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Sample records for experiment model fresh

  1. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B. K.; Althof, J. A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations.

  2. Direct-contact condensers for open-cycle OTEC applications: Model validation with fresh water experiments for structured packings

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Parsons, B.K.; Althof, J.A.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the reported work was to develop analytical methods for evaluating the design and performance of advanced high-performance heat exchangers for use in open-cycle thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. This report describes the progress made on validating a one-dimensional, steady-state analytical computer of fresh water experiments. The condenser model represents the state of the art in direct-contact heat exchange for condensation for OC-OTEC applications. This is expected to provide a basis for optimizing OC-OTEC plant configurations. Using the model, we examined two condenser geometries, a cocurrent and a countercurrent configuration. This report provides detailed validation results for important condenser parameters for cocurrent and countercurrent flows. Based on the comparisons and uncertainty overlap between the experimental data and predictions, the model is shown to predict critical condenser performance parameters with an uncertainty acceptable for general engineering design and performance evaluations. 33 refs., 69 figs., 38 tabs.

  3. Model experiments to establish behaviour of Yersinia enterocolitica O: 9 strains in various types of fresh dry sausage.

    PubMed

    Kleemann, J; Bergann, T

    1996-01-01

    In model experiments different kinds of raw sausages were inoculated with liquid cultures of virulent-plasmid-carrying clinical Yersinia (Y.) enterocolitica (e.) strains of the O: 9 serotype, doses being between 10(4) and 10(5) cfu g-1. The sausage samples were stored at 3-5 degrees C and 13-16 degrees C. During the first 10 d of storage the Y.e. plate count was detected with Desoxycholate-Citrate-Lactose-Sucrose Agar every day, later on in addition to it with phosphate buffer-enrichment and with enrichment according to Schiemann (1982) in intervals of several days' duration. The pH and aw values, the contents of salt and water were detected. The multitude of complexly acting factors and substances prevents obviously the proliferation of Y.e. in fresh dry sausages. Decay dynamics of Y.e. were found to be considerably affected by storage temperature. Cold storage, basically, had a conservation effect and thus delayed the dying process of model strains. Yersinia enterocolitica-contaminated fresh dry sausage may cause potential danger to consumers, because of relatively extended survival periods of the pathogen. Therefore, manufacturers are expected to observe most stringent hygienic rules of Good Manufacturing Practice. PMID:8698649

  4. Global modeling of fresh surface water temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Eikelboom, T.; van Vliet, M. T.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Temperature determines a range of water physical properties, the solubility of oxygen and other gases and acts as a strong control on fresh water biogeochemistry, influencing chemical reaction rates, phytoplankton and zooplankton composition and the presence or absence of pathogens. Thus, in freshwater ecosystems the thermal regime affects the geographical distribution of aquatic species through their growth and metabolism, tolerance to parasites, diseases and pollution and life history. Compared to statistical approaches, physically-based models of surface water temperature have the advantage that they are robust in light of changes in flow regime, river morphology, radiation balance and upstream hydrology. Such models are therefore better suited for projecting the effects of global change on water temperature. Till now, physically-based models have only been applied to well-defined fresh water bodies of limited size (e.g., lakes or stream segments), where the numerous parameters can be measured or otherwise established, whereas attempts to model water temperature over larger scales has thus far been limited to regression type of models. Here, we present a first attempt to apply a physically-based model of global fresh surface water temperature. The model adds a surface water energy balance to river discharge modelled by the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB. In addition to advection of energy from direct precipitation, runoff and lateral exchange along the drainage network, energy is exchanged between the water body and the atmosphere by short and long-wave radiation and sensible and latent heat fluxes. Also included are ice-formation and its effect on heat storage and river hydraulics. We used the coupled surface water and energy balance model to simulate global fresh surface water temperature at daily time steps on a 0.5x0.5 degree grid for the period 1970-2000. Meteorological forcing was obtained from the CRU data set, downscaled to daily values with ECMWF

  5. Assessment of the recycling potential of fresh concrete waste using a factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Correia, S L; Souza, F L; Dienstmann, G; Segadães, A M

    2009-11-01

    Recycling of industrial wastes and by-products can help reduce the cost of waste treatment prior to disposal and eventually preserve natural resources and energy. To assess the recycling potential of a given waste, it is important to select a tool capable of giving clear indications either way, with the least time and work consumption, as is the case of modelling the system properties using the results obtained from statistical design of experiments. In this work, the aggregate reclaimed from the mud that results from washout and cleaning operations of fresh concrete mixer trucks (fresh concrete waste, FCW) was recycled into new concrete with various water/cement ratios, as replacement of natural fine aggregates. A 3(2) factorial design of experiments was used to model fresh concrete consistency index and hardened concrete water absorption and 7- and 28-day compressive strength, as functions of FCW content and water/cement ratio, and the resulting regression equations and contour plots were validated with confirmation experiments. The results showed that the fresh concrete workability worsened with the increase in FCW content but the water absorption (5-10 wt.%), 7-day compressive strength (26-36 MPa) and 28-day compressive strength (32-44 MPa) remained within the specified ranges, thus demonstrating that the aggregate reclaimed from FCW can be recycled into new concrete mixtures with lower natural aggregate content. PMID:19596189

  6. Osmotic Power: A Fresh Look at an Old Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dugdale, Pam

    2014-01-01

    Electricity from osmotic pressure might seem a far-fetched idea but this article describes a prototype in Norway where the osmotic pressure generated between salt and fresh water drives a turbine. This idea was applied in a student investigation, where they were tasked with researching which alternative materials could be used for the…

  7. Preparation of fresh cheese from caprine milk as a model for the reduction of allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Katagiri, Mitsuaki; Fujita, Masaru; Yamato, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    Fresh cheese was prepared from caprine milk by isoelectric precipitation as a model experiment for reducing the allergenicity of milk. After acidic precipitation of casein, the beta-lactoglobulin content in curd was determined by ELISA using monoclonal antibody (MAb-beta209). The beta-lactoglobulin content was very high in the fresh cheese obtained from heat-treated (85 degrees C) bovine or caprine milk, while that obtained from untreated milk contained none of this protein. Taking it into account that caprine milk has only a small amount of alpha(s1)-casein, one of the major bovine milk allergens, the caprine fresh cheese sterilized after processing by precipitation may be useful as a protein source of low allergenicity. PMID:19602841

  8. Methodology for modeling the migration of EOR chemicals in fresh water aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Royce, B.; Garrell, M.; Kahn, A.; Kaplan, E.

    1983-11-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a method for modeling the transport of EOR chemicals accidentally released to fresh water aquifers. Six examples involving hypothetical releases of EOR chemicals at surrogate aquifer sites are used to illustrate the application of this method. Typical injection rates and concentrations of EOR chemicals used at current or proposed projects were obtained from the literature and used as the basis for the hypothetical accidents. Four surrogate aquifer sites were selected from States where chemical flooding methods are employed. Each site is based on real hydrological data but presented in such a way to avoid identification with existing EOR fields. A significant amount of data is required to model ground water systems. The hypothetical examples help to indicate the type of data needed. The computer results illustrate that high levels of contamination are possible for many years. In addition, due to these high levels of contamination, it is possible for contaminants to migrate offsite of the EOR field. There are a variety of pathways through which EOR chemicals could be accidentally released to fresh water aquifers during normal EOR operations. There is insufficient EOR experience to date, however, to forecast risks accurately. 119 references, 10 figures, 9 tables.

  9. Analysis of fresh fuel critical experiments appropriate for burnup credit validation

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.; Bowman, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

  10. Numerical Modelling and Ejecta Distribution Analysis of a Martian Fresh Crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, A.; Cremonese, G.; Cambianica, P.; Daubar, I.; McEwen, A. S.; Re, C.

    2015-12-01

    Images taken by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal fresh craters on Mars that are known to be recent as they are constrained by before and after images (Daubar et al., 2013). In particular, on Nov. 19, 2013 an image acquired by HiRISE, ESP_034285_1835, observed a 25 m diameter fresh crater located at 3.7° N, 53.4° E. This impact occurred between July 2010 and May 2012, as constrained by Context camera (CTX) images. Because the terrain where the crater formed is dusty, the fresh crater appears blue in the enhanced color of the HiRISE image, due to removal of the reddish dust in that area. We analyze this crater using the iSALE shock physics code (Amsden et al., 1980, Collins et al., 2004, Ivanov et al., 1997, Melosh et al., 1992, Wünnemann et al., 2006) to model the formation of this impact structure which is ~25 m in diameter and ~ 2.5 - 3 m in depth. These values are obtained from the DTM profile we have generated. We model the Martian surface considering different target compositions as regolith and fractured basalt rock and we based our simulations on a basalt projectile with a porosity of 10% (which is derived from the average of the meteorite types proposed by Britt et al., 2002) that hits the Martian surface with a beginning velocity equal to 7 km/s (Le Feuvre & Wieczorek, 2011) and an impact angle of 90°. The projectile size is around 1 m and it is estimated from the comparison between the DTM profile and the profiles obtained by numerical modelling. The primary objective of this analysis is the detailed study of the ejecta, in fact we will track the ejecta coming from the simulation and compare them to the ejecta distribution computed on the image (the ejecta reached a distance of more than 15 km). From the matching of the simulated ejecta with their real distribution, we will be able to understand the goodness of the simulation and also put constraints on the target material.

  11. Modeling fresh water lens damage and recovery on atolls after storm-wave washover.

    PubMed

    Chui, Ting Fong May; Terry, James P

    2012-01-01

    The principal natural source of fresh water on scattered coral atolls throughout the tropical Pacific Ocean is thin unconfined groundwater lenses within islet substrates. Although there are many threats to the viability of atoll fresh water lenses, salinization caused by large storm waves washing over individual atoll islets is poorly understood. In this study, a mathematical modeling approach is used to examine the immediate responses, longer-term behavior, and subsequent (partial) recovery of a Pacific atoll fresh water lens after saline damage caused by cyclone-generated wave washover under different scenarios. Important findings include: (1) the saline plume formed by a washover event mostly migrates downward first through the top coral sand and gravel substrate, but then exits the aquifer to the ocean laterally through the more permeable basement limestone; (2) a lower water table position before the washover event, rather than a longer duration of storm washover, causes more severe damage to the fresh water lens; (3) relatively fresher water can possibly be found as a preserved horizon in the deeper part of an aquifer after disturbance, especially if the fresh water lens extends into the limestone under normal conditions; (4) post-cyclone accumulation of sea water in the central depression (swamp) of an atoll islet prolongs the later stage of fresh water lens recovery. PMID:21883195

  12. Numerical modeling of fresh concrete flow through porous medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolařík, F.; Patzák, B.; Zeman, J.

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on a numerical modeling of a non-Newtonian fluid flow in a porous domain. It presents combination of a homogenization approach to obtain permeability from the underlying micro-structure with coupling of a Stokes and Darcy flow through the interface on the macro level. As a numerical method we employed the Finite Element method. The results obtained from the homogenization approach are validated against fully resolved solution computed by direct numerical simulation.

  13. Evaluation of hands-on seminar for reduced port surgery using fresh porcine cadaver model

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Saseem; Kurashima, Yo; Shichinohe, Toshiaki; Kitashiro, Shuji; Kanehira, Eiji; Hirano, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The use of various biological and non-biological simulators is playing an important role in training modern surgeons with laparoscopic skills. However, there have been few reports of the use of a fresh porcine cadaver model for training in laparoscopic surgical skills. The purpose of this study was to report on a surgical training seminar on reduced port surgery using a fresh cadaver porcine model and to assess its feasibility and efficacy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The hands-on seminar had 10 fresh porcine cadaver models and two dry boxes. Each table was provided with a unique access port and devices used in reduced port surgery. Each group of 2 surgeons spent 30 min at each station, performing different tasks assisted by the instructor. The questionnaire survey was done immediately after the seminar and 8 months after the seminar. RESULTS: All the tasks were completed as planned. Both instructors and participants were highly satisfied with the seminar. There was a concern about the time allocated for the seminar. In the post-seminar survey, the participants felt that the number of reduced port surgeries performed by them had increased. CONCLUSION: The fresh cadaver porcine model requires no special animal facility and can be used for training in laparoscopic procedures. PMID:27279391

  14. Measured and Modeled Humidification Factors of Fresh Smoke Particles From Biomass Burning: Role of Inorganic Constituents

    SciTech Connect

    Hand, Jenny L.; Day, Derek E.; McMeeking, Gavin M.; Levin, Ezra; Carrico, Christian M.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Laskin, Alexander; Desyaterik, Yury

    2010-07-09

    During the 2006 FLAME study (Fire Laboratory at Missoula Experiment), laboratory burns of biomass fuels were performed to investigate the physico-chemical, optical, and hygroscopic properties of fresh biomass smoke. As part of the experiment, two nephelometers simultaneously measured dry and humidified light scattering coefficients (bsp(dry) and bsp(RH), respectively) in order to explore the role of relative humidity (RH) on the optical properties of biomass smoke aerosols. Results from burns of several biomass fuels showed large variability in the humidification factor (f(RH) = bsp(RH)/bsp(dry)). Values of f(RH) at RH=85-90% ranged from 1.02 to 2.15 depending on fuel type. We incorporated measured chemical composition and size distribution data to model the smoke hygroscopic growth to investigate the role of inorganic and organic compounds on water uptake for these aerosols. By assuming only inorganic constituents were hygroscopic, we were able to model the water uptake within experimental uncertainty, suggesting that inorganic species were responsible for most of the hygroscopic growth. In addition, humidification factors at 85-90% RH increased for smoke with increasing inorganic salt to carbon ratios. Particle morphology as observed from scanning electron microscopy revealed that samples of hygroscopic particles contained soot chains either internally or externally mixed with inorganic potassium salts, while samples of weak to non-hygroscopic particles were dominated by soot and organic constituents. This study provides further understanding of the compounds responsible for water uptake by young biomass smoke, and is important for accurately assessing the role of smoke in climate change studies and visibility regulatory efforts.

  15. Model Experiments and Model Descriptions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackman, Charles H.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Weisenstein, Debra; Scott, Courtney J.; Shia, Run-Lie; Rodriguez, Jose; Sze, N. D.; Vohralik, Peter; Randeniya, Lakshman; Plumb, Ian

    1999-01-01

    The Second Workshop on Stratospheric Models and Measurements Workshop (M&M II) is the continuation of the effort previously started in the first Workshop (M&M I, Prather and Remsberg [1993]) held in 1992. As originally stated, the aim of M&M is to provide a foundation for establishing the credibility of stratospheric models used in environmental assessments of the ozone response to chlorofluorocarbons, aircraft emissions, and other climate-chemistry interactions. To accomplish this, a set of measurements of the present day atmosphere was selected. The intent was that successful simulations of the set of measurements should become the prerequisite for the acceptance of these models as having a reliable prediction for future ozone behavior. This section is divided into two: model experiment and model descriptions. In the model experiment, participant were given the charge to design a number of experiments that would use observations to test whether models are using the correct mechanisms to simulate the distributions of ozone and other trace gases in the atmosphere. The purpose is closely tied to the needs to reduce the uncertainties in the model predicted responses of stratospheric ozone to perturbations. The specifications for the experiments were sent out to the modeling community in June 1997. Twenty eight modeling groups responded to the requests for input. The first part of this section discusses the different modeling group, along with the experiments performed. Part two of this section, gives brief descriptions of each model as provided by the individual modeling groups.

  16. Hydrochemical Impacts of CO2 Leakage on Fresh Groundwater: a Field Scale Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lions, J.; Gal, F.; Gombert, P.; Lafortune, S.; Darmoul, Y.; Prevot, F.; Grellier, S.; Squarcioni, P.

    2013-12-01

    One of the questions related to the emerging technology for Carbon Geological Storage concerns the risk of CO2 migration beyond the geological storage formation. In the event of leakage toward the surface, the CO2 might affect resources in neighbouring formations (geothermal or mineral resources, groundwater) or even represent a hazard for human activities at the surface or in the subsurface. In view of the preservation of the groundwater resources mainly for human consumption, this project studies the potential hydrogeochemical impacts of CO2 leakage on fresh groundwater quality. One of the objectives is to characterize the bio-geochemical mechanisms that may impair the quality of fresh groundwater resources in case of CO2 leakage. To reach the above mentioned objectives, this project proposes a field experiment to characterize in situ the mechanisms that could impact the water quality, the CO2-water-rock interactions and also to improve the monitoring methodology by controlled CO2 leakage in shallow aquifer. The tests were carried out in an experimental site in the chalk formation of the Paris Basin. The site is equipped with an appropriate instrumentation and was previously characterized (8 piezometers, 25 m deep and 4 piezairs 11 m deep). The injection test was preceded by 6 months of monitoring in order to characterize hydrodynamics and geochemical baselines of the site (groundwater, vadose and soil). Leakage into groundwater is simulated via the injection of a small quantity of food-grade CO2 (~20 kg dissolved in 10 m3 of water) in the injection well at a depth of about 20 m. A plume of dissolved CO2 is formed and moves downward according to the direction of groundwater flow and probably by degassing in part to the surface. During the injection test, hydrochemical monitoring of the aquifer is done in situ and by sampling. The parameters monitored in the groundwater are the piezometric head, temperature, pH and electrical conductivity. Analysis on water

  17. A novel reflectance-based model for evaluating chlorophyll concentration of fresh and water-stressed leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Popescu, S. C.; Huang, S. C.; Chen, Y. C.; Chang, P. T.; Wen, H. L.

    2013-11-01

    Water deficit can cause chlorophyll degradation which decreases foliar chlorophyll concentration (Chls). Few studies investigated the effectiveness of spectral indices under water stress conditions. Chlorophyll meters have been extensively used for a wide variety of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen estimations. Since a chlorophyll meter works based on the sensing of leaves absorptance and transmittance, the reading of chlorophyll concentration will be affected by changes in transmittance as if there is a water deficit in leaves. The overall objective of this paper was to develop a novel and reliable reflectance-based model for estimating Chls of fresh and water stressed leaves using the reflectance at the absorption bands of chlorophyll a and b and the red edge spectrum. Three independent experiments were designed to collect data from three leaf sample sets for the construction and validation of Chls estimation models. First, a reflectance experiment was conducted to collect foliar Chls and reflectance of leaves with varying water stress using the ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer. Second, a chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502) experiment was carried out to collect foliar Chls and meter reading. These two datasets were separately used for developing reflectance-based or absorptance-based Chls estimation models using linear and nonlinear regression analysis. Suitable models were suggested mainly based on the coefficient of determination (R2). Finally, an experiment was conducted to collect the third dataset for the validation of Chls models using the root mean squared error (RMSE) and the mean absolute error (MAE). In all of the experiments, the observations (real values) of the foliar Chls were extracted from acetone solution and determined by using a Hitachi U-2000 spectrophotometer. The spectral indices in the form of reflectance ratio/difference/slope derived from the chlb absorption bands (ρ645 and ρ455) provided Chls estimates with RMSE around 0.40-0.55 mg g-1 for both

  18. A novel reflectance-based model for evaluating chlorophyll concentrations of fresh and water-stressed leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Popescu, S. C.; Huang, S. C.; Chang, P. T.; Wen, H. L.

    2015-01-01

    Water deficits can cause chlorophyll degradation which decreases the total concentration of chlorophyll a and b (Chls). Few studies have investigated the effectiveness of spectral indices under water-stressed conditions. Chlorophyll meters have been extensively used for a wide variety of leaf chlorophyll and nitrogen estimations. Since a chlorophyll meter works by sensing leaves absorptance and transmittance, the reading of chlorophyll concentration will be affected by changes in transmittance as if there were a water deficit in the leaves. The overall objective of this paper was to develop a novel and reliable reflectance-based model for estimating Chls of fresh and water-stressed leaves using the reflectance at the absorption bands of chlorophyll a and b and the red edge spectrum. Three independent experiments were designed to collect data from three leaf sample sets for the construction and validation of Chls estimation models. First, a reflectance experiment was conducted to collect foliar Chls and reflectance of leaves with varying water stress using the ASD FieldSpec spectroradiometer. Second, a chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502) experiment was carried out to collect foliar Chls and meter readings. These two data sets were separately used for developing reflectance-based or absorptance-based Chls estimation models using linear and nonlinear regression analysis. Suitable models were suggested mainly based on the coefficient of determination (R2). Finally, an experiment was conducted to collect the third data set for the validation of Chls models using the root mean squared error (RMSE) and the mean absolute error (MAE). In all of the experiments, the observations (real values) of the foliar Chls were extracted from acetone solution and determined by using a Hitachi U-2000 spectrophotometer. The spectral indices in the form of reflectance ratio/difference/slope derived from the Chl b absorption bands (ρ645 and ρ455) provided Chls estimates with RMSE around 0

  19. A Technique to Perfuse Cadavers that Extends the Useful Life of Fresh Tissues: The Duke Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messmer, Caroline; Kellogg, Ryan T.; Zhang, Yixin; Baiak, Andresa; Leiweke, Clinton; Marcus, Jeffrey R.; Levin, L. Scott; Zenn, Michael R.; Erdmann, Detlev

    2010-01-01

    The demand for laboratory-based teaching and training is increasing worldwide as medical training and education confront the pressures of shorter training time and rising costs. This article presents a cost-effective perfusion technique that extends the useful life of fresh tissue. Refrigerated cadavers are preserved in their natural state for up…

  20. Philip Morris toxicological experiments with fresh sidestream smoke: more toxic than mainstream smoke

    PubMed Central

    Schick, S; Glantz, S

    2005-01-01

    Background: Exposure to secondhand smoke causes lung cancer; however, there are little data in the open literature on the in vivo toxicology of fresh sidestream cigarette smoke to guide the debate about smoke-free workplaces and public places. Objective: To investigate the unpublished in vivo research on sidestream cigarette smoke done by Philip Morris Tobacco Company during the 1980s at its Institut für Biologische Forschung (INBIFO). Methods: Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents now available at the University of California San Francisco Legacy Tobacco Documents Library and other websites. Results: Inhaled fresh sidestream cigarette smoke is approximately four times more toxic per gram total particulate matter (TPM) than mainstream cigarette smoke. Sidestream condensate is approximately three times more toxic per gram and two to six times more tumourigenic per gram than mainstream condensate by dermal application. The gas/vapour phase of sidestream smoke is responsible for most of the sensory irritation and respiratory tract epithelium damage. Fresh sidestream smoke inhibits normal weight gain in developing animals. In a 21day exposure, fresh sidestream smoke can cause damage to the respiratory epithelium at concentrations of 2 µg/l TPM. Damage to the respiratory epithelium increases with longer exposures. The toxicity of whole sidestream smoke is higher than the sum of the toxicities of its major constituents. Conclusion: Fresh sidestream smoke at concentrations commonly encountered indoors is well above a 2 µg/m3 reference concentration (the level at which acute effects are unlikely to occur), calculated from the results of the INBIFO studies, that defines acute toxicity to humans. Smoke-free public places and workplaces are the only practical way to protect the public health from the toxins in sidestream smoke. PMID:16319363

  1. Use of a miniature laboratory fresh cheese model for investigating antimicrobial activities.

    PubMed

    Van Tassell, M L; Ibarra-Sánchez, L A; Takhar, S R; Amaya-Llano, S L; Miller, M J

    2015-12-01

    Hispanic-style fresh cheeses, such as queso fresco, have relatively low salt content, high water activity, and near neutral pH, which predisposes them to growth of Listeria monocytogenes. Biosafety constraints limit the incorporation of L. monocytogenes into cheeses manufactured via traditional methods in challenge studies, so few have focused on in situ testing of novel antimicrobials in fresh cheeses. We have developed a modular, miniaturized laboratory-scale queso fresco model for testing the incorporation of novel antilisterials. We have demonstrated the assessment of the antilisterials nisin and ferulic acid, alone and in combination, at various levels. Our results support the inhibitory effects of ferulic acid in cheese, against both L. monocytogenes and its common surrogate Listeria innocua, and we provide preliminary evaluation of its consumer acceptability. PMID:26454301

  2. Analysis of subcritical experiments using fresh and spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zino, John Frederick

    1999-11-01

    This research investigated the concepts associated with crediting the burnup of spent nuclear fuel assemblies for the purposes of criticality safety. To accomplish this, a collaborative experimental research program was undertaken between Westinghouse, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) facility and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The purpose of the program was to characterize the subcritical behavior of a small array of fresh and spent MURR fuel assemblies using the 252Cf Source-driven noise technique. An aluminum test rig was built which was capable of holding up to four, highly enriched (93.15 wt.% 235U) MURR fuel assemblies in a 2 x 2 array. The rig was outfitted with one source and four detector drywells which allowed researchers to perform active neutron noise measurements on the array of fuel assemblies. The 1 atmosphere gas 3He neutron detectors used to perform the measurements were quenched with CF4 gas to allow improved discrimination of the neutron signals in the very high gamma-ray fields associated with spent fuel (˜8000 R/hr). In addition, the detector drywells were outfitted with 1″ lead collars to provide additional gamma-ray shielding from the spent fuel. Reactivity changes were induced in the subcritical lattice by replacing individual fresh assemblies (in a 4-assembly array) with spent assemblies of known, maximum burnup (143 Mw-D). The absolute and relative measured reactivity changes were then compared to those predicted by three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculations. The purpose of these comparisons was to investigate the accuracy of modern transport theory depletion calculations to accurately simulate the reactivity effects of burnup in spent nuclear fuel. A total of seven subcritical measurements were performed at the MURR reactor facility on July 20th and 27th, 1998. These measurements generated several estimates of prompt neutron decay constants (alpha) and ratios of spectral densities through frequency correlations

  3. Laparoscopic training model using fresh human cadavers without the establishment of penumoperitoneum

    PubMed Central

    Imakuma, Ernesto Sasaki; Ussami, Edson Yassushi; Meyer, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopy is a well-established alternative to open surgery for treating many diseases. Although laparoscopy has many advantages, it is also associated with disadvantages, such as slow learning curves and prolonged operation time. Fresh frozen cadavers may be an interesting resource for laparoscopic training, and many institutions have access to cadavers. One of the main obstacles for the use of cadavers as a training model is the difficulty in introducing a sufficient pneumoperitoneum to distend the abdominal wall and provide a proper working space. The purpose of this study was to describe a fresh human cadaver model for laparoscopic training without requiring a pneumoperitoneum. MATERIALS AND METHODS AND RESULTS: A fake abdominal wall device was developed to allow for laparoscopic training without requiring a pneumoperitoneum in cadavers. The device consists of a table-mounted retractor, two rail clamps, two independent frame arms, two adjustable handle and rotating features, and two frames of the abdominal wall. A handycam is fixed over a frame arm, positioned and connected through a USB connection to a television and dissector; scissors and other laparoscopic materials are positioned inside trocars. The laparoscopic procedure is thus simulated. CONCLUSION: Cadavers offer a very promising and useful model for laparoscopic training. We developed a fake abdominal wall device that solves the limitation of space when performing surgery on cadavers and removes the need to acquire more costly laparoscopic equipment. This model is easily accessible at institutions in developing countries, making it one of the most promising tools for teaching laparoscopy. PMID:27073318

  4. Turbulence modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shabbir, Aamir

    1992-01-01

    The best way of verifying turbulence is to do a direct comparison between the various terms and their models. The success of this approach depends upon the availability of the data for the exact correlations (both experimental and DNS). The other approach involves numerically solving the differential equations and then comparing the results with the data. The results of such a computation will depend upon the accuracy of all the modeled terms and constants. Because of this it is sometimes difficult to find the cause of a poor performance by a model. However, such a calculation is still meaningful in other ways as it shows how a complete Reynolds stress model performs. Thirteen homogeneous flows are numerically computed using the second order closure models. We concentrate only on those models which use a linear (or quasi-linear) model for the rapid term. This, therefore, includes the Launder, Reece and Rodi (LRR) model; the isotropization of production (IP) model; and the Speziale, Sarkar, and Gatski (SSG) model. Which of the three models performs better is examined along with what are their weaknesses, if any. The other work reported deal with the experimental balances of the second moment equations for a buoyant plume. Despite the tremendous amount of activity toward the second order closure modeling of turbulence, very little experimental information is available about the budgets of the second moment equations. Part of the problem stems from our inability to measure the pressure correlations. However, if everything else appearing in these equations is known from the experiment, pressure correlations can be obtained as the closing terms. This is the closest we can come to in obtaining these terms from experiment, and despite the measurement errors which might be present in such balances, the resulting information will be extremely useful for the turbulence modelers. The purpose of this part of the work was to provide such balances of the Reynolds stress and heat

  5. Modelling the influence of time and temperature on the respiration rate of fresh oyster mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Sílvia; Cunha, Luís M; Fonseca, Susana C

    2015-12-01

    The respiration rate of mushrooms is an important indicator of postharvest senescence. Storage temperature plays a major role in their rate of respiration and, therefore, in their postharvest life. In this context, reliable predictions of respiration rates are critical for the development of modified atmosphere packaging that ultimately will maximise the quality of the product to be presented to consumers. This work was undertaken to study the influence of storage time and temperature on the respiration rate of oyster mushrooms. For that purpose, oyster mushrooms were stored at constant temperatures of 2, 6, 10, 14 and 18 ℃ under ambient atmosphere. Respiration rate data were measured with 8-h intervals up to 240 h. A decrease of respiration rate was found after cutting of the carpophores. Therefore, time effect on respiration rate was modelled using a first-order decay model. The results also show the positive influence of temperature on mushroom respiration rate. The model explaining the effect of time on oyster mushroom's respiration rate included the temperature dependence according to the Arrhenius equation, and the inclusion of a parameter describing the decrease of the respiration rate, from the initial time until equilibrium. These yielded an overall model that fitted well to the experimental data. Moreover, results show that the overall model is useful to predict respiration rate of oyster mushrooms at different temperatures and times, using the initial respiration rate of mushrooms. Furthermore, predictive modelling can be relevant for the choice of an appropriate packaging system for fresh oyster mushrooms. PMID:25339381

  6. Numerical modelling and hydrochemical characterisation of a fresh-water lens in the Belgian coastal plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenbohede, A.; Lebbe, L.

    2002-05-01

    The distribution of fresh and salt water in coastal aquifers is influenced by many processes. The influence of aquifer heterogeneity and human interference such as land reclamation is illustrated in the Belgian coastal plain where, around A.D. 1200, the reclamation of a tidally influenced environment was completed. The aquifer, which was filled with salt water, was thereafter freshened. The areal distribution of peat, clay, silt and sand influences the general flow and distribution of fresh and salt water along with the drainage pattern and results in the development of fresh-water lenses. The water quality in and around the fresh-water lenses below an inverted tidal channel ridge is surveyed. The hydrochemical evolution of the fresh water lens is reconstructed, pointing to cation exchange, solution of calcite and the oxidation of organic material as the major chemical reactions. The formation and evolution of the fresh water lens is modelled using a two-dimensional density-dependent solute transport model and the sensitivity of drainage and conductivities are studied. Drainage level mainly influences the depth of the fresh-water lens, whereas the time of formation is mainly influenced by conductivity. Résumé. La répartition de l'eau douce et de l'eau salée dans les aquifères littoraux est influencée par de nombreux mécanismes. L'influence de l'hétérogénéité de l'aquifère et des interférences anthropiques telles que la mise en valeur des terres est illustrée par la plaine côtière belge où, depuis l'an 1200, on a mis en valeur un environnement soumis aux marées. L'aquifère, qui contenait de l'eau salée, contient maintenant de l'eau douce. La distribution spatiale de tourbe, d'argile, de silt et de sable joue un rôle dans l'écoulement général et dans la répartition de l'eau douce et de l'eau salée le long du réseau de drainage et produit des lentilles d'eau douce. La qualité de l'eau dans et autour des lentilles d'eau douce sous une lev

  7. Electron-beam inactivation of a norovirus surrogate in fresh produce and model systems.

    PubMed

    Sanglay, Gabriel C; Li, Jianrong; Uribe, R M; Lee, Ken

    2011-07-01

    Norovirus remains the leading cause of foodborne illness, but there is no effective intervention to eliminate viral contaminants in fresh produce. Murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1) was inoculated in either 100 ml of liquid or 100 g of food. The inactivation of MNV-1 by electron-beam (e-beam), or high-energy electrons, at varying doses was measured in model systems (phosphate-buffered saline [PBS], Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium [DMEM]) or from fresh foods (shredded cabbage, diced strawberries). E-beam was applied at a current of 1.5 mA, with doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 kGy. The surviving viral titer was determined by plaque assays in RAW 264.7 cells. In PBS and DMEM, e-beam at 0 and 2 kGy provided less than a 1-log reduction of virus. At doses of 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 kGy, viral inactivation in PBS ranged from 2.37 to 6.40 log, while in DMEM inactivation ranged from 1.40 to 3.59 log. Irradiation of inoculated cabbage showed up to a 1-log reduction at 4 kGy, and less than a 3-log reduction at 12 kGy. On strawberries, less than a 1-log reduction occurred at doses up to 6 kGy, with a maximum reduction of 2.21 log at 12 kGy. These results suggest that a food matrix might provide increased survival for viruses. In foods, noroviruses are difficult to inactivate because of the protective effect of the food matrix, their small sizes, and their highly stable viral capsid. PMID:21740718

  8. Finite-difference model to simulate the areal flow of saltwater and fresh water separated by an interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mercer, James W.; Larson, S.P.; Faust, Charles R.

    1980-01-01

    Model documentation is presented for a two-dimensional (areal) model capable of simulating ground-water flow of salt water and fresh water separated by an interface. The partial differential equations are integrated over the thicknesses of fresh water and salt water resulting in two equations describing the flow characteristics in the areal domain. These equations are approximated using finite-difference techniques and the resulting algebraic equations are solved for the dependent variables, fresh water head and salt water head. An iterative solution method was found to be most appropriate. The program is designed to simulate time-dependent problems such as those associated with the development of coastal aquifers, and can treat water-table conditions or confined conditions with steady-state leakage of fresh water. The program will generally be most applicable to the analysis of regional aquifer problems in which the zone between salt water and fresh water can be considered a surface (sharp interface). Example problems and a listing of the computer code are included. (USGS).

  9. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, W. J.

    2014-05-01

    Wim J. de Lange, Geert F. Prinsen, Jacco H. Hoogewoud, Ab A Veldhuizen, Joachim Hunink, Erik F.W. Ruijgh, Timo Kroon Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses

  10. Murine Model of Buckwheat Allergy by Intragastric Sensitization with Fresh Buckwheat Flour Extract

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sejo; Lee, Kisun; Jang, Young-Ju; Sohn, Myung-Hyun; Lee, Kyoung-En; Kim, Kyu-Earn

    2005-01-01

    Food allergies affect about 4% of the Korean population, and buckwheat allergy is one of the most severe food allergies in Korea. The purpose of the present study was to develop a murine model of IgE-mediated buckwheat hypersensitivity induced by intragastric sensitization. Young female C3H/HeJ mice were sensitized and challenged intragastricly with fresh buckwheat flour (1, 5, 25 mg/dose of proteins) mixed in cholera toxin, followed by intragastric challenge. Anaphylactic reactions, antigen-specific antibodies, splenocytes proliferation assays and cytokine productions were evaluated. Oral buckwheat challenges of sensitized mice provoked anaphylactic reactions such as severe scratch, perioral/periorbital swellings, or decreased activity. Reactions were associated with elevated levels of buckwheat-specific IgE antibodies. Splenocytes from buckwheat allergic mice exhibited significantly greater proliferative responses to buckwheat than non-allergic mice. Buckwheat-stimulated IL-4, IL-5, and INF-γ productions were associated with elevated levels of buckwheat-specific IgE in sensitized mice. In this model, 1 mg and 5 mg dose of sensitization produced almost the same degree of Th2-directed immune response, however, a 25 mg dose showed blunted antibody responses. In conclusion, we developed IgE-mediated buckwheat allergy by intragastric sensitization and challenge, and this model could provide a good tool for future studies. PMID:16100445

  11. Modelling the response of fresh groundwater to climate and vegetation changes in coral islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comte, Jean-Christophe; Join, Jean-Lambert; Banton, Olivier; Nicolini, Eric

    2014-12-01

    In coral islands, groundwater is a crucial freshwater resource for terrestrial life, including human water supply. Response of the freshwater lens to expected climate changes and subsequent vegetation alterations is quantified for Grande Glorieuse, a low-lying coral island in the Western Indian Ocean. Distributed models of recharge, evapotranspiration and saltwater phytotoxicity are integrated into a variable-density groundwater model to simulate the evolution of groundwater salinity. Model results are assessed against field observations including groundwater and geophysical measurements. Simulations show the major control currently exerted by the vegetation with regards to the lens morphology and the high sensitivity of the lens to climate alterations, impacting both quantity and salinity. Long-term changes in mean sea level and climatic conditions (rainfall and evapotranspiration) are predicted to be responsible for an average increase in salinity approaching 140 % (+8 kg m-3) when combined. In low-lying areas with high vegetation density, these changes top +300 % (+10 kg m-3). However, due to salinity increase and its phytotoxicity, it is shown that a corollary drop in vegetation activity can buffer the alteration of fresh groundwater. This illustrates the importance of accounting for vegetation dynamics to study groundwater in coral islands.

  12. Neonatal transfusion models to determine the impact of using fresh red blood cells on inventory and exposure

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kerry; Quinn, Maureen; Moreno, Christina; Soundar, Esther; Teruya, Jun; Hui, Shiu-Ki

    2015-01-01

    Background Data on age of blood and its impact on donor exposure and inventory in the paediatric setting are lacking. The standard of practice of reserving a specific red blood cell (RBC) unit for neonates who may require repeat transfusions is unique to the paediatric setting. Requiring transfusion of fresher RBC units may increase the exposure of neonates to multiple units and negatively affect the supply of fresh RBC. We constructed a transfusion model based on a 6 months of retrospective neonatal transfusion data at our institution. Materials and methods All neonates (≤4 months old) at Texas Children’s Hospital who received a RBC transfusion from June to November 2011 were included and RBC transfusion data were compiled. The age of blood at the time of each RBC transfusion was recorded. These data were reviewed to calculate exposure and inventory impact if each transfusion had been restricted to RBC either ≤7 or ≤14 days old at transfusion. Results A total of 216 neonates received 938 RBC transfusions. Of these, 393 (42%) were fresh RBC (≤14 days old), even without a required age guideline. Requiring fresh (≤14 days) RBC for all transfusions in this period would have resulted in 70 additional fresh units and one or more additional exposures in 44 patients. Requiring fresher (≤7 days old) RBC would have resulted in an additional 147 units and. one or more additional exposures in 54 patients. Discussion The more conservative model of fresh (≤7 days old) RBC would greatly increase fresh RBC inventory requirements, and 25% of transfused neonates would require additional RBC exposure. Based on retrospective data and the two transfusion models, it can be concluded that requiring RBC ≤14 days old for neonatal transfusion would best balance the use of fresher RBC with the smallest increase in patient exposure (20%) and minimum impact on the RBC inventory. PMID:26192783

  13. Fresh Kills leachate treatment and minimization study: Volume 2, Modeling, monitoring and evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fillos, J.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    1993-09-01

    The New York City Department of Sanitation is developing a comprehensive landfill leachate management plan for the Fresh Kills landfill, located on the western shore of Staten Island, New York. The 3000-acre facility, owned and operated by the City of New York, has been developed into four distinct mounds that correspond to areas designated as Sections 1/9, 2/8, 3/4 and 6/7. In developing a comprehensive leachate management plan, the estimating leachate flow rates is important in designing appropriate treatment alternatives to reduce the offsite migration that pollutes both surface water and groundwater resources.Estimating the leachate flow rates from Sections 1/9 and 6/7 was given priority using an available model, hydrologic evaluation of landfill performance (HELP), and a new model, flow investigation for landfill leachate (FILL). The field-scale analysis for leachate flow included data collection of the leachate mound-level from piezometers and monitoring wells installed on-site, for six months period. From the leachate mound-head contours and flow-gradients, Leachate flow rates were computed using Darcy`s Law.

  14. Litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose and non-linear dynamics stochastic resonance model

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Xiaoguo; Liu, Wei; Hui, Guohua

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, litchi freshness rapid non-destructive evaluating method using electronic nose (e-nose) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) was proposed. EN responses to litchi samples were continuously detected for 6 d Principal component analysis (PCA) and non-linear stochastic resonance (SR) methods were utilized to analyze EN detection data. PCA method could not totally discriminate litchi samples, while SR signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) eigen spectrum successfully discriminated all litchi samples. Litchi freshness predictive model developed using SNR eigen values shows high predictive accuracy with regression coefficients R2 = 0 .99396. PMID:25920547

  15. A comprehensive sharp-interface simulation-optimization model for fresh and saline groundwater management in coastal areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Namsik; Shi, Lei

    2015-09-01

    Both fresh and saline groundwater may be of some value to coastal communities. A comprehensive simulation-optimization model was developed to identify optimal solutions for managing both types of groundwater in coastal areas. The model may be used for conventional management problems of fresh groundwater development and of seawater intrusion control. In addition, the model can be used for problems of concurrent development of fresh and saline/brackish groundwater for beneficial uses. A set of hypothetical examples is given to demonstrate the applicability of the proposed model. In the protection of an over-exploiting freshwater pumping well, the saltwater pumping scheme was less efficient than the freshwater injection scheme. Although the former scheme may be more advantageous in some limited cases, the latter should be considered first as it retains more freshwater in the aquifer. The example of the concurrent development of fresh and brackish groundwater exhibited two different sets of optimal solutions: one with a large amount of freshwater and a small amount of brackish water with high salinity, and the other with a small amount of freshwater and a large amount of brackish water with low salinity.

  16. A production planning model considering uncertain demand using two-stage stochastic programming in a fresh vegetable supply chain context.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Jordi; Pla, Lluis M; Solsona, Francesc; Pagès, Adela

    2016-01-01

    Production planning models are achieving more interest for being used in the primary sector of the economy. The proposed model relies on the formulation of a location model representing a set of farms susceptible of being selected by a grocery shop brand to supply local fresh products under seasonal contracts. The main aim is to minimize overall procurement costs and meet future demand. This kind of problem is rather common in fresh vegetable supply chains where producers are located in proximity either to processing plants or retailers. The proposed two-stage stochastic model determines which suppliers should be selected for production contracts to ensure high quality products and minimal time from farm-to-table. Moreover, Lagrangian relaxation and parallel computing algorithms are proposed to solve these instances efficiently in a reasonable computational time. The results obtained show computational gains from our algorithmic proposals in front of the usage of plain CPLEX solver. Furthermore, the results ensure the competitive advantages of using the proposed model by purchase managers in the fresh vegetables industry. PMID:27386288

  17. CFD modeling to improve safe and efficient distribution of chlorine dioxide gas for packaging fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficiency of the packaging system in inactivating food borne pathogens and prolonging the shelf life of fresh-cut produce is influenced by the design of the package apart from material and atmospheric conditions. Three different designs were considered to determine a specific package design ens...

  18. A new conceptual model on the fate and controls of fresh and pyrolized plant litter decomposition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The leaching of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from fresh and pyrolyzed aboveground plant inputs to the soil is a major pathway by which decomposing aboveground plant material contributes to soil organic matter formation. Understanding how aboveground plant input chemical traits control the partiti...

  19. We Think You Need a Vacation...: The Discipline Model at Fresh Youth Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afterschool Matters, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Fresh Youth Initiative (FYI) is a youth development organization based in the Washington Heights-Inwood section of Manhattan. The group's mission is to support and encourage the efforts of neighborhood young people and their families to design and carry out community service and social action projects, develop leadership skills, fulfill their…

  20. An artificial intelligence approach for modeling volume and fresh weight of callus - A case study of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L.).

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Ali; Fadavi, Ali; Mortazavian, Seyed Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-05-21

    Cumin (Cuminum cyminum Linn.) is valued for its aroma and its medicinal and therapeutic properties. A supervised feedforward artificial neural network (ANN) trained with back propagation algorithms, was applied to predict fresh weight and volume of Cuminum cyminum L. calli. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to evaluate input/output dependency of the eleven input parameters. Area, feret diameter, minor axis length, perimeter and weighted density parameters were chosen as input variables. Different training algorithms, transfer functions, number of hidden nodes and training iteration were studied to find out the optimum ANN structure. The network with conjugate gradient fletcher-reeves (CGF) algorithm, tangent sigmoid transfer function, 17 hidden nodes and 2000 training epochs was selected as the final ANN model. The final model was able to predict the fresh weight and volume of calli more precisely relative to multiple linear models. The results were confirmed by R(2)≥0.89, R(i)≥0.94 and T value ≥0.86. The results for both volume and fresh weight values showed that almost 90% of data had an acceptable absolute error of ±5%. PMID:26987421

  1. Modelling spoilage of fresh turbot and evaluation of a time-temperature integrator (TTI) label under fluctuating temperature.

    PubMed

    Nuin, Maider; Alfaro, Begoña; Cruz, Ziortza; Argarate, Nerea; George, Susie; Le Marc, Yvan; Olley, June; Pin, Carmen

    2008-10-31

    Kinetic models were developed to predict the microbial spoilage and the sensory quality of fresh fish and to evaluate the efficiency of a commercial time-temperature integrator (TTI) label, Fresh Check(R), to monitor shelf life. Farmed turbot (Psetta maxima) samples were packaged in PVC film and stored at 0, 5, 10 and 15 degrees C. Microbial growth and sensory attributes were monitored at regular time intervals. The response of the Fresh Check device was measured at the same temperatures during the storage period. The sensory perception was quantified according to a global sensory indicator obtained by principal component analysis as well as to the Quality Index Method, QIM, as described by Rahman and Olley [Rahman, H.A., Olley, J., 1984. Assessment of sensory techniques for quality assessment of Australian fish. CSIRO Tasmanian Regional Laboratory. Occasional paper n. 8. Available from the Australian Maritime College library. Newnham. Tasmania]. Both methods were found equally valid to monitor the loss of sensory quality. The maximum specific growth rate of spoilage bacteria, the rate of change of the sensory indicators and the rate of change of the colour measurements of the TTI label were modelled as a function of temperature. The temperature had a similar effect on the bacteria, sensory and Fresh Check kinetics. At the time of sensory rejection, the bacterial load was ca. 10(5)-10(6) cfu/g. The end of shelf life indicated by the Fresh Check label was close to the sensory rejection time. The performance of the models was validated under fluctuating temperature conditions by comparing the predicted and measured values for all microbial, sensory and TTI responses. The models have been implemented in a Visual Basic add-in for Excel called "Fish Shelf Life Prediction (FSLP)". This program predicts sensory acceptability and growth of spoilage bacteria in fish and the response of the TTI at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. The program is freely

  2. Introducing a Fresh Cadaver Model for Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Access Training in Undergraduate Medical Education

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan; Ho, Hang; Ng, Vivienne; Tran, Melissa; Rappaport, Douglas; Rappaport, William J.A.; Dandorf, Stewart J.; Dunleavy, James; Viscusi, Rebecca; Amini, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Over the past decade, medical students have witnessed a decline in the opportunities to perform technical skills during their clinical years. Ultrasound-guided central venous access (USG-CVA) is a critical procedure commonly performed by emergency medicine, anesthesia, and general surgery residents, often during their first month of residency. However, the acquisition of skills required to safely perform this procedure is often deficient upon graduation from medical school. To ameliorate this lack of technical proficiency, ultrasound simulation models have been introduced into undergraduate medical education to train venous access skills. Criticisms of simulation models are the innate lack of realistic tactile qualities, as well as the lack of anatomical variances when compared to living patients. The purpose of our investigation was to design and evaluate a life-like and reproducible training model for USG-CVA using a fresh cadaver. Methods This was a cross-sectional study at an urban academic medical center. An 18-point procedural knowledge tool and an 18-point procedural skill evaluation tool were administered during a cadaver lab at the beginning and end of the surgical clerkship. During the fresh cadaver lab, procedure naïve third-year medical students were trained on how to perform ultrasound-guided central venous access of the femoral and internal jugular vessels. Preparation of the fresh cadaver model involved placement of a thin-walled latex tubing in the anatomic location of the femoral and internal jugular vein respectively. Results Fifty-six third-year medical students participated in this study during their surgical clerkship. The fresh cadaver model provided high quality and lifelike ultrasound images despite numerous cannulation attempts. Technical skill scores improved from an average score of 3 to 12 (p<0.001) and procedural knowledge scores improved from an average score of 4 to 8 (p<0.001). Conclusion The use of this novel cadaver

  3. Experimental evaluation of four infiltration models for calcareous soil irrigated with treated untreated grey water and fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharaibeh, M. A.; Eltaif, N. I.; Alrababah, M. A.; Alhamad, M. N.

    2009-04-01

    Infiltration is vital for both irrigated and rainfed agriculture. The knowledge of infiltration characteristics of a soil is the basic information required for designing an efficient irrigation system. The objective of the present study was to model soil infiltration using four models: Green and Ampt, Horton, Kostaikov and modified Kostiakov. Infiltration tests were conducted on field plot irrigated with treated, untreated greywater and fresh water. The field water infiltration data used in these models were based on double ring infiltrometer tests conducted for 4 h. The algebraic parameters of the infiltration models and nonlinear least squares regression were fitted using measured infiltration time [I (t)] data. Among process-based infiltration models, the Horton model performed best and matched the measured I (t) data with lower sum of squares (SS).

  4. Evaluation of food protective property of five natural products using fresh-cut apple slice model.

    PubMed

    Hakkim, Faruk Lumanul; Mathiraj; Essa, Musthafa Mohamed; Arivazhagan, Girija; Guizani, Nejib; Hyuk, Song

    2012-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant (AA), antimicrobial and preservation effects of five plant derived natural products viz., Rosmarinic Acid (RA), p-Coumaric Acid (pCA), Trans-Cinnamic Acid (TCA), Hydroxyphenyllactic Acid (HPA) and Caffeic acid (CA) along with synthetic compounds (Ascorbic acid, gallic acid, citric acid and BHA) on fresh cut apple slices. Antimicrobial efficacy of these compounds against Bacillus licheniformis, Pseudomonas vulgaris, Shigella boydii, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli was found to be concentration dependent with the maximum inhibition observed at 500 microg mL(-1). A considerable AA potential of these compounds was observed in in vitro based assay system, with RA exhibiting significantly higher effect than the other compounds at 500 microg mL(-1). Furthermore the compounds at 500 microg mL(-1) significantly reduced the browning, maintained the acidic pH and restricted growth of L. monocytogenes even after 10 days of treatment. Ethanol accumulation in fresh cut apple slices increased significantly throughout the experimental period. Over all RA exhibited maximum effect in all the food preservation parameters studied suggesting that it has synchronized food protection effect and can be recommended as food additive. PMID:22530437

  5. Using density difference to store fresh water in saline subsurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ginkel, M.; Olsthoorn, Th. N.; des Tombe, B.

    2012-04-01

    The storage of fresh water in the subsurface for later recovery and use (Aquifer Storage and Recovery) is becoming more and more important in the coming decades for seasonal or emergency storage, especially in the light of climate change and increasing population. However, fresh water storage in a saline subsurface poses a challenge: the initially vertical interface between injected fresh and native salt water is unstable and tends to rotate. The injected fresh water tends to float upward on top of native salt water, where it becomes hard or impossible to recover at a later stage. A wide body of literature exists about this buoyancy effect that is caused by the density difference between fresh and salt water. Yet, very few papers focus on solutions to this problem. In this paper we propose a storage principle to overcome this buoyancy problem by actually using the density difference to keep the fresh water in place, by combining salt water extraction and impermeable barriers. This technique seems promising and could solve many local fresh water storage problems. It is especially applicable in shallow water table aquifers for the storage of fresh water below parks and arable land or for seasonal storage of desalinated water. We performed laboratory-scale experiments and numerical modelling to study the dynamic behaviour of a fresh water bubble stored in saline subsurface using the technique of salt water extraction and impermeable barriers; including effects of operation dynamics, groundwater flow, and diffusion, dispersion and density differences.

  6. A comparison of the coupled fresh water-salt water flow and the Ghyben-Herzberg sharp interface approaches to modeling of transient behavior in coastal aquifer systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Essaid, H.I.

    1986-01-01

    A quasi-three dimensional finite difference model which simulates coupled, fresh water and salt water flow, separated by a sharp interface, is used to investigate the effects of storage characteristics, transmissivity, boundary conditions and anisotropy on the transient responses of such flow systems. The magnitude and duration of the departure of aquifer response from the behavior predicted using the Ghyben-Herzberg, one-fluid approach is a function of the ease with which flow can be induced in the salt water region. In many common hydrogeologic settings short-term fresh water head responses, and transitional responses between short-term and long-term, can only be realistically reproduced by including the effects of salt water flow on the dynamics of coastal flow systems. The coupled fresh water-salt water flow modeling approach is able to reproduce the observed annual fresh water head response of the Waialae aquifer of southeastern Oahu, Hawaii. ?? 1986.

  7. Validation of a predictive model coupling gas transfer and microbial growth in fresh food packed under modified atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Guillard, V; Couvert, O; Stahl, V; Hanin, A; Denis, C; Huchet, V; Chaix, E; Loriot, C; Vincelot, T; Thuault, D

    2016-09-01

    Predicting microbial safety of fresh products in modified atmosphere packaging implies to take into account the dynamic of O2, CO2 and N2 exchanges in the system and its effect on microbial growth. In this paper a mechanistic model coupling gas transfer and predictive microbiology was validated using dedicated challenge-tests performed on poultry meat, fresh salmon and processed cheese, inoculated with either Listeria monocytogenes or Pseudomonas fluorescens and packed in commercially used packaging materials (tray + lid films). The model succeeded in predicting the relative variation of O2, CO2 and N2 partial pressure in headspace and the growth of the studied microorganisms without any parameter identification. This work highlighted that the respiration of the targeted microorganism itself and/or that of the naturally present microflora could not be neglected in most of the cases, and could, in the particular case of aerobic microbes contribute to limit the growth by removing all residual O2 in the package. This work also confirmed the low sensitivity of L. monocytogenes toward CO2 while that of P. fluorescens permitted to efficiently prevent its growth by choosing the right combination of packaging gas permeability value and initial % of CO2 initially flushed in the pack. PMID:27217358

  8. An Application of the PMI Model at the Project Level: Evaluation of the ESEA Title IV C Fresh Start Minischool Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia C.

    The Planning, Monitoring, and Implementation Model (PMI) was developed to provide a model for systematic evaluation of educational programs to determine their effectiveness in achieving goals and objectives. This paper demonstrates the applicability of the PMI model at the project level. Fresh Start Minischool at Ballou High School (District of…

  9. Debris flows: Experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, Barbara; Bowman, Elisabeth T.; McElwaine, Jim N.

    2015-01-01

    Debris flows and debris avalanches are complex, gravity-driven currents of rock, water and sediments that can be highly mobile. This combination of component materials leads to a rich morphology and unusual dynamics, exhibiting features of both granular materials and viscous gravity currents. Although extreme events such as those at Kolka Karmadon in North Ossetia (2002) [1] and Huascarán (1970) [2] strongly motivate us to understand how such high levels of mobility can occur, smaller events are ubiquitous and capable of endangering infrastructure and life, requiring mitigation. Recent progress in modelling debris flows has seen the development of multiphase models that can start to provide clues of the origins of the unique phenomenology of debris flows. However, the spatial and temporal variations that debris flows exhibit make this task challenging and laboratory experiments, where boundary and initial conditions can be controlled and reproduced, are crucial both to validate models and to inspire new modelling approaches. This paper discusses recent laboratory experiments on debris flows and the state of the art in numerical models.

  10. Methodology for modeling the disinfection efficiency of fresh-cut leafy vegetables wash water applied on peracetic acid combined with lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Van Haute, S; López-Gálvez, F; Gómez-López, V M; Eriksson, Markus; Devlieghere, F; Allende, Ana; Sampers, I

    2015-09-01

    A methodology to i) assess the feasibility of water disinfection in fresh-cut leafy greens wash water and ii) to compare the disinfectant efficiency of water disinfectants was defined and applied for a combination of peracetic acid (PAA) and lactic acid (LA) and comparison with free chlorine was made. Standardized process water, a watery suspension of iceberg lettuce, was used for the experiments. First, the combination of PAA+LA was evaluated for water recycling. In this case disinfectant was added to standardized process water inoculated with Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157 (6logCFU/mL). Regression models were constructed based on the batch inactivation data and validated in industrial process water obtained from fresh-cut leafy green processing plants. The UV254(F) was the best indicator for PAA decay and as such for the E. coli O157 inactivation with PAA+LA. The disinfection efficiency of PAA+LA increased with decreasing pH. Furthermore, PAA+LA efficacy was assessed as a process water disinfectant to be used within the washing tank, using a dynamic washing process with continuous influx of E. coli O157 and organic matter in the washing tank. The process water contamination in the dynamic process was adequately estimated by the developed model that assumed that knowledge of the disinfectant residual was sufficient to estimate the microbial contamination, regardless the physicochemical load. Based on the obtained results, PAA+LA seems to be better suited than chlorine for disinfecting process wash water with a high organic load but a higher disinfectant residual is necessary due to the slower E. coli O157 inactivation kinetics when compared to chlorine. PMID:26065727

  11. [Extending Hyperspectral Detecting Model of pH in Fresh Pork to New Breeds].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Li, Xiao-yu; Jin, Rui; Xu, Sen-miao; Ku, Jing

    2015-07-01

    Calibration transfer is an effective approach to solve model invalidation problems caused by the change of instruments or the prediction samples. However, most studies on calibration transfer were based on different instruments, and models were established by Near Infrared Spectroscopy. In this study, hyperspectral detecting model of pork pH value was established, and in order to enhance the applicability of model to different breeds of pork samples; a new transfer algorithm based on spectra Mahalanobis distance, sync correction of spectrum and prediction value (CSPV), has been proposed, and was compared with model updating method. Equations with correlation coefficient of prediction (rp) > or = 0.837 and residual prediction deviation (RPD) > or = 1.9 were considered as applicable to predict pork quality. In this paper, three breeds, duchangda, maojia and linghao pork were researched, and a pH detecting model of duchangda (the primary breed) was established using partial least squares (PLS) regression method with r(c) of 0.922, r(p) of 0.904, root mean squared error of cross validation (RMSECV) of 0.045, root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 0.046 and RPD of 2.380. However, the prediction of the model to samples from maojia and linghao breeds (the secondary breeds) was very poor with rp of 0. 770 and 0.731 respectively, RMSEP of 0.111 and 0.209, RPD reached only 1.533 and 1.234 separately. Obviously, the PLS model of duchangda was unable to achieve the prediction to maojia and linghao samples. With the transformation of CSPV algorithm to duchangda model, only 9 and 10 standard samples from maojia and linghao breeds were used respectively, the prediction ability was improved with r(c) of 0.889 and 0.900, RPD grew to 2.071 and 2.231, which met the requirement of r(p) 0.837 and RPD > or = 1.9. While with model updating method, when 11 and 9 representative samples fromitaojia and linghao breeds were added to calibration set of duchangda model, r(c) increased

  12. Involving regional expertise in nationwide modeling for adequate prediction of climate change effects on different demands for fresh water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, Wim; Prinsen, Geert.; Hoogewoud, Jacco; Veldhuizen, Ab; Ruijgh, Erik; Kroon, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Nationwide modeling aims to produce a balanced distribution of climate change effects (e.g. harm on crops) and possible compensation (e.g. volume fresh water) based on consistent calculation. The present work is based on the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI, www.nhi.nu), which is a national, integrated, hydrological model that simulates distribution, flow and storage of all water in the surface water and groundwater systems. The instrument is developed to assess the impact on water use on land-surface (sprinkling crops, drinking water) and in surface water (navigation, cooling). The regional expertise involved in the development of NHI come from all parties involved in the use, production and management of water, such as waterboards, drinking water supply companies, provinces, ngo's, and so on. Adequate prediction implies that the model computes changes in the order of magnitude that is relevant to the effects. In scenarios related to drought, adequate prediction applies to the water demand and the hydrological effects during average, dry, very dry and extremely dry periods. The NHI acts as a part of the so-called Deltamodel (www.deltamodel.nl), which aims to predict effects and compensating measures of climate change both on safety against flooding and on water shortage during drought. To assess the effects, a limited number of well-defined scenarios is used within the Deltamodel. The effects on demand of fresh water consist of an increase of the demand e.g. for surface water level control to prevent dike burst, for flushing salt in ditches, for sprinkling of crops, for preserving wet nature and so on. Many of the effects are dealt with? by regional and local parties. Therefore, these parties have large interest in the outcome of the scenario analyses. They are participating in the assessment of the NHI previous to the start of the analyses. Regional expertise is welcomed in the calibration phase of NHI. It aims to reduce uncertainties by improving the

  13. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1993-01-01

    Modeling plays a vital role in providing physical insights into behavior revealed by experiment. The program at the University of Illinois is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena through the analytical and numerical modeling of a variety of configurations undergoing experimental study in NASA's microgravity combustion program. Significant progress has been made in two areas: (1) flame-balls, studied experimentally by Ronney and his co-workers; (2) particle-cloud flames studied by Berlad and his collaborators. Additional work is mentioned below. NASA funding for the U. of Illinois program commenced in February 1991 but work was initiated prior to that date and the program can only be understood with this foundation exposed. Accordingly, we start with a brief description of some key results obtained in the pre - 2/91 work.

  14. How Famine Started in Somalia: A Simple Model of Fresh Water Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, K. C.; Motesharrei, S.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F. R.; Kalnay, E.; Rivas, J.; Freshwater Modeling Team

    2011-12-01

    Water is the origin of life on our planet and therefore the most valued and essential natural resource for sustaining life on earth. Human uses of freshwater include not only drinking, washing, and other daily domestic activities, but also manufacturing, energy production, agriculture, aquaculture, etc. Though our planet is 97% water, only a minute portion of this is available as freshwater to be used for anthropogenic necessities and the rate at which the natural system can filter and replenish the freshwater supply cannot compete with the rate of demand. That is why special attention must be given to availability of freshwater at present time and in future. We constructed a fairly elementary model of the water cycle while we were working on a more sophisticated water model that includes several additional details. Upon introducing data from different regions of the world (including United States) into our simple model and running simulations, we can gain insight into the future of water sources and availability of freshwater. In particular, we are able to simulate how drought can result in famine, a catastrophe currently taking place in certain areas of Somalia.

  15. Fresh clouds: A parameterized updraft method for calculating cloud densities in one-dimensional models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Michael H.; Atreya, Sushil K.; Kuhn, William R.; Romani, Paul N.; Mihalka, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Models of cloud condensation under thermodynamic equilibrium in planetary atmospheres are useful for several reasons. These equilibrium cloud condensation models (ECCMs) calculate the wet adiabatic lapse rate, determine saturation-limited mixing ratios of condensing species, calculate the stabilizing effect of latent heat release and molecular weight stratification, and locate cloud base levels. Many ECCMs trace their heritage to Lewis (Lewis, J.S. [1969]. Icarus 10, 365-378) and Weidenschilling and Lewis (Weidenschilling, S.J., Lewis, J.S. [1973]. Icarus 20, 465-476). Calculation of atmospheric structure and gas mixing ratios are correct in these models. We resolve errors affecting the cloud density calculation in these models by first calculating a cloud density rate: the change in cloud density with updraft length scale. The updraft length scale parameterizes the strength of the cloud-forming updraft, and converts the cloud density rate from the ECCM into cloud density. The method is validated by comparison with terrestrial cloud data. Our parameterized updraft method gives a first-order prediction of cloud densities in a “fresh” cloud, where condensation is the dominant microphysical process. Older evolved clouds may be better approximated by another 1-D method, the diffusive-precipitative Ackerman and Marley (Ackerman, A.S., Marley, M.S. [2001]. Astrophys. J. 556, 872-884) model, which represents a steady-state equilibrium between precipitation and condensation of vapor delivered by turbulent diffusion. We re-evaluate observed cloud densities in the Galileo Probe entry site (Ragent, B. et al. [1998]. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 22891-22910), and show that the upper and lower observed clouds at ∼0.5 and ∼3 bars are consistent with weak (cirrus-like) updrafts under conditions of saturated ammonia and water vapor, respectively. The densest observed cloud, near 1.3 bar, requires unexpectedly strong updraft conditions, or higher cloud density rates. The cloud

  16. Functional Characterization and Drug Response of Freshly Established Patient-Derived Tumor Models with CpG Island Methylator Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Knapp, Patrick; Waukosin, Nancy; Klar, Ernst; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Patient-individual tumor models constitute a powerful platform for basic and translational analyses both in vitro and in vivo. However, due to the labor-intensive and highly time-consuming process, only few well-characterized patient-derived cell lines and/or corresponding xenografts exist. In this study, we describe successful generation and functional analysis of novel tumor models from patients with sporadic primary colorectal carcinomas (CRC) showing CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Initial DNA fingerprint analysis confirmed identity with the patient in all four cases. These freshly established cells showed characteristic features associated with the CIMP-phenotype (HROC40: APCwt, TP53mut, KRASmut; 3/8 marker methylated; HROC43: APCmut, TP53mut, KRASmut; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC60: APCwt, TP53mut, KRASwt; 4/8 marker methylated; HROC183: APCmut, TP53mut, KRASmut; 6/8 marker methylated). Cell lines were of epithelial origin (EpCAM+) with distinct morphology and growth kinetics. Response to chemotherapeutics was quite individual between cells, with stage I-derived cell line HROC60 being most susceptible towards standard clinically approved chemotherapeutics (e.g. 5-FU, Irinotecan). Of note, most cell lines were sensitive towards “non-classical” CRC standard drugs (sensitivity: Gemcitabin > Rapamycin > Nilotinib). This comprehensive analysis of tumor biology, genetic alterations and assessment of chemosensitivity towards a broad range of (chemo-) therapeutics helps bringing forward the concept of personalized tumor therapy. PMID:26618628

  17. Need Of Modelling Radionuclide Transport In Fresh Water Lake System, Subject To Indian Context

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Hiral; Christian, R. A.

    2010-10-26

    The operations of nuclear facilities results in low level radioactive effluents, which are required to be released into the environment. The effluents from nuclear installations are treated adequately and then released in a controlled manner under strict compliance of discharge criteria. The effluents released from installations into environment undergo dilution and dispersion. However, there is possibility of concentration by the biological process in the environment. Aquatic ecosystems are very complex webs of physical, chemical and biological interactions. It is generally both costly and laborious to describe their characteristics, and to predict them is even harder. Every aquatic ecosystem is unique, and yet it is impossible to study each system in the detail necessary for case-by-case assessment of ecological threats. In this situation, quantitative mathematical models are essential to predict, to guide assessment and to direct interventions.

  18. Experiments beyond the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1984-09-01

    This paper is based upon lectures in which I have described and explored the ways in which experimenters can try to find answers, or at least clues toward answers, to some of the fundamental questions of elementary particle physics. All of these experimental techniques and directions have been discussed fully in other papers, for example: searches for heavy charged leptons, tests of quantum chromodynamics, searches for Higgs particles, searches for particles predicted by supersymmetric theories, searches for particles predicted by technicolor theories, searches for proton decay, searches for neutrino oscillations, monopole searches, studies of low transfer momentum hadron physics at very high energies, and elementary particle studies using cosmic rays. Each of these subjects requires several lectures by itself to do justice to the large amount of experimental work and theoretical thought which has been devoted to these subjects. My approach in these tutorial lectures is to describe general ways to experiment beyond the standard model. I will use some of the topics listed to illustrate these general ways. Also, in these lectures I present some dreams and challenges about new techniques in experimental particle physics and accelerator technology, I call these Experimental Needs. 92 references.

  19. Factors controlling the configuration of the fresh-saline water interface in the Dead Sea coastal aquifers: Synthesis of TDEM surveys and numerical groundwater modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yechieli, Y.; Kafri, U.; Goldman, M.; Voss, C.I.

    2001-01-01

    TDEM (time domain electromagnetic) traverses in the Dead Sea (DS) coastal aquifer help to delineate the configuration of the interrelated fresh-water and brine bodies and the interface in between. A good linear correlation exists between the logarithm of TDEM resistivity and the chloride concentration of groundwater, mostly in the higher salinity range, close to that of the DS brine. In this range, salinity is the most important factor controlling resistivity. The configuration of the fresh-saline water interface is dictated by the hydraulic gradient, which is controlled by a number of hydrological factors. Three types of irregularities in the configuration of fresh-water and saline-water bodies were observed in the study area: 1. Fresh-water aquifers underlying more saline ones ("Reversal") in a multi-aquifer system. 2. "Reversal" and irregular residual saline-water bodies related to historical, frequently fluctuating DS base level and respective interfaces, which have not undergone complete flushing. A rough estimate of flushing rates may be obtained based on knowledge of the above fluctuations. The occurrence of salt beds is also a factor affecting the interface configuration. 3. The interface steepens towards and adjacent to the DS Rift fault zone. Simulation analysis with a numerical, variable-density flow model, using the US Geological Survey's SUTRA code, indicates that interface steep- ening may result from a steep water-level gradient across the zone, possibly due to a low hydraulic conductivity in the immediate vicinity of the fault.

  20. Changes in polyphenol profiles and color composition of freshly fermented model wine due to pulsed electric field, enzymes and thermovinification pretreatments.

    PubMed

    El Darra, Nada; Turk, Mohammad F; Ducasse, Marie-Agnès; Grimi, Nabil; Maroun, Richard G; Louka, Nicolas; Vorobiev, Eugène

    2016-03-01

    This work compares the effects of three pretreatments techniques: pulsed electric fields (PEFs), enzymes treatment (ET) and thermovinification (TV) on the improving of extraction of main phenolic compounds, color characteristics (L(∗)a(∗)b(∗)), and composition (copigmentation, non-discolored pigments) of freshly fermented model wine from Cabernet Sauvignon variety. The pretreatments produced differences in the wines, with the color of the freshly fermented model wine obtained from PEF and TV pretreated musts being the most different with an increase of 56% and 62%, respectively, compared to the control, while the color only increased by 22% for ET. At the end of the alcoholic fermentation, the contents of anthocyanins for all the pretreatments were not statistically different. However, for the content of total phenolics and total flavonols, PEF and TV were statistically different, but ET was not statistically different. The contents of flavonols in musts pretreated by PEF and TV were significantly higher comparing to the control. An increase of 48% and 97% was noted respectively, and only 4% for ET. A similar result was observed for the total phenolics with an increase by 18% and 32% respectively for PEF and TV, and only 3% for ET comparing to the control. The results suggest that the higher intensity and the difference of color composition between the control and pretreated freshly fermented model wines were not related only to a higher content of residual native polyphenols in these freshly fermented model wines. Other phenomena such as copigmentation and formation of derived pigments may be favored by these pretreatments. PMID:26471638

  1. Microbial Biomass in the Rhizosphere: Model Development and Column Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, K.; Corapcioglu, M.; Kim, J.

    2001-12-01

    Microorganisms are important factor in the major contribution to degradation of organic contaminants in bioremediation as well as in phytoremediation. Enhanced biodegradation takes place in soils if there are increased numbers of microorganisms stimulated by additional substrates such as root exudates, exogenous substrate addition, and indigenous substrate conversion. Roots can thus greatly affect the concentration and distribution of microbial biomass in soils. A mathematical model is presented that can be applied to various bioremediation methods, especially phytoremediation, for simulating microbial biomass changes in soils. Experiments were conducted in field lysimeters containing freshly contaminated soil and sown with Johnsongrass. The microbial biomass concentrations from rhizosphere soil, bulk soil, and unplanted soil were estimated for one year using an incubation-fumigation method. The mathematical model was applied to the field data on microbial biomass. To investigate the model behavior, numerical experiments were conducted before applying the model to actual field data. The results show good correlation between simulated and experimental data. Microbial effects on contaminant degradation in phytoremediation can be smaller than that resulting from additional substrates due to indigenous conversion or exogenous supply. However, the addition of exogenous substrates in phytoremediation can increase remediation efficiency in the early period when the roots may not produce exudates rapidly. Cultivation before planting may also increase microbial activity to accelerate degradation of contaminants in soil.

  2. Sonoluminescence: Experiments and models (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisenok, V. A.

    2015-05-01

    Three models of the sonoluminescence source formation are considered: the shock-free compression model, the shock wave model, and the polarization model. Each of them is tested by experimental data on the size of the radiating region and the angular radiation pattern; the shape and duration of the radiation pulse; the influence of the type of liquid, gas composition, surfactants, sound frequency, and temperature of the liquid on the radiation intensity; the characteristics of the shock wave in the liquid; and the radiation spectra. It is shown that the most adequate qualitative explanation of the entire set of experimental data is given by the polarization model. Methods for verifying the model are proposed. Publications devoted to studying the possibility a thermonuclear fusion reaction in a cavitation system are reviewed.

  3. Experiments on a Model Eye

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arell, Antti; Kolari, Samuli

    1978-01-01

    Explains a laboratory experiment dealing with the optical features of the human eye. Shows how to measure the magnification of the retina and the refractive anomaly of the eye could be used to measure the refractive power of the observer's eye. (GA)

  4. An experiment with interactive planning models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beville, J.; Wagner, J. H.; Zannetos, Z. S.

    1970-01-01

    Experiments on decision making in planning problems are described. Executives were tested in dealing with capital investments and competitive pricing decisions under conditions of uncertainty. A software package, the interactive risk analysis model system, was developed, and two controlled experiments were conducted. It is concluded that planning models can aid management, and predicted uses of the models are as a central tool, as an educational tool, to improve consistency in decision making, to improve communications, and as a tool for consensus decision making.

  5. Modeling of microgravity combustion experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckmaster, John

    1995-01-01

    This program started in February 1991, and is designed to improve our understanding of basic combustion phenomena by the modeling of various configurations undergoing experimental study by others. Results through 1992 were reported in the second workshop. Work since that time has examined the following topics: Flame-balls; Intrinsic and acoustic instabilities in multiphase mixtures; Radiation effects in premixed combustion; Smouldering, both forward and reverse, as well as two dimensional smoulder.

  6. The Database for Reaching Experiments and Models

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Ben; Kording, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Reaching is one of the central experimental paradigms in the field of motor control, and many computational models of reaching have been published. While most of these models try to explain subject data (such as movement kinematics, reaching performance, forces, etc.) from only a single experiment, distinct experiments often share experimental conditions and record similar kinematics. This suggests that reaching models could be applied to (and falsified by) multiple experiments. However, using multiple datasets is difficult because experimental data formats vary widely. Standardizing data formats promises to enable scientists to test model predictions against many experiments and to compare experimental results across labs. Here we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a database of reaching called the Database for Reaching Experiments And Models (DREAM). DREAM collects both experimental datasets and models and facilitates their comparison by standardizing formats. The DREAM project promises to be useful for experimentalists who want to understand how their data relates to models, for modelers who want to test their theories, and for educators who want to help students better understand reaching experiments, models, and data analysis. PMID:24244351

  7. Modeling Choice and Valuation in Decision Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loomes, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article develops a parsimonious descriptive model of individual choice and valuation in the kinds of experiments that constitute a substantial part of the literature relating to decision making under risk and uncertainty. It suggests that many of the best known "regularities" observed in those experiments may arise from a tendency for…

  8. Fresh SETI Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tough, A.

    If a smart probe or some other form of extraterrestrial intelligence has reached our planet, what is the next logical step in our scientific search for it? Fresh new search strategies are required. One innovative strategy, an invitation to ETI launched in 1996, was made possible by the creation of the World Wide Web. Other fresh search strategies, too, are emerging.

  9. Microwave scattering models and basic experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Adrian K.

    1989-01-01

    Progress is summarized which has been made in four areas of study: (1) scattering model development for sparsely populated media, such as a forested area; (2) scattering model development for dense media, such as a sea ice medium or a snow covered terrain; (3) model development for randomly rough surfaces; and (4) design and conduct of basic scattering and attenuation experiments suitable for the verification of theoretical models.

  10. Using ecosystem experiments to improve vegetation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medlyn, Belinda E.; Zaehle, Sönke; de Kauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael C.; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul K.; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Colin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Ying-Ping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey M.; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-06-01

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model-Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. By identifying and evaluating the main assumptions causing differences among models, the assumption-centred approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. Here, we explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  11. Fresh Soy Oil Protects Against Vascular Changes in an Estrogen-Deficient Rat Model: An Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Siti Khadijah; Das, Srijit; Othman, Faizah; Jaarin, Kamsiah

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To observe the effects of consuming repeatedly heated soy oil on the aortic tissues of estrogen-deficient rats. METHODS Thirty female Sprague Dawley rats (200–250 g) were divided equally into five groups. One group served as the normal control (NC) group. The four treated groups were ovariectomized and were fed as follows: 2% cholesterol diet (OVXC); 2% cholesterol diet + fresh soy oil (FSO); 2% cholesterol diet + once-heated soy oil (1HSO); and 2% cholesterol diet + five-times-heated soy oil (5HSO). After four months, the rats were sacrificed, and the aortic tissues were obtained for histological studies. RESULTS After four months of feeding, the NC, FSO and 1HSO groups had a lower body weight gain compared to the OVXC and 5HSO groups. The tunica intima/media ratio in the 5HSO group was significantly thicker (p < 0.05) compared to the NC, OVXC and FSO groups. Electron microscopy showed that endothelial cells were normally shaped in the FSO and NC groups but irregular in the 1HSO and 5HSO groups. A greater number of collagen fibers and vacuoles were observed in the 5HSO group compared to the other treatment groups. CONCLUSIONS Fresh soy oil offered protection in the estrogen-deficient state, as these rats had similar features to those of the NC group. The damage to the tunica intima and the increase in the ratio of tunica intima/media thickness showed the deleterious effect of consuming repeatedly heated soy oil in castrated female rats. PMID:19936186

  12. A Hadronization Model for the MINOS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T.; Andreopoulos, C.; Gallagher, H.; Kehayias, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present a detailed description of the Andreopoulos-Gallagher-Kehayias-Yang (AGKY) hadronic multiparticle production model. This model was developed within the context of the MINOS experiment [4]. Its validity spans a wide invariant mass range starting from as low as the pion production threshold. It exhibits satisfactory agreement with a wide variety of experimental data.

  13. Argonne Bubble Experiment Thermal Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Buechler, Cynthia Eileen

    2015-12-03

    This report will describe the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model that was developed to calculate the temperatures and gas volume fractions in the solution vessel during the irradiation. It is based on the model used to calculate temperatures and volume fractions in an annular vessel containing an aqueous solution of uranium . The experiment was repeated at several electron beam power levels, but the CFD analysis was performed only for the 12 kW irradiation, because this experiment came the closest to reaching a steady-state condition. The aim of the study is to compare results of the calculation with experimental measurements to determine the validity of the CFD model.

  14. STELLA Experiment: Design and Model Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, W. D.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Campbell, L. P.; Cline, D. B.; Fiorito, R. B.; Gallardo, J. C.; Gottschalk, S. C.; He, P.; Kusche, K. P.; Liu, Y.; Pantell, R. H.; Pogorelsky, I. V.; Quimby, D. C.; Robinson, K. E.; Rule, D. W.; Sandweiss, J.; Skaritka, J.; van Steenbergen, A.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Yakimenko, V.

    1998-07-05

    The STaged ELectron Laser Acceleration (STELLA) experiment will be one of the first to examine the critical issue of staging the laser acceleration process. The BNL inverse free electron laser (EEL) will serve as a prebuncher to generate {approx} 1 {micro}m long microbunches. These microbunches will be accelerated by an inverse Cerenkov acceleration (ICA) stage. A comprehensive model of the STELLA experiment is described. This model includes the EEL prebunching, drift and focusing of the microbunches into the ICA stage, and their subsequent acceleration. The model predictions will be presented including the results of a system error study to determine the sensitivity to uncertainties in various system parameters.

  15. Fresh Veggies from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Professor Marc Anderson of the University of Wisconsin-Madison developed a technology for use in plant-growth experiments aboard the Space Shuttle. Anderson's research and WCSAR's technology were funded by NASA and resulted in a joint technology licensed to KES Science and Technology, Inc. This transfer of space-age technology resulted in the creation of a new plant-saving product, an ethylene scrubber for plant growth chambers. This innovation presents commercial benefits for the food industry in the form of a new device, named Bio-KES. Bio-KES removes ethylene and helps to prevent spoilage. Ethylene accounts for up to 10 percent of produce losses and 5 percent of flower losses. Using Bio-KES in storage rooms and displays will increase the shelf life of perishable foods by more than one week, drastically reducing the costs associated with discarded rotten foods and flowers. The savings could potentially be passed on to consumers. For NASA, the device means that astronauts can conduct commercial agricultural research in space. Eventually, it may also help to grow food in space and keep it fresh longer. This could lead to less packaged food being taken aboard missions since it could be cultivated in an ethylene-free environment.

  16. Extracting Models in Single Molecule Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presse, Steve

    2013-03-01

    Single molecule experiments can now monitor the journey of a protein from its assembly near a ribosome to its proteolytic demise. Ideally all single molecule data should be self-explanatory. However data originating from single molecule experiments is particularly challenging to interpret on account of fluctuations and noise at such small scales. Realistically, basic understanding comes from models carefully extracted from the noisy data. Statistical mechanics, and maximum entropy in particular, provide a powerful framework for accomplishing this task in a principled fashion. Here I will discuss our work in extracting conformational memory from single molecule force spectroscopy experiments on large biomolecules. One clear advantage of this method is that we let the data tend towards the correct model, we do not fit the data. I will show that the dynamical model of the single molecule dynamics which emerges from this analysis is often more textured and complex than could otherwise come from fitting the data to a pre-conceived model.

  17. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  18. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  19. Experiences with two-equation turbulence models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhal, Ashok K.; Lai, Yong G.; Avva, Ram K.

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses the following: introduction to CFD Research Corporation; experiences with two-equation models - models used, numerical difficulties, validation and applications, and strengths and weaknesses; and answers to three questions posed by the workshop organizing committee - what are your customers telling you, what are you doing in-house, and how can NASA-CMOTT (Center for Modeling of Turbulence and Transition) help.

  20. Quantification of the binding potential of cell-surface receptors in fresh excised specimens via dual-probe modeling of SERS nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Lagnojita; Wang, Yu; Yang, Cynthia; Khan, Altaz; Brankov, Jovan G.; Liu, Jonathan T. C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    The complete removal of cancerous tissue is a central aim of surgical oncology, but is difficult to achieve in certain cases, especially when the removal of surrounding normal tissues must be minimized. Therefore, when post-operative pathology identifies residual tumor at the surgical margins, re-excision surgeries are often necessary. An intraoperative approach for tumor-margin assessment, insensitive to nonspecific sources of molecular probe accumulation and contrast, is presented employing kinetic-modeling analysis of dual-probe staining using surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles (SERS NPs). Human glioma (U251) and epidermoid (A431) tumors were implanted subcutaneously in six athymic mice. Fresh resected tissues were stained with an equimolar mixture of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted and untargeted SERS NPs. The binding potential (BP; proportional to receptor concentration) of EGFR – a cell-surface receptor associated with cancer – was estimated from kinetic modeling of targeted and untargeted NP concentrations in response to serial rinsing. EGFR BPs in healthy, U251, and A431 tissues were 0.06 ± 0.14, 1.13 ± 0.40, and 2.23 ± 0.86, respectively, which agree with flow-cytometry measurements and published reports. The ability of this approach to quantify the BP of cell-surface biomarkers in fresh tissues opens up an accurate new approach to analyze tumor margins intraoperatively. PMID:25716578

  1. Fresh Water Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kestler, Carol Susan

    1991-01-01

    Describes methodology for a fresh water life study with elementary through college age students with suggestions for proper equipment, useful guides, and other materials. Proposes an activity for the collection and study of plankton. Includes background information.(MCO)

  2. What determines fresh fish consumption in Croatia?

    PubMed

    Tomić, Marina; Matulić, Daniel; Jelić, Margareta

    2016-11-01

    Although fresh fish is widely available, consumption still remains below the recommended intake levels among the majority of European consumers. The economic crisis affects consumer food behaviour, therefore fresh fish is perceived as healthy but expensive food product. The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing fresh fish consumption using an expanded Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991) as a theoretical framework. The survey was conducted on a heterogeneous sample of 1151 Croatian fresh fish consumers. The study investigated the relationship between attitudes, perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, moral obligation, involvement in health, availability, intention and consumption of fresh fish. Structural Equation Modeling by Partial Least Squares was used to analyse the collected data. The results indicated that attitudes are the strongest positive predictor of the intention to consume fresh fish. Other significant predictors of the intention to consume fresh fish were perceived behavioural control, subjective norm, health involvement and moral obligation. The intention to consume fresh fish showed a strong positive correlation with behaviour. This survey provides valuable information for food marketing professionals and for the food industry in general. PMID:26721719

  3. Irradiation of Fresh and Fresh-Cut Fruits and Vegetables

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Consumption of fresh and fresh-cut fruits and vegetables in the USA has increased every year in the last decade. Unfortunately, the increasing consumption of fresh produce has been accompanied with an increase in the number of outbreaks and recalls due to contamination with human pathogens. Fresh f...

  4. Data production models for the CDF experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Antos, J.; Babik, M.; Benjamin, D.; Cabrera, S.; Chan, A.W.; Chen, Y.C.; Coca, M.; Cooper, B.; Genser, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hou, S.; Hsieh, T.L.; Jayatilaka, B.; Kraan, A.C.; Lysak, R.; Mandrichenko, I.V.; Robson, A.; Siket, M.; Stelzer, B.; Syu, J.; Teng, P.K.; /Kosice, IEF /Duke U. /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /University Coll. London /Fermilab /Rockefeller U. /Michigan U. /Pennsylvania U. /Glasgow U. /UCLA /Tsukuba U. /New Mexico U.

    2006-06-01

    The data production for the CDF experiment is conducted on a large Linux PC farm designed to meet the needs of data collection at a maximum rate of 40 MByte/sec. We present two data production models that exploits advances in computing and communication technology. The first production farm is a centralized system that has achieved a stable data processing rate of approximately 2 TByte per day. The recently upgraded farm is migrated to the SAM (Sequential Access to data via Metadata) data handling system. The software and hardware of the CDF production farms has been successful in providing large computing and data throughput capacity to the experiment.

  5. Model-scale sound propagation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a scale model propagation experiment to investigate grazing propagation above a finite impedance boundary are reported. In the experiment, a 20 x 25 ft ground plane was installed in an anechoic chamber. Propagation tests were performed over the plywood surface of the ground plane and with the ground plane covered with felt, styrofoam, and fiberboard. Tests were performed with discrete tones in the frequency range of 10 to 15 kHz. The acoustic source and microphones varied in height above the test surface from flush to 6 in. Microphones were located in a linear array up to 18 ft from the source. A preliminary experiment using the same ground plane, but only testing the plywood and felt surfaces was performed. The results of this first experiment were encouraging, but data variability and repeatability were poor, particularly, for the felt surface, making comparisons with theoretical predictions difficult. In the main experiment the sound source, microphones, microphone positioning, data acquisition, quality of the anechoic chamber, and environmental control of the anechoic chamber were improved. High-quality, repeatable acoustic data were measured in the main experiment for all four test surfaces. Comparisons with predictions are good, but limited by uncertainties of the impedance values of the test surfaces.

  6. Modeling Hemispheric Detonation Experiments in 2-Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Howard, W M; Fried, L E; Vitello, P A; Druce, R L; Phillips, D; Lee, R; Mudge, S; Roeske, F

    2006-06-22

    Experiments have been performed with LX-17 (92.5% TATB and 7.5% Kel-F 800 binder) to study scaling of detonation waves using a dimensional scaling in a hemispherical divergent geometry. We model these experiments using an arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian (ALE3D) hydrodynamics code, with reactive flow models based on the thermo-chemical code, Cheetah. The thermo-chemical code Cheetah provides a pressure-dependent kinetic rate law, along with an equation of state based on exponential-6 fluid potentials for individual detonation product species, calibrated to high pressures ({approx} few Mbars) and high temperatures (20000K). The parameters for these potentials are fit to a wide variety of experimental data, including shock, compression and sound speed data. For the un-reacted high explosive equation of state we use a modified Murnaghan form. We model the detonator (including the flyer plate) and initiation system in detail. The detonator is composed of LX-16, for which we use a program burn model. Steinberg-Guinan models5 are used for the metal components of the detonator. The booster and high explosive are LX-10 and LX-17, respectively. For both the LX-10 and LX-17, we use a pressure dependent rate law, coupled with a chemical equilibrium equation of state based on Cheetah. For LX-17, the kinetic model includes carbon clustering on the nanometer size scale.

  7. Decadal predictability of extreme fresh water export events from the Arctic Ocean into the Nordic Seas and subpolar North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Olsen, Steffen M.; Ringgaard, Ida M.; May, Wilhelm

    2016-04-01

    Abrupt fresh water releases originating in the Arctic Ocean have been documented to affect ocean circulation and climate in the North Atlantic area. Therefore, in this study, we investigate prospects for predicting such events up to one decade ahead. This is done in a perfect model setup by a combination of analyzing a 500 year control experiment and dedicated ensemble experiment aimed at predicting selected 10 year long segments of the control experiment. The selected segments are characterized by a large positive or negative trend in the total fresh water content in the Arctic Ocean. The analysis of the components (liquid fresh water and sea ice) reveals that they develop in a near random walk manner. From this we conclude that the main mechanism is integration of fresh water in the Beaufort Gyre through Ekman pumping from the randomly varying atmosphere. Therefore, the predictions from the ensemble experiments are on average not better than a damped persistence predictions. By running two different families of ensemble predictions, one starting from the 'observed' ocean globally, and one starting from climatology in the Arctic Ocean and from the observed ocean elsewhere, we conclude that the former outperforms the latter for the first few years as regards liquid fresh water and for the first year as regards sea ice. Analysis of the model experiments in terms of the fresh water export from the Arctic Ocean into Nordic seas and the subpolar North Atlantic reveals a very modest potential for predictability.

  8. Application of non-linear models to predict inhibition effects of various plant hydrosols on Listeria monocytogenes inoculated on fresh-cut apples.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Ismet; Tornuk, Fatih; Sagdic, Osman; Kisi, Ozgur

    2012-07-01

    In this study, we studied the effects of some plant hydrosols obtained from bay leaf, black cumin, rosemary, sage, and thyme in reducing Listeria monocytogenes on the surface of fresh-cut apple cubes. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), artificial neural network (ANN), and multiple linear regression (MLR) models were used for describing the behavior of L. monocytogenes against the hydrosol treatments. Approximately 1-1.5 log CFU/g decreases in L. monocytogenes counts were observed after individual hydrosol treatments for 20 min. By extending the treatment time to 60 min, thyme, sage, or rosemary hydrosols eliminated L. monocytogenes, whereas black cumin and bay leaf hydrosols did not lead to additional reductions. In addition to antibacterial measurements, the abilities of ANFIS, ANN, and MLR models were compared with respect to estimation of the survival of L. monocytogenes. The root mean square error, mean absolute error, and determination coefficient statistics were used as comparison criteria. The comparison results indicated that the ANFIS model performed the best for estimating the effects of the plant hydrosols on L. monocytogenes counts. The ANN model was also effective; the MLR model was found to be poor at estimating L. monocytogenes numbers. PMID:22690764

  9. Conceptualization of a fresh groundwater lens influenced by climate change: A modeling study of an arid-region island in the Persian Gulf, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoodzadeh, Davood; Ketabchi, Hamed; Ataie-Ashtiani, Behzad; Simmons, Craig T.

    2014-11-01

    Understanding the fresh groundwater lens (FGL) behavior and potential threat of climatic-induced seawater intrusion (SWI) are significant for the future water resources management of many small islands. In this paper, the FGL of Kish Island, an arid-region case in the Persian Gulf, Iran, is modeled using two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) simulations. These simulations are based on the application of SUTRA, a density-dependent groundwater numerical model. Also, the numerical model parameters are calibrated using PEST, an automated parameter estimation code. Firstly a detailed conceptualization of the FGL model is completed to understand the sensitivity of the FGL to some particular aspects of the model prior to analysis of climate change simulations. For these investigations, the FGL system is defined based on Kish Island system to accomplish the integrated comparison of features of a conceptual model that are representative of real-world systems. This is the first study which adopts such an approach. The comparison of cross-sectional simulations suggests that the two-layer properties of the Kish Island aquifer have a significant influence on the FGL while the impacts of lateral-boundary irregularities are negligible. The impacts of sea-level rise (SLR), associated land-surface inundation (LSI), and variations in recharge rate on the FGL salinization of Kish Island are investigated numerically. Variations of SLR value (1-4 m) and net recharge rate (17-24 mm/year) are considered to cover a possible range of climatic scenarios in this arid-region island. The 2D and 3D simulation results demonstrate that LSI caused by SLR and recharge rate variation impacts are more important factors in the FGL in comparison to estimated SLR impacts without LSI. It is also shown that climate change impacts on the FGL are long-term to reach a new FGL equilibrium in the case of Kish Island's aquifer system. The comparative analysis of 2D and 3D results shows that three

  10. Background modeling for the GERDA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Gerda Collaboration

    2013-08-01

    The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay experiment GERDA at the LNGS of INFN has started physics data taking in November 2011. This paper presents an analysis aimed at understanding and modeling the observed background energy spectrum, which plays an essential role in searches for a rare signal like 0νββ decay. A very promising preliminary model has been obtained, with the systematic uncertainties still under study. Important information can be deduced from the model such as the expected background and its decomposition in the signal region. According to the model the main background contributions around Qββ come from 214Bi, 228Th, 42K, 60Co and α emitting isotopes in the 226Ra decay chain, with a fraction depending on the assumed source positions.

  11. Background modeling for the GERDA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Collaboration: GERDA Collaboration

    2013-08-08

    The neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay experiment GERDA at the LNGS of INFN has started physics data taking in November 2011. This paper presents an analysis aimed at understanding and modeling the observed background energy spectrum, which plays an essential role in searches for a rare signal like 0νββ decay. A very promising preliminary model has been obtained, with the systematic uncertainties still under study. Important information can be deduced from the model such as the expected background and its decomposition in the signal region. According to the model the main background contributions around Q{sub ββ} come from {sup 214}Bi, {sup 228}Th, {sup 42}K, {sup 60}Co and α emitting isotopes in the {sup 226}Ra decay chain, with a fraction depending on the assumed source positions.

  12. Impact polymorphs of quartz: experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, M. C.; Dutta, R.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    We have used the light gas gun at the University of Kent to perform a series of impact experiments firing quartz projectiles onto metal, quartz and sapphire targets. The aim is to quantify the amount of any high pressure quartz polymorphs produced, and use these data to develop our hydrocode modelling to enable the predict ion of the quantity of polymorphs produced during a planetary scale impact.

  13. Data assimilation and model evaluation experiment datasets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chung-Cheng A.; Qian, Wen; Glenn, Scott M.

    1994-01-01

    The Institute for Naval Oceanography, in cooperation with Naval Research Laboratories and universities, executed the Data Assimilation and Model Evaluation Experiment (DAMEE) for the Gulf Stream region during fiscal years 1991-1993. Enormous effort has gone into the preparation of several high-quality and consistent datasets for model initialization and verification. This paper describes the preparation process, the temporal and spatial scopes, the contents, the structure, etc., of these datasets. The goal of DAMEE and the need of data for the four phases of experiment are briefly stated. The preparation of DAMEE datasets consisted of a series of processes: (1) collection of observational data; (2) analysis and interpretation; (3) interpolation using the Optimum Thermal Interpolation System package; (4) quality control and re-analysis; and (5) data archiving and software documentation. The data products from these processes included a time series of 3D fields of temperature and salinity, 2D fields of surface dynamic height and mixed-layer depth, analysis of the Gulf Stream and rings system, and bathythermograph profiles. To date, these are the most detailed and high-quality data for mesoscale ocean modeling, data assimilation, and forecasting research. Feedback from ocean modeling groups who tested this data was incorporated into its refinement. Suggestions for DAMEE data usages include (1) ocean modeling and data assimilation studies, (2) diagnosis and theoretical studies, and (3) comparisons with locally detailed observations.

  14. Shop Around for Freshness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, George P.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that cliches make writing stale and flat, and that getting rid of them is a necessity. Lists the "top 14" cliches gathered by a Columbia Scholastic Press Association judge. Uses examples to show how cleansing a passage of its superlatives and cliches improves the writing, adding clarity, fairness, and objectivity as well as freshness and…

  15. Microbial Successions Are Associated with Changes in Chemical Profiles of a Model Refrigerated Fresh Pork Sausage during an 80-Day Shelf Life Study

    PubMed Central

    David, Jairus R. D.; Gilbreth, Stefanie Evans; Smith, Gordon; Nietfeldt, Joseph; Legge, Ryan; Kim, Jaehyoung; Sinha, Rohita; Duncan, Christopher E.; Ma, Junjie; Singh, Indarpal

    2014-01-01

    Fresh pork sausage is produced without a microbial kill step and therefore chilled or frozen to control microbial growth. In this report, the microbiota in a chilled fresh pork sausage model produced with or without an antimicrobial combination of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate was studied using a combination of traditional microbiological methods and deep pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. In the untreated system, microbial populations rose from 102 to 106 CFU/g within 15 days of storage at 4°C, peaking at nearly 108 CFU/g by day 30. Pyrosequencing revealed a complex community at day 0, with taxa belonging to the Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Clostridia. During storage at 4°C, the untreated system displayed a complex succession, with species of Weissella and Leuconostoc that dominate the product at day 0 being displaced by species of Pseudomonas (P. lini and P. psychrophila) within 15 days. By day 30, a second wave of taxa (Lactobacillus graminis, Carnobacterium divergens, Buttiauxella brennerae, Yersinia mollaretti, and a taxon of Serratia) dominated the population, and this succession coincided with significant chemical changes in the matrix. Treatment with lactate-diacetate altered the dynamics dramatically, yielding a monophasic growth curve of a single species of Lactobacillus (L. graminis), followed by a uniform selective die-off of the majority of species in the population. Of the six species of Lactobacillus that were routinely detected, L. graminis became the dominant member in all samples, and its origins were traced to the spice blend used in the formulation. PMID:24928886

  16. Microbial successions are associated with changes in chemical profiles of a model refrigerated fresh pork sausage during an 80-day shelf life study.

    PubMed

    Benson, Andrew K; David, Jairus R D; Gilbreth, Stefanie Evans; Smith, Gordon; Nietfeldt, Joseph; Legge, Ryan; Kim, Jaehyoung; Sinha, Rohita; Duncan, Christopher E; Ma, Junjie; Singh, Indarpal

    2014-09-01

    Fresh pork sausage is produced without a microbial kill step and therefore chilled or frozen to control microbial growth. In this report, the microbiota in a chilled fresh pork sausage model produced with or without an antimicrobial combination of sodium lactate and sodium diacetate was studied using a combination of traditional microbiological methods and deep pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons. In the untreated system, microbial populations rose from 10(2) to 10(6) CFU/g within 15 days of storage at 4°C, peaking at nearly 10(8) CFU/g by day 30. Pyrosequencing revealed a complex community at day 0, with taxa belonging to the Bacilli, Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Clostridia. During storage at 4°C, the untreated system displayed a complex succession, with species of Weissella and Leuconostoc that dominate the product at day 0 being displaced by species of Pseudomonas (P. lini and P. psychrophila) within 15 days. By day 30, a second wave of taxa (Lactobacillus graminis, Carnobacterium divergens, Buttiauxella brennerae, Yersinia mollaretti, and a taxon of Serratia) dominated the population, and this succession coincided with significant chemical changes in the matrix. Treatment with lactate-diacetate altered the dynamics dramatically, yielding a monophasic growth curve of a single species of Lactobacillus (L. graminis), followed by a uniform selective die-off of the majority of species in the population. Of the six species of Lactobacillus that were routinely detected, L. graminis became the dominant member in all samples, and its origins were traced to the spice blend used in the formulation. PMID:24928886

  17. Predictive modeling for growth of non- and cold-adapted Listeria Monocytogenes on fresh-cut cantaloupe at different storage temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to determine the growth kinetics of Listeria monocytogenes, with and without cold-adaption, on fresh-cut cantaloupe under different storage temperatures. Fresh-cut samples, spot inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of L. monocytogenes (about 3.2 log CFU/g), were exposed t...

  18. Observation simulation experiments with regional prediction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diak, George; Perkey, Donald J.; Kalb, Michael; Robertson, Franklin R.; Jedlovec, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Research efforts in FY 1990 included studies employing regional scale numerical models as aids in evaluating potential contributions of specific satellite observing systems (current and future) to numerical prediction. One study involves Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) which mimic operational initialization/forecast cycles but incorporate simulated Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) radiances as input data. The objective of this and related studies is to anticipate the potential value of data from these satellite systems, and develop applications of remotely sensed data for the benefit of short range forecasts. Techniques are also being used that rely on numerical model-based synthetic satellite radiances to interpret the information content of various types of remotely sensed image and sounding products. With this approach, evolution of simulated channel radiance image features can be directly interpreted in terms of the atmospheric dynamical processes depicted by a model. Progress is being made in a study using the internal consistency of a regional prediction model to simplify the assessment of forced diabatic heating and moisture initialization in reducing model spinup times. Techniques for model initialization are being examined, with focus on implications for potential applications of remote microwave observations, including AMSU and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I), in shortening model spinup time for regional prediction.

  19. Experiences in evaluating regional air quality models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mei-Kao; Greenfield, Stanley M.

    Any area of the world concerned with the health and welfare of its people and the viability of its ecological system must eventually address the question of the control of air pollution. This is true in developed countries as well as countries that are undergoing a considerable degree of industrialization. The control or limitation of the emissions of a pollutant can be very costly. To avoid ineffective or unnecessary control, the nature of the problem must be fully understood and the relationship between source emissions and ambient concentrations must be established. Mathematical models, while admittedly containing large uncertainties, can be used to examine alternatives of emission restrictions for achieving safe ambient concentrations. The focus of this paper is to summarize our experiences with modeling regional air quality in the United States and Western Europe. The following modeling experiences have been used: future SO 2 and sulfate distributions and projected acidic deposition as related to coal development in the northern Great Plains in the U.S.; analysis of regional ozone and sulfate episodes in the northeastern U.S.; analysis of the regional ozone problem in western Europe in support of alternative emission control strategies; analysis of distributions of toxic chemicals in the Southeast Ohio River Valley in support of the design of a monitoring network human exposure. Collectively, these prior modeling analyses can be invaluable in examining a similar problem in other parts of the world as well, such as the Pacific rim in Asia.

  20. Ballistic Response of Fabrics: Model and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, Dennis L.; Walker Anderson, James D., Jr.

    2001-06-01

    Walker (1999)developed an analytical model for the dynamic response of fabrics to ballistic impact. From this model the force, F, applied to the projectile by the fabric is derived to be F = 8/9 (ET*)h^3/R^2, where E is the Young's modulus of the fabric, T* is the "effective thickness" of the fabric and equal to the ratio of the areal density of the fabric to the fiber density, h is the displacement of the fabric on the axis of impact and R is the radius of the fabric deformation or "bulge". Ballistic tests against Zylon^TM fabric have been performed to measure h and R as a function of time. The results of these experiments are presented and analyzed in the context of the Walker model. Walker (1999), Proceedings of the 18th International Symposium on Ballistics, pp. 1231.

  1. Process modelling for Space Station experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, J. Iwan D.; Rosenberger, Franz; Nadarajah, Arunan; Ouazzani, Jalil; Amiroudine, Sakir

    1990-01-01

    Examined here is the sensitivity of a variety of space experiments to residual accelerations. In all the cases discussed the sensitivity is related to the dynamic response of a fluid. In some cases the sensitivity can be defined by the magnitude of the response of the velocity field. This response may involve motion of the fluid associated with internal density gradients, or the motion of a free liquid surface. For fluids with internal density gradients, the type of acceleration to which the experiment is sensitive will depend on whether buoyancy driven convection must be small in comparison to other types of fluid motion, or fluid motion must be suppressed or eliminated. In the latter case, the experiments are sensitive to steady and low frequency accelerations. For experiments such as the directional solidification of melts with two or more components, determination of the velocity response alone is insufficient to assess the sensitivity. The effect of the velocity on the composition and temperature field must be considered, particularly in the vicinity of the melt-crystal interface. As far as the response to transient disturbances is concerned, the sensitivity is determined by both the magnitude and frequency of the acceleration and the characteristic momentum and solute diffusion times. The microgravity environment, a numerical analysis of low gravity tolerance of the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique, and modeling crystal growth by physical vapor transport in closed ampoules are discussed.

  2. Fresh embryo donation for human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research: the experiences and values of IVF couples asked to be embryo donors

    PubMed Central

    Haimes, E.; Taylor, K.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND This article reports on an investigation of the views of IVF couples asked to donate fresh embryos for research and contributes to the debates on: the acceptability of human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research, the moral status of the human embryo and embryo donation for research. METHODS A hypothesis-generating design was followed. All IVF couples in one UK clinic who were asked to donate embryos in 1 year were contacted 6 weeks after their pregnancy result. Forty four in-depth interviews were conducted. RESULTS Interviewees were preoccupied with IVF treatment and the request to donate was a secondary consideration. They used a complex and dynamic system of embryo classification. Initially, all embryos were important but then their focus shifted to those that had most potential to produce a baby. At that point, ‘other’ embryos were less important though they later realise that they did not know what happened to them. Guessing that these embryos went to research, interviewees preferred not to contemplate what that might entail. The embryos that caused interviewees most concern were good quality embryos that might have produced a baby but went to research instead. ‘The’ embryo, the morally laden, but abstract, entity, did not play a central role in their decision-making. CONCLUSIONS This study, despite missing those who refuse to donate embryos, suggests that debates on embryo donation for hESC research should include the views of embryo donors and should consider the social, as well as the moral, status of the human embryo. PMID:19502616

  3. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    SciTech Connect

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F.; Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  4. Multiaxial behavior of foams - Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheo, Laurent; Guérard, Sandra; Rio, Gérard; Donnard, Adrien; Viot, Philippe

    2015-09-01

    Cellular materials are strongly related to pressure level inside the material. It is therefore important to use experiments which can highlight (i) the pressure-volume behavior, (ii) the shear-shape behavior for different pressure level. Authors propose to use hydrostatic compressive, shear and combined pressure-shear tests to determine cellular materials behavior. Finite Element Modeling must take into account these behavior specificities. Authors chose to use a behavior law with a Hyperelastic, a Viscous and a Hysteretic contributions. Specific developments has been performed on the Hyperelastic one by separating the spherical and the deviatoric part to take into account volume change and shape change characteristics of cellular materials.

  5. Experience with the CMS Event Data Model

    SciTech Connect

    Elmer, P.; Hegner, B.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; /Fermilab

    2009-06-01

    The re-engineered CMS EDM was presented at CHEP in 2006. Since that time we have gained a lot of operational experience with the chosen model. We will present some of our findings, and attempt to evaluate how well it is meeting its goals. We will discuss some of the new features that have been added since 2006 as well as some of the problems that have been addressed. Also discussed is the level of adoption throughout CMS, which spans the trigger farm up to the final physics analysis. Future plans, in particular dealing with schema evolution and scaling, will be discussed briefly.

  6. Magnitudes and sources of dissolved inorganic phosphorus inputs to surface fresh waters and the coastal zone: A new global model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, John A.; Bouwman, A. F.; Mayorga, Emilio; Seitzinger, Sybil

    2010-03-01

    As a limiting nutrient in aquatic systems, phosphorus (P) plays an important role in controlling freshwater and coastal primary productivity and ecosystem dynamics, increasing frequency and severity of harmful and nuisance algae blooms and hypoxia, as well as contributing to loss of biodiversity. Although dissolved inorganic P (DIP) often constitutes a relatively small fraction of the total P pool in aquatic systems, its bioavailability makes it an important determinant of ecosystem function. Here we describe, apply, evaluate, and interpret an enhanced version of the Global Nutrient Export from Watersheds (NEWS)-DIP model: NEWS-DIP-Half Degree (NEWS-DIP-HD). Improvements to NEWS-DIP-HD over the original NEWS DIP model include (1) the preservation of spatial resolution of input data sets at the 0.5 degree level and (2) explicit downstream routing of water and DIP from half-degree cell to half-degree cell using a global flow-direction representation. NEWS-DIP explains 78% and 62% of the variability in per-basin DIP export (DIP load) for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and global stations, respectively, similar to the original NEWS-DIP model and somewhat more than other global models of DIP loading and export. NEWS-DIP-HD output suggests that hot spots for DIP loading tend to occur in urban centers, with the highest per-area rate of DIP loading predicted for the half-degree grid cell containing Tokyo (6366 kg P km-2 yr-1). Furthermore, cities with populations >100,000 accounted for 35% of global surface water DIP loading while covering less than 2% of global land surface area. NEWS-DIP-HD also indicates that humans supply more DIP to surface waters than natural weathering over the majority (53%) of the Earth's land surface, with a much larger area dominated by DIP point sources than nonpoint sources (52% versus 1% of the global land surface, respectively). NEWS-DIP-HD also suggests that while humans had increased DIP input to surface waters more than fourfold globally

  7. Phytoavailability of thallium - A model soil experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanek, Ales; Mihaljevic, Martin; Galuskova, Ivana; Komarek, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The study deals with the environmental stability of Tl-modified phases (ferrihydrite, goethite, birnessite, calcite and illite) and phytoavailability of Tl in synthetically prepared soils used in a model vegetation experiment. The obtained data clearly demonstrate a strong relationship between the mineralogical position of Tl in the model soil and its uptake by the plant (Sinapis alba L.). The maximum rate of Tl uptake was observed for plants grown on soil containing Tl-modified illite. In contrast, soil enriched in Ksat-birnessite had the lowest potential for Tl release and phytoaccumulation. Root-induced dissolution of synthetic calcite and ferrihydrite in the rhizosphere followed by Tl mobilization was detected. Highly crystalline goethite was more stable in the rhizosphere, compared to ferrihydrite, leading to reduced biological uptake of Tl. Based on the results, the mineralogical aspect must be taken into account prior to general environmental recommendations in areas affected by Tl.

  8. Modelling the optical properties of fresh biomass burning aerosol produced in a smoke chamber: results from the EFEU campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hungershoefer, K.; Zeromskiene, K.; Iinuma, Y.; Helas, G.; Trentmann, J.; Trautmann, T.; Parmar, R. S.; Wiedensohler, A.; Andreae, M. O.; Schmid, O.

    2008-07-01

    A better characterisation of the optical properties of biomass burning aerosol as a function of the burning conditions is required in order to quantify their effects on climate and atmospheric chemistry. Controlled laboratory combustion experiments with different fuel types were carried out at the combustion facility of the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry (Mainz, Germany) as part of the "Impact of Vegetation Fires on the Composition and Circulation of the Atmosphere" (EFEU) project. The combustion conditions were monitored with concomitant CO2 and CO measurements. The mass scattering efficiencies of 8.9±0.2 m2 g-1 and 9.3±0.3 m2 g-1 obtained for aerosol particles from the combustion of savanna grass and an African hardwood (musasa), respectively, are larger than typically reported mainly due to differences in particle size distribution. The photoacoustically measured mass absorption efficiencies of 0.51±0.02 m2 g-1 and 0.50±0.02 m2 g-1 were at the lower end of the literature values. Using the measured size distributions as well as the mass scattering and absorption efficiencies, Mie calculations provided effective refractive indices of 1.60-0.010i (savanna grass) and 1.56-0.010i (musasa) (λ=0.55 μm). The apparent discrepancy between the low imaginary part of the refractive index and the high apparent elemental carbon (ECa) fractions (8 to 15%) obtained from the thermographic analysis of impactor samples can be explained by a positive bias in the elemental carbon data due to the presence of high molecular weight organic substances. Potential artefacts in optical properties due to instrument bias, non-natural burning conditions and unrealistic dilution history of the laboratory smoke cannot be ruled out and are also discussed in this study.

  9. Developing a Model using High School Students for Restoring, Monitoring and Conducting Research in Fresh Water Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blueford, J. R.

    2010-12-01

    Tule Ponds at Tyson Lagoon in eastern San Francisco Bay is one of the largest sag ponds created by the Hayward Fault that has not been destroyed by urbanization. In the 1990’s Alameda County Flood Control and Water Conservation District designed a constructed wetland to naturally filter stormwater before it entered Tyson Lagoon on its way to the San Francisco Bay. The Math Science Nucleus, a non profit organization, manages the facility that incorporates high school students through community service, service learning, and research. Students do a variety of tasks from landscaping to scientific monitoring. Through contracts and grants, we create different levels of competency that the students can participate. Engineers and scientists from the two agencies involved, create tasks that are needed to be complete for successful restoration. Every year the students work on different components of restoration. A group of select student interns (usually juniors and seniors) collects and records the data during the year. Some of these students are part of a paid internship to insure their regular attendance. Every year the students compile and discuss with scientists from the Math Science Nucleus what the data set might mean and how problems can be improved. The data collected helps determine other longer term projects. This presentation will go over the journey of the last 10 years to this very successful program and will outline the steps necessary to maintain a restoration project. It will also outline the different groups that do larger projects (scouts) and liaisons with schools that allow teachers to assign projects at our facility. The validity of the data obtained by students and how we standardize our data collection from soil analysis, water chemistry, monitoring faults, and biological observations will be discussed. This joint agency model of cooperation to provide high school students with a real research opportunity has benefits that allow the program to

  10. Estimation of Fresh Water and Salt Transports in the Northern Indian Ocean Using Aquarius and Model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Addezio, J. M.; Bulusu, S.; Murty, V. S. N.; Nyadjro, E. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Indian Ocean presents a unique dipolar Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) structure with the salty Arabian Sea (AS) on the west and the fresher Bay of Bengal (BoB) on the east. By using a combination of observational data, reanalyses, and model studies, the salinity structure of this dichotomous yet interconnected region is quantified. At the surface, the largest driver of salinity interseasonal variability is caused by the monsoonal winds and their ability to transport volume between the two water masses. Time-depth profiles reveal a rich vertical salinity profile. The AS presents with a mild salinity inversion, with salty waters above fresher ones for the majority of each annual cycle. This vertical gradient is approximately 1 psu between the surface and 200m depth. In the BoB the opposite occurs, where larger volumes of precipitation and river runoff create a lens of freshwater from the surface to approximately 50m depth year around. Salt and freshwater fluxes at the surface show a strong zonal component between the two basins along Sri Lanka twice a year. Within the basins, meridional fluxes dominate especially along the coastal regions where the EICC and WICC flow. Meridional depth-integrated salt, freshwater, and volume transports along a slice of each basin at 6°N reveal the approximate time its takes for each basin to return to equilibrium after strong transports during each monsoonal seasons advect salt and/or freshwater into or out of each respective region.

  11. Reactive transport modeling to quantify trace element release into fresh groundwater in case of CO2 leak from deep geological storage.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lions, J.; Jakymiw, C.; Devau, N.; Barsotti, V.; Humez, P.

    2014-12-01

    Geological storage of CO2 in deep saline aquifers is one of the options considered for the mitigation of CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. A deep geological CO2 storage is not expected to leak but potential impacts on groundwater have to be studied. A better understanding on how it could affect groundwater quality, aquifer minerals and trace elements is necessary to characterize a future storage site. Moreover, monitoring and remediation solutions have to be evaluated before storage operations. As part of the ANR project CIPRES, we present here reactive transport works. In a 3D model using ToughReact v.2, we perform different CO2 leakage scenarios in a confined aquifer, considering CO2 gas leakage. The model is based on the Albian aquifer, a strategic water resource. It takes into account groundwater and rock chemistry of the Albian green sand layer (Quartz, Glauconite, Kaolinite) at 700 m deep. The geochemical model was elaborated from experimental data. The aquifer consists in a mesh, divided roughly in 20000 cells making a 60 m thick and a 500 m large layer. Furthermore, cells are subdivided near the leakage point to consider local phenomena (secondary precipitation, sorption/desorption...). The chemical model takes into account kinetics for mineral dissolution, ion exchange and surface complexation. We highlight the importance of sorption processes on trace element transport (As, Zn and Ni) in fresh groundwater. Moreover, we distinguish different geochemical behavior (CO2 plume shape, secondary precipitation, desorption...) according to different horizontal flow rates influenced by the hydrodynamics (regional gradient). Understanding how geochemical processes and regional flows influence water chemistry, allows to ascertain measurement monitoring and verification plan and remediation works in case of leak considering a given location.

  12. What Is the True Color of Fresh Meat? A Biophysical Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Investigating the Effects of Ligand Binding on Myoglobin Using Optical, EPR, and NMR Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linenberger, Kimberly; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Crowder, Michael W.; McCarrick, Robert; Lorigan, Gary A.; Tierney, David L.

    2011-01-01

    With an increased focus on integrated upper-level laboratories, we present an experiment integrating concepts from inorganic, biological, and physical chemistry content areas. Students investigate the effects of ligand strength on the spectroscopic properties of the heme center in myoglobin using UV-vis, [superscript 1]H NMR, and EPR…

  13. Micro Wire-Drawing: Experiments And Modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Berti, G. A.; Monti, M.; Bietresato, M.; D'Angelo, L.

    2007-05-17

    In the paper, the authors propose to adopt the micro wire-drawing as a key for investigating models of micro forming processes. The reasons of this choice arose in the fact that this process can be considered a quasi-stationary process where tribological conditions at the interface between the material and the die can be assumed to be constant during the whole deformation. Two different materials have been investigated: i) a low-carbon steel and, ii) a nonferrous metal (copper). The micro hardness and tensile tests performed on each drawn wire show a thin hardened layer (more evident then in macro wires) on the external surface of the wire and hardening decreases rapidly from the surface layer to the center. For the copper wire this effect is reduced and traditional material constitutive model seems to be adequate to predict experimentation. For the low-carbon steel a modified constitutive material model has been proposed and implemented in a FE code giving a better agreement with the experiments.

  14. Full-Scale Cookoff Model Validation Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McClelland, M A; Rattanapote, M K; Heimdahl, E R; Erikson, W E; Curran, P O; Atwood, A I

    2003-11-25

    This paper presents the experimental results of the third and final phase of a cookoff model validation effort. In this phase of the work, two generic Heavy Wall Penetrators (HWP) were tested in two heating orientations. Temperature and strain gage data were collected over the entire test period. Predictions for time and temperature of reaction were made prior to release of the live data. Predictions were comparable to the measured values and were highly dependent on the established boundary conditions. Both HWP tests failed at a weld located near the aft closure of the device. More than 90 percent of unreacted explosive was recovered in the end heated experiment and less than 30 percent recovered in the side heated test.

  15. Modeling PBX 9501 overdriven release experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.

    1997-11-01

    High Explosives (HE) performs work by the expansion of its detonation products. Along with the propagation of the detonation wave, the equation of state (EOS) of the products determines the HE performance in an engineering system. The authors show the failure of the standard Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation of state (EOS) in modeling the overdriven release experiments of PBX 9501. The deficiency can be tracked back to inability of the same EOS in matching the shock pressure and the sound speed on the Hugoniot in the hydrodynamic regime above the Chapman-Jouguet pressure. After adding correction terms to the principal isentrope of the standard JWL EOS, the authors are able to remedy this shortcoming and the simulation was successful.

  16. Nanofluid Drop Evaporation: Experiment, Theory, and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, William James

    Nanofluids, stable colloidal suspensions of nanoparticles in a base fluid, have potential applications in the heat transfer, combustion and propulsion, manufacturing, and medical fields. Experiments were conducted to determine the evaporation rate of room temperature, millimeter-sized pendant drops of ethanol laden with varying amounts (0-3% by weight) of 40-60 nm aluminum nanoparticles (nAl). Time-resolved high-resolution drop images were collected for the determination of early-time evaporation rate (D2/D 02 > 0.75), shown to exhibit D-square law behavior, and surface tension. Results show an asymptotic decrease in pendant drop evaporation rate with increasing nAl loading. The evaporation rate decreases by approximately 15% at around 1% to 3% nAl loading relative to the evaporation rate of pure ethanol. Surface tension was observed to be unaffected by nAl loading up to 3% by weight. A model was developed to describe the evaporation of the nanofluid pendant drops based on D-square law analysis for the gas domain and a description of the reduction in liquid fraction available for evaporation due to nanoparticle agglomerate packing near the evaporating drop surface. Model predictions are in relatively good agreement with experiment, within a few percent of measured nanofluid pendant drop evaporation rate. The evaporation of pinned nanofluid sessile drops was also considered via modeling. It was found that the same mechanism for nanofluid evaporation rate reduction used to explain pendant drops could be used for sessile drops. That mechanism is a reduction in evaporation rate due to a reduction in available ethanol for evaporation at the drop surface caused by the packing of nanoparticle agglomerates near the drop surface. Comparisons of the present modeling predictions with sessile drop evaporation rate measurements reported for nAl/ethanol nanofluids by Sefiane and Bennacer [11] are in fairly good agreement. Portions of this abstract previously appeared as: W. J

  17. Development of FT-NIR models for the simultaneous estimation of chlorophyll and nitrogen content in fresh apple (Malus domestica) leaves.

    PubMed

    Tamburini, Elena; Ferrari, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Pedrini, Paola; Ferro, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural practices determine the level of food production and, to great extent, the state of the global environment. During the last decades, the indiscriminate recourse to fertilizers as well as the nitrogen losses from land application have been recognized as serious issues of modern agriculture, globally contributing to nitrate pollution. The development of a reliable Near-Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS)-based method, for the simultaneous monitoring of nitrogen and chlorophyll in fresh apple (Malus domestica) leaves, was investigated on a set of 133 samples, with the aim of estimating the nutritional and physiological status of trees, in real time, cheaply and non-destructively. By means of a FT (Fourier Transform)-NIR instrument, Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression models were developed, spanning a concentration range of 0.577%-0.817% for the total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) content (R2 = 0.983; SEC = 0.012; SEP = 0.028), and of 1.534-2.372 mg/g for the total chlorophyll content (R2 = 0.941; SEC = 0.132; SEP = 0.162). Chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b contents were also evaluated (R2 = 0.913; SEC = 0.076; SEP = 0.101 and R2 = 0.899; SEC = 0.059; SEP = 0.101, respectively). All calibration models were validated by means of 47 independent samples. The NIR approach allows a rapid evaluation of the nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, and may represent a useful tool for determining nutritional and physiological status of plants, in order to allow a correction of nutrition programs during the season. PMID:25629703

  18. Development of FT-NIR Models for the Simultaneous Estimation of Chlorophyll and Nitrogen Content in Fresh Apple (Malus Domestica) Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Tamburini, Elena; Ferrari, Giuseppe; Marchetti, Maria Gabriella; Pedrini, Paola; Ferro, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Agricultural practices determine the level of food production and, to great extent, the state of the global environment. During the last decades, the indiscriminate recourse to fertilizers as well as the nitrogen losses from land application have been recognized as serious issues of modern agriculture, globally contributing to nitrate pollution. The development of a reliable Near-Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS)-based method, for the simultaneous monitoring of nitrogen and chlorophyll in fresh apple (Malus domestica) leaves, was investigated on a set of 133 samples, with the aim of estimating the nutritional and physiological status of trees, in real time, cheaply and non-destructively. By means of a FT (Fourier Transform)-NIR instrument, Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression models were developed, spanning a concentration range of 0.577%–0.817% for the total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN) content (R2 = 0.983; SEC = 0.012; SEP = 0.028), and of 1.534–2.372 mg/g for the total chlorophyll content (R2 = 0.941; SEC = 0.132; SEP = 0.162). Chlorophyll-a and chlorophyll-b contents were also evaluated (R2 = 0.913; SEC = 0.076; SEP = 0.101 and R2 = 0.899; SEC = 0.059; SEP = 0.101, respectively). All calibration models were validated by means of 47 independent samples. The NIR approach allows a rapid evaluation of the nitrogen and chlorophyll contents, and may represent a useful tool for determining nutritional and physiological status of plants, in order to allow a correction of nutrition programs during the season. PMID:25629703

  19. Ringing load models verified against experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Krokstad, J.R.; Stansberg, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    What is believed to be the main reason for discrepancies between measured and simulated loads in previous studies has been assessed. One has focused on the balance between second- and third-order load components in relation to what is called ``fat body`` load correction. It is important to understand that the use of Morison strip theory in combination with second-order wave theory give rise to second- as well as third-order components in the horizontal force. A proper balance between second- and third-order components in horizontal force is regarded as the most central requirements for a sufficient accurate ringing load model in irregular sea. It is also verified that simulated second-order components are largely overpredicted both in regular and irregular seas. Nonslender diffraction effects are important to incorporate in the FNV formulation in order to reduce the simulated second-order component and to match experiments more closely. A sufficient accurate ringing simulation model with the use of simplified methods is shown to be within close reach. Some further development and experimental verification must however be performed in order to take non-slender effects into account.

  20. Numerical modeling of Deep Impact experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultanov, V. G.; Kim, V. V.; Lomonosov, I. V.; Shutov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2007-06-01

    The Deep Impact active space experiment has been done [1,2] to study a hypervelocity collision of a metal impactor with the comet 9P/Temple 1. The modeling of impact on solid or porous ice made it possible to conclude: the form and size of crater depends strongly on the density of comet material; the copper impactor does not melt and remains in the solid state; the temperature of ejecta varies from 5000 K for solid ice to 15000 K for porous ice. The impact on moist water- saturated sand demonstrated different results. In this case, the copper impactor practically does not penetrate the comet surface, melts, destroys and the ricochet process takes place. In the case of moist porous sand the produced crater is stretched in the direction of impact. The analysis of modeling results indicates to the presence of volatile easy-vaporized chemical compounds in the cometary surface. The hypothesis that the cometary surface consists of only ice does not agree with experimental and computational data on the forming and spreading of impact ejecta. [1] http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/home/index.html [2] M. F. A'Hearn et al, Deep Impact: Excavating Comet Tempel 1 // Science, 2005, v.310, pp. 258-264

  1. Collaborative Project: Understanding the Chemical Processes tat Affect Growth rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McMurry, Peter; Smuth, James

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate.

  2. Submarine sand volcanos: experiments and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, P.; Ngoma, J.; Delenne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Fluid overpressure at the bottom of a soil layer may generate fracturation in preferential paths for a cohesive material. But the case of sandy soils is rather different: a significant internal flow is allowed within the material and can potentially induce hydro-mechanical instabilities whose most common example is fluidization. Many works have been devoted to fluidization but very few have the issue of initiation and development of a fluidized zone inside a granular bed, prior entire fluidization of the medium. In this contribution, we report experimental results and numerical simulations on a model system of immersed sand volcanos generated by a localized upward spring of liquid, injected at constant flow-rate at the bottom of a granular layer. Such a localized state of fluidization is relevant for some industrial processes (spouted bed, maintenance of navigable waterways,…) and for several geological issues (kimberlite volcano conduits, fluid venting, oil recovery in sandy soil, More precisely, what is presented here is a comparison between experiments, carried out by direct visualization throughout the medium, and numerical simulations, based on DEM modelling of the grains coupled to resolution of NS equations in the liquid phase (LBM). There is a very good agreement between the experimental phenomenology and the simulation results. When the flow-rate is increased, three regimes are successively observed: static bed, fluidized cavity that does not extend to the top of the layer, and finally fluidization over the entire height of layer that creates a fluidized chimney. A very strong hysteretic effect is present here with an extended range of stability for fluidized cavities when flow-rate is decreased back. This can be interpreted in terms force chains and arches. The influences of grain diameter, layer height and injection width are studied and interpreted using a model previously developed by Zoueshtiagh [1]. Finally, growing rate of the fluidized zone and

  3. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Fresh, Rayed Impact Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-416, 9 July 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a fresh, young meteor impact crater on the martian surface. It is less than 400 meters (less than 400 yards) across. While there is no way to know the exact age of this or any other martian surface feature, the rays are very well preserved. On a planet where wind can modify surface features at the present time, a crater with rayed ejecta patterns must be very young indeed. Despite its apparent youth, the crater could still be many hundreds of thousands, if not several million, of years old. This impact scar is located within the much larger Crommelin Crater, near 5.6oN, 10.0oW. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  5. Modeling active memory: Experiment, theory and simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amit, Daniel J.

    2001-06-01

    Neuro-physiological experiments on cognitively performing primates are described to argue that strong evidence exists for localized, non-ergodic (stimulus specific) attractor dynamics in the cortex. The specific phenomena are delay activity distributions-enhanced spike-rate distributions resulting from training, which we associate with working memory. The anatomy of the relevant cortex region and the physiological characteristics of the participating elements (neural cells) are reviewed to provide a substrate for modeling the observed phenomena. Modeling is based on the properties of the integrate-and-fire neural element in presence of an input current of Gaussian distribution. Theory of stochastic processes provides an expression for the spike emission rate as a function of the mean and the variance of the current distribution. Mean-field theory is then based on the assumption that spike emission processes in different neurons in the network are independent, and hence the input current to a neuron is Gaussian. Consequently, the dynamics of the interacting network is reduced to the computation of the mean and the variance of the current received by a cell of a given population in terms of the constitutive parameters of the network and the emission rates of the neurons in the different populations. Within this logic we analyze the stationary states of an unstructured network, corresponding to spontaneous activity, and show that it can be stable only if locally the net input current of a neuron is inhibitory. This is then tested against simulations and it is found that agreement is excellent down to great detail. A confirmation of the independence hypothesis. On top of stable spontaneous activity, keeping all parameters fixed, training is described by (Hebbian) modification of synapses between neurons responsive to a stimulus and other neurons in the module-synapses are potentiated between two excited neurons and depressed between an excited and a quiescent neuron

  6. Global estimates of fresh submarine groundwater discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luijendijk, Elco; Gleeson, Tom; Moosdorf, Nils

    2016-04-01

    Fresh submarine groundwater discharge, the flow of fresh groundwater to oceans, may be a significant contributor to the water and chemical budgets of the world's oceans. We present new estimates of the flux of fresh groundwater to the world's oceans. We couple density-dependent numerical simulations of generic models of coastal basins with geospatial databases of hydrogeological parameters and topography to resolve the rate of terrestrially-derived submarine groundwater discharge globally. We compare the model results to a new global compilation of submarine groundwater discharge observations. The results show that terrestrially-derived SGD is highly sensitive to permeability. In most watersheds only a small fraction of groundwater recharge contributes to submarine groundwater discharge, with most recharge instead contributing to terrestrial discharge in the form of baseflow or evapotranspiration. Fresh submarine groundwater discharge is only significant in watersheds that contain highly permeable sediments, such as coarse-grained siliciclastic sediments, karstic carbonates or volcanic deposits. Our estimates of global submarine groundwater discharge are much lower than most previous estimates. However, many tropical and volcanic islands are hotspots of submarine groundwater discharge and solute fluxes towards the oceans. The comparison of model results and data highlights the spatial variability of SGD and the difficulty of scaling up observations.

  7. Microbial safety of fresh produce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The book entitled “Microbial Safety of Fresh Produce” with 23 chapters is divided into following six sections: Microbial contamination of fresh produce, Pre-harvest strategies, post-harvest interventions, Produce safety during processing and handling, Public, legal, and economic Perspectives, and Re...

  8. Investigation of models for large-scale meteorological prediction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of extended and long-range weather prediction by means of global atmospheric models was studied. A number of computer experiments were conducted at GISS with the GISS global general circulation model. Topics discussed include atmospheric response to sea-surface temperature anomalies, and monthly mean forecast experiments with the global model.

  9. Modeling of E-164X Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Muggli, P.; Barnes, C.D.; Clayton, C.E.; Decker, F.J.; Fonseca, R.A.; Huang, C.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Katsouleas, T.; Krejcik, P.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; O'Connell, C.; Oz, E.; Tsung, F.; Zhou, M.M.; /Southern California U. /UCLA /SLAC /Lisbon, IST

    2005-06-28

    In current plasma-based accelerator experiments, very short bunches (100-150 {micro}m for E164 [1] and 10-20 {micro}m for E164X [2] experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)) are used to drive plasma wakes and achieve high accelerating gradients, on the order of 10-100GV/m. The self-fields of such intense bunches can tunnel ionize neutral gases and create the plasma [3,4]. This may completely change the physics of plasma wakes. A 3-D object-oriented fully parallel PIC code OSIRIS [5] is used to simulate various gas types, beam parameters, etc. to support the design of the experiments. The simulation results for real experiment parameters are presented.

  10. Modeling of E-164X Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, S.; Muggli, P.; Katsouleas, T.; Oz, E.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; O'Connell, C.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.B.; Tsung, F.; Zhou, M.M.; Fonseca, R.A.

    2004-12-07

    In current plasma-based accelerator experiments, very short bunches (100-150{mu}m for E164 and 10-20 {mu}m for E164X experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC)) are used to drive plasma wakes and achieve high accelerating gradients, on the order of 10-100GV/m. The self-fields of such intense bunches can tunnel ionize neutral gases and create the plasma. This may completely change the physics of plasma wakes. A 3-D object-oriented fully parallel PIC code OSIRIS is used to simulate various gas types, beam parameters, etc. to support the design of the experiments. The simulation results for real experiment parameters are presented.

  11. Experiments with models committees for flow forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, J.; Kayastha, N.; van Andel, S. J.; Fenicia, F.; Solomatine, D. P.

    2012-04-01

    In hydrological modelling typically a single model accounting for all possible hydrological loads, seasons and regimes is used. We argue however, that if a model is not complex enough (and this is the case if conceptual or semi-distributed models are used), then a single model can hardly capture all facets of a complex process, and hence more flexible modelling architectures are required. One possibility here is building several specialized models and making them responsible for various sub-processes. An output would be then a combination of outputs of individual models. In machine learning this approach is widely applied: several learning models are combined in a committee (where each model has a "voting" right with a particular weight). In this presentation we concentrate on optimising the above mentioned process of building a model committee, and on various ways of (a) building individual specialized models (mainly concentrating on calibrating them on various subsets of data and regimes corresponding to hydrological sub-processes), and (b) on various ways of combining their outputs (using the ideas of a fuzzy committee with various parameterisations). In doing so, we extend the approaches developed in [1, 2] and present new results. We consider this problem in multi-objective optimization setting (where objective functions correspond to different hydrological regimes) - leading to a number of Pareto-optimal model combinations from which the most appropriate for a given task can be chosen. Applications of the presented approach to flow forecasting are presented.

  12. Nuclear reaction modeling, verification experiments, and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, F.S.

    1995-10-01

    This presentation summarized the recent accomplishments and future promise of the neutron nuclear physics program at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scatter Center (MLNSC) and the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility. The unique capabilities of the spallation sources enable a broad range of experiments in weapons-related physics, basic science, nuclear technology, industrial applications, and medical physics.

  13. Experiments with a Model Water Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Eastman N; Abbott, Ira H

    1930-01-01

    This report describes a model water tunnel built in 1928 by the NACA to investigate the possibility of using water tunnels for aerodynamic investigations at large scales. The model tunnel is similar to an open-throat wind tunnel, but uses water for the working fluid.

  14. Modeling the Classic Meselson and Stahl Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, JoBeth

    2001-01-01

    Points out the importance of molecular models in biology and chemistry. Presents a laboratory activity on DNA. Uses different colored wax strips to represent "heavy" and "light" DNA, cesium chloride for identification of small density differences, and three different liquids with varying densities to model gradient centrifugation. (YDS)

  15. Accelerating the connection between experiments and models: The FACE-MDS experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norby, R. J.; Medlyn, B. E.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Zaehle, S.; Walker, A. P.

    2014-12-01

    The mandate is clear for improving communication between models and experiments to better evaluate terrestrial responses to atmospheric and climatic change. Unfortunately, progress in linking experimental and modeling approaches has been slow and sometimes frustrating. Recent successes in linking results from the Duke and Oak Ridge free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) experiments with ecosystem and land surface models - the FACE Model-Data Synthesis (FACE-MDS) project - came only after a period of slow progress, but the experience points the way to future model-experiment interactions. As the FACE experiments were approaching their termination, the FACE research community made an explicit attempt to work together with the modeling community to synthesize and deliver experimental data to benchmark models and to use models to supply appropriate context for the experimental results. Initial problems that impeded progress were: measurement protocols were not consistent across different experiments; data were not well organized for model input; and parameterizing and spinning up models that were not designed for simulating a specific site was difficult. Once these problems were worked out, the FACE-MDS project has been very successful in using data from the Duke and ORNL FACE experiment to test critical assumptions in the models. The project showed, for example, that the stomatal conductance model most widely used in models was supported by experimental data, but models did not capture important responses such as increased leaf mass per unit area in elevated CO2, and did not appropriately represent foliar nitrogen allocation. We now have an opportunity to learn from this experience. New FACE experiments that have recently been initiated, or are about to be initiated, include a eucalyptus forest in Australia; the AmazonFACE experiment in a primary, tropical forest in Brazil; and a mature oak woodland in England. Cross-site science questions are being developed that will have a

  16. Experience With Bayesian Image Based Surface Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutz, John C.

    2005-01-01

    Bayesian surface modeling from images requires modeling both the surface and the image generation process, in order to optimize the models by comparing actual and generated images. Thus it differs greatly, both conceptually and in computational difficulty, from conventional stereo surface recovery techniques. But it offers the possibility of using any number of images, taken under quite different conditions, and by different instruments that provide independent and often complementary information, to generate a single surface model that fuses all available information. I describe an implemented system, with a brief introduction to the underlying mathematical models and the compromises made for computational efficiency. I describe successes and failures achieved on actual imagery, where we went wrong and what we did right, and how our approach could be improved. Lastly I discuss how the same approach can be extended to distinct types of instruments, to achieve true sensor fusion.

  17. Turning of slender workpieces: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R.; Lee, C. W.; Ulsoy, A. G.; Scott, R. A.

    1989-04-01

    This paper introduces a dynamic cutting force model for turning of slender workpieces, as well as experimental results related to the frequency response of the workpiece in turning. The model is based on a flexible workpiece and rigid machine tool, and a workpiece displacement dependent cutting force. The model is described and studied theoretically as well as experimentally. The experimental studies utilise both cutting force and workpiece vibration measurements in two orthogonal directions. This data is obtained for both cutting and non-cutting conditions, and analysed in the frequency domain. The model was found to be in partial agreement with the experimental results. The experimental procedure described here represents a new method for determining the cutting process damping ratio, based on differences in the measured workpiece natural frequencies with and without cutting.

  18. As Leaching into Fresh Water from Highly Contaminated Hawaiian Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niklis, N. J.; Rubin, K. H.; El-Kadi, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Arsenic contamination of current and former agricultural soils in Hawaii is an unfortunate legacy of plantation era agricultural practices. Here, we report an investigation of As mobility in fresh water from highly contaminated (0.8 % As) A-zone Hawaiian andisols from the Hamakua Coast of the Island of Hawai’i. Aliquots of the same acidic soil (pH= 5.0) were exposed to fresh water for varying lengths of time and analyzed to quantify the fraction of As and other elements leached from the soil relative to concentrations determined by total digestion. A maximum of 0.04% of As and 0.05% of Fe were removed from the soils in initial rinses and multi-day leaches using 18 megaohm Millipore water, in experiments lasting up to 35 days. Arsenic concentrations were highest in initial soil rinses, indicating that a small fraction of the total As in the soil is either loosely bound or present as a fine-grained, soluble As-bearing phase. During subsequent leaching experiments, arsenic and most other inorganic ions that we analyzed for reached equilibrium after 3 days; Fe reached equilibrium concentrations after 10 days. All soil solutions contained As levels that exceeded the EPA acceptable drinking water limit of 0.01 ppm. However, contaminant transport modeling suggests that As contaminated leachates would not migrate substantially from this site, so that local isolation and storage of contaminated soils would likely be an acceptable containment method.

  19. Hybrid rocket engine, theoretical model and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chelaru, Teodor-Viorel; Mingireanu, Florin

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to build a theoretical model for the hybrid rocket engine/motor and to validate it using experimental results. The work approaches the main problems of the hybrid motor: the scalability, the stability/controllability of the operating parameters and the increasing of the solid fuel regression rate. At first, we focus on theoretical models for hybrid rocket motor and compare the results with already available experimental data from various research groups. A primary computation model is presented together with results from a numerical algorithm based on a computational model. We present theoretical predictions for several commercial hybrid rocket motors, having different scales and compare them with experimental measurements of those hybrid rocket motors. Next the paper focuses on tribrid rocket motor concept, which by supplementary liquid fuel injection can improve the thrust controllability. A complementary computation model is also presented to estimate regression rate increase of solid fuel doped with oxidizer. Finally, the stability of the hybrid rocket motor is investigated using Liapunov theory. Stability coefficients obtained are dependent on burning parameters while the stability and command matrixes are identified. The paper presents thoroughly the input data of the model, which ensures the reproducibility of the numerical results by independent researchers.

  20. Teaching "Instant Experience" with Graphical Model Validation Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekstrøm, Claus Thorn

    2014-01-01

    Graphical model validation techniques for linear normal models are often used to check the assumptions underlying a statistical model. We describe an approach to provide "instant experience" in looking at a graphical model validation plot, so it becomes easier to validate if any of the underlying assumptions are violated.

  1. Foods - fresh vs. frozen or canned

    MedlinePlus

    Frozen foods vs. fresh or canned; Fresh foods vs. frozen or canned; Frozen vegetables versus fresh ... a well-balanced diet. Many people wonder if frozen and canned vegetables are as healthy for you ...

  2. Plasma Reactor Modeling and Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, M.; Bose, D.; Hash, D.; Hwang, H.; Cruden, B.; Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Plasma processing is a key processing stop in integrated circuit manufacturing. Low pressure, high density plum reactors are widely used for etching and deposition. Inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source has become popular recently in many processing applications. In order to accelerate equipment and process design, an understanding of the physics and chemistry, particularly, plasma power coupling, plasma and processing uniformity and mechanism is important. This understanding is facilitated by comprehensive modeling and simulation as well as plasma diagnostics to provide the necessary data for model validation which are addressed in this presentation. We have developed a complete code for simulating an ICP reactor and the model consists of transport of electrons, ions, and neutrals, Poisson's equation, and Maxwell's equation along with gas flow and energy equations. Results will be presented for chlorine and fluorocarbon plasmas and compared with data from Langmuir probe, mass spectrometry and FTIR.

  3. Experiences Using Formal Methods for Requirements Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easterbrook, Steve; Lutz, Robyn; Covington, Rick; Kelly, John; Ampo, Yoko; Hamilton, David

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes three cases studies in the lightweight application of formal methods to requirements modeling for spacecraft fault protection systems. The case studies differ from previously reported applications of formal methods in that formal methods were applied very early in the requirements engineering process, to validate the evolving requirements. The results were fed back into the projects, to improve the informal specifications. For each case study, we describe what methods were applied, how they were applied, how much effort was involved, and what the findings were. In all three cases, the formal modeling provided a cost effective enhancement of the existing verification and validation processes. We conclude that the benefits gained from early modeling of unstable requirements more than outweigh the effort needed to maintain multiple representations.

  4. Silicon Carbide Derived Carbons: Experiments and Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Miklos

    2011-02-28

    The main results of the computational modeling was: 1. Development of a new genealogical algorithm to generate vacancy clusters in diamond starting from monovacancies combined with energy criteria based on TBDFT energetics. The method revealed that for smaller vacancy clusters the energetically optimal shapes are compact but for larger sizes they tend to show graphitized regions. In fact smaller clusters of the size as small as 12 already show signatures of this graphitization. The modeling gives firm basis for the slit-pore modeling of porous carbon materials and explains some of their properties. 2. We discovered small vacancy clusters and their physical characteristics that can be used to spectroscopically identify them. 3. We found low barrier pathways for vacancy migration in diamond-like materials by obtaining for the first time optimized reaction pathways.

  5. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling From Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, Eric

    2011-01-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  6. Fundamental Rotorcraft Acoustic Modeling from Experiments (FRAME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Eric, II

    2011-12-01

    A new methodology is developed for the construction of helicopter source noise models for use in mission planning tools from experimental measurements of helicopter external noise radiation. The models are constructed by employing a parameter identification method to an assumed analytical model of the rotor harmonic noise sources. This new method allows for the identification of individual rotor harmonic noise sources and allows them to be characterized in terms of their individual non-dimensional governing parameters. The method is applied to both wind tunnel measurements and ground noise measurements of two-bladed rotors. The method is shown to match the parametric trends of main rotor harmonic noise, allowing accurate estimates of the dominant rotorcraft noise sources to be made for operating conditions based on a small number of measurements taken at different operating conditions. The ability of this method to estimate changes in noise radiation due to changes in ambient conditions is also demonstrated.

  7. Modeling transfer of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes during preparation of fresh-cut salads: impact of cutting and shredding practices.

    PubMed

    Zilelidou, Evangelia A; Tsourou, Virginia; Poimenidou, Sofia; Loukou, Anneza; Skandamis, Panagiotis N

    2015-02-01

    Cutting and shredding of leafy vegetables increases the risk of cross contamination in household settings. The distribution of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes transfer rates (Tr) between cutting knives and lettuce leaves was investigated and a semi-mechanistic model describing the bacterial transfer during consecutive cuts of leafy vegetables was developed. For both pathogens the distribution of log10Trs from lettuce to knife was towards low values. Conversely log10Trs from knife to lettuce ranged from -2.1 to -0.1 for E. coli O157:H7 and -2.0 to 0 for L. monocytogenes, and indicated a more variable phenomenon. Regarding consecutive cuts, a rapid initial transfer was followed by an asymptotic tail at low populations moving to lettuce or residing on knife. E. coli O157:H7 was transferred at slower rates than L. monocytogenes. These trends were sufficiently described by the transfer-model, with RMSE values of 0.426-0.613 and 0.531-0.908 for L. monocytogenes and E. coli O157:H7, respectively. The model showed good performance in validation trials but underestimated bacterial transfer during extrapolation experiments. The results of the study can provide information regarding cross contamination events in a common household. The constructed model could be a useful tool for the risk-assessment during preparation of leafy-green salads. PMID:25500391

  8. Propagating precipitation waves: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Tinsley, Mark R; Collison, Darrell; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Traveling precipitation waves, including counterrotating spiral waves, are observed in the precipitation reaction of AlCl3 with NaOH [Volford, A.; et al. Langmuir 2007, 23, 961 - 964]. Experimental and computational studies are carried out to characterize the wave behavior in cross-section configurations. A modified sol-coagulation model is developed that is based on models of Liesegang band and redissolution systems. The dynamics of the propagating waves is characterized in terms of growth and redissolution of a precipitation feature that travels through a migrating band of colloidal precipitate. PMID:24191642

  9. A Fresh Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Violino, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Facilities and services are a huge drain on community college budgets. They are also vital to the student experience. As funding dries up across the country, many institutions are taking a team approach, working with partner colleges and private service providers to offset costs and generate revenue without sacrificing the services and amenities…

  10. Modelling of dynamic experiments in MCNP5 environment.

    PubMed

    Mosorov, Volodymyr; Zych, Marcin; Hanus, Robert; Petryka, Leszek

    2016-06-01

    The design of radiation measurement systems includes a modelling phase which ascertains the best 3D geometry for a projected gauge. To simulate measured counts by a detector, the widely-used rigorous phenomenological model is used. However, this model does not consider possible source or/and detector movement during a measurement interval. Therefore, the phenomenological model has been successfully modified in order to consider such a displacement during the time sampling interval in dynamic experiments. To validate the proposed model, a simple radiation system was accurately implemented in the MCNP5 code. The experiments confirmed the accuracy of the proposed model. PMID:27058321

  11. Computational Model of Fluorine-20 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuna, Thomas; Voytas, Paul; George, Elizabeth; Naviliat-Cuncic, Oscar; Gade, Alexandra; Hughes, Max; Huyan, Xueying; Liddick, Sean; Minamisono, Kei; Weisshaar, Dirk; Paulauskas, Stanley; Ban, Gilles; Flechard, Xavier; Lienard, Etienne

    2015-10-01

    The Conserved Vector Current (CVC) hypothesis of the standard model of the electroweak interaction predicts there is a contribution to the shape of the spectrum in the beta-minus decay of 20F related to a property of the analogous gamma decay of excited 20Ne. To provide a strong test of the CVC hypothesis, a precise measurement of the 20F beta decay spectrum will be taken at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory. This measurement uses unconventional measurement techniques in that 20F will be implanted directly into a scintillator. As the emitted electrons interact with the detector material, bremsstrahlung interactions occur and the escape of the resultant photons will distort the measured spectrum. Thus, a Monte Carlo simulation has been constructed using EGSnrc radiation transport software. This computational model's intended use is to quantify and correct for distortion in the observed beta spectrum due, primarily, to the aforementioned bremsstrahlung. The focus of this presentation is twofold: the analysis of the computational model itself and the results produced by the model. Wittenberg University.

  12. Modeling and analysis of pinhole occulter experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ring, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    The objectives were to improve pointing control system implementation by converting the dynamic compensator from a continuous domain representation to a discrete one; to determine pointing stability sensitivites to sensor and actuator errors by adding sensor and actuator error models to treetops and by developing an error budget for meeting pointing stability requirements; and to determine pointing performance for alternate mounting bases (space station for example).

  13. Flexible robot control: Modeling and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, Irving J.; Shimoyama, Isao

    1989-01-01

    Described here is a model and its use in experimental studies of flexible manipulators. The analytical model uses the equivalent of Rayleigh's method to approximate the displaced shape of a flexible link as the static elastic displacement which would occur under end rotations as applied at the joints. The generalized coordinates are thereby expressly compatible with joint motions and rotations in serial link manipulators, because the amplitude variables are simply the end rotations between the flexible link and the chord connecting the end points. The equations for the system dynamics are quite simple and can readily be formulated for the multi-link, three-dimensional case. When the flexible links possess mass and (polar moment of) inertia which are small compared to the concentrated mass and inertia at the joints, the analytical model is exact and displays the additional advantage of reduction in system dimension for the governing equations. Four series of pilot tests have been completed. Studies on a planar single-link system were conducted at Carnegie-Mellon University, and tests conducted at Toshiba Corporation on a planar two-link system were then incorporated into the study. A single link system under three-dimensional motion, displaying biaxial flexure, was then tested at Carnegie-Mellon.

  14. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The main goals of the research under this grant consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular, for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: (1) development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems; and (2) diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. Progress made during this seventh half-year period is reported.

  15. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1993-01-01

    The main goals of the research consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, and diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. During this eighth half-year period, good progress was made on these tasks.

  16. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1992-01-01

    The development is examined of mathematical tools and measurement of transport properties necessary for high fidelity modeling of crystal growth from the melt and solution, in particular for the Bridgman-Stockbarger growth of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) and the solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS). The tasks include development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, kinematic viscosity measurements on liquid MCT at temperatures close to the melting point, and diffusivity measurements on concentrated and supersaturated TGS solutions. A detailed description is given of the work performed for these tasks, together with a summary of the resulting publications and presentations.

  17. Recirculating Planar Magnetron Modeling and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franzi, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hoff, Brad; French, Dave; Lau, Y. Y.

    2011-10-01

    We present simulations and initial experimental results of a new class of crossed field device: Recirculating Planar Magnetrons (RPM). Two geometries of RPM are being explored: 1) Dual planar-magnetrons connected by a recirculating section with axial magnetic field and transverse electric field, and 2) Planar cathode and anode-cavity rings with radial magnetic field and axial electric field. These RPMs have numerous advantages for high power microwave generation by virtue of larger area cathodes and anodes. The axial B-field RPM can be configured in either the conventional or inverted (faster startup) configuration. Two and three-dimensional EM PIC simulations show rapid electron spoke formation and microwave oscillation in pi-mode. Smoothbore prototype axial-B RPM experiments are underway using the MELBA accelerator at parameters of -300 kV, 1-20 kA and pulselengths of 0.5-1 microsecond. Implementation and operation of the first RPM slow wave structure, operating at 1GHz, will be discussed. Research supported by AFOSR, AFRL, L-3 Communications, and Northrop Grumman. Done...processed 1830 records...17:52:57 Beginning APS data extraction...17:52:57

  18. Reaction of seawater with fresh mid-ocean ridge gabbro creates ';atypical' REE pattern and high REE fluid fluxes: Experiments at 425 and 475 °C, 400 and 1000 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beermann, O.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Holzheid, A. D.

    2013-12-01

    High-temperature MOR hydrothermalism significantly affects ocean chemistry. The Sisters Peak (SP) hydrothermal field at 5°S on the slow-spreading Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) emanates fluids >400°C [1] that have high concentrations of H2, transition metals, and rare earth elements (REE) exhibiting ';atypical' REE pattern characterized by depletions of LREE and HREE relative to MREE and no Eu anomaly [2]. This is in contrast to the ';typical' LREE enrichment and strong positive Eu anomaly known from many MOR vent fluids observed world-wide [e.g., 3]. Besides temperature, the seawater-to-rock ratio (w/r ratio) has significant control on the fluid chemistry [e.g., 4, 5]. To understand how vent fluid REE-signatures are generated during water-rock interaction processes we reacted unaltered gabbro with natural bottom seawater at 425 °C and 400 bar and at 425 and 475 °C at 1000 bar at variable w/r (mass) ratios ranging from 0.5-10 by using cold seal pressure vessels (CSPV). The run durations varied from 3-72 h. Reacted fluids were analysed for major and trace elements by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. In our experiments, ';atypical' REE fluid pattern similar to those of SP fluids were obtained at high w/r ratio (5 and 10) that might be characteristic for focused fluid-flow along e.g., detachment faults at slow-spreading MOR [6]. In contrast, more ';typical'-like REE pattern with elevated LREE and slightly positive Eu anomalies have been reproduced at low w/r ratio (0.5-1). Results of numerical simulations imply that strong positive Eu anomalies of fluids and altered gabbro from high temperature MOR hydrothermal systems can be created by intense rock leaching processes at high w/r ratio (5-10). This suggests that hydrothermal circulation through the ocean crust creates ';typical' REE fluid pattern with strong positive Eu anomalies if seawater reacts with gabbroic host rock that has been already leached in REE at high fluid fluxes. Simulations of the temporal chemical evolution of

  19. Statistical analysis of target acquisition sensor modeling experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deaver, Dawne M.; Moyer, Steve

    2015-05-01

    The U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD Modeling and Simulation Division is charged with the development and advancement of military target acquisition models to estimate expected soldier performance when using all types of imaging sensors. Two elements of sensor modeling are (1) laboratory-based psychophysical experiments used to measure task performance and calibrate the various models and (2) field-based experiments used to verify the model estimates for specific sensors. In both types of experiments, it is common practice to control or measure environmental, sensor, and target physical parameters in order to minimize uncertainty of the physics based modeling. Predicting the minimum number of test subjects required to calibrate or validate the model should be, but is not always, done during test planning. The objective of this analysis is to develop guidelines for test planners which recommend the number and types of test samples required to yield a statistically significant result.

  20. The OECI model: the CRO Aviano experience.

    PubMed

    Da Pieve, Lucia; Collazzo, Raffaele; Masutti, Monica; De Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In 2012, the "Centro di Riferimento Oncologico" (CRO) National Cancer Institute joined the accreditation program of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) and was one of the first institutes in Italy to receive recognition as a Comprehensive Cancer Center. At the end of the project, a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis aimed at identifying the pros and cons, both for the institute and of the accreditation model in general, was performed. The analysis shows significant strengths, such as the affinity with other improvement systems and current regulations, and the focus on a multidisciplinary approach. The proposed suggestions for improvement concern mainly the structure of the standards and aim to facilitate the assessment, benchmarking, and sharing of best practices. The OECI accreditation model provided a valuable executive tool and a framework in which we can identify several important development projects. An additional impact for our institute is the participation in the project BenchCan, of which the OECI is lead partner. PMID:27096265

  1. Indian Consortia Models: FORSA Libraries' Experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Y. M.; Birdie, C.; Bawdekar, N.; Barve, S.; Anilkumar, N.

    2007-10-01

    With increases in prices of journals, shrinking library budgets and cuts in subscriptions to journals over the years, there has been a big challenge facing Indian library professionals to cope with the proliferation of electronic information resources. There have been sporadic efforts by different groups of libraries in forming consortia at different levels. The types of consortia identified are generally based on various models evolved in India in a variety of forms depending upon the participants' affiliations and funding sources. Indian astronomy library professionals have formed a group called Forum for Resource Sharing in Astronomy and Astrophysics (FORSA), which falls under `Open Consortia', wherein participants are affiliated to different government departments. This is a model where professionals willingly come forward and actively support consortia formation; thereby everyone benefits. As such, FORSA has realized four consortia, viz. Nature Online Consortium; Indian Astrophysics Consortium for physics/astronomy journals of Springer/Kluwer; Consortium for Scientific American Online Archive (EBSCO); and Open Consortium for Lecture Notes in Physics (Springer), which are discussed briefly.

  2. Experiments and Valve Modelling in Thermoacoustic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duthil, P.; Baltean Carlès, D.; Bétrancourt, A.; François, M. X.; Yu, Z. B.; Thermeau, J. P.

    2006-04-01

    In a so called heat driven thermoacoustic refrigerator, using either a pulse tube or a lumped boost configuration, heat pumping is induced by Stirling type thermodynamic cycles within the regenerator. The time phase between acoustic pressure and flow rate throughout must then be close to that met for a purely progressive wave. The study presented here relates the experimental characterization of passive elements such as valves, tubes and tanks which are likely to act on this phase relationship when included in the propagation line of the wave resonator. In order to carry out a characterization — from the acoustic point of view — of these elements, systematic measurements of the acoustic field are performed varying various parameters: mean pressure, oscillations frequency, supplied heat power. Acoustic waves are indeed generated by use of a thermoacoustic prime mover driving a pulse tube refrigerator. The experimental results are then compared with the solutions obtained with various one-dimensional linear models including non linear correction factors. It turns out that when using a non symmetrical valve, and for large dissipative effects, the measurements disagree with the linear modelling and non linear behaviour of this particular element is shown.

  3. Process modelling for space station experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1988-01-01

    The work performed during the first year 1 Oct. 1987 to 30 Sept. 1988 involved analyses of crystal growth from the melt and from solution. The particular melt growth technique under investigation is directional solidification by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Two types of solution growth systems are also being studied. One involves growth from solution in a closed container, the other concerns growth of protein crystals by the hanging drop method. Following discussions with Dr. R. J. Naumann of the Low Gravity Science Division at MSFC it was decided to tackle the analysis of crystal growth from the melt earlier than originally proposed. Rapid progress was made in this area. Work is on schedule and full calculations were underway for some time. Progress was also made in the formulation of the two solution growth models.

  4. Infusion of freshly isolated autologous bone marrow derived mononuclear cells prevents endotoxin-induced lung injury in an ex-vivo perfused swine model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), affects up to 150,000 patients per year in the United States. We and other groups have demonstrated that bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal stem cells prevent ARDS induced by systemic and local administration of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) in mice. Methods A study was undertaken to determine the effects of the diverse populations of bone marrow derived cells on the pathophysiology of ARDS, using a unique ex-vivo swine preparation, in which only the ventilated lung and the liver are perfused with autologous blood. Six experimental groups were designated as: 1) endotoxin alone, 2) endotoxin + total fresh whole bone marrow nuclear cells (BMC), 3) endotoxin + non-hematopoietic bone marrow cells (CD45 neg), 4) endotoxin + hematopoietic bone marrow cells (CD45 positive), 5) endotoxin + buffy coat and 6) endotoxin + in vitro expanded swine CD45 negative adherent allogeneic bone marrow cells (cultured CD45neg). We measured at different levels the biological consequences of the infusion of the different subsets of cells. The measured parameters were: pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR), gas exchange (PO2), lung edema (lung wet/dry weight), gene expression and serum concentrations of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6. Results Infusion of freshly purified autologous total BMCs, as well as non-hematopoietic CD45(-) bone marrow cells significantly reduced endotoxin-induced pulmonary hypertension and hypoxemia and reduced the lung edema. Also, in the groups that received BMCs and cultured CD45neg we observed a decrease in the levels of IL-1β and TNF-α in plasma. Infusion of hematopoietic CD45(+) bone marrow cells or peripheral blood buffy coat cells did not protect against LPS-induced lung injury. Conclusions We conclude that infusion of freshly isolated autologous whole bone marrow cells and the subset of non-hematopoietic cells can suppress the acute humoral and physiologic

  5. FIELD EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING AT CDG AIRPORTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.

    2009-12-01

    Richard Ramaroson1,4, Klaus Schaefer2, Stefan Emeis2, Carsten Jahn2, Gregor Schürmann2, Maria Hoffmann2, Mikhael Zatevakhin3, Alexandre Ignatyev3. 1ONERA, Châtillon, France; 4SEAS, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA; 2FZK, Garmisch, Germany; (3)FSUE SPbAEP, St Petersburg, Russia. 2-month field campaigns have been organized at CDG airports in autumn 2004 and summer 2005. Air quality and ground air traffic emissions have been monitored continuously at terminals and taxi-runways, along with meteorological parameters onboard trucks and with a SODAR. This paper analyses the commercial engine emissions characteristics at airports and their effects on gas pollutants and airborne particles coupled to meteorology. LES model results for PM dispersion coupled to microphysics in the PBL are compared to measurements. Winds and temperature at the surface and their vertical profiles have been stored with turbulence. SODAR observations show the time-development of the mixing layer depth and turbulent mixing in summer up to 800m. Active low level jets and their regional extent have been observed and analyzed. PM number and mass size distribution, morphology and chemical contents are investigated. Formation of new ultra fine volatile (UFV) particles in the ambient plume downstream of running engines is observed. Soot particles are mostly observed at significant level at high power thrusts at take-off (TO) and on touch-down whereas at lower thrusts at taxi and aprons ultra the UFV PM emissions become higher. Ambient airborne PM1/2.5 is closely correlated to air traffic volume and shows a maximum beside runways. PM number distribution at airports is composed mainly by volatile UF PM abundant at apron. Ambient PM mass in autumn is higher than in summer. The expected differences between TO and taxi emissions are confirmed for NO, NO2, speciated VOC and CO. NO/NO2 emissions are larger at runways due to higher power. Reactive VOC and CO are more produced at low powers during idling at

  6. Process modelling for materials preparation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Alexander, J. Iwan D.

    1994-01-01

    The main goals of the research under this grant consist of the development of mathematical tools and measurement techniques for transport properties necessary for high fidelity modelling of crystal growth from the melt and solution. Of the tasks described in detail in the original proposal, two remain to be worked on: development of a spectral code for moving boundary problems, and development of an expedient diffusivity measurement technique for concentrated and supersaturated solutions. We have focused on developing a code to solve for interface shape, heat and species transport during directional solidification. The work involved the computation of heat, mass and momentum transfer during Bridgman-Stockbarger solidification of compound semiconductors. Domain decomposition techniques and preconditioning methods were used in conjunction with Chebyshev spectral methods to accelerate convergence while retaining the high-order spectral accuracy. During the report period we have further improved our experimental setup. These improvements include: temperature control of the measurement cell to 0.1 C between 10 and 60 C; enclosure of the optical measurement path outside the ZYGO interferometer in a metal housing that is temperature controlled to the same temperature setting as the measurement cell; simultaneous dispensing and partial removal of the lower concentration (lighter) solution above the higher concentration (heavier) solution through independently motor-driven syringes; three-fold increase in data resolution by orientation of the interferometer with respect to diffusion direction; and increase of the optical path length in the solution cell to 12 mm.

  7. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, P. V.; Caleb, O. J.; Singh, Z.; Watkins, C. B.; Geyer, M.

    2014-01-01

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments. PMID:24797137

  8. Postharvest treatments of fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, P V; Caleb, O J; Singh, Z; Watkins, C B; Geyer, M

    2014-06-13

    Postharvest technologies have allowed horticultural industries to meet the global demands of local and large-scale production and intercontinental distribution of fresh produce that have high nutritional and sensory quality. Harvested products are metabolically active, undergoing ripening and senescence processes that must be controlled to prolong postharvest quality. Inadequate management of these processes can result in major losses in nutritional and quality attributes, outbreaks of foodborne pathogens and financial loss for all players along the supply chain, from growers to consumers. Optimal postharvest treatments for fresh produce seek to slow down physiological processes of senescence and maturation, reduce/inhibit development of physiological disorders and minimize the risk of microbial growth and contamination. In addition to basic postharvest technologies of temperature management, an array of others have been developed including various physical (heat, irradiation and edible coatings), chemical (antimicrobials, antioxidants and anti-browning) and gaseous treatments. This article examines the current status on postharvest treatments of fresh produce and emerging technologies, such as plasma and ozone, that can be used to maintain quality, reduce losses and waste of fresh produce. It also highlights further research needed to increase our understanding of the dynamic response of fresh produce to various postharvest treatments. PMID:24797137

  9. Underwater Blast Experiments and Modeling for Shock Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L; McMichael, L; Vandersall, K; Margraf, J

    2010-03-07

    A simple but novel mitigation concept to enforce standoff distance and reduce shock loading on a vertical, partially-submerged structure is evaluated using scaled aquarium experiments and numerical modeling. Scaled, water tamped explosive experiments were performed using three gallon aquariums. The effectiveness of different mitigation configurations, including air-filled media and an air gap, is assessed relative to an unmitigated detonation using the same charge weight and standoff distance. Experiments using an air-filled media mitigation concept were found to effectively dampen the explosive response of the aluminum plate and reduce the final displacement at plate center by approximately half. The finite element model used for the initial experimental design compares very well to the experimental DIC results both spatially and temporally. Details of the experiment and finite element aquarium models are described including the boundary conditions, Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques, detonation models, experimental design and test diagnostics.

  10. A Community Mentoring Model for STEM Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Dale, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a community mentoring model for UREs that avoids some of the common pitfalls of the traditional paradigm while harnessing the power of learning communities to provide young scholars a stimulating collaborative STEM research experience.

  11. Applying modeling Results in designing a global tropospheric experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    A set of field experiments and advanced modeling studies which provide a strategy for a program of global tropospheric experiments was identified. An expanded effort to develop space applications for trospheric air quality monitoring and studies was recommended. The tropospheric ozone, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles are addressed. Stratospheric-tropospheric exchange is discussed. Fast photochemical processes in the free troposphere are considered.

  12. Characteristics of a Model Industrial Technology Education Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Phillip R.; Kozak, Michael R.

    1986-01-01

    This report contains selected findings from a research project that investigated field experiences in industrial technology education. Funded by the Texas Education Agency, the project addressed the identification of characteristics of a model field experience in industrial technology education. This was accomplished using the Delphi technique.…

  13. Engineering teacher training models and experiences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Tirados, R. M.

    2009-04-01

    Education Area, we renewed the programme, content and methodology, teaching the course under the name of "Initial Teacher Training Course within the framework of the European Higher Education Area". Continuous Training means learning throughout one's life as an Engineering teacher. They are actions designed to update and improve teaching staff, and are systematically offered on the current issues of: Teaching Strategies, training for research, training for personal development, classroom innovations, etc. They are activities aimed at conceptual change, changing the way of teaching and bringing teaching staff up-to-date. At the same time, the Institution is at the disposal of all teaching staff as a meeting point to discuss issues in common, attend conferences, department meetings, etc. In this Congress we present a justification of both training models and their design together with some results obtained on: training needs, participation, how it is developing and to what extent students are profiting from it.

  14. Arctic pathways of Pacific Water: Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aksenov, Yevgeny; Karcher, Michael; Proshutinsky, Andrey; Gerdes, Rüdiger; de Cuevas, Beverly; Golubeva, Elena; Kauker, Frank; Nguyen, An T.; Platov, Gennady A.; Wadley, Martin; Watanabe, Eiji; Coward, Andrew C.; Nurser, A. J. George

    2016-01-01

    Pacific Water (PW) enters the Arctic Ocean through Bering Strait and brings in heat, fresh water, and nutrients from the northern Bering Sea. The circulation of PW in the central Arctic Ocean is only partially understood due to the lack of observations. In this paper, pathways of PW are investigated using simulations with six state-of-the art regional and global Ocean General Circulation Models (OGCMs). In the simulations, PW is tracked by a passive tracer, released in Bering Strait. Simulated PW spreads from the Bering Strait region in three major branches. One of them starts in the Barrow Canyon, bringing PW along the continental slope of Alaska into the Canadian Straits and then into Baffin Bay. The second begins in the vicinity of the Herald Canyon and transports PW along the continental slope of the East Siberian Sea into the Transpolar Drift, and then through Fram Strait and the Greenland Sea. The third branch begins near the Herald Shoal and the central Chukchi shelf and brings PW into the Beaufort Gyre. In the models, the wind, acting via Ekman pumping, drives the seasonal and interannual variability of PW in the Canadian Basin of the Arctic Ocean. The wind affects the simulated PW pathways by changing the vertical shear of the relative vorticity of the ocean flow in the Canada Basin.

  15. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  16. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  17. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  18. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen... frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.” The terms defined in this section may be used on the label or in... state and has not been frozen or subjected to any form of thermal processing or any other form...

  19. Freshly brewed continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazel, E.; Hayes, J. L.; Caddick, M. J.; Madrigal, P.

    2015-12-01

    Earth's crust is the life-sustaining interface between our planet's deep interior and surface. Basaltic crusts similar to Earth's oceanic crust characterize terrestrial planets in the solar system while the continental masses, areas of buoyant, thick silicic crust, are a unique characteristic of Earth. Therefore, understanding the processes responsible for the formation of continents is fundamental to reconstructing the evolution of our planet. We use geochemical and geophysical data to reconstruct the evolution of the Central American Land Bridge (Costa Rica and Panama) over the last 70 Ma. We also include new preliminary data from a key turning point (~12-6 Ma) from the evolution from an oceanic arc depleted in incompatible elements to a juvenile continental mass in order to evaluate current models of continental crust formation. We also discovered that seismic P-waves (body waves) travel through the crust at velocities closer to the ones observed in continental crust worldwide. Based on global statistical analyses of all magmas produced today in oceanic arcs compared to the global average composition of continental crust we developed a continental index. Our goal was to quantitatively correlate geochemical composition with the average P-wave velocity of arc crust. We suggest that although the formation and evolution of continents may involve many processes, melting enriched oceanic crust within a subduction zone, a process probably more common in the Achaean where most continental landmasses formed, can produce the starting material necessary for juvenile continental crust formation.

  20. A Comparison of Internship Stage Models: Evidence from Intern Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diambra, Joel F.; Cole-Zakrzewski, Kylie G.; Booher, Josh

    2004-01-01

    Human service interns completing their four-year Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Tennessee participated in this study which focused on investigating student internship experiences from the perspective of three different internship stage models. the three models studied include those of Infester and Boss (1998), Sweitzer and King…

  1. Flow dynamics and salt transport in a coastal aquifer driven by a stratified saltwater body: Lab experiment and numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oz, Imri; Shalev, Eyal; Yechieli, Yoseph; Gavrieli, Ittai; Gvirtzman, Haim

    2014-04-01

    This paper examines the transient development and the steady-state configuration of groundwater within a coastal aquifer adjacent to a stratified saltwater body. Such systems consist of three different water types: the regional fresh groundwater, and low and high salinity brines forming the upper and lower water layers of the stratified water body, respectively. The dynamics, location and the geometry of the interfaces and the density-driven circulation flows that develop in the aquifer are examined using laboratory experiments and numerical modeling at the same scale. The results show that the transient intrusion of the different water bodies into the aquifer takes place at different rates, and that the locations of the interfaces between them change with time, before reaching steady-state. Under steady-state conditions both the model and the experiments show the existence of three interfaces between the three water types. The numerical model, which is calibrated against the salinity distribution and groundwater discharge rate in the laboratory experiments, allows the quantification of the flow rates and flow patterns within the aquifer. These flow patterns, which cannot be derived from laboratory experiments, show the transient development of three circulation cells which are confined between the three interfaces. These results confirm the hypothesis that has been previously suggested based solely on a steady-state numerical modeling defined by a conceptual understanding. Parametric analysis shows that the creation of three circulation cells and three interfaces is limited to certain conditions and defines the ranges for the creation of this unique system.

  2. Team Preceptorship Model: A Solution for Students' Clinical Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cooper Brathwaite, Angela; Lemonde, Manon

    2011-01-01

    There is a shortage of registered nurses in developed countries, and this shortage is due to the aging nursing workforce, demand for healthcare services, and shortage of nursing professors to teach students. In order to increase the number of clinical placements for nursing students, the authors developed and implemented a collaborative preceptorship model between a Canadian University and Public Health Department to facilitate the clinical experiences of Bachelor of Science of Nursing (BScN) students. This paper describes the Team Preceptorship Model which guided the clinical experience of nine students and 14 preceptors. It also highlights the model's evaluation, strengths, and limitations. PMID:21994893

  3. General Blending Models for Data From Mixture Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L.; Donev, A. N.; Bissett, A. C.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a new class of models providing a powerful unification and extension of existing statistical methodology for analysis of data obtained in mixture experiments. These models, which integrate models proposed by Scheffé and Becker, extend considerably the range of mixture component effects that may be described. They become complex when the studied phenomenon requires it, but remain simple whenever possible. This article has supplementary material online. PMID:26681812

  4. An Experiment in Determining Software Reliability Model Applicability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikora, Allen P.

    1995-01-01

    There have been few reports on the behavior of software reliability models under controlled conditions. That is to say, most of the reported experience with the models is during the testing phase of actual projects, during which researchers have little or no control over the data with which they work. Give that failure data for actual projects can be noisy, distorted, and uncertain, reported procedures for determining model applicability may be incomplete.

  5. Investigation of models for large scale meteorological prediction experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spar, J.

    1982-01-01

    Long-range numerical prediction and climate simulation experiments with various global atmospheric general circulation models are reported. A chronological listing of the titles of all publications and technical reports already distributed is presented together with an account of the most recent reseach. Several reports on a series of perpetual January climate simulations with the GISS coarse mesh climate model are listed. A set of perpetual July climate simulations with the same model is presented and the results are described.

  6. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  7. Designing Experiments to Discriminate Families of Logic Models.

    PubMed

    Videla, Santiago; Konokotina, Irina; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G; Saez-Rodriguez, Julio; Schaub, Torsten; Siegel, Anne; Guziolowski, Carito

    2015-01-01

    Logic models of signaling pathways are a promising way of building effective in silico functional models of a cell, in particular of signaling pathways. The automated learning of Boolean logic models describing signaling pathways can be achieved by training to phosphoproteomics data, which is particularly useful if it is measured upon different combinations of perturbations in a high-throughput fashion. However, in practice, the number and type of allowed perturbations are not exhaustive. Moreover, experimental data are unavoidably subjected to noise. As a result, the learning process results in a family of feasible logical networks rather than in a single model. This family is composed of logic models implementing different internal wirings for the system and therefore the predictions of experiments from this family may present a significant level of variability, and hence uncertainty. In this paper, we introduce a method based on Answer Set Programming to propose an optimal experimental design that aims to narrow down the variability (in terms of input-output behaviors) within families of logical models learned from experimental data. We study how the fitness with respect to the data can be improved after an optimal selection of signaling perturbations and how we learn optimal logic models with minimal number of experiments. The methods are applied on signaling pathways in human liver cells and phosphoproteomics experimental data. Using 25% of the experiments, we obtained logical models with fitness scores (mean square error) 15% close to the ones obtained using all experiments, illustrating the impact that our approach can have on the design of experiments for efficient model calibration. PMID:26389116

  8. Configurational diffusion of asphaltenes in fresh and aged catalyst extrudates. Quarterly progress report, June 20, 1993--September 20, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Guin, J.A.; Tarrer, A.R.

    1993-12-01

    This quarter, we measured the surface areas and effective diffusivities for fresh, spent and regenerated unimodal Criterion 324 and bimodal EXP-AO-60 catalysts. The results showed that the surface areas for spent catalysts decreased greatly due to coke formation and metal deposition during coal liquefaction process. After regeneration, the catalyst surface areas were partially or completely restored. Adsorption equilibrium experiments showed that the adsorption isotherms for quinoline in cyclohexane with these six sample of catalysts could be well represented by Freundlich isotherms. The effective diffusivities with these catalysts were obtained by fitting experimental data with the diffusional model. The results indicated that the effective diffusivity for fresh bimodal catalyst with larger pore size was greater than that for fresh unimodal catalyst with a smaller pore size. After the catalysts were used in a coal liquefaction process, the effective diffusivities decreased to less than 1% of those for fresh catalysts. When the spent catalysts were regenerated in air, the effective diffusivites were recovered to 35--50% of those for fresh catalysts.

  9. Cognitive Modeling of Video Game Player User Experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohil, Corey J.; Biocca, Frank A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues for the use of cognitive modeling to gain a detailed and dynamic look into user experience during game play. Applying cognitive models to game play data can help researchers understand a player's attentional focus, memory status, learning state, and decision strategies (among other things) as these cognitive processes occurred throughout game play. This is a stark contrast to the common approach of trying to assess the long-term impact of games on cognitive functioning after game play has ended. We describe what cognitive models are, what they can be used for and how game researchers could benefit by adopting these methods. We also provide details of a single model - based on decision field theory - that has been successfUlly applied to data sets from memory, perception, and decision making experiments, and has recently found application in real world scenarios. We examine possibilities for applying this model to game-play data.

  10. Rotating-fluid experiments with an atmospheric general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Pitcher, E. J.; Malone, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    In order to determine features of rotating fluid flow that are dependent on the geometry, rotating annulus-type experiments are carried out with a numerical model in spherical coordinates. Rather than constructing and testing a model expressly for this purpose, it is found expedient to modify an existing general circulation model of the atmosphere by removing the model physics and replacing the lower boundary with a uniform surface. A regime diagram derived from these model experiments is presented; its major features are interpreted and contrasted with the major features of rotating annulus regime diagrams. Within the wave regime, a narrow region is found where one or two zonal wave numbers are dominant. The results reveal no upper symmetric regime; wave activity at low rotation rates is thought to be maintained by barotropic rather than baroclinic processes.

  11. Modeling a ponded infiltration experiment at Yucca Mountain, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, D.B.; Guertal, W.R.; Flint, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository for high level radioactive waste. As part of the site characterization activities at Yucca Mountain, a field-scale ponded infiltration experiment was done to help characterize the hydraulic and infiltration properties of a layered dessert alluvium deposit. Calcium carbonate accumulation and cementation, heterogeneous layered profiles, high evapotranspiration, low precipitation, and rocky soil make the surface difficult to characterize.The effects of the strong morphological horizonation on the infiltration processes, the suitability of measured hydraulic properties, and the usefulness of ponded infiltration experiments in site characterization work were of interest. One-dimensional and two-dimensional radial flow numerical models were used to help interpret the results of the ponding experiment. The objective of this study was to evaluate the results of a ponded infiltration experiment done around borehole UE25 UZN {number_sign}85 (N85) at Yucca Mountain, NV. The effects of morphological horizons on the infiltration processes, lateral flow, and measured soil hydaulic properties were studied. The evaluation was done by numerically modeling the results of a field ponded infiltration experiment. A comparison the experimental results and the modeled results was used to qualitatively indicate the degree to which infiltration processes and the hydaulic properties are understood. Results of the field characterization, soil characterization, borehole geophysics, and the ponding experiment are presented in a companion paper.

  12. Cryogenic Tank Modeling for the Saturn AS-203 Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grayson, Gary D.; Lopez, Alfredo; Chandler, Frank O.; Hastings, Leon J.; Tucker, Stephen P.

    2006-01-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed for the Saturn S-IVB liquid hydrogen (LH2) tank to simulate the 1966 AS-203 flight experiment. This significant experiment is the only known, adequately-instrumented, low-gravity, cryogenic self pressurization test that is well suited for CFD model validation. A 4000-cell, axisymmetric model predicts motion of the LH2 surface including boil-off and thermal stratification in the liquid and gas phases. The model is based on a modified version of the commercially available FLOW3D software. During the experiment, heat enters the LH2 tank through the tank forward dome, side wall, aft dome, and common bulkhead. In both model and test the liquid and gases thermally stratify in the low-gravity natural convection environment. LH2 boils at the free surface which in turn increases the pressure within the tank during the 5360 second experiment. The Saturn S-IVB tank model is shown to accurately simulate the self pressurization and thermal stratification in the 1966 AS-203 test. The average predicted pressurization rate is within 4% of the pressure rise rate suggested by test data. Ullage temperature results are also in good agreement with the test where the model predicts an ullage temperature rise rate within 6% of the measured data. The model is based on first principles only and includes no adjustments to bring the predictions closer to the test data. Although quantitative model validation is achieved or one specific case, a significant step is taken towards demonstrating general use of CFD for low-gravity cryogenic fluid modeling.

  13. Merging observations with numerical models in oceanography: some approaches and experiences gained within ECCO (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimbach, P.

    2009-12-01

    The problem of extracting information of the state of the polar ice sheets and their evolution through time from sparse observations and with poorly known surface and basal boundary conditions is not unlike the one faced by oceanographers who seek to estimate the global time-varying ocean circulation. Through concerted sea-going campaigns during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), and through the advent of satellite remote sensing dedicated to oceanography the oceanographic community had for the first time nearly global, time-continuous, but diverse, data sets as well as rapidly improving general circulation models (GCMs). Observations remain mostly limited to the near-surface though, cannot be readily compared with each other (altimetry and gravity, for example, measure very different properties and scales), and a quantitative link to the very limited set of in-situ observations, particularly at depth, is difficult. The need to fully exploit the data and models for the purpose of describing and understanding the global ocean circulation and its variability led the establishment of the consortium Estimating the Ocean Circulation and Climate (ECCO). ECCO has sought three-dimensional time-evolving oceanographic estimates which were fully consistent with the available observations, and with the particular GCM being used (primarily the MITgcm), in turn subject to central conservation principles (volume, energy, fresh water, etc.) and, to the degree the GCM was dynamically consistent, with time evolution not subject to artificial jumps or the injection of unphysical sources and sinks e.g. of heat. The science goals of ECCO include the understanding and explanation of the transfers of enthalpy and fresh water to and from the atmosphere and sea ice fields, and so consistency with basic conservation laws is essential. An estimation method which fulfills this requirement, pursued initially by the MIT/SIO and recently by the MIT/AER groups is the adjoint or

  14. Theoretical and experimental studies on low-temperature adsorption drying of fresh ginger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoxi; Xu, Wei; Ding, Jing; Zhao, Yi

    2006-03-01

    The working principle of low-temperature adsorption drying and the advantages of its application for biological materials drying were introduced in this paper. By using fresh ginger as the drying material, the effects of temperature and relative humidity on its drying characteristics were examined. The results show that the drying rate increases with the temperature increasing or the humidity decreasing. The drying time to the equilibrium is almost the same under different humidity conditions, but low equilibrium moisture content can be acquired under low humidity. The shrinkage characteristics of fresh ginger were also studied. The change of its surface appearance during the drying process was characterized by the new Charged Coupled Device (CCD) and the Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) technique. A mathematical model of drying dynamics was set up according to the experiments.

  15. Final Report: "Collaborative Project. Understanding the Chemical Processes That Affect Growth Rates of Freshly Nucleated Particles"

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, James N.; McMurry, Peter H.

    2015-11-12

    This final technical report describes our research activities that have, as the ultimate goal, the development of a model that explains growth rates of freshly nucleated particles. The research activities, which combine field observations with laboratory experiments, explore the relationship between concentrations of gas-phase species that contribute to growth and the rates at which those species are taken up. We also describe measurements of the chemical composition of freshly nucleated particles in a variety of locales, as well as properties (especially hygroscopicity) that influence their effects on climate. Our measurements include a self-organized, DOE-ARM funded project at the Southern Great Plains site, the New Particle Formation Study (NPFS), which took place during spring 2013. NPFS data are available to the research community on the ARM data archive, providing a unique suite observations of trace gas and aerosols that are associated with the formation and growth of atmospheric aerosol particles.

  16. Modeling a set of heavy oil aqueous pyrolysis experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Thorsness, C.B.; Reynolds, J.G.

    1996-11-01

    Aqueous pyrolysis experiments, aimed at mild upgrading of heavy oil, were analyzed using various computer models. The primary focus of the analysis was the pressure history of the closed autoclave reactors obtained during the heating of the autoclave to desired reaction temperatures. The models used included a means of estimating nonideal behavior of primary components with regard to vapor liquid equilibrium. The modeling indicated that to match measured autoclave pressures, which often were well below the vapor pressure of water at a given temperature, it was necessary to incorporate water solubility in the oil phase and an activity model for the water in the oil phase which reduced its fugacity below that of pure water. Analysis also indicated that the mild to moderate upgrading of the oil which occurred in experiments that reached 400{degrees}C or more using a FE(III) 2-ethylhexanoate could be reasonably well characterized by a simple first order rate constant of 1.7xl0{sup 8} exp(-20000/T)s{sup {minus}l}. Both gas production and API gravity increase were characterized by this rate constant. Models were able to match the complete pressure history of the autoclave experiments fairly well with relatively simple equilibria models. However, a consistent lower than measured buildup in pressure at peak temperatures was noted in the model calculations. This phenomena was tentatively attributed to an increase in the amount of water entering the vapor phase caused by a change in its activity in the oil phase.

  17. Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) created the first version of the Community Climate Model (CCM) in 1983 as a global atmosphere model. It was improved in 1994 when NCAR, with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), developed and incorporated a Climate System Model (CSM) that included atmosphere, land surface, ocean, and sea ice. As the capabilities of the model grew, so did interest in its applications and changes in how it would be managed. A workshop in 1996 set the future management structure, marked the beginning of the second phase of the model, a phase that included full participation of the scientific community, and also saw additional financial support, including support from the Department of Energy. In recognition of these changes, the model was renamed to the Community Climate System Model (CCSM). It began to function as a model with the interactions of land, sea, and air fully coupled, providing computer simulations of Earth's past climate, its present climate, and its possible future climate. The CCSM website at http://www2.cesm.ucar.edu/ describes some of the research that has been done since then: A 300-year run has been performed using the CSM, and results from this experiment have appeared in a special issue of theJournal of Climate, 11, June, 1998. A 125-year experiment has been carried out in which carbon dioxide was described to increase at 1% per year from its present concentration to approximately three times its present concentration. More recently, the Climate of the 20th Century experiment was run, with carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases and sulfate aerosols prescribed to evolve according to our best knowledge from 1870 to the present. Three scenarios for the 21st century were developed: a "business as usual" experiment, in which greenhouse gases are assumed to increase with no economic constraints; an experiment using the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Scenario A1; and a "policy

  18. Integrated Experiment and Modeling of Insensitive High Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, D. Scott; Lambert, David E.; Yoo, Sunhee; Lieber, M.; Holman, Steven

    2009-06-01

    New design paradigms for insensitive high explosives are being sought for use in munitions applications that require enhanced, safety, reliability and performance. We describe recent work of our group that uses an integrated approach to develop predictive models, guided by experiments. Insensitive explosive can have relatively longer detonation reaction zones and slower reaction rates than their sensitive counterparts. We employ reactive flow models that are constrained by detonation shock dynamics to pose candidate predictive models. We discuss variation of the pressure dependent reaction rate exponent and reaction order, on the length of the supporting reaction zone, the detonation velocity curvature relation, computed critical energy required for initiation, the relation between the diameter effect curve and the corresponding normal detonation velocity curvature relation. We discuss representative characterization experiments carried out at Eglin, AFB and the constraints imposed on models by a standardized experimental characterization sequence.

  19. HCCI in a CFR engine: experiments and detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Flowers, D; Aceves, S; Smith, R; Torres, J; Girard, J; Dibble, R

    1999-11-05

    Single cylinder engine experiments and chemical kinetic modeling have been performed to study the effect of variations in fuel, equivalence ratio, and intake charge temperature on the start of combustion and the heat release rate. Neat propane and a fuel blend of 15% dimethyl-ether in methane have been studied. The results demonstrate the role of these parameters on the start of combustion, efficiency, imep, and emissions. Single zone kinetic modeling results show the trends consistent with the experimental results.

  20. A Mitigation Scheme for Underwater Blast: Experiments and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glascoe, Lee; McMichael, Larry; Vandersall, Kevin; Margraf, Jon

    2011-06-01

    A novel but relatively easy-to-implement mitigation concept to enforce standoff distance and reduce shock loading on a vertical, partially-submerged structure is evaluated experimentally using scaled aquarium experiments and numerically using a high-fidelity finite element code. Scaled, water-tamped explosive experiments were performed using aquariums of two different sizes. The effectiveness of different mitigation configurations, including air-filled media and an air gap, is assessed relative to an unmitigated detonation using the same charge weight and standoff distance. Experiments using an air-filled media mitigation concept were found to effectively dampen the explosive response of an aluminum plate and reduce the final displacement at plate center by approximately half; an experiment using an air-gap alone resulted in a focused water jet. The finite element model used for the initial experimental design compares very well to the experimental DIC results both spatially and temporally. Details of the experiment and the finite element models of the aquarium, as well as a larger hypothetical structure, are described including the boundary conditions, numerical techniques, detonation models, experimental design and test diagnostics. This work was performed under the auspices of the US DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. We would like to thank DHS S & T Directorate for support and assistance.

  1. Experiments and Modeling of G-Jitter Fluid Mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Ramachandran, N.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    While there is a general understanding of the acceleration environment onboard an orbiting spacecraft, past research efforts in the modeling and analysis area have still not produced a general theory that predicts the effects of multi-spectral periodic accelerations on a general class of experiments nor have they produced scaling laws that a prospective experimenter can use to assess how an experiment might be affected by this acceleration environment. Furthermore, there are no actual flight experimental data that correlates heat or mass transport with measurements of the periodic acceleration environment. The present investigation approaches this problem with carefully conducted terrestrial experiments and rigorous numerical modeling for better understanding the effect of residual gravity and gentler on experiments. The approach is to use magnetic fluids that respond to an imposed magnetic field gradient in much the same way as fluid density responds to a gravitational field. By utilizing a programmable power source in conjunction with an electromagnet, both static and dynamic body forces can be simulated in lab experiments. The paper provides an overview of the technique and includes recent results from the experiments.

  2. Enriching the Student Experience Through a Collaborative Cultural Learning Model.

    PubMed

    McInally, Wendy; Metcalfe, Sharon; Garner, Bonnie

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a knowledge and understanding of an international, collaborative, cultural learning model for students from the United States and Scotland. Internationalizing the student experience has been instrumental for student learning for the past eight years. Both countries have developed programs that have enriched and enhanced the overall student learning experience, mainly through the sharing of evidence-based care in both hospital and community settings. Student learning is at the heart of this international model, and through practice learning, leadership, and reflective practice, student immersion in global health care and practice is immense. Moving forward, we are seeking new opportunities to explore learning partnerships to provide this collaborative cultural learning experience. PMID:26376575

  3. Design of Experiments, Model Calibration and Data Assimilation

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Brian J.

    2014-07-30

    This presentation provides an overview of emulation, calibration and experiment design for computer experiments. Emulation refers to building a statistical surrogate from a carefully selected and limited set of model runs to predict unsampled outputs. The standard kriging approach to emulation of complex computer models is presented. Calibration refers to the process of probabilistically constraining uncertain physics/engineering model inputs to be consistent with observed experimental data. An initial probability distribution for these parameters is updated using the experimental information. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms are often used to sample the calibrated parameter distribution. Several MCMC algorithms commonly employed in practice are presented, along with a popular diagnostic for evaluating chain behavior. Space-filling approaches to experiment design for selecting model runs to build effective emulators are discussed, including Latin Hypercube Design and extensions based on orthogonal array skeleton designs and imposed symmetry requirements. Optimization criteria that further enforce space-filling, possibly in projections of the input space, are mentioned. Designs to screen for important input variations are summarized and used for variable selection in a nuclear fuels performance application. This is followed by illustration of sequential experiment design strategies for optimization, global prediction, and rare event inference.

  4. Design of spatial experiments: Model fitting and prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, V.V.

    1996-03-01

    The main objective of the paper is to describe and develop model oriented methods and algorithms for the design of spatial experiments. Unlike many other publications in this area, the approach proposed here is essentially based on the ideas of convex design theory.

  5. ASTP fluid transfer measurement experiment. [using breadboard model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1974-01-01

    The ASTP fluid transfer measurement experiment flight system design concept was verified by the demonstration and test of a breadboard model. In addition to the breadboard effort, a conceptual design of the corresponding flight system was generated and a full scale mockup fabricated. A preliminary CEI specification for the flight system was also prepared.

  6. Demonstrating the Experimenting Society Model with Classwide Behavior Management Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Taya C.; Stoner, Gary; Green, Susan K.

    1996-01-01

    Demonstrates the experimenting society model using data-based decision making and collaborative consultation to evaluate behavior-management intervention strategies in 25 seventh graders. Each intervention results in improved behavior, but active teaching of classroom rules was determined to be most effective. (Author/JDM)

  7. A Model for a Rural School Field Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Ray; Hegtvedt, Kathryn

    Fifteen University of Oregon undergraduate education majors participated in a successful 3-day program of total immersion in rural community living and teaching in Condon, Oregon. The field experience model had unique elements: (1) the course was offered as an alternative to a required course in teaching strategies and student teachers were…

  8. EBCE: The Far West Model. Experience-Based Career Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    This package of handbooks on the Far West Laboratory version of Experience-Based Career Education provides information on the distinctive features of the Far West model. Part 1 on management has four handbooks: program overview; administration (attendance, budget, insurance and liability, schedules, staff, troubleshooting and problem solving);…

  9. 21 CFR 101.95 - “Fresh,” “freshly frozen,” “fresh frozen,” “frozen fresh.”

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false âFresh,â âfreshly frozen,â âfresh frozen,â âfrozen fresh.â 101.95 Section 101.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION FOOD LABELING Specific Requirements...

  10. Physical mechanism of the Schwarzschild effect in film dosimetry—theoretical model and comparison with experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djouguela, A.; Kollhoff, R.; Rühmann, A.; Willborn, K. C.; Harder, D.; Poppe, B.

    2006-09-01

    In consideration of the importance of film dosimetry for the dosimetric verification of IMRT treatment plans, the Schwarzschild effect or failure of the reciprocity law, i.e. the reduction of the net optical density under 'protraction' or 'fractionation' conditions at constant dose, has been experimentally studied for Kodak XOMAT-V (Martens et al 2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 2221-34) and EDR 2 dosimetry films (Djouguela et al 2005 Phys. Med. Biol. 50 N317-N321). It is known that this effect results from the competition between two solid-state physics reactions involved in the latent-image formation of the AgBr crystals, the aggregation of two Ag atoms freshly formed from Ag+ ions near radiation-induced occupied electron traps and the spontaneous decomposition of the Ag atoms. In this paper, we are developing a mathematical model of this mechanism which shows that the interplay of the mean lifetime τ of the Ag atoms with the time pattern of the irradiation determines the magnitude of the observed effects of the temporal dose distribution on the net optical density. By comparing this theory with our previous protraction experiments and recent fractionation experiments in which the duration of the pause between fractions was varied, a value of the time constant τ of roughly 10 s at room temperature has been determined for EDR 2. The numerical magnitude of the Schwarzschild effect in dosimetry films under the conditions generally met in radiotherapy amounts to only a few per cent of the net optical density (net OD), so that it can frequently be neglected from the viewpoint of clinical applications. But knowledge of the solid-state physical mechanism and a description in terms of a mathematical model involving a typical time constant of about 10 s are now available to estimate the magnitude of the effect should the necessity arise, i.e. in cases of large fluctuations of the temporal pattern of film exposure.

  11. Insight Into Sustainability of Fresh Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonovic, S. P.

    2002-05-01

    Global modeling often assumes that water is not an issue on the macro scale. WorldWater system dynamics model has been developed for modeling global world water balance and capturing the dynamic character of main variables affecting water availability and use in the future. In spite of not being a novel approach, system dynamics offers (i) a new way for identifying factors that are affecting the future availability of fresh water and provides (ii) insight into the impacts of different development strategies on the future availability of fresh water. WorldWater simulations are clearly demonstrating the strong feedback relation between water availability and different aspects of world development. Results of numerous simulations are contradictory to the assumption made by many global modelers and do confirm that water is an issue on the global scale. Two major observations are made from early model simulations: (a) the use of clean water for dilution and transport of wastewater, if not dealt in other ways, imposes a major stress on the global world water balance; and (b) water use by different sectors is demonstrating quite different dynamics then predicted by classical forecasting tools and other water-models. Inherent linkages between water quantity and quality sectors with food, industry, persistent pollution, technology, and nonrenewable resources sectors of the model create shoot and collapse behavior in water use dynamics. This presentation is discussing a number of different water-related scenarios and their implications on the future water balance. In particular, two extreme scenarios (business as usual - named `Chaos', and unlimited desalination - named `Ocean') will be discussed. Based on the conclusions derived from these two extreme cases a set of more moderate and realistic scenarios (named `Conservation') is proposed.

  12. Antimicrobial packaging for fresh-cut fruits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fresh-cut fruits are minimally processed produce which are consumed directly at their fresh stage without any further kill step. Microbiological quality and safety are major challenges to fresh-cut fruits. Antimicrobial packaging is one of the innovative food packaging systems that is able to kill o...

  13. Scattering Models and Basic Experiments in the Microwave Regime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, A. K.; Blanchard, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1985-01-01

    The objectives of research over the next three years are: (1) to develop a randomly rough surface scattering model which is applicable over the entire frequency band; (2) to develop a computer simulation method and algorithm to simulate scattering from known randomly rough surfaces, Z(x,y); (3) to design and perform laboratory experiments to study geometric and physical target parameters of an inhomogeneous layer; (4) to develop scattering models for an inhomogeneous layer which accounts for near field interaction and multiple scattering in both the coherent and the incoherent scattering components; and (5) a comparison between theoretical models and measurements or numerical simulation.

  14. Event-based Simulation Model for Quantum Optics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2011-03-28

    We present a corpuscular simulation model of optical phenomena that does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation of the whole system and reproduces the results of Maxwell's theory by generating detection events one-by-one. The event-based corpuscular model gives a unified description of multiple-beam fringes of a plane parallel plate and single-photon Mach-Zehnder interferometer, Wheeler's delayed choice, photon tunneling, quantum eraser, two-beam interference, double-slit, Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm and Hanbury Brown-Twiss experiments. We also discuss the possibility to refute our corpuscular model.

  15. Evaluation of phytotoxicity of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted inTifton, Georgia to evaluate the phytotoxicity of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes in 2012 for the control of bacterial spot and powdery mildew. Four directed foliar applications were applied on a 6-8 day schedule beginning on 2 May and ending on 24 May 2012 at rat...

  16. Evaluation of phytotoxicty of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted inTifton, Georgia to evaluate the phytotoxicity of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes in 2011 for the control of bacterial spot and powdery mildew. Four directed foliar applications were applied on a 6-8 day schedule beginning on 19 May and ending on 8 Jun 2011at rate...

  17. Evaluation of phytotoxicity of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This experiment was conducted inTifton, Georgia to evaluate the phytotoxicity of quinoxyfen on fresh market tomatoes in 2011 for the control of bacterial spot and powdery mildew. Four directed foliar applications were applied on a 6-8 day schedule beginning on 19 May and ending on 8 Jun 2011at rate...

  18. Fresh squeezed orange juice odor: a review.

    PubMed

    Perez-Cacho, Pilar Ruiz; Rouseff, Russell L

    2008-08-01

    Fresh orange juice is a highly desirable but unstable product. This review examines analytical findings, odor activity, and variations due to cultivar, sampling methods, manner of juicing, plus possible enzymatic and microbial artifacts. Initial attempts to characterize orange juice odor were based on volatile quantitation and overemphasized the importance of high concentration volatiles. Although over 300 volatiles have been reported from GC-MS analytical studies, this review presents 36 consensus aroma active components from GC-olfactometry studies consisting of 14 aldehydes, 7 esters, 5 terpenes, 6 alcohols, and 4 ketones. Most are trace (microg/L) components. (+)-Limonene is an essential component in orange juice odor although its exact function is still uncertain. Total amounts of volatiles in mechanically squeezed juices are three to 10 times greater than hand-squeezed juices because of elevated peel oil levels. Elevated peel oil changes the relative proportion of several key odorants. Odor active components from solvent extraction studies differ from those collected using headspace techniques as they include volatiles with low vapor pressure such as vanillin. Some reported odorants such as 2,3-butanedione are microbial contamination artifacts. Orange juice odor models confirm that fresh orange aroma is complex as the most successful models contain 23 odorants. PMID:18663618

  19. Application of constraint modelling to evaluation of crack growth experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Faleskog, J.; Nilsson, F.; Shehu, S.; Oeberg, H.

    1997-12-01

    A large number of fracture mechanics experiments were carried out using a variety of specimens in order to investigate the applicability of the J-Q approach to initiation and growth of cracks. The study was performed at different temperatures spanning the transition interval of a pressure vessel steel. A comparison of the cleavage initiation levels with the model by Ritchie et al. (RKR) was also conducted. The experiments did not show, although the scatter was large, any systematic geometry effects that could not be explained within the framework of the J-Q concept. This was also the case for surface-cracked plates subjected to nonproportional loading. The trends of the dependence of the initiation on constraint are in qualitative agreement with the RKR model, although this model seems to underestimate this dependence for the current material. The ductile initiation level seems to be fairly independent of constraint but showed a tendency of variation with temperature.

  20. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Kullberg, A. Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-15

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  1. Comparison of a radial fractional transport model with tokamak experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullberg, A.; Morales, G. J.; Maggs, J. E.

    2014-03-01

    A radial fractional transport model [Kullberg et al., Phys. Rev. E 87, 052115 (2013)], that correctly incorporates the geometric effects of the domain near the origin and removes the singular behavior at the outer boundary, is compared to results of off-axis heating experiments performed in the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project (RTP), ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D tokamak devices. This comparative study provides an initial assessment of the presence of fractional transport phenomena in magnetic confinement experiments. It is found that the nonlocal radial model is robust in describing the steady-state temperature profiles from RTP, but for the propagation of heat waves in ASDEX Upgrade, JET, and DIII-D the model is not clearly superior to predictions based on Fick's law. However, this comparative study does indicate that the order of the fractional derivative, α, is likely a function of radial position in the devices surveyed.

  2. Mixture models for gene expression experiments with two species

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cross-species research in drug development is novel and challenging. A bivariate mixture model utilizing information across two species was proposed to solve the fundamental problem of identifying differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments in order to potentially improve the understanding of translation between preclinical and clinical studies for drug development. The proposed approach models the joint distribution of treatment effects estimated from independent linear models. The mixture model posits up to nine components, four of which include groups in which genes are differentially expressed in both species. A comprehensive simulation to evaluate the model performance and one application on a real world data set, a mouse and human type II diabetes experiment, suggest that the proposed model, though highly structured, can handle various configurations of differential gene expression and is practically useful on identifying differentially expressed genes, especially when the magnitude of differential expression due to different treatment intervention is weak. In the mouse and human application, the proposed mixture model was able to eliminate unimportant genes and identify a list of genes that were differentially expressed in both species and could be potential gene targets for drug development. PMID:25085578

  3. High pressure experiments with a Mars general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Murphy, J. R.; Schaeffer, J.; Lee, H.

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of three physical processes will determine the stability of the Martian polar caps as the surface pressure increases: the greenhouse effect, atmospheric heat transport, and the change in the CO2 frost point temperature. The contribution of each is readily determined in the Mars general circulation model (GCM). Therefore, we have initiated experiments with the GCM to determine how these processes interact, and how the atmosphere-polar cap system responds to increasing surface pressure. The experiments are carried out for northern winter solstice and generally assume the atmosphere to be free of dust. Each experiment starts from resting isothermal conditions and runs for 50 Mars days. Mars' current orbital parameters are used. The experiments are for surface pressures of 120, 480, and 960 mb, which represent 16, 64, and 128 times the current value. To date we have analyzed the 120 mb experiment and the results indicate the contrary to the simpler models, the polar caps actually advance instead of retreat. Other aspects of this investigation are presented.

  4. Behavior analysis by model slope experiment of artificial rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min Cheol

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we performed a model slope experiment with rainfall seepage, and the results were compared and verified with the unsaturated slope stability analysis method. In the model slope experiment, we measured the changes in water content and matric suction due to rainfall seepage, and determined the time at which the slope failure occurred and the shape of the failure. In addition, we compared and verified the changes in the factor of safety and the shape of the failure surface, which was calculated from the unsaturated slope stability analysis with the model experiment. From the results of experiment and analysis, it is concluded that the unsaturated slope stability analysis can be used to accurately analyze and predict rainfall-induced slope failure. It is also concluded that in seepage analysis, setting the initial conditions and boundary conditions is very important. If engineers will use the measured porewater pressure or matric suction, the accuracy of analysis can be enhanced. The real-time monitoring system of porewater pressure or matric suction can be used as a warning of rainfall-induced slope failure.

  5. Experiences & Tools from Modeling Instruction Applied to Earth Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervenec, J.; Landis, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    The Framework for K-12 Science Education calls for stronger curricular connections within the sciences, greater depth in understanding, and tasks higher on Bloom's Taxonomy. Understanding atmospheric sciences draws on core knowledge traditionally taught in physics, chemistry, and in some cases, biology. If this core knowledge is not conceptually sound, well retained, and transferable to new settings, understanding the causes and consequences of climate changes become a task in memorizing seemingly disparate facts to a student. Fortunately, experiences and conceptual tools have been developed and refined in the nationwide network of Physics Modeling and Chemistry Modeling teachers to build necessary understanding of conservation of mass, conservation of energy, particulate nature of matter, kinetic molecular theory, and particle model of light. Context-rich experiences are first introduced for students to construct an understanding of these principles and then conceptual tools are deployed for students to resolve misconceptions and deepen their understanding. Using these experiences and conceptual tools takes an investment of instructional time, teacher training, and in some cases, re-envisioning the format of a science classroom. There are few financial barriers to implementation and students gain a greater understanding of the nature of science by going through successive cycles of investigation and refinement of their thinking. This presentation shows how these experiences and tools could be used in an Earth Science course to support students developing conceptually rich understanding of the atmosphere and connections happening within.

  6. Design and modeling of small scale multiple fracturing experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Cuderman, J F

    1981-12-01

    Recent experiments at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have demonstrated the existence of three distinct fracture regimes. Depending on the pressure rise time in a borehole, one can obtain hydraulic, multiple, or explosive fracturing behavior. The use of propellants rather than explosives in tamped boreholes permits tailoring of the pressure risetime over a wide range since propellants having a wide range of burn rates are available. This technique of using the combustion gases from a full bore propellant charge to produce controlled borehole pressurization is termed High Energy Gas Fracturing (HEGF). Several series of HEGF, in 0.15 m and 0.2 m diameter boreholes at 12 m depths, have been completed in a tunnel complex at NTS where mineback permitted direct observation of fracturing obtained. Because such large experiments are costly and time consuming, smaller scale experiments are desirable, provided results from small experiments can be used to predict fracture behavior in larger boreholes. In order to design small scale gas fracture experiments, the available data from previous HEGF experiments were carefully reviewed, analytical elastic wave modeling was initiated, and semi-empirical modeling was conducted which combined predictions for statically pressurized boreholes with experimental data. The results of these efforts include (1) the definition of what constitutes small scale experiments for emplacement in a tunnel complex at the Nevada Test Site, (2) prediction of average crack radius, in ash fall tuff, as a function of borehole size and energy input per unit length, (3) definition of multiple-hydraulic and multiple-explosive fracture boundaries as a function of boreholes size and surface wave velocity, (4) semi-empirical criteria for estimating stress and acceleration, and (5) a proposal that multiple fracture orientations may be governed by in situ stresses.

  7. First Results of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models Experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schorlemmer, D.; Zechar, J.D.; Werner, M.J.; Field, E.H.; Jackson, D.D.; Jordan, T.H.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to successfully predict the future behavior of a system is a strong indication that the system is well understood. Certainly many details of the earthquake system remain obscure, but several hypotheses related to earthquake occurrence and seismic hazard have been proffered, and predicting earthquake behavior is a worthy goal and demanded by society. Along these lines, one of the primary objectives of the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) working group was to formalize earthquake occurrence hypotheses in the form of prospective earthquake rate forecasts in California. RELM members, working in small research groups, developed more than a dozen 5-year forecasts; they also outlined a performance evaluation method and provided a conceptual description of a Testing Center in which to perform predictability experiments. Subsequently, researchers working within the Collaboratory for the Study of Earthquake Predictability (CSEP) have begun implementing Testing Centers in different locations worldwide, and the RELM predictability experiment-a truly prospective earthquake prediction effort-is underway within the U. S. branch of CSEP. The experiment, designed to compare time-invariant 5-year earthquake rate forecasts, is now approximately halfway to its completion. In this paper, we describe the models under evaluation and present, for the first time, preliminary results of this unique experiment. While these results are preliminary-the forecasts were meant for an application of 5 years-we find interesting results: most of the models are consistent with the observation and one model forecasts the distribution of earthquakes best. We discuss the observed sample of target earthquakes in the context of historical seismicity within the testing region, highlight potential pitfalls of the current tests, and suggest plans for future revisions to experiments such as this one. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  8. Future high precision experiments and new physics beyond Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Mingxing.

    1993-01-01

    High precision (< 1%) electroweak experiments that have been done or are likely to be done in this decade are examined on the basis of Standard Model (SM) predictions of fourteen weak neutral current observables and fifteen W and Z properties to the one-loop level, the implications of the corresponding experimental measurements to various types of possible new physics that enter at the tree or loop level were investigated. Certain experiments appear to have special promise as probes of the new physics considered here.

  9. Future high precision experiments and new physics beyond Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Mingxing

    1993-04-01

    High precision (< 1%) electroweak experiments that have been done or are likely to be done in this decade are examined on the basis of Standard Model (SM) predictions of fourteen weak neutral current observables and fifteen W and Z properties to the one-loop level, the implications of the corresponding experimental measurements to various types of possible new physics that enter at the tree or loop level were investigated. Certain experiments appear to have special promise as probes of the new physics considered here.

  10. Nanodosimetry of electrons: analysis by experiment and modelling.

    PubMed

    Bantsar, A; Pszona, S

    2015-09-01

    Nanodosimetry experiments for high-energy electrons from a (131)I radioactive source interacting with gaseous nitrogen with sizes on a scale equivalent to the mass per area of a segment of DNA and nucleosome are described. The discrete ionisation cluster-size distributions were measured in experiments carried out with the Jet Counter. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by Monte Carlo modelling. The descriptors of radiation damages have been derived from the data obtained from ionisation cluster-size distributions. PMID:25971347

  11. Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    James Glimm

    2009-06-04

    The three year plan for this project was to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS), Large Eddy Simulations (LES), full two fluid simulations and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar or circular interfaces. We compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. Multiple layers and reshock are considered here.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of Fluid Mixing Laser Experiments and Supernova

    SciTech Connect

    Glimm, James

    2008-06-24

    The three year plan for this project is to develop novel theories and advanced simulation methods leading to a systematic understanding of turbulent mixing. A primary focus is the comparison of simulation models (both Direct Numerical Simulation and subgrid averaged models) to experiments. The comprehension and reduction of experimental and simulation data are central goals of this proposal. We will model 2D and 3D perturbations of planar interfaces. We will compare these tests with models derived from averaged equations (our own and those of others). As a second focus, we will develop physics based subgrid simulation models of diffusion across an interface, with physical but no numerical mass diffusion. We will conduct analytic studies of mix, in support of these objectives. Advanced issues, including multiple layers and reshock, will be considered.

  13. E-health stakeholders experiences with clinical modelling and standardizations.

    PubMed

    Gøeg, Kirstine Rosenbeck; Elberg, Pia Britt; Højen, Anne Randorff

    2015-01-01

    Stakeholders in e-health such as governance officials, health IT-implementers and vendors have to co-operate to achieve the goal of a future-proof interoperable e-health infrastructure. Co-operation requires knowledge on the responsibility and competences of stakeholder groups. To increase awareness on clinical modeling and standardization we conducted a workshop for Danish and a few Norwegian e-health stakeholders' and made them discuss their views on different aspects of clinical modeling using a theoretical model as a point of departure. Based on the model, we traced stakeholders' experiences. Our results showed there was a tendency that stakeholders were more familiar with e-health requirements than with design methods, clinical information models and clinical terminology as they are described in the scientific literature. The workshop made it possible for stakeholders to discuss their roles and expectations to each other. PMID:25991150

  14. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, B. Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Cerjan, C. J.

    2015-08-15

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  15. Analysis of NIF experiments with the minimal energy implosion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, B.; Kwan, T. J. T.; Wang, Y. M.; Merrill, F. E.; Cerjan, C. J.; Batha, S. H.

    2015-08-01

    We apply a recently developed analytical model of implosion and thermonuclear burn to fusion capsule experiments performed at the National Ignition Facility that used low-foot and high-foot laser pulse formats. Our theoretical predictions are consistent with the experimental data. Our studies, together with neutron image analysis, reveal that the adiabats of the cold fuel in both low-foot and high-foot experiments are similar. That is, the cold deuterium-tritium shells in those experiments are all in a high adiabat state at the time of peak implosion velocity. The major difference between low-foot and high-foot capsule experiments is the growth of the shock-induced instabilities developed at the material interfaces which lead to fuel mixing with ablator material. Furthermore, we have compared the NIF capsules performance with the ignition criteria and analyzed the alpha particle heating in the NIF experiments. Our analysis shows that alpha heating was appreciable only in the high-foot experiments.

  16. Computer simulation models are implementable as replacements for animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Badyal, Dinesh K; Modgill, Vikas; Kaur, Jasleen

    2009-04-01

    It has become increasingly difficult to perform animal experiments, because of issues related to the procurement of animals, and strict regulations and ethical issues related to their use. As a result, it is felt that the teaching of pharmacology should be more clinically oriented and that unnecessary animal experimentation should be avoided. Although a number of computer simulation models (CSMs) are available, they are not being widely used. Interactive demonstrations were conducted to encourage the departmental faculty to use CSMs. Four different animal experiments were selected, that dealt with actions of autonomic drugs. The students observed demonstrations of animal experiments involving conventional methods and the use of CSMs. This was followed by hands-on experience of the same experiment, but using CSMs in small groups, instead of hands-on experience with the animal procedures. Test scores and feedback showed that there was better understanding of the mechanisms of action of the drugs, gained in a shorter time. The majority of the students found the teaching programme used to be good to excellent. CSMs can be used repeatedly and independently by students, and this avoids unnecessary experimentation and also causing pain and trauma to animals. The CSM programme can be implemented in existing teaching schedules for pharmacology undergraduate teaching with basic infrastructure support, and is readily adaptable for use by other institutes. PMID:19453215

  17. Multicomponent reactive transport modeling of uranium bioremediation field experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Yilin; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Morrison, Stan J.; Amonette, James E.; Long, Philip E.

    2009-10-15

    Biostimulation field experiments with acetate amendment are being performed at a former uranium mill tailings site in Rifle, Colorado, to investigate subsurface processes controlling in situ bioremediation of uranium-contaminated groundwater. An important part of the research is identifying and quantifying field-scale models of the principal terminal electron-accepting processes (TEAPs) during biostimulation and the consequent biogeochemical impacts to the subsurface receiving environment. Integrating abiotic chemistry with the microbially mediated TEAPs in the reaction network brings into play geochemical observations (e.g., pH, alkalinity, redox potential, major ions, and secondary minerals) that the reactive transport model must recognize. These additional constraints provide for a more systematic and mechanistic interpretation of the field behaviors during biostimulation. The reaction network specification developed for the 2002 biostimulation field experiment was successfully applied without additional calibration to the 2003 and 2007 field experiments. The robustness of the model specification is significant in that 1) the 2003 biostimulation field experiment was performed with 3 times higher acetate concentrations than the previous biostimulation in the same field plot (i.e., the 2002 experiment), and 2) the 2007 field experiment was performed in a new unperturbed plot on the same site. The biogeochemical reactive transport simulations accounted for four TEAPs, two distinct functional microbial populations, two pools of bioavailable Fe(III) minerals (iron oxides and phyllosilicate iron), uranium aqueous and surface complexation, mineral precipitation, and dissolution. The conceptual model for bioavailable iron reflects recent laboratory studies with sediments from the Old Rifle Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) site that demonstrated that the bulk (~90%) of Fe(III) bioreduction is associated with the phyllosilicates rather than the iron oxides

  18. Electrical Resistivity Monitoring of Voids: Results of Dynamic Modeling Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Singha, K.

    2006-05-01

    Remote, non-invasive detection of voids is a challenging problem for environmental and engineering investigations in karst terrain. Many geophysical methods including gravity, electrical, electromagnetic, magnetic, and seismic have potential to detect voids in the subsurface; lithologic heterogeneity and method- specific sources of noise, however, can mask the geophysical signatures of voids. New developments in automated, autonomous geophysical monitoring technology now allow for void detection using differential geophysics. We propose automated collection of electrical resistivity measurements over time. This dynamic approach exploits changes in subsurface electrical properties related to void growth or water-table fluctuation in order to detect voids that would be difficult or impossible to detect using static imaging approaches. We use a series of synthetic modeling experiments to demonstrate the potential of difference electrical resistivity tomography for finding (1) voids that develop vertically upward under a survey line (e.g., an incipient sinkhole); (2) voids that develop horizontally toward a survey line (e.g., a tunnel); and (3) voids that are influenced by changing hydrologic conditions (e.g., void saturation and draining). Synthetic datasets are simulated with a 3D finite-element model, but the inversion assumes a 2D forward model to mimic conventional practice. The results of the synthetic modeling experiments provide insights useful for planning and implementing field-scale monitoring experiments using electrical methods.

  19. Simulation model for the closed plant experiment facility of CEEF.

    PubMed

    Abe, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Kibe, Seishiro; Nitta, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals and crew of CEEF. Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEFs behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. For the first step of development, a flexible algorithm of the simulation program was investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experiment Facility (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of a real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system. PMID:16175692

  20. Simulation model for the closed plant experiment facility of CEEF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yoshio; Kibe, Seishiro; Nitta, Keiji

    The Closed Ecology Experiment Facilities (CEEF) is a testbed for Controlled Ecological Life Support Systems (CELSS) investigations. CEEF including the physico-chemical material regenerative system has been constructed for the experiments of material circulation among plants, breeding animals and crew of CEEF. Because CEEF is a complex system, an appropriate schedule for the operation must be prepared in advance. The CEEF behavioral Prediction System, CPS, that will help to confirm the operation schedule, is under development. CPS will simulate CEEFs behavior with data (conditions of equipments, quantity of materials in tanks, etc.) of CEEF and an operation schedule that will be made by the operation team everyday, before the schedule will be carried out. The result of the simulation will show whether the operation schedule is appropriate or not. In order to realize CPS, models of the simulation program that is installed in CPS must mirror the real facilities of CEEF. For the first step of development, a flexible algorithm of the simulation program was investigated. The next step was development of a replicate simulation model of the material circulation system for the Closed Plant Experiment Facility (CPEF) that is a part of CEEF. All the parts of a real material circulation system for CPEF are connected together and work as a complex mechanism. In the simulation model, the system was separated into 38 units according to its operational segmentation. In order to develop each model for its corresponding unit, specifications for the model were fixed based on the specifications of the real part. These models were put into a simulation model for the system.

  1. Modeling HEDLA magnetic field generation experiments on laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatenejad, M.; Bell, A. R.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Crowston, R.; Drake, R. P.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Koenig, M.; Krauland, C.; Lamb, D.; Lee, D.; Marques, J. R.; Meinecke, J.; Miniati, F.; Murphy, C. D.; Park, H.-S.; Pelka, A.; Ravasio, A.; Remington, B.; Reville, B.; Scopatz, A.; Tzeferacos, P.; Weide, K.; Woolsey, N.; Young, R.; Yurchak, R.

    2013-03-01

    The Flash Center is engaged in a collaboration to simulate laser driven experiments aimed at understanding the generation and amplification of cosmological magnetic fields using the FLASH code. In these experiments a laser illuminates a solid plastic or graphite target launching an asymmetric blast wave into a chamber which contains either Helium or Argon at millibar pressures. Induction coils placed several centimeters away from the target detect large scale magnetic fields on the order of tens to hundreds of Gauss. The time dependence of the magnetic field is consistent with generation via the Biermann battery mechanism near the blast wave. Attempts to perform simulations of these experiments using the FLASH code have uncovered previously unreported numerical difficulties in modeling the Biermann battery mechanism near shock waves which can lead to the production of large non-physical magnetic fields. We report on these difficulties and offer a potential solution.

  2. Calibration of Predictor Models Using Multiple Validation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for calibrating computational models using data from several and possibly dissimilar validation experiments. The offset between model predictions and observations, which might be caused by measurement noise, model-form uncertainty, and numerical error, drives the process by which uncertainty in the models parameters is characterized. The resulting description of uncertainty along with the computational model constitute a predictor model. Two types of predictor models are studied: Interval Predictor Models (IPMs) and Random Predictor Models (RPMs). IPMs use sets to characterize uncertainty, whereas RPMs use random vectors. The propagation of a set through a model makes the response an interval valued function of the state, whereas the propagation of a random vector yields a random process. Optimization-based strategies for calculating both types of predictor models are proposed. Whereas the formulations used to calculate IPMs target solutions leading to the interval value function of minimal spread containing all observations, those for RPMs seek to maximize the models' ability to reproduce the distribution of observations. Regarding RPMs, we choose a structure for the random vector (i.e., the assignment of probability to points in the parameter space) solely dependent on the prediction error. As such, the probabilistic description of uncertainty is not a subjective assignment of belief, nor is it expected to asymptotically converge to a fixed value, but instead it casts the model's ability to reproduce the experimental data. This framework enables evaluating the spread and distribution of the predicted response of target applications depending on the same parameters beyond the validation domain.

  3. Fracture Mechanics Modelling of an In Situ Concrete Spalling Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siren, Topias; Uotinen, Lauri; Rinne, Mikael; Shen, Baotang

    2015-07-01

    During the operation of nuclear waste disposal facilities, some sprayed concrete reinforced underground spaces will be in use for approximately 100 years. During this time of use, the local stress regime will be altered by the radioactive decay heat. The change in the stress state will impose high demands on sprayed concrete, as it may suffer stress damage or lose its adhesion to the rock surface. It is also unclear what kind of support pressure the sprayed concrete layer will apply to the rock. To investigate this, an in situ experiment is planned in the ONKALO underground rock characterization facility at Olkiluoto, Finland. A vertical experimental hole will be concreted, and the surrounding rock mass will be instrumented with heat sources, in order to simulate an increase in the surrounding stress field. The experiment is instrumented with an acoustic emission system for the observation of rock failure and temperature, as well as strain gauges to observe the thermo-mechanical interactive behaviour of the concrete and rock at several levels, in both rock and concrete. A thermo-mechanical fracture mechanics study is necessary for the prediction of the damage before the experiment, in order to plan the experiment and instrumentation, and for generating a proper prediction/outcome study due to the special nature of the in situ experiment. The prediction of acoustic emission patterns is made by Fracod 2D and the model later compared to the actual observed acoustic emissions. The fracture mechanics model will be compared to a COMSOL Multiphysics 3D model to study the geometrical effects along the hole axis.

  4. Integrated modeling of LHCD experiment on Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraiwa, S.; Bonoli, P.; Parker, R.; Wallace, G.

    2014-02-12

    Recent progress in integrating the latest LHCD model based on ray-tracing into the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) is reported. IPS, a python based framework for time dependent tokamak simulation, was expanded recently to incorporate LHCD simulation using GENRAY/CQL3D (ray-tracing/3D Fokker-Planck package). Using GENRAY/CQL3D in the IPS framework, it becomes possible to include parasitic LHCD power loss near the plasma edge, which was found to be important in experiments particularly at high density as expected on reactors. Moreover, it allows for evolving the velocity distribution function in 4 D (ν{sub ∥}, ν⊥, r/a, t) space self-consistently. In order to validate the code, IPS is applied to LHCD experiments on Alctor C-Mod. In this paper, a LHCD experiment performed at the density of n{sub e}∼0.5×10{sup 20}m{sup −3} where good LHCD efficiency and the development of internal transport barrier (ITB) was reported, is modelled in a predictive mode and the result is compared with experiment.

  5. Innovative Fresh Water Production Process for Fossil Fuel Plants

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Klausner; Renwei Mei; Yi Li; Jessica Knight

    2006-09-29

    This project concerns a diffusion driven desalination (DDD) process where warm water is evaporated into a low humidity air stream, and the vapor is condensed out to produce distilled water. Although the process has a low fresh water to feed water conversion efficiency, it has been demonstrated that this process can potentially produce low cost distilled water when driven by low grade waste heat. This report summarizes the progress made in the development and analysis of a Diffusion Driven Desalination (DDD) system. Detailed heat and mass transfer analyses required to size and analyze the diffusion tower using a heated water input are described. The analyses agree quite well with the current data and the information available in the literature. The direct contact condenser has also been thoroughly analyzed and the system performance at optimal operating conditions has been considered using a heated water/ambient air input to the diffusion tower. The diffusion tower has also been analyzed using a heated air input. The DDD laboratory facility has successfully been modified to include an air heating section. Experiments have been conducted over a range of parameters for two different cases: heated air/heated water and heated air/ambient water. A theoretical heat and mass transfer model has been examined for both of these cases and agreement between the experimental and theoretical data is good. A parametric study reveals that for every liquid mass flux there is an air mass flux value where the diffusion tower energy consumption is minimal and an air mass flux where the fresh water production flux is maximized. A study was also performed to compare the DDD process with different inlet operating conditions as well as different packing. It is shown that the heated air/heated water case is more capable of greater fresh water production with the same energy consumption than the ambient air/heated water process at high liquid mass flux. It is also shown that there can be

  6. Danish heathland manipulation experiment data in Model-Data-Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thum, Tea; Peylin, Philippe; Ibrom, Andreas; Van Der Linden, Leon; Beier, Claus; Bacour, Cédric; Santaren, Diego; Ciais, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    In ecosystem manipulation experiments (EMEs) the ecosystem is artificially exposed to different environmental conditions that aim to simulate circumstances in future climate. At Danish EME site Brandbjerg the responses of a heathland to drought, warming and increased atmospheric CO2 concentration are studied. The warming manipulation is realized by passive nighttime warming. The measurements include control plots as well as replicates for each three treatment separately and in combination. The Brandbjerg heathland ecosystem is dominated by heather and wavy hairgrass. These experiments provide excellent data for validation and development of ecosystem models. In this work we used a generic vegetation model ORCHIDEE with Model-Data-Fusion (MDF) approach. ORCHIDEE model is a process-based model that describes the exchanges of carbon, water and energy between the atmosphere and the vegetation. It can be run at different spatial scales from global to site level. Different vegetation types are described in ORCHIDEE as plant functional types. In MDF we are using observations from the site to optimize the model parameters. This enables us to assess the modelling errors and the performance of the model for different manipulation treatments. This insight will inform us whether the different processes are adequately modelled or if the model is missing some important processes. We used a genetic algorithm in the MDF. The data available from the site included measurements of aboveground biomass, heterotrophic soil respiration and total ecosystem respiration from years 2006-2008. The biomass was measured six times doing this period. The respiration measurements were done with manual chamber measurements. For the soil respiration we used results from an empirical model that has been developed for the site. This enabled us to have more data for the MDF. Before the MDF we performed a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters to different data streams. Fifteen most influential

  7. Testing a model of aging in animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Tyurin YuN; Yakovlev AYu; Shi, J; Bass, L

    1995-03-01

    A stochastic model of aging is developed in terms of accumulation and expression of intracellular lesions caused by environment or intrinsic genetic program. In contrast to the commonly used Gompertz-Makeham approach to the parametric analysis of mortality data, the model yields a hazard function that is bounded from above. For testing the model in experiments aimed at studying animal longevity, a Kolmogorov-type statistical test is presented with regard to the hypothesis involving unknown parameters. Examples concerning longevity of intact animals of two different species, as well as the effect of a prolonged irradiation at a low dose rate, are given to illustrate the model application and goodness-of-fit testing. The results of the analysis of published data show that the rate of lesion formation is not sustained at a constant level throughout life, though in some cases its variations with age can be considered negligible. PMID:7766791

  8. Experience in calibrating the double-hardening constitutive model Monot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, M. A.

    2003-11-01

    The Monot double-hardening soil model has previously been implemented within a general purpose finite element algorithm, and used in the analysis of numerous practical problems. This paper reviews experience gained in calibrating Monot to laboratory data and demonstrates how the calibration process may be simplified without detriment to the range of behaviours modelled. It describes Monot's principal features, important governing equations and various calibration methods, including strategies for overconsolidated, cemented and cohesive soils. Based on a critical review of over 30 previous Monot calibrations, for sands and other geomaterials, trends in parameter values have been identified, enabling parameters to be categorized according to their relative importance. It is shown that, for most practical purposes, a maximum of only 5 parameters is needed; for the remaining parameters, standard default values are suggested. Hence, the advanced stress-strain modelling offered by Monot is attainable with a similar number of parameters as would be needed for some simpler, less versatile, models. Copyright

  9. Early experiences building a software quality prediction model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agresti, W. W.; Evanco, W. M.; Smith, M. C.

    1990-01-01

    Early experiences building a software quality prediction model are discussed. The overall research objective is to establish a capability to project a software system's quality from an analysis of its design. The technical approach is to build multivariate models for estimating reliability and maintainability. Data from 21 Ada subsystems were analyzed to test hypotheses about various design structures leading to failure-prone or unmaintainable systems. Current design variables highlight the interconnectivity and visibility of compilation units. Other model variables provide for the effects of reusability and software changes. Reported results are preliminary because additional project data is being obtained and new hypotheses are being developed and tested. Current multivariate regression models are encouraging, explaining 60 to 80 percent of the variation in error density of the subsystems.

  10. Generating a soliton splash through variational modelling and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalogirou, Anna; Bokhove, Onno

    2015-11-01

    Mathematical modelling of water waves in tanks with wave generators is demonstrated by investigating variational methods asymptotically and numerically. A reduced potential flow water wave model is derived using variational techniques, which is based on the assumptions of waves with small amplitude and large wavelength. This model consists of a set of modified Benney-Luke equations describing the deviation from the still water surface η (x , y , t) and the bottom potential Φ (x , y , t) , and includes a time-dependent gravitional potential mimicking a removable ``sluice gate''. The asymptotic model is solved numerically using the automated system Firedrake. In particular, a (dis)continuous Galerkin finite element method is used, together with symplectic integrators for the time discretisation. As a validation, the numerical results are compared to a soliton splash experiment in a long water channel with a contraction at its end, resulting after a sluice gate is removed at a finite time.