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  1. Electroencephalographic topography measures of experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Pedroni, Andreas; Langer, Nicolas; Koenig, Thomas; Allemand, Michael; Jäncke, Lutz

    2011-07-20

    Economic theory distinguishes two concepts of utility: decision utility, objectively quantifiable by choices, and experienced utility, referring to the satisfaction by an obtainment. To date, experienced utility is typically measured with subjective ratings. This study intended to quantify experienced utility by global levels of neuronal activity. Neuronal activity was measured by means of electroencephalographic (EEG) responses to gain and omission of graded monetary rewards at the level of the EEG topography in human subjects. A novel analysis approach allowed approximating psychophysiological value functions for the experienced utility of monetary rewards. In addition, we identified the time windows of the event-related potentials (ERP) and the respective intracortical sources, in which variations in neuronal activity were significantly related to the value or valence of outcomes. Results indicate that value functions of experienced utility and regret disproportionally increase with monetary value, and thus contradict the compressing value functions of decision utility. The temporal pattern of outcome evaluation suggests an initial (∼250 ms) coarse evaluation regarding the valence, concurrent with a finer-grained evaluation of the value of gained rewards, whereas the evaluation of the value of omitted rewards emerges later. We hypothesize that this temporal double dissociation is explained by reward prediction errors. Finally, a late, yet unreported, reward-sensitive ERP topography (∼500 ms) was identified. The sources of these topographical covariations are estimated in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, the medial frontal gyrus, the anterior and posterior cingulate cortex and the hippocampus/amygdala. The results provide important new evidence regarding "how," "when," and "where" the brain evaluates outcomes with different hedonic impact. PMID:21775593

  2. An anatomy of old-age disability: Time use, affect and experienced utility.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gabriela; Ingenhaag, Michael; Maurer, Jürgen

    2015-12-01

    Complementing the commonly used concepts of evaluative wellbeing and decision utility, emotional wellbeing and experienced utility are important welfare criteria to assess individuals' subjective wellbeing, especially for valuing health and disability. Yet, almost all empirical evidences on the link between disability and experienced wellbeing come from developed countries. This paper studies the relationship between old-age disability and experienced utility in five low- and middle-income countries. Using data on individual time use and activity-specific affective experiences from an abbreviated version of the Day Reconstruction Method, we document a strong negative association between disability and experienced utility. These differences in experienced utility by disability status are exclusively due to worse activity-specific affective experiences among persons with disabilities. By contrast, disability-related differences in time use provide small compensating effects. Interventions or technologies that facilitate daily life hold most promise to improve experienced utility among persons with disabilities in the developing world. PMID:26496227

  3. Anaesthesia care of older patients as experienced by nurse anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Annika Larsson; Palo-Bengtsson, Liisa; Ekman, Sirkka-Liisa

    2005-05-01

    This article analyses problem situations in the context of anaesthesia care. It considers what it means for nurse anaesthetists to be in problematic situations in the anaesthesia care of older patients. Benner's interpretive phenomenological approach proved useful for this purpose. Paradigm cases are used to aid the analysis of individual nurses' experiences. Thirty narrated problematic anaesthesia care situations derived from seven interviews were studied. These show that experienced nurse anaesthetists perceive anaesthesia care as problematic and highly demanding when involving older patients. To be in problematic anaesthesia care situations means becoming morally distressed, which arises from the experience or from being prevented from acting according to one's legal and moral duty of care. An important issue that emerged from this study was the need for an ethical forum to discuss and articulate moral issues, so that moral stress of the kind experienced by these nurse anaesthetists can be dealt with and hopefully reduced. PMID:15921343

  4. Physicians Experiencing Intense Emotions While Seeing Their Patients: What Happens?

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Joana Vilela; Carvalho, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Physicians often deal with emotions arising from both patients and themselves; however, management of intense emotions when they arise in the presence of patients is overlooked in research. The aim of this study is to inspect physicians’ intense emotions in this context, how these emotions are displayed, coping strategies used, adjustment behaviors, and the impact of the emotional reactions on the physician-patient relationship. Methods: A total of 127 physicians completed a self-report survey, built from a literature review. Participants were recruited in 3 different ways: through a snowball sampling procedure, via institutional e-mails, and in person during service meetings. Results: Fifty-two physicians (43.0%) reported experiencing intense emotions frequently. Although most physicians (88.6%) tried to control their reactions, several reported not controlling themselves. Coping strategies to deal with the emotion at the moment included behavioral and cognitive approaches. Only the type of reaction (but not the emotion’s valence, duration, relative control, or coping strategies used) seemed to affect the physician-patient relationship. Choking-up/crying, touching, smiling, and providing support were significantly associated with an immediate positive impact. Withdrawing from the situation, imposing, and defending oneself were associated with a negative impact. Some reactions also had an extended impact into future interactions. Conclusion: Experiencing intense emotions in the presence of patients was frequent among physicians, and the type of reaction affected the clinical relationship. Because many physicians reported experiencing long-lasting emotions, these may have important clinical implications for patients visiting physicians while these emotions last. Further studies are needed to clarify these results. PMID:27479947

  5. Financial burden experienced by patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Kumthekar, Priya; Stell, Becky V.; Jacobs, Daniel I.; Helenowski, Irene B.; Rademaker, Alfred W.; Grimm, Sean A.; Bennett, Charles L.; Raizer, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing treatment for malignant gliomas (MGs) can encounter medical costs beyond what their insurance covers. The magnitude and type of costs experienced by patients are unknown. The purpose of this study was to have patients or their families report on the medical costs incurred during the patients MG treatment. Methods Patients with MG were eligible if they were within 6 months of diagnosis or tumor recurrence. Patients had to be ≥18 years of age, fluent in English, and not aphasic. Weekly logbooks were issued to patients for recording associated costs for ∼6 months or until tumor progression. “Out-of-pocket” (OOP) costs included medical and nonmedical expenses that were not reimbursed by insurance. Direct medical costs included hospital and physician bills. Direct nonmedical costs included transportation, parking, and other related items. Indirect medical costs included lost wages. Costs were analyzed to provide mean and medians with range of expenses. Results Forty-three patients provided cost data for a median of 12 weeks. There were 25 men and 18 women with a median age of 57 years (range, 24y–73y); 79% were married, and 49% reported annual income >$75 000. Health insurance coverage was preferred provider organizations for 58% of patients, and median deductible was $1 500. Median monthly OOP cost was $1 342 (mean, $2 451; range, $333.41–$17 267.16). The highest OOP median costs were medication copayments ($710; range, $0–13 611.20), transportation ($327; range, $0–$1 927), and hospital bill copayments ($403; range, $0–$4 000). Median lost wages were $7 500, and median lost days of work were 12.8. Conclusions OOP costs for MG patients can be significant and comprise direct and indirect costs across several areas. Informing patients about expected costs could limit additional duress and allow financial support systems to be implemented. PMID:26034619

  6. Perception of environmental sounds by experienced cochlear implant patients

    PubMed Central

    Shafiro, Valeriy; Gygi, Brian; Cheng, Min-Yu; Vachhani, Jay; Mulvey, Megan

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Environmental sound perception serves an important ecological function by providing listeners with information about objects and events in their immediate environment. Environmental sounds such as car horns, baby cries or chirping birds can alert listeners to imminent dangers as well as contribute to one's sense of awareness and well being. Perception of environmental sounds as acoustically and semantically complex stimuli, may also involve some factors common to the processing of speech. However, very limited research has investigated the abilities of cochlear implant (CI) patients to identify common environmental sounds, despite patients' general enthusiasm about them. This project (1) investigated the ability of patients with modern-day CIs to perceive environmental sounds, (2) explored associations among speech, environmental sounds and basic auditory abilities, and (3) examined acoustic factors that might be involved in environmental sound perception. Design Seventeen experienced postlingually-deafened CI patients participated in the study. Environmental sound perception was assessed with a large-item test composed of 40 sound sources, each represented by four different tokens. The relationship between speech and environmental sound perception, and the role of working memory and some basic auditory abilities were examined based on patient performance on a battery of speech tests (HINT, CNC, and individual consonant and vowel tests), tests of basic auditory abilities (audiometric thresholds, gap detection, temporal pattern and temporal order for tones tests) and a backward digit recall test. Results The results indicated substantially reduced ability to identify common environmental sounds in CI patients (45.3%). Except for vowels, all speech test scores significantly correlated with the environmental sound test scores: r = 0.73 for HINT in quiet, r = 0.69 for HINT in noise, r = 0.70 for CNC, r = 0.64 for consonants and r = 0.48 for vowels. HINT and

  7. Experiencing Virtual Patients in Clinical Learning: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelbring, Samuel; Dastmalchi, Maryam; Hult, Hakan; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Dahlgren, Lars Owe

    2011-01-01

    Computerised virtual patients (VPs) are increasingly being used in medical education. With more use of this technology, there is a need to increase the knowledge of students' experiences with VPs. The aim of the study was to elicit the nature of virtual patients in a clinical setting, taking the students' experience as a point of departure.…

  8. Experiencing Madness: Mental Patients in Medieval Arabo-Islamic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Koetschet, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    This paper focuses on the mental patients in Arabo-Islamic Middle Ages. Patients suffering from mental illnesses generated a lot of interest for Arabo-Islamic physicians. The first objective of this study is to identify who were the mentally infirm and to compare the Arab physicians' typologies of mental patients to that of their Greek predecessors. The second part of this paper shifts the focus from theoretical descriptions to case histories and biographical sources, in order to understand how the physicians treated their mental patients, and to find out what was the social impact of this medical approach. Finally, because the special provision for the insane is a distinctive feature of the Islamic hospital, the third part of my paper examines whether the main purpose of these hospitals was the patients' confinement or their treatment. PMID:26946679

  9. Constipation Misperception Is Associated With Gender, Marital Status, Treatment Utilization and Constipation Symptoms Experienced

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hee; Choi, Suck Chei; Park, Moo In; Park, Kyung Sik; Shin, Jeong Eun; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Kee Wook; Koo, Hoon Sup; Kim, Wan Jung; Cho, Young Kwan; Kim, Yeon Soo; Lee, Ji Sung

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims It is essential that clinicians have an understanding of patients’ perceptions of constipation as well as constipation mis-perception (CM), which can be defined as failure to recognize the six constipation symptoms (infrequency, straining, hard stool, incomplete evacuation, anorectal obstruction or manual maneuver). The aims of our study were to identify the prevalence of CM and its association with demographics and clinical features. Methods This nationwide survey included 625 self-reported constipated subjects (431 females; mean age, 41.2 years) among random participants in the National Health Screening Program. The prevalence of CM for each constipation symptom was estimated, and the participants were classified into nil (0), low (1–2), mid (3–4) and high (5–6) level CM subgroups according to the number of misperceived symptoms. Results The highest rate of CM was observed for manual maneuver (48.3%), followed by anorectal obstruction (38.4%), stool infrequency (34.6%), incomplete evacuation (32.2%), hard stool (27.2%) and straining (25.4%). Among the nil (n = 153), low (n = 242), mid (n = 144) and high level (n = 86) subgroups, there were significant differences in the proportions of males (18.3%, 34.3%, 39.6% and 30.2%; P = 0.001, respectively), never-married status (25.7%, 38.2%, 36.8% and 45.9%; P = 0.030, respectively) and those who did not receive treatment for constipation (41.8%, 47.5%, 58.3% and 66.3%; P < 0.001, respectively). There was a significant linear trend of increasing degree of CM with decreasing symptoms experienced (P < 0.001). Conclusions CM is significantly associated with gender, marital status, treatment utilization and the range of constipation symptoms experienced. PMID:24935009

  10. Osteoporosis management in older patients who experienced a fracture

    PubMed Central

    Oertel, Mark J; Graves, Leland; Al-Hihi, Eyad; Leonardo, Vincent; Hopkins, Christina; DeSouza, Kristin; Bhattacharya, Rajib K

    2016-01-01

    Background Fractures in older patients are common, morbid, and associated with increased risk of subsequent fractures. Inpatient and outpatient management and treatment of fractures can be costly. With more emphasis placed on quality care for Medicare beneficiaries, we studied if patients were receiving proper screening for osteoporosis and treatment after diagnosis of fracture. This study aims to determine if adequate screening and treatment for osteoporosis occurs in the postfracture period. Methods A retrospective analysis of Medicare beneficiaries aged 67 years or older was gathered from a single institution in both inpatient and outpatient visits. Based on International Classification of Diseases ninth revision codes, primary diagnosis of fractures of neck and trunk, upper limb, and lower limb were obtained in addition to current procedural terminology codes for fracture procedures. We studied patients who had been screened for osteoporosis with a bone mineral study or received osteoporosis treatment after their fracture. Results Medicare beneficiaries totaling 1,375 patients were determined to have an inclusion fracture between June 1, 2013 and November 30, 2014. At the time of our analysis on December 1, 2014, 1,219 patients were living and included in the analysis. Of these patients, 256 (21.0%) either received osteoporosis testing with bone mineral density or received treatment for osteoporosis. On sex breakdown, 208/820 (25.4%) females received proper evaluation or treatment of osteoporosis in comparison to 48/399 (12.0%) males. This is in comparison to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ national average of 19.1% for osteoporosis management in females. Conclusion A minority of studied patients received evaluation or treatment for osteoporosis after their fracture. Postfracture investigation and treatment for osteoporosis in Medicare beneficiaries is inadequate. If improved, Medicare costs could be reduced by prevention of future fractures

  11. Experiencing brain cancer: what physicians should know about patients

    PubMed Central

    Lucchiari, Claudio; Botturi, Andrea; Manzini, Laura; Masiero, Marianna; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    During the last 20 years, numerous studies have highlighted the need to consider Quality of Life (QoL) issues in the treatment of brain cancer. However, gaps in scientific knowledge are still present as we have poor data surrounding the whole experience in patients and regarding their needs. The present study was aimed at evaluating QoL in brain cancer patients and correlated aspects. In particular, we aimed to assess QoL, mood state, and emotional issues in order to describe the patients’ experience to find out the critical aspects involved. Methods We obtained data from 85 patients during chemotherapy treatment at the National Neurological Institute ‘C. Besta’ of Milan, Italy. We used standardised questionnaires to assess different aspects of patients’ QoL. In particular, the functional assessment of cancer therapy-brain (FACT-Br) and the Hamilton scale were used. We also performed a semi-structured ad hoc interview in order to collect ­narrative data about patients’ experience. Results Our data depict a difficult adjustment process to the illness, even though positive elements emerged. Indeed, patients reported a satisfying self-perceived QoL, although specific concerns are still present. Further, even if many patients report depressive symptoms, only a minority have a severe condition. Conclusion Brain cancer may heavily affect patients’ QoL and well being. However, some element of the context may improve the ­adjustment to the disease. In particular, we found that most patients found psychosocial resources to cope with cancer and that spiritual well being also seems to play a key role. These issues deserve further studies in order to obtain significant clinical recommendations. PMID:26635895

  12. Christianity and Resilience as Experienced by Caregivers of Dementia Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lackey, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the role and relationship of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the context of dementia patient caregivers' lives. The guiding question was "What is the relational nature of the practice of Christian beliefs and resilience in the lived experiences of caregivers of dementia…

  13. An Evaluation of the Physiological Strain Experienced by Electrical Utility Workers in North America.

    PubMed

    Meade, Robert D; Lauzon, Martin; Poirier, Martin P; Flouris, Andreas D; Kenny, Glen P

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the physiological strain experienced by North American electrical utility workers during the performance of their normal work duties in heat stressed conditions. Three common job categories were monitored as they are normally performed in 32 electrical utility workers: (i) Ground Work (n = 11); (ii) Bucket Work (n = 9); and (iii) Manual Pole Work (n = 12). Worker hydration status (urine specific gravity (USG)) was measured prior to and following the work monitoring period (duration: 187 ± 104 min). Core and skin temperatures as well as heart rate were measured continuously. Physiological Strain Index (PSI) was calculated from the measurements of core temperature and heart rate. Prior to the start of the work shift, 38% of workers were euhydrated (USG < 1.020; n = 12) whereas the majority of workers were dehydrated (USG > 1.020; prevalence: 75%; p < 0.01) following work. The overall mean and peak core temperatures for all monitored workers were 37.9 ± 0.3 °C and 38.3 ± 0.5 °C, respectively. When responses were compared between job categories, greater mean and peak increases in core temperature were observed in Manual Pole Work relative to the other job categories (both p < 0.04). In fact, six workers performing Manual Pole Work achieved core temperatures in excess of 38.5 °C, while only one other worker surpassed this threshold in Bucket Work. The high levels of thermal strain were paralleled by elevated mean and peak heart rate and PSI responses, which were greater in Manual Pole Work in comparison to the other job categories (all p ≤ 0.05). Furthermore, two workers performing Manual Pole Work achieved severely elevated core temperatures reaching or exceeding 39.5 °C along with prolonged periods of near maximal heart rate responses (i.e., >90% of heart rate reserve). We report elevated levels of thermal and cardiovascular strain in electrical utility workers during work in the heat and potentially dangerous levels of

  14. Managing treatment-experienced pediatric and adolescent HIV patients: role of darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Neely, Michael; Kovacs, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Darunavir is currently the most recently approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor. It is approved for twice-daily dosing with ritonavir in treatment-experienced patients as young as 6 years of age and is available in numerous pill strengths. Emergence of darunavir-specific mutations is generally slow; therefore it can retain activity against viral strains that are resistant to other protease inhibitors, including tipranavir. Darunavir pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, resistance mutations and pharmacodynamics, and adverse effects are reviewed here. Substantial data support its use as a potent, well-tolerated option for salvage therapy in highly treatment-experienced children and adolescents. PMID:19707276

  15. Utilization of medical services by psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Norfleet, M A; Burnell, G M

    1981-03-01

    The relationship between medical and psychiatric utilization of services was examined in a two-year study of two groups of psychiatric patients: high users of psychiatric services (more than ten visits in one year) and low users of psychiatric services (ten or fewer visits in one year). The high-utilization group made more than 60 per cent of the total psychiatric visits in the two-year period, but only 21 per cent of the total medical visits. However, patients in this group increased their utilization of medical services when psychiatric utilization was reduced, raising the question of whether high-utilization patients tend to substitute medical visits for psychiatric visits. In contrast, patients in the low-utilization group were able to hold their medical utilization constant when they reduced psychiatric utilization. Analysis of factors influencing utilization patterns might allow illness behavior in patients to be predetermined and lead to better and more cost-effective health care. PMID:7203418

  16. Sofosbuvir-Based Therapy for Genotype 4 HCV Recurrence Post-Liver Transplant Treatment-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ajlan, A.; Al-Jedai, A.; Elsiesy, H.; Alkortas, D.; Al-Hamoudi, W.; Alarieh, R.; Al-Sebayel, M.; Broering, D.; Aba Alkhail, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. This is an open label prospective cohort study conducted at a tertiary care hospital. The primary endpoint is SVR12 in patients treated with sofosbuvir-based therapy in post-liver transplant patients with genotype 4 HCV recurrence. Methodology. Thirty-six treatment-experienced liver transplant patients with HCV recurrence received sofosbuvir and ribavirin ± peginterferon. Results. We report here safety and efficacy data on 36 patients who completed the follow-up period. Mean age was 56 years, and the cohort included 24 males and one patient had cirrhosis. Mean baseline HCV RNA was 6.2 log10 IU/mL. The majority of patients had ≥ stage 2 fibrosis. Twenty-eight patients were treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin in addition to sofosbuvir for 12 weeks and the remaining were treated with sofosbuvir plus ribavirin only for 24 weeks. By week 4, only four (11.1%) patients had detectable HCV RNA. Of the 36 patients, 2 (5.5%) relapsed and one died (2.75%). Conclusion. Our results suggest that sofosbuvir + ribavirin ± pegylated interferon can be utilized successfully to treat liver transplant patients with HCV recurrence. PMID:27446833

  17. Patient preferences and cost-utility analysis.

    PubMed

    Elnitsky, Christine A; Stone, Patricia

    2005-05-01

    This column discusses patient preference measures and their application in cost utility analysis. A variety of methods of eliciting patient preferences by use of generic utility measures are described. Practical issues in the use of utility measures are discussed. PMID:15991103

  18. Cost-Effectiveness of Dolutegravir in HIV-1 Treatment-Experienced (TE) Patients in France

    PubMed Central

    Pialoux, Gilles; Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Despiégel, Nicolas; Espinas, Caroline; Cawston, Hélène; Finkielsztejn, Laurent; Laurisse, Audrey; Aubin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a new generation integrase inhibitor (INI), dolutegravir (DTG), in France, in treatment-experienced (TE) and INI-naïve HIV-infected adults with at least two classes resistance compared to raltegravir (RAL), by adapting previously published Anti-Retroviral Analysis by Monte Carlo Individual Simulation (ARAMIS) model. Methods ARAMIS is a microsimulation Markov model with a lifetime time horizon and a monthly cycle length. Health states are defined as with or without opportunistic infection and death. In the initial cohort, efficacy and safety data were derived from a phase III study comparing DTG to RAL. Antiretroviral treatment algorithms, accounting for patient history, were based on French guidelines and experts opinion. Costs are mainly including treatment costs, routine HIV and opportunistic infection care, and death. Utilities depend on CD4+ cell count and the occurrence of opportunistic infections. Results The ARAMIS model indicates in the TE population that DTG compared to RAL over a life time is associated with 0.35 additional quality-adjusted life years (QALY; 10.75 versus 10.41) and additional costs of €7,266 (€390,001 versus €382,735). DTG increased costs are mainly related to a 9.1-month increase in life expectancy for DTG compared with RAL, and consequently a longer time spent on ART. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) for DTG compared with RAL is €21,048 per QALY gained. About 83% and 14% of total lifetime costs are associated with antiretroviral therapy and routine HIV care respectively. Univariate deterministic sensitivity analyses demonstrate the robustness of the model. Conclusion DTG is cost-effective in the management of TE INI naive patients in France, from a collective perspective. These results could be explained by the superior efficacy of DTG in this population and its higher genetic barrier to resistance compared to RAL. These data need to be confirmed with longer

  19. Different Aspects of Fatigue Experienced by Patients Receiving Maintenance Dialysis in Hemodialysis Units

    PubMed Central

    Biniaz, Vajihe; Tayybi, Ali; Nemati, Eghlim; Sadeghi Shermeh, Mehdi; Ebadi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Fatigue, a common symptom reported by patients receiving dialysis, is a multidimensional and subjective experience which is readily understood by individuals but difficult to measure. Objectives This study was performed to identify the prevalence of differential aspects of fatigue among patients receiving maintenance dialysis. Patients and Methods The cross-sectional study was conducted in two hemodialysis wards in Tehran with a sample of 163 participants. In this study, the multidimensional fatigue inventory was used to determine the level of fatigue. Demographic data were also collected with self-report survey. To analyze data with SPSS statistical software, test Chi square, T-test, and ANOVA were used. P- Value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results All the patients experienced degrees of fatigue and 50 (30.7%) of the participants experienced a high level of fatigue. Fatigue scores arrangement was founded for physical fatigue followed by reduced activity and general fatigue. Lower levels of fatigue were reported for mental fatigue and reduced motivation. There was no diversity in this study in the levels of fatigue in respects of gender and marital status and employment status. Participants with diabetic nephropathy were the most fatigued. Conclusions People with chronic kidney disease regardless of their age, gender, state of health, and duration of hemodialysis experience high levels of fatigue; it is particularly important for health providers to understand this level of fatigue which affects the daily life of patients. PMID:24350089

  20. Managing distressed and disturbed patients: the thoughts and feelings experienced by Italian nurses.

    PubMed

    Camuccio, C A; Chambers, M; Välimäki, M; Farro, D; Zanotti, R

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study to identify Italian nurses' feelings and emotions towards the management of distressed and disturbed psychiatric patients in acute inpatient settings. Four focus groups were carried out involving 33 nurses from seven acute psychiatric services in a region of Italy. Data were analysed using content analysis. Findings highlight that fear is the prevailing feeling experienced by nurses in the management of distressed patients. This includes both fear of being physically harmed and concerns about doing harm or damage to patients. The unpredictability of aggressive behaviour from unknown patients was described as especially frightening. Known patients, namely those previously admitted to the unit, induced less fear, as their behaviour was considered more predictable. Patients with dual diagnosis were also a worry for many nurses, who considered themselves lacking in the personal relational skills needed to manage an individual in crisis. Nurses reported that they try to understand the reasons for a patient's aggressive behaviour and are empathetic to his or her suffering. When such empathy is lacking, nurses experience conflicting feelings of counter-aggressiveness. The paper concludes by emphasizing the need to increase availability of education related to patient management, in particular team working and its internal relationships. PMID:22296342

  1. Efficacy of PEGylated Interferon in Treatment-Experienced Chinese Patients With HBeAg Positive Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yue-Li; Li, Hu; Liu, Fen; Zhang, Dazhi; Ren, Hong; Hu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background After treatment cessation, a high prevalence of relapse was reported in chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in China, especially in nucleot(s)ide analogues (NUCs)-experienced patients. Re-treatment for these patients remains unsolved. Objectives This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of PEGylated interferon in HBeAg positive patients with exposure to antiviral therapy. Patients and Methods A total of 55 treatment-experienced, HBeAg positive Chinese patients were enrolled in this study. Of these patients, 33 were NUCs-experienced and 22 were interferon-experienced. PEGylated interferon was administered to 34 patients; and 21 patients were retreated with conventional interferon. Results Of the 34 treatment-experienced patients who received PEGylated interferon, 52.9% achieved virologic response, and 41.2% achieved HBeAg loss and seroconversion. Patients who were treated with PEGylated interferon for 48 weeks achieved higher virologic response (80%); HBeAg loss (60%); HBeAg seroconversion (60%); and HBsAg loss (5%) than patients treated for 24 weeks with PEGylated interferon. Their responses were also higher than those who were treated with conventional interferon. HBeAg seroconversion in treatment-experienced patients was independently associated with 48-week PEGylated interferon therapy duration. Conclusions PEGylated interferon was effective in treatment-experienced patients with HBeAg positive CHB, and showed higher rates of virological response, HBeAg loss, and seroconversion. The results provide important information regarding the role of re-treatment with PEGylated interferon in treatment-experienced HBeAg positive patients. PMID:27257427

  2. Subtypes of patients experiencing exacerbations of COPD and associations with outcomes.

    PubMed

    Arostegui, Inmaculada; Esteban, Cristobal; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Bare, Marisa; Fernández-de-Larrea, Nerea; Briones, Eduardo; Quintana, José M

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous condition characterized by occasional exacerbations. Identifying clinical subtypes among patients experiencing COPD exacerbations (ECOPD) could help better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in exacerbations, establish different strategies of treatment, and improve the process of care and patient prognosis. The objective of this study was to identify subtypes of ECOPD patients attending emergency departments using clinical variables and to validate the results using several outcomes. We evaluated data collected as part of the IRYSS-COPD prospective cohort study conducted in 16 hospitals in Spain. Variables collected from ECOPD patients attending one of the emergency departments included arterial blood gases, presence of comorbidities, previous COPD treatment, baseline severity of COPD, and previous hospitalizations for ECOPD. Patient subtypes were identified by combining results from multiple correspondence analysis and cluster analysis. Results were validated using key outcomes of ECOPD evolution. Four ECOPD subtypes were identified based on the severity of the current exacerbation and general health status (largely a function of comorbidities): subtype A (n = 934), neither high comorbidity nor severe exacerbation; subtype B (n = 682), moderate comorbidities; subtype C (n = 562), severe comorbidities related to mortality; and subtype D (n = 309), very severe process of exacerbation, significantly related to mortality and admission to an intensive care unit. Subtype D experienced the highest rate of mortality, admission to an intensive care unit and need for noninvasive mechanical ventilation, followed by subtype C. Subtypes A and B were primarily related to other serious complications. Hospitalization rate was more than 50% for all the subtypes, although significantly higher for subtypes C and D than for subtypes A and B. These results could help identify characteristics

  3. Subtypes of Patients Experiencing Exacerbations of COPD and Associations with Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Arostegui, Inmaculada; Esteban, Cristobal; García-Gutierrez, Susana; Bare, Marisa; Fernández-de-Larrea, Nerea; Briones, Eduardo; Quintana, José M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex and heterogeneous condition characterized by occasional exacerbations. Identifying clinical subtypes among patients experiencing COPD exacerbations (ECOPD) could help better understand the pathophysiologic mechanisms involved in exacerbations, establish different strategies of treatment, and improve the process of care and patient prognosis. The objective of this study was to identify subtypes of ECOPD patients attending emergency departments using clinical variables and to validate the results using several outcomes. We evaluated data collected as part of the IRYSS-COPD prospective cohort study conducted in 16 hospitals in Spain. Variables collected from ECOPD patients attending one of the emergency departments included arterial blood gases, presence of comorbidities, previous COPD treatment, baseline severity of COPD, and previous hospitalizations for ECOPD. Patient subtypes were identified by combining results from multiple correspondence analysis and cluster analysis. Results were validated using key outcomes of ECOPD evolution. Four ECOPD subtypes were identified based on the severity of the current exacerbation and general health status (largely a function of comorbidities): subtype A (n = 934), neither high comorbidity nor severe exacerbation; subtype B (n = 682), moderate comorbidities; subtype C (n = 562), severe comorbidities related to mortality; and subtype D (n = 309), very severe process of exacerbation, significantly related to mortality and admission to an intensive care unit. Subtype D experienced the highest rate of mortality, admission to an intensive care unit and need for noninvasive mechanical ventilation, followed by subtype C. Subtypes A and B were primarily related to other serious complications. Hospitalization rate was more than 50% for all the subtypes, although significantly higher for subtypes C and D than for subtypes A and B. These results could help identify

  4. Antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in naïve and experienced patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2014.

    PubMed

    Naziri, Hamed; Baesi, Kazem; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Aghasadeghi, Mohammad R; Tabarraei, Alijan; McFarland, Willi; Davarpanah, Mohamad Ali

    2016-09-01

    Resistance to antiretroviral agents is a significant concern in the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals, particularly in areas of the world where treatment options are limited. In this study, we aimed to identify HIV drug-resistance-associated mutations in 40 drug-naïve patients and 62 patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART) referred to the Shiraz HIV/AIDS Research Center - the first such data available for the south of Iran. HIV reverse transcriptase and protease genes were amplified and sequenced to determine subtypes and antiretroviral- resistance-associated mutations (RAMs). Subtype CRF35-AD recombinant was the most prevalent in all patients (98 of 102, 96 %), followed by subtype A1, and subtype B (one each, 2 %). Among the 40 ART-naïve patients, two mutations associated with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) resistance (two with Y115F and T215I) and three associated with non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance (two with G190S and Y181C, four with V179T) were found. Among ART-experienced patients, four mutations associated with resistance to NRTI, four with NNRTI, and five with protease inhibitors (PI) were found. Twenty patients with high levels of resistance were already on second-line therapy. We document for the first time in this region of Iran high levels of ART resistance to multiple drugs. Our findings call for more vigilant systematic ART resistance surveillance, increased resistance testing, careful management of patients with existing regimens, and strong advocacy for expansion of available drugs in Iran. PMID:27368990

  5. Critical Situations in Daily Life as Experienced by Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2016-01-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result “The bowels rule life.” The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career. PMID:26870902

  6. Critical Situations in Daily Life as Experienced by Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina; Hollman Frisman, Gunilla; Hjortswang, Henrik; Börjeson, Sussanne

    2016-01-01

    Crohn disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic and have a fluctuating clinical course that impacts daily life. Daily life with a chronic disease involves thinking and worrying about the limitations that chronic disease causes. Knowledge about how patients who suffer from IBD manage critical incidents in daily life is lacking. The aim of the study was to describe how patients living with IBD experience critical incidents in daily life in relation to their disease and symptoms. Thirty adult patients were interviewed focusing on critical incidents in daily life. Data were analyzed using the critical incident technique. The study comprised 224 critical incidents and was grouped into 21 subcategories and 5 categories: losing bowel control, having a body that smells, being unable to meet own and others' expectations, not being believed or seen, and experiencing frustration due to side effects and ineffective treatment. These categories formed one main area describing the overall result "The bowels rule life." The uncertain nature of IBD created critical incidents in which the bowel ruled life, causing patients to avoid social interaction. It also placed considerable demands on the family and sometimes had a negative effect on the afflicted person's career. PMID:26870902

  7. Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies

    Cancer.gov

    Utilizing Data from Cancer Patient & Survivor Studies and Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2011 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  8. Gender differences among discrimination & stigma experienced by depressive patients in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nashi; Kausar, Rukhsana; Khalid, Adeela; Farooq, Anum

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to examine Gender Difference in the level of Discrimination and Stigma experienced by people diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder in Pakistan. It was hypothesized that Women diagnosed with Depression are likely to be experiencing more Discrimination and Internalized Stigma in comparison to Men. Methods: This is a Cross Sectional Study. Thirty eight patients diagnosed with Major Depressive Disorder recruited from different Government Sector Hospitals of Lahore; were approached after obtaining informed consent. Discrimination and Stigma were measured through Discrimination and Stigma Scale and Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Inventory respectively. Results: Both Men and Women experience considerably high level of associated Stigma and Discrimination due to their Mental Illness. However, Women in comparison to Men experience significantly greater level of Internalized Stigma especially in domains of Discrimination Experience and Social Withdrawal. Conclusion: The findings of this study highlight the fact that people with Depression can be more benefited with psychological treatment if dealing with Stigma and Discrimination is also addressed in Intervention Plans. PMID:26870110

  9. Treatment-related problems experienced by cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Wagland, R; Richardson, A; Armes, J; Hankins, M; Lennan, E; Griffiths, P

    2015-09-01

    Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy experience a range of treatment-related problems, and variations in prevalence exist between treatment centres. A scoping review was undertaken to map reported rates of problem prevalence in the literature. This will inform development of a patient-reported outcome measure (PROM) to monitor prevalence and severity of problems over time and assist service providers optimise supportive care provision. Two databases (Embase and Medline) were searched from 2002 to 2013. Fifty one published papers and conference abstracts reporting problem prevalence rates were identified. The papers reported 98 different problems, from which a typology of 27 problem domains was developed, including both physical symptoms and psychosocial issues. The problem domains most often studied were nausea, vomiting and fatigue. This review reflects the chemotherapy-associated problems to which researchers attach the most importance. The range in reported prevalence across studies was very broad (e.g. nausea: 9-74%), with even less frequently studied problems showing high prevalence in some studies (e.g. gynaecological problems: up to 94%). The wide variation in prevalence and range of problems experienced raises challenges for PROM development. Patients should therefore be involved in consensus exercises to assist selection of items to ensure any instrument is complete and robust. PMID:25296389

  10. [Efficacy of dolutegravir in treatment-experienced patients: the SAILING and VIKING trials].

    PubMed

    Moreno, Santiago; Berenguer, Juan

    2015-03-01

    Dolutegravir is an HIV integrase inhibitor with a high genetic barrier to resistance and is active against raltegravir- and/or elvitegravir-resistant strains. The clinical development of dolutegravir for HIV infection rescue therapy is based on 3 clinical trials. In the SAILING trial, dolutegravir (5 mg once daily) in combination with 2 other antiretroviral agents was well tolerated and showed greater virological effect than raltegravir (400 mg twice daily) in the treatment of integrase inhibitor-naïve adults with virological failure infected with HIV strains with at least two-class drug resistance. The VIKING studies were designed to evaluate the efficacy of dolutegravir as rescue therapy in treatment-experienced patients infected with HIV strains with resistance mutations to raltegravir and/or elvitegravir. VIKING-1-2 was a dose-ranging phase IIb trial. VIKING-3 was a phase III trial in which dolutegravir (50 mg twice daily) formed part of an optimized regimen and proved safe and effective in this difficult-to-treat group of patients. Dolutegravir is the integrase inhibitor of choice for rescue therapy in multiresistant HIV infection, both in integrase inhibitor-naïve patients and in those previously treated with raltegravir or elvitegravir. PMID:25858609

  11. Development and pilot evaluation of a complex intervention to improve experienced continuity of care in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    King, M; Jones, L; McCarthy, O; Rogers, M; Richardson, A; Williams, R; Tookman, A; Nazareth, I

    2009-01-27

    High experienced continuity of care in patients with cancer is associated with lower needs for care, better quality of life and better psychological outcomes. We developed and evaluated an intervention to improve experienced continuity. The intervention, consisted of (1) a 17-item patient-completed continuity assessment; (2) feedback to clinical nurse specialists and action to address the needs identified. Multidisciplinary team meetings and oncology outpatient clinics were observed, and patients and staff were interviewed. After qualitative work and reliability testing, the intervention was evaluated in a feasibility trial. Sixty-one patients provided data for analysis. No statistically significant differences were found in patients' experienced continuity between the trial arms, but important trends were seen in measures of needs for care in favour of those receiving the intervention. Feeding back findings from the continuity assessment to clinicians reduced patients' needs for care. Our results indicate that an intervention to target patients' experiences of continuity can reduce their subsequent needs for care. However, overcoming barriers to organisational change and addressing some patients' hesitation to report their continuity difficulties must be considered when implementing such an intervention. A phase III trial targeting patients with inadequate experienced continuity of care is recommended. PMID:19107130

  12. From armchair to wheelchair: how patients with a locked-in syndrome integrate bodily changes in experienced identity.

    PubMed

    Nizzi, Marie-Christine; Demertzi, Athena; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Jouen, François; Laureys, Steven

    2012-03-01

    Different sort of people are interested in personal identity. Philosophers frequently ask what it takes to remain oneself. Caregivers imagine their patients' experience. But both philosophers and caregivers think from the armchair: they can only make assumptions about what it would be like to wake up with massive bodily changes. Patients with a locked-in syndrome (LIS) suffer a full body paralysis without cognitive impairment. They can tell us what it is like. Forty-four chronic LIS patients and 20 age-matched healthy medical professionals answered a 15-items questionnaire targeting: (A) global evaluation of identity, (B) body representation and (C) experienced meaning in life. In patients, self-reported identity was correlated with B and C. Patients differed with controls in C. These results suggest that the paralyzed body remains a strong component of patients' experienced identity, that patients can adjust to objectives changes perceived as meaningful and that caregivers fail in predicting patients' experience. PMID:22100276

  13. The effect of music on discomfort experienced by intensive care unit patients during turning: a randomized cross-over study.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Marie; Chaboyer, Wendy; Schluter, Philip; Foster, Michelle; Harris, Denise; Teakle, Roz

    2010-04-01

    Research consistently demonstrates that intensive care unit (ICU) patients experience pain, discomfort and anxiety despite analgesic and sedative use. The most painful procedure reported by critically ill patients is being turned. Music diminishes anxiety and discomfort in some populations; however, its effect on critically ill patients remains unknown. This research aimed to identify the effect of music on discomfort experienced by ICU patients during turning using a single blind randomized cross-over design. Seventeen post-operative ICU patients were recruited and treatment order randomized. Discomfort and anxiety were measured 15 min before and immediately after two turning procedures. Findings indicated that listening to music 15 min before and during turning did not significantly reduce discomfort or anxiety. Pain management might effectively be addressing discomfort and anxiety experienced during turning. Given previous studies have identified turning as painful, current results are promising and it might be useful to determine if this is widespread. PMID:20487057

  14. Different types of fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy, myotonic dystrophy and HMSN-I. Experienced fatigue and physiological fatigue.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, Joke S; Zwarts, Machiel J; Schillings, Maartje L; van Engelen, Baziel G M; Bleijenberg, Gijs

    2008-09-01

    Although fatigue is a common symptom in neuromuscular disorders, little is known about different types of fatigue. Sixty-five FSHD, 79 adult-onset MD and 73 HMSN type I patients were studied. Experienced fatigue was assessed with the CIS-fatigue subscale. Physiological fatigue was measured during a 2-min sustained maximal voluntary contraction of the biceps brachii muscle using the twitch interpolation technique to assess central activation failure (CAF) and peripheral fatigue. Experienced fatigue, CAF and peripheral fatigue appeared to be predominantly separate types of fatigue. PMID:18690504

  15. Instructional Curriculum Improves Medical Staff Knowledge and Efficacy for Patients Experiencing Intimate Partner Violence

    PubMed Central

    Edwardsen, Elizabeth A.; Dichter, Melissa E.; Walsh, Patrick; Cerulli, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives This study assesses VA mental health providers’ understanding of intimate partner violence (IPV) and the perception of patient benefit of routine inquiry and service referral. The impact of an instructional curriculum was also examined following an interactive training. Methods An evidence-based curriculum was offered to VA mental health providers. The curriculum utilized didactic methods, case scenarios, and resources regarding referrals and statutes regarding crimes related to violence and abuse. The participants completed pre- and post-training surveys to assess their perceptions about IPV and to evaluate the training. Results Seventy-three individuals completed the training. Fifty-four of the participants were female, and thirty-three were over the age of 45. Fifty-one individuals completed both surveys. There were no differences between participants’ views of the seriousness of IPV in the community or their practices before or after the training. However, participants scored significantly higher on the knowledge and efficacy measures after the training (p<.001). Conclusion Following an educational intervention, providers demonstrate more knowledge and efficacy regarding routine inquiry and referral for IPV. Barriers to universal implementation still warrant attention. PMID:22165653

  16. Disclosure behaviour and experienced reactions in patients with HIV versus chronic viral hepatitis or diabetes mellitus in Germany.

    PubMed

    Kittner, J M; Brokamp, F; Jäger, B; Wulff, W; Schwandt, B; Jasinski, J; Wedemeyer, H; Schmidt, R E; Schattenberg, J M; Galle, P R; Schuchmann, M

    2013-01-01

    Disclosure is a prerequisite to receive disease-specific social support. However, in the case of a stigmatised disease, it can also lead to discrimination. We aimed to assess disclosure rates of HIV patients and the reactions they encountered in comparison to patients with chronic viral hepatitis or diabetes mellitus and patients' general perception of disease-specific discrimination. We constructed a self-report questionnaire, anonymously assessing the size of the social environment, the persons who had been informed, and the experienced reactions as perceived by the disclosing patients, to be rated on 1-4 point Likert scales. In addition, patients were asked whether they perceive general discrimination in Germany. One hundred and seventy-one patients were asked to participate. Five rejected, thus questionnaires from 83 patients with HIV, 42 patients with chronic viral hepatitis B (n = 9) or C (n = 33), and 41 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type I n = 14, type II n = 27) were analysed. Whereas the size of the social environment did not differ, HIV-infected patients were least likely to disclose their disease (60.7%, SD ± 31.9) to their social environment as compared to patients with chronic viral hepatitis (84.2 ± 23.3%, p<0.0001), or diabetes mellitus (94.4 ± 10.3%, p<0.0001), respectively. Within the HIV patient group, the mean disclosure rate was highest to partners (90.9%), followed by the public environment (65.2%), friends (59.4%) and family members (43.8%). HIV patients experienced supportive reactions after 79.3 ± 26.4% of disclosures, which was the case in 91.4 ± 19.6% and 75.7 ± 36.1% of patients with hepatitis or diabetes mellitus, respectively. 69.5% of HIV patients stated to perceive general discrimination in Germany. We conclude that HIV patients had experienced supportive reactions after the majority of disclosures, but the low rate points out that their information strategy had been very selective. Societal discrimination

  17. Retrospective Review of Critically Ill Patients Experiencing Alcohol Withdrawal: Dexmedetomidine Versus Propofol and/or Lorazepam Continuous Infusions

    PubMed Central

    Ludtke, Kimberly A.; Yount, Natalie L.; Gerkin, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Alcohol withdrawal symptoms can be difficult to manage and may lead to an intensive care unit (ICU) admission. Patients experiencing severe alcohol withdrawal often require high doses of sedatives, which can lead to respiratory depression and the need for endotracheal intubation. Dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist, provides adequate sedation with little effect on respiratory function when compared to other sedatives. Objective: To evaluate sedation with a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine versus propofol and/or lorazepam in critically ill patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted on ICU admissions between March 2002 and April 2009 for alcohol withdrawal patients who necessitated treatment with a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, propofol, and/or lorazepam. Primary outcomes included the incidence of mechanical ventilation, length of mechanical ventilation (if applicable), and ICU and hospital length of stay. Results: Fifteen patients were treated with a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and 17 were treated with an infusion of propofol and/or lorazepam. Two patients (13.3%) required intubation and mechanical ventilation in the dexmedetomidine group versus 10 (58.8%) in the propofol and/or lorazepam group (P = .006). Length of stay in the ICU was 53 hours for patients treated with dexmedetomidine versus 114.9 hours in the propofol and/or lorazepam group (P = .016). Hospital length of stay was less for the dexmedetomidine group, 135.8 hours versus 241.1 hours in the propofol and/or lorazepam group (P = .008). Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine use was associated with a decrease in the incidence of endotracheal intubation when used to sedate patients experiencing alcohol withdrawal. Patients transferred to a lower level of care faster and were discharged from the hospital sooner when treated with dexmedetomidine. PMID:26405310

  18. The Impact of Learner Characteristics on Information Utilization Strategies, Cognitive Load Experienced, and Performance in Hypermedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter; Vollmann, Brigitte; Catrambone, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Against the background of an adaptation of Cognitive Load Theory to learner-controlled settings we investigated the impact of learner characteristics on information utilization strategies, cognitive load, and learning outcomes in a hypermedia environment. Based on the data of 79 students, five clusters of students were identified according to…

  19. Reporting Misconduct of a Coworker to Protect a Patient: A Comparison between Experienced Nurses and Nursing Students

    PubMed Central

    Mansbach, Abraham; Kushnir, Talma; Ziedenberg, Hana; Bachner, Yaacov G.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Whistleblowing is the reporting of illegal, immoral, or illegitimate practices to persons or organizations that may affect the action. The current study compares experienced nurses to nursing students regarding their willingness to blow the whistle to protect a patient's interests. Methods. 165 participants were divided into two groups: 82 undergraduate nursing students and 83 experienced nurses. Participants responded to two vignettes that described a colleague's and a manager's misconduct at work. Results. The nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower compared to the experienced nurses. The nursing students also ranked the internal and external whistleblowing indices higher than the nurses, but the differences did not reach statistical significance. For each of the examined internal and external indices, professional experience was found to be significant in multivariate regression analyses. Conclusions. Even though nursing students perceived the severity of the misconduct significantly lower than the experienced nurses, the students demonstrated a greater readiness to blow the whistle, both internally and externally. Recommendations for handling comparable situations are offered. PMID:25379527

  20. Resistance profiles observed in virological failures after 24 weeks of amprenavir/ritonavir containing regimen in protease inhibitor experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Affolabi, Dissou; Lamotte, Claire; Mohand, Hocine Ait; Delaugerre, Constance; Wirden, Marc; Voujon, Delphine; Bossi, Philippe; Ktorza, Nadine; Bricaire, François; Costagliola, Dominique; Katlama, Christine; Peytavin, Gilles; Calvez, Vincent

    2004-09-01

    Amprenavir (APV) is an HIV protease inhibitor (PI) used for the treatment of either naive or PI-experienced HIV-infected patients. Several genotypic resistance pathways in protease gene have been described to be associated to unboosted APV failure (I50V, V32I + I47V, I54L/M, or less commonly I84V, which may be accompanied by one ore more accessory mutations such as L10F, L33F, M46I/L). The aims of this study were to investigate the efficacy up to week 24 of an APV plus ritonavir containing regimen in PI experienced patients and to determine the genotypic resistance profiles emerging in patients failing to this therapy. Forty-nine, PI experienced but APV naïve patients were treated with APV (600 mg bid) plus ritonavir (100 mg bid). By intent-to-treat analysis, the median decrease in viral load (VL) was -1.32 log10 (min +0.6; max -2.8) and -1.46 log10 (min +0.5; max -2.8) 12 and 24 weeks after initiating APV plus ritonavir regimen, respectively. Twelve patients harboured a VL >200 copies/ml at week 24. Among these patients, the selection of mutations previously described with the use of APV as first PI (V32I, L33F, M46I/L, I50V, 54M/L, and I84V) was observed. However, in some cases, mutations classically described after the use of other PIs (V82F and L90M) were selected but always with APV-specific mutations. There was no relation between the resistance pathways selected with either APV or ritonavir plasma minimal concentration, but higher APV plasma minimal concentration were associated with a lower rate of resistance mutations selection. PMID:15258963

  1. Elucidating Emergence and Transmission of Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Treatment Experienced Patients by Whole Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Taane G.; Mallard, Kim; Coll, Francesc; Preston, Mark; Assefa, Samuel; Harris, David; Ogwang, Sam; Mumbowa, Francis; Kirenga, Bruce; O’Sullivan, Denise M.; Okwera, Alphonse; Eisenach, Kathleen D.; Joloba, Moses; Bentley, Stephen D.; Ellner, Jerrold J.; Parkhill, Julian; Jones-López, Edward C.; McNerney, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    Background Understanding the emergence and spread of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is crucial for its control. MDR-TB in previously treated patients is generally attributed to the selection of drug resistant mutants during inadequate therapy rather than transmission of a resistant strain. Traditional genotyping methods are not sufficient to distinguish strains in populations with a high burden of tuberculosis and it has previously been difficult to assess the degree of transmission in these settings. We have used whole genome analysis to investigate M. tuberculosis strains isolated from treatment experienced patients with MDR-TB in Uganda over a period of four years. Methods and Findings We used high throughput genome sequencing technology to investigate small polymorphisms and large deletions in 51 Mycobacterium tuberculosis samples from 41 treatment-experienced TB patients attending a TB referral and treatment clinic in Kampala. This was a convenience sample representing 69% of MDR-TB cases identified over the four year period. Low polymorphism was observed in longitudinal samples from individual patients (2-15 SNPs). Clusters of samples with less than 50 SNPs variation were examined. Three clusters comprising a total of 8 patients were found with almost identical genetic profiles, including mutations predictive for resistance to rifampicin and isoniazid, suggesting transmission of MDR-TB. Two patients with previous drug susceptible disease were found to have acquired MDR strains, one of which shared its genotype with an isolate from another patient in the cohort. Conclusions Whole genome sequence analysis identified MDR-TB strains that were shared by more than one patient. The transmission of multidrug-resistant disease in this cohort of retreatment patients emphasises the importance of early detection and need for infection control. Consideration should be given to rapid testing for drug resistance in patients undergoing treatment to monitor the

  2. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  3. Medical complications experienced by first-time ischemic stroke patients during inpatient, tertiary level stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Civelek, Gul Mete; Atalay, Ayce; Turhan, Nur

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to assess the medical complications in first-time ischemic stroke patients, to identify the factors related to occurrence of complications. [Subjects and Methods] First-time ischemic stroke patients (n=81) admitted to a tertiary level inpatient rehabilitation center during a 5 year period were included in the study. The attending physiatrist noted the presence of specific medical complications and complications that required transfer to the acute care facility from patient records. The Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification was used to define the clinical subtypes of the ischemic stroke patients. The Charlson comorbidity index was used to evaluate co-morbid conditions. Functional disability was assessed using the Functional Independence Measure at admission and discharge. [Results] We found that 88.9% of the patients had at least one complication. The five most common complications were urinary tract infection (48.1%), shoulder pain (37.0%), insomnia (37.0%), depression (32.1%), and musculoskeletal pain other than shoulder pain (32.1%) and 11.1% of patients were transferred to acute care facility during rehabilitation period. Functional Independence Measure scores both at admission and discharge were significantly lower in patients with at least one complication than in patients with no complications. [Conclusion] Medical complications are common among patients undergoing stroke rehabilitation. Close interdisciplinary collaboration between physiatrists and other medical specialities is necessary for optimal management. PMID:27065523

  4. Profile of depression, experienced distress and capacity for coping with stress in multiple sclerosis patients--a different perspective.

    PubMed

    Ožura, Ana; Sega, Saša

    2013-12-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) can result in significant changes in psychological functioning. Depression and cognitive deficits are commonly present. In addition personality changes have been described. A growing body of research is showing negative impact of psychological stress on disease course. Our study focused on the profile of depression, capacity for coping with stress and experienced distress in patients with MS measured by a performance based method for personality assessment-the Rorschach Inkblot Method (RIM). We included 95 patients with MS and 44 healthy controls. RIM was used with all participants and was scored by the Exner Comprehensive system. Compared to healthy controls MS patients had statistically significantly lower capacity for coping with stress, complexity of information processing, body image, willingness to process emotional stimulation and interpersonal interest. Surprisingly patients had lower experienced distress than controls. We propose that the profile of depression in advanced MS disease might be better described in terms of negative symptoms such as emotional withdrawal and apathy and less with the profile of positive symptoms such as rumination and worry. RIM variables were not significantly associated with the EDSS. Interventions from which patients could benefit are discussed. PMID:24321148

  5. Effects of Coping and Mastery Modeling on Experienced and Inexperienced Pedodontic Patients' Disruptiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klorman, Rafael; And Others

    This report examines the results of 3 studies on the effects of coping and mastery modeling on 106 pedodontic patients with and 30 patients without a prior filling or extraction. Before undergoing a filling, the 8-year-old subjects viewed a videotape depicting (a) a coping model receiving a filling; (b) a mastery model undergoing identical…

  6. Integrative Therapy Use for Management of Side Effects and Toxicities Experienced by Pediatric Oncology Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Shana S

    2014-01-01

    Integrative Therapies (IT), otherwise known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine, are widely used among pediatric oncology patients, despite a paucity of available evidence. This review summarizes surveys that describe the prevalence of IT use by pediatric oncology patients, both during therapy and in survivorship, as well as the modalities being used. Additionally, the evidence that exists for specific treatments that appear to be efficacious in controlling specific symptoms is described. Finally, there are recommendations for practitioners on how to best counsel patients about IT use. PMID:27417488

  7. Trends in Decline of Antiretroviral Resistance among ARV-Experienced Patients in the HIV Outpatient Study: 1999–2008

    PubMed Central

    Buchacz, Kate; Baker, Rose; Ward, Douglas J.; Palella, Frank J.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Young, Benjamin; Yangco, Bienvenido G.; Novak, Richard M.; Brooks, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Little is known about temporal trends in frequencies of clinically relevant ARV resistance mutations in HIV strains from U.S. patients undergoing genotypic testing (GT) in routine HIV care. Methods. We analyzed cumulative frequency of HIV resistance among patients in the HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) who, during 1999–2008 and while prescribed antiretrovirals, underwent GT with plasma HIV RNA >1,000 copies/mL. Exposure ≥4 months to each of three major antiretroviral classes (NRTI, NNRTI and PI) was defined as triple-class exposure (TCE). Results. 906 patients contributed 1,570 GT results. The annual frequency of any major resistance mutations decreased during 1999–2008 (88% to 79%, P = 0.05). Resistance to PIs decreased among PI-exposed patients (71% to 46%, P = 0.010) as exposure to ritonavir-boosted PIs increased (6% to 81%, P < 0.001). Non-significant declines were observed in resistance to NRTIs among NRTI-exposed (82% to 67%), and triple-class-resistance among TCE patients (66% to 41%), but not to NNRTIs among NNRTI-exposed. Conclusions. HIV resistance was common but declined in HIV isolates from subgroups of ARV-experienced HOPS patients during 1999–2008. Resistance to PIs among PI-exposed patients decreased, possibly due to increased representation of patients whose only PI exposures were to boosted PIs. PMID:22611484

  8. It is time to consider third-line options in antiretroviral-experienced paediatric patients?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The historic use of full-dose ritonavir as part of an unboosted protease inhibitor (PI)-based antiretroviral therapy regimen in some South African children contributes to the frequent accumulation of major PI resistance mutations. Methods In order to describe the prevalence of major PI resistance in children failing antiretroviral therapy and to investigate the clinical, immunological and virological outcomes in children with PI resistance, we conducted a cross-sectional study, with a nested case series, following up those children with major PI resistance. The setting was public health sector antiretroviral clinics in the Western Cape province of South Africa, and the subjects were children failing antiretroviral therapy. The following outcome measures were investigated: CD4 count, viral load and resistance mutations. Results Fourteen (17%) of 82 patients, referred from tertiary hospitals, had major PI resistance. All these patients were exposed to regimens that included ritonavir as a single PI. Immune reconstitution and clinical benefit were achieved when using a lopinavir/ritonavir-based treatment regimen in these children with prior PI resistance. At first HIV-1 viral load follow up after initial resistance testing (n = 11), only one patient had a viral load of less than 400 copies/ml; at a subsequent follow up (n = 9), the viral loads of five patients were less than 400 copies/ml. Patients retained on LPV/r had lower viral loads than those switched to a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). However, two of three patients with follow-up resistance tests accumulated additional PI resistance. Conclusions In children with pre-existing PI resistance, although initially effective, the long-term durability of a lopinavir/ritonavir-based treatment regimen can be compromised by the accumulation of resistance mutations. Furthermore, a second-line NNRTI regimen is often not durable in these patients. As genotypic resistance testing and third

  9. Stressors Experienced by Relatives of Patients in an Innovative Rehabilitation Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quine, Susan; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Conducted 450 interviews with 78 family caregivers of 37 patients with severe brain injuries in rehabilitation treatment program in acute care hospital. Found that involvement in providing treatment was stressful, because of both demands on the family and unproven efficacy of treatment. Findings suggest that family's ability to provide treatment…

  10. Barotrauma-induced pneumocephalus experienced by a high risk patient after commercial air travel.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jisoon

    2013-08-01

    A 49-year-old female with a history of several neurosurgical and otolaryngologic procedures for occipital meningioma and cerebrospinal fluid leaks was diagnosed with pneumocephalus after a one hour flight on a domestic jet airliner. Despite multiple operations, the air appeared to enter the cranium through a weak portion of the skull base due to the low atmospheric pressure in the cabin. The intracranial air was absorbed with conservative management. The patient was recommended not to fly before a definite diagnostic work up and a sealing procedure for the cerebrospinal fluid leak site had been performed. Recent advances in aviation technology have enabled many people to travel by air, including individuals with medical conditions. Low cabin pressure is not dangerous to healthy individuals; however, practicing consultant neurosurgeons should understand the cabin environment and prepare high risk patients for safe air travel. PMID:24175032

  11. Surviving Critical Illness: The Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome as Experienced by Patients and Their Caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Christopher E.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Brandon, Debra H.; Whaley, Christie; Attix, Deborah K.; Clay, Alison S.; Dore, Daniel V.; Hough, Catherine L.; White, Douglas B.; Tulsky, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Survivors of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), a systemic critical illness, often report poor quality of life based on responses to standardized questionnaires. However, the experiences of ARDS survivors have not been reported. Our objective was to characterize the effects of critical illness in the daily lives and functioning of ARDS survivors. Design, Setting, and Patients We recruited consecutively 31 ARDS survivors and their informal caregivers from medical and surgical intensive care units of an academic medical center and a community hospital. Eight patients died before completing interviews. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 23 ARDS survivors and 24 caregivers three to nine months after ICU admission, stopping enrollment after thematic saturation was reached. Transcripts were analyzed using Colaizzi’s qualitative methodology to identify significant ways in which survivors’ critical illness experience impacted their lives. Measurements and Main Results Participants related five key elements of experience as survivors of ARDS: pervasive memories of critical care, day to day impact of new disability, critical illness defining the sense of self, relationship strain and change, and ability to cope with disability. Survivors described remarkable disability that persisted for months. Caregivers’ interviews revealed substantial strain from caregiving responsibilities, as well as frequent symptom minimization by patients. Conclusions The diverse and unique experiences of ARDS survivors reflect the global impact of severe critical illness. We have identified symptom domains important to ARDS patients that are not well represented in existing health outcomes measures. These insights may aid the development of targeted interventions to enhance recovery and return of function after ARDS. PMID:19865004

  12. Humour as experienced by patients and nurses in aged nursing in Finland.

    PubMed

    Isola, A; Astedt-Kurki, P

    1997-03-01

    Humour is an integral part of everyday life and therefore a component of the care and treatment of elderly patients in the modern health care. This article deals with the role of humour in aged nursing from the perspective of the nursing home residents. It also describes some preliminary results of our study on the meaning of humour to professional nurses. The chief motivation for the study is to provide a deeper understanding of humour as a part of aged nursing and as a 'phenomenon', which should also help us in the continuing challenge to improve the quality of nursing care. In this study the qualitative approach was used because the focus of interest was on an issue that has received only little attention in earlier research. The research material consists of data from patients and nurses. The data were collected via interviews and essay-type responses. The data obtained were analysed using the qualitative method of content analysis. In the light of our findings here, humour can be described as a joie de vivre which manifests itself in human interaction in the form of fun, jocularity and laughter. The assumption is supported by earlier research results which indicated that humour is an individual and personal matter and, in aged nursing care it is also very much a context-bound phenomenon. Humour makes it easier for some of the elderly patients to experience a positive, human relationship with the nurse. According to the results it seems to us that research should be continued and intensified into the role and use of humour in elderly people's everyday life and particularly in gerontological nursing care. PMID:9274213

  13. States With The Least Restrictive Regulations Experienced The Largest Increase In Patients Seen By Nurse Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yong-Fang; Loresto, Figaro L.; Rounds, Linda R.; Goodwin, James S.

    2013-01-01

    The use of nurse practitioners (NPs) is one way to address the shortage of physician primary care providers. NP training programs and the number of practicing NPs have increased in the past two decades. However, regulations limiting their scope of practice vary greatly by state. We assessed the impact of state regulations on the increase in care provided by NPs in the United States, using a 5 percent national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. We found that between 1998 and 2010 the number of Medicare patients receiving care from NPs increased fifteenfold. By 2010 states with the least restrictive regulations of NP practice had a 2.5-fold greater likelihood of patients’ receiving their primary care from NPs than did the most restrictive states. Relaxing state restrictions on NP practice should increase the use of NPs as primary care providers, which in turn would reduce the current national shortage of primary care providers. PMID:23836739

  14. Personality Compensates for Impaired Quality of Life and Social Functioning in Patients With Psychotic Disorders Who Experienced Traumatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Boyette, Lindy-Lou; van Dam, Daniëlla; Meijer, Carin; Velthorst, Eva; Cahn, Wiepke; de Haan, Lieuwe; Kahn, René; de Haan, Lieuwe; van Os, Jim; Wiersma, Durk; Bruggeman, Richard; Cahn, Wiepke; Meijer, Carin; Myin-Germeys, Inez

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with psychotic disorders who experienced childhood trauma show more social dysfunction than patients without traumatic experiences. However, this may not hold for all patients with traumatic experiences. Little is known about the potential compensating role of Five-Factor Model personality traits within this group, despite their strong predictive value for social functioning and well-being in the general population. Methods: Our sample consisted of 195 patients with psychotic disorders (74% diagnosed with schizophrenia) and 132 controls. Cluster analyses were conducted to identify and validate distinct personality profiles. General linear model analyses were conducted to examine whether patients with different profiles differed in social functioning and quality of life (QoL), while controlling for possible confounders. Mediation models were tested to assess potential causal links. Results: In general, patients with higher levels of self-reported traumatic experiences (PT+) showed lower QoL and more social withdrawal compared with patients with lower traumatic experiences (PT−). Two clusters reflecting personality profiles were identified. PT+ with the first profile (lower neuroticism and higher extraversion, openness, agreeableness, and conscientiousness) presented higher levels of QoL and better social functioning in several areas, including less withdrawal, compared with both PT+ and PT− with the second profile. PT+ and PT− with the first personality profile did not differ in QoL and social functioning. Mediation analyses suggested that personality traits mediate the relation between traumatic experiences and QoL and social withdrawal. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that personality may “buffer” the impact of childhood traumatic experiences on functional outcome in patients with psychotic disorders. PMID:24771304

  15. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar® gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  16. Clinical experience with repository corticotropin injection in patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing mood changes with intravenous methylprednisolone: a case series.

    PubMed

    Murray, Stacey; Woo, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    The elevated prevalence of neuropsychiatric symptoms and disorders among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is well recognized, as are potential neuropsychiatric side effects of treatment with corticosteroids. Both methylprednisolone (MP) and repository corticotropin injection (HP Acthar(®) gel) have demonstrated efficacy in reducing short-term disability after exacerbations of MS. Although historical data are limited, repository corticotropin injection has not generally been associated with detrimental neuropsychiatric effects. We describe six cases of patients with relapsing-remitting MS who had previously experienced detrimental mood changes with MP treatment. Some of these patients had previous histories of mood disorders or other neuropsychiatric symptoms prior to MS diagnosis. All six patients were subsequently treated with repository corticotropin injection for MS exacerbations and each demonstrated improvements in MS symptoms. This clinical experience suggests that repository corticotropin injection should be considered as an alternative for patients who do not tolerate corticosteroids or have difficulties associated with intravenous medication. Furthermore, the rate of neuropsychiatric side effects observed in these patients was low. These observations support repository corticotropin injection as a viable alternative for the treatment of acute exacerbations of MS, particularly in patients who have a history of neuropsychiatric disorders or symptoms either independently or in response to MP treatment. In reviewing both the published data and our own clinical experience regarding potential neuropsychiatric adverse events with treatment for MS exacerbations, we hope to stimulate further research into the potential efficacy and safety of repository corticotropin injection among patients with some form of neuropsychiatric complications that must be considered when establishing a treatment plan for MS. PMID:27134674

  17. Mental Trauma Experienced by Caregivers of patients with Diffuse Axonal Injury or Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Syed Hassan, Syed Tajuddin; Jamaludin, Husna; Abd Raman, Rosna; Mohd Riji, Haliza; Wan Fei, Khaw

    2013-01-01

    Context As with care giving and rehabilitation in chronic illnesses, the concern with traumatic brain injury (TBI), particularly with diffuse axonal injury (DAI), is that the caregivers are so overwhelmingly involved in caring and rehabilitation of the victim that in the process they become traumatized themselves. This review intends to shed light on the hidden and silent trauma sustained by the caregivers of severe brain injury survivors. Motor vehicle accident (MVA) is the highest contributor of TBI or DAI. The essence of trauma is the infliction of pain and suffering and having to bear the pain (i.e. by the TBI survivor) and the burden of having to take care and manage and rehabilitate the TBI survivor (i.e. by the TBI caregiver). Moreover many caregivers are not trained for their care giving task, thus compounding the stress of care giving and rehabilitating patients. Most research on TBI including DAI, focus on the survivors and not on the caregivers. TBI injury and its effects and impacts remain the core question of most studies, which are largely based on the quantitative approach. Evidence Acquisition Qualitative research can better assess human sufferings such as in the case of DAI trauma. While quantitative research can measure many psychometric parameters to assess some aspects of trauma conditions, qualitative research is able to fully reveal the meaning, ramification and experience of TBI trauma. Both care giving and rehabilitation are overwhelmingly demanding; hence , they may complicate the caregivers’ stress. However, some positive outcomes also exist. Results Caregivers involved in caring and rehabilitation of TBI victims may become mentally traumatized. Posttraumatic recovery of the TBI survivor can enhance the entire family’s closeness and bonding as well as improve the mental status of the caregiver. Conclusions A long-term longitudinal study encompassing integrated research is needed to fully understand the traumatic experiences of

  18. Issues experienced while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals: A study based on focus group interviews

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Risa; Shimizu, Yasuko

    2015-01-01

    Objective Dementia is a major public health problem. More and more patients with dementia are being admitted to acute care hospitals for treatment of comorbidities. Issues associated with care of patients with dementia in acute care hospitals have not been adequately clarified. This study aimed to explore the challenges nurses face in providing care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals in Japan. Methods This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews (FGIs). The setting was six acute hospitals with surgical and medical wards in the western region of Japan. Participants were nurses in surgical and internal medicine wards, excluding intensive care units. Nurses with less than 3 years working experience, those without experience in dementia patient care in their currently assigned ward, and head nurses were excluded from participation. FGIs were used to collect data from February to December 2008. Interviews were scheduled for 1–1.5 h. The qualitative synthesis method was used for data analysis. Results In total, 50 nurses with an average experience of 9.8 years participated. Eight focus groups were formed. Issues in administering care to patients with dementia at acute care hospitals were divided into seven groups. Three of these groups, that is, problematic patient behaviors, recurrent problem, and problems affecting many people equally, interact to result in a burdensome cycle. This cycle is exacerbated by lack of nursing experience and lack of organization in hospitals. In coping with this cycle, the nurses develop protection plans for themselves and for the hospital. Conclusions The two main issues experienced by nurses while administering care to patients with dementia in acute care hospitals were as follows: (a) the various problems and difficulties faced by nurses were interactive and caused a burdensome cycle, and (b) nurses do their best to adapt to these conditions despite feeling conflicted. PMID:25716983

  19. Ethical reasoning concerning the feeding of terminally ill cancer patients. Interviews with registered nurses experienced in the care of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Jansson, L; Norberg, A

    1989-12-01

    In the terminal phase of life, some cancer patients have problems eating. Caregivers then have to decide whether or not to provide the patients with food by artificial means. Taped interviews concerning the treatment of terminally ill, mentally alert, old cancer patients who refuse food were conducted with 20 registered nurses who were regarded as "experienced and good nurses." Not one of these nurses considered using force or violence against the patients. It seemed that the question about whether to feed the patient was not as urgent as the question of whether to accept active euthanasia. The interviewees seemed quite certain about how they would treat the patient in different circumstances, but found it difficult to justify their judgements. Several stressed the importance of their personal experience with dying persons, and thought that one should act according to the Golden Rule. PMID:2512007

  20. Is There a Need for Early Palliative Care in Patients With Life-Limiting Illnesses? Interview Study With Patients About Experienced Care Needs From Diagnosis Onward.

    PubMed

    Beernaert, Kim; Deliens, Luc; De Vleminck, Aline; Devroey, Dirk; Pardon, Koen; Block, Lieve Van den; Cohen, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    The early integration of specialist palliative care has been shown to benefit the quality of life of patients with advanced cancer. In order to explore whether other seriously ill people and people at even earlier phases would also benefit from early palliative care, we conducted 18 qualitative interviews with people having cancer, chronic obstructive lung disease, heart failure, or dementia at different phases of the illness trajectory about how they experienced care needs related to their disease from diagnosis onward. Respondents experienced needs within the different domains of palliative care at different stages of the illness and different illness types or duration of the illness. This study contributes to the understanding of primary care needs of patients for whom palliative care (not necessarily specialized palliative care) could be beneficial. PMID:25852203

  1. Suicidality and symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation in patients experiencing manic episodes with depressive symptoms: a naturalistic study

    PubMed Central

    Eberhard, Jonas; Weiller, Emmanuelle

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients with a bipolar I disorder (BD-I) manic episode meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5), criteria for “with mixed features” have a high incidence of suicide attempts and of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (AIA) symptoms. The aim of this analysis was to explore the relationship between suicidality and AIA symptoms in patients with BD-I experiencing mania with depressive symptoms, using data from a previous naturalistic study. Patients and methods Psychiatrists completed an online questionnaire about their adult patients who had a current BD-I manic episode. Questions covered the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier, the severity of AIA symptoms, the frequency and controllability of suicidal ideation, and the number of suicide attempts. Results Of 1,035 patients with BD-I mania who were included in the analyses, 348 (33.6%) met the criteria for the DSM-5 “with mixed features” specifier (three or more depressive symptoms). These patients were further stratified according to the severity of their AIA symptoms: “mild AIA” (zero or one AIA symptom above a severity threshold; 105 patients) or “severe AIA” (all three AIA symptoms above a severity threshold; 167 patients). A greater incidence of suicidal ideation was observed in the severe AIA group (71.9%) than in the mild AIA group (47.6%). Twice as many patients had easily controlled suicidal ideation than difficult-to-control suicidal ideation in both subgroups. The mean number of suicide attempts was higher in the severe AIA group than in the mild AIA group, during the current episode (0.84 vs 0.34 attempts, respectively; P<0.05) and over the patient’s lifetime (1.56 vs 1.04 attempts, respectively). Conclusion The high risk of suicide among BD-I mania patients with depressive symptoms is further increased when they experience severe AIA symptoms. Recognizing AIA symptoms in BD-I mania could provide a means of identifying

  2. Utilities of Patients with Hypertension in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi-Phuong-Lan; Krabbe, Paul F. M.; Nguyen, Thi-Bach-Yen; Schuiling-Veninga, Catharina C. M.; Wright, E. Pamela; Postma, Maarten J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The study aims to inform potential cost-effectiveness analysis of hypertension management in Vietnam by providing utilities and predictors of utilities in patients with hypertension. Methods Hypertensive patients up to 80 years old visiting the hospital were invited to participate in a survey using Quality Metric’s Short-form 36v2TM translated into Vietnamese. Health-state utilities were estimated by applying a previously published algorithm. Results The mean utility of the 691 patients interviewed was 0.73. Controlling for age, sex, blood pressure (BP) stage, and history of stroke, the utilities in older patients were lower than those in younger ones, and statistically significantly different between the extremes of youngest and oldest groups (p = 0.03). Utility in males was higher than in females (p = 0.002). As expected, patients with a history of stroke appeared to exhibit lower utilities than patients without such history, but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.73). Patients with more than three comorbidities did have lower utilities than patients without comorbidity (p = 0.01). Conclusions Health-state utilities found among hypertensive patients in Vietnam were similar to those found in other international studies. It is suggested that lower of health-state utilities exist among those patients who were older, female or had more than three comorbidities in comparison with respective reference groups. However, further research for confirmation is required. The data from this study provide a potential reference on health-state utilities of hypertensive patients in Vietnam as an input for future cost-effectiveness analysis of interventions. Also, it may serve as a reference for other similar populations, especially in the context of similar environments in low income countries. PMID:26506444

  3. Impact of angina frequency on health utility values of patients with chronic stable angina

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic angina is a profoundly symptomatic disease. We evaluated the relationship between angina frequency and health utility. Methods We used data from stable angina patients reporting ≥3 attacks/week enrolled in the Efficacy of Ranolazine in Chronic Angina (ERICA) trial. Angina frequency was classified using the Seattle Angina Questionnaire angina frequency (SAQAF) domain into no (100); monthly (61-99); weekly (31-60); and daily (0-30) angina. EuroQol (EQ)-5D health utility scores were derived from SAQ data using two mapping equations. Median EQ-5D utility scores for each SAQAF classification after the 6-week trial period were calculated (reported as: Equation 1/Equation 2). Changes in EQ-5D utility scores from baseline to end-of-trial for patients achieving and not achieving a ≥20-point improvement in SAQAF score and improving and not improving ≥1 SAQAF classification were compared. Results Median EQ-5D utility scores (n = 548) were 0.68/0.60. Compared to patients reporting no angina symptoms (n = 28; 0.89/0.87) patients reporting monthly (n = 188; 0.80/0.76), weekly (n = 283; 0.72/0.65) and daily (n = 49; 0.65/0.54) symptoms had poorer health utility (p < 0.001 for both equations). Patients improving ≥1SAQAF classification (n = 254/541, 47%) experienced a median 0.05/0.07 greater improvement in EQ-5D health utility compared to those not improving ≥1 classification (p < 0.001 for both equations). Patients improving ≥20-points on the SAQAF (n = 355/541, 66%) experienced a median 0.06/0.07 greater improvement in health utility compared to those not achieving a ≥20-point improvement (p < 0.001 for both). Conclusions Chronic angina patient health utility decreases as angina frequency increases. Patients reporting clinically important improvement in angina frequency experience a tangible improvement in health utility. Clinical trial registration NCT00091429 PMID:24628859

  4. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. Objectives. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Methods. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Conclusion. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients’ individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients’ entire pathway of care. PMID:26311705

  5. Characteristics of Hospice Patients Utilizing Hospice Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyusuk; Burke, Sloane C.

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing popularity of a hospice inpatient/residential facility (HIRF) among hospice patients and their family members, examining who uses HIRFs has been of increasing importance. Using the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), we found that about 14% of hospice patients received care in a HIRF in 2007. Characteristics of patients associated with HIRF use largely match the industry norm for a general inpatient level of care, and include: having no caregiver, or having an incapable caregiver; having imminent death; and being directly admitted to a hospice after discharge from a hospital. Given a recent stricter enforcement of reimbursement rules, however, we call for close monitoring of any change in the number of HIRF beds—particularly in rural and low-income urban areas. PMID:23264662

  6. Clobazam-treated patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome experienced fewer seizure-related injuries than placebo patients during trial OV-1012.

    PubMed

    Isojarvi, Jouko; Lee, Deborah; Peng, Guangbin; Sperling, Michael R

    2016-06-01

    Drop seizures are especially problematic in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS) because of their potential for serious injury. In this post hoc analysis of phase 3 OV-1012 data, a medical review was conducted of seizure-related injuries based on Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) preferred terms from all adverse event (AE) listings. Patients receiving clobazam experienced fewer seizure-related injuries than those receiving placebo (8.9% all clobazam dosages vs. 27.1% placebo, p ≤ 0.05). Significant differences in the rates of seizure-related injuries were observed for the medium- and high-dosage clobazam treatment groups (4.8% and 10.2%, respectively, p ≤ 0.05). A total of 50 of 53 AEs considered seizure-related were mild or moderate in intensity; 3 severe AEs occurred in the placebo group (fall, contusion, and jaw fracture). A single serious AE (jaw fracture, which required hospitalization and surgery) occurred in a placebo-treated patient. Most injuries resolved by the end of the study. This analysis indicates that the reduction in drop-seizure frequency achieved with clobazam provides a clinically meaningful benefit, a reduced likelihood of experiencing seizure-related injuries. PMID:27145465

  7. Long-Term Efficacy and Safety of Atazanavir/Ritonavir Treatment in a Real-Life Cohort of Treatment-Experienced Patients with HIV Type 1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sönnerborg, Anders; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Thalme, Anders; Svedhem, Veronica; Dupke, Stephan; Eychenne, Jean-Luc; Nakonz, Tina; Jimenez-Exposito, Maria Jesus; Pugliese, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Atazanavir-based regimens have established efficacy and safety in both antiretroviral (ARV)-naive and -experienced patients. However, data evaluating effectiveness beyond 2 years is sparse. Therefore, we assessed the long-term outcomes of ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (ATV/r)-containing regimens in ARV-experienced patients in a clinical setting in a noncomparative, retrospective, observational study collecting data from three European HIV databases on ARV-experienced adults with HIV-1 infection starting an ATV/r-based regimen. Data were extracted every 6 months (maximum follow-up 5 years). Primary outcome was the proportion of patients remaining on ATV/r by baseline HIV-1 RNA (<500 or ≥500 copies/ml). Secondary outcomes included time to virologic failure, reasons for discontinuation, and long-term safety profile. The duration of treatment and time to virologic failure were analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. Data were analyzed for 1,294 ARV-experienced patients (male 74%; mean ART exposure 5.7 years). After 3 years, 56% (95% CI: 52%, 60%) of patients with baseline HIV-1 RNA <500 copies/ml and 53% (95% CI: 49%, 58%) of those with HIV-1 RNA ≥500 copies/ml remained on ATV/r. After 3 years, 75% (95% CI: 69%, 80%) of patients with baseline HIV-1 RNA <50 copies/ml remained suppressed and 51% (95% CI: 47%, 55%) of those with baseline HIV-1 RNA ≥50 copies/ml achieved and maintained virologic suppression. Although adverse events (AEs) were the main known reason for discontinuation, no unexpected AEs were observed. In a real-life setting ATV/r-based regimens demonstrated sustained virologic suppression in ARV-experienced patients. After long-term therapy the majority of patients remained on treatment and no unexpected AEs were observed. PMID:23016535

  8. Health Care Utilization and Expenditures Associated With Remote Monitoring in Patients With Implantable Cardiac Devices.

    PubMed

    Ladapo, Joseph A; Turakhia, Mintu P; Ryan, Michael P; Mollenkopf, Sarah A; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2016-05-01

    Several randomized trials and decision analysis models have found that remote monitoring may reduce health care utilization and expenditures in patients with cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs), compared with in-office monitoring. However, little is known about the generalizability of these findings to unselected populations in clinical practice. To compare health care utilization and expenditures associated with remote monitoring and in-office monitoring in patients with CIEDs, we used Truven Health MarketScan Commercial Claims and Medicare Supplemental Databases. We selected patients newly implanted with an implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD), cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D), or permanent pacemaker (PPM), in 2009, who had continuous health plan enrollment 2 years after implantation. Generalized linear models and propensity score matching were used to adjust for confounders and estimate differences in health care utilization and expenditures in patients with remote or in-office monitoring. We identified 1,127; 427; and 1,295 pairs of patients with a similar propensity for receiving an ICD, CRT-D, or PPM, respectively. Remotely monitored patients with ICDs experienced fewer emergency department visits resulting in discharge (p = 0.050). Remote monitoring was associated with lower health care expenditures in office visits among patients with PPMs (p = 0.025) and CRT-Ds (p = 0.006) and lower total inpatient and outpatient expenditures in patients with ICDs (p <0.0001). In conclusion, remote monitoring of patients with CIEDs may be associated with reductions in health care utilization and expenditures compared with exclusive in-office care. PMID:26996767

  9. How Do Patients and Health Workers Interact around Malaria Rapid Diagnostic Testing, and How Are the Tests Experienced by Patients in Practice? A Qualitative Study in Western Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Altaras, Robin; Nuwa, Anthony; Agaba, Bosco; Streat, Elizabeth; Tibenderana, James K.; Martin, Sandrine; Strachan, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Successful scale-up in the use of malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) requires that patients accept testing and treatment based on RDT results and that healthcare providers treat according to test results. Patient-provider communication is a key component of quality care, and leads to improved patient satisfaction, higher adherence to treatment and better health outcomes. Voiced or perceived patient expectations are also known to influence treatment decision-making among healthcare providers. While there has been a growth in literature on provider practices around rapid testing for malaria, there has been little analysis of inter-personal communication around the testing process. We investigated how healthcare providers and patients interact and engage throughout the diagnostic and treatment process, and how the testing service is experienced by patients in practice. Methods This research was conducted alongside a larger study which explored determinants of provider treatment decision-making following negative RDT results in a rural district (Kibaale) in mid-western Uganda, ten months after RDT introduction. Fifty-five patients presenting with fever were observed during routine outpatient visits at 12 low-level public health facilities. Observation captured communication practices relating to test purpose, results, diagnosis and treatment. All observed patients or caregivers were immediately followed up with in-depth interview. Analysis followed the ‘framework’ approach. A summative approach was also used to analyse observation data. Results Providers failed to consistently communicate the reasons for carrying out the test, and particularly to RDT-negative patients, a diagnostic outcome or the meaning of test results, also leading to confusion over what the test can detect. Patients appeared to value testing, but were frustrated by the lack of communication on outcomes. RDT-negative patients were dissatisfied by the absence of information on an

  10. Efficacy of Once Daily Darunavir/Ritonavir in PI-Naïve, NNRTI-Experienced Patients in the ODIN Trial

    PubMed Central

    Geretti, Anna Maria; Moeketsi, Mathe; Demasi, Ralph; van Delft, Yvon; Mohammed, Perry

    2015-01-01

    Background. An exploratory subanalysis of the ODIN trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r) 800/100 mg OD versus 600/100 mg BID in patients who were NNRTI-experienced but PI-naïve. Methods. ODIN was a phase III, 48-week study comparing DRV/r OD versus BID in 590 treatment-experienced patients with no DRV resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) at screening. Patients received DRV/r 800/100 mg OD or DRV/r 600/100 mg BID plus ≥2 NRTIs. Of the 590 patients randomized, 272 (46%) were NNRTI-experienced but PI-naïve. Results. Overall, 272 patients received DRV/r OD (n = 135) or BID (n = 137) plus ≥2 optimised NRTIs. The mean age was 39 years; 35% were female; 27% were Black, 24% Caucasian, 26% Oriental/Asian, and 23% other races; 17% were recruited in South Africa; and 48% had non-B HIV-1 subtypes. Mean baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA load was 4.10 log10⁡ copies/mL; median CD4 cell count was 258 cells/μL. At week 48, 111/135 (82%) of DRV/r OD and 109/137 (80%) of DRV/r BID patients achieved an HIV-1 RNA load <50 copies/mL. No patient developed primary PI RAMs. Conclusion. DRV/r 800/100 mg OD in combination with ≥2 optimised NRTIs led to virological suppression <50 copies/mL in 82% of NNRTI-experienced, PI-naïve patients by week 48. PMID:26357568

  11. Health State Utility Values in Patients Undergoing Endoscopic Sinus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Zachary M.; Wittenberg, Eve; Schlosser, Rodney J.; Mace, Jess C.; Smith, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS The primary study goal was to measure health state utility values in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) before and after undergoing endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS). A secondary goal was to assess the meaning of these values by comparing them with other chronic disease processes and currently available medical or surgical treatments. STUDY DESIGN Prospective, observational cohort study METHODS Adults with CRS were enrolled after electing ESS and observed over a 5-year period. Baseline demographic and medical comorbidities were recorded for each patient, as well as computed tomography (CT), endoscopy, olfaction, and disease-specific quality of life scores. Utility values were derived using the Short-Form 6D (SF-6D) at baseline and again after surgery. RESULTS The mean SF-6D utility value for the baseline health state of all patients with CRS (n=232) was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.63–0.66). Baseline utility values correlated with disease-specific QOL as measured by the Rhinosinusitis Disability Index (RSDI) (r=−0.660; P<0.001), but not baseline CT, endoscopy, or olfactory scores. Follow-up utility values (≥6 months) after ESS improved by 0.087 (95% CI: 0.06–0.12; P<0.001) in patients with no history of sinus surgery and 0.062 (95% CI: 0.04–0.09; P<0.001) in those undergoing a revision procedure. CONCLUSIONS Patients with CRS who failed medical therapy and elected to undergo ESS report health state utility values which are significantly lower than the United States population norm. Utility values showed improvement after ESS which was statistically and clinically significant. These results provide the initial data necessary for formal cost-effectiveness analyses incorporating ESS. PMID:22034223

  12. The Influence of Gatekeeping and Utilization Review on Patient Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Eve A; Hays, Ron D; Mitchinson, Allison; Lee, Martin; Siu, Albert L

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the influence of utilization review and denial of specialty referrals on patient satisfaction with overall medical care, willingness to recommend one’s physician group to a friend, and desire to disenroll from the health plan. DESIGN Two cross-sectional questionnaires: one of physician groups and one of patient satisfaction. SETTING Eighty-eight capitated physician groups in California. PARTICIPANTS Participants were 11,710 patients enrolled in a large California network-model HMO in 1993 who received care in one of the 88 physician groups. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS Our main measures were how groups conducted utilization review for specialty referrals and tests, patient-reported denial of specialty referrals, and patient satisfaction with overall medical care. Patients in groups that required preauthorization for access to many types of specialists were significantly (p≤ .001) less satisfied than patients in groups that had few preauthorization requirements, even after adjusting for patient and other group characteristics. Patients who had wanted to see a specialist in the previous year but did not see one were significantly less satisfied than those who had wanted to see a specialist and actually saw one (p < .001). In addition, patients who did not see a specialist when desired were more likely to want to disenroll from the health plan than patients who saw the specialist (40% vs 18%, p≤ .001) and more likely not to recommend their group to a friend (38% vs 13%, p≤ .001). CONCLUSIONS Policies that limited direct access to specialists, and especially denial of patient-desired referrals, were associated with significantly lower patient satisfaction, increased desire to disenroll, and lower likelihood of recommending the group to a friend. Health plans and physician groups need to take these factors into account when designing strategies to reduce specialty care use. PMID:10337038

  13. Health State Utilities for Patients with Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Dosoretz, Arie P; Hayman, James A; Yu, James B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Estimating the cost-effectiveness of whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), including Gamma Knife radiosurgery (GKRS), requires the quantitative measurement of patients’ health states after treatment. We sought to quantify individuals’ preferences for the relevant health states after WBRT or GKRS for brain metastases on a 0 to 1 scale, where 1 is perfect health and 0 is death. Methods: We prospectively measured utilities in patients with brain metastases evaluated at Yale for consideration of WBRT and/or GKRS, as well as oncology nurses who had cared for patients with brain metastases before and after WBRT or GKRS, using the Standard Gamble (SG) technique. Demographic information was also collected. Nonparametric tests were used to compare potential differences in utility values and for subgroups based on demographic characteristics. Results: There were 24 patients and 31 nurses who completed the study between December 2013 and May 2015. Median utilities ranged from 0.85 for the status-post (S/P) GKRS state to 0.25 (for neurologic dying). The median utility of being S/P WBRT was 0.70 compared to 0.85 S/P GKRS (p < 0.001). The cognitive decline from WBRT was associated with a notably low utility score of 0.30. There were no statistically significant differences between patients’ and nurses’ median utility scores. Conclusions: These SG utilities provide unique insights into brain metastases-related health states from the patient and provider perspective. As perceived by individuals with direct knowledge of the health states in question, WBRT has a significantly lower utility compared to GKRS. Cognitive decline following WBRT is associated with significant perceived reduction in quality of life. Differences in the relative importance of overall survival and quality of life with treatment existed between patients with different stages of disease. These utilities can be used to calculate quality-adjusted life

  14. Improving Patient Flow Utilizing a Collaborative Learning Model.

    PubMed

    Tibor, Laura C; Schultz, Stacy R; Cravath, Julie L; Rein, Russell R; Krecke, Karl N

    2016-01-01

    This initiative utilized a collaborative learning approach to increase knowledge and experience in process improvement and systems thinking while targeting improved patient flow in seven radiology modalities. Teams showed improvements in their project metrics and collectively streamlined the flow for 530 patients per day by improving patient lead time, wait time, and first case on-time start rates. In a post-project survey of 50 project team members, 82% stated they had more effective solutions as a result of the process improvement methodology, 84% stated they will be able to utilize the process improvement tools again in the future, and 98% would recommend participating in another project to a colleague. PMID:27514106

  15. Patterns of research utilization on patient care units

    PubMed Central

    Estabrooks, Carole A; Scott, Shannon; Squires, Janet E; Stevens, Bonnie; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Watt-Watson, Judy; Profetto-McGrath, Joanne; McGilton, Kathy; Golden-Biddle, Karen; Lander, Janice; Donner, Gail; Boschma, Geertje; Humphrey, Charles K; Williams, Jack

    2008-01-01

    Background Organizational context plays a central role in shaping the use of research by healthcare professionals. The largest group of professionals employed in healthcare organizations is nurses, putting them in a position to influence patient and system outcomes significantly. However, investigators have often limited their study on the determinants of research use to individual factors over organizational or contextual factors. Methods The purpose of this study was to examine the determinants of research use among nurses working in acute care hospitals, with an emphasis on identifying contextual determinants of research use. A comparative ethnographic case study design was used to examine seven patient care units (two adult and five pediatric units) in four hospitals in two Canadian provinces (Ontario and Alberta). Data were collected over a six-month period by means of quantitative and qualitative approaches using an array of instruments and extensive fieldwork. The patient care unit was the unit of analysis. Drawing on the quantitative data and using correspondence analysis, relationships between various factors were mapped using the coefficient of variation. Results Units with the highest mean research utilization scores clustered together on factors such as nurse critical thinking dispositions, unit culture (as measured by work creativity, work efficiency, questioning behavior, co-worker support, and the importance nurses place on access to continuing education), environmental complexity (as measured by changing patient acuity and re-sequencing of work), and nurses' attitudes towards research. Units with moderate research utilization clustered on organizational support, belief suspension, and intent to use research. Higher nursing workloads and lack of people support clustered more closely to units with the lowest research utilization scores. Conclusion Modifiable characteristics of organizational context at the patient care unit level influences research

  16. Health Service Utilization and Poor Health Reporting in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Behr, Joshua G.; Diaz, Rafael; Akpinar-Elci, Muge

    2016-01-01

    The management and treatment of adult asthma has been associated with utilization of health services. Objectives: First, to investigate the likelihood of health service utilization, including primary care, emergency department, and hospital stays, among persons diagnosed with an asthma condition relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Second, to examine the likelihood of poor physical health among asthma respondents relative to those that do not have an asthma condition. Third, to demonstrate that these relationships vary with frequency of utilization. Fourth, to discuss the magnitude of differences in frequent utilization between asthma and non-asthma respondents. Data Source: Data is derived from a random, stratified sampling of Hampton Roads adults, 18 years and older (n = 1678). Study Design: Study participants are interviewed to identify asthma diagnosis, access to primary care, frequency of emergency department utilization, hospital admissions, and days of poor physical health. Odds-ratios establish relationships with the covariates on the outcome variable. Findings: Those with asthma are found more likely (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.05–2.15) to report poor physical health relative to non-asthma study participants. Further, asthma respondents are found more likely (OR 4.23, 95% CI 1.56–11.69) to frequently utilize primary care that may be associated with the management of the condition and are also more likely to utilize treatment services, such as the emergency department (OR 1.87, 95% CI 1.32–2.65) and hospitalization (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.39–3.50), associated with acute and episodic care. Further, it is a novel finding that these likelihoods increase with frequency of utilization for emergency department visits and hospital stays. Conclusion: Continuity in care and better management of the diseases may result in less demand for emergency department services and hospitalization. Health care systems need to recognize that asthma patients are

  17. Utility of ranolazine in chronic stable angina patients

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pawan D; Arora, Rohit R

    2008-01-01

    Chronic stable angina is a debilitating illness affecting at least 6.6 million US residents. Despite being optimally treated by pharmacotherapy and revascularization up to 26% of patients still experience angina. Diabetes mellitus is a common co-morbid condition in angina patients. Several new investigational medications are being tested for chronic angina. Advances in understanding of myocardial ischemia have prompted evaluation of a number of new antianginal strategies. In this review we discuss the utility of ranolazine, a recently approved novel antianginal agent and its efficacy in the diabetic patient population. In addition to its antianginal action in diabetic patients with chronic angina, ranolazine may have favorable effects on glycated hemoglobin levels. PMID:19065998

  18. [Three Elderly Female Patients Who Experienced Self-Recovery during End-of-Life Care at Home].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Hiro; Sato, Mutsuko

    2015-12-01

    Recently, after completing hospital treatment, 3 elderly female patients were introduced to our home care department for end-of-life care at home. However, these patients recovered almost by themselves and now spend quiet days. From now on, women became the era they live alone in the statistics on the elderly. On the basis of these 3 cases, it is suggested that elderly female patients have the capacity to overcome conditions such as infectious diseases and digestive system disorders. PMID:26809415

  19. Prevalence and Evolution of Low Frequency HIV Drug Resistance Mutations Detected by Ultra Deep Sequencing in Patients Experiencing First Line Antiretroviral Therapy Failure

    PubMed Central

    Recordon-Pinson, Patricia; Reigadas, Sandrine; Bidet, Yannick; Bruyand, Mathias; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Neau, Didier; Fleury, Hervé; Dabis, François; Morlat, Philippe; Masquelier, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Clinical relevance of low-frequency HIV-1 variants carrying drug resistance associated mutations (DRMs) is still unclear. We aimed to study the prevalence of low-frequency DRMs, detected by Ultra-Deep Sequencing (UDS) before antiretroviral therapy (ART) and at virological failure (VF), in HIV-1 infected patients experiencing VF on first-line ART. Methods Twenty-nine ART-naive patients followed up in the ANRS-CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, having initiated ART between 2000 and 2009 and experiencing VF (2 plasma viral loads (VL) >500 copies/ml or one VL >1000 copies/ml) were included. Reverse transcriptase and protease DRMs were identified using Sanger sequencing (SS) and UDS at baseline (before ART initiation) and VF. Results Additional low-frequency variants with PI-, NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs were found by UDS at baseline and VF, significantly increasing the number of detected DRMs by 1.35 fold (p<0.0001) compared to SS. These low-frequency DRMs modified ARV susceptibility predictions to the prescribed treatment for 1 patient at baseline, in whom low-frequency DRM was found at high frequency at VF, and 6 patients at VF. DRMs found at VF were rarely detected as low-frequency DRMs prior to treatment. The rare low-frequency NNRTI- and NRTI-DRMs detected at baseline that correlated with the prescribed treatment were most often found at high-frequency at VF. Conclusion Low frequency DRMs detected before ART initiation and at VF in patients experiencing VF on first-line ART can increase the overall burden of resistance to PI, NRTI and NNRTI. PMID:24475178

  20. Four years data of raltegravir-based salvage therapy in HIV-1-infected, treatment-experienced patients: the SALIR-E Study.

    PubMed

    Capetti, Amedeo; Meraviglia, Paola; Landonio, Simona; Sterrantino, Gaetana; Di Biagio, Antonio; Lo Caputo, Sergio; Ammassari, Adriana; Menzaghi, Barbara; De Socio, Giuseppe Vittorio; Franzetti, Marco; Soria, Alessandro; Meschiari, Marianna; Sasset, Lolita; Pellicanò, Giovanni; Mazzotta, Elena; Trezzi, Michele; Celesia, Benedetto Maurizio; Melzi, Sara; Carenzi, Laura; Ricci, Elena; Rizzardini, Giuliano

    2014-02-01

    Apart from the BENCHMRK study, there are no large observational experiences describing the long-term efficacy and safety of rescue regimens for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Antiretroviral-experienced patients with detectable viraemia starting a raltegravir (RAL)-based regimen between March 2007 and June 2009 were consecutively enrolled and followed for ≥4 years. Data were censored at Week 206 for homogeneity. Of 333 patients, 258 (77.5%) were still on RAL-based therapy at Week 206, and 241 had undetectable HIV-1 RNA (73% in intention-to-treat analysis). Of the 75 subjects who discontinued RAL therapy, 36 were lost to follow-up, 15 changed their regimen due to virological failure, 2 simplified their regimen stopping RAL, 9 stopped all antiretrovirals and 13 died. Overall, 100 subjects (30.0%) had at least one detectable viraemia, but only 32 (9.6%) had true viral failure. Seventeen patients continued their failing regimen. 'Blips' were experienced by 53 patients (15.9%), whilst 15 (4.5%) had confirmed viral rebound due to adherence issues and were re-suppressed upon treatment re-introduction. In a multivariate analysis of predictors of interruption or failure, each baseline HIV-1 RNA log10 increase was associated with an adjusted hazard ratio for failure of 1.6; having more than 13 previous treatment courses also emerged as a predictor. Overall, adverse events were rare (n=64), with 13 deaths. Tumours were mainly early events, often fatal (7/15), mainly non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (8), followed by hepatocarcinoma (2). RAL proved effective and well tolerated in this cohort, and few patients experienced viral failure after 4 years. PMID:24315315

  1. Utilization Patterns of Coagulation Factor Consumption for Patients with Hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yu, Su-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Hemophilia is a serious rare disease that requires continuous management and treatment for which the medicine is costly at the annual average of 100 million KRW for an individual. The aim of this study was to investigate trends in the utilization of coagulation factor (CF) used for hemophilia treatment using the National Health Insurance database from 2010 to 2013 in Korea and compare the utilization of CF with other countries. The consumption of CF per capita (IU) in Korea was not more than other countries with similar income to Korea. However, CF usage per patient IU was higher because the prevalence rate of hemophilia in Korea was lower than in other countries while the number of serious patients was much more. Therefore, it is difficult to say that the consumption of hemophilia medicine in Korea is higher than that in other countries. The consumption and cost of hemophilia medicine in Korea is likely to increase due to the increased utilization of expensive bypassing agents and the widespread use of prophylaxis for severe hemophilia. Even during the research period, it increased slightly and other countries show a similar trend. Thus, hemophilia patient management should accompany active monitoring on the health and cost outcomes of pharmaceutical treatment in the future. This study is expected to contribute to further insight into drug policies for other countries that face similar challenges with high price pharmaceuticals. PMID:26770035

  2. Health utility indexes in patients with acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Baris; Rodondi, Nicolas; Auer, Reto; Nanchen, David; Räber, Lorenz; Klingenberg, Roland; Pletscher, Mark; Jüni, Peter; Windecker, Stephan; Matter, Christian M; Lüscher, Thomas F; Mach, François; Perneger, Thomas V; Girardin, François R

    2016-01-01

    Background Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) have been associated with lower health utilities (HUs) compared with the general population. Given the prognostic improvements after ACS with the implementation of coronary angiography (eg, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI)), contemporary HU values derived from patient-reported outcomes are needed. Methods We analysed data of 1882 patients with ACS 1 year after coronary angiography in a Swiss prospective cohort. We used the EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire (EQ-5D) and visual analogue scale (VAS) to derive HU indexes. We estimated the effects of clinical factors on HU using a linear regression model and compared the observed HU with the average values of individuals of the same sex and age in the general population. Results Mean EQ-5D HU 1-year after coronary angiography for ACS was 0.82 (±0.16) and mean VAS was 0.77 (±0.18); 40.9% of participants exhibited the highest utility values. Compared with population controls, the mean EQ-5D HU was similar (expected mean 0.82, p=0.58) in patients with ACS, but the mean VAS was slightly lower (expected mean 0.79, p<0.001). Patients with ACS who are younger than 60 years had lower HU than the general population (<0.001). In patients with ACS, significant differences were found according to the gender, education and employment status, diabetes, obesity, heart failure, recurrent ischaemic or incident bleeding event and participation in cardiac rehabilitation (p<0.01). Conclusions At 1 year, patients with ACS with coronary angiography had HU indexes similar to a control population. Subgroup analyses based on patients' characteristics and further disease-specific instruments could provide better sensitivity for detecting smaller variations in health-related quality of life. PMID:27252878

  3. A Randomized Trial of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Protease Inhibitors in Antiretroviral-Experienced, HIV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Lisa M.; Jiang, Hongyu; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Morse, Gene D.; DiFrancesco, Robin; Dykes, Carrie; Sista, Prakash; Bacheler, Lee; Klingman, Karin; Rinehart, Alex; Albrecht, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Objective Whether therapeutic drug monitoring of protease inhibitors (PIs) improves outcomes in HIV-infected patients is controversial. We evaluated this strategy in a randomized, open-label clinical trial, using a normalized inhibitory quotient (NIQ), which incorporates drug exposure and viral drug resistance. NIQs≤1 may predict poor outcome and identify patients who could benefit from dose escalation. Design/Methods Eligible patients had a viral load ≥1,000 copies/mL on a failing regimen, and began a new PI-containing regimen at entry. All FDA-approved PIs available during study recruitment (June 2002-May 2006) were allowed. One-hundred-eighty-three participants with NIQ≤1, based on their week 2 PI trough concentration and pre-entry drug resistance test, were randomized at week 4 to standard of care (SOC) or PI dose escalation (TDM). The primary endpoint was change in log10 plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration from randomization to 20 weeks later. Results Ninety-one subjects were randomized to SOC, 92 to TDM. NIQs increased more in the TDM arm compared to SOC (+69% versus +25%, p=0.01). Despite this, TDM and SOC arms showed no difference in outcome (+0.09 versus +0.02 log10, p=0.17). In retrospective subgroup analyses, patients with less HIV resistance to their PIs benefited from TDM (p=0.002), as did black and Hispanic patients (p=0.035 and 0.05, respectively). Differences between black and white patients persisted when accounting for PI susceptibility. Conclusions There was no overall benefit of TDM. In post-hoc, subgroup analyses, TDM appeared beneficial in black and Hispanic patients, and in patients whose virus retained some susceptibility to the PIs in their regimen. PMID:19114860

  4. Fludarabine add-on therapy in interferon-beta-treated patients with multiple sclerosis experiencing breakthrough disease

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Steven J.; Zivadinov, Robert; Lee-Kwen, Peterkin; Sharma, Jitendra; Planter, Margaret; Umhauer, Margaret; Glenister, Norman; Bakshi, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) may experience breakthrough disease despite effective interferon beta (IFNβ) therapy. Fludarabine (FLU) is a chemotherapeutic agent used in lymphoproliferative disorders that may be synergistic when combined with immunomodulatory therapy to control active multiple sclerosis (MS). Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the safety and tolerability of FLU versus monthly methylprednisolone (MP) in IFNβ-treated RRMS patients with breakthrough disease. Clinical and MRI effects of IFNβ-1a plus FLU were evaluated. Methods: Eighteen patients with breakthrough disease [⩾2 relapses over the prior year and ⩾1.0-point increase in Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) score sustained for ⩾3 months] after >1 year of IFNβ therapy were enrolled in this prospective, open-label, randomized, proof-of-concept, pilot study. Patients received intravenous (IV) MP 1 g daily for 3 days and then were randomized to receive 3 monthly IV infusions of FLU 25 mg/m2 daily for 5 consecutive days (n = 10) or MP 1 g (n = 8). All patients maintained their intramuscular IFNβ-1a treatment throughout the study. Analyses explored safety signals and directional trends; this preliminary study was not powered to detect clinically meaningful differences. Results: Both combination treatments were safe and well tolerated, with all adverse events mild. Patients treated with IFNβ-1a plus FLU had similar relapse rates, EDSS scores, and MS Functional Composite scores, but significantly less acute corticosteroid use for on-study relapses and better responses on some MRI outcomes, versus patients treated with IFNβ-1a plus MP. Conclusions: Further study of FLU for breakthrough disease in patients with RRMS is warranted. PMID:27006698

  5. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population. PMID:27156441

  6. Patient Experienced Continuity of Care in the Psychiatric Healthcare System—A Study Including Immigrants, Refugees and Ethnic Danes

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Natasja Koitzsch; Johansen, Katrine Schepelern; Kastrup, Marianne; Krasnik, Allan; Norredam, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to investigate continuity of care in the psychiatric healthcare system from the perspective of patients, including vulnerable groups such as immigrants and refugees. Method: The study is based on 19 narrative interviews conducted with 15 patients with diverse migration backgrounds (immigrants, descendents, refugees, and ethnic Danes). Patients were recruited from a community psychiatric centre situated in an area with a high proportion of immigrants and refugees. Data were analysed through the lens of a theoretical framework of continuity of care in psychiatry, developed in 2004 by Joyce et al., which encompasses four domains: accessibility, individualised care, relationship base and service delivery. Results: Investigating continuity of care, we found issues of specific concern to immigrants and refugees, but also commonalities across the groups. For accessibility, areas pertinent to immigrants and refugees include lack of knowledge concerning mental illness and obligations towards children. In terms of individualised care, trauma, additional vulnerability, and taboo concerning mental illness were of specific concern. In the domain of service delivery, social services included assistance with immigration papers for immigrants and refugees. In the relationship base domain, no differences were identified. Implications for priority area: The treatment courses of patients in the psychiatric field are complex and diverse and the patient perspective of continuity of care provides important insight into the delivery of care. The study highlights the importance of person-centred care irrespective of migration background though it may be beneficial to have an awareness of areas that may be of more specific concern to immigrants and refugees. Conclusions: The study sheds light on concerns specific to immigrants and refugees in a framework of continuity of care, but also commonalities across the patient groups. PMID:25233017

  7. Capecitabine-induced coronary artery vasospasm in a patient who previously experienced a similar episode with fluorouracil therapy.

    PubMed

    Karakulak, Uğur Nadir; Aladağ, Elifcan; Maharjan, Naresh; Övünç, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Capecitabine is a chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of metastatic colon cancer and metastatic breast cancer. It is metabolized into fluorouracil (5-FU) in the liver; hence, its mechanism of action is similar to that of 5-FU. Cardiac toxicity, although rarely seen, may be of concern in some patients. Although multiple hypotheses have been proposed for the mechanism of cardiotoxicity, coronary vasospasm is the most commonly accepted one, as patients usually present with chest pain resembling acute myocardial infarction. Electrocardiography may demonstrate ST-segment elevation, and cardiac biomarkers may be elevated. Cardiotoxicity with 5-FU has been reported widely. Capecitabine has been shown to be much less cardiotoxic compared to 5-FU, with only a handful of cases reporting cardiotoxicity with capecitabine. There are no cases reporting cardiotoxicity with both 5-FU and capecitabine in the same patient. In this case report, we present a patient with adverse cardiac effect with capecitabine whose previous 5-FU therapy was stopped due to cardiotoxicity. PMID:26875134

  8. Dolutegravir-based monotherapy or dual therapy maintains a high proportion of viral suppression even in highly experienced HIV-1-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Gubavu, Camelia; Prazuck, Thierry; Niang, Mohamadou; Buret, Jennifer; Mille, Catherine; Guinard, Jérôme; Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Hocqueloux, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background Dolutegravir is a powerful, well-tolerated integrase inhibitor with a high genetic barrier to resistance and may thus constitute the backbone of lightened regimens. Methods This was a monocentric, retrospective study. HIV-1-infected patients receiving dolutegravir as monotherapy (mDGV) or dual therapy (dDGV) were systematically identified. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients who maintained undetectable (<50 copies/mL) plasma HIV RNA [plasma viral load (PVL)]. Results We identified 21 patients on mDGV (50 mg/day) and 31 on dDGV (50 or 100 mg/day, with atazanavir ± ritonavir, n = 12; rilpivirine, n = 11; maraviroc, n = 3; lamivudine, n = 3; darunavir/ritonavir, n = 1; or abacavir, n = 1). All of the patients were treatment experienced and 48% had experienced at least one virological failure. The baseline characteristics were as follows (for the mDGV/dDGV patients, respectively): 5%/29% had a history of AIDS; the median (IQR) highest PVL was 4.5 (4.3–5.5)/5.3 (4.7–5.6) log copies/mL; the median (IQR) nadir CD4+ count was 310 (280–468)/199 (134–281) cells/mm3; 100% had undetectable PVL before the mDGV for a median (IQR) duration of 5.9 (3.5–9.9) years/81% had undetectable PVL before the dDGV for a median (IQR) duration of 3.7 (1.4–8.3) years; and the median (IQR) HIV DNA level was 2.7 (2.1–3.1)/2.9 (2.7–3) log copies/106 PBMCs. At the last follow-up visit, 100% and 97% of patients showed undetectable PVL following mDGV and dDGV, respectively [median (IQR) follow-up of 32 (29–45) and 50 (30–74) weeks, respectively]. Conclusions In our experience, dolutegravir-based lightened regimens provided a high proportion of viral suppression, even in highly treatment-experienced patients. PMID:26712907

  9. Long-term efficacy and safety of etravirine-containing regimens in a real-life cohort of treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Allavena, Clotilde; Katlama, Christine; Cotte, Laurent; Roger, Pierre Marie; Delobel, Pierre; Cheret, Antoine; Duvivier, Claudine; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Hoen, Bruno; Cabie, André; Cheret, Arnaud; Lahoulou, Rima; Raffi, François; Pugliese, Pascal

    2016-05-01

    Objectives Etravirine (ETR) was approved in France in September 2008 and is used in combination with a boosted protease inhibitor (bPI) and other anti-retrovirals (ART) in HIV-infected pre-treated patients. This study aimed to report in a real-life setting the efficacy and tolerability of ETR-based regimens and factors associated with virological response. Methods The study population included all treatment-experienced patients who initiated an ETR-based regimen between September 2008 and July 2013 from the French Dat'AIDS cohort. Analyses were performed in ART-experienced patients starting ETR after virological failure (VF) or as a maintenance therapy (MT), with or without bPI. Results A total of 2006 patients (VF, n = 1014 (51%); MT, n = 992 (49%)) were included. At M12, the proportion of patients with HIV RNA < 50 copies/ml was 71.7% (72.0% and 71.1% with or without bPI) in the VF group and 90.5% (85.0% and 92.3% with or without bPI) in the MT group, without significant differences regarding the use of bPI. ETR was discontinued in 8.8% of patients for adverse events in 23.9% of cases (21.5% in VF, 29.5% in MT), treatment failure in 15.2% (16.2% in VF, 7.4% in MT) or simplification in 5.4% (4.6% in VF, 7.4% in MT). In the VF group, factors associated with virological response were a longer duration of HIV infection (OR = 2.7; p < 0.001) and baseline HIV RNA < 5 log10 copies/mL (OR = 2.1; p = 0.002). Conclusion This study shows that in ART-experienced patients ETR is well tolerated with a high efficacy when combined with other active drugs, even when the regimen does not include a bPI. PMID:26757613

  10. Direct Release of Test Results to Patients Increases Patient Engagement and Utilization of Care

    PubMed Central

    Pillemer, Francesca; Price, Rebecca Anhang; Paone, Suzanne; Martich, G. Daniel; Albert, Steve; Haidari, Leila; Updike, Glenn; Rudin, Robert; Liu, Darren; Mehrotra, Ateev

    2016-01-01

    An important focus for meaningful use criteria is to engage patients in their care by allowing them online access to their health information, including test results. There has been little evaluation of such initiatives. Using a mixed methods analysis of electronic health record data, surveys, and qualitative interviews, we examined the impact of allowing patients to view their test results via patient portal in one large health system. Quantitative data were collected for new users and all users of the patient portal. Qualitative interviews occurred with patients who had received an HbA1c or abnormal Pap result. Survey participants were active patient portal users. Our main measures were patient portal usage, factors associated with viewing test results and utilizing care, and patient and provider experiences with patient portal and direct release. Usage data show 80% of all patient portal users viewed test results during the year. Of survey respondents, 82.7% noted test results to be a very useful feature and 70% agreed that patient portal has made their provider more accessible to them. Interviewed patients reported feeling they should have direct access to test results and identified the ability to monitor results over time and prepare prior to communicating with a provider as benefits. In interviews, both patients and physicians reported instances of test results leading to unnecessary patient anxiety. Both groups noted the benefits of results released with provider interpretation. Quantitative data showed patient utilization to increase with viewing test results online, but this effect is mitigated when results are manually released by physicians. Our findings demonstrate that patient portal access to test results was highly valued by patients and appeared to increase patient engagement. However, it may lead to patient anxiety and increase rates of patient visits. We discuss how such unintended consequences can be addressed and larger implications for

  11. Effect of Peginterferon or Ribavirin Dosing on Efficacy of Therapy With Telaprevir in Treatment-Experienced Patients With Chronic Hepatitis C and Advanced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Janczewska, Ewa; Flisiak, Robert; Zarebska-Michaluk, Dorota; Kozielewicz, Dorota; Berak, Hanna; Dobracka, Beata; Librant-Suska, Marta; Lojewski, Wladyslaw; Jurczyk, Krzysztof; Musialik, Joanna; Postawa-Klosińska, Barbara; Wroblewski, Jacek; Augustyniak, Krystyna; Dudziak, Marek; Olszok, Iwona; Ruszala, Agata; Pisula, Arkadiusz; Lapinski, Tadeusz; Kryczka, Wieslaw; Horban, Andrzej; Dobracki, Witold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the safety, efficacy, and impact of ribavirin and peginterferon dose reduction on complete early virologic response and sustained virologic response (SVR) to triple therapy with telaprevir in treatment-experienced patients with advanced liver fibrosis. Treatment was initiated for 211 patients who failed treatment with peginterferon and ribavirin, with bridging fibrosis (F3, n = 68) or cirrhosis (F4, n = 143), including 103 (49%) null-responders (NR), 30 (14%) partial responders (PR), and 78 (37%) relapsers (REL). Impaired liver function (ILF) platelets <100,000/mm3 or albumin <35 g/L were present in 40 patients. The distribution of hepatitis C virus subtypes was: 1a, 1b, or 1, with undetermined subtype for 10 (5%), 187 (89%), and 14 (6%) patients, respectively. Treatment was started with peginterferon alpha-2a or alpha-2b, ribavirin, and telaprevir at standard doses. The overall SVR24 rate was 56% and was lower in cirrhotic patients (NR: 35%, PR: 40%, and REL: 63%, respectively) than in patients with bridging fibrosis (NR: 50%, PR: 75%, and REL: 75%, respectively). The lowest probability of SVR24 was in NRs with ILF (26%). The SVR24 rate significantly decreased in NRs receiving <60% vs >60% of the total ribavirin dose (23% vs 44%, respectively) or <80% vs >80% of the total ribavirin dose (33% vs 48%, respectively). A significant SVR24 decrease was noted subsequent to a total peginterferon dose reduction, both when comparing patients who received <60% vs >60% of the total dose (NR: 0% vs 44%; REL: 33% vs 68%) and patients who received <80% vs >80% of the total dose (NR: 17% vs 50%; REL: 46% vs 71%). Serious adverse events were observed in 31 patients (15%). Deaths occurred in 4 patients. All of the deceased subjects were cirrhotic members of the ILF (baseline serum albumin level <35 g/L and/or platelet count <100,000/mm3) group. Ribavirin dose reduction did not affect efficacy in REL but did in NR. Peginterferon dose reduction

  12. Scoring correction for MMPI-2 Hs scale with patients experiencing a traumatic brain injury: a test of measurement invariance.

    PubMed

    Alkemade, Nathan; Bowden, Stephen C; Salzman, Louis

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that MMPI-2 scoring requires removal of some items when assessing patients after a traumatic brain injury (TBI). Gass (1991. MMPI-2 interpretation and closed head injury: A correction factor. Psychological assessment, 3, 27-31) proposed a correction procedure in line with the hypothesis that MMPI-2 endorsement may be affected by symptoms of TBI. This study assessed the validity of the Gass correction procedure. A sample of patients with a TBI (n = 242), and a random subset of the MMPI-2 normative sample (n = 1,786). The correction procedure implies a failure of measurement invariance across populations. This study examined measurement invariance of one of the MMPI-2 scales (Hs) that includes TBI correction items. A four-factor model of the MMPI-2 Hs items was defined. The factor model was found to meet the criteria for partial measurement invariance. Analysis of the change in sensitivity and specificity values implied by partial measurement invariance failed to indicate significant practical impact of partial invariance. Overall, the results support continued use of all Hs items to assess psychological well-being in patients with TBI. PMID:25413486

  13. Rapid Prediction of Treatment Futility of Boceprevir with Peginterferon-Ribavirin for Taiwanese Treatment Experienced Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chi-Chieh; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Su, Chien-Wei; Liu, Chun-Jen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the boceprevir (BOC)-containing triple therapy in Taiwanese treatment-experienced patients remains elusive. After 4 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin lead-in therapy, patients with cirrhosis or previous null-response received triple therapy for 44 weeks; whereas others received 32 weeks of triple therapy followed by 12 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. Patients with HCV RNA > 100 IU/mL at week 12 or with detectable HCV RNA at week 24 of treatment were viewed as futile. A total of 123 patients received treatment. The rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and relapse were 66.7% and 8.9%, respectively by using intention-to-treat analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors associated with SVR included HCV-1b (odds ratio [OR]/ 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 19.23/1.76-525.15, P = 0.01), BOC adherence (7.69/1.55-48.78, P = 0.01), serum albumin (OR/CI:6.25/1.14-40.07, P = 0.03) levels and HCV RNA levels (OR/CI:0.34/0.12-0.79, P = 0.01). Twenty-six (21.1%) patients experienced severe adverse events (SAEs). Multivariate analysis revealed that APRI > 1.5 was the single factor associated with occurring SAEs (OR/CI: 3.77/ 0.97-14.98, P = 0.05). Merging the cut-off values of HCV RNA > 7 log IU/mL at baseline and HCV RNA > 6 log IU/mL at week 4 provided the earliest and best combing viral kinetics in predicting week 12/24 futility with the PPV of 100% and accuracy of 93.5%. HCV-1 treatment experienced Taiwanese patients treated with boceprevir-containing triple therapy in real world had comparable efficacy and safety profiles with those reported in clinical trials. Early viral kinetics before week 4 of treatment highly predicted futility at week 12 or 24 of treatment. PMID:26368130

  14. Rapid Prediction of Treatment Futility of Boceprevir with Peginterferon-Ribavirin for Taiwanese Treatment Experienced Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chi-Chieh; Tsai, Wei-Lun; Su, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chung-Feng; Cheng, Pin-Nan; Lo, Ching-Chu; Tseng, Kuo-Chih; Mo, Lein-Ray; Wang, Chun-Hsiang; Hsu, Shih-Jer; Lai, Hsueh-Chou; Su, Chien-Wei; Liu, Chun-Jen; Peng, Cheng-Yuan; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy and safety of the boceprevir (BOC)-containing triple therapy in Taiwanese treatment-experienced patients remains elusive. After 4 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin lead-in therapy, patients with cirrhosis or previous null-response received triple therapy for 44 weeks; whereas others received 32 weeks of triple therapy followed by 12 weeks of peginterferon/ribavirin therapy. Patients with HCV RNA > 100 IU/mL at week 12 or with detectable HCV RNA at week 24 of treatment were viewed as futile. A total of 123 patients received treatment. The rates of sustained virological response (SVR) and relapse were 66.7% and 8.9%, respectively by using intention-to-treat analysis. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors associated with SVR included HCV-1b (odds ratio [OR]/ 95% confidence intervals [CI]: 19.23/1.76–525.15, P = 0.01), BOC adherence (7.69/1.55–48.78, P = 0.01), serum albumin (OR/CI:6.25/1.14–40.07, P = 0.03) levels and HCV RNA levels (OR/CI:0.34/0.12–0.79, P = 0.01). Twenty-six (21.1%) patients experienced severe adverse events (SAEs). Multivariate analysis revealed that APRI > 1.5 was the single factor associated with occurring SAEs (OR/CI: 3.77/ 0.97–14.98, P = 0.05). Merging the cut-off values of HCV RNA > 7 log IU/mL at baseline and HCV RNA > 6 log IU/mL at week 4 provided the earliest and best combing viral kinetics in predicting week 12/24 futility with the PPV of 100% and accuracy of 93.5%. HCV-1 treatment experienced Taiwanese patients treated with boceprevir-containing triple therapy in real world had comparable efficacy and safety profiles with those reported in clinical trials. Early viral kinetics before week 4 of treatment highly predicted futility at week 12 or 24 of treatment. PMID:26368130

  15. A cohort study of treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients treated with raltegravir: factors associated with virological response and mutations selected at failure.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Delaugerre, Constance; Beaudoux, Céline; Descamps, Diane; Morand-Joubert, Laurence; Amiel, Corinne; Schneider, Veronique; Ferre, Virginie; Izopet, Jacques; Si-Mohamed, Ali; Maillard, Anne; Henquell, Cécile; Desbois, Delphine; Lazrek, Mouna; Signori-Schmuck, Anne; Rogez, Sylvie; Yerly, Sabine; Trabaud, Mary-Anne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Fourati, Slim; Houssaini, Allal; Masquelier, Bernard; Calvez, Vincent; Flandre, Philippe

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to identify factors associated with virological response (VR) to raltegravir (RAL)-containing regimens in 468 treatment-experienced but integrase inhibitor-naive HIV-1 patients receiving a RAL-containing regimen. VR was defined at Month 6 (M6) as HIV-1 RNA viral load (VL) <50 copies/mL. The impacts on VR of baseline integrase mutations, VL, CD4 count, genotypic sensitivity score for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors, and the number of new antiretrovirals used for the first time associated with RAL were investigated. For patients with VL >50 copies/mL at M6, integrase mutations selected were characterised. Median baseline VL was 4.2 log(10)copies/mL (IQR 3.3-4.9 log(10) copies/mL) and CD4 count was 219 cells/mm(3) (IQR 96-368 cells/mm(3)). At M6, 71% of patients were responders. In multivariate analysis, baseline VL and CD4 count and ≥ 2 new antiretrovirals among darunavir, etravirine, maraviroc and enfuvirtide were associated with VR to RAL. Neither HIV-1 subtype nor baseline integrase polymorphisms were associated with VR to RAL. Among 63 failing patients at M6, selection of ≥ 1 change in the integrase gene was observed in 49 (77.8%), and 27/63 (42.9%) were considered as RAL-associated resistance mutations. Factors independently associated with the occurrence of ≥ 1 RAL-associated resistance mutation were VL at failure >3 log(10) and having no new drugs associated with RAL. RAL showed great potency in treatment-experienced patients. The number of new drugs associated with RAL was an important factor associated with VR. HIV-1 subtype and baseline integrase polymorphisms do not influence the RAL VR. PMID:23562640

  16. Health service utilization patterns of primary care patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosemann, Thomas; Joos, Stefanie; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Laux, Gunter; Wensing, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Background To assess factors associated with visits to GPs, orthopaedists, and non-physician practitioners of complementary medicine (alternative practitioners) by primary care patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods Cross-sectional survey among 1250 consecutively addressed patients from 75 primary care practices in Germany. All patients suffered from OA of the knee or hip according to ACR criteria. They received questionnaires collecting sociodemographic data, data about health service utilisation, prescriptions, comorbidities. They also included established instruments as the Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale (AIMS2-SF) to assess disease-specific quality of life and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) to assess depression. Hierarchical stepwise multiple linear regression models were used to reveal significant factors influencing health service utilization. Results 1021 of 1250 (81.6%) questionnaires were returned. Nonrespondents did not differ from participants. Factors associated with health service use (HSU) varied between providers of care. Not being in a partnership, achieving a high score on the PHQ-9, increased pain severity reflected in the “symptom” scale of the AIMS2-SF, and an increased number of drug prescriptions predicted a high frequency of GP visits. The PHQ-9 score was also a predictor for visits to orthopaedists, as were previous GP contacts, a high score in the "symptom" scale as well as a high score in the "lower limb scale" of the AIMS2-SF. Regarding visits to alternative practitioners, a high score in the AIMS -"social" scale was a positive predictor as older people were less likely to visit them. Conclusion Our results emphasize the need for awareness of psychological factors contributing to the use of health care providers. Addressing the revealed factors associated with HSU appropriately may lead to decreased health care utilization. But further research is needed to assess how this can be done successfully. PMID:17956605

  17. Holistic self-care for rehabilitation experienced by thai buddhist trauma patients in areas of political and social unrest.

    PubMed

    Songwathana, Praneed; Watanasiriwanich, Wachiraya; Kitrungrote, Luppana

    2013-01-01

    This study describes the meaning and practice of holistic self-care for rehabilitation among Thai Buddhist trauma patients living in areas of political unrest where acts of terrorism occur. Eleven Thai Buddhist trauma patients were selected as specified. The data were collected by in-depth interviews between November 2011 and April 2012, and analyzed using the Van Manen method.Those interviewed described "holistic self-care for rehabilitation" as learning (1) to acquire a new life and (2) to bear the increased demands of care as a chronic disease. Health care responses fell into 3 categories: (1) improving physical self-sufficiency and rehabilitation by increasing muscle strength, pain management, and pressure sores; (2) improving psychological well-being by applying positive thinking, making an effort to live independently, and following a set of religious practices; and (3) finding harmony in life through caution and a willingness to adjust one's lifestyle. Although the participants seemed to adapt well to their new lifestyles, extensive support from health care professionals was necessary. This study promotes better understanding of the holistic health care experiences the survivors of trauma have as a result of an unstable political situation that includes aspects of social unrest and terrorism. PMID:24305082

  18. Assessing the utility of testing aluminum levels in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish K; Toussaint, Nigel D; Pickering, Janice; Beeston, Tony; Smith, Edward R; Holt, Stephen G

    2015-04-01

    Plasma aluminum (Al) is routinely tested in many dialysis patients. Aluminum exposure may lead to acute toxicity and levels in excess of ∼2.2 μmol/L (60 μg/L) should be avoided. Historically, toxicity has been caused by excessive dialyzate Al but modern reverse osmosis (RO) water should be Al free. Nevertheless, many units continue to perform routine Al levels on dialysis patients. This single-center study retrospectively analyzed Al levels in plasma, raw water feed, and RO product between 2010 and 2013 using our database (Nephworks 6) with the aim of determining the utility of these measurements. Two thousand fifty-eight plasma Al tests in 755 patients (61.9% male, mean age 64.7 years) were reviewed showing mean ± SD of 0.41 ± 0.30 μmol/L. One hundred eleven (5.4%) tests from 61 patients had Al levels >0.74 μmol/L and 45 (73.8%) of these patients were or had been prescribed Al hydroxide (Al(OH)(3)) as a phosphate binder. Seven patients had Al concentrations >2.2 μmol/L with no source of Al identified in 1 patient. One hundred sixty-six patients taking Al(OH)(3) (78.7% of all patients on Al(OH)(3)) had levels ≤0.74 μmol/L, the odds ratio of plasma Al > 0.74 μmol/L on Al(OH)3 was 9. The cost of plasma Al assay is $A30.60; thus, costs were $A62,974.80 over the study period. Despite RO feed water Al levels as high as 48 μmol/L, Al output from the RO was almost always undetectable (<0.1 μmol/L) with dialyzate Al levels > 2.2 μmol/L only 3 times since 2010, and never in the last 3 years. Routine unselected testing of plasma Al appears unnecessary and expensive and more selective testing in dialysis patients should be considered. PMID:25306885

  19. Predicting Healthcare Utilization by Patients Admitted for COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Anupama Murthy; Balasubramanian, Nithilavalli; Chandrasekaran, Siddhuraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization, especially length of hospital stay and ICU admission, for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) determine overall outcomes in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost burden. Predicting prolonged hospital stay (PHS) and prolonged intensive care (PIC) for AECOPD is useful for rational allocation of resources in healthcare centres. Aim To characterize the pattern of healthcare utilization by COPD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation, and to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of ‘prolonged hospital stay’ (PHS) and ‘prolonged intensive care’(PIC) Materials and Methods This study attempted through retrospective data analysis, to identify risk factors and evolve prediction models for increased healthcare utilization namely PHS and PIC for AECOPD. The data were extracted from 255 eligible admissions for AECOPD by 166 patients from Aug 2012 to July 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors and models were tested with area under receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Independent predictors of prolonged hospital stay (≥ 6 days) were chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high HbA1c level and positive isolates in sputum culture. Independent predictors of prolonged intensive care (for ≥ 48 hours) were past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high leukocyte count and positive culture isolates in sputum. Prediction models evolved from variables available at admission showed AUC 0.805 (95% CI 0.729 – 0.881) and 0.825 (95% CI 0.75 – 0.90) for PHS and ICU admissions respectively. Conclusion Our prediction models derived from simple and easily available variables show good discriminative properties in predicting PHS and PIC for AECOPD. When prospectively validated, these models are useful for rational allocation of services especially in resource

  20. Utilizing Information Technologies for Lifelong Monitoring in Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Davide; Lanzola, Giordano

    2011-01-01

    Background Information and communication technologies have long been acknowledged to support information sharing along the whole chain of care, from the clinic to the homes of patients and their relatives. Thus they are increasingly being considered for improving the delivery of health care services also in light of clinical and technological achievements that propose new treatments requiring a tighter interaction among patients and physicians. Methods The multiagent paradigm has been utilized within an architecture for delivering telemedicine services to chronic outpatients at their domiciles and enforcing cooperation among patients, caregivers, and different members of the health care staff. The architecture sees each communication device such as a palmtop, smart phone, or personal digital assistant as a separate agent upon which different services are deployed, including telemetry, reminders, notifications, and alarms. Decoupling services from agents account for a highly configurable environment applicable to almost any context that can be customized as needed. Results The architecture has been used for designing and implementing a prototypical software infrastructure, called LifePhone, that runs on several communication devices. A basic set of services has been devised with which we were able to configure two different applications that address long-term and short-term monitoring scenarios for diabetes patients. The long-term scenario encompasses telemetry and reminder services for patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis, which is a treatment for chronic renal failure, a diabetes complication. The short-term scenario incorporates telemetry and remote alarms and is applicable for training patients to use an artificial pancreas. Conclusions Our experiments proved that an infrastructure such as LifePhone can be used successfully for bridging the interaction gap that exists among all the components of a health care delivery process, improving the quality of service

  1. Genotypic Variability of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Gene from Long-Term Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Nzomo, Timothy J; Kitawi, Rose C; Mwatelah, Ruth S; Aman, Rashid; Kimulwo, Maureen J; Masankwa, Geoffrey; Okendo, Javan; Lwembe, Raphael M; Ogutu, Bernhards; Muigai, Anne; Ochieng, Washingtone

    2015-05-01

    There is continuous need to track genetic profiles of HIV strains circulating in different geographic settings to hasten vaccine discovery and inform public health and intervention policies. We partially sequenced the reverse transcriptase region of the HIV-1 pol gene from a total of 54 Kenyan patients aged 18-56 years who continued highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for between 8 and 102 months. Subtyping was done using both the JPHMM tool and phylogenetic method. HIV-1 subtype A1 was the predominant strain in circulation, representing 57.4% and 70.4% of all isolates as determined by JPHMM and phylogenetic methods, respectively. Subtypes D (14.8%, 7.4%), C (5.6%, 9.3%), and A2 (0%, 5.6%) were determined at respective prevalence by both methods. JPHMM identified 22.2% of the isolates as recombinants. This surveillance focused on the RT gene and reaffirms the predominance of subtype A and an increasing proportion of recombinant strains in the Kenyan epidemic. PMID:25748548

  2. Genotypic Variability of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Gene from Long-Term Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nzomo, Timothy J.; Kitawi, Rose C.; Mwatelah, Ruth S.; Aman, Rashid; Kimulwo, Maureen J.; Masankwa, Geoffrey; Okendo, Javan; Lwembe, Raphael M.; Ogutu, Bernhards; Muigai, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is continuous need to track genetic profiles of HIV strains circulating in different geographic settings to hasten vaccine discovery and inform public health and intervention policies. We partially sequenced the reverse transcriptase region of the HIV-1 pol gene from a total of 54 Kenyan patients aged 18–56 years who continued highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for between 8 and 102 months. Subtyping was done using both the JPHMM tool and phylogenetic method. HIV-1 subtype A1 was the predominant strain in circulation, representing 57.4% and 70.4% of all isolates as determined by JPHMM and phylogenetic methods, respectively. Subtypes D (14.8%, 7.4%), C (5.6%, 9.3%), and A2 (0%, 5.6%) were determined at respective prevalence by both methods. JPHMM identified 22.2% of the isolates as recombinants. This surveillance focused on the RT gene and reaffirms the predominance of subtype A and an increasing proportion of recombinant strains in the Kenyan epidemic. PMID:25748548

  3. Speech perception performance in experienced cochlear-implant patients receiving the SPEAK processing strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 cochlear implant.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, A J; Parkinson, W S; Tyler, R S; Lowder, M W; Gantz, B J

    1998-10-01

    Sixteen experienced cochlear implant patients with a wide range of speech-perception abilities received the SPEAK processing strategy in the Nucleus Spectra-22 cochlear implant. Speech perception was assessed in quiet and in noise with SPEAK and with the patients' previous strategies (for most, Multipeak) at the study onset, as well as after using SPEAK for 6 months. Comparisons were made within and across the two test sessions to elucidate possible learning effects. Patients were also asked to rate the strategies on seven speech recognition and sound quality scales. After 6 months' experience with SPEAK, patients showed significantly improved mean performance on a range of speech recognition measures in quiet and noise. When mean subjective ratings were compared over time there were no significant differences noted between strategies. However, many individuals rated the SPEAK strategy better for two or more of the seven subjective measures. Ratings for "appreciation of music" and "quality of my own voice" in particular were generally higher for SPEAK. Improvements were realized by patients with a wide range of speech perception abilities, including those with little or no open-set speech recognition. PMID:9771630

  4. Raltegravir and Abacavir/Lamivudine in Japanese Treatment-Naïve and Treatment-Experienced Patients with HIV Infection: a 48-Week Retrospective Pilot Analysis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akihito; Uehara, Yuki; Saita, Mizue; Inui, Akihiro; Isonuma, Hiroshi; Naito, Toshio

    2016-01-01

    Abacavir/lamivudine (ABC/3TC) is a nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor used for treating human immunodeficiency viral (HIV) infections. Hypersensitivity reactions such as skin eruptions caused by ABC are well-known, but rarely occur in Asians. Raltegravir (RAL) is an integrase strand transfer inhibitor, that is now increasingly, used for treating HIV infections because it has few adverse effects. This retrospective analysis assessed the efficacy and safety of combined ABC/3TC and RAL in both treatment-naïve and -experienced Japanese patients with HIV infections. In all 11 treatment-naïve patients (100%), virological suppression to undetectable level was achieved. Liver transaminases, renal function, and serum lipid profiles showed no exacerbations up to 48 weeks of treatment. In 12 patients who were switched from previous regimens to ABC/3TC and RAL, HIV viral load was undetectable in 11 patients (91.6%), but remained detectable in 1 patient with poor adherence. Major reasons for switching regimens to ABC/3TC and RAL were hyperlipidemia and nausea. After switching, these adverse effects improved, and no new adverse effects were observed. Despite the small number of participants in this study, the results support the combination of ABC/3TC and RAL as a possible treatment choice in Japanese individuals with HIV-infection. PMID:25971320

  5. Spanning boundaries and creating strong patient relationships to coordinate care are strategies used by experienced chronic condition care coordinators.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Carolyn; Kendall, Elizabeth; Muenchberger, Heidi

    2012-08-01

    People with complex chronic conditions frequently need to navigate their own way through and around a fragmented and siloed health care system. Care coordination is a defining principle of primary care and is frequently proposed as a solution to this problem. However, care coordination requires more time and effort than primary care physicians alone have the capacity to deliver. Although registered nurses (RNs) are skilled team members who can be included in the delivery of coordinated patient care, any model of care coordination that involves RNs needs to fit within the existing health care delivery system. In this study, which used qualitative techniques based on grounded theory and included face-to-face interviews and open coding and theoretical sampling until data saturation was achieved, and which was one component of a larger action research study, we aimed to gain an understanding of the difference between usual chronic condition care and the work of chronic condition care coordination. The researchers interviewed general practitioners and RNs from various general practice sites who were actively coordinating care. Four unique processes were found to define care coordination implementation, namely: (1) moving beyond usual practice by spanning boundaries; (2) relationship-based care; (3) agreed roles and routines among relevant parties; and (4) committing to chronic condition care coordination. The findings suggested that existing professional and organisational cultures required negotiation before care coordination could be integrated into existing contexts. The challenge, however, seems to be in acknowledging and overcoming professional practice boundaries that define existing care through reflective practice and shared resourcing. PMID:23050573

  6. Genotypic Inhibitory Quotient as Predictor of Virological Response to Ritonavir-Amprenavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marcelin, Anne-Geneviève; Lamotte, Claire; Delaugerre, Constance; Ktorza, Nadine; Ait Mohand, Hocine; Cacace, Raquel; Bonmarchand, Manuela; Wirden, Marc; Simon, Anne; Bossi, Philippe; Bricaire, François; Costagliola, Dominique; Katlama, Christine; Peytavin, Gilles; Calvez, Vincent

    2003-01-01

    Forty-nine protease inhibitor (PI)-experienced but amprenavir (APV)-naïve patients experiencing virological failure were treated with ritonavir (RTV) (100 mg twice a day [b.i.d.]) plus APV (600 mg b.i.d.). Patients responded to therapy with a median viral load decrease of −1.32 log10 by week 12. The addition of low-dose RTV enhanced the minimal APV concentration in plasma (APV Cmin) up to 10-fold compared with that obtained with APV (1,200 mg b.i.d.) without RTV. Baseline PI resistance mutations (L10F/I/V, K20M/R, E35D, R41K, I54V, L63P, V82A/F/T/S, I84V) identified by univariate analysis and included in a genotypic score and APV Cmin at week 8 were predictive of the virological response at week 12. The response to APV plus RTV was significantly reduced in patients with six or more of the resistance mutations among the ones defined above. The genotypic inhibitory quotient, calculated as the ratio of the APV Cmin to the number of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease mutations, was a better predictor than the virological or pharmacological variables used alone. This genotypic inhibitory quotient could be used in therapeutic drug monitoring to define the concentrations in plasma needed to control replication of viruses with different levels of PI resistance, as measured by the number of PI resistance mutations. PMID:12543665

  7. What experienced HIV-infected lay peer educators working in Midwestern U.S. HIV medical care settings think about their role and contributions to patient care.

    PubMed

    Enriquez, Maithe; Farnan, Rose; Neville, Sally

    2013-08-01

    This qualitative study examined the role of experienced HIV-infected lay individuals who work in HIV medical care settings as educators. Participants in this study had been in the role an average of 4 years, and referred to their work as "peering," a newly coined verb in the vein of nursing. An overarching theme was that the title "peer educator" captured neither the scope of their work, nor the skill set they contribute to patient care. Peers brought unique contributions to the HIV care team that were vital to encouraging patients to stay engaged in care. Peers felt undervalued and expressed the wish to be "professionalized." Results from this study suggest that peers show promise as behavior change agents who can model healthful behaviors, particularly for newly diagnosed patients or those struggling with engagement in HIV care and adherence to treatment. However, peers need and want more formal training in behavior change science, and peer-led services must become more uniform and readily available to patients across HIV care settings. Research is needed to document the positive impact that peers can have on HIV-related health outcomes and to increased knowledge about the attributes of successful peers. PMID:23883321

  8. Analysis of the mdr-1 gene in patients co-infected with Onchocerca volvulus and Loa loa who experienced a post-ivermectin serious adverse event.

    PubMed

    Bourguinat, Catherine; Kamgno, Joseph; Boussinesq, Michel; Mackenzie, Charles D; Prichard, Roger K; Geary, Timothy G

    2010-07-01

    Ivermectin (IVM) is exceptionally safe in humans, and is used for mass treatment of onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis. However, cases of encephalopathy, sometimes fatal, have been reported in a small number of individuals who harbored large numbers of Loa loa microfilariae (mf). A loss-of-function mutation in the mdr-1 gene in some dog breeds and in mice leads to accumulation of the drug in the brain, causing coma and death. This hypothesis was tested in four individuals from Cameroon who experienced a post-IVM serious adverse event (SAE) and in nine non-SAE matched controls. No loss-of-function mutation was detected in mdr-1 in any subject. However, haplotypes, associated with altered drug disposition, were present as homozygotes in two of the SAE patients (50%), but absent as homozygotes in the controls (0%). An association of high Loa mf load and a genetic predisposition to altered IVM distribution could be involved in IVM SAEs. PMID:20595473

  9. Combined BRAF (Dabrafenib) and MEK Inhibition (Trametinib) in Patients With BRAFV600-Mutant Melanoma Experiencing Progression With Single-Agent BRAF Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Douglas B.; Flaherty, Keith T.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Infante, Jeffrey R.; Kim, Kevin B.; Kefford, Richard F.; Hamid, Omid; Schuchter, Lynn; Cebon, Jonathan; Sharfman, William H.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Sznol, Mario; Lawrence, Donald P.; Gibney, Geoffrey T.; Burris, Howard A.; Falchook, Gerald S.; Algazi, Alain; Lewis, Karl; Long, Georgina V.; Patel, Kiran; Ibrahim, Nageatte; Sun, Peng; Little, Shonda; Cunningham, Elizabeth; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Daud, Adil; Gonzalez, Rene

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Preclinical and early clinical studies have demonstrated that initial therapy with combined BRAF and MEK inhibition is more effective in BRAFV600-mutant melanoma than single-agent BRAF inhibitors. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of dabrafenib and trametinib in patients who had received prior BRAF inhibitor treatment. Patients and Methods In this open-label phase I/II study, we evaluated the pharmacology, safety, and efficacy of dabrafenib and trametinib. Here, we report patients treated with combination therapy after disease progression with BRAF inhibitor treatment administered before study enrollment (part B; n = 26) or after cross-over at progression with dabrafenib monotherapy (part C; n = 45). Results In parts B and C, confirmed objective response rates (ORR) were 15% (95% CI, 4% to 35%) and 13% (95% CI, 5% to 27%), respectively; an additional 50% and 44% experienced stable disease ≥ 8 weeks, respectively. In part C, median progression-free survival (PFS) was 3.6 months (95% CI, 2 to 4), and median overall survival was 11.8 months (95% CI, 8 to 25) from cross-over. Patients who previously received dabrafenib ≥ 6 months had superior outcomes with the combination compared with those treated < 6 months; median PFS was 3.9 (95% CI, 3 to 7) versus 1.8 months (95% CI, 2 to 4; hazard ratio, 0.49; P = .02), and ORR was 26% (95% CI, 10% to 48%) versus 0% (95% CI, 0% to 15%). Conclusion Dabrafenib plus trametinib has modest clinical efficacy in patients with BRAF inhibitor–resistant melanoma. This regimen may be a therapeutic strategy for patients who previously benefited from BRAF inhibitor monotherapy ≥ 6 months but demonstrates minimal efficacy after rapid progression with BRAF inhibitor therapy. PMID:25287827

  10. Long-Term Gender-Based Outcomes for Atazanavir/Ritonavir (ATV/r)-Containing Regimens in Treatment-Experienced Patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Svedhem-Johansson, Veronica; Pugliese, Pascal; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Thalme, Anders; Michalik, Claudia; Esser, Stefan; Barlet, Marie-Helene; Nakonz, Tina; Jimenez-Exposito10, Maria J.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on antiretroviral effectiveness in women are limited, especially long-term data, because women are usually underrepresented in clinical trials. This sub-analysis of a large European non-comparative, retrospective, observational cohort study evaluated gender differences in long-term outcomes in antiretroviral-experienced adult patients with HIV-1 infection switched to an ATV/r-based regimen between October 2004 and March 2007. Data were extracted from 3 European HIV databases every 6 months (maximum follow-up 5 years). Time to virological failure (VF), defined as two consecutive HIV-1 RNA ≥50 c/mL or one HIV-1 RNA ≥50 c/mL followed by treatment discontinuation (TD), and time to TD were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Associations of gender with VF and TD were analyzed using multivariate Cox proportional models. Safety and tolerability were evaluated. In total, 1294 patients (336 women, 958 men) were analyzed. No gender differences in time to VF were observed; at 3 years, the probability of not having VF was 0.59 (95%CI: 0.52, 0.65) and 0.63 (95%CI: 0.59, 0.67) for women and men, respectively. In multivariate analyses, women had a higher risk of TD than men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.54; 95%CI: 1.28, 1.85) but no increased risk of VF (HR, 1.06; 95%CI: 0.85, 1.33). Safety and tolerability were comparable between genders. In a clinical setting, long-term efficacy and safety outcomes of ATV/r-based regimens were similar by gender. Women had a higher risk of TD but no increased risk of VF. ATV/r is an effective and well-tolerated therapeutic option for treatment-experienced men and women with HIV-1 infection. PMID:23590675

  11. Consistent and clinically relevant effects with fentanyl buccal tablet in the treatment of patients receiving maintenance opioid therapy and experiencing cancer-related breakthrough pain.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, Giovambattista; Messina, John; Xie, Fang; Slatkin, Neal E

    2010-01-01

    Fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) has shown efficacy and tolerability in patients with cancer-related persistent pain treated with maintenance opioids. We conducted a combined analysis of two similarly designed, randomized, placebo-controlled studies to further evaluate the consistency and clinical relevance of analgesia outcomes. Of the 252 patients enrolled, 150 fulfilled the criteria for efficacy analysis and experienced 1,417 breakthrough pain episodes. A consistently greater effect was noted with FBT vs. placebo on the following measures: improvements from baseline of >or=33% and >or=50% in pain intensity (PI), a >or=2-point reduction in PI, and a score of >or=2 for pain relief. Improvements in these clinically meaningful efficacy measures were seen with FBT at 15 minutes (earliest common evaluation) and remained evident at 60 minutes (final common evaluation). They were also reflected in a more favorable global medication performance assessment for FBT over placebo. FBT was generally well tolerated; most adverse events were typical of potent opioid use in a cancer population. Application-site (buccal) abnormalities were infrequent and led to withdrawal of three patients. There were no serious adverse events or deaths attributable to FBT. This analysis suggests that FBT provides an analgesic effect that is consistent across multiple clinically relevant efficacy measures. PMID:20230447

  12. Utilization of health care services by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J A; Ward, A J; Jones, M K C; McMillan, C; Lordan, N

    2003-01-01

    In order to identify healthcare resource use patterns associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), resource utilization (RU) data collection was integrated into a randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled study of Viozan (sibenadet HCl). This study enrolled patients with symptomatic, smoking-related COPD, randomized to receive sibenadet or placebo for a 52-week treatment period. A questionnaire establishing typical pre-trial, COPD-related RU was completed by each patient. Subsequent data were collected by means of an Interactive Voice Response System (IVRS) at 30-day intervals (14 time points) during the study and in the follow-up period. The IVRS system facilitated data collection and minimized inconvenience to the patient. Compliance with the requirement to record details of the healthcare services during the year-long study was high. No overall trend for lower RU was associated with sibenadet therapy, which correlates with the lack of sustained clinical effect seen in studies conducted concurrently. These data do, however, provide valuable information on RU associated with COPD and insights into adjustments associated with changes in disease course. Physicians were seen to be the most common source of care for patients with COPD and more of the patients with severe COPD (stage III) than mild (stage I) were seen to utilize the most expensive resources (e.g. inpatient hospital care). For those patients who experienced an exacerbation during the trial (irrespective of treatment group), resource use was increased during the periods when an exacerbation was reported when compared with the periods before or after an exacerbation. The proportion of cases attending the physician doubled and with a trip to the Emergency Room (ER) increased approximately ninefold during the reporting period in which the exacerbation occurred compared with the previous month. This study has shown that use of an IVRS, even in elderly patients, is an effective means of

  13. Liver Enzymes Abnormalities among Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Experienced and HAART Naïve HIV-1 Infected Patients at Debre Tabor Hospital, North West Ethiopia: A Comparative Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Tulu, Ketema Tafess; Zegeye, Amtatachew Moges; Wubante, Amarech Asratie

    2016-01-01

    Liver disease has emerged as the most common non-AIDS-related cause of death in HIV patients. However, there is limited data regarding this condition including our setting in Ethiopia. Hence, liver enzyme abnormalities among highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) experienced and HAART naïve patients were assessed in this study. A total of 164 HAART experienced and 164 HAART naïve patients were studied. Blood specimen was collected to determine alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST), CD4 count, and viral hepatitis. The prevalence of liver enzyme abnormality was 20.1% and 22.0% among HAART experienced and HAART naïve patients, respectively. The HAART experienced patients had higher mean ALT than HAART naïve patients (P = 0.002). Viral hepatitis (AOR = 6.02; 95% CI = 1.87–19.39), opportunistic infections (AOR = 2.91; 95% CI = 1.04–8.19), current CD4 count <200 cells/mm3 (AOR = 2.16; 95% CI = 1.06–4.39), and male sex (AOR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.001–3.33) were associated with elevated ALT and/or AST. In conclusion, liver enzyme abnormalities were high in both HAART experienced and HAART naïve HIV-1 infected patients. Hence, monitoring and management of liver enzyme abnormalities in HIV-1 infected patients are important in our setting. PMID:27493798

  14. Engaging Terminally Ill Patients in End of Life Talk: How Experienced Palliative Medicine Doctors Navigate the Dilemma of Promoting Discussions about Dying

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Ruth; Land, Victoria; Faull, Christina; Feathers, Luke; Seymour, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine how palliative medicine doctors engage patients in end-of-life (hereon, EoL) talk. To examine whether the practice of “eliciting and responding to cues”, which has been widely advocated in the EoL care literature, promotes EoL talk. Design Conversation analysis of video- and audio-recorded consultations. Participants Unselected terminally ill patients and their companions in consultation with experienced palliative medicine doctors. Setting Outpatient clinic, day therapy clinic, and inpatient unit of a single English hospice. Results Doctors most commonly promoted EoL talk through open elaboration solicitations; these created opportunities for patients to introduce–then later further articulate–EoL considerations in such a way that doctors did not overtly ask about EoL matters. Importantly, the wording of elaboration solicitations avoided assuming that patients had EoL concerns. If a patient responded to open elaboration solicitations without introducing EoL considerations, doctors sometimes pursued EoL talk by switching to a less participatory and more presumptive type of solicitation, which suggested the patient might have EoL concerns. These more overt solicitations were used only later in consultations, which indicates that doctors give precedence to patients volunteering EoL considerations, and offer them opportunities to take the lead in initiating EoL talk. There is evidence that doctors treat elaboration of patients’ talk as a resource for engaging them in EoL conversations. However, there are limitations associated with labelling that talk as “cues” as is common in EoL communication contexts. We examine these limitations and propose “possible EoL considerations” as a descriptively more accurate term. Conclusions Through communicating–via open elaboration solicitations–in ways that create opportunities for patients to volunteer EoL considerations, doctors navigate a core dilemma in promoting EoL talk: giving

  15. Incidence of utilization- and symptom-defined COPD exacerbations in hospital- and population-recruited patients

    PubMed Central

    Erdal, Marta; Johannessen, Ane; Eagan, Tomas Mikal; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Grønseth, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to estimate the impact of recruitment source and outcome definition on the incidence of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) and explore possible predictors of AECOPD. Patients and methods During a 1-year follow-up, we performed a baseline visit and four telephone interviews of 81 COPD patients and 132 controls recruited from a population-based survey and 205 hospital-recruited COPD patients. Both a definition based on health care utilization and a symptom-based definition of AECOPD were applied. For multivariate analyses, we chose a negative binomial regression model. Results COPD patients from the population- and hospital-based samples experienced on average 0.4 utilization-defined and 2.9 symptom-defined versus 1.0 and 5.9 annual exacerbations, respectively. The incidence rate ratios for utilization-defined AECOPD were 2.45 (95% CI 1.22–4.95), 3.43 (95% CI 1.59–7.38), and 5.67 (95% CI 2.58–12.48) with Global Initiative on Obstructive Lung Disease spirometric stages II, III, and IV, respectively. The corresponding incidence rate ratios for the symptom-based definition were 3.08 (95% CI 1.96–4.84), 3.45 (95% CI 1.92–6.18), and 4.00 (95% CI 2.09–7.66). Maintenance therapy (regular long-acting muscarinic antagonists, long-acting beta-2 agonists, inhaled corticosteroids, or theophylline) also increased the risk of AECOPD with both exacerbation definitions (incidence rate ratios 1.65 and 1.73, respectively). The risk of AECOPD was 59%–78% higher in the hospital sample than in the population sample. Conclusion If externally valid conclusions are to be made regarding incidence and predictors of AECOPD, studies should be based on general population samples or adjustments should be made on account of a likely higher incidence in other samples. Likewise, the effect of different AECOPD definitions should be taken into consideration. PMID:27621614

  16. Interferon γ–Induced Protein10 Kinetics in Treatment-Naive Versus Treatment-Experienced Patients Receiving Interferon-Free Therapy for Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Implications for the Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jennifer C.; Habersetzer, François; Rodriguez-Torres, Maribel; Afdhal, Nezam; Lawitz, Eric J.; Paulson, Matthew S.; Zhu, Yanni; Subramanian, Gangadharan Mani; McHutchison, John G.; Sulkowski, Mark; Wyles, David L.; Schooley, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    We measured interferon γ–induced protein 10 (IP-10) levels in 428 patients at baseline, week 1, and week 2 of all-oral treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. An increased baseline IP-10 level was associated with a T allele in the IL28B gene, an increased alanine aminotransferase level in treatment-naive but not experienced patients, and an increased body mass index. At week 1, the mean decline in plasma IP-10 levels was the same in treatment-naive and treatment-experienced patients (−49%), whereas during week 2 the mean decline in IP-10 levels in treatment-naive patients (−14%) was significantly larger than in treatment-experienced patients (−2%; P = .0176). IP-10 thus may be a surrogate marker of the rate of intracellular viral replication complex decay. PMID:24907384

  17. Dolutegravir in Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients With Raltegravir- and/or Elvitegravir-Resistant HIV-1: 24-Week Results of the Phase III VIKING-3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M.; Aberg, J.; Akil, B.; Arribas, J. R.; Baril, J.-G.; Blanco Arévalo, J. L.; Blanco Quintana, F.; Blick, G.; Boix Martínez, V.; Bouchaud, O.; Branco, T.; Bredeek, U. F.; Castro Iglesias, M.; Clumeck, N.; Conway, B.; DeJesus, E.; Delassus, J.-L.; De Truchis, P.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; Duggan, J.; Duvivier, C.; Elion, R.; Eron, J.; Fish, D.; Gathe, J.; Haubrich, R.; Henderson, H.; Hicks, C.; Hocqueloux, L.; Hodder, S.; Hsiao, C.-B.; Katlama, C.; Kozal, M.; Kumar, P.; Lalla-Reddy, S.; Lazzarin, A.; Leoncini, F.; Llibre, J. M.; Mansinho, K.; Morlat, P.; Mounzer, K.; Murphy, M.; Newman, C.; Nguyen, T.; Nseir, B.; Philibert, P.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Ramgopal, M.; Richmond, G.; Salmon Ceron, D.; Sax, P.; Scarsella, A.; Sension, M.; Shalit, P.; Sighinolfi, L.; Sloan, L.; Small, C.; Stein, D.; Tashima, K.; Tebas, P.; Torti, C.; Tribble, M.; Troisvallets, D.; Tsoukas, C.; Viciana Fernández, P.; Ward, D.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkin, T.; Yeni, G.-P.; Louise Martin-Carpenter, J.; Uhlenbrauck, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Background. The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. Methods. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Results. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was −1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. Conclusions. DTG 50 mg BID–based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. Clinical Trials Registration. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). PMID:24446523

  18. Utility of monitoring mycophenolic acid in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Oremus, Mark; Zeidler, Johannes; Ensom, Mary H H; Matsuda-Abedini, Mina; Balion, Cynthia; Booker, Lynda; Archer, Carolyn; Raina, Parminder

    2008-01-01

    or method of monitoring, and nonexistent for cost-effectiveness. Some studies suggest gender and concomitant use of calcineurin inhibitors will affect pharmacokinetic parameters, but the impact of these findings has not been assessed in relation to monitoring versus no monitoring. CONCLUSIONS The state of knowledge about therapeutic drug monitoring of MPA in solid organ transplants is still in its infancy. Until there is more evidence on the utility of routine MPA monitoring in solid organ transplant recipients, patients, clinicians, and other stakeholders (e.g., public and private insurers) will have to decide on a case by case basis whether the possible but uncertain benefits are worth the extra time and expense of monitoring. PMID:18457479

  19. Brainstorming Design for Health: Helping Patients Utilize Patient-Generated Information on the Web

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jina; Hartzler, Andrea; Munson, Sean; Anderson, Nick; Edwards, Kelly; Gore, John L.; McDonald, David; O’Leary, Jim; Parker, Andrea; Streat, Derek; Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Pratt, Wanda; Ackerman, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and practitioners show increasing sinterest in utilizing patient-generated information on the Web. Although the HCI and CSCW communities have provided many exciting opportunities for exploring new ideas and building broad agenda in health, few venues offer a platform for interdisciplinary and collaborative brainstorming about design challenges and opportunities in this space. The goal of this workshop is to provide participants with opportunities to interact with stakeholders from diverse backgrounds and practices—researchers, practitioners, designers, programmers, and ethnographers—and together generate tangible design outcomes that utilize patient-generated information on the Web. Through small multidisciplinary group work, we will provide participants with new collaboration opportunities, understanding of the state of the art, inspiration for future work, and ideally avenues for continuing to develop research and design ideas generated at the workshop. PMID:24499843

  20. Treatment patterns, health state, and health care resource utilization of patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gianoukakis, Andrew G; Flores, Natalia M; Pelletier, Corey L; Forsythe, Anna; Wolfe, Gregory R; Taylor, Matthew H

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) often respond well to treatment but some become refractory to radioactive iodine (RAI) treatment, and treatment options are limited. Despite the humanistic and economic burden RAI refractory disease imposes on patients, published research concerning treatment patterns and health care resource utilization is sparse. Methods Data were collected from an online retrospective chart review study in the US and five European Union (EU) countries (France, Germany, Italy, Spain, and UK) with physicians recruited from an online panel. Physicians (N=211) provided demographics, disease history, treatment information, and health care resource utilization for one to four of their patients with radioactive iodine refractory differentiated thyroid cancer (RR-DTC). Results The majority of the patients with RR-DTC (N=623) were female (56%), and their mean age was 58.2 years. In this sample, 63.2% had papillary thyroid cancer and 57.0% were in Stage IV when deemed RAI refractory. Patients with RR-DTC experienced regional recurrence in the thyroid bed/central neck area (25.3%) and had distant metastatic disease (53.6%). At the time data were collected, 50.7% were receiving systemic treatment. Of those, 78.5% were on first-line treatment and 62.7% were receiving multikinase inhibitors. Regional differences for prescribed treatments were observed; the US was more likely to have patients receiving multikinase inhibitors (79.2%) compared with UK (41.2%) and Italy (17.1%). Additional details regarding treatment patterns and resource utilization are discussed. Conclusion The current study aimed to obtain a greater understanding of RR-DTC treatment globally. These results can assist in the development and implementation of treatment guidelines and ultimately enhance the care of patients with RR-DTC. PMID:27313476

  1. Demographics, clinical characteristics, health resource utilization and cost of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension patients: retrospective results from six European countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) results from incomplete resolution of a pulmonary embolus, leading to pulmonary hypertension and progressive right heart failure and death. We aimed to describe the demographics, treatment patterns, health resource utilization and related costs of patients with CTEPH. Methods In specialized PH centres across six European countries, medical charts of CTEPH patients on PH medication were retrospectively extracted (chart review between 2006 and 2009). Resource utilization was valued using country-specific unit costs. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed. Results Twenty-one hospitals documented 119 consecutive CTEPH patients over an average of 25.4 months. Patients were inoperable (83.9%) or persistent after surgery (16.0%) with mean age 67.5 ± 12.3 years, 61% were female. The average 6-minute walking distance was 298 ± 120 meters, and NYHA class II/III/IV was 27/59/14%. At baseline, 59.7% patients received endothelin receptor antagonist, 34.4% phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, and 5.8% prostacyclin. Adding a second PH medication was the most common regimen change. CTEPH patients experienced 1.8 ± 2.2 hospitalizations per year accounting for 14.8 ± 26.1 days in hospital. Patients paid on average 2.8 office visits per year to their general practitioner and 1.3 visits to a specialist. Unadjusted annual mortality rate was 6.0%. Annual cost of PH specific medication was the predominant economic factor averaging € 36,768 per year. Costs for hospitalizations (€ 4,496) and concomitant medications (€ 2,510) were substantially lower. Other health care resource items only accounted for marginal additional costs. Conclusion CTEPH patients are characterised by substantial morbidity and mortality. Health care utilisation, predominantly due to off-label use of PH drugs, is significant. PMID:24912804

  2. A Preliminary Study of Psychiatric, Familial, and Medical Characteristics of High Utilizing Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C. Patrick; Haywood, Carlton; Hoot, Michelle R.; Lanzkron, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify demographic, medical, and psychosocial characteristics that distinguished sickle cell disease patients who were frequent utilizers of urgent or emergent care resources from low-utilizing patients. Methods Patients at a large urban comprehensive sickle cell disease treatment center were recruited from clinic or during urgent care visits. Participants who were high utilizers, defined as having more than 4 acute or emergency care visits in the prior 12 months, were compared to patients with more typical utilization patterns on lifetime complications of SCD, family background, psychiatric history, occupational function, coping, depressive symptoms, and personality. Results High utilizers were nearly a decade younger on average; despite this they had a similar lifetime history of SCD complications. High utilizing patients' parents appeared to have greater educational achievement overall. High utilizers reported a nearly three-fold greater prevalence of psychiatric illness in family members than low utilizers. On other measures; including coping strategies, social support, and personality; the two groups were comparable. Discussion The study strengthens emerging evidence that disease severity, familial factors related to greater parental education, and psychiatric illness are important factors in high care utilization in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:23246997

  3. A multicenter, primary-care-based, open-label study to assess the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to morphine sulfate and naltrexone hydrochloride extended-release capsules using a standardized conversion guide

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the conversion of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain to extended-release morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride (MSN) using a standardized conversion guide. Methods This open-label, single-arm study was conducted in 157 primary care centers in the United States. A total of 684 opioid-experienced adults with chronic moderate-to-severe pain were converted to oral administration of MSN from transdermal fentanyl and oral formulations of hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, and other morphine products using a standardized conversion guide. The primary endpoint was the percentage of patients achieving a stable MSN dose within a 6-week titration phase. Secondary endpoints included duration of time to stable dose, number of titration steps, safety and efficacy measures, and investigator assessment of conversion guide utility. Results Of the 684 patients, 51.3% were converted to a stable dose of MSN (95% confidence interval: 47.5%, 55.1%). The mean (standard deviation) number of days to stable dose was 20 (8.94), and number of titration steps to stable dose was 2.4 (1.37). The majority of adverse events were mild/moderate and consistent with opioid therapy. Mean pain scores at stable dose decreased from baseline. Investigators were generally satisfied with the conversion guide and, in 94% of cases, reported they would use it again. Conclusion Conversion to MSN treatment using the standardized MSN conversion guide was an attainable goal in approximately half of the population of opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain. Investigators found the guide to be a useful tool to assist conversion of opioid-experienced patients to MSN. PMID:26185466

  4. Utility of Periodontal exploration in patients with Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Santos-García, Rocío; Sánchez-Domínguez, Benito; Cordero, Mario D.; Rios-Santos, José V.; Jaramillo-Santos, María R.; Climent, Mariano H.

    2012-01-01

    Objetive: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology, which affects predominantly women. Mitochondrial alteration could have a role in the pathophysilogical mechanisms of inflammatory conditions as FM and periodontitis. The aim of the present study was assay the relationship between both diseases and mitochondrial dysfunction. Patient and Methods: We study the presence of periodontitis in twelve patients diagnosed of FM and mitochondrial dysfunction described. The diagnosis of FM was established according to ACR criteria and clinical symptoms were evaluated using the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). Results: Only one patients of twelve included and agreed to participate in the study were diagnosed with periodontitis. Conclusions: Pending studies with larger numbers of patients, we can conclude that mitochondrial dysfunction in FM is a itself event not related with periodontitis. Periodontitis could be considered a exclusion criterion in all studies about mitochondrial dysfunction in patients. Key words:Peridontitis, fibromyalgia, mitocondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress. PMID:24558523

  5. Do patients with active RA have differences in disease activity and perceptions if anti-TNF naïve versus anti-TNF experienced? Baseline results of the optimization of adalimumab trial

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Janet; Thorne, J. Carter; Haraoui, Boulos Paul; Psaradellis, Eliofotisti; Sampalis, John

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The chance of a good response in RA is attenuated in previous anti-TNF users who start new anti-TNF therapy compared to biologic naïve patients. In active RA, those with previous anti-TNF exposure compared to anti-TNF naïve may have different baseline disease activity and patient perceptions when starting a new anti-TNF treatment that could explain the observed response differences. Material/Methods The aim of this study was a post hoc analysis of baseline characteristics of patients enrolled in the Optimization of Adalimumab study that was a treat to target vs. routine care study in patients initiating adalimumab. As per the protocol, a maximum of 20% anti-TNF experienced patients were enrolled in the 300 patient trial. Twelve (4.0%) were excluded who previously used other biologics. Baseline characteristics including age, gender, tender and swollen joint counts, disease activity (DAS28), function (HAQ-DI), patient global assessment, patient satisfaction with current treatment, and inflammatory markers (CRP, ESR), were compared between previously anti-TNF experienced [etanercept or infliximab (EXP)], and anti-TNF naïve patients (NAÏVE). Results The mean (SD) age was 54.8 (13.3) years; 81.0% were female, and 237 (79.0%) were anti-TNF naïve while 51 (17.0%) patients were anti-TNF experienced (29 with etanercept, 16 with infliximab, and 6 for both). The mean (SD) baseline in EXP versus NAÏVE groups respectively was: CRP=21.7(32.9) vs. 17.5(20.7); ESR=28.7(22.5) vs. 29.8(20.4); SJC=10.5(6.0) vs. 10.7(5.6); TJC=12.8(7.1) vs. 12.3(7.3); and DAS28=6.0(1.2) vs. 5.8(1.1). None of the between-group differences were statistically significant, however, the HAQ-DI in EXP was 1.7(0.6) compared to 1.5(0.7) for the NAÏVE (P=0.021). Additionally, EXP patients had a higher patient global score [71.3(26.1) vs. 61.9(26.2), P=0.021]. Conclusions Although anti-TNF naïve and experienced patients who initiated adalimumab were similar, with respect to several

  6. Understanding and Utilizing Patient Preferences in Cancer Treatment Decisions.

    PubMed

    Ubel, Peter A

    2016-05-01

    Shared decision-making is a complex endeavor that should take into account the patient's personal preferences regarding treatment options. To truly empower patients to be partners in decision-making, especially in situations in which their preferences are important, physicians must learn to communicate better and to distinguish between what is "medical fact" versus a "value judgement." Knowing what are, when to ask, and how to ask the right questions will help physicians be effective in guiding patients toward the right treatments. PMID:27226516

  7. Utilization of Blood Glucose Data in Patient Education

    PubMed Central

    Kumah-Crystal, Yaa; Mulvaney, Shelagh

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have tested clinical and behavioral approaches for improving glycemic control in people with diabetes. We review research to identify how blood glucose (BG) values have been used in patient-focused clinical research and interventions. We sought to describe the frequency that BG values have been the focus of patient education research and to characterize the different methods to integrate BG into an intervention, the approaches implemented to support patient education and behavior change, and the nature of communication about BG values. Thirty-four eligible studies were identified that included patient education using BG values. Information regarding the study and intervention characteristics include: 1) Characteristics of the study sample, 2) How BG values were obtained, 3) Use of a graphical interface for BG values, 4) Use of a BG log, 5) BG interpretation and regimen adjustments, 6) Recommended actions to patient, 7) Modality of intervention, and 8) Intervention communication schedule. The review demonstrated that new BG technologies provide outstanding opportunities for greater access to BG data, and for patient support and intervention. However, it also indicated a need to improve and expand support for people with diabetes in their daily use of BG values to maintain and improve glycemic control. In order to make the most sustainable impact on behavior, generalizable skills such as problem solving need to be integrated into BG education. PMID:24057927

  8. Utilization of blood glucose data in patient education.

    PubMed

    Kumah-Crystal, Yaa; Mulvaney, Shelagh

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have tested clinical and behavioral approaches for improving glycemic control in people with diabetes. We reviewed studies to identify how blood glucose (BG) values have been used in patient-focused clinical research and interventions. We sought to describe the frequency that BG values have been the focus of patient education research and to characterize the different methods to integrate BG into an intervention, the approaches implemented to support patient education, and behavior change, and the nature of communication about BG values. Thirty-four eligible studies were identified that included patient education using BG values. Information regarding the study and intervention characteristics include: (1) characteristics of the study sample, (2) how BG values were obtained, (3) use of a graphical interface for BG values, (4) use of a BG log, (5) BG interpretation and regimen adjustments, (6) recommended actions to patient, (7) modality of intervention, and (8) intervention communication schedule. The review demonstrated that new BG technologies provide outstanding opportunities for greater access to BG data, and for patient support and intervention. However, it also indicated a need to improve and expand support for people with diabetes in their daily use of BG values to maintain and improve glycemic control. In order to make the most sustainable impact on behavior, generalizable skills such as problem solving need to be integrated into BG education. PMID:24057927

  9. Characteristics of hospice patients utilizing hospice inpatient/residential facilities.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kyusuk; Burke, Sloane C

    2013-11-01

    Given the increasing popularity of a hospice inpatient/residential facility (HIRF) among hospice patients and their family members, examining who uses HIRFs has been of increasing importance. Using the 2007 National Home and Hospice Care Survey (NHHCS), we found that about 14% of the hospice patients received care in an HIRF in 2007. Characteristics of patients associated with HIRF use largely match the industry norm for a general inpatient level of care and include having no caregiver or having an incapable caregiver; having imminent death; and being directly admitted to a hospice after discharge from a hospital. Given a recent stricter enforcement of reimbursement rules, however, we call for close monitoring of any change in the number of HIRF beds--particularly in rural and low-income urban areas. PMID:23264662

  10. Patient safety stories: a project utilizing narratives in resident training.

    PubMed

    Cox, LeeAnn M; Logio, Lia S

    2011-11-01

    Incident reports have traditionally been the vehicle for identifying, assessing, and responding to quality gaps in hospitals. Yet because of a variety of barriers, residents often fail to participate in this formal process. The authors created a project to engage residents in incident reporting through the use of an online, anonymous narrative format, faculty-facilitated discussion groups, and involvement of patient safety officers in the educational process. During three months, 36 residents submitted a total of 79 stories about patient care that did not "go as intended." The authors reviewed and scored each story for contributing factors and outcomes. The residents met monthly in small groups with trained faculty facilitators to analyze the stories, which were also shared with the patient safety officers. The stories, narratives of both personal involvement and observed events, ranged from near-misses to sentinel events. Key contributing factors included lapses of professionalism, decision errors, communication/information mishaps, transition mix-ups, and workload difficulties. The narrative format proved a feasible tool for collecting significant, previously unrecognized patient safety issues. Internal medicine residents were willing to discuss gaps in care when given the tools and opportunity for anonymous storytelling and blame-free dialogue. PMID:21952066

  11. Utility of endoscopic ultrasound in patients with portal hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ghassan M; Ibdah, Jamal A

    2014-10-21

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has revolutionized the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Its application in patients with liver disease and portal hypertension is increasing. Patients with chronic liver disease are at risk for development of portal hypertension sequale such as ascites, spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and gastroesophageal varices. Bleeding esophageal and gastric varices are among the most common causes of mortality in patients with cirrhosis. Thus, early detection and treatment improve the outcome in this population. EUS can improve the detection and diagnosis of gastroesophageal varices and collateral veins and can provide endoscopic therapy of gastroesophageal varices such as EUS-guided sclerotherapy of esophageal collateral vessels and EUS-guided cynoacrylate (Glue) injection of gastric varices. EUS can also provide knowledge on the efficacy of pharmacotherapy of portal hypertension. Furthermore, EUS can provide assessment and prediction of variceal recurrence after endoscopic therapy and assessment of portal hemodynamics such as E-Flow and Doppler study of the azygous and portal veins. Moreover, EUS-guided fine needle aspiration may provide cytologic diagnosis of focal hepatic tumors and analysis of free abdominal fluid. Using specialized EUS-guided needle biopsy, a sample of liver tissue can be obtained to diagnose and evaluate for chronic liver disease. EUS-guided fine needle injection can be used to study portal vein pressure and hemodynamics, and potentially could be used to assist in exact measurement of portal vein pressure and placement of intrahepatic portosystemic shunt. PMID:25339809

  12. Postacute Stroke Rehabilitation Utilization: Are There Differences between Rural-Urban Patients and Taxonomies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jia, Huanguang; Cowper, Diane C.; Tang, Yuhong; Litt, Eric; Wilson, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the association between Veterans Affairs (VA) stroke patients' poststroke rehabilitation utilization and their residential settings by using 2 common rural-urban taxonomies. Methods: This retrospective study included all VA stroke inpatients in 2001 and 2002. Rehabilitation utilization referred to rehabilitation therapy received…

  13. Utility of Patient-Reported Outcome Instruments in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Kelkar, Anita A; Spertus, John; Pang, Peter; Pierson, Renee F; Cody, Robert J; Pina, Ileana L; Hernandez, Adrian; Butler, Javed

    2016-03-01

    Patient-reported outcomes (PRO) are defined as reports coming directly from patients about how they feel or function in relation to a health condition and its therapy. Although there are numerous compelling reasons why PRO could be an important help in clinical care, they have not evolved into clinical tools integrated into care. The purpose of this review is to assess existing PRO instruments for heart failure with respect to their psychometric properties and potential for use in clinical care. We performed a systematic search of articles published between July 2008 and January 2015 within the MEDLINE, PROMIS, PROQOLID, and Cochrane Library databases. Included instruments had to be developed and tested for heart failure and have had their development processes and psychometric properties described. A total of 31 instruments were identified, 9 of which met all inclusion criteria. After evaluating each remaining instrument in terms of psychometric and clinical criteria and symptom coverage, only 2 instruments-Minnesota Living with Heart Failure and Kansas City Cardiomyopathy questionnaire-met all evaluation criteria. Although clinically useful PRO instruments exist, increasing education to providers on the value and interpretability of PRO instruments, as well as a more streamlined approach to their implementation in the clinical setting is necessary. A clinical trial comparing the routine use of disease-specific PRO with clinical care could further support their incorporation into practice. PMID:26874386

  14. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag; Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  15. Accelerated partial breast irradiation utilizing brachytherapy: patient selection and workflow

    PubMed Central

    Wobb, Jessica; Manyam, Bindu; Khan, Atif; Vicini, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) represents an evolving technique that is a standard of care option in appropriately selected woman following breast conserving surgery. While multiple techniques now exist to deliver APBI, interstitial brachytherapy represents the technique used in several randomized trials (National Institute of Oncology, GEC-ESTRO). More recently, many centers have adopted applicator-based brachytherapy to deliver APBI due to the technical complexities of interstitial brachytherapy. The purpose of this article is to review methods to evaluate and select patients for APBI, as well as to define potential workflow mechanisms that allow for the safe and effective delivery of APBI. Multiple consensus statements have been developed to guide clinicians on determining appropriate candidates for APBI. However, recent studies have demonstrated that these guidelines fail to stratify patients according to the risk of local recurrence, and updated guidelines are expected in the years to come. Critical elements of workflow to ensure safe and effective delivery of APBI include a multidisciplinary approach and evaluation, optimization of target coverage and adherence to normal tissue guideline constraints, and proper quality assurance methods. PMID:26985202

  16. Medical Utilization of Kiosks in the Delivery of Patient Education: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Yvonne Chan, Yu-Feng; Nagurka, Roxanne; Bentley, Suzanne; Ordonez, Edgardo; Sproule, William

    2014-01-01

    Background: The utilization of kiosks has previously been shown to be effective for collecting information, delivering educational modules, and providing access to health information. We discuss a review of current literature for the utilization of kiosks for the delivery of patient education. Methods: The criteria for inclusion in this literature review were: (1) study discusses the utilization of kiosks for patient health education; (2) study discusses the use of touch screens for patient health information; (3) published in English. Our review includes searches via MEDLINE databases and Google Scholar for the years 1996-2014. Results: Overall, 167 articles were screened for final eligibility, and after discarding duplicates and non-eligible studies with abstract. Full-text review of 28 articles was included in the final analysis. Conclusion: The review of available literature demonstrates the effectiveness of touch screen kiosks to educate patients and to improve healthcare, both at a performance and cost advantage over other modes of patient education. PMID:25097831

  17. Utilization and perceived effectiveness of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with dystonia.

    PubMed

    Junker, Judith; Oberwittler, Christoph; Jackson, Didi; Berger, Klaus

    2004-02-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing worldwide, especially by patients with chronic diseases. To date, no data are available about utilization and perceived effectiveness of CAM in patients with dystonia. A questionnaire survey on utilization and costs of CAM was completed by 180 members of the German Dystonia Society, a patient advocate group. In total, 131 dystonia patients (73%) were current or former users of CAM, 55 patients used CAM in addition to botulinum toxin A injections, and 86 patients had experience with three or more CAM methods. The options used most widely were acupuncture (56%), relaxation techniques (44%), homeopathy (27%), and massages (26%). Among users of specific CAM methods, breathing therapy, Feldenkrais, massages, and relaxation techniques were perceived as most effective. On average, patients spent 1,513 Euro on CAM without reimbursement. There was no correlation between costs and perceived effectiveness of different methods. In line with other studies on chronically ill patients, our results show that dystonia patients frequently utilize CAM methods, often in addition to conventional treatment. There is a growing need to evaluate scientifically the effect of CAM methods on symptom severity and quality of life in dystonia, to prevent utilization of costly and ineffective CAM treatments. PMID:14978670

  18. Utilization and likelihood of radiologic diagnostic imaging in patients with implantable cardiac defibrillators

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Matthew R.; Ryan, Michael P.; Wolff, Steven D.; Mollenkopf, Sarah A.; Turakhia, Mintu P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine imaging utilization in a matched cohort of patients with and without implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and to project magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) utilization over a 10‐year period. Materials and Methods The Truven Health MarketScan Commercial claims and Medicare Supplemental health insurance claims data were used to identify patients with continuous health plan enrollment in 2009–2012. Patients with ICDs were identified using ICD‐9 and CPT codes, and matched to patients with the same demographic and comorbidity profile, but no record of device implantation. Diagnostic imaging utilization was compared across the matched cohorts, in total, by imaging categories, and in subpopulations of stroke, back pain, and joint pain. MRI use in the nonimplant group over the 4‐year period was extrapolated out to 10 years for ICD‐indicated patients. Results A cohort of 18,770 matched patients were identified; average age 65.5 ± 13.38 and 21.9% female. ICD patients had significantly less MRI imaging (0.23 0.70 SD vs. 0.00 0.08 SD, P < 0.0001) than nonimplant patients. Among patients with records of stroke/transient ischemic attack (TIA) (ICD 5%, nonimplant 4%) and accompanying diagnostic imaging, 44% of nonimplant patients underwent MRI vs. 1% of ICD patients (P < 0.0001). Forecast models estimated that 53% to 64% of ICD‐eligible patients may require an MRI within 10 years. Conclusion MRI utilization is lower in ICD patients compared to nonimplant patients, yet the burden of incident stroke/TIA, back, and joint pain suggests an unmet need for MR‐conditional devices. J. MAGN. RESON. IMAGING 2016;43:115–127. PMID:26118943

  19. Stratification of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Based on Acetate Utilization.

    PubMed

    Björnson, Elias; Mukhopadhyay, Bani; Asplund, Anna; Pristovsek, Nusa; Cinar, Resat; Romeo, Stefano; Uhlen, Mathias; Kunos, George; Nielsen, Jens; Mardinoglu, Adil

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a deadly form of liver cancer that is increasingly prevalent. We analyzed global gene expression profiling of 361 HCC tumors and 49 adjacent noncancerous liver samples by means of combinatorial network-based analysis. We investigated the correlation between transcriptome and proteome of HCC and reconstructed a functional genome-scale metabolic model (GEM) for HCC. We identified fundamental metabolic processes required for cell proliferation using the network centric view provided by the GEM. Our analysis revealed tight regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis (FAB) and highly significant deregulation of fatty acid oxidation in HCC. We predicted mitochondrial acetate as an emerging substrate for FAB through upregulation of mitochondrial acetyl-CoA synthetase (ACSS1) in HCC. We analyzed heterogeneous expression of ACSS1 and ACSS2 between HCC patients stratified by high and low ACSS1 and ACSS2 expression and revealed that ACSS1 is associated with tumor growth and malignancy under hypoxic conditions in human HCC. PMID:26655911

  20. The utility of ultrasound in patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Uren, Roger F; Sanki, Amira; Thompson, John F

    2007-11-01

    The highest quality gray-scale ultrasound images are obtained with high-frequency transducers; however, such high frequencies do not penetrate more than a few centimeters into body tissue. Fortunately, in patients with melanoma, the structures of interest are close to the skin surface, making them ideal targets for examination with high-resolution ultrasound. These include primary cutaneous melanomas, uveal melanomas and the regional lymph nodes draining the skin that lie in the axilla, groin, neck and other locations. Although ultrasound study of primary melanomas arising in the skin and eye has provided some insights, a major role for ultrasound has evolved recently, to provide early detection of metastatic melanoma in regional lymph nodes. Ultrasound is clearly superior to clinical palpation of the nodes during follow-up and, when combined with guided fine-needle biopsy, allows the earliest possible surgical intervention for regional nodal metastases. In the future the use of ultrasound contrast agents may improve the sensitivity of ultrasound in the detection of very small metastatic deposits. PMID:18020929

  1. Effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in patients on an acute care psychiatric unit: a randomized three group effectiveness study.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Stigma is a major social barrier that can restrict access to and willingness to seek psychiatric care. Psychiatric consumers may use secrecy and withdrawal in an attempt to cope with stigma. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on self- and experienced stigma in acute care psychiatric inpatients using a randomized design with wait-list control. Participants (N=83) were randomly assigned by cluster to one of three single-session group-based conditions: music therapy, education, or wait-list control. Participants in the music therapy and education conditions completed only posttests while participants in the wait-list control condition completed only pretests. The music therapy condition was a group songwriting intervention wherein participants composed lyrics for "the stigma blues." Results indicated significant differences in measures of discrimination (experienced stigma), disclosure (self-stigma), and total stigma between participants in the music therapy condition and participants in the wait-list control condition. From the results of this randomized controlled investigation, music therapy may be an engaging and effective psychosocial technique to treat stigma. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for clinical practice and psychiatric music therapy research are provided. PMID:24070990

  2. In Patients Experiencing Biochemical Failure After Radiotherapy, Pretreatment Risk Group and PSA Velocity Predict Differences in Overall Survival and Biochemical Failure-Free Interval

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Daniel E. Andridge, Rebecca R.; Pan, Charlie C.; Williams, Scott G.; Taylor, Jeremy M.G.; Sandler, Howard M.

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To characterize the demographics and survival outcomes of localized prostate cancer patients who developed biochemical failure (BF) according to a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/mL. Methods and Materials: We identified 375 prostate cancer patients who had undergone external beam radiotherapy without androgen deprivation therapy but with sufficient PSA data to study PSA kinetics. Of these patients, we identified 82 with BF. The pretreatment PSA velocity was calculated for each patient. Results: For the BF cohort, 26% were low-risk and 74% were intermediate- or high-risk patients. Of the 82 BF patients, 16 (20%) were noted to have both low-risk disease and a pretreatment low PSA velocity of {<=}2 ng/mL/y (termed 'low-risk low-velocity' [LRLV]). The remaining BF patients had either intermediate- or high-risk features or a high PSA velocity >2 ng/mL/y (termed 'higher risk' [HR]). For patients who had BF, the LRLV group had a delayed median time to BF of 55 months compared with 33 months for the HR patients (p = 0.04). With a median clinical follow-up of 112 months, the 5-year overall survival rate was 100% for the LRLV BF patients vs. 84% for the HR patients (p = 0.02). Conclusions: We observed that LRLV BF patients represent a sizeable proportion of all patients with treatment failure. However, when comparing LRLV BF with HR BF patients, the former had significantly better overall survival and a longer interval to BF. This suggests that not all BF events are equivalent and emphasizes the challenges associated with using BF alone as a surrogate for a survival endpoint.

  3. Hospice Enrollment, Local Hospice Utilization Patterns, and Rehospitalization in Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Timothy R.; Smith, Maureen A.; Bartels, Christie M.; Campbell, Toby C.; Yu, Menggang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rehospitalizations are prevalent and associated with decreased quality of life. Although hospice has been advocated to reduce rehospitalizations, it is not known how area-level hospice utilization patterns affect rehospitalization risk. Objectives: The study objective was to examine the association between hospice enrollment, local hospice utilization patterns, and 30-day rehospitalization in Medicare patients. Methods: With a retrospective cohort design, 1,997,506 hospitalizations were assessed between 2005 and 2009 from a 5% national sample of Medicare beneficiaries. Local hospice utilization was defined using tertiles representing the percentage of all deaths occurring in hospice within each Hospital Service Area (HSA). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the relationship between 30-day rehospitalization, hospice enrollment, and local hospice utilization, adjusting for patient sociodemographics, medical history, and hospital characteristics. Results: Rates of patients dying in hospice were 27% in the lowest hospice utilization tertile, 41% in the middle tertile, and 53% in the highest tertile. Patients enrolled in hospice had lower rates of 30-day rehospitalization than those not enrolled (2.2% versus 18.8%; adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.12; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.118–0.131). Patients residing in areas of low hospice utilization were at greater rehospitalization risk than those residing in areas of high utilization (19.1% versus 17.5%; HR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.04–1.06), which persisted beyond that accounted for by individual hospice enrollment. Conclusions: Area-level hospice utilization is inversely proportional to rehospitalization rates. This relationship is not fully explained by direct hospice enrollment, and may reflect a spillover effect of the benefits of hospice extending to nonenrollees. PMID:25879990

  4. Dialysis patients' utilization of health care services covered by long-term care insurance in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Utako; Mitadera, Yuji; Aoki, Hagiko; Akazawa, Kouhei

    2015-01-01

    Hemodialysis patients in Japan are aging and thus more patients need support for attending hemodialysis facilities. This study aimed to clarify how dialysis patients utilize the services covered by Japan's public long-term care insurance (LTCI) system. This cross-sectional study was based on LTCI data of March 31, 2009, the latest available data provided by Niigata City, located on the northwest coast of Honshu. Among 30,349 LTCI users in Niigata City, there were 234 dialysis patients. To clarify the characteristics of the dialysis patients, we compared the utilization of LTCI services between the dialysis patients (234 users) and randomly selected 765 non-dialysis users. We also calculated the annual transportation service costs per patient for dialysis patients who continued home care (home care group) and those who switched to long-term hospital care at LTCI care levels 4 and 5 (hospital admission group). These care levels indicate difficulty in walking or maintaining a sitting posture without assistance. The dialysis group more frequently utilized home care and equipment services, such as renting or purchasing care-support products and support for home equipment repair, and utilized facility services and short-stay services (respite care) less frequently (both p < 0.001). Cost per patient was higher in the home care group than in the hospital admission group, because the transportation services for dialysis patients at care levels 4 and 5 involve higher costs. These findings indicate that LTCI services usable for dialysis patients were limited. Therefore, instead of merely subsidizing transportation expenses, transportation services must be improved. PMID:25891160

  5. Dual Therapy Treatment Strategies for the Management of Patients Infected with HIV: A Systematic Review of Current Evidence in ARV-Naive or ARV-Experienced, Virologically Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Jean-Guy; Angel, Jonathan B.; Gill, M. John; Gathe, Joseph; Cahn, Pedro; van Wyk, Jean; Walmsley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Objective We reviewed the current literature regarding antiretroviral (ARV)-sparing therapy strategies to determine whether these novel regimens can be considered appropriate alternatives to standard regimens for the initial treatment of ARV-naive patients or as switch therapy for those patients with virologically suppressed HIV infection. Methods A search for studies related to HIV dual therapy published from January 2000 through April 2014 was performed using Biosis, Derwent Drug File, Embase, International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, Medline, Pascal, SciSearch, and TOXNET databases; seven major trial registries, and the abstracts of major conferences. Using predetermined criteria for inclusion, an expert review committee critically reviewed and qualitatively evaluated all identified trials for efficacy and safety results and potential limitations. Results Sixteen studies of dual therapy regimens were critiqued for the ARV-naive population. Studies of a protease inhibitor/ritonavir in combination with the integrase inhibitor raltegravir or the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor lamivudine provided the most definitive evidence supporting a role for dual therapy. In particular, lopinavir/ritonavir or darunavir/ritonavir combined with raltegravir and lopinavir/ritonavir combined with lamivudine demonstrated noninferiority to standard of care triple therapy after 48 weeks of treatment. Thirteen trials were critiqued in ARV-experienced, virologically suppressed patients. The virologic efficacy outcomes were mixed. Although overall data regarding toxicity are limited, when compared with standard triple therapy, certain dual therapy regimens may offer advantages in renal function, bone mineral density, and limb fat changes; however, some dual combinations may elevate lipid or bilirubin levels. Conclusions The potential benefits of dual therapy regimens include reduced toxicity, improved tolerability and adherence, and reduced cost. Although the data reviewed here

  6. Understanding the digital divide in the clinical setting: the technology knowledge gap experienced by US safety net patients during teleretinal screening.

    PubMed

    George, Sheba; Moran, Erin; Fish, Allison; Ogunyemi, Lola

    2013-01-01

    Differential access to everyday technology and healthcare amongst safety net patients is associated with low technological and health literacies, respectively. These low rates of literacy produce a complex patient "knowledge gap" that influences the effectiveness of telehealth technologies. To understand this "knowledge gap", six focus groups (2 African-American and 4 Latino) were conducted with patients who received teleretinal screenings in U.S. urban safety-net settings. Findings indicate that patients' "knowledge gap" is primarily produced at three points: (1) when patients' preexisting personal barriers to care became exacerbated in the clinical setting; (2) through encounters with technology during screening; and (3) in doctor-patient follow-up. This "knowledge gap" can produce confusion and fear, potentially affecting patients' confidence in quality of care and limiting their disease management ability. In rethinking the digital divide to include the consequences of this knowledge gap faced by patients in the clinical setting, we suggest that patient education focus on both their disease and specific telehealth technologies deployed in care delivery. PMID:23920720

  7. Priorities in the primary care of persons experiencing homelessness: convergence and divergence in the views of patients and provider/experts

    PubMed Central

    Steward, Jocelyn; Holt, Cheryl L; Pollio, David E; Austin, Erika L; Johnson, Nancy; Gordon, Adam J; Kertesz, Stefan G

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Homeless individuals face unique challenges in health care. Several US initiatives seeking to advance patient-centered primary care for homeless persons are more likely to succeed if they incorporate the priorities of the patients they are to serve. However, there has been no prior research to elicit their priorities in primary care. This study sought to identify aspects of primary care important to persons familiar with homelessness based on personal experience or professional commitment, and to highlight where the priorities of patients and professionals dedicated to their care converge or diverge. Methods This qualitative exercise asked 26 homeless patients and ten provider/experts to rank 16 aspects of primary care using a card sort. Patient-level respondents (n=26) were recruited from homeless service organizations across all regions of the USA and from an established board of homeless service users. Provider/expert-level respondents (n=10) were recruited from veteran and non-veteran-focused homeless health care programs with similar geographic diversity. Results Both groups gave high priority to accessibility, evidence-based care, coordination, and cooperation. Provider/experts endorsed patient control more strongly than patients. Patients ranked information about their care more highly than provider/experts. Conclusion Accessibility and the perception of care based on medical evidence represent priority concerns for homeless patients and provider/experts. Patient control, a concept endorsed by experts, is not strongly endorsed by homeless patients. Understanding how to assure fluid communication, coordination, and team member cooperation could represent more worthy targets for research and quality improvement in this domain. PMID:26929607

  8. Healthcare utilization and costs in patients beginning pharmacotherapy for generalized anxiety disorder: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patterns of healthcare utilization and costs in patients beginning pharmacotherapy for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have not been well characterized. Methods Using a large US health insurance database, we identified all patients with evidence of GAD (ICD-9-CM diagnosis code 300.02) who initiated pharmacotherapy with medications commonly used to treat GAD (eg, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs], venlafaxine, benzodiazepines) between 1/1/2003 and 12/31/2007. We examined healthcare utilization and costs over the 12-month periods preceding and following date of initial receipt of such therapy ("pretreatment" and "follow-up", respectively). Patients with incomplete data were excluded. Results A total of 10,275 patients met all study inclusion criteria. Forty-eight percent of patients received SSRIs; 34%, benzodiazepines; and 6%, venlafaxine. SSRIs and venlafaxine were about three times more likely to be used on a long-term basis (> 90 days) than benzodiazepines (p < 0.01). In general, levels of healthcare utilization were higher during follow-up than pretreatment. Mean (SD) total healthcare costs increased from $4812 ($10,006) during pretreatment to $7182 ($22,041) during follow-up (p < 0.01); costs of GAD-related pharmacotherapy during follow-up were $420 ($485). Conclusions More than one-half of patients initiating pharmacotherapy for GAD receive either SSRIs or venlafaxine. Levels of healthcare utilization and costs are greater in the year following initiation of therapy than in the immediately preceding one. PMID:22151689

  9. Comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges and mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang-Ming; Han, Xiao-Feng

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to examine the associations between comorbid conditions and healthcare utilization, medical charges, or mortality of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Nebraska state emergency department (ED) discharge, hospital discharge, and death certificate data from 2007 to 2012 were used to study the comorbid conditions of patients with RA. RA was defined using the standard International Classification of Diseases (ICD-9-CM 714 or ICD-10-CM M05, M06, and M08). There were more comorbid conditions in patients with RA than in patients without RA. Comorbid conditions were majorly related to healthcare utilization and mortality of patients with RA. In addition to injury, fracture, sprains, and strains, symptoms of cardiovascular and digestive systems, respiratory infection, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were common comorbid conditions for ED visits. In addition to joint replacement and fracture, infections, COPD and cardiovascular comorbidities were common comorbid conditions for hospitalizations. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and respiratory comorbidities, dementia, malignant neoplasm, and diabetes mellitus were common comorbid conditions for deaths of patients with RA. In addition, the numbers of comorbid conditions were significantly associated with the length of hospital stay and hospital charges for patients with RA. The findings in this study indicated that comorbid conditions are associated with healthcare utilization, medical charges, and mortality of patients with RA. PMID:27106546

  10. Reinduction with Certolizumab Pegol in Patients with Crohn's Disease Experiencing Disease Exacerbation: 7-Year Data from the PRECiSE 4 Study

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, David T.; Sandborn, William J.; Randall, Charles; Younes, Ziad; Schreiber, Stefan; Schwartz, David A.; Burakoff, Robert; Binion, David; Dassopoulos, Themos; Arsenescu, Razvan; Gutierrez, Alexandra; Scherl, Ellen; Kayhan, Cem; Hasan, Iram; Kosutic, Gordana; Spearman, Marshall; Sen, David; Coarse, Jason; Hanauer, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patients with Crohn's disease in whom tumor necrosis factor antagonist therapy fails have limited treatment options, and the benefit of reintroducing the same therapy remains unclear. Here, we report results from PRECiSE 4 (NCT00160706), an open-label extension study of certolizumab pegol in patients who withdrew from the placebo-controlled studies PRECiSE 1 or 2. Methods: Patients eligible for PRECiSE 4 had Crohn's disease exacerbation on placebo or primary or secondary failure to certolizumab pegol in PRECiSE 1 or 2, and received 400 mg certolizumab pegol subcutaneously at weeks 0, 2, and 4 and every 4 weeks thereafter up to 360 weeks. We assessed safety (adverse events) and efficacy (clinical remission) of extended certolizumab pegol therapy. Results: Patients enrolled in PRECiSE 4 (N = 310; mean age, 37 yr; 58% female; 95% white) had a mean Crohn's disease duration of 8.5 years before entering the qualifying studies. At weeks 52, 104, and 156, remission rates were 28.5%, 17.5%, and 12.6% by nonremitter imputation, and 63.8%, 60.0%, and 63.5% by observed cases, with 47.4%, 31.9%, and 23.2% of patients, respectively, remaining on therapy. By study end (7.5 yr), 92.3% of patients discontinued therapy, 49% on account of adverse events. No new safety signals emerged. Incidence rate (new cases)/100 patient-years was 6.11 for serious infections and 1.29 for malignancies. Conclusions: Certolizumab pegol was effective in many patients who previously discontinued certolizumab pegol for lack or loss of response. Thus, discontinuation of therapy may not always be necessary. Safety was consistent with previous findings. PMID:27400222

  11. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    PubMed

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy. PMID:25887249

  12. Characteristics of acute care utilization of a Delaware adult sickle cell disease patient population.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Nina; Bellot, Jennifer; Senu-Oke, Oluseyi; Ballas, Samir K

    2014-02-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is an inherited blood disorder that is chronic in nature and manifests itself through many facets of the patient's life. Comprehensive specialty centers have the potential to reduce health care costs and improve the quality of care for patients who have chronic medical conditions such as heart failure and SCD. The purpose of this practice inquiry was to analyze de-identified data for acute care episodes involving SCD in order to create a detailed picture of acute care utilization for adult patients in Delaware with SCD from 2007 to 2009. Gaining a better understanding of acute care utilization for adults with SCD may provide evidence to improve access to high-quality health care services for this vulnerable patient population in the state of Delaware. PMID:23965046

  13. Decreased use of glucocorticoids in biological-experienced patients with rheumatoid arthritis who initiated intravenous abatacept: results from the 2-year ACTION study

    PubMed Central

    Alten, Rieke; Nüßlein, Hubert; Galeazzi, Mauro; Lorenz, Hanns-Martin; Nurmohamed, Michael T; Bensen, William G; Burmester, Gerd R; Peter, Hans-Hartmut; Pavelka, Karel; Chartier, Mélanie; Poncet, Coralie; Rauch, Christiane; Elbez, Yedid; Le Bars, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prolonged glucocorticoid use may increase the risk of adverse safety outcomes, including cardiovascular events. The European League Against Rheumatism and the Canadian Rheumatology Association advise tapering glucocorticoid dose as rapidly as clinically feasible. There is a paucity of published data on RA that adequately describe concomitant treatment patterns. Methods ACTION (AbataCepT In rOutiNe clinical practice) is a non-interventional cohort study of patients from Europe and Canada that investigated the long-term retention of intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. We assessed concomitant glucocorticoids in patients with established RA who had participated in ACTION and received ≥1 biological agent prior to abatacept initiation. Results The analysis included 1009 patients. Glucocorticoids were prescribed at abatacept initiation in 734 (72.7%) patients at a median 7.5 mg/day dose (n=692). Of the patients who remained on abatacept at 24 months, 40.7% were able to decrease their dose of glucocorticoids, including 26.9% who decreased their dose from >5 mg/day to ≤5 mg/day. Conclusion Reduction and/or cessation of glucocorticoid therapy is possible with intravenous abatacept in clinical practice. PMID:26925253

  14. The Effects of Experienced Uncertainty and Patients' Assessments of Cancer-Related Information-Seeking Experiences on Fatalistic Beliefs and Trust in Physicians.

    PubMed

    Hong, Soo Jung; You, Kyung Han

    2016-12-01

    Using the 2013 HINTS 4 Cycle 2 data representing a general population sample, this study investigates the effects of patients' experiences of uncertainty about prostate cancer during doctor-patient communication, as well as patients' positive assessments of their cancer-related information-seeking experiences, on their fatalistic beliefs regarding cancer and their trust in physicians. Our tests show significant differences in trust in physicians among men who do and do not experience uncertainty about the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test during doctor-patient communication. The analysis also indicates that individuals with experiences of uncertainty about the PSA test are more likely than those without such experiences of uncertainty to place their trust in doctors. However, no apparent difference or association exists when there are uncertainties relating to treatment choices regarding slow-growing cancer or treatment side effects. Nevertheless, as hypothesized, individuals who positively evaluate their cancer-related information-seeking experiences are less likely to have fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Furthermore, patients' positive assessments are highly predictive of their levels of trust in their physicians. Additionally, tests of interaction effects show that individuals' levels of education moderate the association between uncertainty experiences about the PSA test and both cancer fatalism and trust in physicians. Further implications and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:27092867

  15. Effectively implementing FDA medication alerts utilizing patient centered medical home clinical pharmacists.

    PubMed

    Arenz, Barbara J; Diez, Heidi L; Bostwick, Jolene R; Kales, Helen C; Zivin, Kara; Dalack, Gregory W; Fluent, Tom E; Standiford, Connie J; Stano, Claire; Mi Choe, Hae

    2016-03-01

    FDA medication alerts can be successfully implemented within patient centered medical home (PCMH) clinics utilizing clinical pharmacists. Targeted selection of high-risk patients from an electronic database allows PCMH pharmacists to prioritize assessments. Trusting relationships between PCMH clinical pharmacists and primary care providers facilitates high response rates to pharmacist recommendations. This health system approach led by PCMH pharmacists provides a framework for proactive responses to FDA safety alerts and medication related quality measure improvement. PMID:27001101

  16. Measurement of patient-derived utility values for periodontal health using a multi-attribute scale.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, C A; Brickley, M R; McAndrew, R

    1996-09-01

    Periodontal health states are difficult to quantify and no formal scale quantifying patients' utilities for periodontal health states exits. Multi-attribute utility (MAU) techniques were used to develop such a scale. The MAU scale may be used to quantify patients' assessment of their current periodontal health and that of possible treatment outcomes. Such data, combined with probability values in formal decision analysis techniques would result in improved rationality of treatment planning for periodontal disease. 20 patients attending for routine undergraduate care were interviewed. Data from these interviews were sorted into groups of common interest (domains). Intra-domain health statements were complied from the interview content. 21 patients ranked the intra-domain statements on a scale of 0-100. This same group of patients also performed an inter-domain weighting. Mean results showed that patients were 2X as concerned with how they felt and with the prognosis of possible outcomes, than with how they looked and what facts they knew about their oral health. However, the real value of utilities research lies in application of individual results to treatment planning as there is a wide range of opinion regarding outcome health states. PMID:8891929

  17. Behavioral Problems In The Utilization Of New Technology To Control Caries: Patients And Provider Readiness And Motivation

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, Philip

    2006-01-01

    New research developments frequently are neither adopted by providers nor utilized by patients. This dual problem of impacting the behaviors of providers and patients presents a challenge. This paper will present behavioral theories and technologies that can be utilized to impact both provider and patient behaviors. PMID:16934122

  18. Using Pharmacokinetic and Viral Kinetic Modeling To Estimate the Antiviral Effectiveness of Telaprevir, Boceprevir, and Pegylated Interferon during Triple Therapy in Treatment-Experienced Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Marcellin, Patrick; Lapalus, Martine; Khelifa-Mouri, Feryel; Boyer, Nathalie; Zoulim, Fabien; Serfaty, Lawrence; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Martinot-Peignoux, Michelle; Lada, Olivier; Asselah, Tarik; Dorival, Céline; Hézode, Christophe; Carrat, Fabrice; Nicot, Florence; Peytavin, Gilles; Mentré, France; Guedj, Jeremie

    2014-01-01

    Triple therapy combining a protease inhibitor (PI) (telaprevir or boceprevir), pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN), and ribavirin (RBV) has dramatically increased the chance of eradicating hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, the efficacy of this treatment remains suboptimal in cirrhotic treatment-experienced patients. Here, we aimed to better understand the origin of this impaired response by estimating the antiviral effectiveness of each drug. Fifteen HCV genotype 1-infected patients with compensated cirrhosis, who were nonresponders to prior PEG-IFN/RBV therapy, were enrolled in a nonrandomized study. HCV RNA and concentrations of PIs, PEG-IFN, and RBV were frequently assessed in the first 12 weeks of treatment and were analyzed using a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model. The two PIs achieved similar levels of molar concentrations (P = 0.5), but there was a significant difference in the 50% effective concentrations (EC50) (P = 0.008), leading to greater effectiveness for telaprevir than for boceprevir in blocking viral production (99.8% versus 99.0%, respectively, P = 0.002). In all patients, the antiviral effectiveness of PEG-IFN was modest (43.4%), and there was no significant contribution of RBV exposure to the total antiviral effectiveness. The second phase of viral decline, which is attributed to the loss rate of infected cells, was slow (0.19 day−1) and was higher in patients who subsequently eradicated HCV (P = 0.03). The two PIs achieved high levels of antiviral effectiveness. However, the suboptimal antiviral effectiveness of PEG-IFN/RBV and the low loss of infected cells suggest that a longer treatment duration might be needed in cirrhotic treatment-experienced patients and that a future IFN-free regimen may be particularly beneficial in these patients. PMID:24982076

  19. Resource Utilization for Noncardiac Admissions in Pediatric Patients With Single Ventricle Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Ian D; Seckeler, Michael D

    2016-05-15

    Patients with single ventricle (SV) congenital heart disease (CHD) incur high hospital costs during staged surgical palliation. Health care resource utilization for noncardiac admissions in patients with SV has not been reported. This study sought to compare costs and outcomes for common noncardiac hospital admissions between patients with SV and patients without CHD. Hospital discharge data from the University Health System Consortium from January 2011 to December 2013 was queried for patients aged ≤18 years with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SV lesions: hypoplastic left heart syndrome (746.7), tricuspid atresia (746.1), or common ventricle (745.3). Primary diagnosis, direct cost, length of stay (LOS), intensive care unit admission rate and mortality data were obtained. The 10 most common noncardiac admission diagnoses were compared between patients with SV and patients without CHD using t test and Fisher's exact test. Total direct cost, LOS, and intensive care unit admission rate were higher for patients with SV for all diagnoses with the exception of LOS for dehydration, which was not different between groups. Hospital mortality was significantly higher for patients with SV admitted for acute kidney injury, esophageal reflux, failure to thrive, respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis and pneumonia. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that patients with SV CHD admitted with noncardiac diagnoses have higher health care resource utilization compared to those without CHD. As long-term survival increases, it can be expected that this patient group will use a disproportionate amount of medical dollars. Further characterization of costs will be important so steps can be taken to reduce or prevent hospitalization in these patients. PMID:27018934

  20. Wait Times Experienced by Lung Cancer Patients in the BC Southern Interior to Obtain Oncologic Care: Exploration of the Intervals from First Abnormal Imaging to Oncologic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Rezwan; Boyce, Andrew; Halperin, Ross

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is associated with rapid disease progression, which can significantly progress over a duration of four to eight weeks. This study examines the time interval lung cancer patients from the interior of British Columbia (BC) experience while undergoing diagnostic evaluation, biopsy, staging, and preparation for treatment. Methods: A chart review of lung cancer patients (n=231) referred to the BC Cancer Agency Centre for the Southern Interior between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 was performed. Time zero was defined as the date of the first abnormal chest imaging. Time intervals, expressed as median averages, to specialist consult, biopsy, oncologic referral, initial oncology consultation, and commencement of oncologic treatment were obtained. Results: The median time interval from first abnormal chest imaging to a specialist consultation was 18 days (interquartile range, IQR, 7-36). An additional nine days elapsed prior to biopsy in the form of bronchoscopy, CT-guided biopsy, or sputum cytology (median; IQR, 3-21); if lobectomy was required, 18 days elapsed (median; IQR, 9-28). Eight days were required for pathologic diagnosis and subsequent referral to the cancer centre (median; IQR, 3-16.5). Once referral was received, 10 days elapsed prior to consultation with either a medical or radiation oncologist (median, IQR 5-18). Finally, eight days was required for initiation of radiation and/or chemotherapy (median; IQR, 1-15). The median wait time from detection of lung cancer on imaging to oncologic treatment in the form of radiation and/or chemotherapy was 65.5 days (IQR, 41.5-104.3).  Interpretation: Patients in the BC Southern Interior experience considerable delays in accessing lung cancer care. During this time, the disease has the potential to significantly progress and it is possible that a subset of patients may lose their opportunity for curative intent treatment. PMID:26543688

  1. Identification of aspects of functioning, disability and health relevant to patients experiencing vertigo: a qualitative study using the international classification of functioning, disability and health

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Aims of this study were to identify aspects of functioning and health relevant to patients with vertigo expressed by ICF categories and to explore the potential of the ICF to describe the patient perspective in vertigo. Methods We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews using a descriptive approach. Data was analyzed using the meaning condensation procedure and then linked to categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Results From May to July 2010 12 interviews were carried out until saturation was reached. Four hundred and seventy-one single concepts were extracted which were linked to 142 different ICF categories. 40 of those belonged to the component body functions, 62 to the component activity and participation, and 40 to the component environmental factors. Besides the most prominent aspect “dizziness” most participants reported problems within “Emotional functions (b152), problems related to mobility and carrying out the daily routine. Almost all participants reported “Immediate family (e310)” as a relevant modifying environmental factor. Conclusions From the patients’ perspective, vertigo has impact on multifaceted aspects of functioning and disability, mainly body functions and activities and participation. Modifying contextual factors have to be taken into account to cover the complex interaction between the health condition of vertigo on the individuals’ daily life. The results of this study will contribute to developing standards for the measurement of functioning, disability and health relevant for patients suffering from vertigo. PMID:22738067

  2. Utilizing the health belief model to assess vaccine acceptance of patients on hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Adams, Angela; Hall, Mellisa; Fulghum, Janis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccine rates in patients on hemodialysis are substantially lower than the Healthy People 2020 targets. The purpose of this study is to utilize the perceptions and cues for action constructs of the Health Belief Model (HBM) to assess the attitudes of patients receiving outpatient hemodialysis regarding acceptance of the seasonal influenza, pneumococcal, and hepatitis B virus vaccines. Vaccine acceptance is defined as receiving the vaccine. Study findings suggest age, perceived susceptibility, and perceived severity increase the odds of getting some vaccines. Findings have implications for the development of patient education materials, interdisciplinary team assessments, and plan of care strategies to increase vaccine acceptance. PMID:25244894

  3. Comparison of General Population, Patient, and Carer Utility Values for Dementia Health States

    PubMed Central

    Mulhern, Brendan; Banerjee, Sube; Tait, Rhian; Watchurst, Caroline; Smith, Sarah C.; Young, Tracey A.; Knapp, Martin; Brazier, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Utility values to estimate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for use in cost-utility analyses are usually elicited from members of the general population. Public attitudes and understanding of dementia in particular may mean that values elicited from the general population may differ from patients and carers for dementia health states. This study examines how the population impacts utility values elicited for dementia health states using interviewer-administered time tradeoff valuation of health states defined by the dementia-specific preference-based measures DEMQOL-U (patient-report) and DEMQOL-Proxy-U (carer-report). Eight DEMQOL-U states were valued by 78 members of the UK general population and 71 patients with dementia of mild severity. Eight DEMQOL-Proxy-U states were valued by 77 members of the UK general population and 71 carers of patients with dementia of mild severity. Random-effects generalized least squares regression estimated the impact of population, dementia health state, and respondent sociodemographic characteristics on elicited values, finding that values for dementia health states differed by population and that the difference varied across dementia health states. Patients with dementia and carers of patients with dementia gave systematically lower values than members of the general population that were not due to differences in the sociodemographic characteristics of the populations. Our results suggest that the population used to produce dementia health state values could impact the results of cost-utility analyses and potentially affect resource allocation decisions; yet, currently, only general population values are available for usage. PMID:25385749

  4. Diminished Utilization of In Vitro Fertilization Following Ovarian Transposition in Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Sana. M.; Albayrak, Samet; Seo, Songwon; Stewart, Sarah L.; Bradley, Kristen; Kushner, David. M.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ovarian transposition (OT) is offered to reproductive age women with cervical cancer (CC) to preserve fertility prior to pelvic radiation. The aim of this study was to assess subsequent utilization of fertility treatment in these patients. STUDY DESIGN This is a case series of 216 cervical cancer patients seen in a comprehensive cancer center. 16 patients underwent OT for fertility preservation prior to pelvic radiation. Patients were assessed for utilization of fertility treatment, FSH levels as a measure of ovarian reserve, and functional assessment of chronic illness therapy-cervix cancer (FACT-CX) to assess quality of life after OT. RESULTS 94% of patients maintained regular menstrual cycles three years after OT surgery (15/16). When measured (n=5) serum FSH was normal at baseline, and showed a transient elevation at three months following chemoradiation, with a return to normal levels at six months (Means 6.33±2.94, 48.44±18.63, 12.52±8.25, mIU/ML respectively). Only one patient in this series attempted fertility treatment (in vitro fertilization) following OT, and did not become pregnant. FACT-CX indicated that quality of life did not change significantly over the six months’ duration following OT and chemoradiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS OT preserves menstrual cycle regularity without negatively impacting patients’ quality of life. The utility of OT as an effective fertility preservation option is hampered by the low utilization rate of in vitro fertilization and lack of ovarian reserve assessment following OT. PMID:26380495

  5. A multicenter, primary care-based, open-label study to identify behaviors related to prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion in opioid-experienced patients with chronic moderate-to-severe pain

    PubMed Central

    Setnik, Beatrice; Roland, Carl L; Sommerville, Kenneth W; Pixton, Glenn C; Berke, Robert; Calkins, Anne; Goli, Veeraindar

    2015-01-01

    Objective To compare the investigator assessment of patient risk for prescription opioid misuse, abuse, and diversion with patient self-reports of these activities in a population with chronic pain. Methods As a secondary objective of an open-label, multicenter, primary care-based clinical study to evaluate the success of converting opioid-experienced patients with chronic pain to morphine sulfate with sequestered naltrexone hydrochloride, risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion was assessed using two nonvalidated questionnaires: one was completed by the investigator and another by the patient (Self-Reported Misuse, Abuse, and Diversion [SR-MAD]). In addition, the validated Current Opioid Misuse Measure (COMM) test and urine drug test were used. Results Of the 684 patients assessed by the investigators, 537 returned the self-assessment, SR-MAD. Most patients were assigned by the investigator as low risk for misuse (84.2%), abuse (89.3%), and diversion (94.3%). Of the patients who returned SR-MAD, 60% indicated having taken more opioids than prescribed and 10.9% reported chewing or crushing their opioids in the past. Of the patients who completed COMM, 40.6% were deemed as having aberrant behaviors. COMM results correlated with the risk levels from the investigator assessment. One-third of patients (33.8%) had at least one abnormal urine drug test result. Conclusion More research is needed to better understand the gap between the investigator assessment of potential risk for misuse, abuse, and diversion and the actual extent of these behaviors among patients with chronic pain. PMID:26185467

  6. Re-analysis of survival data of cancer patients utilizing additive homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Gleiss, Andreas; Frass, Michael; Gaertner, Katharina

    2016-08-01

    In this short communication we present a re-analysis of homeopathic patient data in comparison to control patient data from the same Outpatient´s Unit "Homeopathy in malignant diseases" of the Medical University of Vienna. In this analysis we took account of a probable immortal time bias. For patients suffering from advanced stages of cancer and surviving the first 6 or 12 months after diagnosis, respectively, the results show that utilizing homeopathy gives a statistically significant (p<0.001) advantage over control patients regarding survival time. In conclusion, bearing in mind all limitations, the results of this retrospective study suggest that patients with advanced stages of cancer might benefit from additional homeopathic treatment until a survival time of up to 12 months after diagnosis. PMID:27515878

  7. Imaginatively Experiencing Paintings and Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Damien

    2013-01-01

    This essay investigates the special way in which a spectator might engage imaginatively with one work of art when the work is experienced in light of other works by the same artist. In particular, it addresses the idea that we might imaginatively identify with an unrepresented spectator in the picture after we have experienced others in which the…

  8. Estimation of utility values from visual analog scale measures of health in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oddershede, Lars; Andreasen, Jan Jesper; Ehlers, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In health economic evaluations, mapping can be used to estimate utility values from other health outcomes in order to calculate quality adjusted life-years. Currently, no methods exist to map visual analog scale (VAS) scores to utility values. This study aimed to develop and propose a statistical algorithm for mapping five dimensions of health, measured on VASs, to utility scores in patients suffering from cardiovascular disease. Methods Patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting at Aalborg University Hospital in Denmark were asked to score their health using the five VAS items (mobility, self-care, ability to perform usual activities, pain, and presence of anxiety or depression) and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions questionnaire. Regression analysis was used to estimate four mapping models from patients’ age, sex, and the self-reported VAS scores. Prediction errors were compared between mapping models and on subsets of the observed utility scores. Agreement between predicted and observed values was assessed using Bland–Altman plots. Results Random effects generalized least squares (GLS) regression yielded the best results when quadratic terms of VAS scores were included. Mapping models fitted using the Tobit model and censored least absolute deviation regression did not appear superior to GLS regression. The mapping models were able to explain approximately 63%–65% of the variation in the observed utility scores. The mean absolute error of predictions increased as the observed utility values decreased. Conclusion We concluded that it was possible to predict utility scores from VAS scores of the five dimensions of health used in the EuroQol questionnaires. However, the use of the mapping model may be inappropriate in more severe conditions. PMID:24453497

  9. Stressors experienced by injured athletes.

    PubMed

    Evans, Lynne; Wadey, Ross; Hanton, Sheldon; Mitchell, Ian

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to examine the stressors experienced by injured athletes during three phases of their recovery from sport injury, and (b) to explore the differences in the stressors experienced by team as compared to individual-sport athletes. Participants comprised previously injured high-level rugby union players (n = 5) and golfers (n = 5). Semi-structured interviews were used to explore the stressors participants experienced during three phases of injury (onset, rehabilitation and return to competitive sport). Within- and cross-case analyses showed that athletes experienced sport, medical/physical, social and financial stressors. There were a number of differences in the stressors experienced across the three phases and between team and individual-sport athletes. Findings have important implications for the design and implementation of interventions aimed at managing the potentially stressful sport injury experience and facilitating injured athletes' return to competitive sport. PMID:22551525

  10. Recruiting Experienced Educators: A Model and a Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winter, Paul A.

    1996-01-01

    A model was developed for recruiting experienced educators, extending the recruitment-as-marketing theory. To assess the model's utility, 168 experienced female teachers posed as job applicants responding to position advertisements. Participant reactions were more favorable when advertisements contained intrinsic job attributes, a personal tone,…

  11. Recent availability of two novel, fixed formulations of antiretroviral nucleoside analogues: a 12-month prospective, open-label survey of their practical use and therapeutic perspectives in antiretroviral-naive and -experienced patients.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Roberto; Calza, Leonardo

    2008-04-01

    patients. From a tolerability point of view, the emtricitabine-tenofovir association was never withdrawn due to untoward events, while only two cases of early abacavir-lamivudine suspension occurred, due to a probable abacavir hypersensitivity reaction. From our preliminary experience, a major role seems to be played by tenofovir-emtricitabine in first-line treatments (preferably among "compact" regimens based on efavirenz), while the proportionally increased abacavir-lamivudine prescription to pretreated patients is mostly attributable to the different genetic barrier of abacavir (which was often associated with boosted protease inhibitors, in this last patient group). The present availability of two more fixed NRTI combinations favored by their single pill, once-daily administration strongly encourages randomized, controlled "head to head" studies in both first-line and experienced patents, in order to better exploit and target their therapeutic potential, and their most effective associations. PMID:18290748

  12. Health Care Service Utilization of Dementia Patients before and after Institutionalization: A Claims Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Larissa; Hao, Yi; Holle, Rolf; Graessel, Elmar

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-based and institutional dementia care has been compared in cross-sectional studies, but longitudinal information on the effect of institutionalization on health care service utilization is sparse. Methods We analyzed claims data from 651 dementia patients via Generalized Estimation Equations to assess health care service utilization profiles and corresponding expenditures from four quarters before to four quarters after institutionalization. Results In all domains, utilization increased in the quarter of institutionalization. Afterwards, the use of drugs, medical aids, and non-physician services (e.g., occupational therapy and physiotherapy) remained elevated, but use of in- and outpatient treatment decreased. Cost of care showed corresponding profiles. Conclusion Institutional dementia care seems to be associated with an increased demand for supportive services but not necessarily for specialized medical care. PMID:25337076

  13. Clinical characteristics and healthcare utilization of patients with multicentric Castleman disease.

    PubMed

    Casper, Corey; Teltsch, Dana Y; Robinson, Don; Desrosiers, Marie-Pierre; Rotella, Philip; Dispenzieri, Angela; Qi, Ming; Habermann, Thomas; Reynolds, Matthew W

    2015-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease (MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disease. Little is known about how patient clinical features and healthcare utilization varies by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status and disease subtype. Data of MCD patients identified between 2000 and 2009 were collected from medical records at two United States treatment centres. Clinical, demographic, and biochemical characteristics, drug therapies and medical utilization were descriptively reported by HIV status and cell histology, and statistically compared with the Fisher's Exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Patients (n = 59) had a pathologically and clinically confirmed MCD diagnosis: plasmacytic (42%), hyaline vascular (29%) and mixed (15%); 10% had HIV infection. In the first year after diagnosis, MCD patients on average saw a healthcare provider more than six times, were hospitalized at least once and underwent frequent radiological and laboratory testing. Rituximab was the most commonly used drug therapy, followed by corticosteroids and conventional chemotherapy. One- and 2-year survival was excellent in HIV-negative patients (100% and 97%, respectively) but inferior for HIV-positive cases (67% and 67%, respectively). Heterogeneous treatment decisions were observed in this MCD study; HIV status was the only distinguishing clinical criteria associated with pharmacotherapies. Additional research is necessary to guide treatment of this rare lymphoproliferative disorder. PMID:25208471

  14. Utilizing everyday items in play to facilitate hand therapy for pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Peck-Murray, Jill Ann

    2015-01-01

    This article describes how hand therapy for pediatric patients can be enhanced through the use of play with everyday items. Playful activities integrate purposeful hand skills of pinch, grasp and manipulation, while encouraging the child to fully participate in therapy and home programs. By referring to Takata's developmental hierarchy of play, therapists can design the sessions to include novel, fun and age appropriate activities. The author offers eight sample activities for specific therapy goals utilizing inexpensive, everyday items. PMID:25060856

  15. Utility of KRAS mutation detection using circulating cell-free DNA from patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Iwai, Takuma; Takahashi, Goro; Kan, Hayato; Koizumi, Michihiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Shinji, Seiichi; Yamagishi, Aya; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Kawagoe, Tatsuro; Kitano, Shiro; Nakayama, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of detecting KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free (ccf)DNA of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We prospectively recruited 94 metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Circulating cell-free DNA was extracted from plasma samples and analyzed for the presence of seven KRAS point mutations. Using the Invader Plus assay with peptide nucleic acid clamping method and digital PCR, KRAS mutations were detected in the ccfDNA in 35 of 39 patients previously determined to have primary tumors containing KRAS mutations using the Luminex method, and in 5 of 55 patients with tumors containing wild-type KRAS. Curative resection was undertaken in 7 of 34 patients with primary and ccfDNA KRAS mutations, resulting in the disappearance of the mutation from the cell-free DNA in five of seven patients. Three of these patients had tumor recurrence and KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA reappeared. Epidermal growth factor receptor blockade was administered to 24 of the KRAS tumor wild-type patients. Of the 24 patients with wild-type KRAS in their primary tumors, three patients had KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA and did not respond to treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We also detected a new KRAS mutation in five patients during chemotherapy with EGFR blockade, before disease progression was detectable with imaging. The detection of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA is an attractive approach for predicting both treatment response and acquired resistance to EGFR blockade, and for detecting disease recurrence. PMID:27116474

  16. Factors associated with the utilization and costs of health and social services in frail elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Universal access is one of the major aims in public health and social care. Services should be provided on the basis of individual needs. However, municipal autonomy and the fragmentation of services may jeopardize universal access and lead to variation between municipalities in the delivery of services. This paper aims to identify patient-level characteristics and municipality-level service patterns that may have an influence on the use and costs of health and social services of frail elderly patients. Methods Hierarchical analysis was applied to estimate the effects of patient and municipality-level variables on services utilization. Results The variation in the use of health care services was entirely due to patient-related variables, whereas in the social services, 9% of the variation was explained by the municipality-level and 91% by the patient-level characteristics. Health-related quality of life explained a major part of variation in the costs of health care services. Those who had reported improvement in their health status during the preceding year were more frequent users of social care services. Low informal support, poor functional status and poor instrumental activities of daily living, living at a residential home, and living alone were associated with higher social services expenditure. Conclusions The results of this study showed municipality-level variation in the utilization of social services, whereas health care services provided for frail elderly people seem to be highly equitable across municipalities. Another important finding was that the utilization of social and health services were connected. Those who reported improvement in their health status during the preceding year were more frequently also using social services. This result suggests that if municipalities continue to limit the provision of support services only for those who are in the highest need, this saving in the social sector may, in the long run, result in

  17. Impact of lung function on exacerbations, health care utilization, and costs among patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Xuehua; Marvel, Jessica; Yu, Tzy-Chyi; Wertz, Debra; Geremakis, Caroline; Wang, Liya; Stephenson, Judith J; Mannino, David M

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the impact of lung function, measured as forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) % predicted, on health care resource utilization and costs among patients with COPD in a real-world US managed-care population. Methods This observational retrospective cohort study utilized administrative claim data augmented with medical record data. The study population consisted of patients with one or more medical claims for pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry during the intake period (July 1, 2012 to June 30, 2013). The index date was the date of the earliest medical claim for pre- and postbronchodilator spirometry. Spirometry results were abstracted from patients’ medical records. Patients were divided into two groups (low FEV1% predicted [,50%] and high FEV1% predicted [≥50%]) based on the 2014 Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease report. Health care resource utilization and costs were based on the prevalence and number of discrete encounters during the 12-month postindex follow-up period. Costs were adjusted to 2014 US dollars. Results A total of 754 patients were included (n=297 low FEV1% predicted group, n=457 high FEV1% predicted group). COPD exacerbations were more prevalent in the low FEV1% predicted group compared with the high group during the 12-month pre- (52.5% vs 39.6%) and postindex periods (49.8% vs 36.8%). Mean (standard deviation) follow-up all-cause and COPD-related costs were $27,380 ($38,199) and $15,873 ($29,609) for patients in the low FEV1% predicted group, and $22,075 ($28,108) and $10,174 ($18,521) for patients in the high group. In the multivariable analyses, patients in the low FEV1% predicted group were more likely to have COPD exacerbations and tended to have higher COPD-related costs when compared with patients in the high group. Conclusion Real-world data demonstrate that patients with COPD who have low FEV1% predicted levels use more COPD medications, have more COPD exacerbations, and incur higher

  18. US Hemophilia Treatment Center population trends 1990-2010: patient diagnoses, demographics, health services utilization.

    PubMed

    Baker, J R; Riske, B; Drake, J H; Forsberg, A D; Atwood, R; Voutsis, M; Shearer, R

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, US government agencies have partially supported regional networks of Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTC). HTC multidisciplinary teams provide comprehensive and coordinated diagnosis, treatment, prevention, education, outreach and surveillance services to improve the health of people with genetic bleeding disorders. However, national data are scarce on HTC-patient population trends and services. The aim of the study was to examine national trends over the past 20 years in patient diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization among the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-supported HTC network. Diagnoses, demographics and health services utilization data from 1990 to 2010 were aggregated from all HTCs using the Hemophilia Data Set (HDS). From 1990 to 2010, the HTC population grew 90% from 17 177 to 32 612. HTC patients with von Willebrand's disease increased by 148%, females by 346%, Hispanic patients by 236% and African Americans by 104%. Four thousand and seventy-five deaths were reported. From 2002 to 2010, annual comprehensive evaluations grew 38%, and persons with severe haemophilia on a home intravenous therapy programme rose 37%. In 2010, 46% of patients were less than 18 years vs. 24% for the general US population. The Hemophilia Data Set documents the growth and diversity of the US Hemophilia Treatment Center Network's patient population and services. Despite disproportionate deaths due to HIV, the HTC patient base grew faster than the general US population. The HDS is a vital national public health registry for this rare-disorder population. PMID:22845803

  19. Hospital utilization patterns and costs for adult sickle cell patients in Illinois.

    PubMed Central

    Woods, K; Karrison, T; Koshy, M; Patel, A; Friedmann, P; Cassel, C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine population size, demographic characteristics, hospital utilization patterns, the specialties of physicians providing care, and costs for hospitalized adult sickle cell patients in Illinois. METHODS: A statewide, administrative dataset for the two-year period from january 1992 through December 1993 was analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: There were 8403 admissions among 1189 individual sickle cell patients for the two-year period. Eighty-five percent of patients resided in the Chicago metropolitan area. The median age of the 1189 patients was 29; two-thirds had Medicaid or Medicare coverage. Emergency departments were the primary source of admissions (85.7%). The most common admitting diagnosis was painful crisis (97.4%), and average length of stay was four days. The median number of admissions per patient was three; most patients (85%) used only one or two hospitals. A small group used more than four hospitals and accounted for 23% of statewide admissions. Primary care physicians cared for most patients, and total hospitalization charges were more than $59 million. CONCLUSIONS: In Illinois the adult sickle cell population is concentrated in major urban centers, primarily the Chicago metropolitan area. These patients accounted for approximately 8400 admissions and more than $59 million in hospital charges during the two-year study period. A small group of patients used multiple hospitals and accounted for more than 23% of total hospitalization charges. This study shows the necessity of and provides a useful framework for developing targeted programs for adult sickle cell patients as well as for training physicians to efficiently provide comprehensive health care services for this population. PMID:9018288

  20. HIV patients in the HCUP database: a study of hospital utilization and costs.

    PubMed

    Hellinger, Fred J

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the utilization of hospital care by HIV patients in all hospitals in eight states (California, Colorado, Florida, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina), and examines the cost of hospital care for HIV patients in six of these states (California, Colorado, Kansas, New Jersey, New York, and South Carolina). The eight states in the sample account for more than 52% of all persons living with AIDS in the United States; the six states account for 39%. The unit of observation in both studies is a hospital admission by a patient with HIV. Hospital data were obtained from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), State Inpatient Database (SID), which is maintained by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The HCUP contains hospital discharge data and is a federal/state/industry partnership to build a multistate health care data system. Using multivariate analytic techniques and data from 2000, results indicate that cost and length of a hospital stay vary significantly across states after accounting for a patient's gender, insurance type, race, age, and number of diagnoses, as well as the teaching status and ownership category of the hospital. PMID:15224963

  1. A comparison of four different approaches to measuring health utility in depressed patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A variety of instruments are used to measure health related quality of life. Few data exist on the performance and agreement of different instruments in a depressed population. The aim of this study was to investigate agreement between, and suitability of, the EQ-5D-3L, EQ-5D Visual Analogue Scale (EQ-5D VAS), SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm for measuring health utility in depressed patients. Methods The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman approaches were used to assess agreement. Instrument sensitivity was analysed by: (1) plotting utility scores for the instruments against one another; (2) correlating utility scores and depressive symptoms (Beck Depression Inventory (BDI)); and (3) using Tukey’s procedure. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis assessed instrument responsiveness to change. Acceptability was assessed by comparing instrument completion rates. Results The overall ICC was 0.57. Bland and Altman plots showed wide limits of agreement for each pair wise comparison, except between the SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm. Plots of utility scores displayed ’ceiling effects’ in the EQ-5D-3L index and ’floor effects’ in the SF-6D and SF-12 new algorithm. All instruments showed a negative monotonic relationship with BDI, but the EQ-5D-3L index and EQ-5D VAS could not differentiate between depression severity sub-groups. The SF-based instruments were better able to detect changes in health state over time. There was no difference in completion rates of the four instruments. Conclusions There was a lack of agreement between utility scores generated by the different instruments. According to the criteria of sensitivity, responsiveness and acceptability that we applied, the SF-6D and SF-12 may be more suitable for the measurement of health related utility in a depressed population than the EQ-5D-3L, which is the instrument currently recommended by NICE. PMID:23659557

  2. Responsiveness of health status measures and utility-based methods in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Salaffi, F; Stancati, A; Carotti, M

    2002-11-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the responsiveness of disease-specific (Arthritis Impact Measurement Scale 2, AIMS2), generic (Medical Outcome Study Short Form Health Survey, SF-36) and preference-based instruments (rating scale, RS and time tradeoff, TTO) to changes in articular status and perceived health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Seventy-eight consecutive patients with RA, attending the care facilities of the Department of Rheumatology of Ancona, were recruited in this longitudinal study. In order to assess the responsiveness three strategies were used: effect size (ES), standardised response mean (SRM) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC). There were 55 women and 23 men with a mean age of 56 years (range 19-78) and arthritis duration of 7.1 years (range 6 months to 24 years). Using three-category EULAR criteria as external indicators of improvement/response, 21 patients (27%) reported a significant improvement, 23 (29.5%) moderate improvement, and 34 (43.5%) no change over the 12-month period. The mean change scores in generic and specific health status instruments and utility measures were significantly related to response category. The AIMS2 subscales (physical function, pain, psychological function and social interaction) were slightly more responsive than those of SF-36. The physical and pain dimensions were most sensitive for measuring change over a 12-month period, followed by psychological and social dimensions. For the utility measurement, RS scores were found to be significantly more responsive in detecting changes in preferences than TTO scores. These results may have implications for the application of the health status and utility measures in clinical trials in patients with RA. PMID:12447631

  3. A novel misoprostol delivery system for induction of labor: clinical utility and patient considerations

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Megan L; Wing, Deborah A

    2015-01-01

    Induction of labor is one of the most commonly performed obstetric procedures and will likely become more common as the reproductive population in developed nations changes. As the proportion of women undergoing induction grows, there is a constant search for more efficacious ways to induce labor while maintaining fetal and maternal safety as well as patient satisfaction. With almost half of induced labors requiring cervical ripening, methods for achieving active labor and vaginal delivery are constantly being investigated. Prostaglandins have been shown to be effective induction agents, and specifically vaginal misoprostol, used off-label, have been widely utilized to initiate cervical ripening and active labor. The challenge is to administer this medication accurately while maintaining the ability to discontinue the medication when needed. The misoprostol vaginal insert initiates cervical ripening utilizing a delivery system that controls medication release and can be rapidly removed. This paper reviews the design, development, and clinical utility of the misoprostol vaginal insert for induction of labor as well as patient considerations related to the delivery system. PMID:25960635

  4. Design, set-up and utility of the UK facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy patient registry.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Wood, Libby; Fernandez-Torron, Roberto; Williams, Maggie; Smith, Debbie; Lunt, Peter; Hudson, Judith; Norwood, Fiona; Orrell, Richard; Willis, Tracey; Hilton-Jones, David; Rafferty, Karen; Guglieri, Michela; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2016-07-01

    Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a rare inherited neuromuscular disease estimated to affect 1/15,000 people. Through basic research, remarkable progress has been made towards the development of targeted therapies. Patient identification, through registries or other means is essential for trial-readiness. The UK FSHD Patient Registry is a patient initiated registry that collects standardised and internationally agreed dataset of self-reported clinical details combined with professionally verified genetic information. It includes four additional questionnaires to capture patient reported outcomes related to pain, quality of life and scapular fixation. Between 2013 and 2015, 518 patients registered 243 males, 241 females with a mean age of 47.8 years. Most of the patients have FSHD type 1 (91.7 %), and weakness of the facial (59.2 %) was the most prevalent symptom at onset, followed by shoulder-girdle muscles (53.3 %) and distal (22.45 %) or proximal lower limb weakness (14.8 %). 85.57 % patients were ambulant or ambulant with assistance at the time of registration, 7.9 % report respiratory insufficiency. The registry has demonstrated utility with the recruitment of patients for a natural history study of infantile onset FSHD, and the longitudinal analysis of patient-related outcomes will provide much-needed baseline information to power future trials. The internationally agreed core dataset enables national registries to participate in a "Global FSHD registry". We suggest that the registry's ability to interoperate with other large datasets will be instrumental for sharing and exploiting data globally. PMID:27159994

  5. Molecular genetic analysis in 14 Czech Kabuki syndrome patients is confirming the utility of phenotypic scoring.

    PubMed

    Paděrová, J; Holubová, A; Simandlová, M; Puchmajerová, A; Vlčková, M; Malíková, M; Pourová, R; Vejvalková, S; Havlovicová, M; Šenkeříková, M; Ptáková, N; Drábová, J; Geryk, J; Maver, A; Křepelová, A; Macek, M

    2016-09-01

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a dominantly inherited disorder mainly due to de novo pathogenic variation in KMT2D or KDM6A genes. Initially, a representative cohort of 14 Czech cases with clinical features suggestive of KS was analyzed by experienced clinical geneticists in collaboration with other specialties, and observed disease features were evaluated according to the 'MLL2-Kabuki score' defined by Makrythanasis et al. Subsequently, the aforementioned genes were Sanger sequenced and copy number variation analysis was performed by MLPA, followed by genome-wide array CGH testing. Pathogenic variants in KMT2D resulting in protein truncation in 43% (6/14; of which 3 are novel) of all cases were detected, while analysis of KDM6A was negative. MLPA analysis was negative in all instances. One female patient bears a 6.6 Mb duplication of the Xp21.2-Xp21.3 region that is probably disease causing. Subjective KS phenotyping identified predictive clinical features associated with the presence of a pathogenic variant in KMT2D. We provide additional evidence that this scoring approach fosters prioritization of patients prior to KMT2D sequencing. We conclude that KMT2D sequencing followed by array CGH is a diagnostic strategy with the highest diagnostic yield. PMID:26841933

  6. Emergency room resource utilization by patients with low-back pain.

    PubMed

    Drazin, Doniel; Nuño, Miriam; Patil, Chirag G; Yan, Kimberly; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank L

    2016-05-01

    .26-1.53, p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS A significant majority of patients discharged from hospitals in the US from 1998 to 2007 with a primary diagnosis of LBP were admitted through the ER, with more patients being admitted via this route each year. These patients were less likely to be discharged directly home compared with patients with LBP who were not admitted through the ER. Uninsured and African American patients with LBP were more likely to be admitted through the ER than their counterparts, as were patients with more preexisting health problems. Interestingly, patients with LBP at the highest income levels were more likely to be admitted through hospital ERs. The findings suggest that socioeconomic factors may play a role in the utilization of ER resources by patients with LBP, which in turn appears to impact at least the short-term outcome of these patients. PMID:26824585

  7. Results of the ACSUS for pediatric AIDS patients: utilization of services, functional status, and social severity.

    PubMed Central

    Fahs, M C; Waite, D; Sesholtz, M; Muller, C; Hintz, E A; Maffeo, C; Arno, P; Bennett, C

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study describes demographic characteristics of pediatric AIDS patients, describes hospital and community-based service utilization patterns, and analyzes medical and social support service usage patterns with respect to patient demographic characteristics, clinical trial participation, functional/developmental status, and social environment. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SETTING. Data reported in this study are from the AIDS Costs and Service Utilization Survey (ACSUS) and cover the six-month period beginning March 1991 (N = 135). Pediatric patients who sought care for HIV-related problems were sampled at seven different hospitals in five metropolitan regions of the United States. All of the participating hospitals had clinics specifically serving pediatric patients infected with HIV. The sample consists of HIV-positive patients who had had at least one HIV-related symptom or condition. STUDY DESIGN. A stratified probability sample design guided the sampling strategy, which included oversampling in two large hospitals from two of the five metropolitan areas. Survey data cover an 18-month time period of health care utilization, cost, and financing information from HIV-infected patients and their providers. Utilization measures are standardized to a six-month period. Per capita income, family structure, informal personal network, functional status, and clinical trial participation are tested for associations with patterns of utilization. In addition, a weighted ten-point social severity scale was developed to assess family/household stability. DATA COLLECTION. Data were collected through a screener instrument completed by the person accompanying the child to a hospital clinic visit (usually a a parent), and through two interviews conducted in person with the patients' primary caregivers. Data from the questionnaires were coded and assembled into computerized SAS analysis files by WESTAT. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Children in this sample are 62 percent African

  8. Utility of Traditional Circulating and Imaging-Based Cardiac Biomarkers in Patients with Predialysis CKD

    PubMed Central

    Colbert, Gates; Jain, Nishank; de Lemos, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac biomarkers, such as cardiac troponin T (cTnT), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and N-terminal-pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP), are commonly used to diagnose acute coronary syndrome and congestive heart failure exacerbation in symptomatic patients. Levels of these biomarkers are frequently chronically elevated in asymptomatic patients with ESRD who are receiving maintenance dialysis. Other imaging biomarkers commonly encountered in nephrologists’ clinical practice, such as coronary artery calcium measured by computed tomography, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness, are also frequently abnormal in asymptomatic patients with ESRD. This article critically reviews the limited observational data on associations between cTnT, BNP, NT-pro-BNP, coronary artery calcium, left ventricular hypertrophy, and carotid intima-media thickness with cardiovascular events and death in non–dialysis-dependent patients with CKD. Although sufficient evidence suggests that these biomarkers may be used for prognostication, the diagnostic utility of cTnT, BNP, and NT-pro-BNP remain challenging in patients with CKD. Decreased renal clearance may affect the plasma levels of these biomarkers, and upper reference limits were originally derived in patients without CKD. Until better data are available, higher cutoffs, or a rise in level compared with previous values, have been proposed to help distinguish acute myocardial infarction from chronic elevations of cTnT in symptomatic patients with CKD. Additionally, it is not known whether these biomarkers are modifiable and amenable to interventions that could change hard clinical outcomes in patients with CKD not yet undergoing long-term dialysis. PMID:25403922

  9. Utility of the Shock Index and Other Risk-Scoring Tools in Patients with Gastrointestinal Bleeding.

    PubMed

    Ratra, Atul; Rassameehiran, Supannee; Parupudi, Sreeram; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-03-01

    Patients with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding frequently require hospitalization and have a mortality rate that ranges from 6% to 14%. These patients need rapid clinical assessment to determine the urgency of endoscopy and the need for endoscopic treatment. Risk-scoring tools, such as the Rockall score and the Glasgow-Blatchford score, are commonly used in this assessment. These tools clearly help identify high-risk patients but do not necessarily have good predictive value in identifying important outcomes. Their diagnostic accuracy in identifying rebleeding and mortality ranges from poor to fair. The shock index (heart rate divided by systolic blood pressure) provides an integrated assessment of the cardiovascular status. It can be easily calculated during the initial evaluation of patients and monitoring after treatment. The shock index has been used in a few studies in patients with acute GI bleeding, including studies to determine which patients need emergency endoscopy, to predict complications after corrosive ingestions, to identify delayed hemorrhage following pancreatic surgery, and to evaluate the utility of angiograms to identify sites of GI bleeding. Not all studies have found the shock index to be useful in patients with GI bleeding, however. This may reflect the unpredictable natural history of various etiologies of GI bleeding, comorbidity that may influence blood pressure and/or heart rate, and inadequate data acquisition. The shock index needs more formal study in patients with GI bleeding admitted to medical intensive care units. Important considerations include the initial response to resuscitation, persistent bleeding following initial treatment, and rebleeding following a period of stabilization. In addition, it needs correlation with other risk-scoring tools. PMID:26954657

  10. Clinical utility of serum tests for iron deficiency in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Burns, E R; Goldberg, S N; Lawrence, C; Wenz, B

    1990-02-01

    Serum iron and ferritin measurements lack the requisite sensitivity and/or specificity to accurately diagnose iron deficiency. To determine their utility in hospitalized patients, the authors compared the results of these tests with the presence of stainable iron in bone marrow aspirates of 301 patients. Forty (13.3%) had absent marrow iron. The serum diagnosis of iron deficiency was accepted on the basis of the following: iron less than 11 mumol/L, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC) greater than 45 mumol/L, transferrin saturation (%Sat) less than 0.20, and ferritin less than 13 micrograms/L for females and less than 25 micrograms/L for males. Using these criteria, iron deficiency was correctly diagnosed by serum iron in 41%, TIBC in 84%, %Sat in 50%, and ferritin in 90% of the patients. The serum ferritin is clearly the only useful serum test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients but is limited by a low sensitivity. The bone marrow examination is the most sensitive test for diagnosing iron deficiency in hospitalized patients. PMID:2242107

  11. Impact of IL28B, APOH and ITPA Polymorphisms on Efficacy and Safety of TVR- or BOC-Based Triple Therapy in Treatment-Experienced HCV-1 Patients with Compensated Cirrhosis from the ANRS CO20-CUPIC Study

    PubMed Central

    About, Frédégonde; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Niay, Jonathan; Rabiéga, Pascaline; Pedergnana, Vincent; Duffy, Darragh; Sultanik, Philippe; Cagnot, Carole; Carrat, Fabrice; Marcellin, Patrick; Zoulim, Fabien; Larrey, Dominique; Hézode, Christophe; Fontaine, Hélène; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Pol, Stanislas; Albert, Matthew L.; Theodorou, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Background Human genetic factors influence the outcome of pegylated interferon and ribavirin hepatitis C therapy. We explored the role of IL28B, APOH and ITPA SNPs on the outcomes of triple therapy including telaprevir or boceprevir in patients with compensated cirrhosis chronically infected with HCV-1. Patients and Methods A total of 256 HCV-1 Caucasian treatment-experienced patients with compensated cirrhosis from the ANRS CO20-CUPIC cohort were genotyped for a total of 10 candidate SNPs in IL28B (rs12979860 and rs368234815), APOH (rs8178822, rs12944940, rs10048158, rs52797880, rs1801689 and rs1801690) and ITPA (rs1127354 and rs7270101). We tested the association of IL28B and APOH SNPs with sustained virological response and of ITPA SNPs with anemia related phenotypes by means of logistic regression assuming an additive genetic model. Results None of the six APOH SNPs were associated with sustained virological response. The favorable alleles of the IL28B SNPs rs12979860 and rs368234815 were associated with sustained virological response (rs12979860: OR = 2.35[1.50–3.70], P = 2x10-4). Refined analysis showed that the effect of IL28B SNPs on sustained virological response was restricted to prior PegIFN/RBV relapse (OR = 3.80[1.82–8.92], P = 8x10-4). We also confirmed the association between ITPA low activity alleles and protection against early hemoglobin decline in triple therapy (P = 2x10-5). Conclusion Our results suggest that the screening of rs12979860 may remain interesting for decision making in prior relapse HCV-1 Caucasian patients with compensated cirrhosis eligible for a telaprevir- or boceprevir-based therapy. PMID:26670100

  12. Clinical conditions and patient factors significantly influence diagnostic utility of D-dimer in venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Qasim, Asghar; Duggan, Mary; O'Connell, Niamh; O'Driscoll, Anne

    2009-06-01

    Determining D-dimer levels remains important in the diagnostic algorithms for venous thromboembolism (VTE). The present study aimed to identify factors influencing D-dimer utility in diagnosing VTE. Consecutive symptomatic medical patients, who attended our emergency department from 1 November 2006 to 31 December 2006, had D-dimer levels measured as fibrinogen equivalent units (FEU), following clinical risk assessment. Diagnosis of VTE was established by venous compression ultrasonography and computed tomographic pulmonary angiography. VTE-negative patients were followed for 2 months to detect future occurrence of thromboembolism. Impact of various factors on D-dimer levels was analyzed. Four thousand and twenty-six patients attended our emergency department, and 525 patients (median age 52 years) had D-dimer assessed. Final diagnosis of VTE was established in 25 (4.7%) patients on radiological investigations. Median D-dimer levels for VTE-negative patients less than 60 years old, with normal renal function and chest radiology were 0.38 microgFEU/ml (range 0.19-2.3), 0.39 microgFEU/ml (range 0.17-3.5) and 0.39 microgFEU/ml (range 0.1-4.3), respectively. Similar figures for those at least 60 years, with renal impairment and abnormal chest radiology, were 0.75 microgFEU/ml (range 0.22-4.3), 0.52 microgFEU/ml (range 0.17-4.4) and 0.92 microgFEU/ml (range 0.26-5.6), respectively. Factors including patient age, renal function and chest radiology had significant influence on D-dimer levels (P < 0.01). A triad of patient age at least 60 years, renal impairment (modification of diet in renal disease stage 2-5) and abnormal chest radiology had a false positive D-dimer in 96% of patients (n = 72). Use of D-dimer in patients with a triad of advanced age, renal impairment and abnormal chest radiology has no practical diagnostic value in VTE. PMID:19276796

  13. Text message program improves outcomes, decreases ED utilization among ED patients with poorly controlled diabetes.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Diabetic patients who lack access to primary care tend to frequent the ED, often with complications from their disease that could have been prevented with proper management and education. To get around the problem of access, researchers tested an automated program that continuously delivered educational messaging via text to a group of patients who presented to the ED with poorly controlled diabetes. After six months, researchers noted improvements in Hb A1c levels, self-reported medication adherence, and ED utilization when compared with a control group. And the impact was particularly noteworthy among Latinos, according to the researchers. The text messaging program, dubbed TExT-Med, was developed by four physicians and two diabetes educators. The messages were delivered daily, and contained educational as well motivational content derived from the National Diabetes Education Program.There were also medication reminders, healthy living challenges, and trivia questions about diabetes. At six months, Hb A1c levels decreased by 1.05% in the intervention group, compared to 0.60% in the control group, and self-reported medication adherence improved from 4.5 to 5.4 (as measured on an 8 point scale) in the intervention group versus a decrease of 0.1 in the control group. During the six-month study period, 35.9% of patients in the intervention group presented to the ED for care, as compared to 51.6% of patients in the control group. PMID:24505864

  14. Health services utilization of patients with vertigo in primary care: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Grill, Eva; Strupp, Michael; Müller, Martin; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-08-01

    Vertigo and dizziness count among the most frequent symptoms in outpatient practices. Although most vestibular disorders are manageable, they are often under- and misdiagnosed in primary care. This may result in prolonged absence from work, increased resource use and, potentially, in chronification. Reliable information on health services utilization of patients with vertigo in primary care is scarce. Retrospective cohort study in patients referred to a tertiary care balance clinic. Included patients had a confirmed diagnosis of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Menière's disease (MD), vestibular paroxysmia (VP), bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP), vestibular migraine (VM), or psychogenic vertigo (PSY). All previous diagnostic and therapeutic measures prior to the first visit to the clinic were recorded. 2,374 patients were included (19.7 % BPPV, 12.7 % MD, 5.8 % VP, 7.2 % BVP, 14.1 % VM, 40.6 % PSY), 61.3 % with more than two consultations. Most frequent diagnostic measures were magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, 76.2 %, 71 % in BPPV) and electrocardiography (53.5 %). Most frequent therapies were medication (61.0 %) and physical therapy (41.3 %). 37.3 % had received homoeopathic medication (39 % in BPPV), and 25.9 % were treated with betahistine (20 % in BPPV). Patients had undergone on average 3.2 (median 3.0, maximum 6) diagnostic measures, had received 1.8 (median 2.0, maximum 8) therapies and 1.8 (median 1.0, maximum 17) different drugs. Diagnostic subgroups differed significantly regarding number of diagnostic measures, therapies and drugs. The results emphasize the need for establishing systematic training to improve oto-neurological skills in primary care services not specialized on the treatment of dizzy patients. PMID:24817192

  15. Under-Utilization of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators in Patients with Heart Failure - The Current State of Sudden Cardiac Death Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Emert, Martin; Biria, Mazda; Chotia, Rashaad; Guda, Rajeshwer; Bommana, Sudharani; Pimentel, Rhea; Vacek, James; Dendi, Raghuveer; Berenbom, Loren; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite ACC/AHA guidelines indicating implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) as class I therapy for primary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with EF≤35%, ICD utilization rates in real world practice have been low. Objective To determine the rate of ICD implantation at a tertiary care academic center and to assess the reasons for under-utilization of the same. Methods Review of a prospectively collected database which included all patients diagnosed with an EF≤35% was performed to assess the rate of ICD implantation and mortality. Reasons for non-implantation of ICD were then assessed from detailed chart review. Results A total of 707 patients (age 69.4 ± 14.1 years) with mean EF of 26±7% were analyzed. Only 28% (200/707) of patients had ICDs implanted. Mortality was lower in the group with ICD (25% vs 37%, p=0.004). When patients who either died or were lost to follow-up prior to 2005 were excluded, ICD utilization rate was still low at 37.6%. The most common reason for non-implantation of ICD was physicians not discussing this option with their patients. Patient refusal was the second most common reason. Conclusions ICD Implantation rates for primary prevention of SCD in patients with EF≤35% is low. Physician and patient education should be addressed to improve the utilization rates. PMID:25852239

  16. Determinants of C-reactive protein in chronic hemodialysis patients: relevance of dialysis catheter utilization.

    PubMed

    Hung, Adriana; Pupim, Lara; Yu, Chang; Shintani, Ayumi; Siew, Edward; Ayus, Carlos; Hakim, Raymond M; Ikizler, Talat Alp

    2008-04-01

    Biomarkers of inflammation, especially C-reactive protein (CRP), have been consistently shown to predict poor outcomes in chronic hemodialysis (CHD) patients. However, the determinants of CRP and the value of its monitoring in CHD patients have not been well defined. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to evaluate possible determinants of the inflammatory response in CHD patients with a focus on dialysis catheter utilization. Monthly CRP were measured in 128 prevalent CHD patients (mean age 56.6 years [range 19-90], 68% African Americans, 39% diabetics [DM]) over a mean follow-up of 12 months (range 2-26 months). There were a total of 2405 CRP measurements (median 5.7 mg/L; interquartile range [IQR] 2.4-16.6 mg/L). The presence of a dialysis catheter (p<0.002), cardiovascular disease (p=0.01), male gender (p=0.005), higher white blood cell count (p<0.0001), elevated phosphorus (p=0.03), and lower cholesterol (p=0.02) and albumin (p<0.0001) concentrations were independent predictors of elevated CRP in the multivariate analysis. Additionally, CRP levels were significantly associated with the presence of a catheter, when comparing the levels before and after catheter insertion (p=0.002) as well as before and after catheter removal (p=0.009). Our results indicate that the presence of a hemodialysis catheter is an independent determinant of an exaggerated inflammatory response in CHD patients representing a potentially modifiable risk factor. PMID:18394058

  17. Clinical Utility of Serologic Testing for Celiac Disease in Asymptomatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this evidence-based analysis was to evaluate the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated in this report. The clinical utility was based on the effects of a gluten-free diet (GFD) on outcomes specific to each of these conditions. The prevalence of celiac disease in asymptomatic individuals and one of these non-gastrointestinal conditions was also evaluated. Clinical Need and Target Population Celiac Disease Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease characterized by a chronic inflammatory state of the proximal small bowel mucosa accompanied by structural and functional changes. Technology Under Evaluation Serologic Tests for Celiac Disease There are a number of serologic tests for celiac disease available. Serologic tests are automated with the exception of the anti-endomysial antibody test, which is more time-consuming and operator-dependent than the other tests. Research Questions What is the prevalence of asymptomatic celiac disease in patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the effect of the gluten-free diet on condition-specific outcomes in patients with asymptomatic celiac disease presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? What is the clinical utility of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic patients presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? The clinical utility was defined as the impact of the GFD on disease specific outcomes. What is the risk of all-cause mortality and lymphoma in individuals with asymptomatic celiac disease? What is the budget impact of serologic testing for celiac disease in asymptomatic subjects presenting with one of the non-gastrointestinal conditions evaluated? Research Methods Study Population The study population consisted of individuals with newly diagnosed celiac

  18. TMJ replacement utilizing patient-fitted TMJ TJR devices in a re-ankylosis child.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Basile, Emanuela; Angeletti, Diletta; Vellone, Valentino; Ramieri, Valerio

    2016-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a pathological condition characterized by articular bony or fibrous tissue fusion. TMJ ankylosis developing during childhood can lead to growth complications because of the loss of mandibular function. Hard and soft autogenous tissue grafting has been used for TMJ reconstruction in the growing patient. However, in cases where autogenous tissue grafts fail either due to unpredictable growth or ankylosis, total alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement (TMJ TJR) can provide a viable option. The case of a 7-year old female suffering from recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis resulting from birth trauma, and with concomitant obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is presented. Due to prior surgical and autogenous graft failures, the decision was made to complete her joint reconstructions utilizing patient-fitted TMJ prostheses. Questions have been raised about the longevity of TMJ TJR devices as well as their lack of growth potential, but children with TMJ ankylosis do not have condyle-related growth potential and that replacing failed autogenous tissue graft material with more autogenous tissue will result in the same adverse outcomes. Therefore, in growing patients with recurrent TMJ ankylosis and/or failed autogenous tissue grafts, there may be a role for TMJ TJR. PMID:26920044

  19. Ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses1

    PubMed Central

    da Luz, Kely Regina; Vargas, Mara Ambrosina de Oliveira; Schmidtt, Pablo Henrique; Barlem, Edison Luiz Devos; Tomaschewski-Barlem, Jamila Geri; da Rosa, Luciana Martins

    2015-01-01

    Objective: to know the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses. Method: descriptive and exploratory study with a qualitative approach, performed in inpatient units and in chemotherapy out-patients units that provide assistance to oncological patients in two capitals in the South region of Brazil. Eighteen nurses participated in this study, selected by snowball sampling type. For data collection, semi-structured interviews were carried out, which were recorded and transcribed, and then analyzed by thematic analysis. Results: two categories were established: when informing or not becomes a dilemma - showing the main difficulties related to oncological treatment information regarding health staff, health system, and infrastructure; to invest or not - dilemmas related to finitude - showing situations of dilemmas related to pain and confrontation with finitude. Conclusion: for the effective confrontation of the ethical problems experienced by oncology nurses to occur, it is important to invest in the training of these professionals, preparing them in an ethical and human way to act as lawyers of the patient with cancer, in a context of dilemmas related mainly to the possibility of finitude. PMID:26626012

  20. Medication use patterns, health care resource utilization, and economic burden for patients with major depressive disorder in Beijing, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Chen, Yun; Yue, Li; Liu, Qingjing; Montgomery, William; Zhi, Lihua; Wang, Wanqi

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of the study was to investigate medication usage patterns, health care resource utilization, and direct medical costs of patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) in Beijing, People’s Republic of China. Methods Data were extracted from a random sample of the Beijing Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance database. Patients aged ≥18 years, with ≥1 primary diagnosis of MDD and 12-month continuous enrollment after their first observed MDD diagnosis between 2012 and 2013 were identified. Those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or cancer during the analysis period were excluded. Results In total 8,484 patients, with a mean age of 57.2 years, were included and 63% were female. The top three commonly observed comorbidities were hypertension (70.9%), anxiety disorder (68.6%), and coronary heart disease (65.1%). Furthermore, 71.4% of patients were treated with antidepressant medications, including 60.5% of patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, followed by noradrenergic and specific serotonergic antidepressants (9.0%) and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (8.3%). The proportions of patients who discontinued their initial antidepressant within the first and second months after the index date were 45.4% and 77.0%, respectively. Concomitant medications were prescribed for 76.8% of patients. Only 0.42% of patients experienced ≥1 MDD-related hospitalization(s) during the 1-year follow-up, and the average annual number of hospitalization was 1.2 for those hospitalized. The mean length of stay was 33.4 days per hospitalization. All patients had ≥1 MDD-related outpatient visit(s). The mean annual number of outpatient visits per patient was 3.1. The mean annual direct medical costs per patient with MDD was RMB ¥1,694.1 (48.5% for antidepressant medications), and that for hospitalized patients was RMB ¥21,291.0 (15.0% for antidepressant medications). Conclusion In Beijing, the majority of

  1. Utilization study of filgrastim (Neutromax) during autologous haematopoietic precursor transplantation for myeloma and lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Hugo H; Juni, Mariana; Bello, Ricardo; Vidal, Alejandro; Diez, Roberto A; Pavlovsky, Santiago

    2009-10-01

    To describe utilization of a biosimilar product containing filgrastim (Neutromax), data of 414 myeloma or lymphoma patients subjected to autologous SCT between 1998 and 2007 were analyzed. Filgrastim was used for mobilization of progenitors (5 days at 300 microg/day) and for the recovery of neutropenia after transplantation (100 microg/day, since day +5). In 2003, the excipient mannitol was replaced by sorbitol. A mean dose of 9.47 x 10(6)CD34(+)cells/kg was infused; 100 neutrophils/mm(3) required 5-day treatment; 500 neutrophils/mm(3), 6 days and 1000 neutrophils/mm(3), 7 days. Neutromax effect in SCT is similar to reports with other brands. No difference was found between formulations. PMID:19699152

  2. Relationship between buprenorphine adherence and health service utilization and costs among opioid dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Tkacz, Joseph; Volpicelli, Joseph; Un, Hyong; Ruetsch, Charles

    2014-04-01

    Buprenorphine-medication assisted therapy (B-MAT) is an effective treatment for opioid dependence, but may be considered cost-prohibitive based on ingredient cost alone. The purpose of this study was to use medical and pharmacy claims data to estimate the healthcare service utilization and costs associated with B-MAT adherence among a sample of opioid dependent members. Members were placed into two adherence groups based on 1-year medication possession ratio (≥ 0.80 vs. <0.80). The B-MAT adherent group incurred significantly higher pharmacy charges (adjusted means; $6,156 vs. $3,581), but lower outpatient ($9,288 vs. $14,570), inpatient ($10,982 vs. $26,470), ER ($1,891 vs. $4,439), and total healthcare charges ($28,458 vs. $49,051; p<0.01) compared to non-adherent members. Adherence effects were confirmed in general linear models. Though B-MAT adherence requires increased pharmacy utilization, adherent individuals were shown to use fewer expensive health care services, resulting in overall reduced healthcare expenditure compared to non-adherent patients. PMID:24332511

  3. Clinical utility of risedronate in postmenopausal osteoporosis: patient considerations with delayed-release formulation

    PubMed Central

    Kinov, Plamen; Boyanov, Mihail

    2012-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are the most widely prescribed treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis, secondary osteoporosis, and male osteoporosis. Notwithstanding their high effectiveness and favorable safety profile, the adherence to bisphosphonate treatment remains low. Different treatment strategies aim to improve the clinical effectiveness of bisphosphonate therapy. This review paper assesses the clinical utility of oral intermittent risedronate in the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The new delayed-release risedronate formulation is a safer and easy to use alternative to other risedronate therapy. Oral risedronate, a potent nitrogen-containing bisphosphonate, has been extensively studied using daily regimens. A new intermittent (weekly) dosing regimen confirmed its clinical effectiveness in relation to vertebral and nonvertebral fracture prevention. The absence of significant differences in the incidence of adverse effects confirmed the favorable tolerability of the weekly dosage. In efforts to improve patient adherence to treatment, an innovative, delayed-release formulation of risedronate, which ensures adequate bioavailability of the active compound when taken with food, was introduced. The once-weekly delayed-release formulation of risedronate proved to be noninferior to the daily dosage of risedronate in terms of bone mineral density and markers of bone turnover. In addition, the incidence of new morphometric vertebral fractures was comparable in both treatment regimens. The new delayed-release formulation of risedronate showed a favorable safety profile. Delayed-release risedronate is a promising, new, effective, and convenient alternative to current bisphosphonate treatments. It appears to allow better patient adherence to antiresorptive treatment. PMID:22532780

  4. The validity and clinical utility of structured diagnoses of antisocial personality disorder with forensic patients.

    PubMed

    Marin-Avellan, Luisa E; McGauley, Gillian A; Campbell, Colin D; Fonagy, Peter

    2014-08-01

    Current DSM-based instruments for personality disorders (PDs) limit the investigation of the course and outcome of treatment of these disorders. This study examined the validity of the Shedler-Westen Assessment Procedure-200 (SWAP-200) and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II PD (SCID-II) in a sample of forensic PD patients. Results based on 66 participants indicated that the SWAP-200 Q-factors reduced the frequency of diagnostic comorbidity of PD categories by half compared with the SCID-II. Only the SWAP-200's Antisocial PD category showed good convergent and discriminant validity with respect to other instruments describing aspects of PD. The validity of the cutoff score for severe antisocial PD was confirmed, and this category predicted severe incidents in the hospital at 1 year of follow-up. A violence risk scale was constructed, which differentiated violent and nonviolent offenders. The results support the validity of the SWAP-200 and its potential clinical utility with forensic PD patients. PMID:24511901

  5. How Well Do the Generic Multi-attribute Utility Instruments Incorporate Patient and Public Views Into Their Descriptive Systems?

    PubMed

    Stevens, Katherine J

    2016-02-01

    Multi-attribute utility instruments (MAUIs) are increasingly being used to generate utility data, which can be used to calculate quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). These QALY data can then be incorporated into a cost-utility analysis as part of an economic evaluation, to inform health care resource allocation decisions. Many health care decision-making bodies around the world, such as the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, require the use of generic MAUIs. Recently, there has been a call for greater input of patients into the development of patient-reported outcome measures, and this is now actively encouraged. By incorporating the views of patients, greater validity of an instrument is expected and it is more likely that patients will be able to self-complete the instrument, which is the ideal when obtaining information about a patient's health-related quality of life. This paper examines the stages of MAUI development and the scope for patient and/or public involvement at each stage. The paper then reviews how much the main generic MAUIs have incorporated the views of patients/the public into the development of their descriptive systems at each of these stages, and the implications of this. The review finds that the majority of MAUIs had very little input from patients/the public. Instead, existing literature and/or the views of experts were used. If we wish to incorporate patient/public views into future development of MAUIs, qualitative methods are recommended. PMID:25663152

  6. Time from Booking Until Appointment and Healthcare Utilization in Hand Surgery Patients with Discretionary Conditions.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, Michael; Teunis, Teun; Blauth, Johann; Ring, David

    2015-12-01

    Delaying treatment for benign musculoskeletal conditions may allow patients to learn self-efficacy and develop coping strategies, leading to less medical intervention and reduced cost. We tested the hypothesis that time from booking until appointment is not associated with healthcare costs. We further tested the secondary hypothesis that time from booking to appointment is not associated with specific healthcare utilizations. We identified 16,750 patients (55 % women; mean age 50 years) making first clinic visits to hand surgeons at our hospital between January 1, 2003 and December 31, 2012. Booking time was defined as the time between the scheduling of an appointment and the actual visit. Imaging procedures, injections, nerve conduction studies, occupational therapy visits, surgery, and referrals were determined up until the patient's second visit with the surgeon, or 90 days. Costs were determined in Relative Value Units. Duration between booking and office visit was not associated with higher cost (regression coefficient [β] 0.0023, P = 0.77). Duration between booking and office visit was associated with a higher rate of nerve conduction studies (odds ratio [OR] 1.02, P < 0.001) and a lower rate of occupational therapy (OR 0.98, P < 0.001). There was substantial variation between surgeons. Greater wait time was not therapeutic, but is associated with different diagnostic and treatment measures that suggest people that are willing to wait have different types of problems. The variation by surgeon may make variation based on other factors, including time between booking and appointment, difficult to discern. PMID:26578829

  7. Utility of flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy for critically ill pediatric patients: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Field-Ridley, Aida; Sethi, Viyeka; Murthi, Shweta; Nandalike, Kiran; Li, Su-Ting T

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic yield, therapeutic efficacy, and rate of adverse events related to flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FFB) in critically ill children. METHODS: We searched PubMed, SCOPUS, OVID, and EMBASE databases through July 2014 for English language publications studying FFB performed in the intensive care unit in children < 18 years old. We identified 666 studies, of which 89 full-text studies were screened for further review. Two reviewers independently determined that 27 of these studies met inclusion criteria and extracted data. We examined the diagnostic yield of FFB among upper and lower airway evaluations, as well as the utility of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). RESULTS: We found that FFB led to a change in medical management in 28.9% (range 21.9%-69.2%) of critically ill children. The diagnostic yield of FFB was 82% (range 45.2%-100%). Infectious organisms were identified in 25.7% (17.6%-75%) of BALs performed, resulting in a change of antimicrobial management in 19.1% (range: 12.2%-75%). FFB successfully re-expanded atelectasis or removed mucus plugs in 60.3% (range: 23.8%-100%) of patients with atelectasis. Adverse events were reported in 12.9% (range: 0.5%-71.4%) of patients. The most common adverse effects of FFB were transient hypotension, hypoxia and/or bradycardia that resolved with minimal intervention, such as oxygen supplementation or removal of the bronchoscope. Serious adverse events were uncommon; 2.1% of adverse events required intervention such as bag-mask ventilation or intubation and atropine for hypoxia and bradycardia, normal saline boluses for hypotension, or lavage and suctioning for hemorrhage. CONCLUSION: FFB is safe and effective for diagnostic and therapeutic use in critically ill pediatric patients. PMID:25685726

  8. An imaging informatics-based system utilizing DICOM objects for treating pain in spinal cord injury patients utilizing proton beam radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sneha K.; Liu, Brent J.; Chun, Sophia; Gridley, Daila S.

    2014-03-01

    Many US combat personnel have sustained nervous tissue trauma during service, which often causes Neuropathic pain as a side effect and is difficult to manage. However in select patients, synapse lesioning can provide significant pain control. Our goal is to determine the effectiveness of using Proton Beam radiotherapy for treating spinal cord injury (SCI) related neuropathic pain as an alternative to invasive surgical lesioning. The project is a joint collaboration of USC, Spinal Cord Institute VA Healthcare System, Long Beach, and Loma Linda University. This is first system of its kind that supports integration and standardization of imaging informatics data in DICOM format; clinical evaluation forms outcomes data and treatment planning data from the Treatment planning station (TPS) utilized to administer the proton therapy in DICOM-RT format. It also supports evaluation of SCI subjects for recruitment into the clinical study, which includes the development, and integration of digital forms and tools for automatic evaluation and classification of SCI pain. Last year, we presented the concept for the patient recruitment module based on the principle of Bayesian decision theory. This year we are presenting the fully developed patient recruitment module and its integration to other modules. In addition, the DICOM module for integrating DICOM and DICOM-RT-ION data is also developed and integrated. This allows researchers to upload animal/patient study data into the system. The patient recruitment module has been tested using 25 retrospective patient data and DICOM data module is tested using 5 sets of animal data.

  9. a Structure of Experienced Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havel, Ivan M.

    2005-10-01

    The subjective experience of time will be taken as a primary motivation for an alternative, essentially discontinuous conception of time. Two types of such experience will be discussed, one based on personal episodic memory, the other on the theoretical fine texture of experienced time below the threshold of phenomenal awareness. The former case implies a discrete structure of temporal episodes on a large scale, while the latter case suggests endowing psychological time with a granular structure on a small scale, i.e. interpreting it as a semi-ordered flow of smeared (not point-like) subliminal time grains. Only on an intermediate temporal scale would the subjectively felt continuity and fluency of time emerge. Consequently, there is no locally smooth mapping of phenomenal time onto the real number continuum. Such a model has certain advantages; for instance, it avoids counterintuitive interpretations of some neuropsychological experiments (e.g. Libet's measurement) in which the temporal order of events is crucial.

  10. Customer-experienced rapid prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Zhang, Fu; Li, Anbo

    2008-12-01

    In order to describe accurately and comprehend quickly the perfect GIS requirements, this article will integrate the ideas of QFD (Quality Function Deployment) and UML (Unified Modeling Language), and analyze the deficiency of prototype development model, and will propose the idea of the Customer-Experienced Rapid Prototyping (CE-RP) and describe in detail the process and framework of the CE-RP, from the angle of the characteristics of Modern-GIS. The CE-RP is mainly composed of Customer Tool-Sets (CTS), Developer Tool-Sets (DTS) and Barrier-Free Semantic Interpreter (BF-SI) and performed by two roles of customer and developer. The main purpose of the CE-RP is to produce the unified and authorized requirements data models between customer and software developer.

  11. Utilization of Acute Care among Patients with ESRD Discharged Home from Skilled Nursing Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Toles, Mark; Massing, Mark; Jackson, Eric; Peacock-Hinton, Sharon; O’Hare, Ann M.; Colón-Emeric, Cathleen

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Older adults with ESRD often receive care in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) after an acute hospitalization; however, little is known about acute care use after SNF discharge to home. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This study used Medicare claims for North and South Carolina to identify patients with ESRD who were discharged home from a SNF between January 1, 2010 and August 31, 2011. Nursing Home Compare data were used to ascertain SNF characteristics. The primary outcome was time from SNF discharge to first acute care use (hospitalization or emergency department visit) within 30 days. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify patient and facility characteristics associated with the outcome. Results Among 1223 patients with ESRD discharged home from a SNF after an acute hospitalization, 531 (43%) had at least one rehospitalization or emergency department visit within 30 days. The median time to first acute care use was 37 days. Characteristics associated with a shorter time to acute care use were black race (hazard ratio [HR], 1.25; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.04 to 1.51), dual Medicare-Medicaid coverage (HR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.50), higher Charlson comorbidity score (HR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.12), number of hospitalizations during the 90 days before SNF admission (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.22), and index hospital discharge diagnoses of cellulitis, abscess, and/or skin ulcer (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.36 to 4.45). Home health use after SNF discharge was associated with a lower rate of acute care use (HR, 0.72; 95% CI, 0.59 to 0.87). There were no statistically significant associations between SNF characteristics and time to first acute care use. Conclusions Almost one in every two older adults with ESRD discharged home after a post–acute SNF stay used acute care services within 30 days of discharge. Strategies to reduce acute care utilization in these patients are needed. PMID:25649158

  12. Transitioning experienced registered nurses into an obstetrics specialty.

    PubMed

    Bell, Renee; Bossier-Bearden, Mary; Henry, Armilla A G; Kirksey, Kenn M

    2015-04-01

    Ensuring patient safety and enhancing nurse satisfaction both rank high on most hospitals' list of priorities. One of the concerns at a large, comprehensive, county health care system in the southwestern United States has been the shortage of experienced obstetrics (OB) nurses to provide patient care. To address this concern, a nursing fellowship was implemented to facilitate successful transition and retention of experienced RNs into the specialty area of obstetrics. The program provided a gateway for non-OB nurses to participate in relevant, evidence-based didactic and preceptor-facilitated clinical experiences to ensure adequate knowledge, skills, and competencies to care for patients in labor, delivery, and recovery suites. PMID:25856454

  13. Mechanical thrombectomy in patients with acute ischemic stroke: a cost-utility analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xuanqian; Lambrinos, Anna; Chan, Brian; Dhalla, Irfan A.; Krings, Timo; Casaubon, Leanne K.; Lum, Cheemun; Sikich, Nancy; Bharatha, Aditya; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Stotts, Grant; Saposnik, Gustavo; O'Callaghan, Christina; Kelloway, Linda; Hill, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The beneficial effects of endovascular treatment with new-generation mechanical thrombectomy devices compared with intravenous thrombolysis alone to treat acute large-artery ischemic stroke have been shown in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study aimed to estimate the cost utility of mechanical thrombectomy compared with the established standard of care. Methods: We developed a Markov decision process analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis versus treatment with intravenous thrombolysis alone from the public payer perspective in Canada. We conducted comprehensive literature searches to populate model inputs. We estimated the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis from a meta-analysis of 5 RCTs, and we used data from the Oxford Vascular Study to model long-term clinical outcomes. We calculated incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) using a 5-year time horizon. Results: The base case analysis showed the cost and effectiveness of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis to be $126 939 and 1.484 quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), respectively, and the cost and effectiveness of treatment with intravenous thrombolysis alone to be $124 419 and 1.273 QALYs, respectively. The mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis strategy was associated with an ICER of $11 990 per QALY gained. Probabilistic sensitivity analysis showed that the probability of treatment with mechanical thrombectomy plus intravenous thrombolysis being cost-effective was 57.5%, 89.7% and 99.6% at thresholds of $20 000, $50 000 and $100 000 per QALY gained, respectively. The main factors influencing the ICER were time horizon, extra cost of mechanical thrombectomy treatment and age of the patient. Interpretation: Mechanical thrombectomy as an adjunct therapy to intravenous thrombolysis is cost-effective compared with

  14. Increased Burden of Healthcare Utilization and Cost Associated with Opioid-Related Constipation Among Patients with Noncancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Ancilla W.; Kern, David M.; Datto, Catherine; Chen, Yen-Wen; McLeskey, Charles; Tunceli, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    Background Opioids are widely accepted as treatment for moderate to severe pain, and opioid-induced constipation is one of the most common side effects of opioids. This side effect negatively affects pain management and patients’ quality of life, which could result in increased healthcare utilization and costs. Objective To assess healthcare utilization and costs (all-cause, constipation-related, and pain-related) for individuals with and without opioid-induced constipation during the 12 months after initiation of opioid therapy for noncancer pain. Methods This retrospective cohort study was conducted using administrative claims data from HealthCore Integrated Research Environment between January 1, 2006, and June 30, 2014. The analysis was limited to patients aged ≥18 years who filled a prescription for continuous opioid treatment (≥28 days) for noncancer pain. Propensity scores were used to match opioid users with constipation (cohort 1) and opioid users without constipation (cohort 2), using a 1:1 ratio. Generalized linear models were used to estimate all-cause, constipation-related, and pain-related healthcare utilization and costs during the 12 months after the initiation of opioid therapy. Results After matching and balancing for all prespecified variables, 17,384 patients were retained in each cohort (mean age, 56 years; 63% female). Opioid users with constipation were twice as likely as those without constipation to have ≥1 inpatient hospitalizations (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.17–2.39) during the 12 months. The total mean adjusted overall costs per patient during the study period were $12,413 higher for patients with constipation versus those without it (95% CI, $11,726–$13,116). The total mean adjusted overall pain-related costs per patient were $6778 (95% CI, $6293–$7279) higher for the patients with constipation than those without. Among patients using opioids for noncancer pain, the annual mean constipation

  15. The Utility of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment as a Mental Capacity Assessment Tool for Patients with a Learning Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Daniel; Oyefeso, Adenekan; Evans, Carys; Evans, Amber

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the psychometric properties of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) in patients with a learning disability and examine it's utility for conducting mental capacity assessment. Method: This study was a cross-sectional, instrument validation study in an inpatient hospital setting, located in the East of England. The sample…

  16. Hospital utilization outcome of an assertive outreach model for schizophrenic patients - results of a quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Büchtemann, Dorothea; Kästner, Denise; Warnke, Ingeborg; Radisch, Jeanett; Baumgardt, Johanna; Giersberg, Steffi; Kleine-Budde, Katja; Moock, Jörn; Kawohl, Wolfram; Rössler, Wulf

    2016-07-30

    We assessed whether an Assertive Outreach (AO) program for patients with schizophrenia implemented in German routine care in rural areas reduces psychiatric hospital admissions and/or psychiatric hospital days. We conducted a quasi-experimental controlled study with 5 assessments in 12 months. Data collection included health care utilization (Client Sociodemographic and Service Receipt Inventory), and clinical parameters. The assessments took place in the practices of the psychiatrists. Admission incidence rates were calculated. For bivariate group comparison, we used U-tests, T-tests and Chi(2)-Tests, multivariate analysis was conducted using zero-inflated regression models. For hospital outcomes, data of 295 patients was analysed. No statistically significant differences between AO and TAU patients in terms of hospital admissions or hospital days were found. Overall hospital utilization was low (8%). Advantages of AO over TAU referring to hospital utilization were not found. However, a spill-over effect might have reduced hospital utilization in both groups. Further research should differentiate patient subgroups. These two appear to be key factors to explain effects or absence of effects and to draw conclusions for the mental health care delivery. PMID:27208511

  17. Utility of double-balloon enteroscopy in patients with left ventricular assist devices and obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Adam L; Mönkemüller, Klaus; Pamboukian, Salpy V; George, James F; Wilcox, C M; Peter, Shajan

    2014-11-01

    Obscure overt gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB) is a challenge in patients with left ventricular assist devices (LVADs). We evaluated the utility and safety of double-balloon enteroscopy (DBE) in patients with LVADs in an observational consecutive-patient cohort from a single tertiary referral center. Ten patients with LVADs underwent thirteen DBEs for obscure OGIB. The first OGIB event necessitating DBE occurred after a mean of 512 ± 363 days of LVAD support. All patients underwent DBE, eleven anterograde and two retrograde, with a mean insertion depth 176 ± 85 cm. Diagnostic yield was 69 % with the primary bleeding lesion most frequently found in the mid-bowel. The most common lesions were arteriovenous malformations. Therapeutic yield with argon plasma coagulation (APC), epinephrine injection, and/or hemoclip placement was 89 %. There were no procedure-related complications. DBE in patients with LVADs has good diagnostic yield and high therapeutic yield for obscure OGIB and is safe and well tolerated. PMID:25290096

  18. Heart failure patients utilizing an electric home monitor: What effects does heart failure have on their quality of life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simuel, Gloria J.

    Heart Failure continues to be a major public health problem associated with high mortality and morbidity. Heart Failure is the leading cause of hospitalization for persons older than 65 years, has a poor prognosis and is associated with poor quality of life. More than 5.3 million American adults are living with heart failure. Despite maximum medical therapy and frequent hospitalizations to stabilize their condition, one in five heart failure patients die within the first year of diagnosis. Several disease-management programs have been proposed and tested to improve the quality of heart failure care. Studies have shown that hospital admissions and emergency room visits decrease with increased nursing interventions in the home and community setting. An alternative strategy for promoting self-management of heart failure is the use of electronic home monitoring. The purpose of this study was to examine what effects heart failure has on patient's quality of life that had been monitoring on an electronic home monitor longer than 2 months. Twenty-one questionnaires were given to patients utilizing an electronic home monitor by their home health agency nurse. Eleven patients completed the questionnaire. The findings showed that there is some deterioration in quality of life with more association with the physical aspects of life than with the emotional aspects of life, which probably was due to the small sample size. There was no significant difference in readmission rates in patients utilizing an electronic home monitor. Further research is needed with a larger population of patients with chronic heart failure and other chronic diseases which may provide more data, and address issues such as patient compliance with self-care, impact of heart failure on patient's quality of life, functional capacity, and heart failure patient's utilization of the emergency rooms and hospital. Telemonitoring holds promise for improving the self-care abilities of persons with HF.

  19. Improving the utility of the Brunnstrom recovery stages in patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Yu; Lin, Gong-Hong; Huang, Yi-Jing; Song, Chen-Yi; Lee, Ya-Chen; How, Mon-Jane; Chen, Yi-Miau; Hsueh, I-Ping; Chen, Mei-Hsiang; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Brunnstrom recovery stages (the BRS) consists of 2 items assessing the poststroke motor function of the upper extremities and 1 assessing the lower extremities. The 3 items together represent overall motor function. Although the BRS efficiently assesses poststroke motor functions, a lack of rigorous examination of the psychometric properties restricts its utility. We aimed to examine the unidimensionality, Rasch reliability, and responsiveness of the BRS, and transform the raw sum scores of the BRS into Rasch logit scores once the 3 items fitted the assumptions of the Rasch model. We retrieved medical records of the BRS (N = 1180) from a medical center. We used Rasch analysis to examine the unidimensionality and Rasch reliability of both upper-extremity items and the 3 overall motor items of the BRS. In addition, to compare their responsiveness for patients (n = 41) assessed with the BRS and the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM) on admission and at discharge, we calculated the effect size (ES) and standardized response mean (SRM). The upper-extremity items and overall motor items fitted the assumptions of the Rasch model (infit/outfit mean square = 0.57–1.40). The Rasch reliabilities of the upper-extremity items and overall motor items were high (0.91–0.92). The upper-extremity items and overall motor items had adequate responsiveness (ES = 0.35–0.41, SRM = 0.85–0.99), which was comparable to that of the STREAM (ES = 0.43–0.44, SRM = 1.00–1.13). The results of our study support the unidimensionality, Rasch reliability, and responsiveness of the BRS. Moreover, the BRS can be transformed into an interval-level measure, which would be useful to quantify the extent of poststroke motor function, the changes of motor function, and the differences of motor functions in patients with stroke. PMID:27495103

  20. Prognostic Utility of Secretory Phospholipase A2 in Patients with Stable Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Donoghue, Michelle; Mallat, Ziad; Morrow, David A; Benessiano, Joelle; Sloan, Sarah; Omland, Torbjørn; Solomon, Scott D.; Braunwald, Eugene; Tedgui, Alain; Sabatine, Marc S

    2011-01-01

    Background Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) may contribute to atherogenesis. To date, few prospective studies have examined the utility of sPLA2 for risk stratification in coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods Plasma sPLA2 activity was measured at baseline in 3708 subjects in the PEACE randomized trial of trandolapril versus placebo in stable CAD. Median follow-up was 4.8 years. Cox regression was used to adjust for demographics, clinical risk factors, apolipoprotein B, apolipoprotein A1, and medications. Results After multivariable adjustment, sPLA2 was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke (adjusted hazard ratio quartile 4:quartile 1 1.55, 95% CI 1.13–2.14) and cardiovascular death or heart failure (adjusted hazard ratio quartile 4:quartile 1 1.91, 95% CI 1.20–3.03). In further multivariable assessment, increased activities of sPLA2 were associated with the risk of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction or stroke (adjusted hazard ratio 1.47, 95% CI 1.06–2.04) independent of lipoprotein-associated phospholipase A2 mass and C-reactive protein, and modestly improved the area under the curve (AUC) beyond established clinical risk factors (AUC 0.668 to 0.675, P=0.01). sPLA2, NT-pro B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T were all independently associated with cardiovascular death or heart failure and each improved risk discrimination (P=0.02, P<0.001, P<0.001, respectively). Conclusion sPLA2 activity provides independent prognostic information beyond established risk markers in patients with stable CAD. These data are encouraging for studies designed to evaluate the role of sPLA2 as a therapeutic target. PMID:21784767

  1. New care model targets high-utilizing, complex patients, frees up emergency providers to focus on acute care concerns.

    PubMed

    2013-11-01

    Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis, MN, has developed a new model of care, designed to meet the needs of high-utilizing hospital and ED patients with complex medical, social, and behavioral needs.The Coordinated Care Center (CCC) provides easy access to patients with a history of high utilization, and delivers multidisciplinary care in a one-stop-shop format. In one year, the approach has slashed ED visits by 37%, freeing up emergency providers to focus on patients with acute needs. In-patient care stays are down by 25%. The CCC focuses on patients with diagnoses that are primarily medical, such as CHF [congestive heart failure], COPD [chronic obstructive pulmonary disease], or diabetes. ED-based clinical coordinators keep an eye out for patients who world be good candidates for the CCC, and facilitate quick transitions when their needs would be better served in that setting. Administrators describe CCC as an ambulatory intensive care unit, with an on-site pharmacist, social worker, psychologist, and chemical health counselor as well as physicians, nurse practitioners, LPNs, and patient navigators--enough personnel to comprise two full care teams. While the model does not pay for itself under current payment models, administrators anticipate that the approach will work well under future payment reforms that focus on total cost of care. PMID:24195142

  2. Impact of Pharmacist-Provided Medication Therapy Management on Healthcare Quality and Utilization in Recently Discharged Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Haag, Jordan D.; Davis, Amanda Z.; Hoel, Robert W.; Armon, Jeffrey J.; Odell, Laura J.; Dierkhising, Ross A.; Takahashi, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimization of medication use during care transitions represents an opportunity to improve overall health-related outcomes. The utilization of clinical pharmacists during care transitions has demonstrated benefit, although the optimal method of integration during the care transition process remains unclear. Objective To evaluate the impact of pharmacist-provided telephonic medication therapy management (MTM) on care quality in a care transitions program (CTP) for high-risk older adults. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled study was conducted from December 8, 2011, through October 25, 2012, in a primary care work group at a tertiary care academic medical center in the midwestern United States. High-risk elderly (aged ≥60 years) patients were randomized to a pharmacist-provided MTM program via telephone or to usual care within an existing outpatient CTP. The primary outcome was the quality of medication prescribing and utilization based on the Screening Tool to Alert Doctors to the Right Treatment (START) and the Screening Tool of Older Persons’ Prescriptions (STOPP) scores. The secondary outcomes were medication utilization using a modified version of the Medication Appropriateness Index, hospital resource utilization within 30 days of discharge, and drug therapy problems. Results Of 222 eligible high-risk patients, 25 were included in the study and were randomized to the pharmacist MTM intervention (N = 13) or to usual care (N = 12). No significant differences were found between the 2 groups in medications meeting the STOPP or START criteria. At 30-day follow-up, no significant differences were found between the 2 cohorts in medication utilization quality indicators or in hospital utilization. At 30-day follow-up, 3 (13.6%) patients had an emergency department visit or a hospital readmission since discharge. In all, 22 patients completed the study. Medication underuse was common, with 20 START criteria absent medications evident for

  3. What is The Utility of Electrophysiological Study in Elderly Patients with Syncope and Heart Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Rumas; Girerd, Nicolas; Brembilla-Perrot, Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Background Syncope in elderly patients with heart disease is a growing problem. Its aetiological diagnosis is often difficult. We intended to investigate the value of the electrophysiological study (EPS) in old patients with syncope and heart disease. Methods EPS was performed in 182 consecutive patients with syncope and heart disease, among whom 62 patients were ≥75 years old and 120 patients <75. Results Left ventricular ejection fraction was 43.9±11.7% in patients ≥75 and 41.1±12.6% in patients <75. During EPS, induced sustained ventricular arrhythmias were as frequent in both groups (27.4% in patients ≥75 versus 27.5% in patients <75, p=0.99) whereas AV conduction abnormalities were more frequent in older patients (37.1% in patients ≥75 versus 18.3% in patients<75, p<0.005). Syncope remained unexplained in 35.5% of patients ≥75 and in 51.7% of patients <75 (p<0.04). ICD was more likely to be implanted in younger patients than in patients ≥75 years (37.5% vs 21% respectively, p<0.009). During a mean follow-up period of 3.3±3 years, the 4-year-survival rate was 66.9±6.8 % in patients ≥75 and 75.9±6.2 % in patients <75 years. The main cause of death was heart failure in both groups. The factors related to a worse outcome in a multivariate analysis were low LVEF and higher age. Conclusion Complete EPS allows the identification of treatable causes in a high proportion of elderly patients with syncope and heart disease. Yet, the prognosis of these patients is mainly related to LVEF and age. PMID:25852241

  4. The Impact of Trauma Exposure and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Healthcare Utilization Among Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kartha, Anand; Brower, Victoria; Saitz, Richard; Samet, Jeffrey H.; Keane, Terence M.; Liebschutz, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Background Trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) increase healthcare utilization in veterans, but their impact on utilization in other populations is uncertain. Objectives To examine the association of trauma exposure and PTSD with healthcare utilization, in civilian primary care patients. Research Design Cross-sectional study. Subjects English speaking patients at an academic, urban primary care clinic. Measures Trauma exposure and current PTSD diagnoses were obtained from the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. Outcomes were nonmental health outpatient and emergency department visits, hospitalizations, and mental health outpatient visits in the prior year from an electronic medical record. Analyses included bivariate unadjusted and multivariable Poisson regressions adjusted for age, gender, income, substance dependence, depression, and comorbidities. Results Among 592 subjects, 80% had ≥1 trauma exposure and 22% had current PTSD. In adjusted regressions, subjects with trauma exposure had more mental health visits [incidence rate ratio (IRR), 3.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.1–14.1] but no other increased utilization. After adjusting for PTSD, this effect of trauma exposure was attenuated (IRR, 3.2; 95% CI, 0.9–11.7). Subjects with PTSD had more hospitalizations (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4–3.7), more hospital nights (IRR, 2.6; 95% CI, 1.4–5.0), and more mental health visits (IRR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1–4.1) but no increase in outpatient and emergency department visits. Conclusions PTSD is associated with more hospitalizations, longer hospitalizations, and greater mental healthcare utilization in urban primary care patients. Although trauma exposure is independently associated with greater mental healthcare utilization, PTSD mediates a portion of this association. PMID:18362818

  5. The clinical validity and utility of combinatorial pharmacogenomics: Enhancing patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Benitez, Joachim; Jablonski, Michael R; Allen, Josiah D; Winner, Joel G

    2015-06-01

    Prescribing safe and effective medications is a challenge in psychiatry. While clinical use of pharmacogenomic testing for individual genes has provided some clinical benefit, it has largely failed to show clinical utility. However, pharmacogenomic testing that integrates relevant genetic variation from multiple loci for each medication has shown clinical validity, utility and cost savings in multiple clinical trials. While some challenges remain, the evidence for the clinical utility of "combinatorial pharmacogenomics" is mounting. Expanding education of pharmacogenomic testing is vital to implementation efforts in psychiatric treatment settings with the overall goal of improving medication selection decisions. PMID:26937360

  6. The clinical validity and utility of combinatorial pharmacogenomics: Enhancing patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Benitez, Joachim; Jablonski, Michael R.; Allen, Josiah D.; Winner, Joel G.

    2015-01-01

    Prescribing safe and effective medications is a challenge in psychiatry. While clinical use of pharmacogenomic testing for individual genes has provided some clinical benefit, it has largely failed to show clinical utility. However, pharmacogenomic testing that integrates relevant genetic variation from multiple loci for each medication has shown clinical validity, utility and cost savings in multiple clinical trials. While some challenges remain, the evidence for the clinical utility of “combinatorial pharmacogenomics” is mounting. Expanding education of pharmacogenomic testing is vital to implementation efforts in psychiatric treatment settings with the overall goal of improving medication selection decisions. PMID:26937360

  7. An Exploratory Study of the Orientation Needs of Experienced Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Dellasega, Cheryl; Gabbay, Robert; Durdock, Kendra; Martinez-King, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    The orientation period creates a context for a nurse’s relationship with her employer, and can adversely affect attrition rates. While the orientation needs of novice nurses have been detailed, little is known about what might help those with prior experience. Hence, the goal of this study was to explore whether the orientation needs of seasoned nurses are similar to or unique from novice nurses. Over a six month period, we used two intensive qualitative methodologies (daily journaling and focus groups) to study three experienced nurses. A tri-phased model of orientation emerged, with learning and support issues unique to experienced nurses identified. Results suggest that orientation programs for experienced nurses should utilize specific educational strategies and content to promote engagement in a new position. PMID:19639852

  8. Medication utilization patterns among type 2 diabetes patients initiating Exenatide BID or insulin glargine: a retrospective database study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Type 2 diabetes is a common and costly illness, associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Despite this, there is relatively little information on the ‘real-world’ medication utilization patterns for patients with type 2 diabetes initiating exenatide BID or glargine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ‘real-world’ medication utilization patterns in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with exenatide BID (exenatide) versus insulin glargine (glargine). Methods Adult patients( ≥18 years of age) with type 2 diabetes who were new initiators of exenatide or glargine from October 1, 2006 through March 31, 2008 with continuous enrollment for the 12 months pre- and 18 months post-index period were selected from the MarketScan® Commercial and Medicare Databases. To control for selection bias, propensity score matching was used to complete a 1:1 match of glargine to exenatide patients. Key study outcomes (including the likelihood of overall treatment modification, discontinuation, switching, or intensification) were analyzed using survival analysis. Results A total of 9,197 exenatide- and 4,499 glargine-treated patients were selected. Propensity score matching resulted in 3,774 matched pairs with a mean age of 57 years and a mean Deyo Charlson Comorbidity Index score of 1.6; 54% of patients were males. The 18-month treatment intensification rates were 15.9% and 26.0% (p < 0.0001) and the discontinuation rates were 38.3% and 40.0% (p = 0.14) for exenatide and glargine, respectively. Alternatively, 14.9% of exenatide-treated patients switched therapies, compared to 10.0% of glargine-treated patients (p < 0.0001). Overall, glargine-treated patients were more likely to modify their treatment [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.33, p < 0.0001] with shorter mean time on treatment until modification (123 vs. 159 days, p < 0.0001). Compared to exenatide-treated patients, glargine-treated patients were more likely to

  9. Allopathic, complementary, and alternative medical treatment utilization for pain among methadone-maintained patients: An exploratory study1

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Declan T.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Garnet, Brian; Joshi, Dipa; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Rounsaville, Bruce J.

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed 150 methadone maintenance treatment program (MMTP) patients about pain, pain treatment utilization, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in pursuing pain treatment at the MMTP. Respondents with chronic severe pain (CSP) (i.e., pain lasting at least 6 months with moderate to severe pain intensity or significant pain interference) and “some pain” (i.e., pain reported in the previous week but not CSP) endorsed similar rates of past-week and lifetime allopathic or standard medical (with the exception of lifetime medical use of non-opiate medication) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) utilization for pain reduction. Prior pain treatments were perceived to be less effective by CSP than SP patients but both groups had equivalent high rates of interest in pain treatment associated with the MMTP. These findings may have implications for resource and program planning in MMT programs. PMID:19874157

  10. The utility of ambulatory pH monitoring in patients presenting with chronic cough and asthma

    PubMed Central

    AlHabib, KF; Vedal, S; Champion, P; FitzGerald, JM

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients presenting with asthma and chronic cough. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The charts of 358 consecutive patients who were referred for ambulatory gastroesophageal pH monitoring to the Lung Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia, were reviewed, and the data of 108 (30%) patients with asthma and 134 (37%) patients with chronic cough were analyzed. The maintenance treatment for GERD was discontinued before patients underwent the pH monitoring study. One hundred eighteen (33%) patients were excluded. RESULTS: Reflux episodes identified reflux events as the percentage of time where the pH was less than four. For asthma patients, 70 (64.8%) had distal total reflux, 50 (46.3%) had distal upright reflux, 41 (38.3%) had distal supine reflux and 73 (67.6%) had other distal refluxes. Proximal total reflux in asthmatic patients was present in 56 (52%), proximal upright reflux in 55 (51%) and proximal supine reflux in 56 (52%) patients. For chronic cough patients, 70 (52.6%) had distal total reflux, 59 (44.4%) had distal upright reflux, 45 (34.4%) had distal supine reflux and 75 (56%) patients had other distal refluxes. In chronic cough patients, proximal total reflux was present in 70 (52%), proximal upright reflux in 80 (60%) and proximal supine reflux in 59 (44%). Presenting respiratory and/or reflux symptoms were absent in approximately 25% of patients with asthma and reflux, and in approximately 50% of patients with chronic cough and reflux. During pH monitoring, symptoms did not differ significantly between those with and without distal reflux in both study groups, except for more significant heartburn in patients with chronic cough and reflux (RR 2.0). CONCLUSIONS: The data of the present study support the observation that there is a high prevalence of GERD in patients with asthma or chronic cough. The use of different pH parameters for detecting acid reflux during 24 h ambulatory p

  11. Decreased mental health care utilization following a psychosocial intervention in caregivers of hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ouseph, Rita; Croy, Calvin; Natvig, Crystal; Simoneau, Teresa; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-03-01

    Caregivers are known to experience increased morbidity when compared to noncaregivers. Does an intervention targeting caregiver distress affect their health care utilization? One hundred forty-eight caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU) or a psychoeducation, paced respiration, and relaxation (PEPRR) intervention. Assessments of caregivers' service utilization were collected at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months post-transplant. During the first 30 days after patient transplant, caregiver medical and mental health professional service use decreased while support group attendance peaked. Mixed model regressions showed a significant decrease in mental health service use by the PEPRR group (P=0.001). At six months caregivers in TAU had predicted marginal probabilities of mental health services utilization over 10 times as high as caregivers in PEPRR (18.1% vs 1.5%). Groups failed to differ in medical service (P=0.861) or support group (P=0.067) use. We can conclude that participation in PEPRR compared to TAU was associated with reduced mental health service utilization. Caregiver psychosocial support services are critical to improve caregiver outcomes. PMID:25478136

  12. Decreased Mental Health Care Utilization Following a Psychosocial Intervention in Caregivers of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Croy, Calvin; Natvig, Crystal; Simoneau, Teresa; Laudenslager, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers are known to experience increased morbidity when compared to noncaregivers. Does an intervention targeting caregiver distress affect their health care utilization? One hundred forty-eight caregivers of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients were randomized to treatment as usual (TAU) or a psychoeducation, paced respiration, and relaxation (PEPRR) intervention. Assessments of caregivers’ service utilization were collected at baseline and 1, 3, and 6 months post-transplant. During the first 30 days after patient transplant, caregiver medical and mental health professional service use decreased while support group attendance peaked. Mixed model regressions showed a significant decrease in mental health service use by the PEPRR group (P=0.001). At six months caregivers in TAU had predicted marginal probabilities of mental health services utilization over 10 times as high as caregivers in PEPRR (18.1% vs 1.5%). Groups failed to differ in medical service (P=0.861) or support group (P=0.067) use. We can conclude that participation in PEPRR compared to TAU was associated with reduced mental health service utilization. Caregiver psychosocial support services are critical to improve caregiver outcomes. PMID:25478136

  13. Utilization of and Attitudes towards Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies in a Chinese Cancer Hospital: A Survey of Patients and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    McQuade, Jennifer L.; Meng, ZhiQiang; Chen, Zhen; Wei, Qi; Zhang, Ying; Bei, WenYing; Palmer, J. Lynn; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Background. In China, the use of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is very popular, but little is known about how it is integrated with conventional cancer care. We conducted parallel surveys of patients and physicians on TCM utilization. Methods. Two hundred forty-five patients and 72 allopathic physicians at the Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center completed questions on their use of and attitude towards TCM. Results. Patient mean age was 51, with 60% female. Eighty-three percent of patients had used TCM. Use was greatest for Chinese herbal medicine (CHM; 55.8%). Only 1.3% of patients used acupuncture and 6.8% Qi Gong or Tai Qi. Sixty-three percent of patients notified their oncologist about TCM use. The most common reason for use was to improve immune function. CHM was often used with a goal of treating cancer (66.4%), a use that 57% of physicians agreed with. Physicians were most concerned with interference with treatment, lack of evidence, and safety. Ninety percent of physicians have prescribed herbs and 87.5% have used TCM themselves. Conclusion. The use of TCM by Chinese cancer patients is exceptionally high, and physicians are generally well informed and supportive of patients' use. Botanical agents are much more commonly used than acupuncture or movement-based therapies. PMID:23093982

  14. Resource Utilization for Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting Events in Patients with Solid Tumors Treated with Antiemetic Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Schwartzberg, Lee; Harrow, Brooke; Lal, Lincy S.; Radtchenko, Janna; Lyman, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) can lead to increased emergency department visits and hospitalizations, which may contribute to increased cost of care. Antiemetic agents, such as neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonists and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT3) receptor antagonists, are prescribed for patients receiving highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). The current guidelines recommend a 3-drug combination of an NK1 receptor antagonist, a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone with HEC regimens and certain MEC regimens. Objective To compare the incidence of CINV and CINV-related resource utilization among patients who receive guideline-adherent HEC and MEC regimens and patients who receive non–guideline-adherent regimens. Methods In this retrospective, claims-based study, Inovalon's Medical Outcomes Research for Effectiveness and Economics Registry (MORE2 Registry) Research Edition database was used to identify 8089 patients with solid tumors receiving therapy with anthracycline plus cyclophosphamide (AC), cisplatin, or carboplatin from June 2013 to December 2013. The patients were stratified according to the use of an NK1 receptor antagonist regimen. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes were used to identify CINV events associated with hospital, emergency department, and outpatient office visits among patients in the NK1 receptor antagonist group and the non-NK1 receptor antagonist group. Results A total of 1059 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 51% (N = 536) used an NK1 receptor antagonist–based regimen and 49% (N = 523) used non-NK1 receptor antagonist therapy. A higher percentage of patients receiving AC (73%) than cisplatin (56%) or carboplatin (23%) received an NK1 receptor antagonist. The incidence rates of total CINV events and CINV-related emergency department visits were lower in the group receiving an NK1 receptor

  15. The Utility of the Faces Pain Scale in the Assessment of Shoulder Pain in Turkish Stroke Patients: Its Relation with Quality of Life and Psychologic Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dogan, Sebnem Koldas; Ay, Saime; Oztuna, Derya; Aytur, Yesim Kurtais; Evcik, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    This study was planned to investigate the utility of the vertical Faces Pain Scale (FPS) in the assessment of pain in stroke patients using the shoulder pain model and to assess its utility in the Turkish patient population. The secondary aim was to analyze the association of FPS with the quality of life and depression in the study population.…

  16. Clinician's judgments of the utility of the DSM-IV and five-factor models for personality disordered patients.

    PubMed

    Mullins-Sweatt, Stephanie N; Widiger, Thomas A

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the clinical utility of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) and the Five Factor Model of personality disorder (FFM; Widiger, Costa, & McCrae, 2002) in describing personality pathology. In the current study, practicing psychologists described one or two of their personality disordered patients in terms of the FFM and DSM models. In some instances, the patient was someone who met the criteria for one of the 10 DSM-IV personality disorders; in others, the patient was someone who received a diagnosis of personality disorder, not otherwise specified. Participants then rated each model on six aspects of clinical utility. The current study found that the FFM was consistently rated higher than the DSM model in terms of four of the six aspects of clinical utility. Across both cases, the clinicians rated the FFM as significantly more useful with respect to its ability to provide a global description of the individual's personality, to communicate information to clients, and to encompass all of the individual's important personality difficulties. PMID:21838562

  17. Effectiveness of a Multimodal Therapy for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain Regarding Pre-Admission Healthcare Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Borys, Constanze; Lutz, Johannes; Strauss, Bernhard; Altmann, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to examine the effectiveness of an intensive inpatient three-week multimodal therapy. We focused especially on the impact on the multimodal therapy outcome of the pre-admission number of treatment types patients had received and of medical specialist groups patients had consulted. Methods 155 patients with chronic low back pain and indication for multimodal therapy were evaluated with respect to pain intensity, depression, anxiety, well-being, and pre-admission health care utilization. In our controlled clinical trial we compared N = 66 patients on the waiting list with N = 89 patients who received immediate treatment. The waiting list patients likewise attended multimodal therapy after the waiting period. Longitudinal post-treatment data for both were collected at three- and twelve-month follow-ups. The impact of pre-admission health care utilization on multimodal therapy outcome (post) was analysed by structural equation model. Results Compared to the control group, multimodal therapy patients’ pain intensity and psychological variables were significantly reduced. Longitudinal effects with respect to pre-measures were significant at three-month follow-up for pain intensity (ES = -0.48), well-being (ES = 0.78), anxiety (ES = -0.33), and depression (ES = -0.30). Effect sizes at twelve-month follow-up were small for anxiety (ES = -0.22), and moderate for general well-being (ES = 0.61). Structural equation model revealed that a higher number of pre-admission treatment types was associated with poorer post-treatment outcomes in pain intensity, well-being, and depression. Conclusion Multimodal therapy proved to be effective with regard to improvements in pain intensity, depression, anxiety, and well-being. The association between treatment effect and number of pre-admission pain treatment types suggests that patients would benefit more from attending multimodal therapy in an earlier stage of health care. PMID:26599232

  18. The Characteristics and Utilization Pattern of an Admission Cohort of Nursing Home Patients (II).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Korbin; Manton, Kenneth G.

    1984-01-01

    Projects utilization history of a synthetic cohort of nursing home admissions in 1976 by normalizing length of stay (LOS) specific discharge rates derived from life tables to an estimated 1.1 million persons. Results focus on the LOS distribution, discharge status, and total days of nursing home care used. (Author/JAC)

  19. Utilization of potentially inappropriate medications in elderly patients in a tertiary care teaching hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Jhaveri, Binit N.; Patel, Tejas K.; Barvaliya, Manish J; Tripathi, Chandrabhanu

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the use of potentially inappropriate medicines in elderly inpatients in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis was performed for cases of elderly patients admitted between January 2010 and December 2010. Data on age, gender, diagnosis, duration of hospital stay, treatment, and outcome were collected. Prescriptions were assessed for the use of potentially inappropriate medications in geriatric patients by using American Geriatric Society Beer's criteria (2012) and PRISCUS list (2010). Results: A total of 676 geriatric patients (52.12% females) were admitted in the medicine ward. The average age of geriatric patients was 72.69 years. According to Beer's criteria, at least one inappropriate medicine was prescribed in 590 (87.3%) patients. Metoclopramide (54.3%), alprazolam (9%), diazepam (8%), digoxin > 0.125 mg/day (5%), and diclofenac (3.7%) were the commonly used inappropriate medications. Use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in heart and renal failure patients was the commonly identified drug–disease interaction. According to PRISCUS list, at least one inappropriate medication was prescribed in 210 (31.06%) patients. Conclusion: Use of inappropriate medicines is highly prevalent in elderly patients. PMID:25276629

  20. The Clinical Utility of Personality Subtypes in Patients with Anorexia Nervosa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildes, Jennifer E.; Marcus, Marsha D.; Crosby, Ross D.; Ringham, Rebecca M.; Dapelo, Marcela Marin; Gaskill, Jill A.; Forbush, Kelsie T.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Elucidation of clinically relevant subtypes has been proposed as a means of advancing treatment research, but classifying anorexia nervosa (AN) patients into restricting and binge-eating/purging types has demonstrated limited predictive validity. This study aimed to evaluate whether an approach to classifying eating disorder patients on…

  1. Utility of cardiac troponins in patients with suspected cardiac trauma or after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, J E

    1997-12-01

    Detection of cardiac injury after blunt chest wall trauma or cardiac surgery is problematic. Previously available biomarkers have been hindered largely by limitations of specifity for myocardial damage. Both cardiac troponin I and T have been evaluated in these patient subgroups. While many questions remain unanswered, it appears that measurement of troponin proteins will facilitate patient care in these difficult situations. PMID:9439875

  2. Patient and Physician Perceptions of Dimensions of Necessity of Medical Utilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Peggy J.; Warren, Peter R.; Moseley, Ginger

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this research was to understand better the perspectives held by physicians and patients regarding what factors determine the appropriateness of medical visits. We also wished to create a convenient measure of those perspectives. In our first study, we conducted focus groups separately composed of 22 physicians and 16 patients to…

  3. Utilizing Teach-Back to Reinforce Patient Education: A Step-by-Step Approach.

    PubMed

    Caplin, Marcy; Saunders, Tina

    2015-01-01

    Teach-back is a health literacy tool that can be used by orthopaedic nurses to assess their patients' understanding of what has been taught and immediately clarify and review concepts that were misunderstood. Research supports the use of teach-back to engage patients in the learning process, thereby reducing hospital readmissions, and improving self-management, safety, patient satisfaction, and patient outcomes. Nursing journals, however, lack articles that take nurses through the steps of implementing teach-back in their practice. This article describes the four stages of teach-back and takes you step by step through the process of integrating this health literacy tool in your patient education practices. PMID:26575509

  4. Who is responsible for developing experienced vets?

    PubMed

    2016-04-30

    Reports from practice suggest an apparent shortage of experienced vets. A debate at this year's BSAVA congress explored what was meant by 'experienced vet' and who should be responsible for helping new graduates gain the necessary experience. Kathryn Clark reports. PMID:27127087

  5. Assessing the Curriculum Experienced by Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Vincent

    1989-01-01

    Despite teachers' most valiant efforts, the taught and the experienced curricula are not always the same. Most tests are inappropriate measures of the experienced curriculum. A Vermont elementary school has been assembling classroom activity data to help educators understand how children process the curriculum. Helpful assessment activities are…

  6. Clinical utility and patient considerations in the use of the sitagliptin–metformin combination in Chinese patients

    PubMed Central

    Du, Qiang; Wang, Yan-Jun; Yang, Sheng; Han, Ping

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) continues to increase each year. However, the efficacy of glucose-lowering therapies remains unsatisfactory. Moreover, the clinical characteristics and manifestations of DM in Chinese patients are different from those in Western patients. Thus, it is imperative to develop an optimal treatment protocol for lowering blood glucose levels in Chinese patients with DM. Sitagliptin has been used in People’s Republic of China, and sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy may not alter their individual pharmacokinetics. To date, several clinical trials undertaken to investigate the efficacy of sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy have revealed that it effectively controlled glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose, and postprandial plasma glucose levels to a greater extent than sitagliptin or metformin alone. In addition, the combined therapy was well tolerated and induced few side effects, which were largely mild. Furthermore, the combined therapy was easy to administer, and the patients receiving this therapy showed good compliance. Therefore, for Chinese patients with type 2 DM, sitagliptin and metformin combination therapy is preferred. PMID:25709414

  7. Utilization of home telemonitoring in patients 75 years of age and over with complex heart failure.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Geneviève; Azad, Nahid; Struthers, Christine

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a chart review on all patients who had received home telemonitoring after an admission for heart failure at the University of Ottawa Heart Institute. During a 5 year period (2005-2009) a total of 645 patients had home monitoring. A total of 594 patients met the inclusion criteria for the study and were divided into two groups: Group 1 (<75 years of age) contained 350 patients and Group 2 (≥75 years of age) contained 244 patients. There was no significant difference between the groups in the mean duration of follow-up by the telemonitoring team: it was 126.5 days in Group 1 and 125.4 days in Group 2 (P = 0.89). There were no significant differences between the groups in the number of times that titration of diuretic medications occurred, the number of times that titration of cardiac medications occurred, the number of interventions for abnormal vital signs or the number of times that patients were called by the telemonitoring staff. Emergency room visits, hospitalizations and the number of deaths were also not different between two groups. Thus in the telemonitoring programme, the pattern of usage by older patients was similar to that of the younger ones. Based on the present study, the elderly do not require more resources nor do they require them for longer. PMID:23390212

  8. Development and Utilization of a Patient-Oriented Outpatient Guidance System

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Mira; Koo, Bo Kyung; Kim, Byoung Jae; Hong, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Jongdeuk; Yoo, Sooyoung; Hwang, Hee; Seo, Jeongwan; Kim, Donghyeok

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To develop a tool which can easily access the hospital information system (HIS) to facilitate outpatient care and maximize patient satisfaction on his or her hospital visit. Methods Our Center for Informatics developed an outpatient guidance system (OGS) after careful analysis of the list of daily tasks undergone by patients and related work processes. Bluetooth beacons were installed to assist patients, to inform them of points of interest, and to guide them along the proper routes to and within the hospital. Results The OGS conveniently provided patients' clinic schedules, routes to the hospital, and direct costs; all of this information was embedded in the HIS accessed from patients' personal mobile devices or kiosks. Patients were also able to identify their locations within the hospital, receiving proper directions to subsequent task. Since its launch in October 2014, the number of mobile accesses increased from 4,011 to 8,242 per month within a year. Conclusions The substantial growth of interest in and use of our OGS in such a short period indicate that this system has been successfully incorporated into patients' daily activities. We believe that this system will continue to help improve health services and the well-being of those visiting the hospital. PMID:27525158

  9. Ciprofloxacin utility as antifibrotic in the skin of patients with scleroderma.

    PubMed

    Rubén, Enríquez-Casillas; Manuel, Vázquez-Rodríguez; Agustín, Ochoa-Ramírez; Huerta, Miguel; Antonio, Fraga-Mouret; Iván, Delgado-Enciso

    2010-04-01

    Scleroderma is an autoimmune connective tissue disorder that is characterized by microvascular injury, excessive fibrosis of the skin, and distinctive visceral changes that can involve the lungs, heart, kidneys and gastrointestinal tract. To date, although several drugs have been used to reduce fibrosis in scleroderma, there exists no effective pharmacological treatment. To determine if oral ciprofloxacin reduces the severity of scleroderma, a controlled, double-blind randomized clinical trial, with placebo, was conducted on 32 patients with diffuse and limited scleroderma, who received oral ciprofloxacin (250 mg) or placebo every 12 h. Skin induration and thickness of the patients were clinically evaluated using the modified Rodnan skin score at the beginning and once per month during 6 months of treatment with ciprofloxacin. To monitor progression of the disease, a monthly hematological exam and clinical evaluation was done to explore renal and hepatic function for each patient. Thirty patients completed the study; one from the treatment group was excluded when presenting a skin reaction and another from the placebo group abandoned the study due to an exacerbation of disease. At the sixth month of the study, the ciprofloxacin group of patients showed a diminution in the modified Rodnan skin score (58% vs 18%, P = 0.003), showing no significant alterations in the laboratory assays in either groups of patients. Our results suggest that oral administration of ciprofloxacin for 6 months reduces the severity of symptoms affecting the skin of patients with systemic scleroderma, and does so without important secondary effects. PMID:20507401

  10. Experienced discrimination amongst European old citizens.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Wim J A; van Santvoort, Marc M

    2011-12-01

    This study analyses the experienced age discrimination of old European citizens and the factors related to this discrimination. Differences in experienced discrimination between old citizens of different European countries are explored. Data from the 2008 ESS survey are used. Old age is defined as being 62 years or older. The survey data come from 28 European countries and 14,364 old-age citizens. Their average age is 72 years. Factor analysis is used to construct the core variable 'experienced discrimination'. The influence of the independent variables on experienced discrimination is analysed using linear regression analysis. About one-quarter of old European citizens sometimes or frequently experience discrimination because of their age. Gender, education, income and belonging to a minority are related to experienced age discrimination. Satisfaction with life and subjective health are strongly associated with experienced age discrimination, as is trust in other people and the seriousness of age discrimination in the country. Large, significant differences in experienced discrimination due to old age exist between European countries. A north-west versus south-east European gradient is found in experienced discrimination due to old age. The socio-cultural context is important in explaining experienced age discrimination in old European citizens. Old-age discrimination is experienced less frequently in countries with social security arrangements. Further research is needed to understand the variation in (old) age discrimination between European countries. Measures recommended include increasing public awareness about the value of ageing for communities and changing public attitudes towards the old in a positive way. PMID:22207825