmable high voltage DC power supplies to bias the experiment samples, instruments to measure the surrounding plasma environment in the STS cargo bay, and the on-board data acquisition system (DAS). The DAS provided in-flight experiment control, data storage, and communications through the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Hitchhiker flight avionics to the GSFC Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The DAS and the SAMPIE POCC computer systems were designed for telescience operations; this paper will focus on the experiences of the SAMPIE team regarding telescience development and operations from the GSFC POCC during STS-62. The SAMPIE conceptual development, hardware design, and system verification testing were accomplished at the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). SAMPIE was developed under the In-Space Technology Experiment Program (IN-STEP), which sponsors NASA, industry, and university flight experiments designed to enable and enhance space flight technology.

  13. Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner-Bolotin, Marina M.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.; Moll, R.; McPhee, K.; Nashon, S.

    2006-12-01

    We describe Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which build on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro combined with the digital video technology. This data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student learning is assessed in the following lecture using conceptual questions (clickers). The goal of this project is to use ILE to make large lectures more interactive and promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. We report on the systematic study conducted using the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey, Force Concept Inventory, open-ended physics problems and focus group interviews to determine the impact of ILE on student academic achievement, motivation and attitudes towards physics. Three sections of students (750 students) experienced four ILE experiments. The surveys were administered twice and academic results for students who experienced the ILE for a particular topic were compared to the students, from a different section, who did not complete the ILE for that topic. Additional qualitative data on students’ attitudes was collected using open ended survey questions and interviews. We will present preliminary conclusions about the role of ILEs as an effective pedagogy in large introductory physics courses. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, J.Wiley & Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  14. An immersed structure approach for fluid-vegetation interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattis, Steven A.; Dawson, Clint N.; Kees, Christopher E.; Farthing, Matthew W.

    2015-06-01

    We present an immersed structure approach for modeling the interaction between surface flows and vegetation. Fluid flow and rigid and flexible vegetative obstacles are coupled through a local drag relation that conserves momentum. In the presented method, separate meshes are used for the fluid domain and vegetative obstacles. Taking techniques from immersed boundary finite element methods, the effects of the fluid on the vegetative structures and vice versa are calculated using integral transforms. Using a simple elastic structure model we incorporate bending and moving vegetative obstacles. We model flexible vegetation as thin, elastic, inextensible cantilever beams. Using the immersed structure approach, a fully coupled fluid-vegetation interaction model is developed assuming dynamic fluid flow and quasi-static bending. This relatively computationally inexpensive model allows for thousands of vegetative obstacles to be included in a simulation without requiring an extremely refined fluid mesh. The method is validated with comparisons to mean velocity profiles and bent vegetation heights from experiments that are reproduced computationally. We test the method on several channel flow setups. We calculate the bulk drag coefficient in these flow scenarios and analyze their trends with changing model parameters including stem population density and flow Reynolds number. Bulk drag models are the primary method of incorporating small-scale drag from individual plants into a value that can be used in larger-scale models. Upscaled bulk drag quantities from this method may be utilized in larger-scale simulations of flow through vegetation regions.

  15. The FrPNC Experiment, weak interaction studies in Francium at TRIUMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, E.; Aubin, S.; Collister, R.; Behr, J. A.; Gwinner, G.; Orozco, L. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Tandecki, M.; Sheng, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-09-01

    Francium is an excellent system to study the nuclear weak force due to its large nucleus and relatively simple atomic structure. The FrPNC experiment has a facility to produce cold trapped atomic francium samples for parity non-conservation studies. We are preparing to measure both the nuclear spin independent and dependent parts of the weak interaction in francium. The first one gives information about weak neutral currents at low energies, while the second one is sensitive to weak interactions between nucleons. We present the current status of the experiment.

  16. Electronic structure theory of weakly interacting bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Shiang; Kaxiras, Efthimios

    2016-06-01

    We derive electronic structure models for weakly interacting bilayers such as graphene-graphene and graphene-hexagonal boron nitride, based on density functional theory calculations followed by Wannier transformation of electronic states. These transferable interlayer coupling models can be applied to investigate the physics of bilayers with arbitrary translations and twists. The functional form, in addition to the dependence on the distance, includes the angular dependence that results from higher angular momentum components in the Wannier pz orbitals. We demonstrate the capabilities of the method by applying it to a rotated graphene bilayer, which produces the analytically predicted renormalization of the Fermi velocity, Van Hove singularities in the density of states, and moiré pattern of the electronic localization at small twist angles. We further extend the theory to obtain the effective couplings by integrating out neighboring layers. This approach is instrumental for the design of van der Walls heterostructures with desirable electronic features and transport properties and for the derivation of low-energy theories for graphene stacks, including proximity effects from other layers.

  17. Plasma-materials interactions during rf experiments in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, S.A.; Bernabei, S.; Budny, R.; Chu, T.K.; Colestock, P.; Hinnov, E.; Hooke, W.; Hosea, J.; Hwang, D.; Jobes, F.

    1984-09-01

    Plasma-materials interactions studied in recent ICRF heating and lower hybrid current drive experiments are reviewed. The microscopic processes responsible for impurity generation are discussed. In ICRF experiments, improvements in machine operation and in antenna and feedthrough design have allowed efficient plasma heating at RF powers up to 3 MW. No significant loss of energy from the plasma core due to impurity radiation occurs. Lower hybrid current drive results in the generation and maintenance of hundreds of kiloamperes of plasma current carried by suprathermal electrons. The loss of these electrons and their role in impurity generation are assessed. Methods to avoid this problem are evaluated.

  18. Extracting short-ranged interactions from structure factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, A. A.

    2011-12-01

    Inverting scattering experiments to obtain effective interparticle interactions is generally a poorly conditioned problem. L. Reatto [Phil. Mag. A 58, 37 (1986)] showed that for atomic liquids close to the triple point, inversions are hard because the structure closely resembles that of an equivalent hard-sphere fluid. Here I demonstrate that at low concentrations and for particles with short-ranged attractive potentials, S(k) also exhibits a very weak dependence on potential shape. Instead, different potentials all generate an S(k) that closely resembles that of the Baxter model with a similar second-virial coefficient. By contrast, in this energetic fluid regime, the inversion of an attractive interaction from real-space correlations such as the radial distribution function g(r) is well conditioned. Nevertheless, one may extract further information from S(k) by measuring isosbestic points, values of k where the scattering intensity I(k) or the structure factor S(k) is invariant to changes in interaction-potential well depth. These points suggest a new extended corresponding states principle for particles in solution based on the packing fraction, the second osmotic virial coefficient, and a new measure of effective potential range.

  19. Computational and experimental techniques for coupled acoustic/structure interactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Sumali, Anton Hartono; Pierson, Kendall Hugh; Walsh, Timothy Francis; Dohner, Jeffrey Lynn; Reese, Garth M.; Day, David Minot

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the results obtained during a one-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative aimed at investigating coupled structural acoustic interactions by means of algorithm development and experiment. Finite element acoustic formulations have been developed based on fluid velocity potential and fluid displacement. Domain decomposition and diagonal scaling preconditioners were investigated for parallel implementation. A formulation that includes fluid viscosity and that can simulate both pressure and shear waves in fluid was developed. An acoustic wave tube was built, tested, and shown to be an effective means of testing acoustic loading on simple test structures. The tube is capable of creating a semi-infinite acoustic field due to nonreflecting acoustic termination at one end. In addition, a micro-torsional disk was created and tested for the purposes of investigating acoustic shear wave damping in microstructures, and the slip boundary conditions that occur along the wet interface when the Knudsen number becomes sufficiently large.

  20. Distributed flexoelectric structural sensing: Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S. D.; Li, H.; Tzou, H. S.

    2015-07-01

    "Distributed" sensors are sensitive to spatially distributed structural behaviors, as compared with conventional "discrete" sensors measuring only discrete and local behaviors. The phenomenon of electric polarization induced by strain gradients in solid dielectrics is known as the direct flexoelectric effect. In this study, distributed dynamic sensing using flexoelectric materials is proposed and the flexoelectric signal of distributed flexoelectric sensors laminated on an arbitrary shell structure is defined. Both the open-circuit and the close-circuit models of distributed flexoelectric sensing are developed. An equivalent flexoelectric constant is measured using the proposed open-circuit voltage model. Flexoelectric responses of various locations of a BST beam exhibit consistency and linearity in the case of small deflection. The inferred flexoelectric constant is comparable with the reported maximal coefficient and it also proves that the proposed model is effective to the flexoelectric constant measurement. Distributed sensing behaviors are also experimentally validated on the flexoelectric cantilever beam. Results show that theoretical predictions match well with the experimental results for the fundamental mode. Experiments of distributed sensing signals of beams suggest that distributed flexoelectric sensors are competent to provide the mode shape of strain gradients. Thus, distributed sensing based on the flexoelectric effect is effective to monitoring structural dynamic behaviors.

  1. Interest enhancements to science experiments: Interactions with student gender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Michael E.

    Males are more likely than females to aspire to and enter scientific careers, a pattern that might be attributed to gender differences in the appeal of school science. Differences might arise, in part, from gender-related interactions with the interest value of school science experiments. If modifiable, the interest value of experiments could influence attitudes toward science and subsequent choices concerning science involvement. In this study, middle school students carried out versions of science experiments designed to vary in their interest value. Experiment modifications, guided by a three-component model of interest, ranged from introduction of fantasy scenarios to manipulation of the difficulty and social context of the experiments. Subjects were 101 middle school students, 46 males and 55 females. Of primary interest were MANOVA comparisons of self-reported interest in the experiments, by gender and experimental condition. In general, interest enhancements were more effective for girls than boys. Boys were more attentive to aspects of the experiments that elicit perceptions of control, whereas girls were more attentive to social aspects.

  2. Structural studies of lipid-protein interactions on cushioned bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, S. K.; Mukhopadhyay, M. K.; Ma, Y.; Lopez, I.; Bera, S.; Lurio, L. B.; Chakrabarti, A.; Kim, J. E.; Sanyal, M. K.; Sinha, S. K.

    2013-03-01

    Biological membranes are heterogeneous and dynamical organizations of lipids and proteins, which perform functions fundamental to cell survival. Lipid-protein interactions control these functions by influencing folding and stability of integral or peripheral membrane proteins. Further, the incorporation or adsorption of these proteins into the membrane can in turn influence the lipid bilayer properties. In spite of some progress in understanding this process, a detailed structural analysis is lacking. Towards a better understanding of this interaction, we have performed an advanced interface sensitive scattering experiment using synchrotron x-rays. To accurately mimic the biological membranes with their natural thermal fluctuations and in-plane mobility of lipid molecules, polymer cushioned lipid bilayers have been used. This study shows that the adsorption of peripheral membrane proteinspectrindepends on the lipid headgroups, exhibiting different types of binding to phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamie (PE). Further, the interaction of outer membrane protein A (OMP-A), an integral membrane protein is sensitive to the thermodynamic phase of the lipids. A detailed physical modeling of the lipid-protein interactions is under way.

  3. U.S. perspective on technology demonstration experiments for adaptive structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aswani, Mohan; Wada, Ben K.; Garba, John A.

    1991-01-01

    Evaluation of design concepts for adaptive structures is being performed in support of several focused research programs. These include programs such as Precision Segmented Reflector (PSR), Control Structure Interaction (CSI), and the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX). Although not specifically designed for adaptive structure technology validation, relevant experiments can be performed using the Passive and Active Control of Space Structures (PACOSS) testbed, the Space Integrated Controls Experiment (SPICE), the CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM), and the Dynamic Scale Model Test (DSMT) Hybrid Scale. In addition to the ground test experiments, several space flight experiments have been planned, including a reduced gravity experiment aboard the KC-135 aircraft, shuttle middeck experiments, and the Inexpensive Flight Experiment (INFLEX).

  4. Laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, R.P.

    1987-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of several laser-plasma-interaction experiments using multikilojoule lasers, and considers their implications for laser fusion. The experiments used 1.06, 0.53, 0.35, and 0.26 ..mu..m light to produce relatively large, warm, planar plasmas and to study the effect of laser wavelength and density-gradient scale length on the Stimulated Raman Scattering and on the scattering of light at frequencies near the incident laser frequency by Stimulated Brillouin Scattering or other processes. The results of these experiments suggest that some laser wavelength between 0.2 and 0.6 ..mu..m will be required for high-gain laser fusion.

  5. Structure factors in granular experiments with homogeneous fluidization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gnoli, Andrea; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Sarracino, Alessandro; Villamaina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Velocity and density structure factors are measured over a hydrodynamic range of scales in a horizontal quasi-2D fluidized granular experiment, with packing fractions ϕ ∈ [10%, 40%]. The fluidization is realized by vertically vibrating a rough plate, on top of which particles perform a Brownian-like horizontal motion in addition to inelastic collisions. On one hand, the density structure factor is equal to that of elastic hard spheres, except in the limit of large length-scales, as it occurs in the presence of an effective interaction. On the other hand, the velocity field shows a more complex structure which is a genuine expression of a non-equilibrium steady state and which can be compared to a recent fluctuating hydrodynamic theory with non-equilibrium noise. The temporal decay of velocity modes autocorrelations is compatible with linear hydrodynamic equations with rates dictated by viscous momentum diffusion, corrected by a typical interaction time with the thermostat. Equal-time velocity structure factors display a peculiar shape with a plateau at large length-scales and another one at small scales, marking two different temperatures: the "bath" temperature Tb, depending on shaking parameters, and the "granular" temperature Tg < Tb, which is affected by collisions. The two ranges of scales are separated by a correlation length which grows with ϕ, after proper rescaling with the mean free path.

  6. Structure factors in granular experiments with homogeneous fluidization.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Andrea; Gnoli, Andrea; Gradenigo, Giacomo; Sarracino, Alessandro; Villamaina, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Velocity and density structure factors are measured over a hydrodynamic range of scales in a horizontal quasi-2D fluidized granular experiment, with packing fractions φ ∈ [10%, 40%]. The fluidization is realized by vertically vibrating a rough plate, on top of which particles perform a Brownian-like horizontal motion in addition to inelastic collisions. On one hand, the density structure factor is equal to that of elastic hard spheres, except in the limit of large length-scales, as it occurs in the presence of an effective interaction. On the other hand, the velocity field shows a more complex structure which is a genuine expression of a non-equilibrium steady state and which can be compared to a recent fluctuating hydrodynamic theory with non-equilibrium noise. The temporal decay of velocity modes autocorrelations is compatible with linear hydrodynamic equations with rates dictated by viscous momentum diffusion, corrected by a typical interaction time with the thermostat. Equal-time velocity structure factors display a peculiar shape with a plateau at large length-scales and another one at small scales, marking two different temperatures: the "bath" temperature T(b), depending on shaking parameters, and the "granular" temperature T(g) < T(b), which is affected by collisions. The two ranges of scales are separated by a correlation length which grows with φ, after proper rescaling with the mean free path. PMID:22239797

  7. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction - How Vested Interests Affect People's Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions.

    PubMed

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner's freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor-client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  8. Control Of Flexible Structures-2 (COFS-2) flight control, structure and gimbal system interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fay, Stanley; Gates, Stephen; Henderson, Timothy; Sackett, Lester; Kirchwey, Kim; Stoddard, Isaac; Storch, Joel

    1988-01-01

    The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment (COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment, but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal pointing control system has been studied using analysis and simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments. Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers was included. Control system stability and performance and loads on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated. The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets.

  9. Dynamic Structure Factors of the Spin-1/2 XX Chain with Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derzhko, Oleg; Verkholyak, Taras

    2006-10-01

    We consider the spin-1/2 isotropic XY chain in a (z) transverse magnetic field with the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction directed along the z-axis in spin space and examine the effects of the latter interaction on the zz, xx (yy) and xy (yx) dynamic structure factors. The Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction does not manifest itself in the zz dynamic quantities. In contrast, the xx (yy) and xy (yx) dynamic structure factors show dramatical changes owing to the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction. Implications of our results for electron spin resonance experiments are briefly discussed.

  10. Eco-evolutionary experience in novel species interactions.

    PubMed

    Saul, Wolf-Christian; Jeschke, Jonathan M

    2015-03-01

    A better understanding of how ecological novelty influences interactions in new combinations of species is key for predicting interaction outcomes, and can help focus conservation and management efforts on preventing the introduction of novel organisms or species (including invasive species, GMOs, synthetic organisms, resurrected species and emerging pathogens) that seem particularly 'risky' for resident species. Here, we consider the implications of different degrees of eco-evolutionary experience of interacting resident and non-resident species, define four qualitative risk categories for estimating the probability of successful establishment and impact of novel species and discuss how the effects of novelty change over time. Focusing then on novel predator-prey interactions, we argue that novelty entails density-dependent advantages for non-resident species, with their largest effects often being at low prey densities. This is illustrated by a comparison of predator functional responses and prey predation risk curves between novel species and ecologically similar resident species, and raises important issues for the conservation of endangered resident prey species. PMID:25626585

  11. Neutrino-nucleus interactions in the T2K experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, T.; Mosel, U.

    2010-09-15

    We present a study of neutrino-nucleus interactions at the T2K experiment based on the GiBUU transport model. The aim of T2K is to measure {nu}{sub e} appearance and {theta}{sub 13}, but it will also be able to do a precise measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}}disappearance. The former requires a good understanding of {pi}{sup 0} production, while the latter is closely connected with a good understanding of quasielastic scattering. For both processes we investigate the influence of nuclear effects and particular final-state interactions on the expected event rates, taking into account the T2K detector setup.

  12. Perceptions and experiences of people with mental illness regarding their interactions with police.

    PubMed

    Livingston, James D; Desmarais, Sarah L; Verdun-Jones, Simon; Parent, Richard; Michalak, Erin; Brink, Johann

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the perceptions and lived experiences of people with mental illness in relation to their interactions with the police. A community-based participatory research approach was used and a procedural justice theoretical perspective guided the study. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted by peer researchers with 60 people with mental illness who had interacted with the police and were living in Metro Vancouver, Canada. Among the study participants, contact with the police was frequent and occurred under a diverse range of circumstances. The majority of participants perceived being treated in a procedurally just manner by the police officer(s) who were involved in their most recent interaction. Almost three-quarters (n=43, 72%) of participants were generally satisfied with how the police officer(s) had handled their most recent interaction. The slight majority of participants (n=30, 51%) rated their previous contacts with the police as a positive experience overall, with 32% (n=19) indicating that their previous interactions with the police were negative life experiences. The findings paint a more balanced picture than that which is often portrayed by the media. Emphasizing a procedural justice framework for police handling of situations involving people with mental illness is a vital step toward improving how these interactions are experienced and perceived. PMID:24684784

  13. Structure and ubiquitin binding of the ubiquitin-interacting motif

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Wang, B.; Alam, S.; Higginson, D.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, C.; Hill, C.

    2003-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is used to target proteins into a large number of different biological processes including proteasomal degradation, endocytosis, virus budding, and vacuolar protein sorting (Vps). Ubiquitylated proteins are typically recognized using one of several different conserved ubiquitin binding modules. Here, we report the crystal structure and ubiquitin binding properties of one such module, the ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM). We found that UIM peptides from several proteins involved in endocytosis and vacuolar protein sorting including Hrs, Vps27p, Stam1, and Eps15 bound specifically, but with modest affinity (K{sub d} = 0.1-1 mM), to free ubiquitin. Full affinity ubiquitin binding required the presence of conserved acidic patches at the N and C terminus of the UIM, as well as highly conserved central alanine and serine residues. NMR chemical shift perturbation mapping experiments demonstrated that all of these UIM peptides bind to the I44 surface of ubiquitin. The 1.45 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the second yeast Vps27p UIM (Vps27p-2) revealed that the ubiquitin-interacting motif forms an amphipathic helix. Although Vps27p-2 is monomeric in solution, the motif unexpectedly crystallized as an antiparallel four-helix bundle, and the potential biological implications of UIM oligomerization are therefore discussed.

  14. NASA/DOD control/structures interaction technology, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, R. L.

    1986-11-01

    Control/structures interactions, deployment dynamics and system performance of large flexible spacecraft are discussed. Spacecraft active controls, deployable truss structures, deployable antennas, solar power systems for space stations, pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads, computer-aided design for large space structures, and passive damping for flexible structures are among the topics covered.

  15. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Control/structures interactions, deployment dynamics and system performance of large flexible spacecraft are discussed. Spacecraft active controls, deployable truss structures, deployable antennas, solar power systems for space stations, pointing control systems for space station gimballed payloads, computer-aided design for large space structures, and passive damping for flexible structures are among the topics covered.

  16. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-01-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis. PMID:24936906

  17. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    SciTech Connect

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K.; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  18. Structure of local interactions in complex financial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X. F.; Chen, T. T.; Zheng, B.

    2014-06-01

    With the network methods and random matrix theory, we investigate the interaction structure of communities in financial markets. In particular, based on the random matrix decomposition, we clarify that the local interactions between the business sectors (subsectors) are mainly contained in the sector mode. In the sector mode, the average correlation inside the sectors is positive, while that between the sectors is negative. Further, we explore the time evolution of the interaction structure of the business sectors, and observe that the local interaction structure changes dramatically during a financial bubble or crisis.

  19. Constraining the nonstandard interaction parameters in long baseline neutrino experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huitu, Katri; Kärkkäinen, Timo J.; Maalampi, Jukka; Vihonen, Sampsa

    2016-03-01

    In this article we investigate the prospects for probing the strength of the possible nonstandard neutrino interactions (NSI) in long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We find that these experiments are sensitive to NSI couplings down to the level of 0.01-0.1 depending on the oscillation channel and the baseline length, as well as on the detector's fiducial mass. We also investigate the interference of the leptonic C P angle δC P with the constraining of the NSI couplings. It is found that the interference is strong in the case of the νe↔νμ and νe↔ντ transitions but not significant in other transitions. In our numerical analysis we apply the GLoBES software and use the LBNO setup as our benchmark.

  20. Police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive social interactions following traumatic incidents

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rachel; Pistrang, Nancy; Billings, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Background Police officers are routinely exposed to potentially traumatic incidents yet the majority do not develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Social support has been identified as one factor that may maintain wellbeing in this population, although what constitutes supportive or unsupportive interactions is unclear. Objective To explore police officers’ experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions following distressing incidents. Method Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 police officers. Transcripts were analysed using Braun and Clarke's (2006) thematic analysis approach. Results Participants described a range of supportive interactions with colleagues, friends, and family, as well as social constraints that hindered interactions. Ambivalence about talking about the impact of distressing events was striking throughout the accounts. The context and source of available support, as well as beliefs about talking, influenced their interactions. Humour was a central feature of interactions with colleagues; more emotional talk occurred with partners and close family, albeit with officers limiting details in order to protect others. Conclusions The findings provide tentative insights into the processes of social support that may contribute to the resilience of police officers following traumatic incidents. Further research is needed to examine whether the experiences of supportive and unsupportive interactions differ for those with and without PTSD. PMID:23516046

  1. Quantifying long-range correlations and 1/f patterns in a minimal experiment of social interaction

    PubMed Central

    Bedia, Manuel G.; Aguilera, Miguel; Gómez, Tomás; Larrode, David G.; Seron, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, researchers in social cognition have found the “perceptual crossing paradigm” to be both a theoretical and practical advance toward meeting particular challenges. This paradigm has been used to analyze the type of interactive processes that emerge in minimal interactions and it has allowed progress toward understanding of the principles of social cognition processes. In this paper, we analyze whether some critical aspects of these interactions could not have been observed by previous studies. We consider alternative indicators that could complete, or even lead us to rethink, the current interpretation of the results obtained from both experimental and simulated modeling in the fields of social interactions and minimal perceptual crossing. In particular, we discuss the possibility that previous experiments have been analytically constrained to a short-term dynamic type of player response. Additionally, we propose the possibility of considering these experiments from a more suitable framework based on the use and analysis of long-range correlations and fractal dynamics. We will also reveal evidence supporting the idea that social interactions are deployed along many scales of activity. Specifically, we propose that the fractal structure of the interactions could be a more adequate framework to understand the type of social interaction patterns generated in a social engagement. PMID:25429277

  2. Market structure explained by pairwise interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    Financial markets are a typical example of complex systems where interactions between constituents lead to many remarkable features. Here we give empirical evidence, by making as few assumptions as possible, that the market microstructure capturing almost all of the available information in the data of stock markets does not involve higher order than pairwise interactions. We give an economic interpretation of this pairwise model. We show that it accurately recovers the empirical correlation coefficients; thus the collective behaviors are quantitatively described by models that capture the observed pairwise correlations but no higher-order interactions. Furthermore, we show that an order-disorder transition occurs, as predicted by the pairwise model. Last, we make the link with the graph-theoretic description of stock markets recovering the non-random and scale-free topology, shrinking length during crashes and meaningful clustering features, as expected.

  3. Control-structures Interaction Test of the LACE Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.; Fisher, Shalom

    1992-01-01

    It is clear that additional experience and validation of Control Structures Interaction (CSI) techniques are needed in controlling the structural dynamics of flexible spacecraft. It is also clear that the effects of the space environment such as weightlessness dictate that this be done in space. Unfortunately, orbital tests are difficult to achieve because of the high cost of the test article, the launch into orbit, the instrumentation, and communication systems. The Low-power Atmospheric Compensation Experiment (LACE) Satellite has provided an opportunity to achieve a CSI test in space for very little cost. First, the CSI test rode piggy-back and did not interfere with the primary objective of LACE. Second, the novel technique of using ground based measurements of vibration of the orbiting satellite was employed. The LACE has a heavy central body to which is attached booms with lengths as long as 150 feet. The ground measurements were obtained using laser Doppler radar at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory Firepond Facility. The initial tests demonstrated the accuracy of the vibration measurements and obtained structural responses for enhancing the accuracy of the mathematical model of the structural dynamics. Germanium corner-cube retroreflectors attached to the central body and a boom deployed to 18 feet ensured a high strength return signal. Subsequent tests demonstrated the ability of an open-loop damper to attenuate the vibrations of the orbiting satellite. The LACE test results are important in contributing to the validation of a CSI technique, and demonstrating a novel ground measurement technique for orbital tests that is accurate but which has very low cost.

  4. Solving Fluid Structure Interaction Problems with an Immersed Boundary Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barad, Michael F.; Brehm, Christoph; Kiris, Cetin C.

    2016-01-01

    An immersed boundary method for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations can be used for moving boundary problems as well as fully coupled fluid-structure interaction is presented. The underlying Cartesian immersed boundary method of the Launch Ascent and Vehicle Aerodynamics (LAVA) framework, based on the locally stabilized immersed boundary method previously presented by the authors, is extended to account for unsteady boundary motion and coupled to linear and geometrically nonlinear structural finite element solvers. The approach is validated for moving boundary problems with prescribed body motion and fully coupled fluid structure interaction problems. Keywords: Immersed Boundary Method, Higher-Order Finite Difference Method, Fluid Structure Interaction.

  5. Experiments Evaluating the Interaction between Deformable Substrates and Prograding Clinoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatmas, E. S.; Foreman, B.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    Passive margins often contain salt and mobile shale layers that act as deformable substrates underlying coastal sediments. By understanding the interaction between deformable substrates and migrating clinoforms in simplified, experimental settings, we hope to clarify their fundamental behavior in natural deltaic settings. Substrate deformation occurs by a number of processes and can result in rugose ocean floor bathymetry which can locally trap sediment. In our experiments, we focus on how differential sediment loading on two substrates of different rheologies (Newtonian versus Bingham) affects aspects of clinoform deposition. We are particularly interested in the effects of the progradation rate and substrate rheology on the locus of clinoform deposition over time as the substrate and delta interact. Our experimental setup uses a rectangular flume that is 230 cm long, 8 cm wide and 30 cm tall. The materials we used for the mobile shale experiments involved a mixture of kaolinite and water which provide a Bingham rheology, and the sediment was a quartz sand and coal mixture. For a Newtonian rheology we used corn syrup as a deformable substrate, capturing the Newtonian rheology of subsurface salt, and the sediment consisted of a mixture of equal volumes of walnut shells and kaolinite clay. For each experiment we systematically changed sediment feed rate and substrate thickness. Deformation styles differ qualitatively between Bingham (kaolinite/mobile shale) and Newtonian (corn syrup/salt) experiments. In mobile-shale (Bingham) experiments, a bulge forms at the toe of the clinoform and the clinoform eventually overtops this bulge, creating alternating thick and thin stratigraphic accumulations down depositional dip. For the salt (Newtonian) experiments, deformation occurs behind the clinoform foreset in the form of diapirs. Preliminary results show minimal impacts on shoreline progradation rate as the delta loads mobile shale substrates. This suggests that the

  6. Application of linker technique to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are key events controlling several biological processes. We have developed and employed a method to trap transiently interacting protein complexes for structural studies using glycine-rich linkers to fuse interacting partners, one of which is unstructured. Initial steps involve isothermal titration calorimetry to identify the minimum binding region of the unstructured protein in its interaction with its stable binding partner. This is followed by computational analysis to identify the approximate site of the interaction and to design an appropriate linker length. Subsequently, fused constructs are generated and characterized using size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments. The structure of the chimeric protein is then solved by crystallization, and validated both in vitro and in vivo by substituting key interacting residues of the full length, unlinked proteins with alanine. This protocol offers the opportunity to study crucial and currently unattainable transient protein interactions involved in various biological processes. PMID:26985443

  7. Structural characterization of the interaction of human lactoferrin with calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Gifford, Jessica L; Ishida, Hiroaki; Vogel, Hans J

    2012-01-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf) is an 80 kDa, iron (Fe(3+))-binding immunoregulatory glycoprotein secreted into most exocrine fluids, found in high concentrations in colostrum and milk, and released from neutrophil secondary granules at sites of infection and inflammation. In a number of cell types, Lf is internalized through receptor-mediated endocytosis and targeted to the nucleus where it has been demonstrated to act as a transcriptional trans-activator. Here we characterize human Lf's interaction with calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous, 17 kDa regulatory calcium (Ca(2+))-binding protein localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of activated cells. Due to the size of this intermolecular complex (∼100 kDa), TROSY-based NMR techniques were employed to structurally characterize Ca(2+)-CaM when bound to intact apo-Lf. Both CaM's backbone amides and the ε-methyl group of key methionine residues were used as probes in chemical shift perturbation and cross-saturation experiments to define the binding interface of apo-Lf on Ca(2+)-CaM. Unlike the collapsed conformation through which Ca(2+)-CaM binds the CaM-binding domains of its classical targets, Ca(2+)-CaM assumes an extended structure when bound to apo-Lf. Apo-Lf appears to interact predominantly with the C-terminal lobe of Ca(2+)-CaM, enabling the N-terminal lobe to potentially bind another target. Our use of intact apo-Lf has made possible the identification of a secondary interaction interface, removed from CaM's primary binding domain. Secondary interfaces play a key role in the target's response to CaM binding, highlighting the importance of studying intact complexes. This solution-based approach can be applied to study other regulatory calcium-binding EF-hand proteins in intact intermolecular complexes. PMID:23236421

  8. Experiments on Diffusion Flame Structure of a Laminar Vortex Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Shin-Juh; Dahm, Werner J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The study of flame-vortex interactions provides one of the means to better understand turbulent combustion, and allows for canonical configurations that contain the fundamental elements found in turbulent flames, These include concentrated vorticity, entrainment and mixing, strain and nonequilibrium phenomena, diffusion and differential diffusion, partial premixing and diluent effects, and heat release effects. In flame- vortex configurations, these fundamental elements can be studied under more controlled conditions than is possible in direct investigations of turbulent flames. Since the paper of Marble, the problem of the flame-vortex interaction has received considerable attention theoretically, numerically and experimentally. Several configurations exist for study of the premixed flame/vortex ring interaction but more limited results have been obtained to date for the diffusion flame/vortex ring case. The setup of Chen and Dahm, which is conceptually similar to that of Karagozian and Manda and Karagozian, Suganuma and Strom where the ring is composed of fuel and air and combustion begins during the ring formation process, is used in the current study. However, it is essential to conduct the experiments in microgravity to remove the asymmetries caused by buoyancy and thus obtain highly symmetric and repeatable interactions. In previous studies it was found that the flame structure of the vortex ring was similar to that obtained analytically by Karagozian and Manda. Dilution of propane with nitrogen led mainly to a reduction in flame luminosities, flame burnout times were affected by both fuel volumes and amount of dilution, and a simple model of the burnout times was developed. In this paper, a discussion on reacting ring displacement and flame burnout time will be given, and the flame structures of vortex rings containing ethane and air will be compared to those of propane reacting in air.

  9. Spin-mass interaction low-temperature experiment on ISS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, H.; Lee, J.; Moody, M.; Strayer, D.

    The Standard Model of particle physics has had spectacular success in explaining all available data on the fundamental constituents of matter. However, one of the most important unresolved issues is the "strong CP problem." Peccei and Quinn developed a very plausible explanation for this phenom n o n over two decades agoe leading to the prediction of a new particle, dubbed the "axion," which, among other properties, mediates a force between intrinsic spin and mass. The axion is also a strong candidate for dark matter. The Spin-Mass Interaction Low-temperature Experiment (SMILE) is an ISS experiment capable of approaching, to within a factor of 100, the spin-mass interaction allowed for the axion. To reach this sensitivity, existing superconducting accelerometer technology will be combined with advantages of the low-g environment of space. An apparatus for a ground test has been designed and constructed. A slightly modified instrument, flown in LTMPF on ISS, will improve the limit of spin-mass interaction by over eight orders of magnitude from the existing limit. Although the possible detection of the axion at the level allowed may take an experiment on a quieter free-flyer, SMILE will search for a spin-coupling force in a large, explored parameter space, providing an important new test of General Relativity. SMILE employs a superconducting differential angular accelerator. To achieve the required sensitivity, the intrinsic noise of this instrument, as well as its isolation from vibrational, gravitational, and electromagnetic disturbances, must be optimized. The Brownian motion provides the ultimate limit of sensitivity for a gravity experiment. To reduce this noise, the damping coefficient of the detector, as well as its temperature, must be minimized. The low-g environment of space permits nearly free suspension of the test masses, under which the highest resonance quality factors can be attained. The amplifier noise is suppressed by driving the source at the res

  10. Structure and interactions of human respiratory mucin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purdy, Kirstin; Sheehan, John; Rubinstein, Michael; Wong, Gerard

    2006-03-01

    Human respiratory mucin plays a crucial role in the pathology of Cystic Fibrosis lung infections. Mucin is a flexible, linear polyelectrolyte, characterized by its many charged oligo-carbohydrate side chains that give it its bottle-brush structure. The macroscopic properties of a mucin suspension are known to change drastically with changes in ion concentration and solution pH, but little is known about the effect of these variables on individual mucin structure. We present preliminary results on the structural response of individual human respiratory mucin molecules to variations in concentration of ions of different valences via small angle x-ray diffraction.

  11. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya M.; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell W.; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. The streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. The largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  12. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionally dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.

  13. Fluid-structure interactions in compressible cavity flows

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wagner, Justin L.; Casper, Katya Marie; Beresh, Steven J.; Hunter, Patrick S.; Spillers, Russell Wayne; Henfling, John F.; Mayes, Randall L.

    2015-06-08

    Experiments were performed to understand the complex fluid-structure interactions that occur during aircraft internal store carriage. A cylindrical store was installed in a rectangular cavity having a length-to-depth ratio of 3.33 and a length-to-width ratio of 1. The Mach number ranged from 0.6 to 2.5 and the incoming boundary layer was turbulent. Fast-response pressure measurements provided aeroacoustic loading in the cavity, while triaxial accelerometers provided simultaneous store response. Despite occupying only 6% of the cavity volume, the store significantly altered the cavity acoustics. The store responded to the cavity flow at its natural structural frequencies, and it exhibited a directionallymore » dependent response to cavity resonance. Specifically, cavity tones excited the store in the streamwise and wall-normal directions consistently, whereas a spanwise response was observed only occasionally. Also, the streamwise and wall-normal responses were attributed to the longitudinal pressure waves and shear layer vortices known to occur during cavity resonance. Although the spanwise response to cavity tones was limited, broadband pressure fluctuations resulted in significant spanwise accelerations at store natural frequencies. As a result, the largest vibrations occurred when a cavity tone matched a structural natural frequency, although energy was transferred more efficiently to natural frequencies having predominantly streamwise and wall-normal motions.« less

  14. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. I. Experiments on monolayers.

    PubMed Central

    Mingins, J; Stigter, D; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    We study the lateral headgroup interactions among phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and among phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) molecules in monolayers and extend our previous models. In this paper, we present an extensive set of pressure-area isotherms and surface potential experiments on monolayers of phospholipids ranging from 14 to 22 carbons in length at the n-heptane/water interface, over a wide range of temperature, salt concentration, and pH on the acid side. The pressure data presented here are a considerable extension of previous data (1) to higher surface densities, comprehensively checked for monolayer loss, and include new data on PE molecules. We explore surface densities ranging from extremely low to intermediate, near to the main phase transition, in which range the surface pressures and potentials are found to be independent of the chain length. Thus, these data bear directly on the headgroup interactions. These interactions are observed to be independent of ionic strength. PC and PE molecules differ strongly in two respects: (a) the lateral repulsion among PC molecules is much stronger than for PE, and (b) the lateral repulsion among PC molecules increases strongly with temperature whereas PE interactions are almost independent of temperature. Similarly, the surface potential for PC is found to increase with temperature whereas for PE it does not. In this and the following paper we show that these data from dilute to semidilute monolayers are consistent with a theoretical model that predicts that, independent of coverage, for PC the P-N+ dipole is oriented slightly into the oil phase because of the hydrophobicity of the methyl groups, increasingly so with temperature, whereas for PE the P-N+ dipole is directed into the water phase. PMID:1617140

  15. Controller-structure interaction compensation using adaptive residual mode filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davidson, Roger A.; Balas, Mark J.

    1990-01-01

    It is not feasible to construct controllers for large space structures or large scale systems (LSS's) which are of the same order as the structures. The complexity of the dynamics of these systems is such that full knowledge of its behavior cannot by processed by today's controller design methods. The controller for system performance of such a system is therefore based on a much smaller reduced-order model (ROM). Unfortunately, the interaction between the LSS and the ROM-based controller can produce instabilities in the closed-loop system due to the unmodeled dynamics of the LSS. Residual mode filters (RMF's) allow the systematic removal of these instabilities in a matter which does not require a redesign of the controller. In addition RMF's have a strong theoretical basis. As simple first- or second-order filters, the RMF CSI compensation technique is at once modular, simple and highly effective. RMF compensation requires knowledge of the dynamics of the system modes which resulted in the previous closed-loop instabilities (the residual modes), but this information is sometimes known imperfectly. An adaptive, self-tuning RMF design, which compensates for uncertainty in the frequency of the residual mode, has been simulated using continuous-time and discrete-time models of a flexible robot manipulator. Work has also been completed on the discrete-time experimental implementation on the Martin Marietta flexible robot manipulator experiment. This paper will present the results of that work on adaptive, self-tuning RMF's, and will clearly show the advantage of this adaptive compensation technique for controller-structure interaction (CSI) instabilities in actively-controlled LSS's.

  16. Neutron interactions in the CUORE neutrinoless double beta decay experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0nuDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0nuDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0nuDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0nuDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0nuDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0nuDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0nuDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, winch can be produced underground both by (alpha,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE data to set an upper

  17. Neutron Interactions in the CUORE Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dolinski, Michelle Jean

    2008-10-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay (0vDBD) is a lepton-number violating process that can occur only for a massive Majorana neutrino. The search for 0vDBD is currently the only practical experimental way to determine whether neutrinos are identical to their own antiparticles (Majorana neutrinos) or have distinct particle and anti-particle states (Dirac neutrinos). In addition, the observation of 0vDBD can provide information about the absolute mass scale of the neutrino. The Cuoricino experiment was a sensitive search for 0vDBD, as well as a proof of principle for the next generation experiment, CUORE. CUORE will search for 0vDBD of 130Te with a ton-scale array of unenriched TeO2 bolometers. By increasing mass and decreasing the background for 0vDBD, the half-life sensitivity of CUORE will be a factor of twenty better than that of Cuoricino. The site for both of these experiments is the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, an underground laboratory with 3300 meters water equivalent rock overburden and a cosmic ray muon attenuation factor of 10-6. Because of the extreme low background requirements for CUORE, it is important that all potential sources of background in the 0vDBD peak region at 2530 keV are well understood. One potential source of background for CUORE comes from neutrons, which can be produced underground both by (α,n) reactions and by fast cosmic ray muon interactions. Preliminary simulations by the CUORE collaboration indicate that these backgrounds will be negligible for CUORE. However, in order to accurately simulate the expected neutron background, it is important to understand the cross sections for neutron interactions with detector materials. In order to help refine these simulations, I have measured the gamma-ray production cross sections for interactions of neutrons on the abundant stable isotopes of Te using the GEANIE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. In addition, I have used the GEANIE

  18. Laser plasma interaction experiments in the context of inertial fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labaune, C.; Bandulet, H.; Depierreux, S.; Lewis, K.; Michel, P.; Michard, A.; Baldis, H. A.; Hulin, S.; Pesme, D.; Hüller, S.; Tikhonchuk, V.; Riconda, C.; Weber, S.

    2004-12-01

    In laser fusion, the coupling and the propagation of the laser beams in the plasma surrounding the pellet must be well controlled for to succeed in producing a high energy level. To achieve thermonuclear ignition and high gain, the coupling efficiency must be as high as possible, the uniformity of the energy deposition must be very good and the fast electron generation must be minimized. This implies a deep understanding of the laser plasma interaction mechanisms to keep the nonlinear processes at a low level. Important advances in laser plasma interaction physics have been achieved thanks to the converging efforts of the experimental and theoretical approaches. Among the different studies of the last few years, we will report results on three themes which are important for future fusion experiments. The first concerns the ability of plasmas to induce temporal and spatial incoherence to the laser beams during their propagation. Beam smoothing, beam spraying and increased incoherence may in turn reduce the level of backscattering instabilities. In laser fusion, multiple beams are used to irradiate the target. The effect of the overlap of the laser beams on parametric instabilities may complicate the problem. Not only is there the interplay between instabilities driven by one beam, but also the interplay between instabilities driven by different beams. In the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI) experiment, although the overall stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) reflectivity was reduced, a well-defined resonance of the amplitude of ion acoustic waves (IAWs) associated with SBS has been observed for waves propagating along the bisecting direction between two laser beams. Energy transfer between two identical laser beams has been observed and correlated with plasma induced incoherence. The nonlinear saturation of stimulated scattering instabilities is a fundamental ingredient of the understanding of the observed and future reflectivity levels

  19. Fluid Structure Interaction in a Turbine Blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorla, Rama S. R.

    2004-01-01

    An unsteady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes solution in rotating frame formulation for turbomachinery applications is presented. Casting the governing equations in a rotating frame enabled the freezing of grid motion and resulted in substantial savings in computer time. The turbine blade was computationally simulated and probabilistically evaluated in view of several uncertainties in the aerodynamic, structural, material and thermal variables that govern the turbine blade. The interconnection between the computational fluid dynamics code and finite element structural analysis code was necessary to couple the thermal profiles with the structural design. The stresses and their variations were evaluated at critical points on the Turbine blade. Cumulative distribution functions and sensitivity factors were computed for stress responses due to aerodynamic, geometric, mechanical and thermal random variables.

  20. A Virtual Rock Physics Laboratory Through Visualized and Interactive Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanorio, T.; Di Bonito, C.; Clark, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    As new scientific challenges demand more comprehensive and multidisciplinary investigations, laboratory experiments are not expected to become simpler and/or faster. Experimental investigation is an indispensable element of scientific inquiry and must play a central role in the way current and future generations of scientist make decisions. To turn the complexity of laboratory work (and that of rocks!) into dexterity, engagement, and expanded learning opportunities, we are building an interactive, virtual laboratory reproducing in form and function the Stanford Rock Physics Laboratory, at Stanford University. The objective is to combine lectures on laboratory techniques and an online repository of visualized experiments consisting of interactive, 3-D renderings of equipment used to measure properties central to the study of rock physics (e.g., how to saturate rocks, how to measure porosity, permeability, and elastic wave velocity). We use a game creation system together with 3-D computer graphics, and a narrative voice to guide the user through the different phases of the experimental protocol. The main advantage gained in employing computer graphics over video footage is that students can virtually open the instrument, single out its components, and assemble it. Most importantly, it helps describe the processes occurring within the rock. These latter cannot be tracked while simply recording the physical experiment, but computer animation can efficiently illustrate what happens inside rock samples (e.g., describing acoustic waves, and/or fluid flow through a porous rock under pressure within an opaque core-holder - Figure 1). The repository of visualized experiments will complement lectures on laboratory techniques and constitute an on-line course offered through the EdX platform at Stanford. This will provide a virtual laboratory for anyone, anywhere to facilitate teaching/learning of introductory laboratory classes in Geophysics and expand the number of courses

  1. Plasma interaction experiment 2 (PIX 2): Laboratory and flight results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grier, N. T.

    1985-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiments 1 and 2 (PIX 1 and 2) were designed as first steps toward understanding interactions between high-voltage solar arrays and the surrounding plasma. The PIX 2 consisted of an approximately 2000-sq cm array divided into four equal segments. Each of the segments could be biased independently and the current measured separately. In addition to the solar array segments, PIX 2 had a hot-wire-filament electron emitter and a spherical Langmuir probe. The emitter was operated when the array segments were biased positively bove 125 V. Thermal electrons from the emitter aided in balancing the electron currents collected by the array. Laboratory and flight results of PIX 2 are presented. At high positive voltages on the solar array segments, the flight currents were approximately an order of magnitude larger than the ground test currents. This is attributed to the tank walls in the laboratory interfering with the electron currents to the array segments. From previous tests it is known that the tank walls limit the electron currents at high voltages. This was the first verification of the extent of the laboratory tank effect on the plasma coupling current.

  2. Experimental Studies of Hypernuclear Structure and the {lambda}N and {lambda}NN Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tamura, H.

    2008-04-29

    The {lambda}NN three-body force, through {lambda}N-{sigma}N coupling, plays an important role in the structure of {lambda} hypernuclei. We have been studying the {lambda}N interaction via hypernuclear {gamma}-ray spectroscopy experiments and obtained the effective interaction strengths of the spin-dependent {lambda}N interactions. In addition, a possible effect of the {lambda}NN three-body force is being investigated from precise level schemes of light {lambda} hypernuclei. The {lambda}NN three-body force can also be studied from the structure of neutron-rich {lambda} hypernuclei by using the ({pi}{sup -},K{sup +}) reaction.

  3. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist

    PubMed Central

    Porebski, Benjamin T.; Ho, Bosco K.; Buckle, Ashley M.

    2013-01-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  4. Interactive visualization tools for the structural biologist.

    PubMed

    Porebski, Benjamin T; Ho, Bosco K; Buckle, Ashley M

    2013-10-01

    In structural biology, management of a large number of Protein Data Bank (PDB) files and raw X-ray diffraction images often presents a major organizational problem. Existing software packages that manipulate these file types were not designed for these kinds of file-management tasks. This is typically encountered when browsing through a folder of hundreds of X-ray images, with the aim of rapidly inspecting the diffraction quality of a data set. To solve this problem, a useful functionality of the Macintosh operating system (OSX) has been exploited that allows custom visualization plugins to be attached to certain file types. Software plugins have been developed for diffraction images and PDB files, which in many scenarios can save considerable time and effort. The direct visualization of diffraction images and PDB structures in the file browser can be used to identify key files of interest simply by scrolling through a list of files. PMID:24068844

  5. Many-Body Interactions and Nuclear Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Dean, David Jarvis; Hagen, Gaute; Kvaal, S.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents several challenges to nuclear many-body theory and our understanding of the stability of nuclear matter. In order to achieve this, we present five different cases, starting with an idealized toy model. These cases expose problems that need to be understood in order to match recent advances in nuclear theory with current experimental programs in low-energy nuclear physics. In particular, we focus on our current understanding, or lack thereof, of many-body forces, and how they evolve as functions of the number of particles. We provide examples of discrepancies between theory and experiment and outline some selected perspectives for future research directions.

  6. Ecological Networks: Structure, Interaction Strength, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Samit; Sinha, Somdatta

    The fundamental building blocks of any ecosystem, the food webs, which are assemblages of species through various interconnections, provide a central concept in ecology. The study of a food web allows abstractions of the complexity and interconnectedness of natural communities that transcend the specific details of the underlying systems. For example, Fig. 1 shows a typical food web, where the species are connected through their feeding relationships. The top predator, Heliaster (starfish) feeds on many gastropods like Hexaplex, Morula, Cantharus, etc., some of whom predate on each other [129]. Interactions between species in a food web can be of many types, such as predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and ammensalism (see Section 1.1, Fig. 2).

  7. Degeneracies in long-baseline neutrino experiments from nonstandard interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Jiajun; Marfatia, Danny; Whisnant, Kerry

    2016-05-01

    We study parameter degeneracies that can occur in long-baseline neutrino appearance experiments due to nonstandard interactions (NSI) in neutrino propagation. For a single off-diagonal NSI parameter, and neutrino and antineutrino measurements at a single L /E , there exists a continuous four-fold degeneracy (related to the mass hierarchy and θ23 octant) that renders the mass hierarchy, octant, and C P phase unknowable. Even with a combination of NO ν A and T2K data, which in principle can resolve the degeneracy, both NSI and the C P phase remain unconstrained because of experimental uncertainties. A wide-band beam experiment like DUNE will resolve this degeneracy if the nonzero off-diagonal NSI parameter is ɛe μ. If ɛe τ is nonzero, or the diagonal NSI parameter ɛe e is O (1 ), a wrong determination of the mass hierarchy and of C P violation can occur at DUNE. The octant degeneracy can be further complicated by ɛe τ, but is not affected by ɛe e.

  8. Surface erosion studies in a plasma-propellant interaction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bourham, M.A.; Gilligan, J.G.; Edwards, C.M.; Nahm, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    Efforts in plasma-chemical launchers are of growing interest for hypersonic mass acceleration technology. Energy transfer and mixing processes in plasma-propellant reactions are complex. The key to successful operation of electrothermal-chemical launchers (ETC) is to enhance and control the burn rate through plasma injection into the propellant. The injected plasma, as an external heat source, is usually produced from an electrothermal source ET plasma. Critical components of ETC launchers are subject to heat fluxes produced by the ET source and the additional heat generated during the combustion of the propellant. A plasma-propellant interaction experiment, PIPE, has been operated to explore the erosion behavior of candidate barrel materials under typical ETC combustion environment. The electrothermal plasma source injects a high density, low temperature plasma into a solid propellant that is followed by a material test stand. The burn rate of the propellant is calculated for each shot and the material erosion is evaluated via weight loss. The chamber pressure, discharge current and voltage, and temperature increase of the material are measured for each shot. Various coated material surfaces have been tested. Experiments were conducted on two samples of each coating, with and without propellant.

  9. Supersonic Parachute Aerodynamic Testing and Fluid Structure Interaction Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lingard, J. S.; Underwood, J. C.; Darley, M. G.; Marraffa, L.; Ferracina, L.

    2014-06-01

    The ESA Supersonic Parachute program expands the knowledge of parachute inflation and flying characteristics in supersonic flows using wind tunnel testing and fluid structure interaction to develop new inflation algorithms and aerodynamic databases.

  10. Protein tertiary structure recognition using optimized Hamiltonians with local interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, R A; Luthey-Schulten, Z A; Wolynes, P G

    1992-01-01

    Protein folding codes embodying local interactions including surface and secondary structure propensities and residue-residue contacts are optimized for a set of training proteins by using spin-glass theory. A screening method based on these codes correctly matches the structure of a set of test proteins with proteins of similar topology with 100% accuracy, even with limited sequence similarity between the test proteins and the structural homologs and the absence of any structurally similar proteins in the training set. PMID:1409599

  11. Instructions for Administration of the Maternal Interaction Structured Situation (MISS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Dale L.; And Others

    The mother-child interaction procedure described in this manual was developed as one part of the evaluation measures for the Houston Parent-Child Development Center. The Maternal Interaction Structured Situation (MISS) involves the videotaping of a mother and her child involved in a variety of tasks. Using standardized instructions, the tester…

  12. Controls structures interaction, an interdisciplinary challenge for large spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanks, Brantley R.

    1990-01-01

    Controls structures interaction (CSI), a phenomenon which occurs when control forces interact with the flexible motion of a structure, can, if improperly treated in design and development, cause reduced performance or control instabilities. Properly applied, it can improve flexible spacecraft performance. In this paper, the NASA CSI technology program for future spacecraft applications is described. The program objectives and organization are outlined, and the nature of individual program tasks is described. The interdisciplinary aspects of CSI are also addressed.

  13. Structural Variation and Uniformity among Tetraloop-Receptor Interactions and Other Loop-Helix Interactions in RNA Crystal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li; Chai, Dinggeng; Fraser, Marie E.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Tetraloop-receptor interactions are prevalent structural units in RNAs, and include the GAAA/11-nt and GNRA-minor groove interactions. In this study, we have compiled a set of 78 nonredundant loop-helix interactions from X-ray crystal structures, and examined them for the extent of their sequence and structural variation. Of the 78 interactions in the set, only four were classical GAAA/11-nt motifs, while over half (48) were GNRA-minor groove interactions. The GNRA-minor groove interactions were not a homogeneous set, but were divided into five subclasses. The most predominant subclass is characterized by two triple base pair interactions in the minor groove, flanked by two ribose zipper contacts. This geometry may be considered the “standard” GNRA-minor groove interaction, while the other four subclasses are alternative ways to form interfaces between a minor groove and tetraloop. The remaining 26 structures in the set of 78 have loops interacting with mostly idiosyncratic receptors. Among the entire set, a number of sequence-structure correlations can be identified, which may be used as initial hypotheses in predicting three-dimensional structures from primary sequences. Conversely, other sequence patterns are not predictive; for example, GAAA loop sequences and GG/CC receptors bind to each other with three distinct geometries. Finally, we observe an example of structural evolution in group II introns, in which loop-receptor motifs are substituted for each other while maintaining the larger three-dimensional geometry. Overall, the study gives a more complete view of RNA loop-helix interactions that exist in nature. PMID:23152878

  14. Hydrodynamic Limit for Spatially Structured Interacting Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Aline; Ost, Guilherme; Rodríguez, Andrés A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic system of neurons whose interactions are given by Kac Potentials that mimic chemical and electrical synapses and leak currents. The system consists of \\varepsilon ^{-2} neurons embedded in [0,1)^2, each spiking randomly according to a point process with rate depending on both its membrane potential and position. When neuron i spikes, its membrane potential is reset to 0 while the membrane potential of j is increased by a positive value \\varepsilon ^2 a(i,j), if i influences j. Furthermore, between consecutive spikes, the system follows a deterministic motion due both to electrical synapses and leak currents. The electrical synapses are involved in the synchronization of the membrane potentials of the neurons, while the leak currents inhibit the activity of all neurons, attracting simultaneously their membrane potentials to 0. We show that the empirical distribution of the membrane potentials converges, as \\varepsilon vanishes, to a probability density ρ _t(u,r) which is proved to obey a nonlinear PDE of Hyperbolic type.

  15. Structural changes and intermolecular interactions of filled ice Ic structure for hydrogen hydrate under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, S.; Hirai, H.; Kawamura, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yagi, T.

    2010-03-01

    High-pressure experiments of hydrogen hydrate were performed using a diamond anvil cell under conditions of 0.1-44.2 GPa and at room temperature. Also, high pressure Raman studies of solid hydrogen were performed in the pressure range of 0.1-43.7 GPa. X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for hydrogen hydrate revealed that a known high-pressure structure, filled ice Ic structure, of hydrogen hydrate transformed to a new high-pressure structure at approximately 35-40 GPa. A comparison of the Raman spectroscopy of a vibron for hydrogen molecules between hydrogen hydrate and solid hydrogen revealed that the extraction of hydrogen molecules from hydrogen hydrate occurred above 20 GPa. Also, the Raman spectra of a roton revealed that the rotation of hydrogen molecules in hydrogen hydrate was suppressed at around 20 GPa and that the rotation recovered under higher pressure. These results indicated that remarkable intermolecular interactions in hydrogen hydrate between neighboring hydrogen molecules and between guest hydrogen molecules and host water molecules might occur. These intermolecular interactions could produce the stability of hydrogen hydrate.

  16. Operational experience with VAWT blades. [structural performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, W. N.

    1979-01-01

    The structural performance of 17 meter diameter wind turbine rotors is discussed. Test results for typical steady and vibratory stress measurements are summarized along with predicted values of stress based on a quasi-static finite element model.

  17. Adaptive piezoelectric shell structures: theory and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzou, H. S.; Zhong, J. P.

    1993-07-01

    Active "smart" space and mechanical structures with adaptive dynamic characteristics have long been interested in a variety of high-performance systems, e.g. flexible space structures, flexible robots, "smart" machines etc. In this paper, an active adaptive structure made of piezoelectric materials is proposed and evaluated. Electromechanical equations of motion and generalised boundary conditions of a generic piezoelectric shell subjected to mechanical and electrical excitations are derived using Hamilton's principle and the linear piezoelectric theory. The structural adaptivity is achieved by a voltage feedback (open or closed loops) utilising the converse piezoelectric effect. Applications of the theory is demonstrated in a bimorph beam case and a cylindrical shell case. Frequency manipulation of the bimorph beam is studied theoretically and experimentally. Damping control of the cylindrical shell via in-plane membrane forces is also investigated.

  18. Characterization of DNA-protein interactions using high-throughput sequencing data from pulldown experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreland, Blythe; Oman, Kenji; Curfman, John; Yan, Pearlly; Bundschuh, Ralf

    Methyl-binding domain (MBD) protein pulldown experiments have been a valuable tool in measuring the levels of methylated CpG dinucleotides. Due to the frequent use of this technique, high-throughput sequencing data sets are available that allow a detailed quantitative characterization of the underlying interaction between methylated DNA and MBD proteins. Analyzing such data sets, we first found that two such proteins cannot bind closer to each other than 2 bp, consistent with structural models of the DNA-protein interaction. Second, the large amount of sequencing data allowed us to find rather weak but nevertheless clearly statistically significant sequence preferences for several bases around the required CpG. These results demonstrate that pulldown sequencing is a high-precision tool in characterizing DNA-protein interactions. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1410172.

  19. Entanglement dynamics of three interacting two-level atoms within a common structured environment

    SciTech Connect

    An, Nguyen Ba; Kim, Jaewan; Kim, Kisik

    2011-08-15

    We derive exact time evolution of three two-level atoms coupled to a common environment. The environment is structured and is modeled by a leaky cavity with Lorentzian spectral density. The atoms are initially prepared in a generalized W state and later on experience pairwise dipole-dipole interactions and couplings to the cavity. We study tripartite disentangling and entangling dynamics as well as protecting bipartite entanglement with both atom-atom interactions and atom-cavity couplings taken simultaneously into account.

  20. Structural Similarity and Classification of Protein Interaction Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Pang, Bin; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between proteins play a key role in many cellular processes. Studying protein-protein interactions that share similar interaction interfaces may shed light on their evolution and could be helpful in elucidating the mechanisms behind stability and dynamics of the protein complexes. When two complexes share structurally similar subunits, the similarity of the interaction interfaces can be found through a structural superposition of the subunits. However, an accurate detection of similarity between the protein complexes containing subunits of unrelated structure remains an open problem. Here, we present an alignment-free machine learning approach to measure interface similarity. The approach relies on the feature-based representation of protein interfaces and does not depend on the superposition of the interacting subunit pairs. Specifically, we develop an SVM classifier of similar and dissimilar interfaces and derive a feature-based interface similarity measure. Next, the similarity measure is applied to a set of 2,806×2,806 binary complex pairs to build a hierarchical classification of protein-protein interactions. Finally, we explore case studies of similar interfaces from each level of the hierarchy, considering cases when the subunits forming interactions are either homologous or structurally unrelated. The analysis has suggested that the positions of charged residues in the homologous interfaces are not necessarily conserved and may exhibit more complex conservation patterns. PMID:21589874

  1. The NASA controls-structures interaction technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R.; Layman, W. E.; Waites, H. B.; Hayduk, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction between a flexible spacecraft structure and its control system is commonly referred to as controls-structures interaction (CSI). The CSI technology program is developing the capability and confidence to integrate the structure and control system, so as to avoid interactions that cause problems and to exploit interactions to increase spacecraft capability. A NASA program has been initiated to advance CSI technology to a point where it can be used in spacecraft design for future missions. The CSI technology program is a multicenter program utilizing the resources of the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The purpose is to describe the current activities, results to date, and future activities of the NASA CSI technology program.

  2. Coherent structure dynamics during turbulence-flame interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haffner, Eileen; Green, Melissa; Hamlington, Peter; Poludnenko, Alexi; Oran, Elaine

    2015-11-01

    Several studies have been conducted to characterize the turbulence-flame interaction in reacting flows quantitatively. It has been observed that increased turbulence intensity both wrinkles and broadens the flame front throughout the preheat zone and reaction zone. In addition, previous studies showed that interaction with the flame changes the orientation of turbulent structures and and in some cases incites loss of vorticity, but the physical mechanism of this interaction was still unclear. An Eulerian analysis (Q criterion) is preformed to track structures through the flow, and to visualize the vortex transformation as it encounters the flame. This is coupled with the contours of the fuel-mass fraction, density, and pressure throughout the flame brush to provide insight into the physical interaction between turbulent structures and the flame. A complete description of the physical mechanism could provide insight into ways to design engine inlets for efficient mixing in combustion applications.

  3. Structures-propulsion interactions and requirements. [large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V.

    1982-01-01

    The effects of low-thrust primary propulsion system characteristics on the mass, area, and orbit transfer characteristics of large space systems (LSS) were determined. Three general structural classes of LSS were considered, each with a broad range of diameters and nonstructural surface densities. While transferring the deployed structure from LEO and to GEO, an acceleration range of 0.02 to 0.1 g's was found to maximize deliverable payload based on structural mass impact. After propulsion system parametric analyses considering four propellant combinations produced values for available payload mass, length and volume, a thrust level range which maximizes deliverable LSS diameter was determined corresponding to a structure and propulsion vehicle. The engine start and/or shutdown thrust transients on the last orbit transfer (apogee) burn can impose transient loads which would be greater than the steady-state loads at the burnout acceleration. The effect of the engine thrust transients on the LSS was determined from the dynamic models upon which various engine ramps were imposed.

  4. Structural Dynamics and Control Interaction of Flexible Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Robert S. (Editor); Scofield, Harold N. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    A Workshop was held to promote technical exchange between the structural dynamic and control disciplines, foster joint technology, and provide a forum for discussing and focusing critical issues in the separate and combined areas. The workshop was closed by a panel meeting. Panel members' viewpoints and their responses to questions are included.

  5. Seeing Deep Structure from the Interactions of Surface Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chi, Michelene T. H.; VanLehn, Kurt A.

    2012-01-01

    Transfer is typically thought of as requiring individuals to "see" what is the same in the deep structure between a new target problem and a previously encountered source problem, even though the surface features may be dissimilar. We propose that experts can "see" the deep structure by considering the first-order interactions of the explicit…

  6. Interaction of Dogmatism and Rhetorical Structure in Text Recall.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickards, John P.; Slife, Brent D.

    1987-01-01

    A study involving 40 rote (high dogmatic) learners and 37 conceptual (low dogmatic) learners of college age was conducted to determine the optimal rhetorical structure of passages for each type of learner. The results indicate a significant interaction between dogmatism and rhetorical structure. (TJH)

  7. Interactive Hangman Teaches Amino Acid Structures and Abbreviations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennington, Britney O.; Sears, Duane; Clegg, Dennis O.

    2014-01-01

    We developed an interactive exercise to teach students how to draw the structures of the 20 standard amino acids and to identify the one-letter abbreviations by modifying the familiar game of "Hangman." Amino acid structures were used to represent single letters throughout the game. To provide additional practice in identifying…

  8. The Interaction of Information Structure and Syntactic Representation in Chinese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Yu-Yin

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation concerns the interaction of syntax and information structure in Mandarin Chinese and puts the theoretical assumption of parallelism between clauses and noun phrases to the test. It examines and validates the information structural status of the object phrases preposed to clause-internal positions. I argue that Rizzi's (1997)…

  9. Designing an experiment to measure cellular interaction forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlinden, Niall; Glass, David G.; Millington, Owain R.; Wright, Amanda J.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trapping is a powerful tool in Life Science research and is becoming common place in many microscopy laboratories and facilities. The force applied by the laser beam on the trapped object can be accurately determined allowing any external forces acting on the trapped object to be deduced. We aim to design a series of experiments that use an optical trap to measure and quantify the interaction force between immune cells. In order to cause minimum perturbation to the sample we plan to directly trap T cells and remove the need to introduce exogenous beads to the sample. This poses a series of challenges and raises questions that need to be answered in order to design a set of effect end-point experiments. A typical cell is large compared to the beads normally trapped and highly non-uniform - can we reliably trap such objects and prevent them from rolling and re-orientating? In this paper we show how a spatial light modulator can produce a triple-spot trap, as opposed to a single-spot trap, giving complete control over the object's orientation and preventing it from rolling due, for example, to Brownian motion. To use an optical trap as a force transducer to measure an external force you must first have a reliably calibrated system. The optical trapping force is typically measured using either the theory of equipartition and observing the Brownian motion of the trapped object or using an escape force method, e.g. the viscous drag force method. In this paper we examine the relationship between force and displacement, as well as measuring the maximum displacement from equilibrium position before an object falls out of the trap, hence determining the conditions under which the different calibration methods should be applied.

  10. Recent Experience Affects the Strength of Structural Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaschak, Michael P.; Loney, Renrick A.; Borreggine, Kristin L.

    2006-01-01

    In two experiments, we explore how recent experience with particular syntactic constructions affects the strength of the structural priming observed for those constructions. The results suggest that (1) the strength of structural priming observed for double object and prepositional object constructions is affected by the relative frequency with…

  11. Ground test experiment for large space structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tollison, D. K.; Waites, H. B.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years a new body of control theory has been developed for the design of control systems for Large Space Structures (LSS). The problems of testing this theory on LSS hardware are aggravated by the expense and risk of actual in orbit tests. Ground tests on large space structures can provide a proving ground for candidate control systems, but such tests require a unique facility for their execution. The current development of such a facility at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the subject of this report.

  12. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations.

    PubMed

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions. PMID:26986362

  13. Evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Aming; Broom, Mark; Du, Jinming; Wang, Long

    2016-02-01

    The evolution of populations is influenced by many factors, and the simple classical models have been developed in a number of important ways. Both population structure and multiplayer interactions have been shown to significantly affect the evolution of important properties, such as the level of cooperation or of aggressive behavior. Here we combine these two key factors and develop the evolutionary dynamics of general group interactions in structured populations represented by regular graphs. The traditional linear and threshold public goods games are adopted as models to address the dynamics. We show that for linear group interactions, population structure can favor the evolution of cooperation compared to the well-mixed case, and we see that the more neighbors there are, the harder it is for cooperators to persist in structured populations. We further show that threshold group interactions could lead to the emergence of cooperation even in well-mixed populations. Here population structure sometimes inhibits cooperation for the threshold public goods game, where depending on the benefit to cost ratio, the outcomes are bistability or a monomorphic population of defectors or cooperators. Our results suggest, counterintuitively, that structured populations are not always beneficial for the evolution of cooperation for nonlinear group interactions.

  14. NASA/DOD Control/Structures Interaction Technology, 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Robert L. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    Papers presented at the CSI Technology Conference are given. The conference was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense. The conference is the beginning of a series of annual conferences whose purpose is to report to industry, academia, and government agencies the current status of Control/Structures Interaction technology. The conference program was divided into five sessions: (1) Future spacecraft requirements; Technology issues and impact; (2) DOD special topics; (3) Large space systems technology; (4) Control of flexible structures, and (5) Selected NASA research in control structures interaction.

  15. JPL control/structure interaction test bed real-time control computer architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.

    1989-01-01

    The Control/Structure Interaction Program is a technology development program for spacecraft that exhibit interactions between the control system and structural dynamics. The program objectives include development and verification of new design concepts - such as active structure - and new tools - such as combined structure and control optimization algorithm - and their verification in ground and possibly flight test. A focus mission spacecraft was designed based upon a space interferometer and is the basis for design of the ground test article. The ground test bed objectives include verification of the spacecraft design concepts, the active structure elements and certain design tools such as the new combined structures and controls optimization tool. In anticipation of CSI technology flight experiments, the test bed control electronics must emulate the computation capacity and control architectures of space qualifiable systems as well as the command and control networks that will be used to connect investigators with the flight experiment hardware. The Test Bed facility electronics were functionally partitioned into three units: a laboratory data acquisition system for structural parameter identification and performance verification; an experiment supervisory computer to oversee the experiment, monitor the environmental parameters and perform data logging; and a multilevel real-time control computing system. The design of the Test Bed electronics is presented along with hardware and software component descriptions. The system should break new ground in experimental control electronics and is of interest to anyone working in the verification of control concepts for large structures.

  16. NASA experiments on the B-720 structure and seats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments onboard a remotely piloted transport aircraft that was crashed on landing are discussed. The structural experiment deals with the location and distribution of the instrumentation throughout the airplane structure. In the seat experiment, the development and testing of an energy absorbing seat are discussed. The objective of the structural experiment was to obtain a data base of structural crash loads for use in the advancement of crashworthy technology of materials (such as composites) in structural design and for use in the comparison between computer and experimental results. The objective of the seat experiment was to compare the performance of an energy absorbing transport seat and a standard seat when subjected to similar crash pulses. Details are given on the location of instrumentation, on the dynamic seat test pulse and headward acceleration limits.

  17. Different Strokes for Different Folks: Jung's Typology and Structured Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haber, Russell Alan

    1980-01-01

    Examined and compared the evaluations of students differentiated by Carl Jung's psychotypology when they were involved in either a session of nonverbal communication experiences or a session of fantasy experiences. Some of the Jungian psychological types preferred different structured experiences. (Author)

  18. Modelling of dynamic soil-structure-ice interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karna, Tuomo

    A computer model was developed for evaluating the dynamic ice-structure interaction. The effects of soil structure interaction are included in the model. The program can be used in the analysis of events, where an offshore structure is subjected to the action of drifting ice sheets or massive ice features like an iceberg. The new approach is based on a generalized modeling of the ice crushing process which takes into account the dependence of ice load on relative displacement and relative velocity between the ice edge and the structure. A substructure technique, where separate equations are set up for each of the interacting medium, is considered. A zonal approach is applied while modeling the ice failure processes. The effects of nonsimultaneous crushing are considered.

  19. Environmental constraints shaping constituent order in emerging communication systems: Structural iconicity, interactive alignment and conventionalization.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Peer; Fusaroli, Riccardo; Tylén, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Where does linguistic structure come from? Recent gesture elicitation studies have indicated that constituent order (corresponding to for instance subject-verb-object, or SVO in English) may be heavily influenced by human cognitive biases constraining gesture production and transmission. Here we explore the alternative hypothesis that syntactic patterns are motivated by multiple environmental and social-interactional constraints that are external to the cognitive domain. In three experiments, we systematically investigate different motivations for structure in the gestural communication of simple transitive events. The first experiment indicates that, if participants communicate about different types of events, manipulation events (e.g. someone throwing a cake) and construction events (e.g. someone baking a cake), they spontaneously and systematically produce different constituent orders, SOV and SVO respectively, thus following the principle of structural iconicity. The second experiment shows that participants' choice of constituent order is also reliably influenced by social-interactional forces of interactive alignment, that is, the tendency to re-use an interlocutor's previous choice of constituent order, thus potentially overriding affordances for iconicity. Lastly, the third experiment finds that the relative frequency distribution of referent event types motivates the stabilization and conventionalization of a single constituent order for the communication of different types of events. Together, our results demonstrate that constituent order in emerging gestural communication systems is shaped and stabilized in response to multiple external environmental and social factors: structural iconicity, interactive alignment and distributional frequency. PMID:26402649

  20. Relaunch of the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, A.; Rusaitis, L.; Zwicker, A.; Stotler, D. P.

    2015-11-01

    In the late 1990's PPPL's Science Education Department developed an innovative online site called the Interactive Plasma Physics Educational Experience (IPPEX). It featured (among other modules) two Java based applications which simulated tokamak physics: A steady state tokamak (SST) and a time dependent tokamak (TDT). The physics underlying the SST and the TDT are based on the ASPECT code which is a global power balance code developed to evaluate the performance of fusion reactor designs. We have relaunched the IPPEX site with updated modules and functionalities: The site itself is now dynamic on all platforms. The graphic design of the site has been modified to current standards. The virtual tokamak programming has been redone in Javascript, taking advantage of the speed and compactness of the code. The GUI of the tokamak has been completely redesigned, including more intuitive representations of changes in the plasma, e.g., particles moving along magnetic field lines. The use of GPU accelerated computation provides accurate and smooth visual representations of the plasma. We will present the current version of IPPEX as well near term plans of incorporating real time NSTX-U data into the simulation.

  1. Astronomy Patch Day: An Interactive Astronomy Experience for Girl Scouts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierman, K. A.; McCarthy, D. W.; Schutz, K.

    2005-12-01

    To help encourage a new generation of women in science, we have created Astronomy Patch Day for the Sahuaro Girl Scout Council in Tucson, Arizona. This all-day event is an interactive experience for Girl Scouts ages 5-18 to learn about astronomical concepts and women in astronomy. Our first Astronomy Patch Day, held on March 19, 2005, in conjunction with the Sahuaro Council's annual Science, Math, and Related Technologies (SMART) program, was very successful, reaching about 150-200 girls and their leaders. Individual troops rotated every half hour among our six activity booths: Earth-Moon, Solar System, Stars, Galaxies, Universe, and Ask an Astronomer, which were staffed by trained Girl Scout Leaders as well as faculty, post-doctoral researchers, and graduate students from Steward Observatory. To earn a patch, younger girls (ages 5-12) had to complete activities at three booths and older girls had to complete all six activities. Positive feedback for this event was received from both the girls and leaders. We plan to hold Astronomy Patch Day annually, possibly with different and/or additional activities in future years. K. Knierman is supported by an Arizona/NASA Space Grant Fellowship. This outreach program is supported by NIRCam/JWST E/PO.

  2. Experiments on Structure and Trapping of Coulomb balls

    SciTech Connect

    Block, D.; Arp, O.; Piel, A.; Melzer, A.

    2006-10-18

    This paper gives a survey of recent experiments on Coulomb balls. Starting with typical observations to introduce the Coulomb ball experiment and its diagnostic potential, their structural properties are discussed. Further, the trapping mechanism for the dust is quantified to allow for a systematic comparison of experiment and simulations. Finally, the presented results focus on the question how screening influences the structural properties and how Coulomb balls and other strongly coupled systems are related.

  3. Computational modeling of RNA 3D structures and interactions.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Wayne K; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    RNA molecules have key functions in cellular processes beyond being carriers of protein-coding information. These functions are often dependent on the ability to form complex three-dimensional (3D) structures. However, experimental determination of RNA 3D structures is difficult, which has prompted the development of computational methods for structure prediction from sequence. Recent progress in 3D structure modeling of RNA and emerging approaches for predicting RNA interactions with ions, ligands and proteins have been stimulated by successes in protein 3D structure modeling. PMID:26689764

  4. Quantum Theory of Atomic and Molecular Structures and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makrides, Constantinos

    This dissertation consists of topics in two related areas of research that together provide quantum mechanical descriptions of atomic and molecular interactions and reactions. The first is the ab initio electronic structure calculation that provides the atomic and molecular interaction potential, including the long-range potential. The second is the quantum theory of interactions that uses such potentials to understand scattering, long-range molecules, and reactions. In ab initio electronic structure calculations, we present results of dynamic polarizabilities for a variety of atoms and molecules, and the long-range dispersion coefficients for a number of atom-atom and atom-molecule cases. We also present results of a potential energy surface for the triatomic lithium-ytterbium-lithium system, aimed at understanding the related chemical reactions. In the quantum theory of interactions, we present a multichannel quantum-defect theory (MQDT) for atomic interactions in a magnetic field. This subject, which is complex especially for atoms with hyperfine structure, is essential for the understanding and the realization of control and tuning of atomic interactions by a magnetic field: a key feature that has popularized cold atom physics in its investigations of few-body and many-body quantum systems. Through the example of LiK, we show how MQDT provides a systematic and an efficient understanding of atomic interaction in a magnetic field, especially magnetic Feshbach resonances in nonzero partial waves.

  5. Freestanding film structures for laser plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klyuenkov, E B; Lopatin, A Ya; Luchin, V I; Salashchenko, Nikolai N; Tsybin, N N

    2013-04-30

    The technique is developed for fabricating 5-500-nm-thick freestanding films of various materials and multilayer compositions. Apart from the traditional use in spectral filtration of soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet radiation, the possibility of using the ultrathin films fabricated by this technique as targets in experiments on laser acceleration of ions is considered. A sample of the target in the form of a 5-nm-thick carbon film on a supporting net is fabricated. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  6. Transient Dynamic Response and Failure of Sandwich Composite Structures under Impact Loading with Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Y. W.; Violette, M. A.; McCrillis, R. D.; Didoszak, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) effect on transient dynamic response and failure of sandwich composite structures under impact loading. The primary sandwich composite used in this study consisted of a 6.35 mm balsa core and a multi-ply symmetrical plain weave 6 oz E-glass skin. Both clamped sandwich composite plates and beams were studied using a uniquely designed vertical drop-weight testing machine. There were three impact conditions on which these experiments focused. The first of these conditions was completely dry (or air surrounded) testing. The second condition was completely water submerged. The final condition was also a water submerged test with air support at the backside of the plates. The tests were conducted sequentially, progressing from a low to high drop height to determine the onset and spread of damage to the sandwich composite when impacted with the test machine. The study showed the FSI effect on sandwich composite structures is very critical such that impact force, strain response, and damage size are generally much greater with FSI under the same impact condition. As a result, damage initiates at much lower impact energy conditions with the effect of FSI. Neglecting to account for FSI effects on sandwich composite structures results in very non-conservative analysis and design. Additionally, it was observed that the damage location changed for sandwich composite beams with the effect of FSI.

  7. A new structural insight into XPA–DNA interactions

    PubMed Central

    Hilton, Benjamin; Shkriabai, Nick; Musich, Phillip R.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Shell, Steven; Zou, Yue

    2014-01-01

    XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A) protein is an essential factor for NER (nucleotide excision repair) which is believed to be involved in DNA damage recognition/verification, NER factor recruiting and stabilization of repair intermediates. Past studies on the structure of XPA have focused primarily on XPA interaction with damaged DNA. However, how XPA interacts with other DNA structures remains unknown though recent evidence suggest that these structures could be important for its roles in both NER and non-NER activities. Previously, we reported that XPA recognizes undamaged DNA ds/ssDNA (double-strand/single-strandDNA) junctions with a binding affinity much higher than its ability to bind bulky DNA damage. To understand how this interaction occurs biochemically we implemented a structural determination of the interaction using a MS-based protein footprinting method and limited proteolysis. By monitoring surface accessibility of XPA lysines to NHS-biotin modification in the free protein and the DNA junction-bound complex we show that XPA physically interacts with the DNA junctions via two lysines, K168 and K179, located in the previously known XPA(98–219) DBD (DNA-binding domain). Importantly, we also uncovered new lysine residues, outside of the known DBD, involved in the binding. We found that residues K221, K222, K224 and K236 in the C-terminal domain are involved in DNA binding. Limited proteolysis analysis of XPA–DNA interactions further confirmed this observation. Structural modelling with these data suggests a clamp-like DBD for the XPA binding to ds/ssDNA junctions. Our results provide a novel structure-function view of XPA–DNA junction interactions. PMID:25385088

  8. Fluid-Structure Interactions and Microparticle Transport in Pulmonary Alveoli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiali, Samir

    2005-11-01

    The transport of micron-size particles in the lung has important implications for both respiratory disorders and drug delivery systems. During breathing, the expansion of pulmonary alveoli produces sub-ambient pressures that draw airflow into the lung. The fate of inhaled microparticles during breathing will depend on both particle properties and the complex transient flow fields generated by alveolar wall motion. In this study, fluid-structure interaction (FSI) models are used to evaluate the effects of breathing rates, particle size, tissue viscoelasticity and surface tension forces on microparticle transport. In addition to fluid and solid dynamic equations, these models solve a particle equation of motion that includes both Brownian diffusion and gravitational terms. Our results indicate that Brownian diffusion is the dominant mechanism of transport for particles smaller than one micron and that the elastic properties of alveolar tissues can significantly affect particle deposition. Particles larger than 0.5 microns also experience significant gravitational sedimentation, while convection forces become increasingly dominant for larger particles and faster breathing rates. These results may be useful in designing improved drug delivery systems and in establishing new threshold levels for exposure to viral agents. Supported by the NSF and Parker B. Francis Foundation.

  9. Predicting PDZ domain mediated protein interactions from structure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are structural protein domains that recognize simple linear amino acid motifs, often at protein C-termini, and mediate protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in important biological processes, such as ion channel regulation, cell polarity and neural development. PDZ domain-peptide interaction predictors have been developed based on domain and peptide sequence information. Since domain structure is known to influence binding specificity, we hypothesized that structural information could be used to predict new interactions compared to sequence-based predictors. Results We developed a novel computational predictor of PDZ domain and C-terminal peptide interactions using a support vector machine trained with PDZ domain structure and peptide sequence information. Performance was estimated using extensive cross validation testing. We used the structure-based predictor to scan the human proteome for ligands of 218 PDZ domains and show that the predictions correspond to known PDZ domain-peptide interactions and PPIs in curated databases. The structure-based predictor is complementary to the sequence-based predictor, finding unique known and novel PPIs, and is less dependent on training–testing domain sequence similarity. We used a functional enrichment analysis of our hits to create a predicted map of PDZ domain biology. This map highlights PDZ domain involvement in diverse biological processes, some only found by the structure-based predictor. Based on this analysis, we predict novel PDZ domain involvement in xenobiotic metabolism and suggest new interactions for other processes including wound healing and Wnt signalling. Conclusions We built a structure-based predictor of PDZ domain-peptide interactions, which can be used to scan C-terminal proteomes for PDZ interactions. We also show that the structure-based predictor finds many known PDZ mediated PPIs in human that were not found by our previous sequence-based predictor and is less dependent on

  10. Recent experiences using finite-element-based structural optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, B. K.; Mcconnell, J. C.; Love, Mike H.

    1989-01-01

    Structural optimization has been available to the structural analysis community as a tool for many years. The popular use of displacement method finite-element techniques to analyze linearly elastic structures has resulted in an ability to calculate the weight and constraint gradients inexpensively for numerical optimization of structures. Here, recent experiences in the investigation and use of structural optimization are discussed. In particular, experience with the commercially available ADS/NASOPT code is addressed. An overview of the ADS/NASOPT procedure and how it was implemented is given. Two example problems are also discussed.

  11. Social setting, intuition and experience in laboratory experiments interact to shape cooperative decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that cooperative decision-making in one-shot interactions is a history-dependent dynamic process: promoting intuition versus deliberation typically has a positive effect on cooperation (dynamism) among people living in a cooperative setting and with no previous experience in economic games on cooperation (history dependence). Here, we report on a laboratory experiment exploring how these findings transfer to a non-cooperative setting. We find two major results: (i) promoting intuition versus deliberation has no effect on cooperative behaviour among inexperienced subjects living in a non-cooperative setting; (ii) experienced subjects cooperate more than inexperienced subjects, but only under time pressure. These results suggest that cooperation is a learning process, rather than an instinctive impulse or a self-controlled choice, and that experience operates primarily via the channel of intuition. Our findings shed further light on the cognitive basis of human cooperative decision-making and provide further support for the recently proposed social heuristics hypothesis. PMID:26156762

  12. Social setting, intuition and experience in laboratory experiments interact to shape cooperative decision-making.

    PubMed

    Capraro, Valerio; Cococcioni, Giorgia

    2015-07-22

    Recent studies suggest that cooperative decision-making in one-shot interactions is a history-dependent dynamic process: promoting intuition versus deliberation typically has a positive effect on cooperation (dynamism) among people living in a cooperative setting and with no previous experience in economic games on cooperation (history dependence). Here, we report on a laboratory experiment exploring how these findings transfer to a non-cooperative setting. We find two major results: (i) promoting intuition versus deliberation has no effect on cooperative behaviour among inexperienced subjects living in a non-cooperative setting; (ii) experienced subjects cooperate more than inexperienced subjects, but only under time pressure. These results suggest that cooperation is a learning process, rather than an instinctive impulse or a self-controlled choice, and that experience operates primarily via the channel of intuition. Our findings shed further light on the cognitive basis of human cooperative decision-making and provide further support for the recently proposed social heuristics hypothesis. PMID:26156762

  13. A Study of Hadronic Weak Interaction - The n3He Experiment at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Latiful

    2015-10-01

    While parity violation (PV) is well-understood at the quark and lepton level, it is much more elusive in hadronic systems, being dominated by several orders of magnitude by the strong interaction. However, studies of PV in hadronic systems offer a unique probe of nucleon structure, complementary to other probes of low-energy non-perturbative QCD. The n3He experiment at the spallation neutron source at ORNL is motivated to probe the Hadronic Weak Interaction (HWI) by measuring the parity violating spin asymmetry of the recoil proton in the reaction n + 3He --> p +T +765 KeV. This is sensitive to ΔI = 0 and 1 components of the HWI, and is expected to be extremely small (of the order of 10-7). The experiment aims to determine this PV asymmetry with the statistical sensitivity of the order of 10-8. The experiment is now in the data taking phase and will continue until the end of the year. I will describe the experiment and give its current status.

  14. The Narrative-Communication Structure in Interactive Narrative Works

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Arie, Udi

    Interactive work on new media platforms differs from familiar work on more traditional media, such as literature, theatre, cinema and television, in terms of their narrative-communication situation. Interactive works, unlike cinematic works, allow the viewer to participate to a different extent, involving a reciprocal communication process. In this paper I propose a bi-directional communication structure for interactive storytelling systems, based on narratology theory and communication film theory. I adapt existing narrative-communication models of conventional media, mainly those of Seymour Chatman and Vivian Sobchack, to suggest a detailed narrative-communication model for interactive storytelling systems, which would facilitate the formulation of a better definition of the various constituent elements of interactive storytelling communication, and the functions they fulfill.

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on structured populations: a review

    PubMed Central

    Perc, Matjaž; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús; Szolnoki, Attila; Floría, Luis M.; Moreno, Yamir

    2013-01-01

    Interactions among living organisms, from bacteria colonies to human societies, are inherently more complex than interactions among particles and non-living matter. Group interactions are a particularly important and widespread class, representative of which is the public goods game. In addition, methods of statistical physics have proved valuable for studying pattern formation, equilibrium selection and self-organization in evolutionary games. Here, we review recent advances in the study of evolutionary dynamics of group interactions on top of structured populations, including lattices, complex networks and coevolutionary models. We also compare these results with those obtained on well-mixed populations. The review particularly highlights that the study of the dynamics of group interactions, like several other important equilibrium and non-equilibrium dynamical processes in biological, economical and social sciences, benefits from the synergy between statistical physics, network science and evolutionary game theory. PMID:23303223

  16. Modifications in structure and interaction of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehan, Sumit; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R.

    2016-05-01

    SANS experiments of three-component system of anionic silica nanoparticles, anionic BSA protein and anionic SDS surfactants have been carried out without and with electrolyte in aqueous solution. In both the cases, the interaction of surfactant with protein results in formation of bead-necklace structure of protein-surfactant complexes in solution. These protein-surfactant complexes interact very differently with nanoparticles in absence and presence of electrolyte. In absence of electrolyte, nanoparticles remain in dispersed phase in solution, whereas with the addition of electrolyte the nanoparticles fractal aggregates are formed. SANS describes the phase behavior to be governed by competition of electrostatic and depletion interactions among the components solution.

  17. Advanced Smart Structures Flight Experiments for Precision Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Erwin, R. Scott; Ninneman, R. Rory

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents an overview as well as data from four smart structures flight experiments directed by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Middeck Active Control Experiment $¯Flight II (MACE II) is a space shuttle flight experiment designed to investigate modeling and control issues for achieving high precision pointing and vibration control of future spacecraft. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX-I) is an experiment that has demonstrated active vibration suppression using smart composite structures with embedded piezoelectric sensors and actuators. The Satellite Ultraquiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) is an isolation platform that uses active piezoelectric actuators as well as damped mechanical flexures to achieve hybrid passive/active isolation. The Vibration Isolation, Suppression, and Steering Experiment (VISS) is another isolation platform that uses viscous dampers in conjunction with electromagnetic voice coil actuators to achieve isolation as well as a steering capability for an infra-red telescope.

  18. Structural ordering of trapped colloids with competing interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa Campos, L. Q.; Apolinario, S. W. S.; Löwen, H.

    2013-10-01

    The structure of colloids with competing interactions which are confined in a harmonic external trap potential is analyzed numerically by energy minimization in two spatial dimensions. A wealth of different cluster structures is found to be stable including clusters with a fringed outer rim (reminiscent to an ornamental border), clusters perforated with voids, as well as clusters with a crystalline core and a disordered rim. All cluster structures occur in a two-dimensional parameter space. The structural ordering can therefore be efficiently tuned by changing few parameters only providing access to a controlled fabrication of colloidal clusters.

  19. The growth of structure in interacting dark energy models

    SciTech Connect

    Caldera-Cabral, Gabriela; Maartens, Roy; Schaefer, Bjoern Malte E-mail: roy.maartens@port.ac.uk

    2009-07-01

    If dark energy interacts with dark matter, there is a change in the background evolution of the universe, since the dark matter density no longer evolves as a{sup −3}. In addition, the non-gravitational interaction affects the growth of structure. In principle, these changes allow us to detect and constrain an interaction in the dark sector. Here we investigate the growth factor and the weak lensing signal for a new class of interacting dark energy models. In these models, the interaction generalises the simple cases where one dark fluid decays into the other. In order to calculate the effect on structure formation, we perform a careful analysis of the perturbed interaction and its effect on peculiar velocities. Assuming a normalization to today's values of dark matter density and overdensity, the signal of the interaction is an enhancement (suppression) of both the growth factor and the lensing power, when the energy transfer in the background is from dark matter to dark energy (dark energy to dark matter)

  20. Structural Requirements of the Fructan-Lipid Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Vereyken, Ingrid J.; van Kuik, J. Albert; Evers, Toon H.; Rijken, Pieter J.; de Kruijff, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Fructans are a group of fructose-based oligo- and polysaccharides. They are proposed to be involved in membrane protection of plants during dehydration. In accordance with this hypothesis, they show an interaction with hydrated lipid model systems. However, the structural requirements for this interaction are not known both with respect to the fructans as to the lipids. To get insight into this matter, the interaction of several inulins and levan with lipids was investigated using a monomolecular lipid system or the MC 540 probe in a bilayer system. MD was used to get conformational information concerning the polysaccharides. It was found that levan-type fructan interacted comparably with model membranes composed of glyco- or phospholipids but showed a preference for lipids with a small headgroup. Furthermore, it was found that there was an inulin chain-length-dependent interaction with lipids. The results also suggested that inulin-type fructan had a more profound interaction with the membrane than levan-type fructan. MD simulations indicated that the favorable conformation for levan is a helix, whereas inulin tends to form random coil structures. This suggests that flexibility is an important determinant for the fructan-lipid interaction. PMID:12719244

  1. Ionized van-der-Waals systems: Structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zuelicke, L.

    1996-12-31

    Ions of molecular systems with internal interactions partly of van-der-Waals type differ significantly from their neutral parent species in binding, structure and dynamics. Theoretical knowledge is still rather scarce. The paper discusses some recent advances from theoretical work in the field concerning (i) electronic and geometric structure of triatomic rare-gas containing cations like Ar{sub 3}{sup +} and ArHCI{sup +}, in ground and excited electronic states; (ii) potential energy surfaces for the interaction of H{sup +} or H{sup -} with diatomic molecules, in ground and excited electronic states; (iii) some features of the dynamics of these systems.

  2. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  3. The Fifth NASA/DOD Controls-Structures Interaction Technology Conference, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newsom, Jerry R. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    This publication is a compilation of the papers presented at the Fifth NASA/DoD Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Technology Conference held in Lake Tahoe, Nevada, March 3-5, 1992. The conference, which was jointly sponsored by the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology and the Department of Defense, was organized by the NASA Langley Research Center. The purpose of this conference was to report to industry, academia, and government agencies on the current status of controls-structures interaction technology. The agenda covered ground testing, integrated design, analysis, flight experiments and concepts.

  4. Control structure interactions in large space structures Analysis using energy approach. [for constant and pulsed thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shrivastava, S. K.; Ried, R. C.; Manoharan, M. G.

    1983-01-01

    A simple energy approach to study the problem of control structure interactions in large space structures is presented. For the illustrative cases of free-free beam and free rectangular plate, the vibrational energy imparted during operation of constant and pulsed thrusters is found in a nondimensional form. Then based on a parametric study, suggestions are made on the choice of the thruster location and parameters to minimize the control structure interactions.

  5. Evaluation of FEMA-440 for including soil-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnoudian, F.; Behmanesh, I.

    2010-09-01

    Replacing the entire soil-structure system with a fixed base oscillator to consider the effect of soil-structure interaction (SSI) is a common analysis method in seismic design. This technique has been included in design procedures such as NEHRP, ASCE, etc. by defining an equivalent fundamental period and damping ratio that can modify the response of the structure. However, recent studies indicate that the effects of SSI should be reconsidered when a structure undergoes a nonlinear displacement demand. In recent documents on Nonlinear Static Procedures (NSPs), FEMA-440 (2005), a modified damping ratio of the replacement oscillator was proposed by introducing the ductility of the soil-structure system obtained from pushover analysis. In this paper, the damping defined in FEMA-440 to include the soil-structure interaction effect is evaluated, and the accuracy of the Coefficient Method given in FEMA-440 and the Equivalent Linearization Method is studied. Although the improvements for Nonlinear Static Procedures (NSPs) in FEMA-440 are achieved for a fixed base SDOF structure, the soil effects are not perfectly obtained. Furthermore, the damping definition of a soil-structure system is extended to structures to consider bilinear behavior.

  6. Hey! I Can Read This! The Interactive Book Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Donna Sabino; Thurman, Kathy Barlow

    This teaching resource goes beyond songs, games, and finger plays to function as a one-of-a-kind interactive book. Teachers are given basic instructions on how to create a variety of different interactive books for their students to enjoy. Lists of materials needed to create each book are also included with the instructions. The resource book…

  7. Interaction and e-Learning: The Student Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorpe, Mary; Godwin, Steve

    2006-01-01

    A distinction between interpersonal and content interaction was identified in the literature, and applied in research undertaken on a selection of 36 courses. These courses differed in both the kinds of interaction offered and its integration in the teaching and assessment. They included different combinations and use of conferencing, email,…

  8. An Experiment with WWW Interactive Learning in University Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, David R.; Wolff, Francis G.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses an exploration with the use of interactive learning on the Web in an Introduction to C Programming Course taught at Cleveland State University, and compares the results with the same course taught during a previous semester using no interactive Web instruction. (Author/AEF)

  9. Azimuthal structures of produced particles in heavy-ion interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vokal, S. Orlova, G. I.; Lehocka, S.

    2009-02-15

    The angular structures of particles produced in {sup 208}Pb at 158 A GeV/c and {sup 197}Au at 11.6 A GeV/c induced interactions with Ag(Br) nuclei in emulsion detector have been investigated. Nonstatistical well-ordered ring-like structures of produced particles in azimuthal plane of a collision have been found, and their parameters have been determined.

  10. Fluid-structure Interaction Simulations of Deformable Soft Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borazjani, Iman

    2011-11-01

    Soft tissue interacts with the surrounding fluid environment in many biological and biomedical applications. Simulating such an interaction is quite challenging due to the large non-linear deformations of tissue, flow pulsatility, transition to turbulence, and non-linear fluid-structure interaction. We have extended our previous three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction (FSI) framework for rigid bodies (Borazjani, Ge, and Sotiropoulos, Journal of Computational Physics, 2008) to deformable soft tissue by coupling our incompressible Navier-Stokes solver for fluids with a non-linear large deformation finite element method for soft tissue. We use Fung-type constitutive law for the soft tissue that can capture the stress-strain behavior of the tissue. The FSI solver adopts a strongly-coupled partitioned approach that is stabilized with under-relaxation and Aitken acceleration technique. We validate our solvers against the experimental data for tissue valves and elastic tubes. We show the capabilities of our solver by simulating the fluid-structure interaction of tissue valves implanted in the aortic positions and elastic collapsible tubes. This work was partly supported by the Center for Computational Research at the University at Buffalo.

  11. Kinetic and Structural Studies of Interactions between Glycosaminoglycans and Langerin.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liu, Xinyue; Kao, Chelsea; Zhang, Emily; Li, Quanhong; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J

    2016-08-16

    Langerin, a C-type lectin, is expressed in Langerhans cells. It was reported that langerin binds sulfated glycans, which is an important initial step for its role in blocking human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission by capturing HIV pathogens and mediating their internalization into Birbeck granules for their elimination. It is fundamentally important to understand these interactions at the molecular level for the design of new highly specific therapeutic agents for HIV. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR), which allows for the real-time, direct, quantitative analysis of the label-free molecular interactions, has been used successfully for biophysical characterization of glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-protein interactions. In this study, we report kinetics, structural analysis, and the effects of physiological conditions (e.g., pH, salt concentration, and Ca(2+) and Zn(2+)concentrations) on the interactions between GAGs and langerin using SPR. SPR results revealed that langerin binds to heparin with high affinity (KD ∼ 2.4 nM) and the oligosaccharide length required for the interactions is larger than a tetrasaccharide. This heparin/heparan sulfate-binding protein also interacts with other GAGs, including dermatan sulfate, chondroitin sulfates C-E and KS. In addition, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis was used to characterize the structure of sulfated glycans that bound to langerin. PMID:27447199

  12. Why we interact: on the functional role of the striatum in the subjective experience of social interaction.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Ulrich J; Schilbach, Leonhard; Timmermans, Bert; Kuzmanovic, Bojana; Georgescu, Alexandra L; Bente, Gary; Vogeley, Kai

    2014-11-01

    There is ample evidence that human primates strive for social contact and experience interactions with conspecifics as intrinsically rewarding. Focusing on gaze behavior as a crucial means of human interaction, this study employed a unique combination of neuroimaging, eye-tracking, and computer-animated virtual agents to assess the neural mechanisms underlying this component of behavior. In the interaction task, participants believed that during each interaction the agent's gaze behavior could either be controlled by another participant or by a computer program. Their task was to indicate whether they experienced a given interaction as an interaction with another human participant or the computer program based on the agent's reaction. Unbeknownst to them, the agent was always controlled by a computer to enable a systematic manipulation of gaze reactions by varying the degree to which the agent engaged in joint attention. This allowed creating a tool to distinguish neural activity underlying the subjective experience of being engaged in social and non-social interaction. In contrast to previous research, this allows measuring neural activity while participants experience active engagement in real-time social interactions. Results demonstrate that gaze-based interactions with a perceived human partner are associated with activity in the ventral striatum, a core component of reward-related neurocircuitry. In contrast, interactions with a computer-driven agent activate attention networks. Comparisons of neural activity during interaction with behaviorally naïve and explicitly cooperative partners demonstrate different temporal dynamics of the reward system and indicate that the mere experience of engagement in social interaction is sufficient to recruit this system. PMID:24996121

  13. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, Albert J.; Kanev, Georgi K.; van Linden, Oscar P.J.; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J.P.; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  14. KLIFS: a structural kinase-ligand interaction database.

    PubMed

    Kooistra, Albert J; Kanev, Georgi K; van Linden, Oscar P J; Leurs, Rob; de Esch, Iwan J P; de Graaf, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play a crucial role in cell signaling and are important drug targets in several therapeutic areas. The KLIFS database contains detailed structural kinase-ligand interaction information derived from all (>2900) structures of catalytic domains of human and mouse protein kinases deposited in the Protein Data Bank in order to provide insights into the structural determinants of kinase-ligand binding and selectivity. The kinase structures have been processed in a consistent manner by systematically analyzing the structural features and molecular interaction fingerprints (IFPs) of a predefined set of 85 binding site residues with bound ligands. KLIFS has been completely rebuilt and extended (>65% more structures) since its first release as a data set, including: novel automated annotation methods for (i) the assessment of ligand-targeted subpockets and the analysis of (ii) DFG and (iii) αC-helix conformations; improved and automated protocols for (iv) the generation of sequence/structure alignments, (v) the curation of ligand atom and bond typing for accurate IFP analysis and (vi) weekly database updates. KLIFS is now accessible via a website (http://klifs.vu-compmedchem.nl) that provides a comprehensive visual presentation of different types of chemical, biological and structural chemogenomics data, and allows the user to easily access, compare, search and download the data. PMID:26496949

  15. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-15

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (∼ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  16. Spectral function in electro-weak interactions and its impact on neutrino oscillation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments have entered the high-precision era in the last few years. The oscillation parameters, as a measure of the neutrino properties, are extracted from the energy-dependent oscillation probability function. Different types of nuclear dynamics deeply influence the determination of neutrino energies in neutrino oscillation experiments. As a consequence, a comprehensive understanding of various nuclear dynamics interprets the scenario behind the neutrino interaction with nucleus and nuclei. The initial ground-state structure of the target nucleus is categorized in one typical nuclear dynamics, and its realistic description is generally referred as the spectral function (SF). Implementing the SF for each target nucleus into the GENIE neutrino event generator is the preliminary step necessary to obtain a reliable determination of the kinematics of all detectable final-products from neutrino interactions. At the intermedium-range of neutrino energies (˜ 1 GeV), the kinematic energy reconstruction is the vastly used approach and consists in identifying final-products as coming from the charged-current quasi-elastic-like (CCQE-like) neutrino interactions.

  17. "Songese": Maternal Structuring of Musical Interaction with Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longhi, Elena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal structure of mother-infant interactions with songs, with particular attention to two aspects: 1) the singing of the mothers to their infants, and 2) the non-verbal behaviours mothers and infants produce in synchrony with the musical beat. Four mother-infant dyads were video-recorded when the…

  18. Website on Protein Interaction and Protein Structure Related Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj; Liang, Shoudan; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    In today's world, three seemingly diverse fields - computer information technology, nanotechnology and biotechnology are joining forces to enlarge our scientific knowledge and solve complex technological problems. Our group is dedicated to conduct theoretical research exploring the challenges in this area. The major areas of research include: 1) Yeast Protein Interactions; 2) Protein Structures; and 3) Current Transport through Small Molecules.

  19. L2 Requests: Preference Structure in Talk-in-Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taleghani-Nikazm, Carmen; Huth, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    This study provides an empirical examination of how American learners of German accomplish the social action of requesting in L2 conversation, demonstrating how L2 learners use their linguistic and interactional resources to orient to preference structure in their talk. The data illustrate the sequential contingencies surrounding requests and…

  20. SEISMIC RESPONSE OF DAM WITH SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bycroft, G.N.; Mork, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    An analytical solution to the response of a long trapezoidal-section dam on a foundation consisting of an elastic half-space and subjected to simulated earthquake motion is developed. An optimum seismic design is achieved when the cross section of the dam is triangular. The effect of soil structure interaction is to lower the strain occurring in the dam.

  1. A Structural Examination of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tokar, David M.; Buchanan, Taneisha S.; Subich, Linda M.; Hall, Rosalie J.; Williams, Christine M.

    2012-01-01

    The underlying factor structure of the Learning Experiences Questionnaire (LEQ; Schaub, 2004) was examined using data from 742 male and female college-age respondents. The LEQ items reflect a variety of learning experiences (generated based on Bandura's (1986, 1997) four sources of self-efficacy perceptions) that might occur in each of Holland's…

  2. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurtado, Sylvia; Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2009-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma.…

  3. A space station Structures and Assembly Verification Experiment, SAVE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, R. A.; Raney, J. P.; Deryder, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The Space Station structure has been baselined to be a 5 M (16.4 ft) erectable truss. This structure will provide the overall framework to attach laboratory modules and other systems, subsystems and utilities. The assembly of this structure represents a formidable EVA challenge. To validate this capability the Space Station Structures/Dynamics Technical Integration Panel (TIP) met to develop the necessary data for an integrated STS structures flight experiment. As a result of this meeting, the Langley Research Center initiated a joint Langley/Boeing Aerospace Company study which supported the structures/dynamics TIP in developing the preliminary definition and design of a 5 M erectable space station truss and the resources required for a proposed flight experiment. The purpose of the study was to: (1) devise methods of truss assembly by astronauts; (2) define a specific test matrix for dynamic characterization; (3) identify instrumentation and data system requirements; (4) determine the power, propulsion and control requirements for the truss on-orbit for 3 years; (5) study the packaging of the experiment in the orbiter cargo bay; (6) prepare a preliminary cost estimate and schedule for the experiment; and (7) provide a list of potential follow-on experiments using the structure as a free flyer. The results of this three month study are presented.

  4. Linkers in the structural biology of protein–protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy Chichili, Vishnu Priyanka; Kumar, Veerendra; Sivaraman, J

    2013-01-01

    Linkers or spacers are short amino acid sequences created in nature to separate multiple domains in a single protein. Most of them are rigid and function to prohibit unwanted interactions between the discrete domains. However, Gly-rich linkers are flexible, connecting various domains in a single protein without interfering with the function of each domain. The advent of recombinant DNA technology made it possible to fuse two interacting partners with the introduction of artificial linkers. Often, independent proteins may not exist as stable or structured proteins until they interact with their binding partner, following which they gain stability and the essential structural elements. Gly-rich linkers have been proven useful for these types of unstable interactions, particularly where the interaction is weak and transient, by creating a covalent link between the proteins to form a stable protein–protein complex. Gly-rich linkers are also employed to form stable covalently linked dimers, and to connect two independent domains that create a ligand-binding site or recognition sequence. The lengths of linkers vary from 2 to 31 amino acids, optimized for each condition so that the linker does not impose any constraints on the conformation or interactions of the linked partners. Various structures of covalently linked protein complexes have been described using X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance and cryo-electron microscopy techniques. In this review, we evaluate several structural studies where linkers have been used to improve protein quality, to produce stable protein–protein complexes, and to obtain protein dimers. PMID:23225024

  5. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-12-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  6. Control-structure-thermal interactions in analysis of lunar telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Roger C.

    1992-01-01

    The lunar telescope project was an excellent model for the CSTI study because a telescope is a very sensitive instrument, and thermal expansion or mechanical vibration of the mirror assemblies will rapidly degrade the resolution of the device. Consequently, the interactions are strongly coupled. The lunar surface experiences very large temperature variations that range from approximately -180 C to over 100 C. Although the optical assemblies of the telescopes will be well insulated, the temperature of the mirrors will inevitably fluctuate in a similar cycle, but of much smaller magnitude. In order to obtain images of high quality and clarity, allowable thermal deformations of any point on a mirror must be less than 1 micron. Initial estimates indicate that this corresponds to a temperature variation of much less than 1 deg through the thickness of the mirror. Therefore, a lunar telescope design will most probably include active thermal control, a means of controlling the shape of the mirrors, or a combination of both systems. Historically, the design of a complex vehicle was primarily a sequential process in which the basic structure was defined without concurrent detailed analyses or other subsystems. The basic configuration was then passed to the different teams responsible for each subsystem, and their task was to produce a workable solution without requiring major alterations to any principal components or subsystems. Consequently, the final design of the vehicle was not always the most efficient, owing to the fact that each subsystem design was partially constrained by the previous work. This procedure was necessary at the time because the analysis process was extremely time-consuming and had to be started over with each significant alteration of the vehicle. With recent advances in the power and capacity of small computers, and the parallel development of powerful software in structural, thermal, and control system analysis, it is now possible to produce very

  7. The absence of tertiary interactions in a self-assembled DNA crystal structure.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nam; Birktoft, Jens J; Sha, Ruojie; Wang, Tong; Zheng, Jianping; Constantinou, Pamela E; Ginell, Stephan L; Chen, Yi; Mao, Chengde; Seeman, Nadrian C

    2012-04-01

    DNA is a highly effective molecule for controlling nanometer-scale structure. The convenience of using DNA lies in the programmability of Watson-Crick base-paired secondary interactions, useful both to design branched molecular motifs and to connect them through sticky-ended cohesion. Recently, the tensegrity triangle motif has been used to self-assemble three-dimensional crystals whose structures have been determined; sticky ends were reported to be the only intermolecular cohesive elements in those crystals. A recent communication in this journal suggested that tertiary interactions between phosphates and cytosine N(4) groups are responsible for intermolecular cohesion in these crystals, in addition to the secondary and covalent interactions programmed into the motif. To resolve this issue, we report experiments challenging this contention. Gel electrophoresis demonstrates that the tensegrity triangle exists in conditions where cytosine-PO(4) tertiary interactions seem ineffective. Furthermore, we have crystallized a tensegrity triangle using a junction lacking the cytosine suggested for involvement in tertiary interactions. The unit cell is isomorphous with that of a tensegrity triangle crystal reported earlier. This structure has been solved by molecular replacement and refined. The data presented here leave no doubt that the tensegrity triangle crystal structures reported earlier depend only on base pairing and covalent interactions for their formation. PMID:22434713

  8. Biological Structures, Interactions, Function and Behavior: Research Opportunities for Physicists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concepcion, Gisela P.

    2008-06-01

    Studies on marine biomolecules at the Marine Natural Products Laboratory (MNPL) and studies on biomedically relevant proteins at the Virtual Laboratory of Biomolecular Structures (VIRLS) of the University of the Philippines Marine Science Institute (UPMSI) are presented. These serve to illustrate some underlying principles of biological structures, interactions, function and behavior, and also to draw out some unresolved questions in biology of possible interest to non-biologists. The Biological Structures course offered at UPMSI, which aims to introduce underlying biological principles to non-biology majors and to promote trans-disciplinary research efforts, is also presented.

  9. MOLVIE: an interactive visualization environment for molecular structures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Huandong; Li, Ming; Xu, Ying

    2003-05-01

    A Molecular visualization interactive environment (MOLVIE), is designed to display three-dimensional (3D) structures of molecules and support the structural analysis and research on proteins. The paper presents the features, design considerations and applications of MOLVIE, especially the new functions used to compare the structures of two molecules and view the partial fragment of a molecule. Being developed in JAVA, MOLVIE is platform-independent. Moreover, it may run on a webpage as an applet for remote users. MOLVIE is available at http://www.cs.ucsb.edu/~mli/Bioinf/software/index.html. PMID:12725967

  10. Structural mode significance using INCA. [Interactive Controls Analysis computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Downing, John P.; Thorpe, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Structural finite element models are often too large to be used in the design and analysis of control systems. Model reduction techniques must be applied to reduce the structural model to manageable size. In the past, engineers either performed the model order reduction by hand or used distinct computer programs to retrieve the data, to perform the significance analysis and to reduce the order of the model. To expedite this process, the latest version of INCA has been expanded to include an interactive graphical structural mode significance and model order reduction capability.

  11. On media data structures for interactive streaming in immersive applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Gene; Ortega, Antonio; Cheung, Ngai-Man; Girod, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    Interactive media streaming is the communication paradigm where an observer periodically requests new desired subsets from the streaming sender in real-time, upon which the sender sends the appropriate media data, corresponding to the received requests, for immediate decoding and display. This is in contrast to non-interactive media streaming, e.g., TV broadcast, where the entire media set is compressed and delivered to the observer before the observer interacts with the data (such as switching TV channels). Examples of interactive streaming abound in different media modalities: interactive browsing of JPEG2000 images, interactive light field or multiview video streaming, etc. Interactive media streaming has the obvious advantage of bandwidth efficiency: only the media subsets corresponding to observer's requests are transmitted. This is important when an observer only views a small subset out of a very large media data set during a typical streaming session. The technical challenge is how to structure media data such that good compression efficiency can be achieved by exploiting correlation among media subsets (thus inducing a particular decoding order if correlation is exploited during encoding), while providing sufficient flexibility for the observer to freely navigate the media data set in his/her desired unique order. In this overview paper, we survey different proposals in the literature that simultaneously achieve the conflicting objectives of compression efficiency and decoding flexibility.

  12. Some experiences with the viscous-inviscid interaction approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandalsem, W. R.; Steger, J. L.; Rao, K. V.

    1987-01-01

    Methods for simulating compressible viscous flow using the viscid-inviscid interaction approach are described. The formulations presented range from the more familiar full-potential/boundary-layer interaction schemes to a method for coupling Euler/Navier-Stokes and boundary-layer algorithms. An effort is made to describe the advantages and disadvantages of each formulation. Sample results are presented which illustrate the applicability of the methods.

  13. Adaptivity and smart algorithms for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oden, J. Tinsley

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews new approaches in CFD which have the potential for significantly increasing current capabilities of modeling complex flow phenomena and of treating difficult problems in fluid-structure interaction. These approaches are based on the notions of adaptive methods and smart algorithms, which use instantaneous measures of the quality and other features of the numerical flowfields as a basis for making changes in the structure of the computational grid and of algorithms designed to function on the grid. The application of these new techniques to several problem classes are addressed, including problems with moving boundaries, fluid-structure interaction in high-speed turbine flows, flow in domains with receding boundaries, and related problems.

  14. A vorticity based approach to handle the fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbakhsh, Iman; Ghassemi, Hassan; Sabetghadam, Fereidoun

    2016-02-01

    A vorticity based approach for the numerical solution of the fluid-structure interaction problems is introduced in which the fluid and structure(s) can be viewed as a continuum. Retrieving the vorticity field and recalculating a solenoidal velocity field, specially at the fluid-structure interface, are the kernel of the proposed algorithm. In the suggested method, a variety of constitutive equations as a function of left Cauchy-Green deformation tensor can be applied for modeling the structure domain. A nonlinear Mooney-Rivlin and Saint Venant-Kirchhoff model are expressed in terms of the left Cauchy-Green deformation tensor and the presented method is able to model the behavior of a visco-hyperelastic structure in the incompressible flow. Some numerical experiments, with considering the neo-Hookean model for structure domain, are executed and the results are validated via the available results from literature.

  15. Adaptive-Control Experiments On A Large Flexible Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ih, Che-Hang C.; Bayard, David S.; Wang, Shyh J.; Eldred, Daniel B.

    1990-01-01

    Antennalike flexible structure built for research in advanced technology including suppression of vibrations and control of initial deflections. Structure instrumented with sensors and actuators connected to digital electronic control system, programmed with control algorithms to be tested. Particular attention in this research focused on direct model-reference adaptive-control algorithm based on command generator tracker theory. Built to exhibit multiple vibrational modes, low modal frequencies, and low structural damping. Made three-dimensional so complicated interactions among components of structure and control system investigated.

  16. Low-cost Active Structural Control Space Experiment (LASC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinett, Rush; Bukley, Angelia P.

    1992-01-01

    The DOE Lab Director's Conference identified the need for the DOE National Laboratories to actively and aggressively pursue ways to apply DOE technology to problems of national need. Space structures are key elements of DOD and NASA space systems and a space technology area in which DOE can have a significant impact. LASC is a joint agency space technology experiment (DOD Phillips, NASA Marshall, and DOE Sandia). The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: phase 4 investigator testbed; control of large flexible structures in orbit; INFLEX; Controls, Astrophysics; and structures experiments in space; SARSAT; and LASC mission objectives.

  17. Control/structure interactions of Freedom's solar dynamic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.; Yunis, I.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to address potential control/structures interaction (CSI) problems of large flexible multibody structures in the presence of pointing and tracking requirements. A control approach is introduced for the simultaneous tracking and vibration control of multibody space structures. The application that is discussed is Space Station Freedom configured with solar dynamic (SD) modules. The SD fine-pointing and tracking requirements may necessitate controller frequencies above the structural natural frequencies of Freedom and the SD modules. It is well known that this can give rise to CSI problems if the controller is designed without due consideration given to the structural dynamics of the system. In this paper, possible CSI problems of Freedom's solar dynamic power systems are demonstrated using a simple lumped mass model. A NASTRAN model of Freedom developed at NASA Lewis is used to demonstrate potential CSI problems and the proposed tracking and vibration control approach.

  18. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  19. The Energetic Particles in Shock-ICME Interaction Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, C.

    2015-12-01

    Previous results show that the energetic particles intensity will decreased in the ICMEs. But, in the year of 2008, Shen et al. reported a definite case that the intensity of solar energetic particles (SEP) in the shock-MC interaction structure increase greatly. They further found that such enhancement is the main cause of the largest SEP event in solar cycle 23. The questions remained are: Did all the shock-ICME(MC) structure cause the enhancement of the SEP intensity? If not, why it only happened in some events? Is there any other mechanism which can make the energetic particle intensity in ICME enhanced? To answer these questions, the SEP signatures in all ICMEs including the shock-ICME interaction structures from 1996 to 2014 are studied detail. It is found that the SEP intensities enhanced in about half of the shock-ICME interaction events. Meanwhile, large fraction of energetic particles intensity enhanced ICMEs are interacted with shocks. To find the possible condition and physical mechanismof such enhancement, the parameters of the shock, ICME(MC) and etc. are detailed analyzed.

  20. From Geometry to Diagnosis: Experiences of Geomatics in Structural Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveiro, B.; Arias, P.; Armesto, J.; Caamaño, J. C.; Solla, M.

    2012-07-01

    Terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning are technologies that have been successfully used for metric surveying and 3D modelling in many different fields (archaeological and architectural documentation, industrial retrofitting, mining, structural monitoring, road surveying, etc.). In the case of structural applications, these techniques have been successfully applied to 3D modelling and sometimes monitoring; but they have not been sufficiently implemented to date, as routine tools in infrastructure management systems, in terms of automation of data processing and integration in the condition assessment procedures. In this context, this paper presents a series of experiences in the usage of terrestrial photogrammetry and laser scanning in the context of dimensional and structural evaluation of structures. These experiences are particularly focused on historical masonry structures, but modern prestressed concrete bridges are also investigated. The development of methodological procedures for data collection, and data integration in some cases, is tackled for each particular structure (with access limitations, geometrical configuration, range of measurement, etc.). The accurate geometrical information provided by both terrestrial techniques motivates the implementation of such results in the complex, and sometimes slightly approximated, geometric scene that is frequently used in structural analysis. In this sense, quantitative evaluating of the influence of real and accurate geometry in structural analysis results must be carried out. As main result in this paper, a series of experiences based on the usage of photogrammetric and laser scanning to structural engineering are presented.

  1. INFLEX: an inexpensive structure and materials flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogan, Ray E.

    1993-09-01

    The Inexpensive Structure and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX) validates new technologies for space that can reduce cost and improve the performance of future precision structure space programs. These technologies include advanced sensors, structural modeling, actuators, system identification, active control algorithms, health monitoring, passive damping, and advanced composites. The INFLEX payload consists of a 16-foot deployable structure, avionics, control system actuators, and structural sensors. The entire payload structure is hinged with the spacecraft bus and is controlled by an extendible strut. Sensors and proof-mass actuators are distributed on the structure to conduct dynamics and control experiments. Two video cameras (wide and narrow field of view) monitor deployment, assess structural status, and quantitatively monitor structural motion. The data acquisition Remote Units, located on each rib and the central tower, interface to the actuators and sensors mounted nearby. The payload processor is mounted on the thermally controlled bulkhead of the spacecraft bus, and communicates with the Remote Units and the spacecraft to control all experiment hardware.

  2. Recent transitions of smart structures technologies through flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Benjamin K.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    2001-06-01

    A clear milestone has been reached in the development and demonstration of smart structures technologies for space applications. The success of recent space experiments not only demonstrates the feasibility of several new technologies, but also provides a glimpse of the various future opportunities available for research and development in the smart structures area. Three missions are discussed herein, as well as the role of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) and its government, industry, and academic partners in bringing them to fruition. The currently operating Vibration Isolation, Suppression, and Steering (VISS) space experiment and the Middeck Active Control Experiment Reflight (MACE-II), as well as the upcoming Satellite Ultra-quiet Isolation Technology Experiment (SUITE) are discussed in terms of notable achievements and lessons learned over the course of their execution. Directions for future research revealed by these experiments are also discussed, along with technology needs and transition opportunities for future operational systems.

  3. On-line interactive virtual experiments on nanoscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadar, Manuella; Ileana, Ioan; Hutanu, Constantin

    2009-01-01

    This paper is an overview on the next generation web which allows students to experience virtual experiments on nano science, physics devices, processes and processing equipment. Virtual reality is used to support a real university lab in which a student can experiment real lab sessions. The web material is presented in an intuitive and highly visual 3D form that is accessible to a diverse group of students. Such type of laboratory provides opportunities for professional and practical education for a wide range of users. The expensive equipment and apparatuses that build the experimental stage in a particular standard laboratory is used to create virtual educational research laboratories. Students learn how to prepare the apparatuses and facilities for the experiment. The online experiments metadata schema is the format for describing online experiments, much like the schema behind a library catalogue used to describe the books in a library. As an online experiment is a special kind of learning object, one specifies its schema as an extension to an established metadata schema for learning objects. The content of the courses, metainformation as well as readings and user data are saved on the server in a database as XML objects.

  4. Analysis of interactions between ribosomal proteins and RNA structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background One important goal of structural bioinformatics is to recognize and predict the interactions between protein binding sites and RNA. Recently, a comprehensive analysis of ribosomal proteins and their interactions with rRNA has been done. Interesting results emerged from the comparison of r-proteins within the small subunit in T. thermophilus and E. coli, supporting the idea of a core made by both RNA and proteins, conserved by evolution. Recent work showed also that ribosomal RNA is modularly composed. Motifs are generally single-stranded sequences of consecutive nucleotides (ssRNA) with characteristic folding. The role of these motifs in protein-RNA interactions has been so far only sparsely investigated. Results This work explores the role of RNA structural motifs in the interaction of proteins with ribosomal RNA (rRNA). We analyze composition, local geometries and conformation of interface regions involving motifs such as tetraloops, kink turns and single extruded nucleotides. We construct an interaction map of protein binding sites that allows us to identify the common types of shared 3-D physicochemical binding patterns for tetraloops. Furthermore, we investigate the protein binding pockets that accommodate single extruded nucleotides either involved in kink-turns or in arbitrary RNA strands. This analysis reveals a new structural motif, called tripod. It corresponds to small pockets consisting of three aminoacids arranged at the vertices of an almost equilateral triangle. We developed a search procedure for the recognition of tripods, based on an empirical tripod fingerprint. Conclusion A comparative analysis with the overall RNA surface and interfaces shows that contact surfaces involving RNA motifs have distinctive features that may be useful for the recognition and prediction of interactions. PMID:20122215

  5. A versatile electro-optical sensor provides feedback for controls-structures interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffelt, Everett; Schroeder, Curtis

    1992-08-01

    The importance of remote sensing for high-rate, high-accuracy position feedback in the control of large flexible structures is gaining wide recognition. Less obvious is the equally important use of these sensors for target tracking, proximity sensing, systems identification, and other control-related applications. The remote attitude measurement sensor (RAMS) can be easily adapted to satisfy each of these applications by selecting the optical components to meet specific measurement needs. The RAMS system has been configured to accept many different lens/target combinations and thereby provide versatility, easy of use, and reliable performance. Examples of typical applications are provided, along with descriptions of the sensor configurations and performance. Recent experiences in RAMS hardware development and testing are also described, including the use of RAMS for the Control, Astrophysics, and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES) Advanced Development Facility (ADF) and the controls-structures interaction demonstration experiment (C-SIDE).

  6. Interactive Negotiation of Perspectives in Japanese: Predicate-Final Structure as a Resource to Organize Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kanae

    2009-01-01

    While the predicate-final structure of the Japanese language has been considered one of the main causes of its late projectability (Tanaka, 1999), this study demonstrates that the final predicate component of a "turn constructional unit" (TCU) furnishes a useful resource for conversational participants to negotiate various aspects of interaction.…

  7. DRAFT: an interactive map plotting program for structural geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, Andrew C.

    DRAFT is a FORTRAN IV program for interactive generation and compilation of geological maps at any scale for geometric analysis, using any combination or quantity of three input file types, and is designed to be simple to use by users with little experience. The input data may consist of three basic types: (1) orientation, (2) alphanumeric, or (3) streamed digitizer data. Output is to the terminal and four-pen graph plotter. All nonstandard FORTRAN IV features used are listed.

  8. Interplay between magnetic interactions in spin-valve structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Oliveira, A. B.; Rezende, S. M.; Azevedo, A.

    2006-04-01

    In this work we report on the experimental and theoretical investigations of the effects of various magnetic couplings existing in spin-valve structures. Magnetic interactions such as the exchange bias that occurs at the ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic interface and the indirect coupling between ferromagnetic (FM) layers mediated by a nonmagnetic metal spacer as well as the interchange between both kinds of interactions were investigated. The unidirectional anisotropy that pins the magnetization of the pinned layer transmits to the free layer throughout the nonmagnetic spacer. Also, the resonance fields of the FM layers show an upward (downward) shift for an antiferromagnetic (ferromagnetic) bilinear coupling.

  9. Nail-like targets for laser plasma interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J; Wei, M; Shipton, E; Chen, S; Ma, T; Beg, F N; Alexander, N; Stephens, R B; MacPhee, A G; Hey, D; Pape, S L; Patel, P; Mackinnon, A J; Key, M H; Offermann, D; Link, A; Chowdhury, E; Van-Woerkom, L D; Freeman, R R

    2007-12-18

    The interaction of ultra-high power picosecond laser pulses with solid targets is of interest both for benchmarking the results of hybrid particle in cell (PIC) codes and also for applications to re-entrant cone guided fast ignition. We describe the construction of novel targets in which copper/titanium wires are formed into 'nail-like' objects by a process of melting and micromachining, so that energy can be reliably coupled to a 24 {micro}m diameter wire. An extreme-ultraviolet image of the interaction of the Titan laser with such a target is shown.

  10. Genetic Risk by Experience Interaction for Childhood Internalizing Problems: Converging Evidence across Multiple Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendlinski, Matthew K.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Essex, Marilyn J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2011-01-01

    Background: Identifying how genetic risk interacts with experience to predict psychopathology is an important step toward understanding the etiology of mental health problems. Few studies have examined genetic risk by experience interaction (GxE) in the development of childhood psychopathology. Methods: We used both co-twin and parent mental…

  11. SAMPIE (Solar Array Module Plasma Interactions Experiment). (Videotape)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    SAMPIE is an in-space technology experiment that flew on STS-62. Its intent is to investigate the potentially damaging effects of space plasma (gases) on different types, sizes, and shapes of solar cells, solar modules, and spacecraft materials.

  12. GMOL: An Interactive Tool for 3D Genome Structure Visualization.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Jackson; Wells, Avery; Oluwadare, Oluwatosin; Xu, Lingfei; Cao, Renzhi; Trieu, Tuan; He, Chenfeng; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that genome spatial structures largely affect both genome activity and DNA function. Knowing this, many researchers are currently attempting to accurately model genome structures. Despite these increased efforts there still exists a shortage of tools dedicated to visualizing the genome. Creating a tool that can accurately visualize the genome can aid researchers by highlighting structural relationships that may not be obvious when examining the sequence information alone. Here we present a desktop application, known as GMOL, designed to effectively visualize genome structures so that researchers may better analyze genomic data. GMOL was developed based upon our multi-scale approach that allows a user to scale between six separate levels within the genome. With GMOL, a user can choose any unit at any scale and scale it up or down to visualize its structure and retrieve corresponding genome sequences. Users can also interactively manipulate and measure the whole genome structure and extract static images and machine-readable data files in PDB format from the multi-scale structure. By using GMOL researchers will be able to better understand and analyze genome structure models and the impact their structural relations have on genome activity and DNA function. PMID:26868282

  13. Classroom Interaction Based on Teacher Ethnicity and Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Runett H.

    A study was conducted to investigate classroom interaction between black and white teachers working with black students in New York City. The purpose was to compare black and white teachers' attitudes as they taught minority students. Also compared were conceptions of students, parents, and administrators on what constitutes a "good teacher." The…

  14. Experience-dependent Structural Plasticity in the Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Min; Zuo, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are the fundamental units of neuronal circuits. Synaptic plasticity can occur through changes in synaptic strength, as well as through the addition/removal of synapses. Two-photon microscopy, in combination with fluorescence labeling, offers a powerful tool to peek into the living brain and follow structural reorganization at individual synapses. Time-lapse imaging depicts a dynamic picture, in which experience-dependent plasticity of synaptic structures varies between different cortical regions and layers, as well as between neuronal subtypes. Recent studies have demonstrated that the formation and elimination of synaptic structures happens rapidly in a subpopulation of cortical neurons during various sensorimotor learning experiences, and that stabilized synaptic structures are associated with long-lasting memories for the task. Thus, circuit plasticity, mediated by structural remodeling, provides an underlying mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:21397343

  15. Fluid-Structure Interactions with Flexible and Rigid Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daily, David Jesse

    Fluid structure interactions occur to some extent in nearly every type of fluid flow. Understanding how structures interact with fluids and visa-versa is of vital importance in many engineering applications. The purpose of this research is to explore how fluids interact with flexible and rigid structures. A computational model was used to model the fluid structure interactions of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. The model simulated the coupling of the fluid and solid domains using a fluid-structure interface boundary condition. The fluid domain used a slightly compressible flow solver to allow for the possibility of acoustic coupling with the subglottal geometry and vibration of the vocal fold model. As the subglottis lengthened, the frequency of vibration decreased until a new acoustic mode could form in the subglottis. Synthetic aperture particle image velocimetry (SAPIV) is a three-dimensional particle tracking technique. SAPIV was used to image the jet of air that emerges from vibrating human vocal folds (glottal jet) during phonation. The three-dimensional reconstruction of the glottal jet found faint evidence of flow characteristics seen in previous research, such as axis-switching, but did not have sufficient resolution to detect small features. SAPIV was further applied to reconstruct the smaller flow characteristics of the glottal jet of vibrating synthetic vocal folds. Two- and four-layer synthetic vocal fold models were used to determine how the glottal jet from the synthetic models compared to the glottal jet from excised human vocal folds. The two- and four-layer models clearly exhibited axis-switching which has been seen in other 3D analyses of the glottal jet. Cavitation in a quiescent fluid can break a rigid structure such as a glass bottle. A new cavitation number was derived to include acceleration and pressure head at cavitation onset. A cavitation stick was used to validate the cavitation number by filling it with different depths and hitting

  16. CME Interaction with Large-Scale Coronal Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswarny, Nat

    2012-01-01

    This talk presents some key observations that highlight the importance of CME interaction with other large scale structures such as CMEs and coronal holes . Such interactions depend on the phase of the solar cycle: during maximum, CMEs are ejected more frequently, so CME-CME interaction becomes dominant. During the rise phase, the polar coronal holes are strong, so the interaction between polar coronal holes and CMEs is important, which also leads to a possible increase in the number of interplanetary CMEs observed as magnetic clouds. During the declining phase, there are more equatorial coronal holes, so CMEs originating near these coronal holes are easily deflected. CMEs can be deflected toward and away from the Sun-Earth line resulting in interesting geospace consequences. For example, the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 23 was due to a CME that was deflected towards the Sun-earth line from E22. CME deflection away from the Sun-Earth line diminishes the chance of a CME producing a geomagnetic storm. CME interaction in the coronagraphic field of view was first identified using enhanced radio emission, which is an indication of acceleration of low energy (approx.10 keV) electrons in the interaction site. CME interaction, therefore, may also have implications for proton acceleration. For example, solar energetic particle events typically occur with a higher intensity, whenever multiple CMEs occur in quick succession from the same source region. CME deflection may also have implications to the arrival of energetic particles to earth because magnetic connectivity may be changed by the interaction. I illustrate the above points using examples from SOHO, STEREO, Wind, and ACE data .

  17. Giant protein kinases: domain interactions and structural basis of autoregulation.

    PubMed Central

    Kobe, B; Heierhorst, J; Feil, S C; Parker, M W; Benian, G M; Weiss, K R; Kemp, B E

    1996-01-01

    The myosin-associated giant protein kinases twitchin and titin are composed predominantly of fibronectin- and immunoglobulin-like modules. We report the crystal structures of two autoinhibited twitchin kinase fragments, one from Aplysia and a larger fragment from Caenorhabditis elegans containing an additional C-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain. The structure of the longer fragment shows that the immunoglobulin domain contacts the protein kinase domain on the opposite side from the catalytic cleft, laterally exposing potential myosin binding residues. Together, the structures reveal the cooperative interactions between the autoregulatory region and the residues from the catalytic domain involved in protein substrate binding, ATP binding, catalysis and the activation loop, and explain the differences between the observed autoinhibitory mechanism and the one found in the structure of calmodulin-dependent kinase I. Images PMID:9003756

  18. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    PubMed

    Capone, Cristiano; Filosa, Carla; Gigante, Guido; Ricci-Tersenghi, Federico; Del Giudice, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones. PMID:25807389

  19. Structures and geriatrics from a failure analysis experience viewpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, D.M. )

    1993-05-01

    In a failure analysis consulting engineering practice one sees a variety of structural failures from which observations may be made concerning geriatric structures. Representative experience with power plants, refineries, offshore structures, and forensic investigations is summarized and generic observations are made regarding the maintenance of fitness for purpose of structures. Although it is important to optimize the engineering design for a range of operational and environmental variables, it is essential that fabrication and inspection controls exist along with common sense based ongoing monitoring and operations procedures. 18 figs.

  20. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  1. Minimal metabolic pathway structure is consistent with associated biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Bordbar, Aarash; Nagarajan, Harish; Lewis, Nathan E; Latif, Haythem; Ebrahim, Ali; Federowicz, Stephen; Schellenberger, Jan; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2014-01-01

    Pathways are a universal paradigm for functionally describing cellular processes. Even though advances in high-throughput data generation have transformed biology, the core of our biological understanding, and hence data interpretation, is still predicated on human-defined pathways. Here, we introduce an unbiased, pathway structure for genome-scale metabolic networks defined based on principles of parsimony that do not mimic canonical human-defined textbook pathways. Instead, these minimal pathways better describe multiple independent pathway-associated biomolecular interaction datasets suggesting a functional organization for metabolism based on parsimonious use of cellular components. We use the inherent predictive capability of these pathways to experimentally discover novel transcriptional regulatory interactions in Escherichia coli metabolism for three transcription factors, effectively doubling the known regulatory roles for Nac and MntR. This study suggests an underlying and fundamental principle in the evolutionary selection of pathway structures; namely, that pathways may be minimal, independent, and segregated. PMID:24987116

  2. Relative Displacement Method for Track-Structure Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Pantaleón, Marcos J.

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  3. Reconciling CMB and structure growth measurements with dark energy interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourtsidou, Alkistis; Tram, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We study a coupled quintessence model with pure momentum exchange and present the effects of such an interaction on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and matter power spectrum. For a wide range of negative values of the coupling parameter β structure growth is suppressed and the model can reconcile the tension between cosmic microwave background observations and structure growth inferred from cluster counts. We find that this model is as good as Λ CDM for CMB and baryon acoustic oscillation data, while the addition of cluster data makes the model strongly preferred, improving the best-fit χ2 value by more than 16.

  4. Relative displacement method for track-structure interaction.

    PubMed

    Schanack, Frank; Ramos, Óscar Ramón; Reyes, Juan Patricio; Pantaleón, Marcos J

    2014-01-01

    The track-structure interaction effects are usually analysed with conventional FEM programs, where it is difficult to implement the complex track-structure connection behaviour, which is nonlinear, elastic-plastic and depends on the vertical load. The authors developed an alternative analysis method, which they call the relative displacement method. It is based on the calculation of deformation states in single DOF element models that satisfy the boundary conditions. For its solution, an iterative optimisation algorithm is used. This method can be implemented in any programming language or analysis software. A comparison with ABAQUS calculations shows a very good result correlation and compliance with the standard's specifications. PMID:24634610

  5. High frequency flow-structural interaction in dense subsonic fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Baw-Lin; Ofarrell, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Prediction of the detailed dynamic behavior in rocket propellant feed systems and engines and other such high-energy fluid systems requires precise analysis to assure structural performance. Designs sometimes require placement of bluff bodies in a flow passage. Additionally, there are flexibilities in ducts, liners, and piping systems. A design handbook and interactive data base have been developed for assessing flow/structural interactions to be used as a tool in design and development, to evaluate applicable geometries before problems develop, or to eliminate or minimize problems with existing hardware. This is a compilation of analytical/empirical data and techniques to evaluate detailed dynamic characteristics of both the fluid and structures. These techniques have direct applicability to rocket engine internal flow passages, hot gas drive systems, and vehicle propellant feed systems. Organization of the handbook is by basic geometries for estimating Strouhal numbers, added mass effects, mode shapes for various end constraints, critical onset flow conditions, and possible structural response amplitudes. Emphasis is on dense fluids and high structural loading potential for fatigue at low subsonic flow speeds where high-frequency excitations are possible. Avoidance and corrective measure illustrations are presented together with analytical curve fits for predictions compiled from a comprehensive data base.

  6. Deciphering Supramolecular Structures with Protein-Protein Interaction Network Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tsuji, Toshiyuki; Yoda, Takao; Shirai, Tsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Many biological molecules are assembled into supramolecules that are essential to perform complicated functions in the cell. However, experimental information about the structures of supramolecules is not sufficient at this point. We developed a method of predicting and modeling the structures of supramolecules in a biological network by combining structural data of the Protein Data Bank (PDB) and interaction data in IntAct databases. Templates for binary complexes in IntAct were extracted from PDB. Modeling was attempted by assembling binary complexes with superposed shared subunits. A total of 3,197 models were constructed, and 1,306 (41% of the total) contained at least one subunit absent from experimental structures. The models also suggested 970 (25% of the total) experimentally undetected subunit interfaces, and 41 human disease-related amino acid variants were mapped onto these model-suggested interfaces. The models demonstrated that protein-protein interaction network modeling is useful to fill the information gap between biological networks and structures. PMID:26549015

  7. Mutualistic Interactions and Community Structure in Biological Metacommunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rikvold, Per Arne; Filotas, Elise; Grant, Martin; Parrott, Lael

    2011-03-01

    The role of space in determining species coexistence and community structure is well established. However, previous studies mainly focus on simple competition and predation systems, and the role of mutualistic interspecies interactions is not well understood. Here we use a spatially explicit metacommunity model, in which new species enter by a mutation process, to study the effect of fitness-dependent dispersal on the structure of communities with interactions comprising mutualism, competition, and exploitation. We find that the diversity and interaction network undergo a nonequilibrium phase transition with increasing dispersal rate. Low dispersion rate favors spontaneous emergence of many dissimilar, strongly mutualistic and species-poor local communities. Due to the local dissimilarities, the global diversity is high. High dispersion rate promotes local biodiversity and supports similar, species-rich local communities with a wide range of interactions. The strong similarity between neighboring local communities leads to reduced global diversity. Supported by NSERC (Canada), FQRNT (Québec), NSF (U.S.A.)

  8. Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction and thermal stability

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.Y.; Billone, M.C.; Taghavi, K.

    1985-04-01

    Solid breeder/structure mechanical interaction (BSMI) during fusion reactor blanket operation is a potential failure mode which could limit the lifetime of the blanket. The severity of BSMI will generally depend on the materials, specific blanket designs, and blanket operating conditions. Thermomechanical analyses performed for a helium-cooled blanket employing Li/sub 2/O/HT-9 plates indicate that BSMI could be a serious concern for this blanket.

  9. Solar neutrino interactions with liquid scintillators used for double beta-decay experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, Hiroyasu; Zuber, Kai

    2016-08-01

    Solar neutrinos interact within double-beta-decay (DBD) detectors and hence will contribute to backgrounds (BGs) for DBD experiments. Background contributions due to solar neutrinos are evaluated for their interactions with atomic electrons and nuclei in liquid scintillation detectors used for DBD experiments. They are shown to be serious BGs for high-sensitivity DBD experiments to search for the Majorana neutrino masses in the inverted and normal hierarchy regions.

  10. Rotor-Fuselage Interaction: Analysis and Validation with Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; Bettschart, Nicolas

    1997-01-01

    The problem of rotor-fuselage aerodynamic interaction has to be considered in industry applications from various aspects. First, in order to increase helicopter speed and reduce operational costs, rotorcraft tend to be more and more compact, with a main rotor closer to the fuselage surface. This creates significant perturbations both on the main rotor and on the fuselage, including steady and unsteady effects due to blade and wake passage and perturbed inflow at the rotor disk. Furthermore,the main rotor wake affects the tail boom, empennage and anti-torque system. This has important consequences for helicopter control and vibrations at low speeds and also on tail rotor acoustics (main rotor wake-tail rotor interactions). This report describes the US Army-France MOD cooperative work on this problem from both the theoretical and experimental aspects. Using experimental 3D velocity field and fuselage surface pressure measurements, three codes that model the interactions of a helicopter rotor with a fuselage are compared. These comparisons demonstrate some of the strengths and weaknesses of current models for the combined rotor-fuselage analysis.

  11. Constraints on neutrino-dark matter interactions from cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data

    SciTech Connect

    Serra, Paolo; Cooray, Asantha; Zalamea, Federico; Mangano, Gianpiero; Melchiorri, Alessandro

    2010-02-15

    We update a previous investigation of cosmological effects of a nonstandard interaction between neutrinos and dark matter. Parametrizing the elastic-scattering cross section between the two species as a function of the temperature of the Universe, the resulting neutrino-dark matter fluid has a nonzero pressure, which determines diffusion-damped oscillations in the matter power spectrum similar to the acoustic oscillations generated by the photon-baryon fluid. Using cosmic microwave background data in combination with large scale structure experiment results, we then put constraints on the fraction of the interacting dark matter component as well as on the corresponding opacity.

  12. Quantifying the energetic interplay of RNA tertiary and secondary structure interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, S K; Zheng, M; Wu, M; Tinoco, I; Cech, T R

    1999-01-01

    To understand the RNA-folding problem, we must know the extent to which RNA structure formation is hierarchical (tertiary folding of preformed secondary structure). Recently, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to show that Mg2+-dependent tertiary interactions force secondary structure rearrangement in the 56-nt tP5abc RNA, a truncated subdomain of the Tetrahymena group I intron. Here we combine mutagenesis with folding computations, nondenaturing gel electrophoresis, high-resolution NMR spectroscopy, and chemical-modification experiments to probe further the energetic interplay of tertiary and secondary interactions in tP5abc. Point mutations predicted to destabilize the secondary structure of folded tP5abc greatly disrupt its Mg2+-dependent folding, as monitored by nondenaturing gels. Imino proton assignments and sequential NOE walks of the two-dimensional NMR spectrum of one of the tP5abc mutants confirm the predicted secondary structure, which does not change in the presence of Mg2+. In contrast to these data on tP5abc, the same point mutations in the context of the P4-P6 domain (of which P5abc is a subdomain) shift the Mg2+ dependence of P4-P6 folding only moderately, and dimethyl sulfate (DMS) modification experiments demonstrate that Mg2+ does cause secondary structure rearrangement of the P4-P6 mutants' P5abc subdomains. Our data provide experimental support for two simple conclusions: (1) Even single point mutations at bases involved only in secondary structure can be enough to tip the balance between RNA tertiary and secondary interactions. (2) Domain context must be considered in evaluating the relative importance of tertiary and secondary contributions. This tertiary/secondary interplay is likely relevant to the folding of many large RNA and to bimolecular snRNA-snRNA and snRNA-intron RNA interactions. PMID:10606276

  13. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  14. Interest Enhancements to Science Experiments: Interactions with Student Gender.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    Summarizes comparisons of self-reported interest by gender and experimental condition for middle school students (n=101) who performed scientific experiments under conditions designed to vary across difficulty levels, social contexts, and scenarios of fantasy to realism. Findings indicate that boys were more attentive to aspects of experimental…

  15. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-01-01

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45 pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20 nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129 MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures. PMID:26014599

  16. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequency demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.

  17. Dynamic near-field optical interaction between oscillating nanomechanical structures

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ahn, Phillip; Chen, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Ford, Matthew; Rosenmann, Daniel; Jung, II Woong; Sun, Cheng; Balogun, Oluwaseyi

    2015-05-27

    Near-field optical techniques exploit light-matter interactions at small length scales for mechanical sensing and actuation of nanomechanical structures. Here, we study the optical interaction between two mechanical oscillators—a plasmonic nanofocusing probe-tip supported by a low frequency cantilever, and a high frequency nanomechanical resonator—and leverage their interaction for local detection of mechanical vibrations. The plasmonic nanofocusing probe provides a confined optical source to enhance the interaction between the two oscillators. Dynamic perturbation of the optical cavity between the probe-tip and the resonator leads to nonlinear modulation of the scattered light intensity at the sum and difference of their frequencies. This double-frequencymore » demodulation scheme is explored to suppress unwanted background and to detect mechanical vibrations with a minimum detectable displacement sensitivity of 0.45pm/Hz1/2, which is limited by shot noise and electrical noise. We explore the demodulation scheme for imaging the bending vibration mode shape of the resonator with a lateral spatial resolution of 20nm. We also demonstrate the time-resolved aspect of the local optical interaction by recording the ring-down vibrations of the resonator at frequencies of up to 129MHz. The near-field optical technique is promising for studying dynamic mechanical processes in individual nanostructures.« less

  18. Structured learning of human interactions in TV shows.

    PubMed

    Patron-Perez, Alonso; Marszalek, Marcin; Reid, Ian; Zisserman, Andrew

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this work is recognition and spatiotemporal localization of two-person interactions in video. Our approach is person-centric. As a first stage we track all upper bodies and heads in a video using a tracking-by-detection approach that combines detections with KLT tracking and clique partitioning, together with occlusion detection, to yield robust person tracks. We develop local descriptors of activity based on the head orientation (estimated using a set of pose-specific classifiers) and the local spatiotemporal region around them, together with global descriptors that encode the relative positions of people as a function of interaction type. Learning and inference on the model uses a structured output SVM which combines the local and global descriptors in a principled manner. Inference using the model yields information about which pairs of people are interacting, their interaction class, and their head orientation (which is also treated as a variable, enabling mistakes in the classifier to be corrected using global context). We show that inference can be carried out with polynomial complexity in the number of people, and describe an efficient algorithm for this. The method is evaluated on a new dataset comprising 300 video clips acquired from 23 different TV shows and on the benchmark UT--Interaction dataset. PMID:23079467

  19. Structural features underlying raloxifene's biophysical interaction with bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Bivi, Nicoletta; Hu, Haitao; Chavali, Balagopalakrishna; Chalmers, Michael J; Reutter, Christopher T; Durst, Gregory L; Riley, Anna; Sato, Masahiko; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David D; Dodge, Jeffrey A

    2016-02-15

    Raloxifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), reduces fracture risk at least in part by improving the mechanical properties of bone in a cell- and estrogen receptor-independent manner. In this study, we determined that raloxifene directly interacts with the bone tissue. Through the use of multiple and complementary biophysical techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), we show that raloxifene interacts specifically with the organic component or the organic/mineral composite, and not with hydroxyapatite. Structure-activity studies reveal that the basic side chain of raloxifene is an instrumental determinant in the interaction with bone. Thus, truncation of portions of the side chain reduces bone binding and also diminishes the increase in mechanical properties. Our results support a model wherein the piperidine interacts with bone matrix through electrostatic interactions with the piperidine nitrogen and through hydrophobic interactions (van der Waals) with the aliphatic groups in the side chain and the benzothiophene core. Furthermore, in silico prediction of the potential binding sites on the surface of collagen revealed the presence of a groove with sufficient space to accommodate raloxifene analogs. The hydroxyl groups on the benzothiophene nucleus, which are necessary for binding of SERMs to the estrogen receptor, are not required for binding to the bone surface, but mediate a more robust binding of the compound to the bone powder. In conclusion, we report herein a novel property of raloxifene analogs that allows them to interact with the bone tissue through potential contacts with the organic matrix and in particular collagen. PMID:26795112

  20. STS-74/Mir photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.; Gilbert, Michael G.

    1996-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) is an International Space Station (ISS) Phase-1 risk mitigation experiment. Phase-1 experiments are performed during docking missions of the U.S. Space Shuttle to the Russian Space Station Mir. The purpose of the experiment is to demonstrate the use of photogrammetric techniques for determination of structural dynamic mode parameters of solar arrays and other spacecraft appendages. Photogrammetric techniques are a low cost alternative to appendage mounted accelerometers for the ISS program. The objective of the first flight of PASDE, on STS-74 in November 1995, was to obtain video images of Mir Kvant-2 solar array response to various structural dynamic excitation events. More than 113 minutes of high quality structural response video data was collected during the mission. The PASDE experiment hardware consisted of three instruments each containing two video cameras, two video tape recorders, a modified video signal time inserter, and associated avionics boxes. The instruments were designed, fabricated, and tested at the NASA Langley Research Center in eight months. The flight hardware was integrated into standard Hitchhiker canisters at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and then installed into the Space Shuttle cargo bay in locations selected to achieve good video coverage and photogrammetric geometry.

  1. Software for continuum modeling of controls-structures interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence W., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    It is clear that computer software is needed to assist in the generation of the equations of motion for complex, flexible spacecraft. Daniel Poelaert of ESTEC has developed the software DISTEL with which he has modeled the structural dynamics for different satellites. He is interested in expanding the capabilities of DISTEL to include structural damping and control systems. Unfortunately, the software has not been released. The author has developed similar software, PDEMOD, which has been used to model the Spacecraft control Laboratory Experiment (SCOLE), the Solar Array Flight Experiment (SAFE), the Mini-MAST truss, and the LACE satellite. PDEMOD has been used also for optimal parameter estimation and integrated control-structures design. PDEMOD is also being extended to include structural damping and control systems which are imbedded into the same equations for the structural dynamics. This paper will address the formulation of the equations for the structural dynamics of spacecraft structures which are constructed of a 3-dimensional arrangement of rigid bodies and flexible beam elements. Control system dynamics are imbedded into the same equations so that model order reduction approximations are not necessary. The input data consists of the physical data of the elements and the topological information describing how the elements are connected. PDEMOD accomplishes the following: (1) automatically assembles the equations of motion for the entire structural model; (2) calculates the modal frequencies; (3) calculates the mode shapes; (4) generates perspective views of the mode shapes; and (5) forms selected transfer functions. The software PDEMOD continues to be developed to provide additional features to assist in analyzing and synthesizing control and structural systems for flexible spacecraft.

  2. Structural consequences of weak interactions in dispirooxindole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Krishnan; Sridhar, Balasubramanian; Nanubolu, Jagadeesh Babu; Karthik, Govindaraju; Reddy, Basi Venkata Subba

    2015-11-01

    Spiro scaffolds are being increasingly utilized in drug discovery due to their inherent three-dimensionality and structural variations, resulting in new synthetic routes to introduce spiro building blocks into more pharmaceutically active molecules. Multicomponent cascade reactions, involving the in situ generation of carbonyl ylides from α-diazocarbonyl compounds and aldehydes, and 1,3-dipolar cycloadditon with 3-arylideneoxindoles gave a novel class of dispirooxindole derivatives, namely 1,1''-dibenzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C44H33ClN2O3, (I), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-5'-(4-chlorophenyl)-4'-phenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H29ClN2O4, (II), 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione, C39H30N2O4, (III), and 1''-acetyl-1-benzyl-4',5'-diphenyl-4',5'-dihydrodispiro[indoline-3,2'-furan-3',3''-indoline]-2,2''-dione acetonitrile hemisolvate, C39H30N2O4·0.5C2H3N, (IV). All four compounds exist as racemic mixtures of the SSSR and RRRS stereoisomers. In these structures, the two H atoms of the dihydrofuran ring and the two substituted oxindole rings are in a trans orientation, facilitating intramolecular C-H···O and π-π interactions. These weak interactions play a prominent role in the structural stability and aid the highly regio- and diastereoselective synthesis. In each of the four structures, the molecular assembly in the crystal is also governed by weak noncovalent interactions. Compound (IV) is the solvated analogue of (III) and the two compounds show similar structural features. PMID:26524175

  3. Inhalation experiments with mixtures of hydrocarbons. Experimental design, statistics and interpretation of kinetics and possible interactions.

    PubMed

    Eide, I; Zahlsen, K

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes experimental and statistical methods for toxicokinetic evaluation of mixtures in inhalation experiments. Synthetic mixtures of three C9 n-paraffinic, naphthenic and aromatic hydrocarbons (n-nonane, trimethylcyclohexane and trimethylbenzene, respectively) were studied in the rat after inhalation for 12h. The hydrocarbons were mixed according to principles for statistical experimental design using mixture design at four vapour levels (75, 150, 300 and 450 ppm) to support an empirical model with linear, interaction and quadratic terms (Taylor polynome). Immediately after exposure, concentrations of hydrocarbons were measured by head space gas chromatography in blood, brain, liver, kidneys and perirenal fat. Multivariate data analysis and modelling were performed with PLS (projections to latent structures). The best models were obtained after removing all interaction terms, suggesting that there were no interactions between the hydrocarbons with respect to absorption and distribution. Uptake of paraffins and particularly aromatics is best described by quadratic models, whereas the uptake of the naphthenic hydrocarbons is nearly linear. All models are good, with high correlation (r2) and prediction properties (Q2), the latter after cross validation. The concentrations of aromates in blood were high compared to the other hydrocarbons. At concentrations below 250 ppm, the naphthene reached higher concentrations in the brain compared to the paraffin and the aromate. Statistical experimental design, multivariate data analysis and modelling have proved useful for the evaluation of synthetic mixtures. The principles may also be used in the design of liquid mixtures, which may be evaporated partially or completely. PMID:8740533

  4. Cross-Modal Interactions in the Experience of Musical Performances: Physiological Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapados, Catherine; Levitin, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate cross-modal interactions in the emotional experience of music listeners. Previous research showed that visual information present in a musical performance is rich in expressive content, and moderates the subjective emotional experience of a participant listening and/or observing musical stimuli [Vines,…

  5. Diversifying Science: Underrepresented Student Experiences in Structured Research Programs

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Nolan L.; Lin, Monica H.; Arellano, Lucy; Espinosa, Lorelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Targeting four institutions with structured science research programs for undergraduates, this study focuses on how underrepresented students experience science. Several key themes emerged from focus group discussions: learning to become research scientists, experiences with the culture of science, and views on racial and social stigma. Participants spoke of essential factors for becoming a scientist, but their experiences also raised complex issues about the role of race and social stigma in scientific training. Students experienced the collaborative and empowering culture of science, exhibited strong science identities and high self-efficacy, while developing directed career goals as a result of “doing science” in these programs. PMID:23503690

  6. Magnetosphere-thermosphere coupling - An experiment in interactive modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, Jeffrey M.; Harel, Moshe

    1989-01-01

    The present use of the Rice convection model to investigate the electrodynamic coupling of the thermosphere to the inner magnetosphere encompasses the effects of EUV-driven and convection-driven neutral winds under quasi-equilibrium conditions. Convection-driven winds are included self-consistently and interactively; a steady-state wind parameterization is written analytically in terms of the electrostatic potential, which is in turn included in a closed-loop calculation for the electric potential itself. The simulations conducted show that, as the neutral system approaches a quasi-equilibrium state, the neutral winds play a much more significant role.

  7. Primate paternal care: interactions between biology and social experience

    PubMed Central

    Storey, Anne E.; Ziegler, Toni E.

    2016-01-01

    We review recent research on the roles of hormones and social experiences on the development of paternal care in humans and non-human primates. Generally, lower concentrations of testosterone and higher concentrations of oxytocin are associated with greater paternal responsiveness. Hormonal changes prior to the birth appear to be important in preparation for fatherhood and changes after the birth are related to how much time fathers spend with offspring and whether they provide effective care. Prolactin may facilitate approach and the initiation of infant care, and in some biparental non-human primates, it affects body mass regulation. Glucocorticoids are involved in coordinating reproductive and parental behavior between mates. New research involving intranasal oxytocin and neuropeptide receptor polymorphisms may help us understand individual variation in paternal responsiveness. This area of research, integrating both biological factors and the role of early and adult experience, has the potential to suggest individually designed interventions that can strengthen relationships between fathers and their offspring. PMID:26253726

  8. Genetic variation, predator–prey interactions and food web structure

    PubMed Central

    Moya-Laraño, Jordi

    2011-01-01

    Food webs are networks of species that feed on each other. The role that within-population phenotypic and genetic variation plays in food web structure is largely unknown. Here, I show via simulation how variation in two key traits, growth rates and phenology, by influencing the variability of body sizes present through time, can potentially affect several structural parameters in the direction of enhancing food web persistence: increased connectance, decreased interaction strengths, increased variation among interaction strengths and increased degree of omnivory. I discuss other relevant traits whose variation could affect the structure of food webs, such as morphological and additional life-history traits, as well as animal personalities. Furthermore, trait variation could also contribute to the stability of food web modules through metacommunity dynamics. I propose future research to help establish a link between within-population variation and food web structure. If appropriately established, such a link could have important consequences for biological conservation, as it would imply that preserving (functional) genetic variation within populations could ensure the preservation of entire communities. PMID:21444316

  9. Fluid/Structure Interaction Studies of Aircraft Using High Fidelity Equations on Parallel Computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guruswamy, Guru; VanDalsem, William (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Abstract Aeroelasticity which involves strong coupling of fluids, structures and controls is an important element in designing an aircraft. Computational aeroelasticity using low fidelity methods such as the linear aerodynamic flow equations coupled with the modal structural equations are well advanced. Though these low fidelity approaches are computationally less intensive, they are not adequate for the analysis of modern aircraft such as High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) and Advanced Subsonic Transport (AST) which can experience complex flow/structure interactions. HSCT can experience vortex induced aeroelastic oscillations whereas AST can experience transonic buffet associated structural oscillations. Both aircraft may experience a dip in the flutter speed at the transonic regime. For accurate aeroelastic computations at these complex fluid/structure interaction situations, high fidelity equations such as the Navier-Stokes for fluids and the finite-elements for structures are needed. Computations using these high fidelity equations require large computational resources both in memory and speed. Current conventional super computers have reached their limitations both in memory and speed. As a result, parallel computers have evolved to overcome the limitations of conventional computers. This paper will address the transition that is taking place in computational aeroelasticity from conventional computers to parallel computers. The paper will address special techniques needed to take advantage of the architecture of new parallel computers. Results will be illustrated from computations made on iPSC/860 and IBM SP2 computer by using ENSAERO code that directly couples the Euler/Navier-Stokes flow equations with high resolution finite-element structural equations.

  10. Finite element solution of transient fluid-structure interaction problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everstine, Gordon C.; Cheng, Raymond S.; Hambric, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    A finite element approach using NASTRAN is developed for solving time-dependent fluid-structure interaction problems, with emphasis on the transient scattering of acoustic waves from submerged elastic structures. Finite elements are used for modeling both structure and fluid domains to facilitate the graphical display of the wave motion through both media. For the liquid, the use of velocity potential as the fundamental unknown results in a symmetric matrix equation. The approach is illustrated for the problem of transient scattering from a submerged elastic spherical shell subjected to an incident tone burst. The use of an analogy between the equations of elasticity and the wave equation of acoustics, a necessary ingredient to the procedure, is summarized.

  11. Shock-driven fluid-structure interaction for civil design

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Stephen L; Deiterding, Ralf

    2011-11-01

    The multiphysics fluid-structure interaction simulation of shock-loaded structures requires the dynamic coupling of a shock-capturing flow solver to a solid mechanics solver for large deformations. The Virtual Test Facility combines a Cartesian embedded boundary approach with dynamic mesh adaptation in a generic software framework of flow solvers using hydrodynamic finite volume upwind schemes that are coupled to various explicit finite element solid dynamics solvers (Deiterding et al., 2006). This paper gives a brief overview of the computational approach and presents first simulations that utilize the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D for complex 3D structures of interest in civil engineering. Results from simulations of a reinforced column, highway bridge, multistory building, and nuclear reactor building are presented.

  12. Analysis of soil-structure interaction due to ambient vibration

    SciTech Connect

    Tabatabaie, M., Sommer, S.C.

    1998-03-27

    This paper presents the results of a study to evaluate the effects of soil-structure interaction (SSI) on the ambient vibration response of the switchyard/target area (S/TA) buildings at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) presently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. This laser facility houses optical and other special equipment whose alignment stability is sensitive to vibrations caused by ambient vibrations or other vibrating sources. In evaluating the deformations and displacements of the S/TA structures, the contribution of the SSI to the overall system flexibility can be very significant. The present study examines the results of fixed-base and SSI analyses of these massive stiff structures to develop an understanding of the potential contribution of SSI to the overall system displacements and deformations. A simple procedure using a set of factors is recommended for scaling the results of fixed-base analyses to approximately account for SSI effects.

  13. Isotope labeling for NMR studies of macromolecular structure and interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, P.E.

    1994-12-01

    Implementation of biosynthetic methods for uniform or specific isotope labeling of proteins, coupled with the recent development of powerful heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods, has led to a dramatic increase in the size and complexity of macromolecular systems that are now amenable to NMR structural analysis. In recent years, a new technology has emerged that combines uniform {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeling with heteronuclear multidimensional NMR methods to allow NMR structural studies of systems approaching 25 to 30 kDa in molecular weight. In addition, with the introduction of specific {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N labels into ligands, meaningful NMR studies of complexes of even higher molecular weight have become feasible. These advances usher in a new era in which the earlier, rather stringent molecular weight limitations have been greatly surpassed and NMR can begin to address many central biological problems that involve macromolecular structure, dynamics, and interactions.

  14. Interactions of cryptolepine and neocryptolepine with unusual DNA structures.

    PubMed

    Guittat, Lionel; Alberti, Patrizia; Rosu, Frédéric; Van Miert, Sabine; Thetiot, Emilie; Pieters, Luc; Gabelica, Valérie; De Pauw, Edwin; Ottaviani, Alexandre; Riou, Jean-François; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2003-05-01

    Cryptolepine, the main alkaloid present in the roots of Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, presents a large spectrum of biological properties. It has been reported to behave like a DNA intercalator with a preference for GC-rich sequences. In this study, dialysis competition assay and mass spectrometry experiments were used to determine the affinity of cryptolepine and neocryptolepine for DNA structures among duplexes, triplexes, quadruplexes and single strands. Our data confirm that cryptolepine and neocryptolepine prefer GC over AT-rich duplex sequences, but also recognize triplex and quadruplex structures. These compounds are weak telomerase inhibitors and exhibit a significant preference for triplexes over quadruplexes or duplexes. PMID:12763313

  15. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  16. Structures of the spectrin-ankyrin interaction binding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Huang, Lei; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2010-01-07

    As key components of the erythrocyte membrane skeleton, spectrin and ankyrin specifically interact to tether the spectrin cytoskeleton to the cell membrane. The structure of the spectrin binding domain of ankyrin and the ankyrin binding domain of spectrin have been solved to elucidate the structural basis for ankyrin-spectrin recognition. The structure of repeats 14 and 15 of spectrin shows that these repeats are similar to all other spectrin repeats. One feature that could account for the preference of ankyrin for these repeats is the presence of a conserved, negatively charged patch on one side of repeat 14. The structure of the ankyrin ZU5 domain shows a novel structure containing a {beta} core. The structure reveals that the canonical ZU5 consensus sequence is likely to be missing an important region that codes for a {beta} strand that forms part of the core of the domain. In addition, a positively charged region is suggestive of a binding surface for the negatively charged spectrin repeat 14. Previously reported mutants of ankyrin that map to this region lie mostly on the surface of the protein, although at least one is likely to be part of the core.

  17. Speed of evolution with spatial structure and interacting mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otwinowski, Jakub

    Perhaps the simplest question about long term evolutionary adaptation is how quickly do populations adapt to a new environment by incorporating mutations? This question is approached from several different angles. Chapter 1 investigates the speed of evolution when there is a large supply of beneficial mutations and the population has spatial structure. For large system sizes, a speed limit is found on the rate adaptation. The model is analyzed as a surface growth model in physics, which reveals universal properties of the model, such as the distribution of fitnesses. However, neglecting spatial structure, the speed of evolution also depends on how mutations interact with each other. This may be quantified by a fitness landscape, or a genotype-phenotype-fitness map. In chapter 2, the fitness landscape and genotype-phenotype map of an E. coli lac promoter is inferred from a large dataset with 100,000 sequences and fluorescence measurements. The interactions between mutations are quantified using a simple quadratic model, similar to a spin glass Hamiltonian. Chapter 3 describes a toy model based on an overdamped particle in a potential, which demonstrates how a fitness landscape with time dependent interactions between mutations determines the speed of evolution.

  18. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure.

    PubMed

    Vasilyev, Oleg A; Klumov, Boris A; Tkachenko, Alexei V

    2015-07-01

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of "color," i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such "chromatic" interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the "colored" and "colorless" systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the "colorless" patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding "colored" one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram. PMID:26274163

  19. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral and cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.

  20. Chromatic patchy particles: Effects of specific interactions on liquid structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Vasilyev, Oleg A.; Tkachenko, Alexei V.; Klumov, Boris A.

    2015-07-13

    We study the structural and thermodynamic properties of patchy particle liquids, with a special focus on the role of “color,” i.e., specific interactions between individual patches. A possible experimental realization of such “chromatic” interactions is by decorating the particle patches with single-stranded DNA linkers. The complementarity of the linkers can promote selective bond formation between predetermined pairs of patches. By using MD simulations, we compare the local connectivity, the bond orientation order, and other structural properties of the aggregates formed by the “colored” and “colorless” systems. The analysis is done for spherical particles with two different patch arrangements (tetrahedral andmore » cubic). It is found that the aggregated (liquid) phase of the “colorless” patchy particles is better connected, denser and typically has stronger local order than the corresponding “colored” one. This, in turn, makes the colored liquid less stable thermodynamically. Specifically, we predict that in a typical case the chromatic interactions should increase the relative stability of the crystalline phase with respect to the disordered liquid, thus expanding its region in the phase diagram.« less

  1. Aerothermal modeling program, phase 2. Element B: Flow interaction experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Murthy, S. N. B.; Sullivan, J. P.

    1986-10-01

    The design process was improved and the efficiency, life, and maintenance costs of the turbine engine hot section was enhanced. Recently, there has been much emphasis on the need for improved numerical codes for the design of efficient combustors. For the development of improved computational codes, there is a need for an experimentally obtained data base to be used at test cases for the accuracy of the computations. The purpose of Element-B is to establish a benchmark quality velocity and scalar measurements of the flow interaction of circular jets with swirling flow typical of that in the dome region of annular combustor. In addition to the detailed experimental effort, extensive computations of the swirling flows are to be compared with the measurements for the purpose of assessing the accuracy of current and advanced turbulence and scalar transport models.

  2. Experiments on the interaction between hydrodynamic turbulence and surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamin, Timothee; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Different regimes of interaction between hydrodynamic turbulence and a free surface are investigated in a meter scale basin. A homogeneous and isotropic turbulence is generated by an 8×8 array of jets pointing upwards at the bottom of the tank. The 64 jets are driven individually to reach a random spatiotemporal forcing pattern and produce an intense turbulence. Using fluid velocity measurements, we characterize the turbulence obtained with this setup, then we investigate free-surface deformations induced by hydrodynamic turbulence. In a second stage an electromechanical shaker will generate gravity-capillary waves at the free surface. We aim to study reduction or amplification of surface waves and then measure energy exchange between hydrodynamic turbulence and wave turbulence. This work was supported by the DGA-CNRS Ph.D program and ANR Turbulon 12-BS04-0005.

  3. Structures and Interaction Analyses of Integrin αMβ2 Cytoplasmic Tails*

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Geok-Lin; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Amalraj, Monalisa; Tan, Suet-Mien; Bhattacharjya, Surajit

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are heterodimeric (α and β subunits) signal transducer proteins involved in cell adhesions and migrations. The cytosolic tails of integrins are essential for transmitting bidirectional signaling and also implicated in maintaining the resting states of the receptors. In addition, cytosolic tails of integrins often undergo post-translation modifications like phosphorylation. However, the consequences of phosphorylation on the structures and interactions are not clear. The leukocyte-specific integrin αMβ2 is essential for myeloid cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and degranulation. In this work, we determined solution structures of the myristoylated cytosolic tail of αM and a Ser phosphorylated variant in dodecylphosphocholine micelles by NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, the interactions between non-phosphorylated and phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail were investigated by NMR and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The three-dimensional structures of the 24-residue cytosolic tail of αM or phosphorylated αM are characterized by an N-terminal amphipathic helix and a loop at the C terminus. The residues at the loop are involved in packing interactions with the hydrophobic face of the helix. 15N-1H heteronuclear single quantum coherence experiments identified residues of αM and β2 tails that may be involved in the formation of a tail-tail heterocomplex. We further examined interactions between myristoylated β2 tail in dodecylphosphocholine micelles with dansylated αM tail peptides by FRET. These studies revealed enhanced interactions between αM or phosphorylated αM tails with β2 tail with Kd values ∼5.2 ± 0.6 and ∼4.4 ± 0.7 μm, respectively. Docked structures of tail-tail complexes delineated that the αM/β2 interface at the cytosolic region could be sustained by a network of polar interactions, ionic interactions, and/or hydrogen bonds. PMID:22052909

  4. Primate paternal care: Interactions between biology and social experience.

    PubMed

    Storey, Anne E; Ziegler, Toni E

    2016-01-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Parental Care".We review recent research on the roles of hormones and social experiences on the development of paternal care in humans and non-human primates. Generally, lower concentrations of testosterone and higher concentrations of oxytocin are associated with greater paternal responsiveness. Hormonal changes prior to the birth appear to be important in preparation for fatherhood and changes after the birth are related to how much time fathers spend with offspring and whether they provide effective care. Prolactin may facilitate approach and the initiation of infant care, and in some biparental non-human primates, it affects body mass regulation. Glucocorticoids may be involved in coordinating reproductive and parental behavior between mates. New research involving intranasal oxytocin and neuropeptide receptor polymorphisms may help us understand individual variation in paternal responsiveness. This area of research, integrating both biological factors and the role of early and adult experience, has the potential to suggest individually designed interventions that can strengthen relationships between fathers and their partners and offspring. PMID:26253726

  5. Structure and intermolecular interactions of glipizide from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction.

    PubMed

    Burley, Jonathan C

    2005-12-01

    The crystal structure of glipizide, used as a major treatment of type-2 diabetes, has been determined ab initio using variable-temperature laboratory X-ray powder diffraction combined with a direct-space Monte Carlo/simulated annealing methodology. The strengths of the intermolecular interactions (van der Waals, pi-pi stacking, hydrogen bonding and steric interlock) were quantitatively estimated using the thermal expansion data, which were collected in the same set of experiments as those used to determine the structure. PMID:16306678

  6. Stability and Interaction of Coherent Structure in Supersonic Reactive Wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Suresh

    1983-01-01

    A theoretical formulation and analysis is presented for a study of the stability and interaction of coherent structure in reacting free shear layers. The physical problem under investigation is a premixed hydrogen-oxygen reacting shear layer in the wake of a thin flat plate. The coherent structure is modeled as a periodic disturbance and its stability is determined by the application of linearized hydrodynamic stability theory which results in a generalized eigenvalue problem for reactive flows. Detailed stability analysis of the reactive wake for neutral, symmetrical and antisymmetrical disturbance is presented. Reactive stability criteria is shown to be quite different from classical non-reactive stability. The interaction between the mean flow, coherent structure and fine-scale turbulence is theoretically formulated using the von-Kaman integral technique. Both time-averaging and conditional phase averaging are necessary to separate the three types of motion. The resulting integro-differential equations can then be solved subject to initial conditions with appropriate shape functions. In the laminar flow transition region of interest, the spatial interaction between the mean motion and coherent structure is calculated for both non-reactive and reactive conditions and compared with experimental data wherever available. The fine-scale turbulent motion determined by the application of integral analysis to the fluctuation equations. Since at present this turbulence model is still untested, turbulence is modeled in the interaction problem by a simple algebraic eddy viscosity model. The applicability of the integral turbulence model formulated here is studied parametrically by integrating these equations for the simple case of self-similar mean motion with assumed shape functions. The effect of the motion of the coherent structure is studied and very good agreement is obtained with previous experimental and theoretical works for non-reactive flow. For the reactive case

  7. Causal inference and the hierarchical structure of experience

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Samuel G. B.; Keil, Frank C.

    2014-01-01

    Children and adults make rich causal inferences about the physical and social world, even in novel situations where they cannot rely on prior knowledge of causal mechanisms. We propose that this capacity is supported in part by constraints provided by event structure—the cognitive organization of experience into discrete events that are hierarchically organized. These event-structured causal inferences are guided by a level-matching principle, with events conceptualized at one level of an event hierarchy causally matched to other events at that same level, and a boundary-blocking principle, with events causally matched to other events that are parts of the same superordinate event. These principles are used to constrain inferences about plausible causal candidates in unfamiliar situations, both in diagnosing causes (Experiment 1) and predicting effects (Experiment 2). The results could not be explained by construal level (Experiment 3) or similarity-matching (Experiment 4), and were robust across a variety of physical and social causal systems. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate a novel way in which non-causal information we extract from the environment can help to constrain inferences about causal structure. PMID:25347533

  8. The Boundary Structure in the Analysis of Reversibly Interacting Systems by Sedimentation Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huaying; Balbo, Andrea; Brown, Patrick H.; Schuck, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sedimentation velocity (SV) experiments of heterogeneous interacting systems exhibit characteristic boundary structures that can usually be very easily recognized and quantified. For slowly interacting systems, the boundaries represent concentrations of macromolecular species and they can be interpreted directly with population models based solely on the mass action law. For fast reactions, migration and chemical reactions are coupled, and different, but equally easily discernable boundary structures appear. However, these features have not been commonly utilized for data analysis, for the lack of an intuitive and computationally simple model. The recently introduced effective particle theory (EPT) provides a suitable framework. Here, we review the motivation and theoretical basis of EPT, and explore practical aspects for its application. We introduce an EPT-based design tool for SV experiments of heterogeneous interactions in the software SEDPHAT. As a practical tool for the first step of data analysis, we describe how the boundary resolution can be further improved in c(s) with a Bayesian adjustment of maximum entropy regularization to the case of heterogeneous interactions between molecules that have been previously studied separately. This can facilitate extracting the characteristic boundary features by integration of c(s) and their assembly into isotherms as a function of total loading concentrations, which are fitted with EPT in a second stage. Methods for addressing concentration errors in isotherms are discussed. Finally, in an experimental model system of alpha-chymotrypsin interacting with soybean trypsin inhibitor, we show that EPT provides an excellent description of the experimental sedimentation boundary structure of fast interacting systems. PMID:21315155

  9. In-Cell Protein Structures from 2D NMR Experiments.

    PubMed

    Müntener, Thomas; Häussinger, Daniel; Selenko, Philipp; Theillet, Francois-Xavier

    2016-07-21

    In-cell NMR spectroscopy provides atomic resolution insights into the structural properties of proteins in cells, but it is rarely used to solve entire protein structures de novo. Here, we introduce a paramagnetic lanthanide-tag to simultaneously measure protein pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) to be used as input for structure calculation routines within the Rosetta program. We employ this approach to determine the structure of the protein G B1 domain (GB1) in intact Xenopus laevis oocytes from a single set of 2D in-cell NMR experiments. Specifically, we derive well-defined GB1 ensembles from low concentration in-cell NMR samples (∼50 μM) measured at moderate magnetic field strengths (600 MHz), thus offering an easily accessible alternative for determining intracellular protein structures. PMID:27379949

  10. Simulation of the photogrammetric appendage structural dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Welch, Sharon S.

    1995-01-01

    The Photogrammetric Appendage Structural Dynamics Experiment (PASDE) uses six video cameras in the Space Shuttle cargo bay to measure vibration of the Russian Mir space station Kvant-ll solar array. It occurs on Shuttle/Mir docking mission STS-74 scheduled for launch in November 1995. The objective of PASDE is to demonstrate photogrammetric technology for measuring 'untargeted' spacecraft appendage structural dynamics. This paper discusses a pre-flight simulation test conducted in July 1995, focusing on the image processing aspects. The flight camera system recorded vibrations of a full-scale structural test article having grids of white lines on black background, similar in appearance to the Mir solar array. Using image correlation analysis, line intersections on the structure are tracked in the video recordings to resolutions of less than 0.1 pixel. Calibration and merging of multiple camera views generated 3-dimensional displacements from which structural modal parameters are then obtained.

  11. Interactive computer graphics system for structural sizing and analysis of aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendavid, D.; Pipano, A.; Raibstein, A.; Somekh, E.

    1975-01-01

    A computerized system for preliminary sizing and analysis of aircraft wing and fuselage structures was described. The system is based upon repeated application of analytical program modules, which are interactively interfaced and sequence-controlled during the iterative design process with the aid of design-oriented graphics software modules. The entire process is initiated and controlled via low-cost interactive graphics terminals driven by a remote computer in a time-sharing mode.

  12. Structure factor of interacting one-dimensional helical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharaiah, Suhas; Schmidt, Thomas L.; Loss, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the dynamical structure factor S (q,ω) of a weakly interacting helical edge state in the presence of a magnetic field B. The latter opens a gap of width 2B in the single-particle spectrum, which becomes strongly nonlinear near the Dirac point. For chemical potentials |μ|>B, the system then behaves as a nonlinear helical Luttinger liquid, and a mobile-impurity analysis reveals power-law singularities in S (q,ω) which depend on the interaction strength as well as on the spin texture of the edge states. For |μ|

  13. Structure and effective interactions of comb polymer nanocomposite melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qinzhi; Xu, Mengjin; Feng, Yancong; Chen, Lan

    2014-11-01

    In this work, the structure and effective interactions of branched comb polymer nanocomposite (PNC) melts are investigated by using the polymer reference interaction site model (PRISM) integral equation theory. It is observed that the nanoparticle contact (bridging) aggregation is formed when the nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength is relatively weak (large) in comb PNCs. The organization states of aggregation for the moderate nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength can be well suppressed by the comb polymer architecture, while the bridging structure for relatively large attraction is obviously promoted. With the increase of the particle volume fraction, the organization states of bridging-type structure become stronger and tighter; however, this effect is weaker than that of the nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength. When the particle volume fraction and moderate nanoparticle-monomer attraction strength are fixed, the effects of degree of polymerization, side chain number, side chain length, and nanoparticle-monomer size ratio on the organization states of PNC melts are not prominent and the nanoparticles can well disperse in comb polymer. All the observations indicate that the present PRISM theory can give a detailed description of the comb PNC melts and assist in future design control of new nanomaterials.

  14. Fixed point sensitivity analysis of interacting structured populations.

    PubMed

    Barabás, György; Meszéna, Géza; Ostling, Annette

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis of structured populations is a useful tool in population ecology. Historically, methodological development of sensitivity analysis has focused on the sensitivity of eigenvalues in linear matrix models, and on single populations. More recently there have been extensions to the sensitivity of nonlinear models, and to communities of interacting populations. Here we derive a fully general mathematical expression for the sensitivity of equilibrium abundances in communities of interacting structured populations. Our method yields the response of an arbitrary function of the stage class abundances to perturbations of any model parameters. As a demonstration, we apply this sensitivity analysis to a two-species model of ontogenetic niche shift where each species has two stage classes, juveniles and adults. In the context of this model, we demonstrate that our theory is quite robust to violating two of its technical assumptions: the assumption that the community is at a point equilibrium and the assumption of infinitesimally small parameter perturbations. Our results on the sensitivity of a community are also interpreted in a niche theoretical context: we determine how the niche of a structured population is composed of the niches of the individual states, and how the sensitivity of the community depends on niche segregation. PMID:24368160

  15. DNA-cisplatin interaction studied with single molecule stretching experiments.

    PubMed

    Crisafuli, F A P; Cesconetto, E C; Ramos, E B; Rocha, M S

    2012-05-01

    By performing single molecule stretching experiments with optical tweezers, we have studied the changes in the mechanical properties of DNA-cisplatin complexes as a function of some variables of interest such as the drug diffusion time and concentration in the sample. We propose a model to explain the behavior of the persistence length as a function of the drug concentration, extracting the binding data from pure mechanical measurements. Such analysis has allowed us to show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule. In addition, DNA compaction by the action of the drug was also observed under our experimental conditions by studying the kinetics of some mechanical properties such as the radius of gyration and the end-to-end distance, e.g. Crisafuli et al., Integr. Biol., 2011, xx, xxxx. PMID:22513758

  16. Correlative Microscopy for 3D Structural Analysis of Dynamic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sangmi; Zhao, Gongpu; Ning, Jiying; Gibson, Gregory A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Peijun

    2013-01-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-physiological state1. However, direct visualization of individual viral complexes in their host cellular environment with cryoET is challenging2, due to the infrequent and dynamic nature of viral entry, particularly in the case of HIV-1. While time-lapse live-cell imaging has yielded a great deal of information about many aspects of the life cycle of HIV-13-7, the resolution afforded by live-cell microscopy is limited (~ 200 nm). Our work was aimed at developing a correlation method that permits direct visualization of early events of HIV-1 infection by combining live-cell fluorescent light microscopy, cryo-fluorescent microscopy, and cryoET. In this manner, live-cell and cryo-fluorescent signals can be used to accurately guide the sampling in cryoET. Furthermore, structural information obtained from cryoET can be complemented with the dynamic functional data gained through live-cell imaging of fluorescent labeled target. In this video article, we provide detailed methods and protocols for structural investigation of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions using 3D correlative high-speed live-cell imaging and high-resolution cryoET structural analysis. HeLa cells infected with HIV-1 particles were characterized first by confocal live-cell microscopy, and the region containing the same viral particle was then analyzed by cryo-electron tomography for 3D structural details. The correlation between two sets of imaging data, optical imaging and electron imaging, was achieved using a home-built cryo-fluorescence light microscopy stage. The approach detailed here will be valuable, not only for study of virus-host cell interactions, but also for broader applications in cell biology, such as cell signaling, membrane receptor trafficking, and many other dynamic cellular processes. PMID:23852318

  17. The Dynamic Reactance Interaction – How Vested Interests Affect People’s Experience, Behavior, and Cognition in Social Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Steindl, Christina; Jonas, Eva

    2015-01-01

    In social interactions, individuals may sometimes pursue their own interests at the expense of their interaction partner. Such self-interested behaviors impose a threat to the interaction partner’s freedom to act. The current article investigates this threat in the context of interdependence and reactance theory. We explore how vested interests influence reactance process stages of an advisor–client interaction. We aim to explore the interactional process that evolves. In two studies, participants took the perspective of a doctor (advisor) or a patient (client). In both studies we incorporated a vested interest. In Study 1 (N = 82) we found that in response to a vested interest of their interaction partner, patients indicated a stronger experience of reactance, more aggressive behavioral intentions, and more biased cognitions than doctors. A serial multiple mediation revealed that a vested interest engendered mistrust toward the interaction partner and this mistrust led to an emerging reactance process. Study 2 (N = 207) further demonstrated that doctors expressed their reactance in a subtle way: they revealed a classic confirmation bias when searching for additional information on their preliminary decision preference, indicating stronger defense motivation. We discuss how these findings can help us to understand how social interactions develop dynamically. PMID:26640444

  18. Communication and laboratory performance in parapsychology experiments: demand characteristics and the social organization of interaction.

    PubMed

    Wooffitt, Robin

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports findings from a conversation analytic study of experimenter-participant interaction in parapsychology experiments. It shows how properties of communication through which the routine business of the experiment is conducted may have an impact on the research participant's subsequent performance. In this, the study explores social psychological features of the psychology laboratory. In particular, it examines aspects of Orne's (1962) account of what he called the demand characteristics of the psychological experiment. The data come from a corpus of audio recordings of experimenter-participant interaction during experiments on extra-sensory perception. These kinds of experiments, and the phenomena they purport to study, are undoubtedly controversial; however, the paper argues that there are grounds for social psychologists to consider parapsychology experiments as a class (albeit distinctive) of psychology experiments, and, therefore, as sites in which general social psychological and communicative phenomena can be studied. The empirical sections of the paper examine interaction during part of the experimental procedure when the experimenter verbally reviews a record of the participant's imagery reported during an earlier part of the experiment. The analysis shows that the way in which the experimenter acknowledges the research participants' utterances may be significant for the trajectory of the experiment and explores how the participants' subsequent performance in the experiment may be influenced by interactionally generated contingencies. PMID:17877849

  19. Epoxide Chemistry: Guided Inquiry Experiment Emphasizing Structure Determination and Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurty, H. G.; Jain, Niveta; Samby, Kiran

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents an operationally simple three-step synthesis of an a-hydroxy acid based on epoxide chemistry. The focus of the experiment is on the preparation of the chalcone epoxide and its reaction with hot alcoholic alkali. The experiment leads to an unpredicted reaction product. Its structure is established as 2-benzyl-2-phenylglycollic acid by chemical and spectroscopic analysis. The hydroxyacid is a good example to bring home an important NMR principle: the nonequivalence of hydrogens adjacent to a stereogenic center. The formation of the alpha-hydroxy acid is a mechanistic puzzle. A stepwise mechanism can be developed applying lecture-based organic chemistry concepts. On the other hand, acid-catalyzed (H2SO4, BF3) reaction of the chalcone epoxide gives benzoylphenylacetaldehyde. The exercise can be used as a multistep organic chemistry experiment. It also gives students a research-type experience.

  20. Simulation and modeling techniques for parachute fluid-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Keith Robert

    This thesis is on advanced flow simulation and modeling techniques for fluid-structure interactions (FSI) encountered in parachute systems. The main fluid dynamics solver is based on the Deforming-Spatial-Domain/Stabilized Space-Time (DSD/SST) finite element formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations of incompressible flows. The DSD/SST formulation, which was introduced earlier for flow computations involving moving boundaries and interfaces, gives us the capability to handle parachute structural deformations. The structural dynamics solver is based on a total Lagrangian finite element formulation of the equilibrium equations for a "tension structure" composed of membranes, cables, and concentrated masses. The fluid and structure are coupled iteratively within a nonlinear iteration loop, with multiple nonlinear iterations improving the convergence of the coupled system. Unstructured mesh generation and mesh moving techniques for handling of parachute deformations are developed and/or adapted to address the challenges posed by the coupled problem. The FSI methodology was originally implemented on the Thinking Machines CM-5 supercomputer and is now actively used on the CRAY T3E-1200. Applications to a variety of round and cross parachutes used by the US Army are presented, and different stages of the parachute operations, including inflation and terminal descent, are modeled.

  1. Multi-scale modeling for dynamics of structure-soil-structure interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Claude; Soubestre, Jean; Schwan, Logan; Dietz, Matt

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents two cases of multi-scale modeling in the context of dynamic structure soil-structure interaction. The first case concerns the behaviour of reinforced soils. It is shown that such system may involve both shear and bending effect at the leading order, which corresponds to a second gradient material. The second case addresses the seismic response of soils in presence of a densely urbanized city. It appears that the effect of resonance of the whole buildings in interaction actually modify the seismic response. In both cases the theoretical approach is completed by a validation through analogous samples tested on a shaking table.

  2. Structural Interaction and Functional Regulation of Polycystin-2 by Filamin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Dai, Xiao-Qing; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zuocheng; Cantero, María del Rocío; Li, Shu; Shen, Ji; Tu, Jian-Cheng; Cantiello, Horacio; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Filamins are important actin cross-linking proteins implicated in scaffolding, membrane stabilization and signal transduction, through interaction with ion channels, receptors and signaling proteins. Here we report the physical and functional interaction between filamins and polycystin-2, a TRP-type cation channel mutated in 10–15% patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down experiments demonstrated that the C-termini of filamin isoforms A, B and C directly bind to both the intracellular N- and C-termini of polycystin-2. Reciprocal co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed that endogenous polycystin-2 and filamins are in the same complexes in renal epithelial cells and human melanoma A7 cells. We then examined the effect of filamin on polycystin-2 channel function by electrophysiology studies with a lipid bilayer reconstitution system and found that filamin-A substantially inhibits polycystin-2 channel activity. Our study indicates that filamins are important regulators of polycystin-2 channel function, and further links actin cytoskeletal dynamics to the regulation of this channel protein. PMID:22802962

  3. Chondroitin Sulfate Tetrasaccharides: Synthesis, Three-Dimensional Structure and Interaction with Midkine.

    PubMed

    Solera, Cristina; Macchione, Giuseppe; Maza, Susana; Kayser, M Mar; Corzana, Francisco; de Paz, José L; Nieto, Pedro M

    2016-02-12

    The biological activity of midkine, a cytokine implicated in neuro- and tumourigenesis, is regulated by its binding to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), such as heparin and chondroitin sulfate (CS). To better understand the molecular recognition of GAG sequences by this growth factor, the interactions between synthetic chondroitin sulfate-like tetrasaccharides and midkine were studied by using different techniques. Firstly, a synthetic approach for the preparation of CS-like oligosaccharides in the sequence GalNAc-GlcA was developed. A fluorescence polarisation competition assay was then employed to analyse the relative binding affinities of the synthetic compounds and revealed that midkine interacted with CS-like tetrasaccharides in the micromolar range. The 3D structure of these tetramers was studied in detail by a combination of NMR spectroscopy experiments and molecular dynamics simulations. Saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy experiments indicate that the CS tetrasaccharides bind to midkine in an extended conformation, with similar saturation effects along the entire sugar chain. These results are compatible with docking studies that suggest an interaction of the tetrasaccharide with midkine in a folded structure. Overall, this study provides valuable information on the interaction between midkine and well-defined, chemically synthesised CS oligosaccharides and these data can be useful for the design of more active compounds that modulate the biological function of this protein. PMID:26784281

  4. Human antibody-Fc receptor interactions illuminated by crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Woof, Jenny M; Burton, Dennis R

    2004-02-01

    Immunoglobulins couple the recognition of invading pathogens with the triggering of potent effector mechanisms for pathogen elimination. Different immunoglobulin classes trigger different effector mechanisms through interaction of immunoglobulin Fc regions with specific Fc receptors (FcRs) on immune cells. Here, we review the structural information that is emerging on three human immunoglobulin classes and their FcRs. New insights are provided, including an understanding of the antibody conformational adjustments that are required to bring effector cell and target cell membranes sufficiently close for efficient killing and signal transduction to occur. The results might also open up new possibilities for the design of therapeutic antibodies. PMID:15040582

  5. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 2: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  6. Flow interaction experiment. Volume 1: Aerothermal modeling, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Murthy, S. N. B.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational study is reported for the flow of a turbulent jet discharging into a rectangular enclosure. The experimental configurations consisting of primary jets only, annular jets only, and a combination of annular and primary jets are investigated to provide a better understanding of the flow field in an annular combustor. A laser Doppler velocimeter is used to measure mean velocity and Reynolds stress components. Major features of the flow field include recirculation, primary and annular jet interaction, and high turbulence. A significant result from this study is the effect the primary jets have on the flow field. The primary jets are seen to create statistically larger recirculation zones and higher turbulence levels. In addition, a technique called marker nephelometry is used to provide mean concentration values in the model combustor. Computations are performed using three levels of turbulence closures, namely k-epsilon model, algebraic second moment (ASM), and differential second moment (DSM) closure. Two different numerical schemes are applied. One is the lower-order power-law differencing scheme (PLDS) and the other is the higher-order flux-spline differencing scheme (FSDS). A comparison is made of the performance of these schemes. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. For the cases considered in this study, the FSDS is more accurate than the PLDS. For a prescribed accuracy, the flux-spline scheme requires a far fewer number of grid points. Thus, it has the potential for providing a numerical error-free solution, especially for three-dimensional flows, without requiring an excessively fine grid. Although qualitatively good comparison with data was obtained, the deficiencies regarding the modeled dissipation rate (epsilon) equation, pressure-strain correlation model, and the inlet epsilon profile and other critical closure issues need to be resolved before one can achieve the degree of accuracy required to

  7. Analytical and experimental study on the fluid structure interaction during air blast loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Erheng; Wright, Jefferson; Shukla, Arun

    2011-12-01

    A new fluid-structure interaction model that considers high gas compressibility is developed using the Rankine-Hugoniot relations. The impulse conservation between the gas and structure is utilized to determine the reflected pressure profile from the known incident pressure profile. The physical parameters of the gas such as the shock front velocity, gas density, local sound velocity, and gas particle velocity as well as the impulse transmitted onto the structure are also evaluated. A series of one-dimensional shock loading experiments on free standing monolithic aluminum plates were conducted using a shock tube to validate the proposed model. The momentum was evaluated using high speed digital imagery. The experimental peak reflected pressure, the reflected pressure profile, and the momentum transmitted onto the plate were compared with the predicted results. The comparisons show that the gas's compressibility significantly affects the fluid structure interaction behavior, and the new model can predict more accurate results than existing models. The effect of factors, such as the areal density of a plate and the peak incident pressure on momentum transfer are also discussed using the present model. Moreover, the maximum achievable momentum and the fluid structure interaction time are defined and calculated.

  8. Identification of domains in protein structures from the analysis of intramolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Genoni, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Colombo, Giorgio

    2012-03-15

    The subdivision of protein structures into smaller and independent structural domains has a fundamental importance in understanding protein evolution and function and in the development of protein classification methods as well as in the interpretation of experimental data. Due to the rapid growth in the number of solved protein structures, the need for devising new accurate algorithmic methods has become more and more urgent. In this paper, we propose a new computational approach that is based on the concept of domain as a compact and independent folding unit and on the analysis of the residue-residue energy interactions obtainable through classical all-atom force field calculations. In particular, starting from the analysis of the nonbonded interaction energy matrix associated with a protein, our method filters out and selects only those specific subsets of interactions that define possible independent folding nuclei within a complex protein structure. This allows grouping different protein fragments into energy clusters that are found to correspond to structural domains. The strategy has been tested using proper benchmark data sets, and the results have shown that the new approach is fast and reliable in determining the number of domains in a totally ab initio manner and without making use of any training set or knowledge of the systems in exam. Moreover, our method, identifying the most relevant residues for the stabilization of each domain, may complement the results given by other classification techniques and may provide useful information to design and guide new experiments. PMID:22384792

  9. Near minimum-time maneuvers of the advanced space structures technology research experiment (ASTREX) test article: Theory and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vadali, Srinivas R.; Carter, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    The Phillips Laboratory at the Edwards Air Force Base has developed the Advanced Space Structures Technology Research Experiment (ASTREX) facility to serve as a testbed for demonstrating the applicability of proven theories to the challenges of spacecraft maneuvers and structural control. This report describes the work performed on the ASTREX test article by Texas A&M University under contract NAS119373 as a part of the Control-Structure Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator Program. The focus of this work is on maneuvering the ASTREX test article with compressed air thrusters that can be throttled, while attenuating structural excitation. The theoretical foundation for designing the near minimum-time thrust commands is based on the generation of smooth, parameterized optimal open-loop control profiles, and the determination of control laws for final position regulation and tracking using Lyapunov stability theory. Details of the theory, mathematical modeling, model updating, and compensation for the presence of 'real world' effects are described and the experimental results are presented. The results show an excellent match between theory and experiments.

  10. Structural investigations on a linear isolated depsipeptide: the importance of dispersion interactions.

    PubMed

    Stamm, A; Bernhard, D; Gerhards, M

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present the first investigations on an isolated linear depsipetide CyCO-Gly-Lac-NH-PhOMe (cyclohexylcarbonyl-glycine-lactate-2-anisidine abbreviated as MOC) in a molecular beam experiment. Depsipeptides are a special subclass of peptides which contain at least one ester bond replacing a peptide bond. This leads to a different folding behavior and a different biological activity compared to a "normal" peptide. In order to analyze the folding of an isolated depsipeptide on a molecular level a variety of combined IR/UV methods including IR/IR/UV experiments are applied to MOC. Three different isomers are identified in combination with DFT calculations using the hybrid functional B3LYP-D3 with a TZVP basis set. The most stable structure shows a tweezer-like arrangement between the aromatic chromophore and the aliphatic cyclohexyl ring. A characteristic feature of this structure is that it is stabilized by dispersion interactions resulting from CH/π interactions. If dispersion is not taken into account this structural arrangement is no longer a minimum on the potential energy surface indicating the importance of dispersion interactions. PMID:27211924

  11. Dual keel space station control/structures interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John W.; Lallman, Frederick J.; Cooper, Paul A.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made to determine the influence of truss bay size on the performance of the space station control system. The objective was to determine if any control problems existed during reboost and to assess the level of potential control/structures interaction during operation of the control moment gyros used for vertical stabilization. The models analyzed were detailed finite-element representations of the 5 meter and 9 foot growth versions of the 300 kW dual keel station. Results are presented comparing the performance of the reboost control system for both versions of the space station. Standards for comparison include flexible effects at the attitude control sensor locations and flexible contributions to pointing error at the solar collectors. Bode analysis results are presented for the attitude control system and control, structural, and damping sensitivities are examined.

  12. Picornavirus IRES elements: RNA structure and host protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Diaz-Toledano, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements were discovered in picornaviruses. These elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that adopt diverse three-dimensional structures and recruit the translation machinery using a 5' end-independent mechanism assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RNA binding proteins termed IRES transacting factors (ITAFs). Many of these factors suffer important modifications during infection including cleavage by picornavirus proteases, changes in the phosphorylation level and/or redistribution of the protein from the nuclear to the cytoplasm compartment. Picornavirus IRES are amongst the most potent elements described so far. However, given their large diversity and complexity, the mechanistic basis of its mode of action is not yet fully understood. This review is focused to describe recent advances on the studies of RNA structure and RNA-protein interactions modulating picornavirus IRES activity. PMID:25617758

  13. Structural basis of Keap1 interactions with Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Canning, Peter; Sorrell, Fiona J.; Bullock, Alex N.

    2015-01-01

    Keap1 is a highly redox-sensitive member of the BTB-Kelch family that assembles with the Cul3 protein to form a Cullin–RING E3 ligase complex for the degradation of Nrf2. Oxidative stress disables Keap1, allowing Nrf2 protein levels to accumulate for the transactivation of critical stress response genes. Consequently, the Keap1–Nrf2 system is extensively pursued for the development of protein–protein interaction inhibitors that will stabilize Nrf2 for therapeutic effect in conditions of neurodegeneration, inflammation, and cancer. Here we review current progress toward the structure determination of Keap1 and its protein complexes with Cul3, Nrf2 substrate, and small-molecule antagonists. Together the available structures establish a rational three-dimensional model to explain the two-site binding of Nrf2 as well as its efficient ubiquitination. PMID:26057936

  14. Development of a Fluid Structures Interaction Test Technique for Fabrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilliac, Gregory G.; Heineck, James T.; Schairer, Edward T.; Mosher, Robert N.; Garbeff, Theodore Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Application of fluid structures interaction (FSI) computational techniques to configurations of interest to the entry, descent and landing (EDL) community is limited by two factors - limited characterization of the material properties for fabrics of interest and insufficient experimental data to validate the FSI codes. Recently ILC Dover Inc. performed standard tests to characterize the static stress-strain response of four candidate fabrics for use in EDL applications. The objective of the tests described here is to address the need for a FSI dataset for CFD validation purposes. To reach this objective, the structural response of fabrics was measured in a very simple aerodynamic environment with well controlled boundary conditions. Two test series were undertaken. The first series covered a range of tunnel conditions and the second focused on conditions that resulted in fabric panel buckling.

  15. Discrete Data Transfer Technique for Fluid-Structure Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a general three-dimensional algorithm for data transfer between dissimilar meshes. The algorithm is suitable for applications of fluid-structure interaction and other high-fidelity multidisciplinary analysis and optimization. Because the algorithm is independent of the mesh topology, we can treat structured and unstructured meshes in the same manner. The algorithm is fast and accurate for transfer of scalar or vector fields between dissimilar surface meshes. The algorithm is also applicable for the integration of a scalar field (e.g., coefficients of pressure) on one mesh and injection of the resulting vectors (e.g., force vectors) onto another mesh. The author has implemented the algorithm in a C++ computer code. This paper contains a complete formulation of the algorithm with a few selected results.

  16. The Intrinsic Geometric Structure of Protein-Protein Interaction Networks for Protein Interaction Prediction.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yi; Sun, Mengtian; Dai, Guoxian; Ramain, Karthik

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in high-throughput technologies for measuring protein-protein interaction (PPI) have profoundly advanced our ability to systematically infer protein function and regulation. However, inherently high false positive and false negative rates in measurement have posed great challenges in computational approaches for the prediction of PPI. A good PPI predictor should be 1) resistant to high rate of missing and spurious PPIs, and 2) robust against incompleteness of observed PPI networks. To predict PPI in a network, we developed an intrinsic geometry structure (IGS) for network, which exploits the intrinsic and hidden relationship among proteins in network through a heat diffusion process. In this process, all explicit PPIs participate simultaneously to glue local infinitesimal and noisy experimental interaction data to generate a global macroscopic descriptions about relationships among proteins. The revealed implicit relationship can be interpreted as the probability of two proteins interacting with each other. The revealed relationship is intrinsic and robust against individual, local and explicit protein interactions in the original network. We apply our approach to publicly available PPI network data for the evaluation of the performance of PPI prediction. Experimental results indicate that, under different levels of the missing and spurious PPIs, IGS is able to robustly exploit the intrinsic and hidden relationship for PPI prediction with a higher sensitivity and specificity compared to that of recently proposed methods. PMID:26886733

  17. Experiments on the nuclear interactions of pions and electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Minehart, R. C.; Ziock, K. O.H.

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses: {pi}{sup +} + d {yields} 2p; Pion Absorption in {sup 3}He; Pion Absorption in {sup 4}He; Evidence for narrow structure in the analyzing power of the {sup 3}He ({rvec p}, d)X reaction; Coherent {eta}-Meson Production in the Reaction {pi}{minus} + {sup 3}He {yields} {eta} + t; Search for heavy neutrinos; The search for fractionally charged particles; Search for the rare decay, {mu} {sup +} {yields} e{sup +} + {gamma}; A Precise Measurement of the {pi}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup 0} e{sup +}{nu} Decay Rate; Transverse and Longitudinal Response Functions for Several Nuclei near Q{sup 2} = 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}; The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the {sup 4}He (e, e'p) coincidence cross section at the quasielastic peak; The Response Function R{sub LT} in the reaction {sup 16}O(e, e' p); and Absorption of anti-protons in heavy nuclei.

  18. Student Perceptions of Experiences of Interaction in Online Graduate Education Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pugh, Daphne

    2010-01-01

    This phenomenological study investigated student perceptions of experiences of interaction in online graduate education courses. The researcher aimed to better understand the importance of interaction to students involved with online graduate education courses. The purposive sample included fifteen graduate students who had completed at least one…

  19. Disability Support Workers' Experience of Interaction with a Person with Profound Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forster, Sheridan; Iacono, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Background: The primary communication partner for many people with profound intellectual disability (PID) who are living in supported accommodation is their disability support worker (DSW). The experiences of DSWs in interacting with people with PID have received limited attention in the literature. Method: The nature of interactions between…

  20. A General Chemistry Experiment Incorporating Synthesis and Structural Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ryswyk, Hal

    1997-07-01

    An experiment for the general chemistry laboratory is described wherein gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) are used to characterize the products of a series of microscale reactions on vanillin. A single sophisticated instrument can be incorporated into the laboratory given sufficient attention to the use of sampling accessories and software macros. Synthetic experiments coupled with modern instrumental techniques can be used in the general chemistry laboratory to illustrate the concepts of synthesis, structure, bonding, and spectroscopy.

  1. Interacting as Experimenting. The Integration of Interaction Laboratory Functions for Lecture Improvement: Four Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinzing, Hans Gerhard

    This paper examines four studies, integrated into regular courses for the preparation of secondary school teachers at the University of Tuebingen (Germany), that assessed the effectiveness of an interaction laboratory to enhance social competence, as well as lecturing skills. The program involved formal instruction; symbolic modeling and…

  2. Passively Adaptive Inflatable Structure for the Shooting Star Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L..

    1998-01-01

    An inflatable structural system is described for the Shooting Star Experiment that is a technology demonstrator flight for solar thermal propulsion. The inflatable structure is a pressurized assembly used in orbit to support a fresnel lens for focusing sunlight into a thermal storage engine. When the engine temperature reaches a preset level, the propellant is injected into the storage engine, absorbs heat from a heat exchanger, and is expanded through the nozzle to produce thrust. The inflatable structure is an adaptive system in that a regulator and relief valve are utilized to maintain pressure within design limits during the full range of orbital conditions. Further, the polyimide film material used for construction of the inflatable is highly nonlinear, with modulus varying as a function of frequency, temperature, and level of excitation. A series of tests is described for characterizing the structure in response to various operating conditions.

  3. Validation of a 2-D semi-coupled numerical model for fluid-structure-seabed interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jianhong; Jeng, Dongsheng; Wang, Ren; Zhu, Changqi

    2013-10-01

    A 2-D semi-coupled model PORO-WSSI 2D (also be referred as FSSI-CAS 2D) for the Fluid-Structure-Seabed Interaction (FSSI) has been developed by employing RANS equations for wave motion in fluid domain, VARANS equations for porous flow in porous structures; and taking the dynamic Biot's equations (known as "u - p" approximation) for soil as the governing equations. The finite difference two-step projection method and the forward time difference method are adopted to solve the RANS, VARANS equations; and the finite element method is adopted to solve the "u - p" approximation. A data exchange port is developed to couple the RANS, VARANS equations and the dynamic Biot's equations together. The analytical solution proposed by Hsu and Jeng (1994) and some experiments conducted in wave flume or geotechnical centrifuge in which various waves involved are used to validate the developed semi-coupled numerical model. The sandy bed involved in these experiments is poro-elastic or poro-elastoplastic. The inclusion of the interaction between fluid, marine structures and poro-elastoplastic seabed foundation is a special point and highlight in this paper, which is essentially different with other previous coupled models The excellent agreement between the numerical results and the experiment data indicates that the developed coupled model is highly reliablefor the FSSI problem.

  4. Dynamical spin structure factor of one-dimensional interacting fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir A.; Maslov, Dmitrii L.

    2015-02-01

    We revisit the dynamic spin susceptibility χ (q ,ω ) of one-dimensional interacting fermions. To second order in the interaction, backscattering results in a logarithmic correction to χ (q ,ω ) at q ≪kF , even if the single-particle spectrum is linearized near the Fermi points. Consequently, the dynamic spin structure factor Im χ (q ,ω ) is nonzero at frequencies above the single-particle continuum. In the boson language, this effect results from the marginally irrelevant backscattering operator of the sine-Gordon model. Away from the threshold, the high-frequency tail of Im χ (q ,ω ) due to backscattering is larger than that due to finite mass by a factor of kF/q . We derive the renormalization group equations for the coupling constants of the g -ology model at finite ω and q and find the corresponding expression for χ (q ,ω ) , valid to all orders in the interaction but not in the immediate vicinity of the continuum boundary, where the finite-mass effects become dominant.

  5. SAXS studies of RNA: structures, dynamics, and interactions with partners.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yujie; Pollack, Lois

    2016-07-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering, SAXS, is a powerful and easily employed experimental technique that provides solution structures of macromolecules. The size and shape parameters derived from SAXS provide global structural information about these molecules in solution and essentially complement data acquired by other biophysical methods. As applied to protein systems, SAXS is a relatively mature technology: sophisticated tools exist to acquire and analyze data, and to create structural models that include dynamically flexible ensembles. Given the expanding appreciation of RNA's biological roles, there is a need to develop comparable tools to characterize solution structures of RNA, including its interactions with important biological partners. We review the progress toward achieving this goal, focusing on experimental and computational innovations. The use of multiphase modeling, absolute calibration and contrast variation methods, among others, provides new and often unique ways of visualizing this important biological molecule and its essential partners: ions, other RNAs, or proteins. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:512-526. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27071649

  6. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates: Cyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. M.; Afroz, Taliman; Allen, Joshua L.; Boyle, Paul D.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-11-13

    Only limited information is available regarding the manner in which cyclic carbonate and ester solvents coordinate Li+ cations in electrolyte solutions for lithium batteries. One approach to gleaning significant insight into these interactions is to examine crystalline solvate structures. To this end, eight new solvate structures are reported with ethylene carbonate, γ-butyrolactone and γ-valerolactone: (EC)3:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiClO4, (EC)2:LiBF4, (GBL)4:LiPF6, (GBL)1:LiClO4, (GVL)1:LiClO4, (GBL)1:LiBF4 and (GBL)1:LiCF3SO3. The crystal structure of (EC)1:LiCF3SO3 is also re-reported for comparison. These structures enable the factors which govern the manner in which the ions are coordinated and the ion/solvent packing—in the solid-state—to be scrutinized in detail.

  7. Blast waves and how they interact with structures.

    PubMed

    Cullis, I G

    2001-02-01

    The paper defines and describes blast waves, their interaction with a structure and its subsequent response. Explosions generate blast waves, which need not be due to explosives. A blast wave consists of two parts: a shock wave and a blast wind. The paper explains how shock waves are formed and their basic properties. The physics of blast waves is non-linear and therefore non-intuitive. To understand how an explosion generates a blast wave a numerical modelling computer code, called a hydrocode has to be employed. This is briefly explained and the cAst Eulerian hydrocode is used to illustrate the formation and propagation of the blast wave generated by a 1 kg sphere of TNT explosive detonated 1 m above the ground. The paper concludes with a discussion of the response of a structure to a blast wave and shows that this response is governed by the structures natural frequency of vibration compared to the duration of the blast wave. The basic concepts introduced are illustrated in a second simulation that introduces two structures into the blast field of the TNT charge. PMID:11307674

  8. Structural Interactions within Lithium Salt Solvates. Acyclic Carbonates and Esters

    SciTech Connect

    Afroz, Taliman; Seo, D. M.; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2015-03-06

    Solvate crystal structures serve as useful models for the molecular-level interactions within the diverse solvates present in liquid electrolytes. Although acyclic carbonate solvents are widely used for Li-ion battery electrolytes, only three solvate crystal structures with lithium salts are known for these and related solvents. The present work, therefore, reports six lithium salt solvate structures with dimethyl and diethyl carbonate: (DMC)2:LiPF6, (DMC)1:LiCF3SO3, (DMC)1/4:LiBF4, (DEC)2:LiClO4, (DEC)1:LiClO4 and (DEC)1:LiCF3SO3 and four with the structurally related methyl and ethyl acetate: (MA)2:LiClO4, (MA)1:LiBF4, (EA)1:LiClO4 and (EA)1:LiBF4.

  9. Innovative Interactive Visitor Experiences Focused on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettvin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Science Center has adopted a multi-pronged approach to introduce visitors to the concepts of climate change and linkages to human behavior in an informal science education setting. We leverage key fixed exhibit assets derived from collaborations with NOAA: Science on a Sphere and an exhibit kiosk showcasing local CO2 measurements that are adjacent on our exhibit floor. NOAA PMEL Scientists deployed a sensor at the top of the Space Needle that measures variability in atmospheric CO2 over Seattle; the kiosk showcases these near-real-time, daily, weekly and monthly measurements as well as similar observations from a NOAA buoy near Aberdeen, Washington. Displays of these data enable visitors to see first-hand varying CO2 levels in urban and remote marine environments as well as seasonal cycling. It also reveals quantifiable increases in CO2 levels over a relatively short time (~5 years). Trained interpreters help visitors understand linkages between personal behavior and corresponding CO2 footprints. Interpreters discuss connections between local and regional CO2 measurements displayed on the kiosk, and global Sphere datasets including NOAA Carbon Tracker, changing arctic sea ice coverage and sea level rise projections. Portable Discovery Carts, consisting of props and interactive, hands-on activities provide a platform for facilitated interpretation on a series of topics. We have developed two climate focused carts: 'Sinks and Sources' that examines materials and activities that produce and absorb carbon, and 'Ocean Acidification' that shows how absorption of atmospheric CO2 is changing ocean composition and its habitability for marine life. These carts can be deployed anywhere on the exhibit floor but are primarily used adjacent to the Sphere and the kiosk, making it possible to have a range of conversations about global and local CO2 levels, linkages to individual and collective behaviour and associated implications. Additional collaborations with members of

  10. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  11. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J; White, Stephen

    2014-12-16

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  12. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-01-01

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell. PMID:23545211

  13. Structural interactions of a voltage sensor toxin with lipid membranes

    PubMed Central

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Krepkiy, Dmitriy; Milescu, Mirela; Gawrisch, Klaus; Swartz, Kenton J.; White, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Protein toxins from tarantula venom alter the activity of diverse ion channel proteins, including voltage, stretch, and ligand-activated cation channels. Although tarantula toxins have been shown to partition into membranes, and the membrane is thought to play an important role in their activity, the structural interactions between these toxins and lipid membranes are poorly understood. Here, we use solid-state NMR and neutron diffraction to investigate the interactions between a voltage sensor toxin (VSTx1) and lipid membranes, with the goal of localizing the toxin in the membrane and determining its influence on membrane structure. Our results demonstrate that VSTx1 localizes to the headgroup region of lipid membranes and produces a thinning of the bilayer. The toxin orients such that many basic residues are in the aqueous phase, all three Trp residues adopt interfacial positions, and several hydrophobic residues are within the membrane interior. One remarkable feature of this preferred orientation is that the surface of the toxin that mediates binding to voltage sensors is ideally positioned within the lipid bilayer to favor complex formation between the toxin and the voltage sensor. PMID:25453087

  14. Structural Transformations of Cytochrome c upon Interaction with Cardiolipin

    PubMed Central

    Muenzner, Julia; Pletneva, Ekaterina V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of cytochrome c (cyt c) with cardiolipin (CL) play a critical role in early stages of apoptosis. Upon binding to CL, cyt c undergoes changes in secondary and tertiary structure that lead to a dramatic increase in its peroxidase activity. Insertion of the protein into membranes, insertion of CL acyl chains into the protein interior, and extensive unfolding of cyt c after adsorption to the membrane have been proposed as possible modes for interaction of cyt c with CL. Dissociation of Met80 is accompanied by opening of the heme crevice and binding of another heme ligand. Fluorescence studies have revealed conformational heterogeneity of the lipid-bound protein ensemble with distinct polypeptide conformations that vary in the degree of protein unfolding. We correlate these recent findings to other biophysical observations and rationalize the role of experimental conditions in defining conformational properties and peroxidase activity of the cyt c ensemble. Latest time-resolved studies propose the trigger and the sequence of cardiolipin-induced structural transitions of cyt c. PMID:24252639

  15. Simulating Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation Using Fluid Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Bazilevs, Yuri; Marsden, Alison

    2012-11-01

    Ventricular Assist Devices (VADs) provide mechanical circulatory support to patients in heart failure. They are primarily used to extend life until cardiac transplant, but also show promise as a ``bridge-to-recovery'' device in pediatric patients. Commercially available pediatric pumps are pulsatile displacement pumps, with two distinct chambers for air and blood separated by a thin, flexible membrane. The air chamber pneumatically drives the membrane, which drives blood through the other chamber via displacement. The primary risk factor associated with these devices is stroke or embolism due to thrombogenesis in the blood chamber, occurring in as many as 40% of patients. Our goal is to perform simulations that accurately model the hemodynamics of the device, as well as the non-linear membrane buckling. We apply a finite-element based fluid solver, with an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) framework to account for mesh motion. Isogeometric Analysis with a Kirchhoff-Love shell formulation is used on the membrane, and two distinct fluid subdomains are used for the air and blood chambers. The Fluid Structure Interaction (FSI) problem is solved simultaneously, using a Matrix Free method to model the interactions at the fluid-structure boundary. Methods and results are presented.

  16. Structural analysis of DNA interaction with retinol and retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Mandeville, J S; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Neault, J F; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2010-06-01

    Dietary constituents of fresh fruits and vegetables may play a relevant role in DNA adduct formation by inhibiting enzymatic activities. Studies have shown the important role of antioxidant vitamins A, C, and E in the protection against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The antioxidant activity of vitamin A and beta-carotene may consist of scavenging oxygen radicals and preventing DNA damage. This study was designed to examine the interaction of calf-thymus DNA with retinol and retinoic acid in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant DNA concentration and various retinoid contents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine retinoid binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of retinol and retinoic acid complexation on DNA conformation and aggregation. Structural analysis showed that retinol and retinoic acid bind DNA via G-C and A-T base pairs and the backbone phosphate groups with overall binding constants of Kret = 3.0 (+/-0.50) x 10(3) (mol.L(-1))(-1) and Kretac = 1.0 (+/-0.20) x 10(4) (mol.L(-1))(-1). The number of bound retinoids per DNA were 0.84 for retinol and 1.3 for retinoic acid. Hydrophobic interactions were also observed at high retinol and retinoic acid contents. At a high retinoid concentration, major DNA aggregation occurred, while DNA remained in the B-family structure. PMID:20555389

  17. A self-excited flapper from fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curet, Oscar M.; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2010-11-01

    The flexible nature of lifting and propulsive surfaces is a common characteristic of aquatic and aerial locomotion in animals. These surfaces may not only move actively, but also passively or with a combination of both. What is the nature of this passive movement? What is the role of this passive motion on force generation, efficiency and muscle control? Here, we present results using a simple wing model with two degrees of freedom designed to study passive flapping, and fluid-structure interaction. The wing is composed of a flat plate with a hinged trailing flap. The wing is cantilevered to the main body to enable a flapping motion with a well-defined natural frequency. We test the wing model in a wind tunnel. At low speed the wing is stationary. Above a critical velocity the trailing wing section starts to oscillate, generating an oscillating lift force on the wing. This oscillating lift force results on a self-excited flapping motion of the wing. We measure the kinematics and the forces generated by the wing as a function of flow velocity and stiffness of the cantilever. Comparisons with aeroelasticity theory will be presented as well as details of the fluid-structure interactions.

  18. Dissecting the structural basis of MEIG1 interaction with PACRG

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Walavalkar, Ninad M.; Buchwald, William A.; Teves, Maria E.; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Hong; Bilinovich, Stephanie; Peterson, Darrell L.; Strauss III, Jerome F.; Williams Jr, David C.; Zhang, Zhibing

    2016-01-01

    The product of the meiosis-expressed gene 1 (MEIG1) is found in the cell bodies of spermatocytes and recruited to the manchette, a structure unique to elongating spermatids, by Parkin co-regulated gene (PACRG). This complex is essential for targeting cargo to the manchette during sperm flagellum assembly. Here we show that MEIG1 adopts a unique fold that provides a large surface for interacting with other proteins. We mutated 12 exposed and conserved amino acids and show that four of these mutations (W50A, K57E, F66A, Y68A) dramatically reduce binding to PACRG. These four amino acids form a contiguous hydrophobic patch on one end of the protein. Furthermore, each of these four mutations diminishes the ability of MEIG1 to stabilize PACRG when expressed in bacteria. Together these studies establish the unique structure and key interaction surface of MEIG1 and provide a framework to explore how MEIG1 recruits proteins to build the sperm tail. PMID:26726850

  19. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Relationship of marital structure and interactions to opiate abuse relapse.

    PubMed

    Kosten, T R; Jalali, B; Steidl, J H; Kleber, H D

    1987-01-01

    Several aspects of marital functioning were associated with subsequent relapse to opiate abuse in 17 married addicts. The addicts and spouses were evaluated in a task-oriented interview and rated using the Beavers Timberlawn Family Assessment instrument. The global health-pathology ratings on this instrument indicated that most couples had rigid patterns of interacting, rather than a chaotic lack of structure or a flexible, negotiated partnership. Within this range of rigid functioning, higher ratings were associated with longer times drug-free (up to 18 months with a mean of 7 months). On the seven subscales of the Beavers', five were significantly correlated with the time drug-free: effective and clear leadership, closeness between the spouses, a nonhostile mood, empathy, and efficient negotiation and problem solving. The subscales associated with drug abstinence were quite different for a group of seven single ex-addicts participating in the same outpatient program, but living with their parents. For these single ex-addicts three subscales were correlated with the time drug-free: parental reaction to separation strivings, the open expression of thoughts and feelings, and empathy. This difference in the subscales associated with abstinence for married versus single addicts suggested some specificity in the characteristics of family structure and interaction that may be related to drug abstinence. PMID:3687898

  1. Interaction of a Single Large Wave with a Tall Fixed Structure. Part i: Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, Catherine; Arnason, Halldor; Yeh, Harry

    2002-11-01

    This work is part of a joint effort to develop experimental and numerical capabilities to better understand the interactions of large waves with solid structures as pertaining to tsunami mitigation. This abstract reports on the laboratory experiments conducted as part of this ongoing investigation. The experiments were performed at the Harris Hydraulics Laboratory at the University of Washington using scale models of square and circular cylindrical structures in a 2-foot wide, 50-foot long rectangular channel. The models represent a row of structures or a single structure in a channel subjected to a broken tsunami wave or bore. Bores were generated using a rapidly lifted gate and various amounts of impounded water. We present the measured water surfaces and impact forces on the structures as well as velocity fields measured through Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). These data along with high-speed video were used to validate a numerical simulation performed with the Eulerian-Lagrangian Marker and Micro Cell method developed at SMU. The laboratory data presented shows the flow patterns around the scaled structures and how the flow affects the observed force records. Velocity field data makes it possible to predict wake effects and local scour around the structures, which relates directly to their stability during an actual tsunami event and to recommendations for the reduction of tsunami hazards.

  2. Interaction of dislocations in UO2 during high burn-up structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, V. G.; Lunev, A. V.; Tenishev, A. V.; Khlunov, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Dislocation dynamics is used to investigate the distribution of dislocations in oxide nuclear fuel under irradiation using the values of dislocation density from experiments. A model is constructed to account for the effects of irradiation on dislocation movement and for the brittle behavior of the material. Results show that the ground state of interacting dislocations in UO2 during irradiation is a periodic structure with spacing between walls equal to 100-300 nm at experimental dislocation densities. These regions adorned by dislocation walls are called sub-grains and represent the result of polygonization. The threshold of polygonization is shown to depend on the fluctuations of the stress field produced by interaction of many dislocations. These fluctuations reach a critical value when a critical dislocation density is reached (˜4 × 1014 m-2). The calculated value matches experimental data on dislocation density measurement of irradiated uranium dioxide at burn-up corresponding to the formation of high burn-up structure.

  3. Drum-mate: interaction dynamics and gestures in human-humanoid drumming experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kose-Bagci, Hatice; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Syrdal, Dag S.; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2010-06-01

    This article investigates the role of interaction kinesics in human-robot interaction (HRI). We adopted a bottom-up, synthetic approach towards interactive competencies in robots using simple, minimal computational models underlying the robot's interaction dynamics. We present two empirical, exploratory studies investigating a drumming experience with a humanoid robot (KASPAR) and a human. In the first experiment, the turn-taking behaviour of the humanoid is deterministic and the non-verbal gestures of the robot accompany its drumming to assess the impact of non-verbal gestures on the interaction. The second experiment studies a computational framework that facilitates emergent turn-taking dynamics, whereby the particular dynamics of turn-taking emerge from the social interaction between the human and the humanoid. The results from the HRI experiments are presented and analysed qualitatively (in terms of the participants' subjective experiences) and quantitatively (concerning the drumming performance of the human-robot pair). The results point out a trade-off between the subjective evaluation of the drumming experience from the perspective of the participants and the objective evaluation of the drumming performance. A certain number of gestures was preferred as a motivational factor in the interaction. The participants preferred the models underlying the robot's turn-taking which enable the robot and human to interact more and provide turn-taking closer to 'natural' human-human conversations, despite differences in objective measures of drumming behaviour. The results are consistent with the temporal behaviour matching hypothesis previously proposed in the literature which concerns the effect that the participants adapt their own interaction dynamics to the robot's.

  4. The Role of Personal Experience and Social Interaction in Knowledge Creation and Utilisation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Handzic, Meliha; Tolhurst, Denise

    This paper reports the results of an empirical examination of the effects of personal experience and social interaction on individual knowledge and performance in a specific decision making task context. The study revealed a differential effect of increased experience on the quality of participants decisions. In particular, increased experience…

  5. Lysozyme Thermal Denaturation and Self-Interaction: Four Integrated Thermodynamic Experiments for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Schaefle, Nathaniel J.; Muth, Gregory W.; Miessler, Gary L.; Clark, Christopher A.

    2008-01-01

    As part of an effort to infuse our physical chemistry laboratory with biologically relevant, investigative experiments, we detail four integrated thermodynamic experiments that characterize the denaturation (or unfolding) and self-interaction of hen egg white lysozyme as a function of pH and ionic strength. Students first use Protein Explorer to…

  6. Privatization of cooperative benefits stabilizes mutualistic cross-feeding interactions in spatially structured environments.

    PubMed

    Pande, Samay; Kaftan, Filip; Lang, Stefan; Svatoš, Aleš; Germerodt, Sebastian; Kost, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Metabolic cross-feeding interactions are ubiquitous in natural microbial communities. However, it remains generally unclear whether the production and exchange of metabolites incurs fitness costs to the producing cells and if so, which ecological mechanisms can facilitate a cooperative exchange of metabolites among unrelated individuals. We hypothesized that positive assortment within structured environments can maintain mutualistic cross-feeding. To test this, we engineered Acinetobacter baylyi and Escherichia coli to reciprocally exchange essential amino acids. Interspecific coculture experiments confirmed that non-cooperating types were selectively favoured in spatially unstructured (liquid culture), yet disfavoured in spatially structured environments (agar plates). Both an individual-based model and experiments with engineered genotypes indicated that a segregation of cross-feeders and non-cooperating auxotrophs stabilized cooperative cross-feeding in spatially structured environments. Chemical imaging confirmed that auxotrophs were spatially excluded from cooperative benefits. Together, these results demonstrate that cooperative cross-feeding between different bacterial species is favoured in structured environments such as bacterial biofilms, suggesting this type of interactions might be common in natural bacterial communities. PMID:26623546

  7. Study of turbulence and interacting inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoff, Michael; Harlander, Uwe; Triana, Santiago Andrés

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of inertial modes in a differentially rotating spherical shell (spherical Couette flow) experiment with a radius ratio of η =1 /3 . Inertial modes are Coriolis-restored linear wave modes which often arise in rapidly rotating fluids. Recent experimental work has shown that inertial modes exist in a spherical Couette flow for Ωi<Ωo , where Ωi and Ωo are the inner and outer sphere rotation rate. A finite number of particular inertial modes has previously been found. By scanning the Rossby number from -2.5 experiments. We show that the kinetic energy of the dominant inertial mode dramatically increases with decreasing Rossby number, which eventually leads to a wave breaking and an increase of small-scale structures at a critical Rossby number. Such a transition in a spherical Couette flow has not been described before. The critical Rossby number scales with the Ekman number as E1 /5. Additionally, the increase of small-scale features beyond the transition transfers energy to a massively enhanced mean flow around the tangent cylinder. In this context, we discuss an interaction between the dominant inertial modes with a geostrophic Rossby mode exciting secondary modes whose frequencies match the triadic resonance condition.

  8. "What matters most:" a cultural mechanism moderating structural vulnerability and moral experience of mental illness stigma.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lawrence H; Chen, Fang-pei; Sia, Kathleen Janel; Lam, Jonathan; Lam, Katherine; Ngo, Hong; Lee, Sing; Kleinman, Arthur; Good, Byron

    2014-02-01

    To understand Chinese immigrants' experiences with mental illness stigma and mental health disparities, we integrate frameworks of 'structural vulnerability' and 'moral experience' to identify how interaction between structural discrimination and cultural engagements might shape stigma. Fifty Chinese immigrants, including 64% Fuzhounese immigrants who experienced particularly harsh socio-economical deprivation, from two Chinese bilingual psychiatric inpatient units in New York City were interviewed from 2006 to 2010 about their experiences of mental illness stigma. Interview questions were derived from 4 stigma measures, covering various life domains. Participants were asked to elaborate their rating of measure items, and thus provided open-ended, narrative data. Analysis of the narrative data followed a deductive approach, guided by frameworks of structural discrimination and "what matters most" - a cultural mechanism signifying meaningful participation in the community. After identifying initial coding classifications, analysis focused on the interface between the two main concepts. Results indicated that experiences with mental illness stigma were contingent on the degree to which immigrants were able to participate in work to achieve "what mattered most" in their cultural context, i.e., accumulation of financial resources. Structural vulnerability - being situated in an inferior position when facing structural discrimination - made access to affordable mental health services challenging. As such, structural discrimination increased healthcare spending and interfered with financial accumulation, often resulting in future treatment nonadherence and enforcing mental health disparities. Study participants' internalizing their structurally-vulnerable position further led to a depreciated sense of self, resulting in a reduced capacity to advocate for healthcare system changes. Paradoxically, the multi-layered structural marginalization experienced by Chinese

  9. IRIS Controlled Source Seismic Experiments: Continental Structure, Instrumentation, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooney, W. D.; Keller, G. R.

    2004-12-01

    The controlled-source seismology program of IRIS/PASSCAL has made major contributions to the study of continental structure and evolution. It has also undergone major developments in seismic instrumentation. The first PASSCAL experiments (1984/85) targeted the Basin and Range Province and the Ouachita orogenic belt. The Basin and Range study provided remarkably clear images of this thin, highly-extended crust, while the Ouachita experiment tested competing hypotheses for the deep structure of this Paleozoic orogen. However, both of these projects were limited by a lack of seismic instruments. The situation improved in the late 1980's with the benefit of a mixed array of 600 seismic recorders from the USGS, Stanford, and the Geological Survey of Canada. The resolution achieved with these instruments was revolutionary. Results include the imaging of such remarkable features as crustal-scale duplexes in the Brooks Range compressional orogen of northern Alaska, and of crustal "core complexes" in the extended crust of southwest Arizona. The 3-channel PASSCAL Jr. instrument was developed, leading to experiments in which ˜1000 instruments were deployed, including three-component recording. This complex mix of instruments served the community well for several years, but required large, complex instrument centers and lots of technical support. With input from PASSCAL and the international community, a newly designed, compact instrument (the Texan) was finalized in the spring of 1998, and the first 200 instruments was delivered to the Univ. of Texas-El Paso in late 1998. The present instrument pool of Texans exceeds 1,400 and these have been used on such projects as the high-resolution imaging of the Los Angeles and San Fernando basins (LARSE I and II experiments), where active thrust faults have been imaged. Controlled-source seismic experiments are now very numerous. During calendar year 2004 alone, portable Texan instruments have traveled from Venezuela to Denmark

  10. Parasites destabilize host populations by shifting stage-structured interactions.

    PubMed

    Hite, Jessica L; Penczykowski, Rachel M; Shocket, Marta S; Strauss, Alexander T; Orlando, Paul A; Duffy, Meghan A; Cáceres, Carla E; Hall, Spencer R

    2016-02-01

    Should parasites stabilize or destabilize consumer-resource dynamics? Recent theory suggests that parasite-enhanced mortality may confer underappreciated stability to their hosts. We tested this hypothesis using disease in zooplankton. Across both natural and experimental epidemics, bigger epidemics correlated with larger--not smaller--host fluctuations. Thus, we tested two mechanistic hypotheses to explain destabilization or apparent destabilization by parasites. First, enrichment could, in principle, simultaneously enhance both instability and disease prevalence. In natural epidemics, destabilization was correlated with enrichment (indexed by total phosphorous). However, an in situ (lake enclosure) experiment did not support these links. Instead, field and experimental results point to a novel destabilizing mechanism involving host stage structure. Epidemics pushed hosts from relatively more stable host dynamics with less-synchronized juveniles and adults to less stable dynamics with more-synchronized juveniles and adults. Our results demonstrate how links between host stage structure and disease can shape host/consumer-resource stability. PMID:27145618

  11. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  12. Sequence and Structure Dependent DNA-DNA Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopchick, Benjamin; Qiu, Xiangyun

    Molecular forces between dsDNA strands are largely dominated by electrostatics and have been extensively studied. Quantitative knowledge has been accumulated on how DNA-DNA interactions are modulated by varied biological constituents such as ions, cationic ligands, and proteins. Despite its central role in biology, the sequence of DNA has not received substantial attention and ``random'' DNA sequences are typically used in biophysical studies. However, ~50% of human genome is composed of non-random-sequence DNAs, particularly repetitive sequences. Furthermore, covalent modifications of DNA such as methylation play key roles in gene functions. Such DNAs with specific sequences or modifications often take on structures other than the canonical B-form. Here we present series of quantitative measurements of the DNA-DNA forces with the osmotic stress method on different DNA sequences, from short repeats to the most frequent sequences in genome, and to modifications such as bromination and methylation. We observe peculiar behaviors that appear to be strongly correlated with the incurred structural changes. We speculate the causalities in terms of the differences in hydration shell and DNA surface structures.

  13. Interactive Internet delivery of scientific visualization via structured prerendered imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jerry; Bethel, E. Wes; Yoon, Ilmi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we explore leveraging industry-standard media formats to effectively deliver interactive, 3D scientific visualization to a remote viewer. Our work is motivated by the need for remote visualization of time-varying, 3D data produced by scientific simulations or experiments while taking several practical factors into account, including: maximizing ease of use from the user's perspective, maximizing reuse of image frames, and taking advantage of existing software infrastructure wherever possible. Visualization or graphics applications first generate images at some number of view orientations for 3D scenes and temporal locations for time-varying scenes. We then encode the resulting imagery into one of two industry-standard formats: QuickTime VR Object Movies or a combination of HTML and JavaScript code implementing the client-side navigator. Using an industry-standard QuickTime player or web browser, remote users may freely navigate through the pre-rendered images of time-varying, 3D visualization output. Since the only inputs consist of image data, a viewpoint and time stamps, our approach is generally applicable to all visualization and graphics rendering applications capable of generating image files in an ordered fashion. Our design is a form of latency-tolerant remote visualization infrastructure where processing time for visualization, rendering and content delivery is effectively decoupled from interactive exploration. Our approach trades off increased interactivity, reduced load and effective reuse of coherent frames between multiple users (from the server's perspective) at the expense of unconstrained exploration. This paper presents the system architecture along with an analysis and discussion of its strengths and limitations.

  14. Managing uncertainty in collaborative robotics engineering projects: The influence of task structure and peer interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Michelle

    Uncertainty is ubiquitous in life, and learning is an activity particularly likely to be fraught with uncertainty. Previous research suggests that students and teachers struggle in their attempts to manage the psychological experience of uncertainty and that students often fail to experience uncertainty when uncertainty may be warranted. Yet, few educational researchers have explicitly and systematically observed what students do, their behaviors and strategies, as they attempt to manage the uncertainty they experience during academic tasks. In this study I investigated how students in one fifth grade class managed uncertainty they experienced while engaged in collaborative robotics engineering projects, focusing particularly on how uncertainty management was influenced by task structure and students' interactions with their peer collaborators. The study was initiated at the beginning of instruction related to robotics engineering and preceded through the completion of several long-term collaborative robotics projects, one of which was a design project. I relied primarily on naturalistic observation of group sessions, semi-structured interviews, and collection of artifacts. My data analysis was inductive and interpretive, using qualitative discourse analysis techniques and methods of grounded theory. Three theoretical frameworks influenced the conception and design of this study: community of practice, distributed cognition, and complex adaptive systems theory. Uncertainty was a pervasive experience for the students collaborating in this instructional context. Students experienced uncertainty related to the project activity and uncertainty related to the social system as they collaborated to fulfill the requirements of their robotics engineering projects. They managed their uncertainty through a diverse set of tactics for reducing, ignoring, maintaining, and increasing uncertainty. Students experienced uncertainty from more different sources and used more and

  15. Experiments for locating damaged truss members in a truss structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Smith, Suzanne W.; Javeed, Mehzad

    1991-01-01

    Locating damaged truss members in large space structures will involve a combination of sensing and diagnostic techniques. Methods developed for damage location require experimental verification prior to on-orbit applications. To this end, a series of experiments for locating damaged members using a generic, ten bay truss structure were conducted. A 'damaged' member is a member which has been removed entirely. Previously developed identification methods are used in conjunction with the experimental data to locate damage. Preliminary results to date are included, and indicate that mode selection and sensor location are important issues for location performance. A number of experimental data sets representing various damage configurations were compiled using the ten bay truss. The experimental data and the corresponding finite element analysis models are available to researchers for verification of various methods of structure identification and damage location.

  16. Flow Interactions with Cells and Tissues: Cardiovascular Flows and Fluid–Structure Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Morton H.; Krams, Rob; Chandran, Krishnan B.

    2010-01-01

    Interactions between flow and biological cells and tissues are intrinsic to the circulatory, respiratory, digestive and genitourinary systems. In the circulatory system, an understanding of the complex interaction between the arterial wall (a living multi-component organ with anisotropic, nonlinear material properties) and blood (a shear-thinning fluid with 45% by volume consisting of red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells) is vital to our understanding of the physiology of the human circulation and the etiology and development of arterial diseases, and to the design and development of prosthetic implants and tissue-engineered substitutes. Similarly, an understanding of the complex dynamics of flow past native human heart valves and the effect of that flow on the valvular tissue is necessary to elucidate the etiology of valvular diseases and in the design and development of valve replacements. In this paper we address the influence of biomechanical factors on the arterial circulation. The first part presents our current understanding of the impact of blood flow on the arterial wall at the cellular level and the relationship between flow-induced stresses and the etiology of atherosclerosis. The second part describes recent advances in the application of fluid–structure interaction analysis to arterial flows and the dynamics of heart valves. PMID:20336826

  17. Structure and interactions in isotropic and liquid crystalline neurofilament networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jayna Bea

    2007-12-01

    Neurofilaments (NFs) are cytoskeletal proteins that are localized within nerve cells, which form long oriented bundles running the length of axons. While abnormal aggregations of these proteins have been implicated in several neurological disorders including Parkinson's disease and ALS, interfilament interactions in both the normal and diseased states are not well understood. In vivo, NFs are supramolecular structures composed of three subunit proteins of low (NF-L), medium (NF-M), and high molecular (NF-H) weight that assemble into a 10 nm diameter rod with radiating sidearms, forming a bottle-brush conformation. In this study we alter the subunit composition and probe the resulting networks with polarized microscopy and synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), in order to isolate the role of each subunit in interfilament interactions. By reassembling NFs in vitro from varying ratios of the subunit proteins, purified from bovine spinal cord, we form filaments with controlled subunit compositions. The resulting filaments, at a high volume fraction, are nematic liquid crystalline gels with a well defined spacing, determined with SAXS. Upon dilution the difference between the subunits is realized with NF-M grafted filaments being dominated by attractive interactions and remaining aligned, while those flanked with NF-H sidearms repel and become isotropic gels. Interplay between these forces is seen in the ternary system composed of all three subunit proteins (NF-LMH). The polyampholytic subunits have a charge distribution that varies along the length of the sidearm, which forms the brush layer, and the distribution is different for each subunit. The interfilament interactions are highly dependent on environmental conditions including salt concentration, pH, and osmotic pressure. Increasing ionic strength induces attractive interactions and a stabilization of the nematic phase in filaments that were repulsive at lower monovalent salt concentration. The

  18. Land management practices interactively affect wetland beetle ecological and phylogenetic community structure.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sandor L; Song, Hojun; Jenkins, David G

    2015-06-01

    Management practices can disturb ecological communities in grazing lands, which represent one-quarter of land surface. But three knowledge gaps exist regarding disturbances: disturbances potentially interact but are most often studied singly; experiments with multiple ecosystems as treatment units are rare; and relatively new metrics of phylogenetic community structure have not been widely applied. We addressed all three of these needs with a factorial experiment; 40 seasonal wetlands embedded in a Florida ranch were treated with pasture intensification, cattle exclosure, and prescribed fire. Treatment responses were evaluated through four years for aquatic beetle (Coleoptera: Adephaga) assemblages using classic ecological metrics (species richness, diversity) and phylogenetic community structure (PCS) metrics. Adephagan assemblages consisted of 23 genera representing three families in a well-resolved phylogeny. Prescribed fire significantly reduced diversity one year post-fire, followed by a delayed pasture X fire interaction. Cattle exclosure significantly reduced one PCS metric after one year and a delayed pasture x fence x fire interaction was detected with another PCs metric. Overall, effects of long-term pasture intensification were modified by cattle exclosure and prescribed fire. Also, PCS metrics revealed effects otherwise undetected by classic ecological metrics. Management strategies (e.g., "flash grazing," prescribed fires) in seasonal wetlands may successfully balance economic gains from high forage quality with ecological benefits of high wetland diversity in otherwise simplified grazing lands. Effects are likely taxon specific; multiple taxa should be similarly evaluated. PMID:26465031

  19. Structural Design Feasibility Study for the Global Climate Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin,K.F.; Nagy, J.

    2008-12-01

    Neon, Inc. is proposing to establish a Global Change Experiment (GCE) Facility to increase our understanding of how ecological systems differ in their vulnerability to changes in climate and other relevant global change drivers, as well as provide the mechanistic basis for forecasting ecological change in the future. The experimental design was initially envisioned to consist of two complementary components; (A) a multi-factor experiment manipulating CO{sub 2}, temperature and water availability and (B) a water balance experiment. As the design analysis and cost estimates progressed, it became clear that (1) the technical difficulties of obtaining tight temperature control and maintaining elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels within an enclosure were greater than had been expected and (2) the envisioned study would not fit into the expected budget envelope if this was done in a partially or completely enclosed structure. After discussions between NEON management, the GCE science team, and Keith Lewin, NEON, Inc. requested Keith Lewin to expand the scope of this design study to include open-field exposure systems. In order to develop the GCE design to the point where it can be presented within a proposal for funding, a feasibility study of climate manipulation structures must be conducted to determine design approaches and rough cost estimates, and to identify advantages and disadvantages of these approaches including the associated experimental artifacts. NEON, Inc requested this design study in order to develop concepts for the climate manipulation structures to support the NEON Global Climate Experiment. This study summarizes the design concepts considered for constructing and operating the GCE Facility and their associated construction, maintenance and operations costs. Comparisons and comments about experimental artifacts, construction challenges and operational uncertainties are provided to assist in selecting the final facility design. The overall goal

  20. Experiences with integral microelectronics on smart structures for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nye, Ted; Casteel, Scott; Navarro, Sergio A.; Kraml, Bob

    1995-05-01

    One feature of a smart structure implies that some computational and signal processing capability can be performed at a local level, perhaps integral to the controlled structure. This requires electronics with a minimal mechanical influence regarding structural stiffening, heat dissipation, weight, and electrical interface connectivity. The Advanced Controls Technology Experiment II (ACTEX II) space-flight experiments implemented such a local control electronics scheme by utilizing composite smart members with integral processing electronics. These microelectronics, tested to MIL-STD-883B levels, were fabricated with conventional thick film on ceramic multichip module techniques. Kovar housings and aluminum-kapton multilayer insulation was used to protect against harsh space radiation and thermal environments. Development and acceptance testing showed the electronics design was extremely robust, operating in vacuum and at temperature range with minimal gain variations occurring just above room temperatures. Four electronics modules, used for the flight hardware configuration, were connected by a RS-485 2 Mbit per second serial data bus. The data bus was controlled by Actel field programmable gate arrays arranged in a single master, four slave configuration. An Intel 80C196KD microprocessor was chosen as the digital compensator in each controller. It was used to apply a series of selectable biquad filters, implemented via Delta Transforms. Instability in any compensator was expected to appear as large amplitude oscillations in the deployed structure. Thus, over-vibration detection circuitry with automatic output isolation was incorporated into the design. This was not used however, since during experiment integration and test, intentionally induced compensator instabilities resulted in benign mechanical oscillation symptoms. Not too surprisingly, it was determined that instabilities were most detectable by large temperature increases in the electronics, typically

  1. Species interactions and the structure of complex communication networks

    PubMed Central

    Tobias, Joseph A.; Planqué, Robert; Cram, Dominic L.; Seddon, Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    A universal challenge faced by animal species is the need to communicate effectively against a backdrop of heterospecific signals. It is often assumed that this need results in signal divergence to minimize interference among community members, yet previous support for this idea is mixed, and few studies have tested the opposing hypothesis that interactions among competing species promote widespread convergence in signaling regimes. Using a null model approach to analyze acoustic signaling in 307 species of Amazonian birds, we show that closely related lineages signal together in time and space and that acoustic signals given in temporal or spatial proximity are more similar in design than expected by chance. These results challenge the view that multispecies choruses are structured by temporal, spatial, or acoustic partitioning and instead suggest that social communication between competing species can fundamentally organize signaling assemblages, leading to the opposite pattern of clustering in signals and signaling behavior. PMID:24395769

  2. Fluid Structure Interaction of Parachutes in Supersonic Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sengupta, Anita

    2011-01-01

    A research program to provide physical insight into disk-gap-band parachute operation in the supersonic regime on Mars was conducted. The program included supersonic wind tunnel tests, computational fluid dynamics and fluid structure interaction simulations. Specifically, the nature and cause of the "area oscillation" phenomenon were investigated to determine the scale, aerodynamic, and aero-elastic dependence of the supersonic parachute collapse and re-inflation event. A variety of non-intrusive, temporally resolved, and high resolution diagnostic techniques were used to interrogate the flow and generate validation datasets. The results of flow visualization, particle image velocimetry, load measurements, and photogrammetric reconstruction will be presented. Implications to parachute design, use, and verification will also be discussed.

  3. Fluid structure interaction in electrohydraulic servovalve: a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, Somashekhar S.; Singaperumal, M.

    2010-01-01

    Electrohydraulic servovalves (EHSV) promise unique application opportunities and high performance, unmatched by other drive technologies. Typical applications include aerospace, robotic manipulators, motion simulators, injection molding, CNC machines and material testing machines. EHSV available are either a flapper/nozzle type or a jet pipe type. In the present paper an attempt has been made to study the dynamics of jet pipe EHSV with built-in mechanical feedback using Finite Element Method (FEM). In jet pipe EHSV, the dynamics of spool greatly depends on pressure recovery and hence the fluid flow at spool ends. The effect of pressure recovery on spool dynamics is studied using FEM by creating the fluid-structure-interaction. The mechanical parts were created using general purpose finite elements like shell, beam, and solid elements while fluid cavities were created using hydrostatic fluid elements. The analysis was carried out using the commercially available FE code ABAQUS. The jet pipe and spool dynamics are presented in the paper.

  4. Fluid structure interaction in electrohydraulic servovalve: a finite element approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, Somashekhar S.; Singaperumal, M.

    2009-12-01

    Electrohydraulic servovalves (EHSV) promise unique application opportunities and high performance, unmatched by other drive technologies. Typical applications include aerospace, robotic manipulators, motion simulators, injection molding, CNC machines and material testing machines. EHSV available are either a flapper/nozzle type or a jet pipe type. In the present paper an attempt has been made to study the dynamics of jet pipe EHSV with built-in mechanical feedback using Finite Element Method (FEM). In jet pipe EHSV, the dynamics of spool greatly depends on pressure recovery and hence the fluid flow at spool ends. The effect of pressure recovery on spool dynamics is studied using FEM by creating the fluid-structure-interaction. The mechanical parts were created using general purpose finite elements like shell, beam, and solid elements while fluid cavities were created using hydrostatic fluid elements. The analysis was carried out using the commercially available FE code ABAQUS. The jet pipe and spool dynamics are presented in the paper.

  5. A fluid-structure interaction model with interior damping and delay in the structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peralta, Gilbert

    2016-03-01

    A coupled system of partial differential equations modeling the interaction of a fluid and a structure with delay in the feedback is studied. The model describes the dynamics of an elastic body immersed in a fluid that is contained in a vessel, whose boundary is made of a solid wall. The fluid component is modeled by the linearized Navier-Stokes equation, while the solid component is given by the wave equation neglecting transverse elastic force. Spectral properties and exponential or strong stability of the interaction model under appropriate conditions on the damping factor, delay factor and the delay parameter are established using a generalized Lax-Milgram method.

  6. The D3 dopamine receptor: From structural interactions to function.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Chiara; Savoia, Paola; Bono, Federica; Tallarico, Paola; Missale, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    Novel structural and functional aspects of the dopamine (DA) D3 receptors (D3R) have been recently described. D3R expressed in dopaminergic neurons have been classically considered to play the role of autoreceptors inhibiting, as the D2R, DA release. However, evidence for D3R-mediated neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on DA neurons suggests their involvement in preventing pathological alterations leading to neurodegeneration. On the other hand, given its localization and functional role at postsynaptic striatal levels, the D3R may also be involved in the pathogenesis of movement disorders and psychiatric diseases. Functional interactions of D3R with other receptor systems are crucial for the modulation of several physiological events. On this line, the discovery that the D3R can form heteromers with other receptors has opened the possibility of uncover novel molecular mechanisms of brain functions and dysfunctions. This paper summarizes the functional and physical interactions of D3R with other receptors both at pre-synaptic sites, where it is co-expressed with the D2R and nicotinic receptors, and at post-synaptic sites where it interacts with the DA D1 receptors (D1R). The biochemical and functional properties of the D1R-D3R heteromer will be especially discussed. Both D1R and D3R have been in fact implicated in several disorders, including schizophrenia and motor dysfunctions. Therefore, the D1R-D3R heteromer may represent a potential drug target for the treatment of these diseases. PMID:25532864

  7. Diffusion and Subdiffusion of Interacting Particles on Comblike Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bénichou, O.; Illien, P.; Oshanin, G.; Sarracino, A.; Voituriez, R.

    2015-11-01

    We study the dynamics of a tracer particle (TP) on a comb lattice populated by randomly moving hard-core particles in the dense limit. We first consider the case where the TP is constrained to move on the backbone of the comb only. In the limit of high density of the particles, we present exact analytical results for the cumulants of the TP position, showing a subdiffusive behavior ˜t3 /4. At longer times, a second regime is observed where standard diffusion is recovered, with a surprising nonanalytical dependence of the diffusion coefficient on the particle density. When the TP is allowed to visit the teeth of the comb, based on a mean-field-like continuous time random walk description, we unveil a rich and complex scenario with several successive subdiffusive regimes, resulting from the coupling between the geometrical constraints of the comb lattice and particle interactions. In this case, remarkably, the presence of hard-core interactions asymptotically speeds up the TP motion along the backbone of the structure.

  8. Spin-orbit interaction in relativistic nuclear structure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Mutschler, A.; Khan, E.; Vretenar, D.

    2016-08-01

    Relativistic self-consistent mean-field (SCMF) models naturally account for the coupling of the nucleon spin to its orbital motion, whereas nonrelativistic SCMF methods necessitate a phenomenological ansatz for the effective spin-orbit potential. Recent experimental studies aim to explore the isospin properties of the effective spin-orbit interaction in nuclei. SCMF models are very useful in the interpretation of the corresponding data; however, standard relativistic mean-field and nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models use effective spin-orbit potentials with different isovector properties, mainly because exchange contributions are not treated explicitly in the former. The impact of exchange terms on the effective spin-orbit potential in relativistic mean-field models is analyzed, and it is shown that it leads to an isovector structure similar to the one used in standard nonrelativistic Hartree-Fock models. Data on the isospin dependence of spin-orbit splittings in spherical nuclei could be used to constrain the isovector-scalar channel of relativistic mean-field models. The reproduction of the empirical kink in the isotope shifts of even Pb nuclei by relativistic effective interactions points to the occurrence of pseudospin symmetry in the single-neutron spectra in these nuclei.

  9. Computational modeling of fluid structural interaction in arterial stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bali, Leila; Boukedjane, Mouloud; Bahi, Lakhdar

    2013-12-01

    Atherosclerosis affects the arterial blood vessels causing stenosis because of which the artery hardens resulting in loss of elasticity in the affected region. In this paper, we present: an approach to model the fluid-structure interaction through such an atherosclerosis affected region of the artery, The blood is assumed as an incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid, and the vessel wall was treated as a thick-walled, incompressible and isotropic material with uniform mechanical properties. The numerical simulation has been studied in the context of The Navier-Stokes equations for an interaction with an elastic solid. The study of fluid flow and wall motion was initially carried out separately, Discretized forms of the transformed wall and flow equations, which are coupled through the boundary conditions at their interface, are obtained by control volume method and simultaneously to study the effects of wall deformability, solutions are obtained for both rigid and elastic walls. The results indicate that deformability of the wall causes an increase in the time average of pressure drop, but a decrease in the maximum wall shear stress. Displacement and stress distributions in the wall are presented.

  10. Does age matter in song bird vocal interactions? Results from interactive playback experiments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The song of oscines provides an extensively studied model of age-dependent behaviour changes. Male and female receivers might use song characteristics to obtain information about the age of a signaller, which is often related to its quality. Whereas most of the age-dependent song changes have been studied in solo singing, the role of age in vocal interactions is less well understood. We addressed this issue in a playback study with common nightingales (Luscinia megarhynchos). Previous studies showed that male nightingales had smaller repertoires in their first year than older males and males adjusted their repertoire towards the most common songs in the breeding population. We now compared vocal interaction patterns in a playback study in 12 one year old and 12 older nightingales (cross-sectional approach). Five of these males were tested both in their first and second breeding season (longitudinal approach). Song duration and latency to respond did not differ between males of different ages in either approach. In the cross-sectional approach, one year old nightingales matched song types twice as often as did older birds. Similarly, in the longitudinal approach all except one bird reduced the number of song type matches in their second season. Individuals tended to overlap songs at higher rates in their second breeding season than in their first. The higher levels of song type matches in the first year and song overlapping by birds in their second year suggest that these are communicative strategies to establish relationships with competing males and/or choosy females. PMID:22071317

  11. 3Drefine: an interactive web server for efficient protein structure refinement.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Nowotny, Jackson; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-07-01

    3Drefine is an interactive web server for consistent and computationally efficient protein structure refinement with the capability to perform web-based statistical and visual analysis. The 3Drefine refinement protocol utilizes iterative optimization of hydrogen bonding network combined with atomic-level energy minimization on the optimized model using a composite physics and knowledge-based force fields for efficient protein structure refinement. The method has been extensively evaluated on blind CASP experiments as well as on large-scale and diverse benchmark datasets and exhibits consistent improvement over the initial structure in both global and local structural quality measures. The 3Drefine web server allows for convenient protein structure refinement through a text or file input submission, email notification, provided example submission and is freely available without any registration requirement. The server also provides comprehensive analysis of submissions through various energy and statistical feedback and interactive visualization of multiple refined models through the JSmol applet that is equipped with numerous protein model analysis tools. The web server has been extensively tested and used by many users. As a result, the 3Drefine web server conveniently provides a useful tool easily accessible to the community. The 3Drefine web server has been made publicly available at the URL: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/3Drefine/. PMID:27131371

  12. 3Drefine: an interactive web server for efficient protein structure refinement

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Debswapna; Nowotny, Jackson; Cao, Renzhi; Cheng, Jianlin

    2016-01-01

    3Drefine is an interactive web server for consistent and computationally efficient protein structure refinement with the capability to perform web-based statistical and visual analysis. The 3Drefine refinement protocol utilizes iterative optimization of hydrogen bonding network combined with atomic-level energy minimization on the optimized model using a composite physics and knowledge-based force fields for efficient protein structure refinement. The method has been extensively evaluated on blind CASP experiments as well as on large-scale and diverse benchmark datasets and exhibits consistent improvement over the initial structure in both global and local structural quality measures. The 3Drefine web server allows for convenient protein structure refinement through a text or file input submission, email notification, provided example submission and is freely available without any registration requirement. The server also provides comprehensive analysis of submissions through various energy and statistical feedback and interactive visualization of multiple refined models through the JSmol applet that is equipped with numerous protein model analysis tools. The web server has been extensively tested and used by many users. As a result, the 3Drefine web server conveniently provides a useful tool easily accessible to the community. The 3Drefine web server has been made publicly available at the URL: http://sysbio.rnet.missouri.edu/3Drefine/. PMID:27131371

  13. Controls-structures interaction guest investigator program: Overview and phase 1 experimental results and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith-Taylor, Rudeen; Tanner, Sharon E.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA Controls-Structures Interaction (CSI) Guest Investigator program is described in terms of its support of the development of CSI technologies. The program is based on the introduction of CSI researchers from industry and academia to available test facilities for experimental validation of technologies and methods. Phase 1 experimental results are reviewed with attention given to their use of the Mini-MAST test facility and the facility for the Advance Control Evaluation of Structures. Experiments were conducted regarding the following topics: collocated/noncollocated controllers, nonlinear math modeling, controller design, passive/active suspension systems design, and system identification and fault isolation. The results demonstrate that significantly enhanced performance from the control techniques can be achieved by integrating knowledge of the structural dynamics under consideration into the approaches.

  14. State Effect of Traumatic Experience on Personality Structure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong-seock; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Lee, Heung-Pyo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Personality is defined as the trait-like qualities of a person. However, it has been recently suggested that the state effect of a situation leads to changes in scores on personality assessments. We predicted that traumatic experiences would induce changes not only in personality scores but also in the factor structures of personality assessments. Methods MethodsaaWe conducted a cross-sectional, case-controlled study using two data sets: a traumatized adolescent sample (n=71) and a non-traumatized adolescent sample (n=296). Personality factor structures were compared between the two samples using exploratory factor analyses for 25 lower-ordered subscales of the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). In the non-traumatized sample, evaluation of the scree plot suggested a five-factor solution supporting TCI's original seven-factor model. Results The traumatized sample showed a three-factor structure representing a biological factor, a social factor and an existential factor. This decrease in number of personality factors was caused by strengthened correlations among personality subscales related to coping with traumatic situations. Cloninger's psychobiological model of personality (i.e., temperament-character) was adequate in capturing personality traits of non-traumatized adolescents, but the tripartite view of existential psychology (i.e., body-mind-spirit) clearly corresponded to the factor structure of the traumatized adolescents. Conclusion The three-factor solution of the present traumatized group is consistent with the tripartite model of personality (i.e., body-mind-spirit), while the five-factor solution of the non-traumatized group corresponds to Cloninger's seven-factor model. This is the first study to describe the state effects of traumatic experiences on personality structure. PMID:23251200

  15. Exploring High-Order Functional Interactions via Structurally-Weighted LASSO Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Dajiang; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Xi; Chen, Hanbo; Shen, Dinggang; Liu, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    A major objective of brain science research is to model and quantify functional interaction patterns among neural networks, in the sense that meaningful interaction patterns reflect the working mechanisms of neural systems and represent their relationships with the external world. Most current research approaches in the neuroimaging field, however, focus on pair-wise functional/effective connectivity and are thus unable to handle high-order, network-scale functional interactions. In this paper, we propose a novel structurally-weighted LASSO (SW-LASSO) regression model to represent the functional interaction among multiple regions of interests (ROIs) based on resting state fMRI (rsfMRI) data. In particular, the structural connectivity constraints derived from diffusion tenor imaging (DTI) data are used to guide the selection of the weights, thus adaptively adjusting the penalty levels of different coefficients which correspond to different ROIs. The robustness and accuracy of our models are evaluated and demonstrated via a series of carefully designed experiments. In an application example, the generated regression graphs show different assortative mixing patterns between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) patients and normal controls (NC). Our results indicate that the proposed model has promising potential to enable the construction of high-order functional networks and their applications in clinical datasets. PMID:24683954

  16. Multiwave interaction formulation of a coaxial Bragg structure and its experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    LaiYingxin; Zhang Shichang

    2007-11-15

    A multiwave interaction formulation of coaxial Bragg structure with either one or both of the conductors sinusoidally corrugated is presented to describe all the forward and backward waves of various propagating modes within the structure. The validity of the formulation is examined in terms of the reported experiments, and good agreement of the theoretical results with the experimental measurements is demonstrated. Comparison of the present formulation with the previous two-wave interaction treatment shows substantial difference, and confirms the significance of the multiwave interaction formulation presented in this paper. Based on the multiwave interaction formulation, interesting information is revealed that a higher-order mode (such as TE{sub 6,1}) operation at a frequency of hundreds of gigahertz in a coaxial Bragg reflector can be achieved due to the suppression of spurious modes. This peculiarity provides potential application in constructing a high-Q coaxial Bragg resonator for a high-power cyclotron autoresonance maser or a free-electron laser oscillator in the millimeter and submillimeter wave ranges.

  17. RF ACCELERATING STRUCTURE FOR THE MUON COOLING EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    CORLETT,J.; GREEN,M.; LI,D.; HOLTKAMP,N.; MORETTI,A.; KIRK,H.G.; PALMER,R.B.; ZHAO,Y.; SUMMERS,D.

    1999-03-29

    The ionization cooling of muons requires longitudinal acceleration of the muons after scattering in a hydrogen target. In order to maximize the accelerating voltage, we propose using linear accelerating structures with cells bounded by thin beryllium metal foils. This produces an on-axis field equivalent to the maximum surface field, whereas with beam-pipes the accelerating field is approximately half that of the peak surface field in the cavity. The muons interact only weakly with the thin foils. A {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure has been chosen, with alternate cells coupled together externally, and the two groups of cells fed in quadrature. At present they are considering an operating temperature of 77K to gain a factor of at least two in Q-value over room temperature. The authors describe the design of the {pi}/2 interleaved cavity structure, design of an alternative {pi}-mode open structure, preliminary experimental results from a low-power test cavity, and plans for high-power testing.

  18. The extended interacting wind structure of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Nielsen, K. E.; Corcoran, M. F.; Madura, T. I.; Owocki, S. P.; Russell, C. M. P.; Hillier, D. J.; Hamaguchi, K.; Kober, G. V.; Weis, K.; Stahl, O.; Okazaki, A. T.

    2009-07-01

    The highly eccentric binary system, η Car, provides clues to the transition of massive stars from hydrogen-burning via the CNO cycle to a helium-burning evolutionary state. The fast-moving wind of η Car B creates a cavity in η Car A's slower, but more massive, stellar wind, providing an in situ probe. The Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (HST/STIS), with its high spatial and spectral resolutions, is well matched to follow temporal spatial and velocity variations of multiple wind features. We use observations obtained across 1998-2004 to produce a rudimentary three-dimensional model of the wind interaction in the η Car system. Broad (+/-500 km s-1) [FeII] emission line structures extend 0.7arcsec (~1600 au) from the stellar core. In contrast, [FeIII], [ArIII], [NeIII] and [SIII] lines extend only 0.3arcsec (700 au) from NE to SW and are blue shifted from -500 to +200 km s-1. All observed spectral features vary with the 5.54-year orbital period. The highly ionized, forbidden emission disappears during the low state, associated with periastron passage. The high-ionization emission originates in the outer wind interaction region that is directly excited by the far-ultraviolet radiation from η Car B. The HST/STIS spectra reveal a time-varying, distorted paraboloidal structure, caused by the interaction of the massive stellar winds. The model and observations are consistent with the orbital plane aligned with the skirt of the Homunculus. However, the axis of the distorted paraboloid, relative to the major axis of the binary orbit, is shifted in a prograde rotation along the plane, which projected on the sky is from NE to NW. Based on observations made with the National Aeronautics and Space Agency/European Space Agency (NASA/ESA) HST. Support for Programme numbers 7302, 8036, 8483, 8619, 9083, 9337, 9420, 9973, 10957 and 11273 was provided by NASA directly to the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph Science Team and through grants from the

  19. Fluid–Structure Interaction-Based Biomechanical Perception Model for Tactile Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The reproduced tactile sensation of haptic interfaces usually selectively reproduces a certain object attribute, such as the object's material reflected by vibration and its surface shape by a pneumatic nozzle array. Tactile biomechanics investigates the relation between responses to an external load stimulus and tactile perception and guides the design of haptic interface devices via a tactile mechanism. Focusing on the pneumatic haptic interface, we established a fluid–structure interaction-based biomechanical model of responses to static and dynamic loads and conducted numerical simulation and experiments. This model provides a theoretical basis for designing haptic interfaces and reproducing tactile textures. PMID:24260228

  20. Holographic particle velocimetry - A 3D measurement technique for vortex interactions, coherent structures and turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui; Hussain, Fazle

    1991-10-01

    To understand the topology and dynamics of coherent structures (CS), the interactions of CS with fine-scale turbulence, and the effects of CS on entrainment, mixing and combustion, experimental tools are needed that can measure velocity (preferably vorticity) vector fields in both 3D space and time. While traditional measurement techniques are not able to serve this purpose, holographic particle velocimetry (HPV) appears to be promising. In a demonstration experiment, the instantaneous 3D velocity vector fields in some simple vortical flows have been obtained using the HPV technique. In this preliminary report, the principles of the HPV technique are illustrated and the key issues in its implementation are discussed.

  1. Experimental validation of the fluid-structure interaction simulation of a bioprosthetic aortic heart valve.

    PubMed

    Kemp, I; Dellimore, K; Rodriguez, R; Scheffer, C; Blaine, D; Weich, H; Doubell, A

    2013-09-01

    Experiments performed on a 19 mm diameter bioprosthetic valve were used to successfully validate the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulation of an aortic valve at 72 bpm. The FSI simulation was initialized via a novel approach utilizing a Doppler sonogram of the experimentally tested valve. Using this approach very close quantitative agreement (≤12.5%) between the numerical predictions and experimental values for several key valve performance parameters, including the peak systolic transvalvular pressure gradient, rapid valve opening time and rapid valve closing time, was obtained. The predicted valve leaflet kinematics during opening and closing were also in good agreement with the experimental measurements. PMID:23907849

  2. Investigating Intermolecular Interactions via Scanning Tunneling Microscopy: An Experiment for the Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullman, David; Peterson, Karen I.

    2004-01-01

    A scanning tunneling microscope (STM) project designed as a module for the undergraduate physical chemistry laboratory is described. The effects of van der Waals interactions on the condensed-phase structure are examined by the analysis of the pattern of the monolayer structures.

  3. Structuring of the Magnetospheric Plasma by the Solar Terrestrial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontaine, Dominique

    The existence of a magnetospheric cavity around a planet depends on the interactions of the planet including its atmospheric and magnetic environment with the interplanetary medium. A magnetized planet like the Earth sets a magnetic obstacle against the supersonic super-Alfvénic solar wind flow. The solar wind pressure shapes the magnetosphere, compressing it on the dayside to a few Earth's radii while the nightside tail extends to hundreds of Earth's radii. Away from a homogeneous and constant distribution, very different plasma regions have been identified inside the magnetosphere. Mass and energy transfers with the solar wind are considered as responsible for the magnetospheric plasma structure and dynamics at large-scale as well as for impulsive or transient events. However, these transfer processes remain poorly understood, and reconnection and other working assumptions are presently put forward and developed. Detailed descriptions of the magnetosphere at various complexity levels can be found in textboo ks on space plasma physics. This simplified introduction only aims at proposing keys to get an insight into the structure of the magnetospheric plasma, into a few basic concepts and specific processes at the root of the present understanding and also into questions and issues to be addressed in the future.

  4. Interactions of structural defects with metallic impurities in multicrystalline silicon

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Hieslmair, H.; Weber, E.R.; Rosenblum, M.D.; Kalejs, J.P.

    1996-11-01

    Interactions between structural defects and metallic impurities were studied in multicrystalline silicon for solar cells applications. The objective was to gain insight into the relationship between solar cell processing, metallic impurity behavior and the resultant effect on material/device performance. With an intense synchrotron x-ray source, high sensitivity x-ray fluorescence measurements were utilized to determine impurity distributions with a spatial resolution of {approx} 1{micro}m. Diffusion length mapping and final solar cell characteristics gauged material/device performance. The materials were tested in both the as-grown state and after full solar cell processing. Iron and nickel metal impurities were located at structural defects in as-grown material, while after solar cell processing, both impurities were still observed in low performance regions. These results indicate that multicrystalline silicon solar cell performance is directly related to metal impurities which are not completely removed during typical processing treatments. A discussion of possible mechanisms for this incomplete removal is presented.

  5. Numerical simulation of shock interaction with above-ground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, Joseph D.; Lohner, Rainald

    1994-05-01

    This final report for DNA contract DNA 001-89-C-0098 for the time period May 15, 1989 to Dec 31, 1992 describes the results of several of the computations conducted under this research effort. The numerical simulations conducted simulated shock wave diffraction phenomenon about complex-geometry two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. Since a significant part of this effort was composed of parametric studies that have been delivered to the sponsors, the Defense Nuclear Agency and the Air Force Ballistic Missile Organization (BMO), and conducted under the now defunct Rail Garrison project, we included in this report a detailed description of the results of the major computations, and a brief summary of all the repetitive computations. The final report is divided into three sections. Chapter 1 describes in detail the two-dimensional numerical methodology and typical two-dimensional computation, i.e., the application of the numerical methodology to the simulation of shock interaction with a typical 2-D train (a 2-D cut at the center of a 3-D train). Chapter 2 describes the numerical development of a passive shock reflector, a major effort undertaken in this project. The objective of this effort was to design a passive device that, while allowing the ventilation of the enclosure under steady conditions, will prevent blast waves impinging on the wall from entering the enclosure when the structure is impacted by a shock.

  6. Fluid Structure Interaction Simulations of Pediatric Ventricular Assist Device Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chris; Marsden, Alison; Bazilevs, Yuri

    2011-11-01

    Pediatric ventricular assist devices (PVADs) are used for mechanical circulatory support in children with failing hearts. They can be used to allow the heart to heal naturally or to extend the life of the patient until transplant. A PVAD has two chambers, blood and air, separated by a flexible membrane. The air chamber is pressurized, which drives the membrane and pumps the blood. The primary risk associated with these devices is stroke or embolism from thrombogenesis. Simulation of these devices is difficult due to a complex coupling of two fluid domains and a thin membrane, requiring fluid-structure interaction modeling. The goal of this work is to accurately simulate the hemodynamics of a PVAD. We perform FSI simulations using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element framework to account for large motions of the membrane and the fluid domains. The air, blood, and membrane are meshed as distinct subdomains, and a method for non-matched discretizations at the fluid-structure interface is presented. The use of isogeometric analysis to model the membrane mechanics is also discussed, and the results of simulations are presented.

  7. Fluid-structure interaction of solid rocket motor inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, R. L.; Gramoll, K.; Weaver, M.; Flandro, G. A.

    1992-07-01

    The deformation of solid rocket motor inhibitor material due to loads imposed by the gas flow is studied in this effort. The flow field is computed around an infinitely stiff inhibitor using a Navier-Stokes solution procedure which provides the stress distributions on the inhibitor. These stresses are then fed into a structural finite element analysis code, ANSYS to determine the deflection based on these stresses and a realistic stiffness. The deformed shape is fed back into the Navier-Stokes solution procedure and a new grid and stress distribution are obtained. The process continues until the inhibitor deflection becomes fixed or periodic. While this is a somewhat crude approach, the availability of the two codes without modifications provide a tempting way to take a first look at a fluid-structure interaction problem and to help in the design of truly coupled approach. The geometry used is typical of those found in large solid rocket boosters of the type used on the Space Shuttle system and the Titan III series.

  8. Interactions in Bacterial Biofilm Development: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Garnett, James A; Matthews, Steve

    2012-01-01

    A community-based life style is the normal mode of growth and survival for many bacterial species. These cellular accretions or biofilms are initiated upon recognition of solid phases by cell surface exposed adhesive moieties. Further cell-cell interactions, cell signalling and bacterial replication leads to the establishment of dense populations encapsulated in a mainly self-produced extracellular matrix; this comprises a complex mixture of macromolecules. These fascinating architectures protect the inhabitants from radiation damage, dehydration, pH fluctuations and antimicrobial compounds. As such they can cause bacterial persistence in disease and problems in industrial applications. In this review we discuss the current understandings of these initial biofilm-forming processes based on structural data. We also briefly describe latter biofilm maturation and dispersal events, which although lack high-resolution insights, are the present focus for many structural biologists working in this field. Finally we give an overview of modern techniques aimed at preventing and disrupting problem biofilms. PMID:23305361

  9. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  10. Shallow lunar structure determined from the passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1975-01-01

    Data relevant to the shallow structure of the moon obtained at the Apollo seismic stations are compared with previously published results of the active seismic experiments. It is concluded that the lunar surface is covered by a layer of low seismic velocity which appears to be equivalent to the lunar regolith defined previously by geological observations. This layer is underlain by a zone of distinctly higher seismic velocity at all of the Apollo landing sites. The regolith thicknesses at the Apollo 11, 12, and 15 sites are estimated from the shear-wave resonance to be 4.4, 3.7, and 4.4 m, respectively. These thicknesses and those determined at the other Apollo sites by the active seismic experiments appear to be correlated with the age determinations and the abundances of extralunar components at the sites.

  11. Responses to olfactory signals reflect network structure of flower-visitor interactions.

    PubMed

    Junker, Robert R; Höcherl, Nicole; Blüthgen, Nico

    2010-07-01

    1. Network analyses provide insights into the diversity and complexity of ecological interactions and have motivated conclusions about community stability and co-evolution. However, biological traits and mechanisms such as chemical signals regulating the interactions between individual species--the microstructure of a network--are poorly understood. 2. We linked the responses of receivers (flower visitors) towards signals (flower scent) to the structure of a highly diverse natural flower-insect network. For each interaction, we define link temperature--a newly developed metric--as the deviation of the observed interaction strength from neutrality, assuming that animals randomly interact with flowers. 3. Link temperature was positively correlated to the specific visitors' responses to floral scents, experimentally examined in a mobile olfactometer. Thus, communication between plants and consumers via phytochemical signals reflects a significant part of the microstructure in a complex network. Negative as well as positive responses towards floral scents contributed to these results, where individual experience was important apart from innate behaviour. 4. Our results indicate that: (1) biological mechanisms have a profound impact on the microstructure of complex networks that underlies the outcome of aggregate statistics, and (2) floral scents act as a filter, promoting the visitation of some flower visitors, but also inhibiting the visitation of others. PMID:20412348

  12. The Plasma Interaction Experiment /PIX/ - Description and flight qualification test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ignaczak, L. R.; Haley, F. A.; Domino, E. J.; Culp, D. H.; Shaker, F. J.

    1978-01-01

    The Plasma Interaction Experiment (PIX) is a battery powered preprogrammed auxiliary payload on the Landsat-C launch. This experiment is part of a larger program to investigate space plasma interactions with spacecraft surfaces and components. The varying plasma densities encountered during available telemetry coverage periods are deemed sufficient to determine first order interactions between the space plasma environment and the biased experimental surfaces. The specific objectives of the PIX flight experiment are to measure the plasma coupling current and the negative voltage breakdown characteristics of a solar array segment and a gold plated steel disk. Measurements will be made over a range of surface voltages up to plus or minus 1 kilovolt. The orbital environment will provide a range of plasma densities. The experimental surfaces will be voltage-biased in a preprogrammed step sequence to optimize the data returned for each plasma region and for the available telemetry coverage.

  13. Information-driven structural modelling of protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Karaca, Ezgi; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J

    2015-01-01

    Protein-protein docking aims at predicting the three-dimensional structure of a protein complex starting from the free forms of the individual partners. As assessed in the CAPRI community-wide experiment, the most successful docking algorithms combine pure laws of physics with information derived from various experimental or bioinformatics sources. Of these so-called "information-driven" approaches, HADDOCK stands out as one of the most successful representatives. In this chapter, we briefly summarize which experimental information can be used to drive the docking prediction in HADDOCK, and then focus on the docking protocol itself. We discuss and illustrate with a tutorial example a "classical" protein-protein docking prediction, as well as more recent developments for modelling multi-body systems and large conformational changes. PMID:25330973

  14. Diagnosing the Magnetic Structure of the Sustained Spheromak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Hillary; Romero Talamas, Carlos

    2005-10-01

    Unlike in traditional fusion devices, SSPX plasmas are confined by a magnetic field that is predominately generated by the plasma itself. The process by which plasma creates and changes the magnetic field is complicated and therefore makes it difficult to know its exact structure everywhere in the plasma at any point in time. This poster describes three different methods of studying the magnetic structure of the experiment; using edge probes in conjunction with Corsica- an equilibrium fitting code, imaging the plasma with a high-speed intensified CCD camera, and inserting an array of magnetic probes internal to the plasma. The research was performed under appointment to the Fusion Energy Sciences Fellowship Program and supported by US DOE. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  15. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  16. Laboratory plasma interactions experiments: Results and implications to future space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, Philip

    1986-01-01

    The experimental results discussed show the significance of the effects caused by spacecraft plasma interactions, in particular the generation of Electromagnetic Interference. As the experimental results show, the magnitude of the adverse effects induced by Plasma Interactions (PI) will be more significant for spacecraft of the next century. Therefore, research is needed to control possible adverse effects. Several techniques to control the selected PI effects are discussed. Tests, in the form of flight experiments, are needed to validate these proposed ideas.

  17. Integrating theory into disturbance interaction experiments to better inform ecosystem management.

    PubMed

    Foster, Claire N; Sato, Chloe F; Lindenmayer, David B; Barton, Philip S

    2016-04-01

    Managing multiple, interacting disturbances is a key challenge to biodiversity conservation, and one that will only increase as global change drivers continue to alter disturbance regimes. Theoretical studies have highlighted the importance of a mechanistic understanding of stressor interactions for improving the prediction and management of interactive effects. However, many conservation studies are not designed or interpreted in the context of theory and instead focus on case-specific management questions. This is a problem as it means that few studies test the relationships highlighted in theoretical models as being important for ecological management. We explore the extent of this problem among studies of interacting disturbances by reviewing recent experimental studies of the interaction between fire and grazing in terrestrial ecosystems. Interactions between fire and grazing can occur via a number of pathways; one disturbance can modify the other's likelihood, intensity or spatial distribution, or one disturbance can alter the other's impacts on individual organisms. The strength of such interactions will vary depending on disturbance attributes (e.g. size or intensity), and this variation is likely to be nonlinear. We show that few experiments testing fire-grazing interactions are able to identify the mechanistic pathway driving an observed interaction, and most are unable to detect nonlinear effects. We demonstrate how these limitations compromise the ability of experimental studies to effectively inform ecological management. We propose a series of adjustments to the design of disturbance interaction experiments that would enable tests of key theoretical pathways and provide the deeper ecological understanding necessary for effective management. Such considerations are relevant to studies of a broad range of ecological interactions and are critical to informing the management of disturbance regimes in the context of accelerating global change. PMID

  18. Solution Structures of Rat Amylin Peptide: Simulation, Theory, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Allam S.; Wang, Lu; Lin, Yu-Shan; Ling, Yun; Chopra, Manan; Zanni, Martin T.; Skinner, James L.; De Pablo, Juan J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Amyloid deposits of amylin in the pancreas are an important characteristic feature found in patients with Type-2 diabetes. The aggregate has been considered important in the disease pathology and has been studied extensively. However, the secondary structures of the individual peptide have not been clearly identified. In this work, we present detailed solution structures of rat amylin using a combination of Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. A new Monte Carlo method is presented to determine the free energy of distinct biomolecular conformations. Both folded and random-coil conformations of rat amylin are observed in water and their relative stability is examined in detail. The former contains an α-helical segment comprised of residues 7–17. We find that at room temperature the folded structure is more stable, whereas at higher temperatures the random-coil structure predominates. From the configurations and weights we calculate the α-carbon NMR chemical shifts, with results that are in reasonable agreement with experiments of others. We also calculate the infrared spectrum in the amide I stretch regime, and the results are in fair agreement with the experimental line shape presented herein. PMID:20141758

  19. Implementing Interactive Lecture Experiments in Large Introductory Physics Courses (Part I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Rachel; Milner-Bolotin, M. M.; McPhee, K.; Zhdanovich, S.; Kotlicki, A.; Rieger, G.; Bates, F.

    2006-12-01

    This presentation describes a pedagogical approach, Interactive Lecture Experiments (ILE), which builds on Interactive Lecture Demonstrations proposed by Sokoloff and Thornton (2004) and extends it by providing students with the opportunity to analyze experiments demonstrated in the lecture outside of the classroom and report the result of their analysis suing Peer Response System during the following lecture. Real time experimental data is collected, using Logger Pro technology combined with digital video recording. Then the data is uploaded to the Internet and made available to the students for further analysis. Student understanding of the experiment is assessed in the following lecture using clickers and conceptual questions. The goal of this project is to use ILE activities to make large lectures more interactive and to promote student interest in science, critical thinking and data analysis skills. Sokoloff, D.R. and R.K. Thornton (2004). Interactive Lecture Demonstrations: Active Learning in Introductory Physics, John Wiley and Sons, INC. Interactive Lecture Experiments at the University of British Columbia: http://www.physics.ubc.ca/ year1lab/p100/LectureLabs/lectureLabs.html

  20. Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition Experiment Probes Particle Interactions in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Everything in the universe is made up of the same basic building blocks - atoms. All physical properties of matter such as weight, hardness, and color are determined by the kind of atoms present and the way they interact with each other. The Colloidal Disorder-Order Transition (CDOT) shuttle flight experiment tested fundamental theories that model atomic interactions. The experiment was part of the Second United States Microgravity Laboratory (USML-2) aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, which flew from October 20 to November 5, 1995.

  1. PiDNA: Predicting protein-DNA interactions with structural models.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Kang; Chen, Chien-Yu

    2013-07-01

    Predicting binding sites of a transcription factor in the genome is an important, but challenging, issue in studying gene regulation. In the past decade, a large number of protein-DNA co-crystallized structures available in the Protein Data Bank have facilitated the understanding of interacting mechanisms between transcription factors and their binding sites. Recent studies have shown that both physics-based and knowledge-based potential functions can be applied to protein-DNA complex structures to deliver position weight matrices (PWMs) that are consistent with the experimental data. To further use the available structural models, the proposed Web server, PiDNA, aims at first constructing reliable PWMs by applying an atomic-level knowledge-based scoring function on numerous in silico mutated complex structures, and then using the PWM constructed by the structure models with small energy changes to predict the interaction between proteins and DNA sequences. With PiDNA, the users can easily predict the relative preference of all the DNA sequences with limited mutations from the native sequence co-crystallized in the model in a single run. More predictions on sequences with unlimited mutations can be realized by additional requests or file uploading. Three types of information can be downloaded after prediction: (i) the ranked list of mutated sequences, (ii) the PWM constructed by the favourable mutated structures, and (iii) any mutated protein-DNA complex structure models specified by the user. This study first shows that the constructed PWMs are similar to the annotated PWMs collected from databases or literature. Second, the prediction accuracy of PiDNA in detecting relatively high-specificity sites is evaluated by comparing the ranked lists against in vitro experiments from protein-binding microarrays. Finally, PiDNA is shown to be able to select the experimentally validated binding sites from 10,000 random sites with high accuracy. With PiDNA, the users can

  2. Structure and Interactions in Polypeptide Cationic Lipid Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, G.; Hjelm, R. P.; Smith, G. S.; Safinya, C. R.

    1998-03-01

    Complexes of polypeptides and cationic lipids have elicited much interest recently because of their potential in developing novel biomolecular materials. We have investigated the solution structure of complexes made from the anionic polypeptide poly-L-glutamic acid (PGA), the cationic lipid DDAB, and the neutral lipid DLPC. X-ray scattering and SANS revealed the structure of the complexes to be multilamellar in nature with the PGA molecules sandwiched in between the lipid bilayers and that the PGA molecules are in the disordered state on the plane of the bilayers. Lipid dilution experiments at charge neutrality indicated that the "d" spacing of the complexes monotonically increases from 39Åupto 60Åat very high dilutions. While lipid chain stretching alone does not account for the increase in "d" spacing, we propose a "pinching" mechanism where the PGA and DDAB molecules are localized to form a tightly packed layer. Away from these "pinches" the system behaves as a pure DLPC membrane with an equilibrium spacing of 60ÅSupported by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  3. Structural analysis of CXCR4 - Antagonist interactions using saturation-transfer double-difference NMR.

    PubMed

    Cox, Bryan D; Mehta, Anil K; DiRaddo, John O; Liotta, Dennis C; Wilson, Lawrence J; Snyder, James P

    2015-10-01

    CXCR4 is a GPCR involved in leukocyte trafficking. Small molecule antagonists of the receptor may treat inflammatory disease, cancer and HIV. Here we probe the binding of a tetrahydroisoquinoline-based antagonist (TIQ-10) to CXCR4 using saturation transfer double-difference (STDD) NMR. STDD spectra were acquired using extracts from Chinese Hamster Ovary cells expressing membrane-embedded CXCR4. The experiments demonstrate competitive binding between TIQ-10 and established antagonists and provide the TIQ-10 - CXCR4 binding epitope. Molecular modeling of TIQ-10 into the binding pocket provides a pose consistent with STDD-derived interactions. This study paves the way for future investigations of GPCR-ligand interactions in a biological milieu for use in chemical biology, biochemistry, structural biology, and rational drug design. PMID:26301631

  4. Seismic response of tall building considering soil-pile-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yingcai

    2002-06-01

    The seismic behavior of tall buildings can be greatly affected by non-linear soil-pile interaction during strong earthquakes. In this study a 20-storey building is examined as a typical structure supported on a pile foundation for different conditions: (1) rigid base, i.e. no deformation in the foundation: (2) linear soil-pile system; and (3) nonlinear soil-pile system. The effects of pile foundation displacements on the behavior of tall building are investigated, and compared with the behavior of buildings supported on shallow foundation. With a model of non-reflective boundary between the near field and far field, Novak’s method of soil-pile interaction is improved. The computation method for vibration of pile foundations and DYNAN computer program are introduced comprehensively. A series of dynamic experiments have been done on full-scale piles, including single pile and group, linear vibration and nonlinear vibration, to verify the validity of boundary zone model.

  5. Nonstandard interactions spoiling the C P violation sensitivity at DUNE and other long baseline experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masud, Mehedi; Mehta, Poonam

    2016-07-01

    It is by now established that neutrino oscillations occur due to nonzero masses and parameters in the leptonic mixing matrix. The extraction of oscillation parameters may be complicated due to subleading effects such as nonstandard neutrino interactions and one needs to have a fresh look how a particular parameter value is inferred from experimental data. In the present work, we focus on an important parameter entering the oscillation framework-the leptonic C P -violating phase δ , about which we know very little. We demonstrate that the sensitivity to C P violation gets significantly impacted due to nonstandard neutrino interaction effects for the upcoming long baseline experiment, Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We also draw a comparison with the sensitivities of other ongoing neutrino beam experiments such as NO ν A and T2K as well as a future generation experiment, T2HK.

  6. Nanoparticle-cell interactions: molecular structure of the protein corona and cellular outcomes.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Candace C; Payne, Christine K

    2014-08-19

    The use of nanoparticles (NPs) in biology and medicine requires a molecular-level understanding of how NPs interact with cells in a physiological environment. A critical difference between well-controlled in vitro experiments and in vivo applications is the presence of a complex mixture of extracellular proteins. It has been established that extracellular serum proteins present in blood will adsorb onto the surface of NPs, forming a "protein corona". Our goal was to understand how this protein layer affected cellular-level events, including NP binding, internalization, and transport. A combination of microscopy, which provides spatial resolution, and spectroscopy, which provides molecular information, is necessary to probe protein-NP-cell interactions. Initial experiments used a model system composed of polystyrene NPs functionalized with either amine or carboxylate groups to provide a cationic or anionic surface, respectively. Serum proteins adsorb onto the surface of both cationic and anionic NPs, forming a net anionic protein-NP complex. Although these protein-NP complexes have similar diameters and effective surface charges, they show the exact opposite behavior in terms of cellular binding. In the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs is enhanced, whereas the cellular binding of BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs is inhibited. These trends are independent of NP diameter or cell type. Similar results were obtained for anionic quantum dots and colloidal gold nanospheres. Using competition assays, we determined that BSA-NP complexes formed from anionic NPs bind to albumin receptors on the cell surface. BSA-NP complexes formed from cationic NPs are redirected to scavenger receptors. The observation that similar NPs with identical protein corona compositions bind to different cellular receptors suggested that a difference in the structure of the adsorbed protein may be responsible for the

  7. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction’s mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein–protein interactions or protein–DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1 040 000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43 000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12 000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  8. Interactions and structural variability of β-carboxysomal shell protein CcmL.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Thomas J; Samborska, Bożena; Demers, Ryan W; Kimber, Matthew S

    2014-09-01

    CcmL is a small, pentameric protein that is argued to fill the vertices of β-carboxysomal shell. Here we report the structures of two CcmL orthologs, those from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. These structures broadly resemble those previously reported for other strains. However, the Nostoc CcmL structure shows an interesting pattern of behavior where two loops that map to the base of the pentamer adopt either an out or in conformation, with a consistent (over six pentamers) out-in-out-in-in pattern of protomers. The pentamers in this structure are also consistently organized into a back-to-back decamer, though evidence suggests that this is likely not present in solution. Förster resonance energy transfer experiments were able to show a weak interaction between CcmL and CcmK2 when CcmK2 was present at >100 μM. Since CcmK2 forms defined bodies with approximately 200 nm diameter at this concentration, this would support the idea that CcmL can only interact with CcmK2 at rare defect points in the growing shell. PMID:24504539

  9. Two-dimensional modeling of an aircraft engine structural bladed disk-casing modal interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrand, Mathias; Pierre, Christophe; Cartraud, Patrice; Lombard, Jean-Pierre

    2009-01-01

    In modern turbo machines such as aircraft jet engines, structural contacts between the casing and bladed disk may occur through a variety of mechanisms: coincidence of vibration modes, thermal deformation of the casing, rotor imbalance due to design uncertainties to name a few. These nonlinear interactions may result in severe damage to both structures and it is important to understand the physical circumstances under which they occur. In this study, we focus on a modal coincidence during which the vibrations of each structure take the form of a k-nodal diameter traveling wave characteristic of axi-symmetric geometries. A realistic two-dimensional model of the casing and bladed disk is introduced in order to predict the occurrence of this very specific interaction phenomenon versus the rotation speed of the engine. The equations of motion are solved using an explicit time integration scheme in conjunction with the Lagrange multiplier method where friction is accounted for. This model is validated from the comparison with an analytical solution. The numerical results show that the structures may experience different kinds of behaviors (namely damped, sustained and divergent motions) mainly depending on the rotational velocity of the bladed disk.

  10. Magnetic Diagnostics and Field Structure in the Madison Dynamo Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmus, A. M.; Clark, M.; Kaplan, E. J.; Kendrick, R. D.; Nornberg, M. D.; Rahbarnia, K.; Taylor, N. Z.; Forest, C. B.

    2010-11-01

    The Madison Dynamo Experiment(MDE) is expected to spontaneously self-generate a magnetic field in a two vortex flow geometry driven by counter rotating impellers in a 1 m diameter sphere filled with liquid sodium. This poster will focus on the spatial structure of the magnetic field associated with the dynamo eigenmodes and the turbulent fluctuations. A new internal array of Hall probes will increase the number of probe locations from 60 to 100 (in addition to 74 existing surface probes), including 40 spanning the center of the experiment. Three orthogonal measurements of the magnetic field are taken at each internal location, whereas previous internal probes took one directional data (2 directional after probe rotation on a different run). This will allow resolution of harmonic modes up to a poloidal order of l=7 and a toroidal order of m=5. Cross correlation analysis between the surface probes and internal probes will be used to determine the internal structure associated with each l and m. This work is supported by the NSF/DOE partnership in plasma physics.

  11. Trait-mediated interactions: influence of prey size, density and experience.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Michael W; Bolker, Benjamin M

    2008-05-01

    1. The role of non-consumptive predator effects in structuring ecological communities has become an important area of study for ecologists. Numerous studies have shown that adaptive changes in prey in response to a predator can improve survival in subsequent encounters with that predator. 2. Prey-mediated changes in the shapes of predators' functional response surfaces determine the qualitative predictions of theoretical models. However, few studies have quantified the effects of adaptive prey responses on the shape of predator functional responses. 3. This study explores how prey density, size and previous predator experience interact to change the functional response curves of different-sized predators. 4. We use a response surface design to determine how previous exposure to small or large odonate predators affected the short-term survival of squirrel tree frog (Hyla squirella) tadpoles across a range of sizes and densities (i.e. the shape of odonate functional response curves). 5. Predator-induced tadpoles in a given size class did not differ in shape, although induction changed tadpole behaviour significantly. Induced tadpoles survived better in lethal encounters with either predator than did similar-sized predator-naive tadpoles. 6. Induction by either predator resulted in increased survival with both predators at a given size. However, different mechanisms led to increased survival for induced tadpoles. Attack rate for the small predators, whereas handling time increased for the large predators. PMID:18312336

  12. Embodied social interaction constitutes social cognition in pairs of humans: A minimalist virtual reality experiment

    PubMed Central

    Froese, Tom; Iizuka, Hiroyuki; Ikegami, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have traditionally limited the mechanisms of social cognition to one brain, but recent approaches claim that interaction also realizes cognitive work. Experiments under constrained virtual settings revealed that interaction dynamics implicitly guide social cognition. Here we show that embodied social interaction can be constitutive of agency detection and of experiencing another's presence. Pairs of participants moved their “avatars” along an invisible virtual line and could make haptic contact with three identical objects, two of which embodied the other's motions, but only one, the other's avatar, also embodied the other's contact sensor and thereby enabled responsive interaction. Co-regulated interactions were significantly correlated with identifications of the other's avatar and reports of the clearest awareness of the other's presence. These results challenge folk psychological notions about the boundaries of mind, but make sense from evolutionary and developmental perspectives: an extendible mind can offload cognitive work into its environment. PMID:24419102

  13. DISCOS- DYNAMIC INTERACTION SIMULATION OF CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES (IBM VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    The Dynamic Interaction Simulation of Controls and Structure (DISCOS) program was developed for the dynamic simulation and stability analysis of passive and actively controlled spacecraft. In the use of DISCOS, the physical system undergoing analysis may be generally described as a cluster of contiguous flexible structures (bodies) that comprise a mechanical system, such as a spacecraft. The entire system (spacecraft) or portions thereof may be either spinning or nonspinning. Member bodies of the system may undergo large relative excursions, such as those of appendage deployment or rotor/ stator motion. The general system of bodies is, by its inherent nature, a feedback system in which inertial forces (such as those due to centrifugal and Coriolis acceleration) and the restoring and damping forces are motion-dependent. The system may possess a control system in which certain position and rate errors are actively controlled through the use of reaction control jets, servomotors, or momentum wheels. Bodies of the system may be interconnected by linear or nonlinear springs and dampers, by a gimbal and slider block mechanism, or by any combination of these. The DISCOS program can be used to obtain nonlinear and linearized time response of the system, interaction constant forces in the system, total system resonance properties, and frequency domain response and stability information for the system. DISCOS is probably the most powerful computational tool to date for the computer simulation of actively controlled coupled multi-flexible-body systems. The program is not easy to understand and effectively apply, but is not intended for simple problems. The DISCOS user is expected to have extensive working knowledge of rigid-body and flexible-body dynamics, finite-element techniques, numerical methods, and frequency-domain analysis. Various applications of DISCOS include simulation of the Shuttle payload deployment/retrieval mechanism, solar panel array deployment, antenna

  14. An enhanced Immersed Structural Potential Method for fluid-structure interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, A. J.; Arranz Carreño, A.; Bonet, J.; Hassan, O.

    2013-10-01

    Within the group of immersed boundary methods employed for the numerical simulation of fluid-structure interaction problems, the Immersed Structural Potential Method (ISPM) was recently introduced (Gil et al., 2010) [1] in order to overcome some of the shortcomings of existing immersed methodologies. In the ISPM, an incompressible immersed solid is modelled as a deviatoric strain energy functional whose spatial gradient defines a fluid-structure interaction force field in the Navier-Stokes equations used to resolve the underlying incompressible Newtonian viscous fluid. In this paper, two enhancements of the methodology are presented. First, the introduction of a new family of spline-based kernel functions for the transfer of information between both physics. In contrast to classical IBM kernels, these new kernels are shown not to introduce spurious oscillations in the solution. Second, the use of tensorised Gaussian quadrature rules that allow for accurate and efficient numerical integration of the immersed structural potential. A series of numerical examples will be presented in order to demonstrate the capabilities of the enhanced methodology and to draw some key comparisons against other existing immersed methodologies in terms of accuracy, preservation of the incompressibility constraint and computational speed.

  15. Experience versus talent shapes the structure of the Web

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Joseph S.; Sarshar, Nima; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    2008-01-01

    We use sequential large-scale crawl data to empirically investigate and validate the dynamics that underlie the evolution of the structure of the web. We find that the overall structure of the web is defined by an intricate interplay between experience or entitlement of the pages (as measured by the number of inbound hyperlinks a page already has), inherent talent or fitness of the pages (as measured by the likelihood that someone visiting the page would give a hyperlink to it), and the continual high rates of birth and death of pages on the web. We find that the web is conservative in judging talent and the overall fitness distribution is exponential, showing low variability. The small variance in talent, however, is enough to lead to experience distributions with high variance: The preferential attachment mechanism amplifies these small biases and leads to heavy-tailed power-law (PL) inbound degree distributions over all pages, as well as over pages that are of the same age. The balancing act between experience and talent on the web allows newly introduced pages with novel and interesting content to grow quickly and surpass older pages. In this regard, it is much like what we observe in high-mobility and meritocratic societies: People with entitlement continue to have access to the best resources, but there is just enough screening for fitness that allows for talented winners to emerge and join the ranks of the leaders. Finally, we show that the fitness estimates have potential practical applications in ranking query results. PMID:18779560

  16. Experience versus talent shapes the structure of the Web.

    PubMed

    Kong, Joseph S; Sarshar, Nima; Roychowdhury, Vwani P

    2008-09-16

    We use sequential large-scale crawl data to empirically investigate and validate the dynamics that underlie the evolution of the structure of the web. We find that the overall structure of the web is defined by an intricate interplay between experience or entitlement of the pages (as measured by the number of inbound hyperlinks a page already has), inherent talent or fitness of the pages (as measured by the likelihood that someone visiting the page would give a hyperlink to it), and the continual high rates of birth and death of pages on the web. We find that the web is conservative in judging talent and the overall fitness distribution is exponential, showing low variability. The small variance in talent, however, is enough to lead to experience distributions with high variance: The preferential attachment mechanism amplifies these small biases and leads to heavy-tailed power-law (PL) inbound degree distributions over all pages, as well as over pages that are of the same age. The balancing act between experience and talent on the web allows newly introduced pages with novel and interesting content to grow quickly and surpass older pages. In this regard, it is much like what we observe in high-mobility and meritocratic societies: People with entitlement continue to have access to the best resources, but there is just enough screening for fitness that allows for talented winners to emerge and join the ranks of the leaders. Finally, we show that the fitness estimates have potential practical applications in ranking query results. PMID:18779560

  17. Assessing Spurious Interaction Effects in Structural Equation Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harring, Jeffrey R.; Weiss, Brandi A.; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have stressed the importance of simultaneously estimating interaction and quadratic effects in multiple regression analyses, even if theory only suggests an interaction effect should be present. Specifically, past studies suggested that failing to simultaneously include quadratic effects when testing for interaction effects could…

  18. Students' experiences with interactivity and learning in a high school physics multimedia distance learning course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal-Stewart, Irene

    The purpose guiding this research has been to learn about and describe the phenomena of interactivity from the learners' perspectives and to learn which of the interactivity affordances and practices were actually used by students and why in the process of learning physics using an interactive multimedia distance learning course system. The bigger purpose behind learning about and describing interactivity has been to gain knowledge and perspective for its instructional design to benefit the learner, the school as curriculum implementer, and instructional media designers to create better products. Qualitative methodology in the interpretivist tradition was used, that is, in-depth interviews and on-site observations, to gain understanding of interactivity from the learners' perspective and to gain understanding of the student learning context impacting and shaping the students' interactivity experiences. NVivo was used to sort, organize and index data. All data were read on three levels: literally, interpretively, and reflexively; and were read comparatively to other perspectives to get descriptions and interpretations that were holistic to the implementation and had potential insight to improve practice for instructional designers, teachers, administrators, specifically to improve the learning experience for students. Site-Specific Findings: Students watched videos, resisted using phone and e-mail, and worked math problems to demonstrate learning, which resulted in very little interactivity, virtually no dialogue about physics, no physical activity, one-way communication, multifaceted dissatisfaction, student need for teacher involvement in the learning enterprise, student appreciation for interactivity, and expressed desire for a real, live teacher. I also found that some students did experience the system as interactive, did experience learner control and self-directed learning, and despite dissatisfaction, liked and appreciated the course. Wider Applications

  19. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  20. Fluid-Structure interaction modeling in deformable porous arteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakerzadeh, Rana; Zunino, Paolo

    2015-11-01

    A computational framework is developed to study the coupling of blood flow in arteries interacting with a poroelastic arterial wall featuring possibly large deformations. Blood is modeled as an incompressible, viscous, Newtonian fluid using the Navier-Stokes equations and the arterial wall consists of a thick material which is modeled as a Biot system that describes the mechanical behavior of a homogeneous and isotropic elastic skeleton, and connecting pores filled with fluid. Discretization via finite element method leads to the system of nonlinear equations and a Newton-Raphson scheme is adopted to solve the resulting nonlinear system through consistent linearization. Moreover, interface conditions are imposed on the discrete level via mortar finite elements or Nitsche's coupling. The discrete linearized coupled FSI system is solved by means of a splitting strategy, which allows solving the Navier-Stokes and Biot equations separately. The numerical results investigate the effects of proroelastic parameters on the pressure wave propagation in arteries, filtration of incompressible fluids through the porous media, and the structure displacement. The fellowship support from the Computational Modeling & Simulation PhD program at University of Pittsburgh for Rana Zakerzadeh is gratefully acknowledged.