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Sample records for experiment seeds ii

  1. Persistence of iron limitation in the western subarctic Pacific SEEDS II mesoscale fertilization experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Mark L.; Trick, Charles G.; Cochlan, William P.; Beall, Ben

    2009-12-01

    The cumulative evidence from more than a dozen mesoscale iron-enrichment studies in high nitrate low chlorophyll (HNLC) waters demonstrates that iron limitation is widespread and very likely affects atmospheric carbon dioxide and thus global climate. However, the responses of microphytoplankton (>20 μm), predominantly diatoms, vary greatly among these mesoscale experiments even though similar amounts of iron were added, making it difficult to quantitatively incorporate iron effects into global climate models. Nowhere is this difference more dramatic than between the massive bloom observed during Subarctic Pacific Iron Experiment for Ecosystem Dynamics Study (SEEDS) I and the order of magnitude smaller ecosystem response in SEEDS II; two mesocale experiments performed in the same HNLC region of the western subarctic Pacific in different years. Deckboard incubation experiments initiated during the early, middle, and late stages of the 32-day SEEDS II experiment show that while the two iron infusions increased phytoplankton growth, diatoms remained significantly limited by iron availability, despite total dissolved Fe concentrations in the patch being well above the diffusion-limited threshold for rapid diatom growth. This iron limitation was apparent <6 days after the initial iron infusion and was not alleviated by the second, smaller iron infusion. In contrast, smaller phytoplankton (<20 μm) showed a more restricted response to further iron amendments, indicating that their iron nutrition was near optimal. Iron complexed to desferrioximine B, a commonly available siderophore produced by at least one marine bacterium, was poorly available to diatoms throughout the patch evolution, indicating that these diatoms lacked the ability to induce high-affinity iron uptake systems. These results suggest that the strong organic complexation of Fe(III) observed in the SEEDS II-fertilized patch was not compatible with rapid diatom growth. In contrast, iron associated with

  2. Behavior of particulate materials during iron fertilization experiments in the Western Subarctic Pacific (SEEDS and SEEDS II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aramaki, Takafumi; Nojiri, Yukihiro; Imai, Keiri

    2009-12-01

    During two mesoscale iron-enrichment studies in the northwestern subarctic Pacific (SEEDS in 2001 summer and SEEDS II in 2004 summer), particulate materials from the iron-induced phytoplankton bloom in the upper water column were monitored to analyze the export processes beneath the upper mixed layer, mainly with drifting sediment traps. We could not observe the total downward export process of the high accumulation of particulate organic carbon from the mixed layer induced by the large diatom bloom of SEEDS [e.g., Tsuda, A., Takeda, S., Saito, H., Nishioka, J., Nojiri, Y., Kudo, I., Kiyosawa, H., Shiomoto, A., Imai, K., Ono, T., Shimamoto, A., Tsumune, D., Yoshimura, T., Aono, T., Hinuma, A., Kinugasa, M., Suzuki, K., Sohrin, Y., Noiri, Y., Tani, H., Deguchi, Y., Tsurushima, N., Ogawa, H., Fukami, K., Kuma, K., Saino, T., 2003. A mesoscale iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific induces large centric diatom bloom. Science 300, 958-961] because the 2-week observation period was too short to examine the decline phase of the bloom. In contrast, in SEEDS II, the particulate organic carbon and particulate organic nitrogen were accumulated 123 and 23 mmol m -2, respectively, in the mixed layer until day-15 (days from iron-enrichment), and then ca. 90% were removed from the mixed layer by day-25. The sediment traps at 40 m depth between day-15 and day-25 accounted for at least more than 35% of these particles. There was no large variation in chemical composition in settling particles above 100 m depth throughout the experimental periods both in SEEDS and SEEDS II. The content of biogenic opal remained more than 50% of all settling particles during SEEDS, while the content of biogenic calcium carbonate was relatively high, with a low biogenic opal content of consistently less than 30% during SEEDS II. These results suggest that high standing stock of seed population of diatoms before the iron fertilization, indicated by low C/Si ratio of particulate matter, is an

  3. Seeds in space experiment results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1991-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) tray in sealed canister number six and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results are presented. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  4. Experiments on the enhancement of compressible mixing via streamwise vorticity. II - Vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naughton, J. W.; Cattafesta, L. N.; Settles, G. S.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of streamwise vorticity on compressible axisymmetric mixing layers is examined using vortex strength assessment and seed particle dynamics analysis. Experimental results indicate that the particles faithfully represent the dynamics of the turbulent swirling flow. A comparison of the previously determined mixing layer growth rates with the present vortex strength data reveals that the increase of turbulent mixing up to 60 percent scales with the degree of swirl. The mixing enhancement appears to be independent of the compressibility level of the mixing layer.

  5. Experiment "Seeds" on Biokosmos 9. Dosimetric part.

    PubMed

    Baican, B; Schopper, E; Wendnagel, T h; Schott, J U; Heilman, C

    1992-01-01

    The aim of the experiment "Seeds" on the Sowjetic satellite Biokosmos 9 was the observation of mutagenic effects caused at special loci of seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and assigned to particles of the Cosmic radiation. Two types of exposure units were flown: A low-shielding unit Type I, mounted at the surface of the satellite (1.4 g/cm2 shielding) and, for comparison, an identical item inside (16 g/cm2 shielding), using nuclear emulsion as track detectors. A Type II unit, flown inside (18g/cm2 shielding) was mounted with AgCl track detectors. The layout will be briefly described. A first set of dosimetric data from the physical evaluation of the experiment will be presented. The subdivision into charge- and LET-groups shows a rather high contribution of the intermediate LET-group (350-1000 MeV/cm) due to medium heavy particles (Z = 6-10) and to enders of light (p, alpha) particles. PMID:11537029

  6. Experiments with solid particle seeding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, C. E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Kaoline, a hydrated aluminum silicate clay, is investigated as a seeding material for laser velocimetry. It is inexpensive but is polydispersed with some of the fineparticles being too large to follow wind tunnel flow and is in the form of nonspherical platelets having an aspect ratio of approximately 4/1. Gravity sedimentation experiments as a means of narrowing the fineparticle sizes distribution are being conducted. The fineparticle size distribution of Engelhard ASP 200 kaolin suspended in ethanol (0.00792 grams kaolin/ml ethanol) as received, after 24 hours gravity sedimentation and after 48 hours sedimentation, respectively is shown. A shearing atomizer is used to inject the fineparticles. Gravity sedimentation is carried out in an 800 ml pyrex beaker. Following gravity sedimentation, the top 3.5 inches are siphoned from the liquid, which has a column height of 4.5 inches. In a like manner, longer settling times will serve to further narrow the fineparticle distribution range. As successive sedimentations are effected, the number of fineparticles per unit volume of ethanol decreased markedly.

  7. Echo-seeding options for LCLS-II

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2010-09-14

    The success of LCLS has opened up a new era of x-ray sciences. An upgrade to LCLS is currently being planned to enhance its capabilities. In this paper we study the feasibility of using the echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) technique to generate narrow bandwidth soft x-ray radiation in the proposed LCLS-II soft x-ray beam line. We focus on the conceptual design, the technical implementation and the expected performances of the echo-seeding scheme. We will also show how the echo-seeding scheme allows one to generate two color x-ray pulses with the higher energy photons leading the lower energy ones as is favored in the x-ray pump-probe experiments.

  8. Re-evaluation of the Arizona cloud-seeding experiment.

    PubMed

    Neyman, J; Osborn, H B; Scott, E L; Wells, M A

    1972-06-01

    The apparent effect of cloud seeding on the average 24-hr precipitation in the Santa Catalina Mountains during the two programs of the 7-year-long Arizona experiment was found to be a 30% loss of rain (P = 0.06). Considering rainy days only, the apparent effect is a 34% loss of rain (P = 0.03). On South-East days the apparent loss was 40% (P = 0.03). The analysis of the diurnal variation in the amounts of hourly precipitation brought out two suggestions: (i) more active silver iodide enters the clouds through seeding at their bases than at the -6 degrees C level; (ii) the population of experimental days includes two categories with opposite responses to seeding: augmentations of rain in one case and losses in the other. These suggestions require independent confirmation. PMID:16591991

  9. Experiment Tgv II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, P.; Štekl, I.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Briancon, Ch.; Šimkovic, F.

    2004-07-01

    The project aims at the measurement of very rare processes of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The experimental facility TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) makes use of 32 HPGe planar detectors mounted in one common cryostat. The detectors are interleaved with thin foils containing ββ sources. Besides passive shielding against background radiation made of pure copper, lead and boron dopped polyethylene additional techniques for background suppression based on digital pulse shape analysis are used. The experimental setup is located in Modane underground laboratory (France). A review of the TGV II facility, its performance parameters and capabilities are presented.

  10. Continued results of the seeds in space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1992-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed on the Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) tray in the sealed canister number 6 and in two small vented canisters. The seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants compared to the control seed that stayed in the storage facility. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility. At least some of the seed in the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed mutations was very low. In the initial testing, the small seeded crops were not grown to maturity to check for mutation and obtain a second generation seed. These small seeded crops are now being grown for evaluation.

  11. A New Look at the Israeli Cloud Seeding Experiments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangno, Arthur L.; Robbs, Peter V.

    1995-05-01

    Two statistical experiments, carried out in Israel, appeared for a time to have provided a unique demonstration of the ability of cloud seeding to increase rainfall. In this paper the authors examine the possibility that both experiments were compromised by type I statistical errors (i.e., `lucky draws' or false positives). It is concluded that in the first Israeli experiment a type I statistical error produced the appearance of statistically significant effects of artificial seeding on rainfall 1) in the buffer zone and the center target area, 2) in the coastal region of Israel, a few kilometers downwind of the seeding, and 3) in portions of Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan.Analysis of the second Israeli experiment using the original crossover design produced a null result. However, when the two target areas were evaluated separately, naturally heavier rainfall over a wide region on days when the north target area was seeded produced the appearance of increases in rainfall due to seeding in the north target area, and when the south target area was seeded, the appearance of decreases in rainfall due to seeding was produced.Target-control (as contrasted with crossover) evaluations of the second Israeli experiment for the north target area alone foundered when control stations were selected from a relatively small region of anomalously low seed/no-seed ratios that was situated within a much larger region of high seed/no-seed ratios, which included Lebanon, Jordan, and most of Israel. Thus, the north target area seed/no-seed ratios are not an isolated, seeding-induced anomaly. On the contrary, it is the low seed/no-seed ratios of the northern coastal control stations, selected after the experiment began, that are anomalous in a regional context and are virtually the only stations that yield an apparently statistically significant effect due to seeding in the north target area.It is concluded that neither of the Israeli experiments demonstrated statistically significant

  12. Continued results of the seeds in space experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1993-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seed were housed on the Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) tray in the sealed canister number 6 and in two small vented canisters. The tray was in the F-2 position. The seed were germinated and the germination rates and the development of the resulting plants were compared to the performance of the control seed that stayed in Park Seed's seed storage facility. The initial results were presented in a paper at the First LDEF Post-Retrieval Symposium. There was a better survival rate of the seed in the sealed canister in space than in the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seed in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low. In the initial testing, the small seeded crops were not grown to maturity to check for mutations and obtain second generation seed. These small seeded crops have now been grown for evaluation and second generation seed collected.

  13. ``From seed-to-seed'' experiment with wheat plants under space-flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashinsky, A.; Ivanova, I.; Derendyaeva, T.; Nechitailo, G.; Salisbury, F.

    1994-11-01

    An important goal with plant experiments in microgravity is to achieve a complete life cycle, the ``seed-to-seed experiment''. Some Soviet attempts to reach this goal are described, notably an experiment with the tiny mustard, Arabidopsis thaliana, in the Phyton 3 device on Salyut 7. Normal seeds were produced although yields were reduced and development was delayed. Several other experiments have shown abnormalities in plants grown in space. In recent work, plants of wheat (Triticum aestivum) were studied on the ground and then in a preliminary experiment in space. Biometric indices of vegetative space plants were 2 to 2.5 times lower than those of controls, levels of chlorophyll a and b were reduced (no change in the ratio of the two pigments), carotenoids were reduced, there was a serious imbalance in major minerals, and membrane lipids were reduced (no obvious change in lipid patterns). Following the preliminary studies, an attempt was made with the Svetoblock-M growth unit to grow a super-dwarf wheat cultivar through a life cycle. The experiment lasted 167 d on Mir. Growth halted from about day 40 to day 100, when new shoots appeared. Three heads had appeared in the boot (surrounded by leaves) when plants were returned to earth. One head was sterile, but 28 seeds matured on earth, and most of these have since produced normal plants and seeds. In principle, a seed-to-seed experiment with wheat should be successful in microgravity.

  14. Atmospheric variability experiment /AVE II/ pilot experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, R. E.; Scroggins, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE II) was conducted in May 1974. Rawinsonde releases were made at 54 upper-air stations in two thirds of the eastern U.S. at 3-hr intervals for a 24-hr period. Radar data were obtained from 11 stations located near the center of the observational area, and as many data as possible were collected from the Nimbus 5, NOAA 2, ATS-3, and DMSP satellites. The present paper provides an overview of the experiment and describes how the user community can obtain copies of the data.

  15. Multibeam seeded brillouin sidescatter in inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, D; Michel, P; Ralph, J E; Divol, L; Ross, J S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Kritcher, A L; Hinkel, D E; Moody, J D

    2015-03-27

    We present the first observations of multibeam weakly seeded Brillouin sidescatter in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. Two seeding mechanisms have been identified and quantified: specular reflections ("glint") from opposite hemisphere beams, and Brillouin backscatter from neighboring beams with a different angle of incidence. Seeded sidescatter can dominate the overall coupling losses, so understanding this process is crucial for proper accounting of energy deposition and drive symmetry. Glint-seeded scattered light could also be used to probe hydrodynamic conditions inside ICF targets. PMID:25860748

  16. LDEF (Postflight), P0004-01 : Seeds in Space Experiment, Tray F02

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    LDEF (Postflight), P0004-01 : Seeds in Space Experiment, Tray F02 EL-1994-00704 The postflight photograph was taken in the SAEF II at KSC after the experiment was removed from the LDEF and the silvered TEFLON® thermal cover was removed from the experiment tray. The Seeds in Space Experiment (P0004-01) is one of three passive experiments located in a 6 inch deep LDEF peripheral tray. The experiment consist of 2 million seeds of 120 different varieties, one sealed canister, two smaller vented canisters, and a silvered TEFLON® thermal cover. Two other experiments, the Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) P0004-02 and the Linear Energy Transfer (LET) Experiment (P0006), were companion experiments in the tray. The experiment hardware was assembled and mounted in the experiment tray with non-magnetic stainless steel fasteners. Areas of the experiment tray flanges covered by the tray clamp blocks are unstained and clearly visible. The sealed Seeds in Space Experiment canister, a base portion and a dome portion, was machined from aluminum and assembled together with a butyl rubber o-ring seal. The machined interior was approximately 4 inches deep with a 12 inch internal diameter, providing a volume of approximately 1/3 cubic foot. the sealed canister was the center canister in the top row. The two vented canisters were also aluminum. One canister, 4 inches in diameter and 4 inches high, was mounted on the top side of the experiment tray at the lower right corner of the large sealed canister. The other vented canister was rectangular in shape and mounted on the bottom side of the tray, the side facing the LDEF interior. The exterior surfaces of all canisters located on the top side of the experiment tray were painted white with Chemglaze II A-276. The exterior surface of the rectangular canister on the bottom side of the experiment tray was coated with Chemglaze Z-306 flat black paint over a Chemglaze 9924 primer. Thermal control was accomplished by

  17. Cloud microphysical background for the Israel-4 cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freud, Eyal; Koussevitzky, Hagai; Goren, Tom; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    The modest amount of rainfall in Israel occurs in winter storms that bring convective clouds from the Mediterranean Sea when the cold post frontal air interacts with its relatively warm surface. These clouds were seeded in the Israel-1 and Israel-2 cloud glaciogenic seeding experiments, which have shown statistically significant positive effect of added rainfall of at least 13% in northern Israel, whereas the Israel-3 experiment showed no added rainfall in the south. This was followed by operational seeding in the north since 1975. The lack of physical evidence for the causes of the positive effects in the north caused a lack of confidence in the statistical results and led to the Israel-4 randomized seeding experiment in northern Israel. This experiment started in the winter of 2013/14. The main difference from the previous experiments is the focus on the orographic clouds in the catchment of the Sea of Galilee. The decision to commence the experiment was partially based on evidence supporting the existence of seeding potential, which is reported here. Aircraft and satellite microphysical and dynamic measurements of the clouds document the critical roles of aerosols, especially sea spray, on cloud microstructure and precipitation forming processes. It was found that the convective clouds over sea and coastal areas are naturally seeded hygroscopically by sea spray and develop precipitation efficiently. The diminution of the large sea spray aerosols farther inland along with the increase in aerosol concentrations causes the clouds to develop precipitation more slowly. The short time available for the precipitation forming processes in super-cooled orographic clouds over the Golan Heights farthest inland represents the best glaciogenic seeding potential.

  18. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887.

    PubMed

    Anikeeva, I D; Akatov YuA; Vaulina, E N; Kostina, L N; Marenny, A M; Portman, A I; Rusin, S V; Benton, E V

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors. PMID:11537516

  19. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benton, E. V.; Anikeeva, I. D.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied. The seeds were located inside the satellite in an open space, protected with aluminum foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminum foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival rate and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can thus be regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  20. Radiobiological experiments with plant seeds aboard the biosatellite Kosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anikeeva, I. D.; Vaulina, E. N.; Kostina, L. N.; Marenny, A. M.; Portman, A. I.; Rusin, S. V.; Benton, E. V.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of spaceflight factors on the seeds of Arabidopsis thaliana and Crepis capillaris were studied provided with various protective measures: the seeds were located inside the satellite and in open space, protected with aluminium foil and also exposed without the foil cover. When the seeds were in open space without any protection, their viability was found to be suppressed; the survival rate and fertility of plants grown from these seeds were also diminished. An increase in the frequency of chromosome aberrations (CA) and in the number of multiple injuries was registered in this case. Experiments with the aluminium foil shielding showed a decrease in the suppression of the seeds' viability, but mutational changes were found to be even more increased, while the survival and fertility of the plants decreased. An increase in the thickness of shielding resulted in a decrease in the effects up to the level of the control, except for the effects connected with CA and fertility of the plants. Analysis of the results shows that these impairments can be ascribed to the action of single heavy charged particles (HCP). The seeds can be thus regarded as an integral biological 'dosimeter' which allows estimation of the total effects of radiation, ecological and biological factors.

  1. Biodiesel from Seeds: An Experiment for Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Plants can store the chemical energy required by their developing offspring in the form of triglycerides. These lipids can be isolated from seeds and then converted into biodiesel through a transesterification reaction. This second-year undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment exemplifies the conversion of an agricultural energy…

  2. Preliminary results of the echo-seeding experiment at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; Schlueter, R.; Venturini, M.; Wan, W.; Pernet, P-L.

    2010-05-23

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  3. Present Status of the Experiment TGV II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Štekl, I.; Čermák, P.; Beneš, P.; Brudanin, V. B.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Egorov, V. G.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalík, A.; Salamatin, A. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Šimkovic, F.

    2002-04-01

    Present status of the experiment TGV II is given. The experiment TGV II is devoted to the measurement of double-beta decay of 106Cd and 48Ca. The new HPGe multi-detector TGV spectrometer has been constructed and installed in the Modane underground laboratory (in France). Preliminary results of the first background measurement are presented.

  4. Removal of Lead(II) Ions from Aqueous Solution Using L. Seed Husk Ash as a Biosorbent.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bingfang; Zuo, Weiyuan; Zhang, Jinlei; Tong, Haijuan; Zhao, Jinhe

    2016-05-01

    The removal of heavy metals, especially from wastewater, has attracted significant interest because of their toxicity, tendency to bioaccumulate, and the threat they pose to human life and the environment. Many low-cost sorbents have been investigated for their biosorption capacity toward heavy metals. However, there are no reports available on the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by of L. seed husk ash. In this work, use of seed husk ash for the removal of Pb(II) from wastewater was investigated as a function of contact time and the initial pH of the solution. Kinetics and equilibrium constants were obtained from batch experiments. Our study shows that the adsorption process follows pseudo-second-order kinetics. Moreover, the Langmuir absorption model gave a better fit to the experimental data than the Freundlich equation. The maximum adsorption capacity of the husk ash was 263.10 mg g at 298 K and pH 5.0, and this is higher than the previously reported data obtained using other sorbents. The results obtained confirm that seed husk ash is an effective sorbent for the removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution. Analysis of infrared spectra of the husk ash after absorption of Pb(II) suggested that OH, C=O, C-O, Si-O-Si, and O-Si-O groups were important for the Pb(II) ion removal. Moreover, practical tests on this biosorbent for Pb(II) removal in real wastewater samples successfully demonstrated that seed husk ash constitutes an efficient and cost-effective technology for the elimination of heavy metals from industrial effluent. PMID:27136166

  5. Primary productivity, bacterial productivity and nitrogen uptake in response to iron enrichment during the SEEDS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Isao; Noiri, Yoshifumi; Cochlan, William P.; Suzuki, Koji; Aramaki, Takafumi; Ono, Tsuneo; Nojiri, Yukihiro

    2009-12-01

    Primary productivity (PP), bacterial productivity (BP) and the uptake rates of nitrate and ammonium were measured using isotopic methods ( 13C, 3H, 15N) during a mesoscale iron (Fe)-enrichment experiment conducted in the western subarctic Pacific Ocean in 2004 (SEEDS II). PP increased following Fe enrichment, reached maximal rates 12 days after the enrichment, and then declined to the initial level on day 17. During the 23-day observation period, we observed the development and decline of the Fe-induced bloom. The surface mixed layer (SML) integrated PP increased by 3-fold, but was smaller than the 5-fold increase observed in the previous Fe-enrichment experiment conducted at almost the same location and season during 2001 (SEEDS). Nitrate uptake rates were enhanced by Fe enrichment but decreased after day 5, and became lower than ammonium uptake rates after day 17. The total nitrogenous nutrient uptake rate declined after the peak of the bloom, and accumulation of ammonium was obvious in the euphotic layer. Nitrate utilization accounted for all the requirements of N for the massive bloom development during SEEDS, whereas during SEEDS II, nitrate accounted for >90% of total N utilization on day 5, declining to 40% by the end of the observation period. The SML-integrated BP increased after day 2 and peaked twice on days 8 and 21. Ammonium accumulation and the delayed heterotrophic activity suggested active regeneration occurred after the peak of the bloom. The SML-integrated PP between days 0 and 23 was 19.0 g C m -2. The SML-integrated BP during the same period was 2.6 g C m -2, which was 14% of the SML-integrated PP. Carbon budget calculation for the whole experimental period indicated that 33% of the whole (particulate plus dissolved) PP (21.5 g C m -2) was exported below the SML and 18% was transferred to the meso-zooplankton (growth). The bacterial carbon consumption (43% of the whole PP) was supported by DOC or POC release from phytoplankton, zooplankton

  6. Seeded FEL Microbunching Experiments at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Tochitsky, S. Ya.; Musumeci, P.; Rosenzweig, J. B.; Joshi, C.; Gottschalk, S. C.

    2010-11-04

    Seeded high-gain FELs, which can generate very powerful radiation pulses in a relatively compact undulator and simultaneously modulate the electron beam longitudinally at the seed wavelength, are important tools for advanced accelerator development. A single-pass 0.5-9 THz FEL amplifier-buncher driven by a regular photoinjector is being built at the UCLA Neptune Laboratory. FEL interactions at 340 {mu}m (1 THz) are considered for the first experiment, since time-resolved measurements of longitudinal current distribution of the bunched beam using the RF deflecting cavity are possible. A design of a 0.2-2.0 {mu}m FEL using the same undulators is presented. In this case the FEL is driven by a high-peak current beam from the laser-plasma accelerator tunable in the 100-300 MeV range.

  7. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy.

    PubMed

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen; Wang, Zeng-Yu

    2016-06-21

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4 This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  8. A class II KNOX gene, KNOX4, controls seed physical dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Maofeng; Zhou, Chuanen; Molina, Isabel; Fu, Chunxiang; Nakashima, Jin; Li, Guifen; Zhang, Wenzheng; Park, Jongjin; Tang, Yuhong; Jiang, Qingzhen

    2016-01-01

    Physical dormancy of seed is an adaptive trait that widely exists in higher plants. This kind of dormancy is caused by a water-impermeable layer that blocks water and oxygen from the surrounding environment and keeps embryos in a viable status for a long time. Most of the work on hardseededness has focused on morphological structure and phenolic content of seed coat. The molecular mechanism underlying physical dormancy remains largely elusive. By screening a large number of Tnt1 retrotransposon-tagged Medicago truncatula lines, we identified nondormant seed mutants from this model legume species. Unlike wild-type hard seeds exhibiting physical dormancy, the mature mutant seeds imbibed water quickly and germinated easily, without the need for scarification. Microscopic observations of cross sections showed that the mutant phenotype was caused by a dysfunctional palisade cuticle layer in the seed coat. Chemical analysis found differences in lipid monomer composition between the wild-type and mutant seed coats. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that a class II KNOTTED-like homeobox (KNOXII) gene, KNOX4, was responsible for the loss of physical dormancy in the seeds of the mutants. Microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses identified CYP86A, a gene associated with cutin biosynthesis, as one of the downstream target genes of KNOX4. This study elucidated a novel molecular mechanism of physical dormancy and revealed a new role of class II KNOX genes. Furthermore, KNOX4-like genes exist widely in seed plants but are lacking in nonseed species, indicating that KNOX4 may have diverged from the other KNOXII genes during the evolution of seed plants. PMID:27274062

  9. Status of the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    S. Rolli

    2002-08-14

    The status of the CDF II experiment is described. Since operations start-up for run II data taking in March 2001, the CDF detector has been commissioned using about 20 pb{sup -1} of data provided by the Tevatron (utilized about 4-8). Most detector components are ready for physics quality data. The goal is to present the first physics results by summer-fall 2002.

  10. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  11. The Amityville Experience During World War II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Historical Inquiry, 1985

    1985-01-01

    An historical journal compiled by advanced placement American history high school students contains 10 articles about the experiences of residents of Amityville, New York, during World War II. Students used secondary sources, first-hand newspaper accounts, oral interviews, and primary source documents to recreate Amityville as it was during those…

  12. Seeds in space experiment. [long duration exposure facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alston, Jim A.

    1992-01-01

    Two million seeds of 120 different varieties representing 106 species, 97 genera, and 55 plant families were flown aboard the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The seeds were housed in one sealed canister and in two small vented canisters. After being returned to earth, the seeds were germinated and the germination rates and development of the resulting plants were compared to the performance of the control seeds that stayed in the Park Seed's seed storage facility. There was a better survival rate in the sealed canister in space than at the storage facility at Park Seed. At least some of the seeds in each of the vented canisters survived the exposure to vacuum for almost six years. The number of observed apparent mutations was very low.

  13. Ground and space experiments to determine the ability of plant seeds to survive in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepfer, David; Zalar, Andreja; Leach, Sydney

    2008-09-01

    The EXPOSE consortium seeks to understand the capacity of organisms (including extremophiles) to survive under space conditions, i.e. to withstand a long voyage through space. We have proposed that plant seeds are suited for space travel. In our current SEEDS experiment on the Columbus module of the ISS, Arabidopsis seeds were chosen for their small size (approx. 300 μm) and the availability of mutants lacking UV screens. These mutants should allow us to establish the role of flavonoids and sinapic acid esters in resistance to UV and other stresses encountered during space travel. The importance of these substances is indicated by simulations (manuscripts in preparation) and spectroscopy (Zalar 2004; Zalar et al. 2007; Zalar et al. 2007), the results of which will be discussed. Zalar A, (2004) Résistance des graines d'arabidopsis aux UV et à d'autres conditions néfastes dans l'espace. Journal DESS Zalar A, Tepfer D, Hoffmann SV, Kenney JM, Leach S (2007) Directed exospermia: I. Biological modes of resistance to UV light are implied through absorption spectroscopy of DNA and potential UV screens. International Journal of Astrobiology 6: 229-240 Zalar A, Tepfer D, Hoffmann SV, Kollmann A, Leach S (2007) Directed exospermia: II. VUV-UV spectroscopy of specialized UV screens, including plant flavonoids, suggests using metabolic engineering to improve survival in space. International Journal of Astrobiology 6: 291-301

  14. Final results of the Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) P-0004-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, Doris K.

    1992-01-01

    Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS), resulted in the distribution of over 132,000 SEED kits in 1990. The kits contained Rutger's tomato seeds that had flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) as well as seeds that had been stored in a climate controlled warehouse for the same period of time. Students compared germination and growth rate characteristics of the two seeds groups and returned data to NASA for analysis. The scientific information gained was valuable as students shared the excitement of taking part in a national project. Of greater importance was the subsequent interest generated in science education.

  15. Megabar liner experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.

    1997-09-01

    Using pulsed power to implode a liner onto a target can produce high shock pressures for many interesting application experiments. With a Pegasus II facility in Los Alamos, a detailed theoretical analysis has indicated that the highest attainable pressure is around 2 Mbar for a best designed aluminum liner. Recently, an interesting composite liner design has been proposed which can boost the shock pressure performance by a factor 4 over the aluminum liner. This liner design was adopted in the first megabar (Megabar-1) liner experiment carried out on Pegasus last year to verify the design concept and to compare the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities on liner integrity with the code simulations. We present briefly the physical considerations to explain why the composite liner provides the best shock pressure performance. The theoretical modeling and performance of Megabar-1 liner are discussed. Also presented are the first experimental results and the liner design modification for our next experiment.

  16. Temporal changes in community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during in situ iron enrichment in the western subarctic Pacific (SEEDS-II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kataoka, Takafumi; Suzuki, Koji; Hayakawa, Maki; Kudo, Isao; Higashi, Seigo; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2009-12-01

    Little is known about the effects of iron enrichment in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll (HNLC) waters on the community composition of heterotrophic bacteria, which are crucial to nutrient recycling and microbial food webs. Using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of 16S rDNA fragments, we investigated the heterotrophic eubacterial community composition in surface waters during an in situ iron-enrichment experiment (SEEDS-II) in the western subarctic Pacific in the summer of 2004. DGGE fingerprints representing the community composition of eubacteria differed inside and outside the iron-enriched patch. Sequencing of DGGE bands revealed that at least five phylotypes of α-proteobacteria including Roseobacter, Cytophaga-Flavobacteria- Bacteroides (CFB), γ-proteobacteria, and Actinobacteria occurred in almost all samples from the iron-enriched patch. Diatoms did not bloom during SEEDS-II, but the eubacterial composition in the iron-enriched patch was similar to that in diatom blooms observed previously. Although dissolved organic carbon (DOC) accumulation was not detected in surface waters during SEEDS-II, growth of the Roseobacter clade might have been particularly stimulated after iron additions. Two identified phylotypes of CFB were closely related to the genus Saprospira, whose algicidal activity might degrade the phytoplankton assemblages increased by iron enrichment. These results suggest that the responses of heterotrophic bacteria to iron enrichment could differ among phylotypes during SEEDS-II.

  17. First commissioning experiments at DARHT-II

    SciTech Connect

    Ekdahl, C. A.; Abeyta, E. O.; Caudill, L. D.; Dalmas, D. A.; Eversole, S. A.; Gallegos, R. A.; Harrison, J. F.; Holzscheiter, M. H.; Johnson, J. B.; Jacquez, E. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Montoya, N. A.; Nath, S.; Neilsen, K. E.; Oro, D. M.; Rodriguez, L. R.; Rodriguez, P.; Sanchez, M.; Scarpetti, R.; Schauer, M. M.; Simmons, D. F.; Smith, H. V.; Studebaker, J. K.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swinney, C. A.; Temple, R. D.; Chen, Y. J.; Houck, T. L.; Henestroza, E.; Eylon, S.; Fawley, W. M.; Yu, S.; Bender, H. A.; Broste, W. B.; Carlson, C. A.; Durtschi, G. M.; Frayer, D. K.; Johnson, D. E.; Jones, K. C.; Meidinger, A.; Moy, K. J.; Sturgess, R. E.; Tom, C. Y.

    2004-01-01

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydro-Test (DARHT) facility will provide up to four short (< 150 ns) radiation pulses for flash radiography of high-explosive driven implosion experiments. To accomplish this the DARBT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) will produce a 2-kA electron beam with 18-MeV kinetic energy, constant to within {+-}0.5% for 2-{mu}s. A fast kicker will cleave four short pulses out of the 2-{mu}s flattop, with the bulk of the beam diverted into a dump. The short pulses will then be transported to the final-focus magnet, and focused onto a tantalum target for conversion to bremsstrahlung pulses for radiography. DARHT-II is a collaborative effort between the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories of the University of California. The first tests of the second axis accelerator were designed to demonstrate the technology, and to meet the modest performance requirements for closing out. The DARHT-II construction project. These experiments demonstrated that we could indeed produce a 1.2 kA beam with pulse length 0.5-1.2 {mu}s and accelerate it to 12.5 MeV. These de-rated parameters were chosen to minimize risk of damage in these first experiments with this novel accelerator. The beam showed no evidence of the BBU instability for these parameters. In fact, we had to reduce the magnetic guide field by a factor of 5 before BBU was observed.

  18. Evidence of Widespread Effects of Cloud Seeding at Two Arizona Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Neyman, Jerzy; Osborn, Herbert B.

    1971-01-01

    The average effect of two cloud seeding experiments (1957-1960; 1961, 1962, and 1964) over the Santa Catalina Mountains, Arizona, on the 24-hr precipitation at Walnut Gulch, 65 miles away, was an apparent 40% loss of rainfall (P = 0.025) on seeded, as opposed to not-seeded, experimental days. Larger apparent losses, some highly significant, were found for experimental days on which Walnut Gulch was downwind from the seeding site (but not on upwind days), and also on “second days” of the randomized pairs (but not on “first days”). The timing of significant apparent effects indicated that the afternoon maximum of precipitation, which is very pronounced on days without seeding, is either absent or weakened on days with seeding. This phenomenon was observed earlier in a study of the Whitetop Project. PMID:16591914

  19. Liner target interaction experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.P.; Chrien, R.E.; Bartsch, R.

    1995-09-01

    The Los Alamos High Energy Density Physics program uses capacitively driven low voltage, inductive-storage pulse power to implode cylindrical targets for hydrodynamics experiments. Once a precision driver liner was characterized an experimental series characterizing the aluminum target dynamics was performed. The target was developed for shock-induced quasi-particle ejecta experiments including holography. The concept for the Liner shock experiment is that the driver liner is used to impact the target liner which then accelerates toward a collimator with a slit in it. A shock wave is set up in the target liner and as the shock emerges from the back side of the target liner, ejecta are generated. By taking a laser hologram the particle distribution of the ejecta are hoped to be determined. The goal for the second experimental series was to characterize the target dynamics and not to measure and generate the ejecta. Only the results from the third shot, Pegasus II-26 fired April 26th, 1994, from the series is discussed in detail. The second experimental series successfully characterized the target dynamics necessary to move forward towards the planned quasi-ejecta experiments.

  20. Intravitreal Melphalan for Vitreous Seeds: Initial Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Xunda; Hua, Peiyan; Li, Jing; Li, Jiakai; Zhao, Junyang; Zhao, Peiquan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of intravitreal melphalan for vitreous seeds from retinoblastoma in Chinese patients. Methods. This is a retrospective review of 17 consecutive Chinese patients (19 eyes) with viable vitreous seeds from retinoblastoma. The patients received multiple intravitreal injections of 20 ug melphalan. Results. The International Classification of Retinoblastoma groups were B in 1 eye, C in 5 eyes, D in 11 eyes, and E in 2 eyes. On average, 6 injections (range: 1–15) were given to each eye at the interval of 2–4 weeks. Successful control of vitreous seeds was achieved in 16 of 19 eyes (84.21%). Globe retention was achieved in 73.68% (14/19) eyes. The patients were followed up for 27 months on average (median: 26; range: 17–42 months). There is a significant difference in response to intravitreal melphalan for cloud, spheres, and dust seeds with a median number of injections of 9, 6, and 3, respectively (P = 0.003). Complications related to intravitreal melphalan included vitreous hemorrhage, cataract, salt-and-pepper retinopathy, and pupil posterior synechia. There was no case of epibulbar extension or systemic metastasis within the period of follow-up. Conclusion. Intravitreal melphalan achieved a high local control rate for vitreous seeds without extraocular extension and with acceptable toxicity in Chinese retinoblastoma patients. PMID:26977313

  1. Atmospheric trace gas measurements during SEEDS-II over the northwestern pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Shungo; Watari, Mayo; Nagao, Ippei; Uematsu, Mitsuo; Kajii, Yoshizumi

    2009-12-01

    Atmospheric trace gas measurements were conducted during SEEDS-II. Atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) was continuously measured by GC-MS during the R/V Hakuho cruise. Further, ambient air was sampled into canisters (42 samples) and analyzed by GC-MS and GC-FID for various biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) after the cruise. CO, O 3, SO 2, and NO x were monitored continuously aboard the ship. A fertilization experiment was conducted in a high-nitrate, low-chlorophyll (HNLC) region (48°N, 165°E). The atmospheric concentrations inside a patch (fertilized area) were compared with those outside it (natural area); however, clear differences were not observed for biogenic trace gasses (DMS, CH 3Cl, CH 3I, isoprene, and alkenes) in the atmosphere. However, a high DMS concentration was observed over the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The fertilized area was also observed by R/V Kilo Moana, and DMS was measured by GC-FPD. A good agreement was observed between the results of the measurements made aboard the two independent ships by different measurement methods. The atmospheric SO 2 concentration was compared with the atmospheric DMS concentration. The SO 2 concentration was found to vary with the atmospheric DMS concentration. A diurnal variation of the atmospheric DMS concentration was observed around the fertilized region. The DMS content tends to increase during the night and decrease during the day. A box model calculation was conducted to explain the diurnal variation of the atmospheric DMS. Since there was no diurnal variation of the wind speed, a constant DMS flux from the ocean surface was assumed. Further, the atmospheric OH radical concentration was assumed to be dependent on sunlight. The box model can roughly reproduce the atmospheric DMS diurnal variation mainly caused by its removal reaction with OH radicals.

  2. Model analysis of radar echo split observed in an artificial cloud seeding experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masaki, Shimada; Kikuro, Tomine; Koji, Nishiyama

    2016-06-01

    An artificial cloud seeding experiment was performed over the Japan Sea in winter to show how massive seeding could be effective to mitigate heavy snowfall damage. The results showed that 20 min after cloud seeding, a portion of the radar echo beneath the seeding track was weakened to divide the radar echo into two parts. In order to analyze the results, a numerical simulation was conducted by using the Weather Research and Forecasting model verion 3.5.1. In this simulation, the seeding effects were represented as phenomena capable of changing rain particles by accreting cloud ice and snow to form graupel particles and by changing cloud liquid water to snow particles. The graupel particles fell rapidly, thus temporarily intensifying the rainfall, which subsequently decreased. Therefore, the weakened radar echo in the field experiment is deemed to have been caused by the increase in rapidly falling graupel particles.

  3. NDCX-II target experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, J. J.; More, R. M.; Terry, M.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Koniges, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Ng, A.; Ni, P. A.; Liu, W.; Logan, B. G.; Startsev, E.; Yuen, A.

    2013-06-13

    The ion accelerator NDCX-II is undergoing commissioning at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Its principal mission is to explore ion-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) especially in the Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime. We have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated targets for parameters expected for the initial configuration of NDCX-II. For metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets), the beam is predicted to heat the target in a timescale comparable to the hydrodynamic expansion time for experiments that infer material properties from measurements of the resulting rarefaction wave. We have also carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam heating of metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets) in which the ion range is shorter than the areal density of the material. In this case shock waves will form and we derive simple scaling laws for the efficiency of conversion of ion energy into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Geometries with a tamping layer may also be used to study the merging of a tamper shock with the end-of-range shock. As a result, this process can occur in tamped, direct drive IFE targets.

  4. NDCX-II target experiments and simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Barnard, J. J.; More, R. M.; Terry, M.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Koniges, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Ng, A.; Ni, P. A.; Liu, W.; et al

    2013-06-13

    The ion accelerator NDCX-II is undergoing commissioning at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Its principal mission is to explore ion-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) especially in the Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime. We have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated targets for parameters expected for the initial configuration of NDCX-II. For metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets), the beam is predicted to heat the target in a timescale comparable to the hydrodynamic expansion time for experiments that infer material properties from measurements of the resulting rarefaction wave. We have alsomore » carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam heating of metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets) in which the ion range is shorter than the areal density of the material. In this case shock waves will form and we derive simple scaling laws for the efficiency of conversion of ion energy into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Geometries with a tamping layer may also be used to study the merging of a tamper shock with the end-of-range shock. As a result, this process can occur in tamped, direct drive IFE targets.« less

  5. NDCX-II target experiments and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnard, J. J.; More, R. M.; Terry, M.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Koniges, A.; Kwan, J. W.; Ng, A.; Ni, P. A.; Liu, W.; Logan, B. G.; Startsev, E.; Yuen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The ion accelerator NDCX-II is undergoing commissioning at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Its principal mission is to explore ion-driven High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) relevant to Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) especially in the Warm Dense Matter (WDM) regime. We have carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam-heated targets for parameters expected for the initial configuration of NDCX-II. For metal foils of order one micron thick (thin targets), the beam is predicted to heat the target in a timescale comparable to the hydrodynamic expansion time for experiments that infer material properties from measurements of the resulting rarefaction wave. We have also carried out hydrodynamic simulations of beam heating of metallic foam targets several tens of microns thick (thick targets) in which the ion range is shorter than the areal density of the material. In this case shock waves will form and we derive simple scaling laws for the efficiency of conversion of ion energy into kinetic energy of fluid flow. Geometries with a tamping layer may also be used to study the merging of a tamper shock with the end-of-range shock. This process can occur in tamped, direct drive IFE targets.

  6. Comparative studies of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE II satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, Glenn K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Wang, P.; Osborn, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    Results from the Stratospheric Aerosol Measurement (SAM) II and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II are compared for measurement locations which are coincident in time and space. At 1.0 micron, the SAM II and SAGE II aerosol extinction profiles are similar within their measurement errors. In addition, sunrise and sunset aerosol extinction data at four different wavelengths are compared for occasions when the SAGE II and SAM II measurements are nearly coincident in space and about 12 hours apart.

  7. Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) P-0004-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, Doris K.

    1991-01-01

    This cooperative endeavor of NASA Headquarters, the NASA Langley Research Center, and the George W. Park Seed Company, resulted in the distribution, by the end of March, 1990, of approximately 132,000 space exposed experiment developed for students (SEEDS) kits to 64,000 teachers representing 40,000 classrooms and 3.3 million kindergarden through university students. Kits were sent to every state, as well as to 30 foreign countries. Preliminary radiation data indicates that layer A received 725 rads, while layer D received 350 rads. Germination rate was reported to be 73.8 percent for space exposed seeds and 70.3 percent for earth based control seeds. Tests conducted within the first six months after retrieval indicated space exposed seeds germinated in an average of 8.0 days, while earth based control seeds' average germination rate was 8.3 days. Some mutations (assumed to be radiation induced) reported by students and Park Seed include plants that added a leaf instead of the usual flower at the end of the flower front and fruit produced from a flower with a variegated calyx bore seeds producing albino plants, while fruit from a flower with a green calyx from the same plant bore seeds produced green plants.

  8. Seed Experiments for Students. Tips & Demonstrations for Teachers & Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tant, Carl

    This book provides a short course in the mysteries of seed structure, function, and development. Chapter 1, "Backgrounds, Hints, And Tips For Teachers And Parents," provides a basis for working with the mid-years student. Chapater 2, "Where Do I Start? What Do I Do?" provides procedural tips for science research. Chapter 3, "Peek Inside A…

  9. VINETA II: a linear magnetic reconnection experiment.

    PubMed

    Bohlin, H; Von Stechow, A; Rahbarnia, K; Grulke, O; Klinger, T

    2014-02-01

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors. PMID:24593355

  10. VINETA II: A linear magnetic reconnection experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlin, H. Von Stechow, A.; Rahbarnia, K.; Grulke, O.; Klinger, T.

    2014-02-15

    A linear experiment dedicated to the study of driven magnetic reconnection is presented. The new device (VINETA II) is suitable for investigating both collisional and near collisionless reconnection. Reconnection is achieved by externally driving magnetic field lines towards an X-point, inducing a current in the background plasma which consequently modifies the magnetic field topology. Owing to the open field line configuration of the experiment, the current is limited by the axial sheath boundary conditions. A plasma gun is used as an additional electron source in order to counterbalance the charge separation effects and supply the required current. Two drive methods are used in the device. First, an oscillating current through two parallel conductors drive the reconnection. Second, a stationary X-point topology is formed by the parallel conductors, and the drive is achieved by an oscillating current through a third conductor. In the first setup, the magnetic field of the axial plasma current dominates the field topology near the X-point throughout most of the drive. The second setup allows for the amplitude of the plasma current as well as the motion of the flux to be set independently of the X-point topology of the parallel conductors.

  11. Results of the South African Cloud-Seeding Experiments Using Hygroscopic Flares.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mather, G. K.; Terblanche, D. E.; Steffens, F. E.; Fletcher, L.

    1997-11-01

    A new method of seeding convective clouds for the purpose of augmenting rainfall is being developed in South Africa. Flares that produce small salt particles (0.5-m mean diameter) are attached to the trailing edge of the wings of seeding aircraft and ignited in updrafts below the cloud base of convective storms. This method of delivery overcomes most of the difficulties encountered in the handling and the use of hygroscopic materials, difficulties that made seeding with ice nuclei (AgI) a more attractive option.The research that has led to the development of this new technique was prompted by an encounter with a storm with dramatically altered microphysics that was growing over a Kraft paper mill in the research area. Hygroscopic seeding flares were subsequently developed, and seeding trials began in October 1990. Successful seeding trials quickly led to the design and execution of a randomized convective cloud-seeding experiment, the results of which show convincing evidence of increases in the radar-measured rain mass from seeded storms when compared to the control or unseeded storms.Heightened reflectivities aloft seen by the real-time storm-tracking software and observed in the exploratory analysis raises the possibility of developing a radar-measured seeding algorithm that can recognize in almost real time a successful convective seeding event. The implications of such a development would have far-reaching effects on the conduct of future convective cloud-seeding experiments and operations.The authors' seeding hypothesis postulates that the hygroscopic seeding at cloud base accelerates the growth of large hydrometeors in the treated clouds, which harvest more of the available supercooled water before it is expelled into the anvils by the strong updrafts that are a characteristic of the local storms, thereby increasing the efficiency of the rainfall process. The validity of this hypothesis is supported by microphysical measurements made from an instrumented

  12. Biosorption of Cd(II) on jatropha fruit coat and seed coat.

    PubMed

    Jain, Niveta; Johnson, Thomas Anish; Johnson, Thoma Anish; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, ShahiVind; Gupta, Navindu

    2015-07-01

    Jatropha (Jatropha curcas L.) seed coat (JSC) and fruit coat (JFC) were investigated for adsorption of Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. JFC and JSC fine powders were characterized using FTIR and SEM which indicated that both the adsorbents have high surface area, pore space on their surface, and anionic sites for metal ion binding. Batch adsorption study was conducted to study the effect of adsorption time, agitation speed, and initial concentration of Cd(II) ion, pH, and temperature on the adsorption of Cd(II) by adsorbents. The equilibrium isotherm, kinetics, and thermodynamics of the adsorption process were studied. Adsorption equilibrium followed both Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm. The adsorption capacity (Q m ) of Cd(II) on JSC and JFC were 22.83 and 21.97 mg g(-1), respectively. The adsorption of Cd(II) on JSC and JFC is endothermic in nature. The change of free energy (∆G) of the biosorption of Cd(II) on JSC ranged from -37.05 to -40.54 kJ mol(-1) and for JFC -34.50 to -37.35 kJ mol(-1). The enthalpy change (∆H) and entropy change (∆S) was 15.84 kJ mol(-1) and -0.17 kJ mol(-1) K(-1) for JSC and 8.77 kJ mol(-1) and -0.14 kJ mol(-1) K(-1) for JFC. Elovich model provided a better correlation of the experimental data in comparison with pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models. The study indicated that JFC and JSC have good adsorption capacity for Cd(II). PMID:26050066

  13. Increased temperatures negatively affect Juniperus communis seeds: evidence from transplant experiments along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Gruwez, R; De Frenne, P; Vander Mijnsbrugge, K; Vangansbeke, P; Verheyen, K

    2016-05-01

    With a distribution range that covers most of the Northern hemisphere, common juniper (Juniperus communis) has one of the largest ranges of all vascular plant species. In several regions in Europe, however, populations are decreasing in size and number due to failing recruitment. One of the main causes for this failure is low seed viability. Observational evidence suggests that this is partly induced by climate warming, but our mechanistic understanding of this effect remains incomplete. Here, we experimentally assess the influence of temperature on two key developmental phases during sexual reproduction, i.e. gametogenesis and fertilisation (seed phase two, SP2) and embryo development (seed phase three, SP3). Along a latitudinal gradient from southern France to central Sweden, we installed a transplant experiment with shrubs originating from Belgium, a region with unusually low juniper seed viability. Seeds of both seed phases were sampled during three consecutive years, and seed viability assessed. Warming temperatures negatively affected the seed viability of both SP2 and SP3 seeds along the latitudinal gradient. Interestingly, the effect on embryo development (SP3) only occurred in the third year, i.e. when the gametogenesis and fertilisation also took place in warmer conditions. We found strong indications that this negative influence mostly acts via disrupting growth of the pollen tube, the development of the female gametophyte and fertilisation (SP2). This, in turn, can lead to failing embryo development, for example, due to nutritional problems. Our results confirm that climate warming can negatively affect seed viability of juniper. PMID:26465806

  14. A Review of Cloud Seeding Experiments to Enhance Precipitation and Some New Prospects.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruintjes, Roelof T.

    1999-05-01

    Water is one of the most basic commodities on earth sustaining human life. In many regions of the world, traditional sources and supplies of ground water, rivers and reservoirs, are either inadequate or under threat from ever-increasing demands on water from changes in land use and growing populations. This has prompted scientists and engineers to explore the possibility of augmenting water supplies by means of cloud seeding.This paper provides an overview of the current scientific status of weather modification activities to enhance precipitation for both glaciogenic and hygroscopic seeding experiments. It is important to emphasize that although funding for scientific studies has decreased substantially during the past decade, operational programs have actually increased.During the last 10 years there has been a thorough scrutiny of past experiments involving experiments using glaciogenic seeding. Although there still exist indications that seeding can increase precipitation, a number of recent studies have questioned many of the positive results, weakening the scientific credibility. As a result, considerable skepticism exists as to whether these methods provides a cost-effective means for increasing precipitation for water resources.Recent results from hygroscopic seeding experiments provided for some renewed optimism in the field of precipitation enhancement. Although promising results have been obtained to date, some fundamental questions remain that need to be answered in order to provide a sound scientific basis for this technology.

  15. [Experiences with ambulatory cardiologic phase II rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Schönstedt, S; Beckmann, S; Disselhoff, W; Rüssmann, B

    1999-04-01

    The phase II cardiac rehabilitation in Germany differs markedly from other European countries and the USA. Most of the patients enter a 3-week full residential program. In contrast we developed an outpatient phase II cardiac rehabilitation program. Since 1979 we treated more than 8,500 patients with different indications (i.e. after myocardial infarction, coronary bypass surgery, valve replacement and reconstruction). Patients with a daily commuting time over 60 minutes are not suitable for outpatient rehabilitation. Our model corresponds to the German intrahospital rehabilitation. The rehabilitation is carried out in 3 weeks offering approximately 66 hours of therapy. Groups of 8 patients with a similar level of physical capacity stay together during the rehabilitation. A comprehensive program with exercise training, physical therapy, psychological support, education in life style changes and risk factor modification has been developed. The compliance of the patients as well as the acceptance by the family are excellent. Long-lasting reduction in LDL cholesterol levels and increments in work-load capacities have been demonstrated. A high percentage of patients returned to work. Cost analysis demonstrates a reduction up to 40% in comparison to the full residential program. Therefore the outpatient phase II cardiac rehabilitation is a good alternative especially in urban areas. PMID:10372303

  16. Commissioning the Echo-Seeding Experiment Echo-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Weathersby, S.a E.Colby; Dunning, M.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Woodley, M.; Xiang, D.; Pernet, P-L.; /Ecole Polytechnique, Lausanne

    2011-06-02

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment is intended to test the EEHG principle at low electron beam energy, 120 MeV, and determine the sensitivities and limitations to understand the expected performance at the higher energy scales and harmonic numbers required for x-ray FELs. In this paper we present the experimental results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  17. The COBRA-1B irradiation experiment in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Hins, A.G.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L.

    1994-09-01

    The objective of the forthcoming COBRA-1B experiment in EBR-II is to evaluate the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the physical and mechanical properties of candidate fusion structural materials. Of special interest in this experiment will be ITER-relevant temperature and exposure for the test specimens. Approximately 50% of the irradiation test volume will be devoted to vanadium-alloy specimens. Design of the COBRA-1B irradiation experiment began in this reporting period and is in progress. The target reactor insertion date for COBRA-1B is September 1994. Technical and programmatic feasibility approval for the experiment has been granted by EBR-II Operations.

  18. Preliminary Results of the Echo-Seeding Experiment ECHO-7 at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Colby, E.; Ding, Y.; Dunning, M.; Frederico, J.; Gilevich, S.; Hast, C.; Jobe, K.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Soong, K.; Stupakov, G.; Szalata, Z.; Walz, D.; Weathersby, S.; Woodley, M.; Corlett, J.; Qiang, J.; Penn, G.; Prestemon, S.; /LBL, Berkeley /LPHE, Lausanne

    2010-06-15

    ECHO-7 is a proof-of-principle echo-enabled harmonic generation FEL experiment in the Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator (NLCTA) at SLAC. The experiment aims to generate coherent radiation at 318 nm and 227 nm, which are the 5th and 7th harmonic of the infrared seed laser. In this paper we present the preliminary results from the commissioning run of the completed experimental setup which started in April 2010.

  19. EBR-II: twenty years of operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, G.L.; Buschman, H.W.; Smith, R.N.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 2 (EBR-II) is an unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt. For the last 20 years EBR-II has operated safely, has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, has shown excellent performance of its sodium components, and has had an excellent plant factor. These years of operating experience provide a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future liquid metal fast reactors. This report provides a brief description of the EBR-II plant and its early operating experience, describes some recent problems of interest to the nuclear community, and also mentions some of the significant operating achievements of EBR-II. Finally, a few words and speculations on EBR-II's future are offered. 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    SciTech Connect

    Benes, P.; Cermak, P.; Stekl, I.; Brudanin, V. B.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Kovalik, A.; Simkovic, F.

    2007-10-12

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of {sup 106}Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.{yields}g.s.) in {sup 106}Cd as 2.0x10{sup 20} years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  1. The TGV II Experiment (Phase I Results)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beneš, P.; Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Gusev, K. N.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalenko, V. E.; Kovalik, A.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Salamatin, A. V.; Šimkovic, F.; Štekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.

    2007-10-01

    The TGV II (Telescope Germanium Vertical) facility is a low background spectrometer operated in Modane Underground Laboratory. It aims at the study of double electron capture of 106Cd. The spectrometer is composed of 32 HPGe planar detectors interleaved with thin-foil samples made of Cd-106 enriched to 75% (total mass about 10 g). In 2006, the main run of phase I (1 year duration) was terminated yielding a new limit on half-life for two-neutrino double electron capture (g.s.→g.s.) in 106Cd as 2.0×1020 years. This limit is significantly higher (by almost three orders of magnitude) than those already published.

  2. Improvement of AMGA Python Client Library for Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Geunchul; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes the recent improvement of the AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) python client library for the Belle II Experiment. We were drawn to the action items related to library improvement after in-depth discussions with the developer of the Belle II distributed computing system. The improvement includes client-side metadata federation support in python, DIRAC SSL library support as well as API refinement for synchronous operation. Some of the improvements have already been applied to the AMGA python client library as bundled with the Belle II distributed computing software. The recent mass Monte- Carlo (MC) production campaign shows that the AMGA python client library is reliably stable.

  3. The Structures of Summer Convective Clouds in Eastern Montana. II: Effects of Artificial Seeding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Peter V.; Politovich, Marcia K.

    1980-06-01

    The seeding of clouds in Miles City, Montana with AgI pyrotechnics at cloud tops generally produced large increases in ice particle concentrations, decreases in liquid water contents, and increases in precipitation particles lower down in the clouds. Similar, but even more pronounced, changes were observed when clouds were seeded with dry ice. Seeding with AgI-NH4I-acetone solution at cloud base generally did not produce observable changes in cloud microstructures at higher levels but in one case changes attributable to this type of seeding were observed.Comparisons of the structure of seeded clouds at Miles City with unseeded clouds suggests that the seeding of small and embedded cumulus clouds with dry ice to produce ice panicle concentrations of 1-10 1 may offer the best potential for enhancing precipitation.

  4. DESIGN AND STATUS OF THE VISA II EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDONIAN,G.BABZIEN,MLBEN-ZVI,I.YAKIMENKO,Y.ET AL.

    2004-03-24

    VISA II is the follow-up project to the successful Visible to Infrared SASE Amplifier (VISA) experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) in Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). This paper will report the motivation for and status of the two main experiments associated with the VISA II program. One goal of VISA II is to perform an experimental study of the physics of a chirped beam SASE FEL at the upgraded facilities of the ATF. This requires a linearization of the transport line to preserve energy chirping of the electron beam at injection. The other planned project is a strong bunch compression experiment, where the electron bunch is compressed in the chicane, and the dispersive beamline transport, allowing studies of deep saturation.

  5. Multiwell experiment: reservoir modeling analysis, Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, A.I.

    1985-05-01

    This report updates an ongoing analysis by reservoir modelers at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of well test data from the Department of Energy's Multiwell Experiment (MWX). Results of previous efforts were presented in a recent METC Technical Note (Horton 1985). Results included in this report pertain to the poststimulation well tests of Zones 3 and 4 of the Paludal Sandstone Interval and the prestimulation well tests of the Red and Yellow Zones of the Coastal Sandstone Interval. The following results were obtained by using a reservoir model and history matching procedures: (1) Post-minifracture analysis indicated that the minifracture stimulation of the Paludal Interval did not produce an induced fracture, and extreme formation damage did occur, since a 65% permeability reduction around the wellbore was estimated. The design for this minifracture was from 200 to 300 feet on each side of the wellbore; (2) Post full-scale stimulation analysis for the Paludal Interval also showed that extreme formation damage occurred during the stimulation as indicated by a 75% permeability reduction 20 feet on each side of the induced fracture. Also, an induced fracture half-length of 100 feet was determined to have occurred, as compared to a designed fracture half-length of 500 to 600 feet; and (3) Analysis of prestimulation well test data from the Coastal Interval agreed with previous well-to-well interference tests that showed extreme permeability anisotropy was not a factor for this zone. This lack of permeability anisotropy was also verified by a nitrogen injection test performed on the Coastal Red and Yellow Zones. 8 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. SAGE II stratospheric density and temperature retrieval experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Pi-Huan; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.; Lenoble, J.; Nagatani, R. M.; Chanin, M. L.; Barnes, R. A.; Schmidlin, F.; Rowland, M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a stratospheric density and temperature retrieval experiment based on the solar occultation measurement of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II). The entire retrieval analysis involves two inversion steps: the vertical structure inversion, which derives the profile of local atmospheric extinction from SAGE II limb optical depth data, and the species inversion, which inverts the concentration of air molecules, aerosols, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the derived atmospheric extinction at five SAGE II short wavelengths (0.385, 0.448, 0.453, 0.525, and 0.600 microns). The derived density profile is then used to infer the temperature distribution, assuming that the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and obeys the ideal gas law. The temperature profiles retrieved from the SAGE II observations are compared with near-coincident, in both time and space, French Rayleigh lidar and NASA Wallops Flight Facility rocket datasonde soundings as well as the National Meteorological Center (NMC) data analyses. The results indicate that the mean SAGE II temperature agrees with the mean lidar measurements to within 2 C at altitudes from 30.5 to 52.5 km. The SAGE II and datasonde observations agree to within about 4 C in approximately the same altitude region.

  7. Recent operating experiences and programs at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, G.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) is a pool-type, unmoderated, sodium-cooled reactor with a design power of 62.5 MWt and an electrical generation capability of 20 MW. It has been operated by Argonne National Laboratory for the US government for almost 20 years. During that time, it has operated safely and has demonstrated stable operating characteristics, high availability, and excellent performance of its sodium components. The 20 years of operating experience of EBR-II is a valuable resource to the nuclear community for the development and design of future LMFBR's. Since past operating experience has been extensively reported, this report will focus on recent programs and events.

  8. Simultaneous existence of cinnamomin (a type II RIP) and small amount of its free A- and B-chain in mature seeds of camphor tree.

    PubMed

    Hou, Fa-Jian; Xu, Hong; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2003-04-01

    Cinnamomin, a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), was isolated from the mature seeds of camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). In this paper, small amount of free A- and B-chain of cinnamomin were found to be present in the mature seed cell of C. camphora besides the intact cinnamomin. Our results demonstrated that camphorin, a type I RIP previously reported to coexist with cinnamomin in the seeds of C. camphora, actually was the A-chain of cinnamomin. The percentage of free A- and B-chain in the total cinnamomin was 2.6-2.8% in the seed extract. Of these free A- and B-chain approximate 80% already existed in the seed cell, only about 20% were produced during the purification operation. As the enzymatic activity to reduce disulfide bond of cinnamomin in the seed extract of C. camphora was detected, we proposed that the free A- and B-chain were derived from the enzymatic reduction of the interchain disulfide bond of cinnamomin. It was demonstrated that the endogenous type II RIPs of several plant species, such as Cinnamomum porrectum, Cinnamomum bodinieri and Ricinus communis, could be enzymatically reduced into the free A- and B-chain in their respective seed cells. The function of the free A-chain in the seed cell and the possibility that metabolic enzymes might be involved in the reduction of the interchain disulfide bond of type II RIPs in vivo are discussed. PMID:12565707

  9. SAGE II inversion algorithm. [Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Lenoble, J.; Brogniez, C.; Pruvost, P.

    1989-01-01

    The operational Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II multichannel data inversion algorithm is described. Aerosol and ozone retrievals obtained with the algorithm are discussed. The algorithm is compared to an independently developed algorithm (Lenoble, 1989), showing that the inverted aerosol and ozone profiles from the two algorithms are similar within their respective uncertainties.

  10. A transient overpower experiment in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Herzog, J.P.; Tsai, H.; Dean, E.M.; Aoyama, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    1994-03-01

    The TOPI-IE test was a transient overpower test on irradiate mixed-oxide fuel pins in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The test, the fifth in a series, was part of a cooperative program between the US Department of Energy and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan to conduct operational transient testing on mixed-oxide fuel pins in the metal-fueled EBR-II. The principle objective of the TOPI-1E test was to assess breaching margins for irradiated mixed-oxide fuel pins over the Plant Protection System (PPS) thresholds during a slow, extended overpower transient. This paper describes the effect of the TOPI-1E experiment on reactor components and the impact of the experiment on the long-term operability of the reactor. The paper discusses the role that SASSYS played in the pre-test safety analysis of the experiment. The ability of SASSYS to model transient overpower events is detailed by comparisons of data from the experiment with computed reactor variables from a SASSYS post-test simulation of the experiment.

  11. The Software Framework of the Belle II Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Andreas

    2011-12-01

    The future of CP-Violation experiments is to begin in 2014 with the launch of the SuperKEKB collider in Tsukuba, Japan. As a part of this process the BELLE experiment will undergo an upgrade, giving rise to the BELLE II experiment. The BELLE II detector will include improvements and redesigns of various subdetectors, as well as the addition of an entire new subdetector for precise vertexing. In order to reflect these changes in the existing BELLE software framework, major modifications of nearly all parts of the software would have been necessary. As a result the decision was made to completely rewrite the software framework. In this article the main concepts of the new framework and the applied technologies are presented.

  12. Shear History Extensional Rheology Experiment II (SHERE II) Microgravity Rheology with Non-Newtonian Polymeric Fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaishankar, Aditya; Haward, Simon; Hall, Nancy Rabel; Magee, Kevin; McKinley, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of SHERE II is to study the effect of torsional preshear on the subsequent extensional behavior of filled viscoelastic suspensions. Microgravity environment eliminates gravitational sagging that makes Earth-based experiments of extensional rheology challenging. Experiments may serve as an idealized model system to study the properties of lunar regolith-polymeric binder based construction materials. Filled polymeric suspensions are ubiquitous in foods, cosmetics, detergents, biomedical materials, etc.

  13. The silicon strip vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onuki, Yoshiyuki

    2014-11-01

    The Belle II upgrade of the Belle experiment will extend the search for physics beyond the standard model. The upgrade is currently under construction, and foreseen to complete in time for the physics run scheduled for 2016. The vertex detector of the Belle II comprises two types of silicon detectors: the pixel detector (PXD) and the strip detector (SVD) using double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). One of the most characteristic features of the SVD is a unique chip-on-sensor scheme which enabling good signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio while reducing the material budget. This paper describes the implementation of the scheme, status and future prospects of the Belle II SVD.

  14. Prospects of charmonium studies in the Belle-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pakhlova, G. V.

    2015-12-15

    TheBelle-II experiment at the SuperKEKB super-B factorywill begin data acquisition in 2016, the expected integrated luminosity being 50 ab{sup -1}. A statistical data sample of record volume 50 times as large as that of the statistical data sample accumulated earlier at the Belle detector will make it possible to measure precisely the parameters of new exotic states discovered recently at B factories and to clarify the origin of these states.

  15. Biosorption kinetics, thermodynamics and isosteric heat of sorption of Cu(II) onto Tamarindus indica seed powder.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Shamik; Saha, Papita Das

    2011-12-01

    Biosorption of Cu(II) by Tamarindus indica seed powder (TSP) was investigated as a function of temperature in a batch system. The Cu(II) biosorption potential of TSP increased with increasing temperature. The rate of the biosorption process followed pseudo second-order kinetics while the sorption equilibrium data well fitted to the Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. The maximum monolayer Cu(II) biosorption capacity increased from 82.97 mg g(-1) at 303 K to 133.24 mg g(-1) at 333 K. Thermodynamic study showed spontaneous and endothermic nature of the sorption process. Isosteric heat of sorption, determined using the Clausius-Clapeyron equation increased with increase in surface loading showing its strong dependence on surface coverage. The biosorbent was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area and porosity analyzer, X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results of FTIR analysis of unloaded and Cu(II)-loaded TSP revealed that -NH(2), -OH, -C=O and C-O functional groups on the biosorbent surface were involved in the biosorption process. The present study suggests that TSP can be used as a potential, alternative, low-cost biosorbent for removal of Cu(II) ions from aqueous media. PMID:21872453

  16. Pegasus II experiments and plans for the Atlas pulsed power facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Adams, P.J.; Atchison, W.L.

    1997-09-01

    Atlas will be a high-energy (36 MJ stored), high-power ({approximately} 10 TW) pulsed power driver for high energy-density experiments, with an emphasis on hydrodynamics. Scheduled for completion in late 1999, Atlas is designed to produce currents in the 40-50 MA range with a quarter-cycle time of 4-5 {mu}s. It will drive implosions of heavy liners (typically 50 g) with implosion velocities exceeding 20 mm/{mu}s. Under these conditions very high pressures and magnetic fields are produced. Shock pressures in the 50 Mbar range and pressures exceeding 10 Mbar in an adiabatic compression will be possible. By performing flux compression of a seed field, axial magnetic fields in the 2000 T range may be achieved. A variety of concepts have been identified for the first experimental campaigns on Atlas. These experiments include Rayleigh-Taylor instability studies, convergent (e.g., Bell-Plesset type) instability studies, material strength experiments at very high strain and strain rate, hydrodynamic flows in 3-dimensional geometries, equation of state measurements along the hugoniot and adiabats, transport and shock propagation in dense strongly-coupled plasmas, and atomic and condensed matter studies employing ultra-high magnetic fields. Experimental configurations, associated physics issues, and diagnostic strategies are all under investigation as the design of the Atlas facility proceeds. Near-term proof-of-principle experiments employing the smaller Pegasus II capacitor bank have been identified, and several of these experiments have not been performed. This paper discusses a number of recent Pegasus II experiments and identifies several areas of research presently planned on Atlas.

  17. Bioactive compounds extracted from Indian wild legume seeds: antioxidant and type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition properties.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Basanta; Vadivel, Vellingiri; Stuetz, Wolfgang; Biesalski, Hans K

    2012-03-01

    Seven different wild legume seeds (Acacia leucophloea, Bauhinia variegata, Canavalia gladiata, Entada scandens, Mucuna pruriens, Sesbania bispinosa and Tamarindus indica) from various parts of India were analyzed for total free phenolics, l-Dopa (l-3,4 dihydroxyphenylalanine), phytic acid and their antioxidant capacity (ferric-reducing antioxidant power [FRAP] and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl [DPPH] assay) and type II diabetes-related enzyme inhibition activitiy (α-amylase). S. bispinosa had the highest content in both total free phenolics and l-Dopa, and relatively low phytic acid when compared with other seeds. Phytic acid content, being highest in E. scandens, M. pruriens and T. indica, was highly predictive for FRAP (r = 0.47, p < 0.05) and DPPH (r = 0.66, p < 0.001) assays. The phenolic extract from T. indica and l-Dopa extract from E. scandens showed significantly higher FRAP values among others. All seed extracts demonstrated a remarkable reducing power (7-145 mM FeSO4 per mg extract), DPPH radical scavenging activity (16-95%) and α-amylase enzyme inhibition activity (28-40%). PMID:21970446

  18. Cinnamomin, a type II ribosome-inactivating protein, is a storage protein in the seed of the camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora).

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren-shui; Wei, Guo-qing; Yang, Qiang; He, Wen-jun; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2002-03-15

    Cinnamomin is a novel type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) isolated in our laboratory from the seed of the camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). In this paper the physiological role it plays in the plant cell was studied. Northern and Western blotting revealed that cinnamomin was expressed specifically in cotyledons. It accumulated in large amounts simultaneously with other proteins at the post-stages of seed development. Cinnamomin degraded rapidly during the early stages of seed germination. Endopeptidase was proved to play an important role in the degradation of cinnamomin. Western blotting of total proteins from the protein body with antibodies against cinnamomin demonstrated that it only existed in this specific cellular organelle as a storage protein. The similar properties of cinnamomin and other seed storage proteins of dicotyledons were compared. We conclude that cinnamomin is a special storage protein in the seed of C. camphora. PMID:11879193

  19. Database usage and performance for the Fermilab Run II experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bonham, D.; Box, D.; Gallas, E.; Guo, Y.; Jetton, R.; Kovich, S.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kumar, A.; Litvintsev, D.; Lueking, L.; Stanfield, N.; Trumbo, J.; Vittone-Wiersma, M.; White, S.P.; Wicklund, E.; Yasuda, T.; Maksimovic, P.; /Johns Hopkins U.

    2004-12-01

    The Run II experiments at Fermilab, CDF and D0, have extensive database needs covering many areas of their online and offline operations. Delivering data to users and processing farms worldwide has represented major challenges to both experiments. The range of applications employing databases includes, calibration (conditions), trigger information, run configuration, run quality, luminosity, data management, and others. Oracle is the primary database product being used for these applications at Fermilab and some of its advanced features have been employed, such as table partitioning and replication. There is also experience with open source database products such as MySQL for secondary databases used, for example, in monitoring. Tools employed for monitoring the operation and diagnosing problems are also described.

  20. Results on QCD Physics from the CDF-II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pagliarone, C.; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2006-12-01

    In this paper the authors review a selection of recent results obtained, in the area of QCD physics, from the CDF-II experiment that studies p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV provided by the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. All results shown correspond to analysis performed using the Tevatron Run II data samples. In particular they will illustrate the progress achieved and the status of the studies on the following QCD processes: jet inclusive production, using different jet clustering algorithm, W({yields} e{nu}{sub e}) + jets and Z({yields} e{sup +}e{sup -}) + jets production, {gamma} + b-jet production, dijet production in double pomeron exchange and finally exclusive e{sup +}e{sup -} and {gamma}{gamma} production. No deviations from the Standard Model have been observed so far.

  1. Plasma flow switch experiments on Pegasus-II

    SciTech Connect

    Shlachter, J.S.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.F.

    1994-12-31

    Pegasus-II, a 4.3 MJ capacitor bank facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has a current rise time of 5 {mu}s and requires the use of a fast ({approx} 500 ns) opening switch with long conduction time for some applications. Development of plasma flow opening switches (PFS), based on the design of the Shiva Star experiments, has been conducted during the last year. The PFS for these experiments consisted of two components: an annular aluminum conductor bridging the gap between the coaxial conductors in the Pegasus-II power-flow channel and an annular mylar foil located 6.3 mm downstream of the aluminum. The authors have investigated assemblies with 1/r{sup 2} mass distributions, designed to produce planar motion down the power flow channel. The total mass of the PFS assembly has been varied as has the construction of the aluminum component. The downstream load in the load slot was either a high inductance, 1-cm radius non-imploding pipe or a cylindrical, 12.7-mg pure aluminum imploding foil with 5-cm radius. Experiments have been conducted both with and without a trap region in the downstream inner conductor; the trap is one mechanism for preventing PFS material from entering the load slot.

  2. Greenhouse (III): Gas-Exchange and Seed-to-Seed Experiments on the Russian Space Station MIR and Earth-grown, Ethylene-Treated Wheat Plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, William F.; Bingham, Gail; Carman, John; Bubenheim, David; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sytchev, Vladimir N.; Podolsky, Igor B.; Chernova, Lola; Nefodova, Yelena

    2001-01-01

    The Mir Space Station provided an outstanding opportunity to study long-term plant responses when exposed to a microgravity environment. Furthermore, if plants can be grown to maturity in a microgravity environment, they might be used in future bioregenerative life-support systems (BLSS). The primary objective of the Greenhouse experiment onboard Mir was to grow Super Dwarf and Apogee wheat through complete life cycles in microgravity; i.e., from seed-to-seed-to-seed. Additional objectives were to study chemical, biochemical, and structural changes in plant tissues as well as photosynthesis, respiration, and transpiration (evaporation of water from plants). Another major objective was to evaluate the suitability clothe facilities on Mir for advanced research with plants. The Greenhouse experiment was conducted in the Russian/Bulgarian plant growth chamber, the Svet, to which the United States added instrumentation systems to monitor changes in CO2 and water vapor caused by the plants (with four infrared gas analyzers monitoring air entering and leaving two small plastic chambers). In addition, the US instrumentation also monitored O2; air, leaf (IR), cabin pressure; photon flux; and substrate temperature and substrate moisture (16 probes in the root module). Facility modifications were first performed during the summer of 1995 during Mir 19, which began after STS-72 left Mir. Plant development was monitored by daily observations and some photographs.

  3. Injection Seeding of Ti:Al2O3 in an unstable resonator theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. C.; Wang, L. G.; Barnes, N. P.; Edwards, W. C.; Cheng, W. A.; Hess, R. V.; Lockard, G. E.; Ponsardin, P. L.

    1991-01-01

    Injection Seeding of a Ti:Al2O3 unstable resonator using both a pulsed single-mode Ti:Al2O3 laser and a continuous wave laser diode has been characterized. Results are compared with a theory which calculates injection seeding as function of seed and resonator alignment, beam profiles, and power.

  4. While they were asleep: Do seeds after-ripen in cold storage? Experiences with Calendula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The progressive loss of seed dormancy after maturity is known as after-ripening. Although after-ripening is generally well understood in seeds stored at relatively high temperatures, little is known about this phenomenon at lower temperatures (e.g. 4 degrees C) generally used for medium-term seed s...

  5. TOP counter for particle identification at the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inami, Kenji

    2014-12-01

    Ring imaging Cherenkov counter, named TOP counter, utilizing precise photon detection timing has been developed as a particle identification detector for the Belle II experiment. The real size prototype has been produced and tested with 2 GeV positrons at Spring-8 LEPS beam line. The quartz radiator production and assembling with microchannel plate photomultipliers was successfully carried out. The beam test data shows good agreement with full Monte-Carlo simulation results in the ring image and the distribution of number of detected photons and timing information.

  6. The PICASSO Dark Matter Experiment - Getting Ready for Phase II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Carsten B.; Picasso Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    PICASSO is a dark matter search experiment that uses the superheated droplet technique to find spin-dependently interacting WIMPs. A set of 1 l detectors with a total active mass of 19.4 g was used to prove the validity of the technique. The data from this run disfavors WIMP-proton cross sections larger than 1.3 pb for a WIMP mass of 29 GeV. Currently phase II of PICASSO is getting started. It will consist of 32 4.5 l detectors with a projected active mass of 2.5 kg and improved detectors.

  7. Dark matter searches with the CDMS II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Saab, T.; Collaboration: CDMS Collaboration

    2014-06-24

    The CDMS II experiment ran between 2003 and 2009. A total of 30 germanium and silicon ZIP detectors were operated, producing a high quality set of data that has been analyzed for evidence of and placed leading constraints on standard, low-mass, electron-recoil, and annually modulating WIMP interactions. This article will describe the general operation principles behind the CDMS detectors, report on the results of major Ge and Si detector analyses, and describe the current and future activities of the SuperCDMS program.

  8. A new cylindrical drift chamber for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Cavoto, G.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Cei, F.; Corvaglia, A.; Dussoni, S.; Fahrni, D.; Galli, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Hofer, A.; Hildebrandt, M.; Ignatov, F.; Miccoli, A.; Nicolò, D.; Orsini, A.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Pinto, C.; Piredda, G.; Signorelli, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Recchia, L.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Tassielli, G.; Tazzioli, A.; Tenchini, F.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.; Zullo, A.

    2016-07-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is currently under construction for the MEG II experiment. The chamber is meant to track low momentum positrons from μ+ decays to search for μ+ →e+ γ events. The detector is segmented in very small drift cells, placed in stereo configuration and operated in a helium-isobutane gas mixture. The use of thin aluminium wires and light gas mixture set the total radiation length of the chamber to only 1.6 ×10-3X0 per track turn allowing for a momentum resolution of ~120 keV/c.

  9. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-05-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components. Operation of EBR-II has produced a wealth of information. As an irradiation facility, EBR-II has generated specific information on the behavior of oxide, carbide, and metallic fuels. As an LMFBR power plant, EBR-II has produced general information related to plant-systems and equipment design, plant safety, plant availability, and plant maintenance.

  10. Field testing soybeans for residual effects of air pollution and seed size on crop yield

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.K.; Rose, L.P. Jr.; Leffel, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mean seed weights (g/100 seeds) for four soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), cultivars grown in 1973 and 1974 in cylindrical open-top field chambers that provided carbon-filtered air were significantly greater (17.2) than from plants grown in nonfiltered air in chambers (15.1), or in conventional plots without chambers (15.7). Using this seed, as experiment was designed to answer three questions: (i) does air quality influence seed yields from subsequent plants; (ii) do seed size differences, possibly induced by air pollutants, influence subsequent seed yields; (iii) is there a yield advantage from planting large seed vs an original lot of seed. This experiment was designed as a split-split plot with six replications. The whole plot treatments were the four cultivars; the split-plot treatments consisted of the nine factorial combinations of three seed sizes and three environments. The split-split plot treatment was a comparison between the specified seed size and an original lot of the seed from which the specific seed size was obtained. Six seeds per 30 cm of row were planted and evaluated in a field experiment near Queenstown, Maryland, in 1975. We found no residual air quality effects on subsequent seed yields. Differences in seed size observed for different air qualities did not significantly affect yields. In general, there was no significant yield advantage for plants grown from a selected seed size as compared with the original lot seed.

  11. Direct drive foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.F.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Hockaday, M.Y.P.; Hockaday, R.G.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-05-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos Above Ground Experiments (AGEX) program. The goal of the program is to produce an intense (>100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the KE of a 1 to 10 MJ collapsing plasma source. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several tens of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. This paper addresses z-pinch experiments done on a capacitor bank where the radiating plasma source is formed by an imploding annular aluminum foil driven by the J {times} B forces generated by the current flowing through the foil.

  12. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-01-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10's of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  13. Plasma flow switch and foil implosion experiments on Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrane, J.C.; Bartsch, R.R.; Benage, J.R.; Forman, P.R.; Gribble, R.F.; Ladish, J.S.; Oona, H.; Parker, J.V.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

    1993-07-01

    Pegasus II is the upgraded version of Pegasus, a pulsed power machine used in the Los Alamos AGEX (Above Ground EXperiments) program. A goal of the program is to produce an intense (> 100 TW) source of soft x-rays from the thermalization of the kinetic energy of a 1 to 10 MJ plasma implosion. The radiation pulse should have a maximum duration of several 10`s of nanoseconds and will be used in the study of fusion conditions and material properties. The radiating plasma source will be generated by the thermalization of the kinetic energy of an imploding cylindrical, thin, metallic foil. This paper addresses experiments done on a capacitor bank to develop a switch (plasma flow switch) to switch the bank current into the load at peak current. This allows efficient coupling of bank energy into foil kinetic energy.

  14. Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) (P0004-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigsby, Doris K.; Ehrlich, Nelson J.

    1992-01-01

    SEEDS, a cooperative endeavor of NASA Headquarters, the NASA Langley Research Center, and the George W. Park Seed Company, resulted in the distribution of approximately 132,000 SEEDS kits to 3.3 million students. Kits contained Rutger's tomato seeds that had flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF), as well as seeds that had been stored in a climate controlled warehouse for the same time period. Preliminary data indicates the germination rate for space exposed seeds was 73.8 percent while Earth based seeds germinated at a rate of 70.3 percent. Tests conducted within the first six months after retrieval indicated space exposed seeds germinated in an average of 8.0 days, while Earth based seeds' average germination time was 8.3 days. Some mutations (assumed to be radiation induced) include plants that added a leaf instead of the usual flower at the end of the flower frond. Also, fruit produced from a flower with a variegated calyx bore seeds producing albino plants, while fruit from a flower with a green calyx from the same plant bore seeds producing green plants.

  15. Onboard Photo: Astronauts Use Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Space Shuttle Discovery (STS-56) onboard photo of Pilot Stephen S. Oswald (wearing a headset) uses the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment II (SAREX-II) while sitting at the pilot's station on the forward flight deck. Oswald smiled from behind the microphone as he talks to amateur radio operators on Earth via the SAREX equipment. SAREX cables and the interface module freefloat in front of Oswald. The anterna located in the forward flight deck window is visible in the background. SAREX was established by NASA, the American Radio League/Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation and the Johnson Space Center (JSC) Amateur Radio Club to encourage public participation in the space program through a program to demonstrate the effectiveness of conducting short-wave radio transmissions between the Shuttle and ground-based radio operators at low-cost ground stations with amateur and digital techniques.

  16. A numerical study of winter orographic seeding experiments in Korea using the Weather Research and Forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Ki; Yum, Seong Soo; Park, Young-San

    2016-02-01

    Ice nucleation processes by silver iodide were parameterized and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting model to perform winter orographic cloud seeding experiment in an eastern mountainous region of the Korean Peninsula. Cloud seeding at a mountain site resulted in production of ice crystals, mostly by deposition and condensation freezing nucleation of seeding material and depletion of water drops by ice crystals themselves and by snow and graupel particles grown from these ice crystals but importantly precipitation increased over the target area to the west of the seeding site. Sensitivity test showed that increasing the release rate of seeding material led to enhanced precipitation. Interestingly, dominant ice crystal nucleation mode was different for different aerosol concentrations: deposition and condensation freezing nucleation were dominantly responsible for ice crystal formation for maritime aerosol type (i.e., low concentration) while the dominant mode was contact freezing nucleation for continental aerosol type (i.e., high concentration). When seeding material was released at a low-altitude site (i.e., upslope of mountain), it was not successfully transported upward to the target area but instead dispersed along the direction of the mountain ridges by the barrier jets.

  17. TRIGA Mark II Criticality Benchmark Experiment with Burned Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Persic, Andreja; Ravnik, Matjaz; Zagar, Tomaz

    2000-12-15

    The experimental results of criticality benchmark experiments performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor are presented. The experiments were performed with partly burned fuel in two compact and uniform core configurations in the same arrangements as were used in the fresh fuel criticality benchmark experiment performed in 1991. In the experiments, both core configurations contained only 12 wt% U-ZrH fuel with 20% enriched uranium. The first experimental core contained 43 fuel elements with average burnup of 1.22 MWd or 2.8% {sup 235}U burned. The last experimental core configuration was composed of 48 fuel elements with average burnup of 1.15 MWd or 2.6% {sup 235}U burned. The experimental determination of k{sub eff} for both core configurations, one subcritical and one critical, are presented. Burnup for all fuel elements was calculated in two-dimensional four-group diffusion approximation using the TRIGLAV code. The burnup of several fuel elements was measured also by the reactivity method.

  18. Studies of three genes encoding Cinnamomin (a type II RIP) isolated from the seeds of camphor tree and their expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qiang; Liu, Ren-shui; Gong, Zhen-zhen; Liu, Wang-Yi

    2002-02-01

    Cinnamomin, which has three isoforms, is a type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) purified from the mature seeds of camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora). In a previous study, an incomplete cDNA that encoded the A- and B-chain of Cinnamomin but lacked signal peptide sequence was cloned. In the present paper, its full-length cDNA was obtained by 5' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (5'RACE). Subsequently, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of its genomic DNA was performed. Unexpectedly, sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed three cinnamomin genes with >98.0% sequence identity. One of them corresponded to the published cDNA and was designated as cinnamomin I, whereas the other two genes were named as cinnamomin II and cinnamomin III, respectively. RT-PCR amplification of the cDNAs of cinnamomin II and III manifested that these two genes were functional. The three genes have no intron. Three Cinnamomin precursors that were inferred from the cDNA sequence of three cinnamomin genes exhibited relatively high sequence homology with other type II RIPs. Northern blot analysis demonstrated that the cinnamomin genes only expressed in cotyledons of C. camphora seeds and the acmes of expression emerged at 75-90 DAF when seeds were close to maturity. It is proposed that the three cinnamomin genes may encode three isoforms of Cinnamomin. The physiological function of Cinnamomin in C. camphora seeds is briefly discussed. PMID:11891062

  19. WIND DIRECTIONS ALOFT AND EFFECTS OF SEEDING ON PRECIPITATION IN THE WHITETOP EXPERIMENT*

    PubMed Central

    Lovasich, Jeanne L.; Neyman, Jerzy; Scott, Elizabeth L.; Smith, Jerome A.

    1969-01-01

    The subdivision of all the experimental days of the Whitetop project into two approximately equal groups, group W with predominantly westerly winds aloft and group E with frequent easterly winds, shows a remarkable difference in the apparent effect of seeding. On W days there was no detectable effect of seeding on rainfall. On E days with seeding, the average 24 hour precipitation in an area of about 100,000 square miles was significantly less than that without seeding by 46 per cent of the latter. The decrease resulted from a “decapitation” of the usual afternoon rise in rainfall. It may be significant that the afternoon maximum of natural precipitation on E days occurs some two hours later than on W days. If the actual cause of the differences in rainfall was seeding, then the loss of water resulting from operational, rather than experimental, seeding would have averaged eight million acre-feet per summer. PMID:16591800

  20. Hypoelastic Soft Tissues: Part II: In-Plane Biaxial Experiments.

    PubMed

    Freed, Alan D; Einstein, Daniel R; Sacks, Michael S

    2010-08-01

    In Part I, a novel hypoelastic framework for soft-tissues was presented. One of the hallmarks of this new theory is that the well-known exponential behavior of soft-tissues arises consistently and spontaneously from the integration of a rate based formulation. In Part II, we examine the application of this framework to the problem of biaxial kinematics, which are common in experimental soft-tissue characterization. We confine our attention to an isotropic formulation in order to highlight the distinction between non-linearity and anisotropy. In order to provide a sound foundation for the membrane extension of our earlier hypoelastic framework, the kinematics and kinetics of in-plane biaxial extension are revisited, and some enhancements are provided. Specifically, the conventional stress-to-traction mapping for this boundary value problem is shown to violate the conservation of angular momentum. In response, we provide a corrected mapping. In addition, a novel means for applying loads to in-plane biaxial experiments is proposed. An isotropic, isochoric, hypoelastic, constitutive model is applied to an in-plane biaxial experiment done on glutaraldehyde treated bovine pericardium. The experiment is comprised of eight protocols that radially probe the biaxial plane. Considering its simplicity (two adjustable parameters) the model does a reasonably good job of describing the non-linear normal responses observed in these experimental data, which are more prevalent than are the anisotropic responses exhibited by this tissue. PMID:21394222

  1. STATUS OF THE NEUTRALIZED DRIFT COMPRESSION EXPERIMENT (NDCX-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-21

    The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) is an 11 M$ induction accelerator project currently in construction at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for warm dense matter (WDM) experiments investigating the interaction of ion beams with matter at elevated temperature and pressure. The machine consists of a lithium injector, induction accelerator cells, diagnostic cells, a neutralized drift compression line, a final focus solenoid, and a target chamber. The induction cells and some of the pulsed power systems have been reused from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory after refurbishment and modification. The machine relies on a sequence of acceleration waveforms to longitudinally compress the initial ion pulse from 600 ns to less than 1 ns in {approx} 12 m. Radial confinement of the beam is achieved with 2.5 T pulsed solenoids. In the initial hardware configuration, 50 nC of Li{sup +} will be accelerated to 1.25 MeV and allowed to drift-compress to a peak current of {approx}40 A. The project started in the summer of 2009. Construction of the accelerator will be completed in the fall of 2011 and will provide a worldwide unique opportunity for ion-driven warm dense matter experiments as well as research related to novel beam manipulations for heavy ion fusion drivers.

  2. Results from the Final Exposure of the CDMS II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Z.; Akerib, D.S.; Arrenberg, S.; Bailey, C.N.; Balakishiyeva, D.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, D.A.; Brink, P.L.; Bruch, T.; Bunker, R.; Cabrera, B.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Barbara

    2009-12-01

    We report results from a blind analysis of the final data taken with the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search experiment (CDMS II) at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minnesota, USA. A total raw exposure of 612 kg-days was analyzed for this work. We observed two events in the signal region; based on our background estimate, the probability of observing two or more background events is 23%. These data set an upper limit on the Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP)-nucleon elastic-scattering spin-independent cross-section of 7.0 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level. Combining this result with all previous CDMS II data gives an upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross-section of 3.8 x 10{sup -44} cm{sup 2} for a WIMP of mass 70 GeV/c{sup 2}. We also exclude new parameter space in recently proposed inelastic dark matter models.

  3. Experiments on Electron Cloud Mitigation at PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Johnny S.T.; Pivi, Mauro T.F.; /SLAC

    2011-11-22

    The electron cloud effect has been observed at many accelerator facilities. It has been the subject of many workshops and reviews. An electron cloud is formed when low energy photoelectrons released from the vacuum chamber surfaces and ionized residual gas molecules, driven by the beam fields of passing positively charged bunches, impinge on the chamber walls and create secondary emission. It is an important issue for many currently operating facilities and the damping rings of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) because beam-cloud interaction can severely impact the machines performance. Systematic studies on the electron cloud effect, and its possible remedies, have been carried out in many laboratories. At SLAC, the effort has been concentrated on theoretical understanding with the aid of computer simulations, and experimental measurements with high intensity positron beams at PEP-II. Computer simulation results have been presented at ECLOUD07 and in an earlier article in this journal. In this article, we present recent results from electron cloud experiments at the positron storage ring of PEP-II. In particular, we discuss the performance of various mitigation techniques.

  4. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  5. Results on artemia cysts, lettuce and tobacco seeds in the Biobloc 4 experiment flown aboard the Soviet biosatellite Cosmos 1129

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubin, Y.; Planel, H.; Gasset, G.; Pianezzi, B.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of space flight factors, in particular the heavy ion component of cosmic rays, on dormant stages of life forms were investigated as part of the Biobloc 4 experiment flown aboard the Cosmos 1129 biosatellite. Artemia cysts and seeds of tobacco and lettuce plants were placed in tubes and in monolayers sandwiched between layers of visual particle track detectors. Although Artemia cysts exposed in the dry state did not differ from ground controls, hydrated cysts exhibited a slight decrease in hatchability and reduced (C-14)O2 incorporation and protein and nucleic acid synthesis. For cysts held in the monolayers, hits by HZE particles were observed to stimulate emergence, hatching and survival. Higher proportions of chromosomal aberrations were found in lettuce seeds hit by HZE particles, while space flight produced a stimulatory effect on both germination rate and abnormality frequency in both hit and nonhit tobacco seeds. 9 references.

  6. An in situ iron-enrichment experiment in the western subarctic Pacific (SEEDS): Introduction and summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Shigenobu; Tsuda, Atsushi

    2005-02-01

    To test the iron hypothesis in the subarctic Pacific Ocean, an in situ iron-enrichment experiment (SEEDS) was performed in the western subarctic gyre in July-August 2001. About 350 kg of iron (as acidic iron sulfate) and 0.48 mol of the inert chemical tracer sulfur hexafluoride were introduced into a 10-m deep surface mixed layer over an 80 km 2 area. This single iron infusion raised dissolved iron levels to ∼2.9 nM initially. Dissolved iron concentrations rapidly decreased after the infusion, but levels remained close to 0.15 nM even at the end of the 14-day experimental period. During SEEDS there were iron-mediated increases in chlorophyll a concentrations (up to 20 μg l -1), primary production rates, biomass and photosynthetic energy conversion efficiency relative to waters outside the iron-enriched patch. The rapid and very high accumulation of phytoplankton biomass in response to the iron addition appeared to be partly attributable to shallow mixed-layer depth and moderate water temperature in the western subarctic Pacific. However, the main reason was a floristic shift to fast-growing centric diatom Chaetoceros debilis, unlike the previous iron-enrichment experiments in the equatorial Pacific and the Southern Ocean, in both of which iron stimulated the growth of pennate diatoms. The iron-mediated blooming of diatoms resulted in a marked consumption of macronutrients and drawdown of pCO 2. Biological and physiological measurements indicate that phytoplankton growth in the patch became both light- and iron-limited, making phytoplankton biomass relatively constant after day 9. The increase in microzooplankton grazing rate after day 9 also influenced the net growth rate of phytoplankton. There was no significant increase in the export flux of carbon to depth during the 14-day occupation of the experimental site. The export flux between day 4 and day 13 was estimated to be only 13% of the integrated primary production in the iron-enriched patch. The major part

  7. A Survey of Optometry Graduates to Determine Practice Patterns: Part II: Licensure and Practice Establishment Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleimann, Robert L.; Smith, Lee W.

    1985-01-01

    A summary of Part II of a two-volume study of optometry graduates conducted by the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry is presented. Part II includes the analysis of the graduates' licensure and practice establishment experiences. (MLW)

  8. Retrograde Flow and Myosin II Activity within the Leading Cell Edge Deliver F-Actin to the Lamella to Seed the Formation of Graded Polarity Actomyosin II Filament Bundles in Migrating Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Tom W.; Vaughan, Andrew N.

    2008-01-01

    In migrating fibroblasts actomyosin II bundles are graded polarity (GP) bundles, a distinct organization to stress fibers. GP bundles are important for powering cell migration, yet have an unknown mechanism of formation. Electron microscopy and the fate of photobleached marks show actin filaments undergoing retrograde flow in filopodia, and the lamellipodium are structurally and dynamically linked with stationary GP bundles within the lamella. An individual filopodium initially protrudes, but then becomes separated from the tip of the lamellipodium and seeds the formation of a new GP bundle within the lamella. In individual live cells expressing both GFP-myosin II and RFP-actin, myosin II puncta localize to the base of an individual filopodium an average 28 s before the filopodium seeds the formation of a new GP bundle. Associated myosin II is stationary with respect to the substratum in new GP bundles. Inhibition of myosin II motor activity in live cells blocks appearance of new GP bundles in the lamella, without inhibition of cell protrusion in the same timescale. We conclude retrograde F-actin flow and myosin II activity within the leading cell edge delivers F-actin to the lamella to seed the formation of new GP bundles. PMID:18799629

  9. Convoy active safety technologies war fighter experiment II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenherr, Edward W.

    2009-01-01

    The operational ability to project and sustain forces in distant, anti-access and area denial environments poses new challenges for combatant commanders. One of the new challenges is the ability to conduct sustainment operations at operationally feasible times and places on the battlefield. Combatant commanders require a sustainment system that is agile, versatile, and survivable throughout the range of military operations and across the spectrum of conflict. A key component of conducting responsive, operationally feasible sustainment operations is the ability to conduct sustainment convoys. Sustainment convoys are critical to providing combatant commanders the right support, at the right time and place, and in the right quantities, across the full range of military operations. The ability to conduct sustainment convoys in a variety of hostile environments require force protection measures that address the enemy threat and protect the Soldier. One cost effective, technically feasible method of increasing the force protection for sustainment convoys is the use of robotic follower technology and autonomous navigation. The Convoy Active Safety Technologies (CAST) system is a driver assist, convoy autopilot technology aimed to address these issues. The CAST Warfigher Experiment II, being held at The Nevada Automotive Test Center in the fall of 2008, will continue analysis of the utility of this vehicle following technology not only in measures of system integrity and performance vs. manual driving, but also the physiological effects on the operators themselves. This paper will detail this experiment's methodology and analysis. Results will be presented at the SPIE Electronic Imaging 2009 symposium.

  10. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    W. J. Carmack; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; H. Tsai

    2008-01-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR II as part of the Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few MA bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide, and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MAs. Of primary interest are the effect of the MAs on fuel cladding chemical interaction and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995–1996 and, currently, represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This report provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  11. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

    2008-06-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

  12. SAMGrid experiences with the Condor technology in Run II computing

    SciTech Connect

    Baranovski, A.; Loebel-Carpenter, L.; Garzoglio, G.; Herber, R.; Illingworth, R.; Kennedy, R.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A.; Merritt, W.; Terekhov, I.; Trumbo, J.; Veseli, S.; White, S.; St. Denis, R.; Jain, S.; Nishandar, A.; /Texas U., Arlington

    2004-12-01

    SAMGrid is a globally distributed system for data handling and job management, developed at Fermilab for the D0 and CDF experiments in Run II. The Condor system is being developed at the University of Wisconsin for management of distributed resources, computational and otherwise. We briefly review the SAMGrid architecture and its interaction with Condor, which was presented earlier. We then present our experiences using the system in production, which have two distinct aspects. At the global level, we deployed Condor-G, the Grid-extended Condor, for the resource brokering and global scheduling of our jobs. At the heart of the system is Condor's Matchmaking Service. As a more recent work at the computing element level, we have been benefiting from the large computing cluster at the University of Wisconsin campus. The architecture of the computing facility and the philosophy of Condor's resource management have prompted us to improve the application infrastructure for D0 and CDF, in aspects such as parting with the shared file system or reliance on resources being dedicated. As a result, we have increased productivity and made our applications more portable and Grid-ready. Our fruitful collaboration with the Condor team has been made possible by the Particle Physics Data Grid.

  13. The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

    2009-07-01

    The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

  14. Tolerance and Acceptance Results of a Palladium-103 Permanent Breast Seed Implant Phase I/II Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pignol, Jean-Philippe Rakovitch, Eileen; Keller, Brian M.; Sankreacha, Raxa; Chartier, Carole

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To test, in a prospective Phase I/II trial, a partial breast irradiation technique using a {sup 103}Pd permanent breast seed implant (PBSI) realized in a single 1-h procedure under sedation and local freezing. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had infiltrating ductal carcinoma {<=}3 cm in diameter, surgical margin {>=}2 mm, no extensive intraductal component, no lymphovascular invasion, and negative lymph nodes. Patients received a permanent seed implant, and a minimal peripheral dose of 90 Gy was prescribed to the clinical target volume, with a margin of 1.5 cm. Results: From May 2004 to April 2007, 67 patients received the PBSI treatment. The procedure was well tolerated, with 17% of patients having significant pain after the procedure. Only 1 patient (1.5%) had an acute skin reaction (Grade 3 according to the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria). The rates of acute moist desquamation, erythema, and indurations were 10.4%, 42%, and 27%, respectively. At 1 year the rate of Grade 1 telangiectasia was 14%. The rate of skin reaction decreased from 65% to 28% when skin received less than the 85% isodose. According to a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group questionnaire, 80-90% of patients were very satisfied with their treatment, and the remainder were satisfied. One patient (1.5%) developed an abscess, which resolved after the use of antibiotics. There was no recurrence after a median follow-up of 32 months (range, 11-49 months). Conclusions: The feasibility, safety, and tolerability of PBSI compares favorably with that of external beam and other partial breast irradiation techniques.

  15. Supercritical fractional extraction of fennel seed oil and essential oil: Experiments and mathematical modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Reverchon, E.; Marrone, C.; Poletto, M.; Daghero, J.; Mattea, M.

    1999-08-01

    Supercritical CO{sub 2} extraction of fennel seeds has been performed in two steps; the first step was performed at 90 bar and 50 C to obtain the selective extraction of essential oil. The second one was performed at 200 bar and 40 C and allowed the extraction of vegetable oil. The experiments were performed using the fractional separation of the extracts using three different CO{sub 2} flow rates (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 kg/h). On the basis of the extraction results and of the analysis of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the vegetable matter, mathematical models of the two extraction processes have been proposed. The extraction of fennel vegetable oil has been modeled using a model based on differential mass balances and on the concept of broken and intact cells as evidenced by SEM. Only one adjustable parameter has been used: the internal mass-transfer coefficient k{sub t}. A fairly good fitting of the experimental data was obtained by setting k{sub t} = 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} m/s. The fennel essential oil extraction process was modeled as desorption from the vegetable matter plus a small mass-transfer resistance. The same internal mass-transfer coefficient value used for vegetable oil extraction allowed a fairly good fitting of the essential oil extraction data.

  16. Seventeen years of LMFBR experience: Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II)

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, W.H.; Lentz, G.L.; Richardson, W.J.; Wolz, G.C.

    1982-01-01

    Operating experience at EBR-II over the past 17 years has shown that a sodium-cooled pool-type reactor can be safely and efficiently operated and maintained. The reactor has performed predictably and benignly during normal operation and during both unplanned and planned plant upsets. The duplex-tube evaporators and superheaters have never experienced a sodium/water leak, and the rest of the steam-generating system has operated without incident. There has been no noticeable degradation of the heat transfer efficiency of the evaporators and superheaters, except for the one superheater replaced in 1981. There has been no need to perform any chemical cleaning of steam-system components.

  17. Antidiabetic II drug metformin in plants: uptake and translocation to edible parts of cereals, oily seeds, beans, tomato, squash, carrots, and potatoes.

    PubMed

    Eggen, Trine; Lillo, Cathrine

    2012-07-18

    Residues of pharmaceuticals present in wastewater and sewage sludge are of concern due to their transfer to aquatic and terrestrial food chains and possible adverse effects on nontargeted organisms. In the present work, uptake and translocation of metformin, an antidiabetic II medicine, by edible plant species cultivated in agricultural soil have been investigated in greenhouse experiment. Metformin demonstrated a high uptake and translocation to oily seeds of rape ( Brassica napus cv. Sheik and Brassica rapa cv. Valo); expressed as an average bioconcentration factor (BCF, plant concentration over initial concentration in soil, both in dry weight), BCF values as high as 21.72 were measured. In comparison, BCFs for grains of the cereals wheat, barley, and oat were in the range of 0.29-1.35. Uptake and translocation to fruits and vegetables of tomato (BCFs 0.02-0.06), squash (BCFs 0.12-0.18), and bean (BCF 0.88) were also low compared to rape. BCFs for carrot, potato, and leaf forage B. napus cv. Sola were similar (BCF 1-4). Guanylurea, a known degradation product of metformin by microorganisms in activated sludge, was found in barley grains, bean pods, potato peel, and small potatoes. The mechanisms for transport of metformin and guanidine in plants are still unknown, whereas organic cation transporters (OCTs) in mammals are known to actively transport such compounds and may guide the way for further understanding of mechanisms also in plants. PMID:22712757

  18. Arabidopsis seed production limited by CO2 in simulated space experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoshizaki, T.

    1984-01-01

    Several generations of Arabidopsis thaliana were grown axenically from seed to seed on nutrient agar medium. The Arabidopsis plants produce seeds within 30 days after seeding, when grown either in containers open to the ambient atmosphere or in large sealed jars, but not in sealed test tubes. Moreover, the plant height was directly proportional to the size of the sealed container. Periodic analyses of the CO2 levels in the sealed containers has shown a decrease during the first week, but a tenfold increase in the following weeks. It is speculated that, by the end of the second week, the cotyledons entering the senescence stage would release ethylene into the culture atmosphere with a concomitant release of CO2, which in turn would induce further release of ethylene, hastening the senescence process in other tissues. Thus, in a controlled ecological life-support system of a space station, various components of the plant atmosphere may have to be maintained within the prescribed limits.

  19. Axion searches with the EDELWEISS-II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Armengaud, E.; Boissière, T. de; Arnaud, Q.; Augier, C.; Benoit, A.; Cazes, A.; Censier, B.; Charlieux, F.; Jesus, M. De; Bergé, L.; Broniatowski, A.; Chapellier, M.; Couëdo, F.; Bergmann, T.; Blümer, J.; Cox, G.A.; Brudanin, V.; Coulter, P. E-mail: thibault.main-de-boissiere@cea.fr; and others

    2013-11-01

    We present new constraints on the couplings of axions and more generic axion-like particles using data from the EDELWEISS-II experiment. The EDELWEISS experiment, located at the Underground Laboratory of Modane, primarily aims at the direct detection of WIMPs using germanium bolometers. It is also sensitive to the low-energy electron recoils that would be induced by solar or dark matter axions. Using a total exposure of up to 448 kg.d, we searched for axion-induced electron recoils down to 2.5 keV within four scenarios involving different hypotheses on the origin and couplings of axions. We set a 95 % CL limit on the coupling to photons g{sub Aγ} < 2.15 × 10{sup −9} GeV{sup −1} in a mass range not fully covered by axion helioscopes. We also constrain the coupling to electrons, g{sub Ae} < 2.59 × 10{sup −11}, similar to the more indirect solar neutrino bound. Finally we place a limit on g{sub Ae} × g{sub AN}{sup eff} < 4.82 × 10{sup −17}, where g{sub AN}{sup eff} is the effective axion-nucleon coupling for {sup 57}Fe. Combining these results we fully exclude the mass range 0.92 eV < m{sub A} < 80 keV for DFSZ axions and 5.78 eV < m{sub A} < 40 keV for KSVZ axions.

  20. A high resolution Timing Counter for the MEG II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Gerone, M.; Bevilacqua, A.; Biasotti, M.; Boca, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Gatti, F.; Nishimura, M.; Ootani, W.; Pizzigoni, G.; Rossella, M.; Shibata, N.; Siccardi, F.; Simonetta, M.; Uchiyama, Y.; Yoshida, K.

    2016-07-01

    The development of a Timing Counter detector designed for the MEGII upgrade of the MEG experiment, which strives to improve the sensitivity on the μ+ →e+ γ decay of an order of magnitude, is presented. It is based on two sets of counters (sectors) arranged on a semi-cylindrical structure; each sector consists of 256 counters. Each counter consists of tile of fast scintillator with a dual-side read-out based on SiPM arrays in series connection. The high granularity has two advantages: optimized size for achieving high resolution (75 ps) for the single counter, and a signal e+ crosses several counters, so that resolution improves by averaging multiple time measurements. A prototype has been built and tested both in BTF and PSI facilities in order to prove the multi-hit scheme in MEG-like beam conditions. A 35 ps resolution with eight hits has been obtained with a e+ beam at 100 kHz. The first sector will be tested in the MEG II pre-engineering run planned at the end of 2015.

  1. Seeding Experiment of Liquid Carbon Dioxide for Enhancing Winter-time Precipitation in Saga Prefecture,Northern Kyushu,Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakimizu, K.; Nishiyama, K.; Tomine, K.; Maki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Morita, O.

    2012-12-01

    ice perticles formed by LC seeding grew to the precipitable size and resultant snowfall was detected by radar in approximately 120 min. after seeding operation. In this study, based on these observed facts, optimum design for enhancing winter-time water resources by LC seeding method was suggested. Successive low-level horizontal penetrations of operational aircraft with seeding LC into many moving super-cooled cumuli towards the Japan Islands will lead to the spreading of cloud volume and subsequent coversion of large amount of iv active cloud volume into newly exploited artificial precipitation. As a result, these experiments succeeded, and the total amount of estimated radar precipitation of the be able to secure a large amount of water resource from these experiment results.

  2. Growth and productivity of different Pleurotus ostreatus strains on sunflower seed hulls supplemented with N-NH4+ and/or Mn(II).

    PubMed

    Curvetto, N R; Figlas, D; Devalis, R; Delmastro, S

    2002-09-01

    The mycelial growth rates in lineal growth assay, yield, and production rate of five Pleurotus ostreatus strains were evaluated in response to different levels of Mn(II) and/or NH4+ in a substrate containing sunflower seed hulls as a main energy and nutritional component. Each strain showed different basal values for mycelial growth rate and biological efficiency on sunflower seed-hull substrate. Adding growth limiting mineral nutrients increased the mycelial growth rate by 13-25%. Primordia initiation for the first flush appeared between day 24 and 28 and days to the second crop ranged from 39 to 51. Biological efficiency increased over control values and reached 60-112%, depending on the strain and the concentration of Mn(II) and NH4+. This study demonstrated the advantage of selecting the most productive P. ostreatus strains in a substrate formulated with sunflower seed hulls to provide the main energy and nutritional ingredients and supplemented with Mn(II) and/or NH4+. PMID:12139334

  3. PLANS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS AND IFE TARGET EXPERIMENTS ON NDCX-II

    SciTech Connect

    Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.

    2008-09-22

    The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently developing design concepts for NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will consist of a new short pulse injector and induction cells from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). To fit within an existing building and to meet the energy and temporal requirements of various target experiments, an aggressive beam compression and acceleration schedule is planned. WDM physics and ion-driven direct drive hydrodynamics will initially be explored with 30 nC of lithium ions in experiments involving ion deposition, ablation, acceleration and stability of planar targets. Other ion sources which may deliver higher charge per bunch will be explored. A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. Another test stand is being used to develop and characterize lithium-doped aluminosilicate ion sources. The first experiments will include heating metallic targets to 10,000 K and hydrodynamics studies with cryogenic hydrogen targets.

  4. The possibility of seeding vestibular schwannomas through surgery: Limited experience with two cases

    PubMed Central

    Roser, Florian; Ebner, Florian Heinrich; Skardelly, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Background: We present two exceptional cases of possible tumor seeding in benign vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients occurring years after initial microsurgical resection. Case Description: We retrospectively analyzed the surgical management, histology and documented the growth of new tumor occurrence in close vicinity of the original schwannomas by serial magnetic resonance imaging over a period of 10 years. None of the patients had stigmata of neurofibromatosis, making it a reasonable assumption that the second tumor was due to surgical seeding during the first surgery. Moreover, in the second case, a microsurgical re-exploration showed that the recurrent tumor did not show any adhesion or contact to the caudal cranial nerves as anticipated had this been a new cranial nerve schwannoma. Conclusions: Surgical seeding of VSs is a rare complication but can occur despite benign histology and generous irrigation during surgery. PMID:27217967

  5. OWR/RTNS-II low exposure spectral effects experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Atkin, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Miniature flat tensile specimens of Fe, Cu, 316 stainless steel and A302B pressure vessel steel are to be irradiated to a range of fluences in RTNS-II and the Omega West Reactor at 90/sup 0/C and 290/sup 0/C. The first RTNS-II irradiation is now in progress, and preparations are being made for the first Omega West Reactor irradiation. Some specimens are also being irradiated at room temperature in RTNS-II. The flat tensile specimens lend themselves to a variety of measurements, many of which, including the tensile tests, can be done on the same specimen.

  6. The response of the virus community to the SEEDS II mesoscale iron fertilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Julie L.; Kudo, Isao; Nishioka, Jun; Tsuda, Atsushi; Wilhelm, Steven W.

    2009-12-01

    Although the important role of viruses in marine biogeochemical cycles has been established in recent years, virus activity (including changes in this activity) has been largely ignored during mesoscale iron (Fe)-fertilization experiments relative to other processes. This is of particular interest as viruses have been shown to be critical to the transformation of Fe from the particulate (i.e., biological) to the dissolved pools. The goal of the present study was to evaluate changes in the virus-mediated lysis of heterotrophic bacterial cells following a shift in ecosystem trophic status brought about by a mesoscale Fe addition in the subarctic Pacific Ocean. Virus production rates, estimated by a reduction and reoccurrence assay, were coupled with transmission electron microscopy estimates of burst size and direct counts of virus and bacterial abundance. Fe fertilization of the upper mixed layer resulted in significant yet weak increases in virus production rates during the 12 days of observation immediately after fertilization, although the burst size (viruses produced per lytic event) and the percentage of visibly infected cells remained constant. The results imply that increases in virus production rates were most likely tied to a decreased lytic cycle length or the stimulation of lysogenized cells following the stimulation of primary and secondary productivity by the addition of Fe. The results also indicate that virus-induced cell-lysis regenerated an estimated nearly 200 pmol L -1 Fe daily, providing a significant return of Fe back to the water column, which may be critical in the maintenance of this added Fe as resident.

  7. Entdeckung elektroschwacher Produktion einzelner Top-Quarks mit dem CDF II Experiment; Discovery electroweak production of single top quarks with the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luck, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents a neural network search for combined as well as separate s- and t-channel single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment at the Tevatron using 3.2 fb-1 of collision data. It is the twelfth thesis dealing with single top-quark production performed within the CDF Collaboration, whereas three have been done in Run I [53–55] and eight in Run II [23, 25, 28, 39, 56–59].

  8. Litter effects on seedling establishment interact with seed position and earthworm activity.

    PubMed

    Donath, T W; Eckstein, R L

    2012-01-01

    Seedling establishment is influenced by litter cover and by seed predators, but little is known about interactions between these two factors. We tested their effects on emergence of five typical grassland species in a microcosm experiment. We manipulated the amounts of grass litter, seed sowing position and earthworm activity to determine whether: (i) the protective effect of litter against seed predation depends on cover amount and seed sowing position, i.e., on top or beneath litter; (ii) seed transport by earthworms changes the effect of seed sowing position on seedling emergence; and (iii) seeds transported into deeper soil layers by earthworms are still germinable. Litter cover and presence of earthworms lowered seedling emergence. The impact of seed position increased with seed size. Emergence of large-seeded species was reduced when sown on the surface. Additionally, we found an important seed position × earthworm interaction related to seed size. Emergence of large-seeded species sown on top of the litter was up to three times higher when earthworms were present than without earthworms. Earthworms also significantly altered the depth distribution of seeds in the soil and across treatments: on average 6% of seeds germinated after burial. In contrast to the seed position effect, we found no size effect on mobility and germinability of seeds after burial in the soil. Nevertheless, the fate of different-sized seeds may differ. While burial will remove large seeds from the regeneration pool, it may enhance seed bank build up in small-seeded species. Consequently, changes in the amount of litter cover and the invertebrate community play a significant role in plant community composition. PMID:21972886

  9. Kinetics of successive seeding of monodisperse polystyrene latexes. I - Initiation via potassium persulfate. II - Azo initiators with and without inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudol, E. D.; El-Aasser, M. S.; Vanderhoff, J. W.

    1986-01-01

    The polymerization kinetics of monodisperse polystyrene latexes with diameters of 1 micron are studied. The monodisperse latexes were prepared by the successive seeding method using 1 mM K2S2O8 with an 8 percent emulsifier surface coverage and 0.5 mM K2S2O8 with a 4 percent emulsifier surface coverage, and the kinetics were measured in a piston/cylinder dialometer. The data reveal that the polymerization rate decreases with increasing particle size; and the surface charge decreases with increasing particle size. The effects of initiators (AIBN and AMBN) and inhibitors (NH24SCN, NaNO2, and hydroquinone) on the product monodispersity and polymerization kinetics of latexes with diameters greater than 1 micron are investigated in a second experiment. It is observed that hydroquinone combined with AMBN are most effective in reducing nucleation without causing flocculation. It is noted that the kinetic transition from emulsion to bulk is complete for a particle size exceeding 1 micron in which the polymerization rate is independent of the particle size.

  10. Operational experience with the CDF Run II Silicon Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Mondragon, Miguel N.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    The CDF Run II Silicon Detector is the largest operating silicon detector in High Energy Physics. Its 722,000 channels spread over 7 m{sup 2} of silicon micro-strip sensors allow precision tracking and vertexing. The CDF silicon detector played a critical role in the discovery of B{sub s} mixing and is used extensively for the current Higgs Boson searches. Over the last 7 years, the detector efficiency has remained stable at 95% after the Run II commissioning period. The infrastructure (cooling, power supplies) problems dealt with are discussed.

  11. Adult Education. Part II: Collection of Learning Experiences. Volume 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peavey, Kay S., Ed.

    This document, which is the first in a series of best practice documents incorporating the wisdom and experiences of New York's adult educators, presents eight learning experiences that are specifically tailored for adult learners and instructors. The following information is provided for each learning experience: (1) a brief description of the…

  12. Experiment TGV II—results of Phases I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briançon, Ch.; Brudanin, V. B.; Čermák, P.; Egorov, V. G.; Klimenko, A. A.; Kovalík, A.; Mamedov, F.; Rukhadze, N. I.; Sandukovski, V. G.; Shitov, Yu. A.; Šimkovic, F.; Stekl, I.; Timkin, V. V.; Vylov, Ts.; Zinatulina, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    Currently, the TGV collaboration is investigating the two-neutrino double electron capture (2vEC/EC) of 106Cd at the Modane underground laboratory. The study is performed with low-background multi-HPGe detector TGV II, which has been constructed for measurements of the rare processes. The half-life limits of T1/2>2.6×1020 years (for Phase I, 8687 hours) and T1/2>3.6×1020 years (for Phase II, 9003 hours) were obtained for the ground state to ground state 2vEC/EC of 106Cd. The results already allow to rule out some of the previous nuclear structure calculations.

  13. Experiments on transferring helium II with a thermomechanical pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, G. L.; Urbach, A. R.; Mord, A. J.; Brandreth, B. H.; Hermanson, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Porous plugs were tested as thermomechanical pumps for the transfer of helium II from one dewar to another through a transfer line and two valves. SEM images for two different size porous plugs are presented. The present pump design was shown to transfer 80 liters at a maximum flow rate of 90 liters/hr. Temperature, pressure, flow rate, and heater power data are compared with theoretical results.

  14. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  15. SAFE II: Large systems space plasma evaluation experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, M. R., Jr.; Young, L. E.; Purvis, C. K.; Stevens, N. J.

    1983-01-01

    A shuttle flight experiment, the purpose of which is to obtain space data on the interaction of a high voltage solar array with the ambient space plasma is addressed. This flight experiment is a reflight of the solar array flight experiment, SAFE, except that three active solar array panels, electron release devices and plasma diagnostics are added. This experiment, SAFE 2, evaluates power loss due to parasitic current collected by the solar array, arcing on the solar array and perturbations to the plasma which may increase power loss and disturb plasma and charged particle science acquisition.

  16. Project SEED.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Reports on Project SEED (Summer Educational Experience for the Disadvantaged) a project in which high school students from low-income families work in summer jobs in a variety of academic, industrial, and government research labs. The program introduces the students to career possibilities in chemistry and to the advantages of higher education.…

  17. Computer Programs for Chemistry Experiments I and II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynard, Dale C.

    This unit of instruction includes nine laboratory experiments. All of the experiments are from the D.C. Health Revision of the Chemical Education Materials Study (CHEMS) with one exception. Program six is the lab from the original version of the CHEMS program. Each program consists of three parts (1) the lab and computer hints, (2) the description…

  18. Smog chamber experiments to investigate Henry's law constants of glyoxal using different seed aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Ronit

    2014-05-01

    Aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere. Hence, they have a direct as well as an indirect impact on the earth's climate. Depending on their formation, one distinguishes between primary and secondary aerosols[1]. Important groups within the secondary aerosols are the secondary organic aerosols (SOAs). In order to improve predictions about these impacts on the earth's climate the existing models need to be optimized, because they still underestimate SOA formation[2]. Glyoxal, the smallest α-dicarbonyl, not only acts as a tracer for SOA formation but also as a direct contributor to SOA. Because glyoxal has such a high vapour pressure, it was common knowledge that it does not take part in gas-particle partitioning and therefore has no impact on direct SOA formation. However, the Henry's law constant for glyoxal is surprisingly high. This has been explained by the hydration of the aldehyde groups, which means that a species with a lower vapour pressure is produced. Therefore the distribution of glyoxal between gas- and particle phase is atmospherically relevant and the direct contribution of glyoxal to SOA can no longer be neglected. A high salt concentration present in chamber seed aerosols leads to an enhanced glyoxal uptake into the particle. This effect is called "salting-in". The salting effect depends on the composition of the seed aerosol as well as the soluble compound. For very polar compounds, like glyoxal, a "salting-in" is observed[3]. Glyoxal particle formation during a smog chamber campaign at Paul-Scherrer-Institut (PSI) in Switzerland was examined using different seed aerosols such as ammonium sulfate, sodium chloride and sodium nitrate. The aim of this campaign was to investigate Henry's law constants for different seed aerosols. During the campaign filter samples were taken to investigate the amount of glyoxal in the particle phase. After filter extraction, the analyte was derivatized and measured using UHPLC

  19. Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) - II Quarterly Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, J.W.

    2009-10-01

    LBNL has received American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding to construct a new accelerator at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to significantly increase the energy on target, which will allow both the Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) and Warm Dense Matter (WDM) research communities to explore scientific conditions that have not been available in any other device. For NDCX-II, a new induction linear accelerator (linac) will be constructed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). NDCX-II will produce nano-second long ion beam bunches to hit thin foil targets. The final kinetic energy of the ions arriving at the target varies according to the ion mass. For atomic mass unit of 6 or 7 (Lithium ions), useful kinetic energies range from 1.5 to 5 or more MeV. The expected beam charge in the 1 ns (or shorter) pulse is about 20 nanoCoulombs. The pulse repetition rate will be about once or twice per minute (of course, target considerations will often reduce this rate). Our approach to building the NDCX-II ion accelerator is to make use of the available induction modules and 200 kV pulsers from the retired ATA electron linac at LLNL. Reusing this hardware will maximize the ion energy on target at a minimum cost. Some modification of the cells (e.g., reduce the bore diameter and replace with higher field pulsed solenoids) are needed in order to meet the requirements of this project. The NDCX-II project will include the following tasks: (1) Physics design to determine the required ion current density at the ion source, the injector beam optics, the layout of accelerator cells along the beam line, the voltage waveforms for beam acceleration and compression, the solenoid focusing, the neutralized drift compression and the final focus on target; (2) Engineering design and fabrication of the accelerator components, pulsed power system, diagnostic system, and control and data acquisition system; (3) Conventional facilities; and (4) Installation and integration

  20. ISAC SC-LINAC PHASE-II HELIUM REFRIGERATOR COMMISSIONING AND FIRST OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT TRIUMF

    SciTech Connect

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-09

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  1. Isac Sc-Linac Phase-II Helium Refrigerator Commissioning and First Operational Experience at Triumf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2010-04-01

    ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

  2. Lower hybrid rf heating experiments in the MIT Alcator A, C and Versator II tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Porkolab, M.; Schuss, J.; Takase, Y.; Chen, K.I.; Knowlton, S.; Luckhardt, S.; McDermott, S.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental results on lower hybrid heating in the Alcator A and the Versator II tokamaks with power levels up to 90 kW are presented. In Alcator A a double waveguide grill, and in Versator II a 4 waveguide grill with arbitrary phasing are used. Also, a 6 waveguide grill experiment in Versator II is described which launches a travelling wave aimed at driving toroidal currents. The forthcoming lower hybrid heating experiment in Alcator C, utilizing four 4 x 4 waveguide arrays with power levels up to 4 MW, is also described.

  3. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented of a comparison beteen observations of the upper-tropospheric water vapor data obtained from the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) instrument and radiosonde observations for 1987 and radiosonde-based climatologies. Colocated SAGE II-radiosonde measurement pairs are compared individually and in a zonal mean sense. A straight comparison of monthly zonal means between SAGE II and radiosondes for 1987 and Global Atmospheric Statistics (1963-1973) indicates that the clear-sky SAGE II climatology is approximately half the level of clear/cloudy sky of both radiosonde climatologies. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again showed SAGE II to be significantly drier in many altitude bands.

  4. Results and perspectives of the MEG and MEG II experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturini, Marco; MEG Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Charged-lepton-flavour-violating decays are prohibited in the framework of the Standard Model of elementary particles, but many of its extensions predict measurable values for such decays. Several experiments are running or being designed to measure (or to set a limit on) such processes. Among these, the MEG experiment has recently set a new upper limit on the μto eγ branching ratio {B}<5.7× 10^{-13} at 90% CL. The process has a simple kinematics but very good resolutions are needed for discarding the huge background. In order to improve its sensitivity, an upgrade of the experiment is under development, and will start taking data in 2016. The foreseen sensitivity of the upgraded apparatus will be about 5× 10^{-14} on the branching ratio of the process.

  5. Tannin concentration enhances seed caching by scatter-hoarding rodents: An experiment using artificial ‘seeds’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Chen, Jin

    2008-11-01

    Tannins are very common among plant seeds but their effects on the fate of seeds, for example, via mediation of the feeding preferences of scatter-hoarding rodents, are poorly understood. In this study, we created a series of artificial 'seeds' that only differed in tannin concentration and the type of tannin, and placed them in a pine forest in the Shangri-La Alpine Botanical Garden, Yunnan Province of China. Two rodent species ( Apodemus latronum and A. chevrieri) showed significant preferences for 'seeds' with different tannin concentrations. A significantly higher proportion of seeds with low tannin concentration were consumed in situ compared with seeds with a higher tannin concentration. Meanwhile, the tannin concentration was significantly positively correlated with the proportion of seeds cached. The different types of tannin (hydrolysable tannin vs condensed tannin) did not differ significantly in their effect on the proportion of seeds eaten in situ vs seeds cached. Tannin concentrations had no significant effect on the distance that cached seeds were carried, which suggests that rodents may respond to different seed traits in deciding whether or not to cache seeds and how far they will transport seeds.

  6. Human Blood Typing: A Forensic Science Approach: Part II. Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kobilinsky, Lawrence; Sheehan, Francis X.

    1988-01-01

    Describes several experiments that explore the methodology available to the forensic serologist for typing a human bloodstain in the ABH grouping system. Presents ABO blood group of wet blood, Lattes Crust test procedure, and the absorption-elution procedure. Uses outdated blood; equipment requirements are minimal. (ML)

  7. Chemical Remediation of Nickel(II) Waste: A Laboratory Experiment for General Chemistry Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, K. Blake; Rood, Brian E.; Trogden, Bridget G.

    2011-01-01

    This project involved developing a method to remediate large quantities of aqueous waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment. Aqueous Ni(II) waste from a general chemistry laboratory experiment was converted into solid nickel hydroxide hydrate with a substantial decrease in waste volume. The remediation method was developed for a…

  8. Electron beam injection during active experiments. II - Collisional effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winglee, R. M.

    1990-01-01

    During active beam experiments, the presence of high neutral densities at low altitudes and/or during thruster firings has been observed to modify the spacecraft charging and the properties of the beam. Two-dimensional (three-velocity) electromagnetic particle simulations with ionizing collisions incorporated are used to investigate the modification of the beam-plasma interaction as the neutral density is increased. It is shown that when the spacecraft is uniformly immersed in a neutral cloud, most of the ionization is produced by direct ionization by the beam and its secondaries, rather than via vehicle-induced or wave-induced ionization for the neutral densities considered.

  9. Pleiades Experiments on the NIF: Phase II-C

    SciTech Connect

    Benstead, James; Morton, John; Guymer, Thomas; Garbett, Warren; Stevenson, Mark; Moore, Alastair; Kline, John; Schmidt, Derek; Perry, Ted; Lanier, Nick; Workman, Jonathan

    2015-06-08

    Pleiades was a radiation transport campaign fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) between 2011 and 2014. The primary goals of the campaign were to develop and characterise a reproducible ~350eV x-ray drive and to constrain a number of material data properties required to successfully model the propagation of radiation through two low-density foam materials. A further goal involved the development and qualification of diagnostics for future radiation transport experiments at NIF. Pleiades was a collaborative campaign involving teams from both AWE and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  10. MUON EDM EXPERIMENT USING STAGE II OF THE NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    FERNOW,R.C.; GALLARDO,J.C.; MORSE,W.M.; SEMERTZIDIS,Y.K.

    2002-07-01

    During the second stage of a future neutrino factory unprecedented numbers of bunched muons will become available. The cooled medium-energy muon beam could be used for a high sensitivity search for an electric dipole moment (EDM) of the muon with a sensitivity better than 10{sup -24}e {center_dot} cm. This will make the sensitivity of the EDM experiment to non-standard physics competitive and in many models more sensitive than the present limits on edms of the electron and nucleons. The experimental design exploits the strong motional electric field sensed by relativistic particles in a magnetic storage ring.

  11. Light ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II and Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Barber, T.L.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Cook, D.L.; Derzon, M.S.; Dukart, R.J.; Hebron, D.E.; Johnson, D.J.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Moats, A.R.; Nash, T.J.; Noack, D.D.; Olsen, R.W.; Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Ruiz, C.L.; Stark, M.A.; Torres, J.A.; Wenger, D.F.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program in the United States is a target yield in the range of 200 to 1000 MJ. To address this goal, the near-term emphasis in the Light Ion Target Physics program is to design a credible high-gain target driven by ion beams. Based on this target design, we have identified ion beam spatial parameters, ion beam energy and power deposition, the conversion of ion-beam energy into soft x-ray thermal radiation, the conversion of ion-beam energy into hydrodynamic motion, radiation smoothing in low-density foams, and internal pulse shaping as the critical physics issues. These issues are currently being addressed in both ion- and laser-driven experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Light ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II and Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Barber, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program in the United States is a target yield in the range of 200 to 1000 MJ. To address this goal, the near-term emphasis in the Light Ion Target Physics program is to design a credible high-gain target driven by ion beams. Based on this target design, we have identified ion beam spatial parameters, ion beam energy and power deposition, the conversion of ion-beam energy into soft x-ray thermal radiation, the conversion of ion-beam energy into hydrodynamic motion, radiation smoothing in low-density foams, and internal pulse shaping as the critical physics issues. These issues are currently being addressed in both ion- and laser-driven experiments.

  13. Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment 1. II - Instrument calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, Thomas N.; Rottman, Gary J.; Ucker, Gregory J.

    1993-01-01

    The science objective for the Solar-Stellar Irradiance Comparison Experiment (SOLSTICE) is to accurately measure the full disk solar spectral irradiance in the ultraviolet (UV) spectral region over a long time period. The SOLSTICE design was driven by the requirement for long-term, precise solar photometry conducted from space. The SOLSTICE 1 is on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), launched in September 1991 with the possibility for a 10-year operational mission. The in-flight calibration for SOLSTICE to meet its primary objective is the routine measurements of the UV radiation from a set of early-type stars, using the identical optical elements employed for the solar observations. The extensive preflight calibrations of the instrument have yielded a precise characterization of the three SOLSTICE channels. Details of the preflight and in-flight SOLSTICE calibrations are discussed in this paper.

  14. A comparative study of aerosol extinction measurements made by the SAM II and SAGE satellite experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yue, G. K.; Mccormick, M. P.; Chu, W. P.

    1984-01-01

    SAM II and SAGE are two satellite experiments designed to measure stratospheric aerosol extinction using the technique of solar occultation or limb extinction. Although each sensor is mounted aboard a different satellite, there are occasions when their measurement locations are nearly coincident, thereby providing opportunities for a measurement comparison. In this paper, the aerosol extinction profiles and daily contour plots for some of these events in 1979 are reported. The comparisons shown in this paper demonstrate that SAM II and SAGE are producing similar aerosol extinction profiles within their measurement errors and that since SAM II has been previously validated, these results show the validity of the SAGE aerosol measurements.

  15. Magnetic stimulation of marigold seed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afzal, I.; Mukhtar, K.; Qasim, M.; Basra, S. M. A.; Shahid, M.; Haq, Z.

    2012-10-01

    The effects of magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds on germination, early seedling growth and biochemical changes of seedlings were studied under controlled conditions. For this purpose, seeds were exposed to five different magnetic seed treatments for 3 min each. Most of seed treatments resulted in improved germination speed and spread, root and shoot length, seed soluble sugars and a-amylase activity. Magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT maximally improved germination, seedling vigour and starch metabolism as compared to control and other seed treatments. In emergence experiment, higher emergence percentage (4-fold), emergence index (5-fold) and vigorous seedling growth were obtained in seeds treated with 100 mT. Overall, the enhancement of marigold seeds by magnetic seed treatment with 100 mT could be related to enhanced starch metabolism. The results suggest that magnetic field treatments of French marigold seeds have the potential to enhance germination, early growth and biochemical parameters of seedlings.

  16. Ligand field spectroscopy of Cu(II) and Ag(II) complexes in the gas phase: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Puskar, Ljiljana; Cox, Hazel; Goren, Alan; Aitken, Georgina D C; Stace, Anthony J

    2003-01-01

    Ligand field spectra have been recorded in the gas phase for the two series of complexes containing either Cu(II) or Ag(II) in association with pyridine. Where comparisons are possible, the gas phase spectra match those recorded in the condensed phase; however, for Ag(II) systems the results differ in interpretation. The Ag(II) data are attributed to a ligand-to-metal charge transfer process, and the Cu(II) data (spectral region and extinction coefficient) match the characteristics of a d-d transition. A detailed theoretical analysis of two complexes. [Cu(py)4]2+ and [Ag(py)4]2+ provides evidence of a minimum energy, D4h structure and two less stable D2h and D2d structures within approximately 60 kJ mol(-1). From these structures it is possible to identify a range of optically and vibronically allowed transitions that could contribute to spectra observed in the gas phase. In the case of calculations on [Ag(py)4]2+ there is strong evidence of an electronic transition that would account for the observation of charge transfer in the experiments. Less detailed calculations on [Cu(py)6]2+ and [Ag(py)6]2+ show structural evidence of extensive Jahn Teller distortion. Taken together with incremental binding energies calculated for complexes containing between two and six pyridine molecules, these results show that the level of theory adopted is capable of providing a semi-quantitative understanding of the experimental data. PMID:14527220

  17. Magnetic shielding of a laboratory Hall thruster. II. Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Hofer, Richard R. Goebel, Dan M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2014-01-28

    The physics of magnetic shielding in Hall thrusters were validated through laboratory experiments demonstrating essentially erosionless, high-performance operation. The magnetic field near the walls of a laboratory Hall thruster was modified to effectively eliminate wall erosion while maintaining the magnetic field topology away from the walls necessary to retain efficient operation. Plasma measurements at the walls validate our understanding of magnetic shielding as derived from the theory. The plasma potential was maintained very near the anode potential, the electron temperature was reduced by a factor of two to three, and the ion current density was reduced by at least a factor of two. Measurements of the carbon backsputter rate, wall geometry, and direct measurement of plasma properties at the wall indicate that the wall erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 1000 relative to the unshielded thruster. These changes effectively eliminate wall erosion as a life limitation in Hall thrusters, enabling a new class of deep-space missions that could not previously be attempted.

  18. Magnetoreception in birds: II. Behavioural experiments concerning the cryptochrome cycle.

    PubMed

    Wiltschko, Roswitha; Gehring, Dennis; Denzau, Susanne; Nießner, Christine; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Behavioural tests of the magnetic compass of birds and corresponding immunohistological studies on the activation of retinal cryptochrome 1a, the putative receptor molecule, showed oriented behaviour and activated Cry1a under 373 nm UV, 424 nm blue, 502 nm turquoise and 565 nm green light, although the last wavelength does not allow the first step of photoreduction of cryptochrome to the semiquinone form. The tested birds had been kept under 'white' light before, hence we suggested that there was a supply of semiquinone present at the beginning of the exposure to green light that could be further reduced and then re-oxidized. To test the hypothesis in behavioural experiments, we tested robins, Erithacus rubecula, under various wavelengths (1) after 1 h pre-exposure to total darkness and (2) after 1 h pre-exposure to the same light as used in the test. The birds were oriented under blue and turquoise light, where the full cryptochrome cycle can run, but not under green light. This finding is in agreement with the hypothesis. Orientation under green light appears to be a transient phenomenon until the supply of semiquinone is depleted. PMID:25472973

  19. Characterization of starch synthase I and II expressed in early developing seeds of kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Senoura, Takeshi; Isono, Naoto; Yoshikawa, Motoyo; Asao, Ayako; Hamada, Shigeki; Watanabe, Kenji; Ito, Hiroyuki; Matsui, Hirokazu

    2004-09-01

    Plant starch synthase (SS) contributes to the elongation of glucan chains during starch biosynthesis and hence plays an essential role in determining the fine structure of amylopectin. To elucidate the role of SS activity in the formation of amylopectin in kidney bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), a study was undertaken to isolate cDNA clones for SS and to characterize the enzymatic properties of the coded recombinant enzymes. Two SS cDNAs, designated pvss1 and pvss21, which were isolated from early developing seeds, encoded SSI and SSII (designated PvSSI and PvSSII-1) that displayed significant identity (more than 65%) with other SSI and SSII members, respectively. RNA gel blot analysis indicated that both transcripts accumulate in leaves and developing seeds at the early stage. Immunoblot analysis with antisera raised against both recombinant proteins (rPvSSI and rPvSSII-1) showed that the accumulation of both proteins parallels the gene expression profiles, although both were detectable only in starch-granule fractions. Recombinant enzymes expressed by Escherichia coli cells showed distinct chain-length specificities for the extension of glucan chains. Our results suggest that these SS isozymes for synthesis of transitory starch are also responsible for synthesis of storage starch in early developing seeds of kidney bean. PMID:15388972

  20. The "Chugakuryoko" and Hogan's Heroes: The Experience Gap between U.S. and Japanese Students' Knowledge of World War II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olwell, Russ

    2011-01-01

    Based on his own teaching experiences and findings, the author discusses the experience gap between U.S. and Japanese students' knowledge of World War II. He compares and contrasts how the subject of World War II is taught in the United States versus Japan. While it takes teacher effort to enrich the history experiences of U.S. students, the…

  1. Seeds: A Celebration of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, Bob

    The Space Exposed Experiment Developed for Students (SEEDS) Project offered science classes at the 5-12 and college levels the opportunity to conduct experiments involving tomato seeds that had been space-exposed over long periods of time. SEEDS kits were complete packages obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for…

  2. Middeck Active Control Experiment Reflight (MACE II): lessons learned and reflight status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ninneman, Ronald R.; Denoyer, Keith K.

    2000-06-01

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is sponsoring the Middeck Active Control Experiment Reflight (MACE II) Program. MACE II is a manned space experiment that evaluates the capabilities of adaptive control of flexible structures in the zero-g environment of the space shuttle's Middeck. MACE II has grown out of lessons learned from the original MACE flight and from AFRL sponsored structural control experiments. Previous experiments required extensive testing and 'tuning' for their particular test environment to meet their performance expectations. Such a process is too inefficient to be seriously considered for operational systems, especially space-based systems where access is limited. MACE II takes the next logical step by evaluating the capability of adaptive structural control algorithms AFRL has assembled a team of five small businesses and universities to develop and evaluate several adaptive control methodologies. In addition, AFRL has recruited a second science team led by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to evaluate control system for time-varying and geometrically nonlinear systems. This paper is an overview of the AFRL science team only.

  3. Vanadium alloy irradiation experiment X530 in EBR-II{sup *}

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Hins, A.G.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of the X530 experiment in EBR-II was to obtain early irradiation performance data, particularly the fracture properties, on the new 500-kg production heat of V-4Cr-4Ti material before the scheduled reactor shutdown at the end of September 1994.

  4. Complexation Effect on Redox Potential of Iron(III)-Iron(II) Couple: A Simple Potentiometric Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Syed, Raashid Maqsood; Khan, Badruddin

    2011-01-01

    A titration curve with multiple inflection points results when a mixture of two or more reducing agents with sufficiently different reduction potentials are titrated. In this experiment iron(II) complexes are combined into a mixture of reducing agents and are oxidized to the corresponding iron(III) complexes. As all of the complexes involve the…

  5. Simulating the formation of massive seed black holes in the early Universe - II. Impact of rate coefficient uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate how uncertainties in the chemical and cooling rate coefficients relevant for a metal-free gas influence our ability to determine the critical ultraviolet field strength required to suppress H2 cooling in high-redshift atomic cooling haloes. The suppression of H2 cooling is a necessary prerequisite for the gas to undergo direct collapse and form an intermediate mass black hole. These black holes can then act as seeds for the growth of the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) observed at redshifts z ˜ 6. The viability of this model for SMBH formation depends on the critical ultraviolet field strength, Jcrit: if this is too large, then too few seeds will form to explain the observed number density of SMBHs. We show in this paper that there are five key chemical reactions whose rate coefficients are uncertain enough to significantly affect Jcrit. The most important of these is the collisional ionization of hydrogen by collisions with other hydrogen atoms, as the rate for this process is very poorly constrained at the low energies relevant for direct collapse. The total uncertainty introduced into Jcrit by this and the other four reactions could in the worst case approach a factor of five. We also show that the use of outdated or inappropriate values for the rates of some chemical reactions in previous studies of the direct collapse mechanism may have significantly affected the values of Jcrit determined by these studies.

  6. Numerical modeling of laser-driven experiments of colliding jets: Turbulent amplification of seed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, Petros; Fatenejad, Milad; Flocke, Norbert; Graziani, Carlo; Gregori, Gianluca; Lamb, Donald; Lee, Dongwook; Meinecke, Jena; Scopatz, Anthony; Weide, Klaus

    2014-10-01

    In this study we present high-resolution numerical simulations of laboratory experiments that study the turbulent amplification of magnetic fields generated by laser-driven colliding jets. The radiative magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) simulations discussed here were performed with the FLASH code and have assisted in the analysis of the experimental results obtained from the Vulcan laser facility. In these experiments, a pair of thin Carbon foils is placed in an Argon-filled chamber and is illuminated to create counter-propagating jets. The jets carry magnetic fields generated by the Biermann battery mechanism and collide to form a highly turbulent region. The interaction is probed using a wealth of diagnostics, including induction coils that are capable of providing the field strength and directionality at a specific point in space. The latter have revealed a significant increase in the field's strength due to turbulent amplification. Our FLASH simulations have allowed us to reproduce the experimental findings and to disentangle the complex processes and dynamics involved in the colliding flows. This work was supported in part at the University of Chicago by DOE NNSA ASC.

  7. Concerning the preliminary results of space experiment with the seeds of rare plants (on the boad of BION-M No.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorelov, Yury; Kurganskaya, Lubov; Ilyin, Vyacheslav; Ruzaeva, Irina; Rozno, Svetlana; Kavelenova, Ludmila

    The problem of native flora plants conservation appears today as one of the most actual for humanity. The wide spreading natural ecosystems degradation results in the status changes for formerly common species to rare, endangered or extincted ones. That is why the complex of biological diversity conservation measures must be used including ex situ and in situ forms. Last years the seed banks (special seed collections in controlled conditions, including temperature below zero) and field banks (special alive plants collections) were created in many countries taking in mind the future of humanity. The seed banks as long-term depositories can be placed on the space stations where the threat of earth catastrophes is removed. But we must make it clear how the complex of space flight factors effects upon the seed quality and germination and plants development from “cosmic” seeds. For instance, the action of residual ionizing radiation into space apparatus on plant seeds can alter its vitality maybe by the growth of free radicals pool in molecular and subcellular level. The unknown level of such action permits us to propose wide diapason of effects from the absence of any changes to the stimulation of vital activity, decrease of it, mutagenesis and maybe the death of seeds. Only the experiments that begin in space and continue on the Earth can show us the effect of space flight factors complex on plant seeds. Here we describe the first results of experiment held on the board of space apparatus “Bion-M” No1. Totally 79 experiments were included to the program of “Bion-M”, among them the experiment “Biocont-BS”. The equipment for it was prepared by Central Scientific Research Institute of Machine-building; the seed material was selected and prepared by the Botanical Garden of Samara State University. The equipment with seeds was into space apparatus, which working orbit was average 575 km and the flight lasted for 30 days. The seed samples of 9 rare plants

  8. Phase II Upgrade of the GERDA Experiment for the Search of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majorovits, B.

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta decay could answer the question regarding the Majorana or Dirac nature of neutrinos. The GERDA experiment utilizes HPGe detectors enriched with the isotope 76Ge to search for this process. Recently the GERDA collaboration has unblinded data of Phase I of the experiment. In order to further improve the sensitivity of the experiment, additionally to the coaxial detectors used, 30 BEGe detectors made from germanium enriched in 76Ge will be deployed in GERDA Phase II. BEGe detectors have superior PSD capability, thus the background can be further reduced. The liquid argon surrounding the detector array will be instrumented in order to reject background by detecting scintillation light induced in the liquid argon by radiation. After a short introduction the hardware preparations for GERDA Phase II as well as the processing and characterization of the 30 BEGe detectors are discussed.

  9. Commissioning and Early Operation Experience of the NSLS-II Storage Ring RF System

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, F.; Rose, J.; Cupolo, J.; Dilgen, T.; Rose, B.; Gash, W.; Ravindranath, V.; Yeddulla, M.; Papu, J.; Davila, P.; Holub, B.; Tagger, J.; Sikora, R.; Ramirez, G.; Kulpin, J.

    2015-05-03

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a 3 GeV electron X-ray user facility commissioned in 2014. The storage ring RF system, essential for replenishing energy loss per turn of the electrons, consists of digital low level RF controllers, 310 kW CW klystron transmitters, CESR-B type superconducting cavities, as well as a supporting cryogenic system. Here we will report on RF commissioning and early operation experience of the system for beam current up to 200mA.

  10. ETA-II experiments for determining advanced radiographic capabilities of induction linacs

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, J.T.; Caporaso, G.J.; Clark, J.C.; Kirbie, H.C.; Chen, Y.-J.; Lund, S.M.; Westenskow, G.A.; Paul, A.C

    1997-05-01

    LLNL has proposed a multi-pulsed, multi-line of sight radiographic machine based on induction linac technology to be the core of the advanced hydrotest facility (AHF) being considered by the Department of Energy. In order to test the new technologies being developed for AHF we have recommissioned the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA II). We will conduct our initial experiments using kickers and large angle bending optics at the ETA II facility. Our current status and our proposed experimental schedule will be presented.

  11. Physics Design of the Eta-II Double Pulse Target Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Ho, Darwin D.-H.; McCarrick, James; Paul, Arthur; Sampayan, Stephen; Wang, Li-Fang; Weir, John

    2000-10-01

    The second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility will provide four 2.1 mm spot size, x-ray pulses within 2 ms with their x-doses in the range of several hundred rads at a meter for x-ray imaging. To achieve its performance specifications, there should be a sufficient amount of the DARHT-II x-ray converter material remaining while it turns into plasma and expands rapidly due to the heating of previous beam pulses. Furthermore, the beam-target interactions, such as the unwanted focusing by the backstreaming ions from the desorbed gas from the target surface for the first pulse and by those from the target plasma for the subsequent pulses, and the instability of the beam propagating in dense plasma, should be mitigated. We have modified the single pulse target experimental facility on the Experimental Test Accelerator II (ETA-II) to perform the double pulse target experiments to validate the DARHT-II multi-pulse target concept. The 1.15 MeV, 2 kA Snowtron injector will be used to provide the first electron pulse. The 6 MeV, 2 kA ETA-II beam will be used as the probe beam, i.e., the second pulse. The ETA-II target is located inside a focusing magnet (near the center). To use the same ETA-II final focus lens, an iron sleeve will be inserted from the downstream side of the magnet to reduce the downstream side’s magnetic field, and the Snowtron beam will strike the x-ray converter from the back. The physics design of the final focus area will be presented. We have modeled the hydrodynamics of the target expansion for the Snowtron beam. Comparison against the DARHT-II target will be presented.

  12. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II),a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Barnard, J.J.; Cohen, R.H.; Grote, D.P.; Lund, S.M.; Sharp, W.M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J.-Y.; Kwan, J.W.; Lee, E.P.; Leitner, M.A.; Logan, B.G.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W.L.; Davidson, R.C.; Dorf, M.; Gilson, E.P.; Kaganovich, I.D.

    2009-12-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  13. Beam dynamics of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II), a novel pulse-compressing ion accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A; Barnard, J J; Cohen, R H; Grote, D P; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Faltens, A; Henestroza, E; Jung, J; Kwan, J W; Lee, E P; Leitner, M A; Logan, B G; Vay, J; Waldron, W L; Davidson, R C; Dorf, M; Gilson, E P; Kaganovich, I

    2009-11-19

    Intense beams of heavy ions are well suited for heating matter to regimes of emerging interest. A new facility, NDCX-II, will enable studies of warm dense matter at {approx}1 eV and near-solid density, and of heavy-ion inertial fusion target physics relevant to electric power production. For these applications the beam must deposit its energy rapidly, before the target can expand significantly. To form such pulses, ion beams are temporally compressed in neutralizing plasma; current amplification factors of {approx}50-100 are routinely obtained on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX) at LBNL. In the NDCX-II physics design, an initial non-neutralized compression renders the pulse short enough that existing high-voltage pulsed power can be employed. This compression is first halted and then reversed by the beam's longitudinal space-charge field. Downstream induction cells provide acceleration and impose the head-to-tail velocity gradient that leads to the final neutralized compression onto the target. This paper describes the discrete-particle simulation models (1-D, 2-D, and 3-D) employed and the space-charge-dominated beam dynamics being realized.

  14. Test results of the SHARE II Mid-deck Flight Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Richard F.; Dominguez, Peter; Cornwell, John

    1992-07-01

    The SHARE II (Space Station Advanced Radiator Experiment II) Mid-deck Experiment was flown on board the Space Shuttle (STS-37) from April 5 to 12, 1991. The purpose of the experiment was to demonstrate the operation of several design changes proposed for the NASA/Grumman SHARE II heat pipe as a result of the lessons learned during the first SHARE flight (STS-29) in March 1989. Two test articles flew during the mission. The first, the Bubble Management Test Article, was a Plexiglas model of the monogroove heat pipe. This test article was primarily used to evaluate the performance of two 0-g bubble management devices; the redesigned evaporator screen artery and the condenser bubble trap. The second, the Blended Manifold Priming Test Article, also constructed of Plexiglas, was used to demonstrate passive self-priming of a heat pipe blended manifold connecting three evaporator legs to a single condenser leg. Both test articles used a 50/50 mixture of ethanol and water as the working fluid. Overall, the experiment was highly successful, with all the major test objectives fulfilled, including blended manifold priming, condenser bubble trap operation, screen artery bubble ingestion, and elimination of hydraulic diameter mismatch.

  15. Kolaviron, Biflavonoid Complex from the Seed of Garcinia kola Attenuated Angiotensin II- and Lypopolysaccharide-induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Oyagbemi, Ademola Adetokunbo; Omobowale, Temidayo Olutayo; Adedapo, Adeolu Alex; Yakubu, Momoh Audu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kolaviron (KV), a biflavonoid extract from Garcinia kola seeds has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, hepato-protective, cardio-protective, nephro-protective and other arrays of chemopreventive capabilities but the mechanism of action is still not completely understood. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative potential of KV in cultured Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells (VSMCs). Effects of KV (25-100 μg/mL) on VSMC proliferation alone or following treatments with mitogen and proinflammatory agents Angiotensin II (Ag II, 10-6 M) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 μg/mL) and effects on NO production were determined. Cellular proliferations were determined by MTT assay, nitric oxide (NO) level was determined by Griess assay. KV dose-and time dependently attenuated VSMC growth. Results: Treatment of VSMCs with Ag II and LPS significantly enhanced proliferation of the cell which was significantly attenuated by the treatment with KV. Treatment of VSMC with LPS significantly increased nitric oxide (NO) level in the media which was attenuated by KV. These results demonstrated anti-proliferative anti-inflammatory properties of KV as it clearly inhibited cellular proliferation induced by mitogens as well as LPS-induced inflammatory processes. Conclusion: Therefore, KV may mitigate cardiovascular conditions that involve cell proliferation, free radical generation and inflammatory processes such as hypertension, diabetes and stroke. However, the molecular mechanism of action of KV needs to be investigated. SUMMARY Angiotensin-induced cell proliferationKolaviron mitigates angiotensin-induced cell proliferationKolaviron ameliorates nitric oxide productionKolaviron offers antioxidant activity. Abbreviations Used: VSMCs: Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells, Ag II: Angiotensin II, KV: Kolaviron, LPS: lypopolysaccharide, NO: Nitric Oxide, DMEM: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium, MTT

  16. Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning machinery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fiber and seed loss from seed cotton cleaning equipment in cotton gins occurs, but the quantity of material lost, factors affecting fiber and seed loss, and the mechanisms that cause material loss are not well understood. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the effects of different factors on...

  17. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, J. C.; Chiou, E. W.; Chu, W. P.; McCormick, M. P.; McMaster, L. R.; Oltmans, S.; Rind, D.

    1993-03-01

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, we took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. We show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere.

  18. A comparison of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II tropospheric water vapor to radiosonde measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.C.; Chiou, E.W. ); Chu, W.P.; McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R. ); Oltmans, S. ); Rind, D. )

    1993-03-20

    Upper tropospheric Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) water vapor observations are compared to correlative radiosonde observations and radiosonde based climatologies. The SAGE II 1987 monthly zonal mean water vapor climatology is compared to both the Global Atmospheric Circulation Statistics (1963-1973) climatology and to the 1987 radiosonde climatology. The clear sky SAGE II climatology is found to be approximately half the level of both the clear/cloudy sky radiosonde climatologies. To determine whether this is realistic for these two different climatologies or includes additional observational and instrumental biases, the authors took the 1987 radiosonde data set and identified approximately 800 correlative profile pairs. The observational biases inherent to SAGE II and the radiosondes produce a set of profile pairs characteristic of clear sky, land conditions. A critical review of the radiosonde measurement capability was carried out to establish the operating range and accuracy in the upper troposphere. The authors show that even with tight coincidence criterion, the quality of the profile pair comparisons varies considerably because of strong water vapor variability occurring on small time and space scales. Annual zonal means calculated from the set of profile pairs again finds SAGE II significantly drier in many latitude bands. Resolving the radiosonde data base by hygrometer type shows this to be true for all hygrometers except for the thin film capacitive type (Vaisala Humicap). For this hygrometer, between 4.5 and 6.5 km SAGE II is drier by approximately 25.%, and from 8.5 to 11.5 km they are nearly equivalent when global annual means are compared. The good agreement with the Vaisala Humicap, currently the most accurate and responsive hygrometer in operational use, suggests existing radiosonde climatologies contain a significant moist bias in the upper troposphere. 31 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Writing Seveso II safety reports: new EU guidance reflecting 5 years' experience with the Directive.

    PubMed

    Wood, Maureen Heraty; Fabbri, Luciano; Struckl, Michael

    2008-09-15

    Since the coming into force of the Seveso II Directive, considerable experience has been acquired in regard to preparation of safety reports for establishments that fall under the requirements of this Directive. In light of this experience, the Amendment of the Seveso II Directive adopted by the European Parliament and the Council on 16 December 2003, gave the European Commission the mandate "to review by 31 December 2006 in close cooperation with the Member States, the existing Guidance on the Preparation of a safety report (EUR 17690)". As a result, a technical working group of Member States representing the Seveso competent authorities and the European Commission's Major Accident Hazards Bureau was established to review and re-examine the guidance. The new guidance maintains the high-level and overarching character of the older version, but improves the document through better definition of conceptual elements of the safety report and greater alignment with Annex II of the Directive, which describes the essential elements of the safety report. This paper describes the new guidance in terms of its contribution to developing a harmonized conceptual framework for preparing and reviewing safety reports within the context of Seveso II implementation. Overall, the aim of the guidance is to provide concrete advice to operators and competent authorities on the logic and expectations underlying the safety report, so as to make both preparation and review of the report a more efficient and useful exercise for all parties involved. PMID:18276071

  20. Seed Germination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Initiation of seed germination is a critical decision for plants. It is important for seed populations under natural conditions to spread the timing of germination of individual seeds to maximize the probability of species survival. Therefore, seeds have evolved the multiple layers of mechanisms tha...

  1. The Life-Long Mortality Risks Of World War II Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Elder, Glen H.; Brown, James Scott; Martin, Leslie R.; Friedman, Howard W.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This longitudinal study of American veterans investigated the mortality risks of five World War II military experiences (i.e., combat exposure) and their variation among veterans in the post-war years. Methods The male subjects (N=854) are members of the Stanford-Terman study, and 38 percent served in World War II. Cox models (proportional hazards regressions) compared the relative mortality risk associated with each military experience. Results Overseas duty, service in the Pacific and exposure to combat significantly increased the mortality risks of veterans in the study. Individual differences in education, mental health in 1950, and age at entry into the military, as well as personality factors made no difference in these results. Conclusions A gradient is observable such that active duty on the home front, followed by overseas duty, service in the Pacific, and combat exposure markedly increased the risk of relatively early mortality. Potential linking mechanisms include heavy drinking. PMID:20161074

  2. Integration of Experiments across Diverse Environments Identifies the Genetic Determinants of Variation in Sorghum bicolor Seed Element Composition.

    PubMed

    Shakoor, Nadia; Ziegler, Greg; Dilkes, Brian P; Brenton, Zachary; Boyles, Richard; Connolly, Erin L; Kresovich, Stephen; Baxter, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    Seedling establishment and seed nutritional quality require the sequestration of sufficient element nutrients. The identification of genes and alleles that modify element content in the grains of cereals, including sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), is fundamental to developing breeding and selection methods aimed at increasing bioavailable element content and improving crop growth. We have developed a high-throughput work flow for the simultaneous measurement of multiple elements in sorghum seeds. We measured seed element levels in the genotyped Sorghum Association Panel, representing all major cultivated sorghum races from diverse geographic and climatic regions, and mapped alleles contributing to seed element variation across three environments by genome-wide association. We observed significant phenotypic and genetic correlation between several elements across multiple years and diverse environments. The power of combining high-precision measurements with genome-wide association was demonstrated by implementing rank transformation and a multilocus mixed model to map alleles controlling 20 element traits, identifying 255 loci affecting the sorghum seed ionome. Sequence similarity to genes characterized in previous studies identified likely causative genes for the accumulation of zinc, manganese, nickel, calcium, and cadmium in sorghum seeds. In addition to strong candidates for these five elements, we provide a list of candidate loci for several other elements. Our approach enabled the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in strong linkage disequilibrium with causative polymorphisms that can be evaluated in targeted selection strategies for plant breeding and improvement. PMID:26896393

  3. Integration of Experiments across Diverse Environments Identifies the Genetic Determinants of Variation in Sorghum bicolor Seed Element Composition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Erin L.

    2016-01-01

    Seedling establishment and seed nutritional quality require the sequestration of sufficient element nutrients. The identification of genes and alleles that modify element content in the grains of cereals, including sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), is fundamental to developing breeding and selection methods aimed at increasing bioavailable element content and improving crop growth. We have developed a high-throughput work flow for the simultaneous measurement of multiple elements in sorghum seeds. We measured seed element levels in the genotyped Sorghum Association Panel, representing all major cultivated sorghum races from diverse geographic and climatic regions, and mapped alleles contributing to seed element variation across three environments by genome-wide association. We observed significant phenotypic and genetic correlation between several elements across multiple years and diverse environments. The power of combining high-precision measurements with genome-wide association was demonstrated by implementing rank transformation and a multilocus mixed model to map alleles controlling 20 element traits, identifying 255 loci affecting the sorghum seed ionome. Sequence similarity to genes characterized in previous studies identified likely causative genes for the accumulation of zinc, manganese, nickel, calcium, and cadmium in sorghum seeds. In addition to strong candidates for these five elements, we provide a list of candidate loci for several other elements. Our approach enabled the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in strong linkage disequilibrium with causative polymorphisms that can be evaluated in targeted selection strategies for plant breeding and improvement. PMID:26896393

  4. A MUTATION IN A 3-KETO-ACYL-ACP SYNTHASE II GENE IS ASSOCIATED WITH ELEVATED PALMITIC ACID LEVELS IN SOYBEAN SEEDS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Palmitic acid is the major saturated fatty acid component of soybean [Glycine max, (L.) Merr.] oil, typically accounting for ~11 % of total seed oil content. Several genetic loci have been shown to control the seed palmitate content of soybean. One such locus, fap2, mediates an elevated seed palmit...

  5. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J.; Schulz, H.; Sievers, J.

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  6. Fiber optic timing, firing and control system for high energy density physics experiments at Pegasus II

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, C.R.; Rohlev, L.; Earley, L.; Cochrane, J.

    1995-12-01

    Several fiber optic systems have been designed and implemented for the high energy density experiments at Pegasus II. The main fiber optic system developed for Pegasus II, remotely controls both the charging and discharging of the capacitor discharge unit (CDU). This fiber optic system is also used to distribute the timing and firing information specific to each experiment to the operators and experimenters. The timing and firing information includes the voltage on the CDU as it is being charged, a confirmation signal indicating the CDU has discharged and common timing signals based on the output signals on the load ring of the CDU. Various fiber optic systems were implemented to transfer diagnostic information related to the discharge of the main capacitor bank to the control room. The diagnostics include the current, electric field, and vacuum pressure at the target area. Not only do these fiber optic systems provide the control and monitor signals for the experiments at Pegasus II, they have the added value of preventing premature firing of the capacitor bank, eliminating ground loops between the test area and the control room and providing overall increased operator safety.

  7. TRIGA Mark II benchmark experiment; Part I: Steady-state operation

    SciTech Connect

    Mele, I.; Ravnik, M.; Trkov, A. )

    1994-01-01

    The experimental results of startup tests after reconstruction and modification of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana are presented. The experiments were performed with a completely fresh, compact, and uniform core. The operating conditions were well defined and controlled, so that the results can be used as a benchmark test case for TRIGA reactor calculations. Both steady-state and pulse mode operation were tested. In this paper, the following steady-state experiments are treated: critical core and excess reactivity, control rod worths, fuel element reactivity worth distribution, fuel temperature distribution, and fuel temperature reactivity coefficient.

  8. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments - Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiou, E. W.; Mccormick, M. P.; Mcmaster, L. R.; Chu, W. P.; Larsen, J. C.; Rind, D.; Oltmans, S.

    1993-01-01

    A comparison is made of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite sensors of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus-7 LIMS, and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. It was found that, despite differences in the measurement techniques, sampling bias, and observational periods, the three experiments have disclosed a generally consistent pattern of stratospheric water vapor distribution. The only significant difference occurs at high southern altitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements were 2-3 ppmv greater than those of SAGE II and ATMOS.

  9. Aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles using Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newchurch, M. J.; Cunnold, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    This study examines 1211 cases of coincident ozone profiles derived from 1164 Umkehrs and 928 Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II) profiles within 1000 km and 12 hours between October 1984 and April 1989 to study the stratospheric-aerosol effect on Umkehr ozone profiles. Because of the close correspondence of stratospheric aerosol optical depth at the SAGE II-measured 0.525-micrometer wavelength and the extrapolated 0.32 Umkehr wavelength determined in this study we use the 0.525-micrometer data to determine the aerosol effect on Umkehr profiles. At the 95% confidence level, we find the following errors to the Umkehr ozone amounts: in Umkehr layer 9 (-2.9 +/- 2.1), layer 8 (-2.3 +/- 1.1), layer 7 (0.1 +/- 1.1), layer 6 (2.2 +/- 1.0), layer 5 (-1.5 +/- 0.8), and layer 4 (-2.4 +/- 1.7) in percent ozone amount per 0.01 stratospheric aerosol optical depth. These results agree with previous theoretical and empirical studies within their respective error bounds in layers 9, 8, and 7. The results in layers 6, 5, and 4 differ significantly from those in previous works. Using only those eight stations with more than 47 coincidences results in mean aerosol effects that are not significantly different from the 14-station results. Because SAGE II and Umkehr produce different ozone retrievals in layer 9 and because the intralayer correlation of SAGE II ozone and aerosol in layer 9 is nonzero, one must exercise some caution in attributing the entire SAGE II-Umkehr difference in this layer to an aerosol effect.

  10. A new inversion for Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusch, D. W.; Randall, C. E.; Callan, M. T.; Horanyi, M.; Clancy, R. T.; Solomon, S. C.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Koehler, U.; Claude, H.; de Muer, D.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new inversion algorithm for retrieving ozone densities and aerosol extinctions from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) II measurements. The primary differences between the new algorithm and the current operational SAGE II inversion are the order of the species and altitude inversions, and the methods used to calculate aerosol extinction and remove saturated signals. Ozone densities retrieved at altitudes from 15 to 30 km using the new algorithm are compared to those from the operational SAGE II inversion, as well as to ozone densities from coincident balloon ozonesonde measurements at four different locations in the northern hemisphere between 1984 and 1991 for low to medium stratospheric aerosol loading conditions. The results of the comparison show that the ozone densities resulting from the operational and new algorithms agree to within 1% above 22 km. Below 22 km, the new results are lower than the operational results by up to 30%, depending on altitude and location. At all four stations the new results agree better with the sondes, decreasing the SAGE II/sonde differences by a factor of 2 or more.

  11. Stratospheric aerosol and gas experiments I and II comparisons with ozonesondes

    SciTech Connect

    Veiga, R.E.; Cunnold, D.M.; Chu, W.P.

    1995-05-20

    Ozone profiles measured by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiments (SAGE) I and II are compared with ozonesonde profiles at 24 stations over the period extending from 1979 through 1991. Ozonesonde/satellite differences at 21 stations with SAGE II overpasses were computed down to 11.5 km in the midlatitudes, to 15.5 km in the lower latitudes, and for nine stations with SAGE I overpasses down to 15.5 km. The set of individual satellite and ozonesonde profile comparisons most closely colocated in time and space shows mean absolute differences relative to the satellite measurement of 6 {plus_minus} 2% for SAGE II and 8 {plus_minus}3% for SAGE I. The ensemble of ozonesonde/satellite differences, when averaged over all altitudes, shows that for SAGE II, 70% were less than 5%, whereas for SAGE I, 50% were less than 5%. The best agreement occurred in the altitude region near the ozone density maximum where almost all the relative differences were less than 5%. Most of the statistically significant differences occurred below the ozone maximum down to the tropopause in the region of steepest ozone gradients and typically ranged between 0 and {minus}20%. Correlations between ozone and aerosol extinction in the northern midlatitudes indicate that aerosols had no discernible impact on the ozonesonde/satellite differences and on the stratosphere during 1984 to mid-1991. 42 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Particle identification performance of the prototype aerogel RICH counter for the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, S.; Adachi, I.; Hara, K.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, H.; Kakuno, H.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Nishida, S.; Ogawa, S.; Pestotnik, R.; Šantelj, L.; Seljak, A.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tabata, M.; Tahirovic, E.; Yusa, Y.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new type of particle identification device, called an aerogel ring imaging Cherenkov (ARICH) counter, for the Belle II experiment. It uses silica aerogel tiles as Cherenkov radiators. For detection of Cherenkov photons, hybrid avalanche photo-detectors (HAPDs) are used. The designed HAPD has a high sensitivity to single photons under a strong magnetic field. We have confirmed that the HAPD provides high efficiency for single-photon detection even after exposure to neutron and γ -ray radiation that exceeds the levels expected in the 10-year Belle II operation. In order to confirm the basic performance of the ARICH counter system, we carried out a beam test at the using a prototype of the ARICH counter with six HAPD modules. The results are in agreement with our expectations and confirm the suitability of the ARICH counter for the Belle II experiment. Based on the in-beam performance of the device, we expect that the identification efficiency at 3.5 GeV/c is 97.4% and 4.9% for pions and kaons, respectively. This paper summarizes the development of the HAPD for the ARICH and the evaluation of the performance of the prototype ARICH counter built with the final design components.

  13. Charge exchange contamination of CRIT-II barium CIV experiment. [critical ionization velocity in ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swenson, G. R.; Mende, S. B.; Meyerott, R. E.; Rairden, R. L.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have been recently performed which attempted to confirm critical ionization velocity (CIV) ionization by deploying chemicals at high velocity in the ionosphere. Specifically, the CRIT-II rocket performed a barium release in the ionosphere, where observations of Ba(+) resonant emissions following the release are believed to have resulted from the CIV process. Calculations are presented which suggest a significant fraction (if not all) of the Ba(+) observed likely resulted from charge exchange with the thermosphere ions and not through CIV processes. The results presented here are pertinent to other CIV experiments performed in the ionosphere. It is recommended that laboratory measurements should be made of the charge exchange cross section between O(+) and Ba as well as other metal vapors used in CIV experiments.

  14. Caries experience in a child population in a deprived area of Brazil, using ICDAS II.

    PubMed

    de Amorim, Rodrigo Guedes; Figueiredo, Maria José; Leal, Soraya Coelho; Mulder, Jan; Frencken, Jo E

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the caries experience of children aged 6 to 7 years old in a socially deprived suburban area of Brazil's Federal District, using the ICDAS II system and to investigate determinants of dental caries. The survey was carried out in six public schools by three calibrated examiners, on a sample of 835 children. ICDAS II codes had to be converted into dmf/DMF components at surface and tooth levels, resulting in unfamiliar caries variables, to enable some meaningful reporting of the findings. The prevalence of dental caries, including enamel and dentinal carious lesions, in primary teeth was 95.6% and in permanent teeth it was 63.7%. Mean values of d(2)mf(2)-t (enamel and dentinal lesions), d(3)mf(3)-t (dentine lesions), D(2)MF(2)-T and D(3)MF(3)-T indices were 6.9 ± 3.8, 3.2 ± 3.4, 1.7 ± 1.6 and 0.2 ± 0.5, respectively. Enamel carious lesions predominated in the dmf-t/s and DMF-T/S indices. Seven-year-old children had statistically significantly more enamel and dentine carious lesions in permanent teeth than 6-year-old children had. Using ICDAS II, the prevalence of dental caries in both dentitions was very high. In both dentitions, the decay component predominated, with hardly any restorations or extractions observed. The new ICDAS II system leads to overvaluation of the seriousness of dental caries experience and made reporting of outcomes cumbersome. Guidelines on analysing data and reporting results should be agreed upon before this system can be used in epidemiological surveys globally. PMID:21384127

  15. Plant Growth During the Greenhouse II Experiment on the MIR Orbital Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2002-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 sq m growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (three, then four of six lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 C), and sometimes excessive-substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 days, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the US Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experiment procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 days in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  16. Directory search performance optimization of AMGA for the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Geunchul; Kwak, Jae-Hyuck; Huh, Taesang; Hwang, Soonwook

    2015-12-01

    AMGA (ARDA Metadata Grid Application) is a grid metadata catalogue system that has been developed as a component of the EU FP7 EMI consortium based on the requirements of the HEP (High-Energy Physics) and the biomedical user communities. Currently, AMGA is exploited to manage the metadata in the gBasf2 framework at the Belle II experiment, one of the largest particle physics experiments in the world. In this paper, we present our efforts to optimize the metadata query performance of AMGA to better support the massive MC Campaign of the Belle II experiment. Although AMGA exhibits very outstanding performance for a relatively small amount of data, as the number of directories and the metadata size increase (e.g. hundreds of thousands of directories) during the MC Campaign, AMGA suffers from severe query processing performance degradation. To address this problem, we modified the query search mechanism and the database scheme of AMGA to provide dramatic improvements of metadata search performance and query response time. Throughout our comparative performance analysis of metadata search operations, we show that AMGA can be an optimal solution for a metadata catalogue in a large-scale scientific experimental framework

  17. Impact of General Physics Laboratory II Course on Recognizing Electricity Experiments' Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ege, Y.; Çirkinoǧlu, A. G.; Aytaç, N.; Özcan, H.

    2007-04-01

    In this study, the abilities related to the tools and their functions that are used in electrical experiments in the general physics laboratory II courses by the 1st grade students attending the education of science teaching in Balikesir University, in 2005-2006 education year has been researched. The measuring tool used in our research consists of 3 parts and it has been applied to 82 students as pre-test and post- test. Also semi-constructed interviews have been conducted with 8 students among them. The data obtained at the end of the research have been analyzed and discussed with the aim.

  18. EMC studies for the vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thalmeier, R.; Iglesias, M.; Arteche, F.; Echeverria, I.; Friedl, M.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Cervenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnicka, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Moser, H. G.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaia, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Rummel, S.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-01-01

    The upgrade of the Belle II experiment plans to use a vertex detector based on two different technologies, DEPFET pixel (PXD) technology and double side silicon microstrip (SVD) technology. The vertex electronics are characterized by the topology of SVD bias that forces to design a sophisticated grounding because of the floating power scheme. The complex topology of the PXD power cable bundle may introduce some noise inside the vertex area. This paper presents a general overview of the EMC issues present in the vertex system, based on EMC tests on an SVD prototype and a study of noise propagation in the PXD cable bundle based on Multi-conductor transmission line theory.

  19. Biomarkers in phase I–II chemoprevention trials: lessons from the NCI experience

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Early phase clinical trials are an essential component of chemopreventive drug development to identify signals of drug efficacy that can subsequently be explored definitively in phase III trials. Whereas phase I trials focus on safety and identification of optimal dose and schedule for cancer prevention, phase II trials focus on intermediate endpoints that are variably related to cancer development. The United States National Cancer Institute supports a programme devoted to early phase cancer prevention clinical trials. The experience, along with the benefits and limitations of the range of biomarker endpoints used in these studies, are reviewed here. PMID:26635903

  20. Seed proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds comprise a protective covering, a small embryonic plant, and a nutrient-storage organ. Seeds are protein-rich, and have been the subject of many mass spectrometry-based analyses. Seed storage proteins (SSP), which are transient depots for reduced nitrogen, have been studied for decades by cel...

  1. Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (Mohave, Mohave II): Results Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, Thierry; McDermid, Iain S.; McGee, Thomas G.; Twigg, Laurence W.; Sumnicht, Grant K.; Whiteman, David N.; Rush, Kurt D.; Cadirola, Martin P.; Venable, Demetrius D.; Connell, R.; Demoz, Belay B.; Vomel, Holger; Miloshevich, L.

    2008-01-01

    The Measurements of Humidity in the Atmosphere and Validation Experiments (MOHAVE, MOHAVE-II) inter-comparison campaigns took place at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.5(sup o)N) in October 2006 and 2007 respectively. Both campaigns aimed at evaluating the capability of three Raman lidars for the measurement of water vapor in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). During each campaign, more than 200 hours of lidar measurements were compared to balloon borne measurements obtained from 10 Cryogenic Frost-point Hygrometer (CFH) flights and over 50 Vaisala RS92 radiosonde flights. During MOHAVE, fluorescence in all three lidar receivers was identified, causing a significant wet bias above 10-12 km in the lidar profiles as compared to the CFH. All three lidars were reconfigured after MOHAVE, and no such bias was observed during the MOHAVE-II campaign. The lidar profiles agreed very well with the CFH up to 13-17 km altitude, where the lidar measurements become noise limited. The results from MOHAVE-II have shown that the water vapor Raman lidar will be an appropriate technique for the long-term monitoring of water vapor in the UT/LS given a slight increase in its power-aperture, as well as careful calibration.

  2. Plant growth during the Greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    2003-01-01

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 degrees C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible. c2002 Published by Elsevier Science Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  3. Plant growth during the greenhouse II experiment on the Mir orbital station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Campbell, W. F.; Carman, J. G.; Bingham, G. E.; Bubenheim, D. L.; Yendler, B.; Sytchev, V.; Levinskikh, M. A.; Ivanova, I.; Chernova, L.; Podolsky, I.

    We carried out three experiments with Super Dwarf wheat in the Bulgarian/Russian growth chamber Svet (0.1 m2 growing area) on the Space Station Mir. This paper mostly describes the first of these NASA-supported trials, began on Aug. 13, 1995. Plants were sampled five times and harvested on Nov. 9 after 90 days. Equipment failures led to low irradiance (3, then 4 of 6 lamp sets failed), instances of high temperatures (ca. 37 °C), and sometimes excessive substrate moisture. Although plants grew for the 90 d, no wheat heads were produced. Considering the low light levels, plants were surprisingly green, but of course biomass production was low. Plants were highly disoriented (low light, mirror walls?). Fixed and dried samples and the root module were returned on the U.S. Shuttle Atlantis on Nov. 20, 1995. Samples of the substrate, a nutrient-charged zeolite called Balkanine, were taken from the root module, carefully examined for roots, weighed, dried, and reweighed. The Svet control unit and the light bank were shipped to Moscow. An experiment validation test (EVT) of plant growth and experimental procedures, carried out in Moscow, was highly successful. Equipment built in Utah to measure CO2, H2O vapor, irradiance, air and leaf (IR) temperature, O2, pressure, and substrate moisture worked well in the EVT and in space. After this manuscript was first prepared, plants were grown in Mir with a new light bank and controller for 123 d in late 1996 and 39 days in 1996/1997. Plants grew exceptionally well with higher biomass production than in any previous space experiment, but the ca. 280 wheat heads that were produced in 1996 contained no seeds. Ethylene in the cabin atmosphere was responsible.

  4. Early Experience with the Amplatzer Vascular Plug II for Occlusive Purposes in Arteriovenous Hemodialysis Access

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, Steven Narlawar, Ranjeet; Odetoyinbo, Tolulola; Littler, Peter; Oweis, Deyana; Sharma, Ajay; Bakran, Ali

    2010-02-15

    The Amplatzer Vascular Plug Type II (AVP II) has proven effective in the therapeutic embolization of various vascular lesions. It benefits from very rapid occlusion of the target lesion and can be deployed, retrieved, and redeployed if required. There is no literature available on use of the AVP II in the maintenance, closure, and management of complicated arteriovenous access in hemodialysis patients. In this series, we present our clinical experience with the use of the AVP II for embolization of problematic hemodialysis access. The AVP II is a self-expandable Nitinol wire-mesh device. Mounted on a delivery wire it has the capability to be deployed, recaptured, and redeployed. In total seven patients (four males: one diabetic, all nonsmokers), with ages ranging from 44 to 81 years (mean, 63 years), were treated between July 2008 and January 2009. One patient had not started dialysis. The remaining six patients had varied histories, with the time on hemodialysis ranging from 1 to 21 years. Retrospective review of clinical notes revealed patient demographics, type of access, device size, deployment site, and outcomes. Indications for embolization included steal syndrome (one patient), high-flow tributaries (two patients), and limb swelling (four patients). All patients had clinical and sonographical follow-up to 3 months. Surgical ligation had either failed, was considered a contraindication due to concerns regarding wound healing, or was considered difficult due to complex venous anatomy. Only one device was used in each patient, ranging from 6 to 16 mm in diameter. Immediate technical success was seen in 100%. All these patients were followed up clinically in the vascular access radiology clinic at 4 weeks and 3 months. Occlusion of the treated vessel and resolution of symptoms were reconfirmed in 100% of cases at 3 months. It was also noted whether patients were having successful dialysis, if required. There were no complications. Average procedural time was 19

  5. Spatial ionization effects of a shock layer in the RAM-C-II flight experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surzhikov, S. T.

    2015-02-01

    A three-dimensional computer model of the nonequilibrium ionization aerophysics of descent moduli entering dense atmospheric layers with orbital velocity in the height range of 60-90 km is developed. A three-dimensional numerical analysis of the experimental data on the ionization of the shock layer near the surface of a hypersonic flying module having the form of a blunt-sphere cone with the flight velocity higher than 7.5 km/s at heights of 61-81 km is fulfilled. The data of the flight experiment are obtained in the framework of the RAM-C-II investigatory program. The use of a three-dimensional computer model made it possible to find the calculated data in good agreement with the flight experiment data, as well as to explain some spatial effects not considered before.

  6. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-01-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at midlatitudes (about 45 deg N) and tropical latitudes (12-25 deg S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At +/- 0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  7. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pruvost, P.; Lenoble, J. ); Ovarlez, J. ); Chu, W.P. )

    1993-03-20

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research Center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmospherique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes ([approximately]45[degrees]N) and tropical latitudes (12[degrees]S-25[degrees]S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique. At [plus minus]0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more). 17 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Search for electroweak single top-quark production with the CDF II experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, Svenja

    2007-11-02

    Understanding the world -- This aim drives humankind since the beginning of conscious thinking. Especially the nature of matter has been of major interest. Nowadays, we have a complex image of the constitution of matter. Atoms consist of electrons and nucleons. But even nucleons are not elementary. Their basic constituents are called quarks. Physicists developed a model describing the elementary components of matter as well as the forces between them: the standard model of elementary particle physics. The substructure of matter is only visible in scattering experiments. In high energy physics, these experiments are done at particle accelerators. The world's highest energetic collider, the Tevatron, is hosted by the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), also called Fermilab, in the vicinity of Chicago. The proton-antiproton collisions with a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV are recorded by two multipurpose detectors, namely D0 and CDF II.

  9. Comparison of Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II and balloon-borne stratospheric water vapor measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruvost, P.; Ovarlez, J.; Lenoble, J.; Chu, W. P.

    1993-03-01

    The Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II has one channel at 940 nm related to water vapor. Two inversion procedures were developed independently in order to obtain the water vapor profile: the Chahine method by the Langley Research center, and the Mill method by the Laboratoire d'Optique Atmosphérique. Comparisons were made between these two algorithms and some results are presented at mid-latitudes (~45°N) and tropical latitudes (12°S-25°S). They are compared with in situ frost point hygrometer data provided by balloon experiments from the Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique. At +/-0.5 ppmv, agreement between the inversion results and the experimental results was obtained in the altitude range from 18-19 to 26-27 km. Below 18-19 km and above 26-27 km the error is larger (sometimes 1 ppmv and more).

  10. Indirect-drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments on the Shenguang-II laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J. F.; Fan, Z. F.; Zheng, W. D.; Wang, M.; Pei, W. B.; Zhu, S. P.; Zhang, W. Y.; Miao, W. Y.; Yuan, Y. T.; Cao, Z. R.; Deng, B.; Jiang, S. E.; Liu, S. Y.; Ding, Y. K.; Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H. He, X. T.

    2014-04-15

    In this research, a series of single-mode, indirect-drive, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability experiments performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility [X. T. He and W. Y. Zhang, Eur. Phys. J. D 44, 227 (2007)] using planar target is reported. The simulation results from the one-dimensional hydrocode for the planar foil trajectory experiment indicate that the energy flux at the hohlraum wall is obviously less than that at the laser entrance hole. Furthermore, the non-Planckian spectra of x-ray source can strikingly affect the dynamics of the foil flight and the perturbation growth. Clear images recorded by an x-ray framing camera for the RT growth initiated by small- and large-amplitude perturbations are obtained. The observed onset of harmonic generation and transition from linear to nonlinear growth regime is well predicted by two-dimensional hydrocode simulations.

  11. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.

    1994-11-01

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

  12. The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS-II) Experiment: First Results from the Soudan Mine

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Clarence Leeder

    2004-09-01

    There is an abundance of evidence that the majority of the mass of the universe is in the form of non-baryonic non-luminous matter that was non-relativistic at the time when matter began to dominate the energy density. Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are attractive cold dark matter candidates because they would have a relic abundance today of {approx}0.1 which is consistent with precision cosmological measurements. WIMPs are also well motivated theoretically. Many minimal supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model have WIMPs in the form of the lightest supersymmetric partner, typically taken to be the neutralino. The CDMS II experiment searches for WIMPs via their elastic scattering off of nuclei. The experiment uses Ge and Si ZIP detectors, operated at <50 mK, which simultaneously measure the ionization and athermal phonons produced by the scattering of an external particle. The dominant background for the experiment comes from electromagnetic interactions taking place very close to the detector surface. Analysis of the phonon signal from these interactions makes it possible to discriminate them from interactions caused by WIMPs. This thesis presents the details of an important aspect of the phonon pulse shape analysis known as the ''Lookup Table Correction''. The Lookup Table Correction is a position dependent calibration of the ZIP phonon response which improves the rejection of events scattering near the detector surface. The CDMS collaboration has recently commissioned its experimental installation at the Soudan Mine. This thesis presents an analysis of the data from the first WIMP search at the Soudan Mine. The results of this analysis set the world's lowest exclusion limit making the CDMS II experiment at Soudan the most sensitive WIMP search to this date.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of the TRIGA Mark II Benchmark Experiment with Burned Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Jeraj, Robert; Zagar, Tomaz; Ravnik, Matjaz

    2002-03-15

    Monte Carlo calculations of a criticality experiment with burned fuel on the TRIGA Mark II research reactor are presented. The main objective was to incorporate burned fuel composition calculated with the WIMSD4 deterministic code into the MCNP4B Monte Carlo code and compare the calculated k{sub eff} with the measurements. The criticality experiment was performed in 1998 at the ''Jozef Stefan'' Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia, with the same fuel elements and loading pattern as in the TRIGA criticality benchmark experiment with fresh fuel performed in 1991. The only difference was that in 1998, the fuel elements had on average burnup of {approx}3%, corresponding to 1.3-MWd energy produced in the core in the period between 1991 and 1998. The fuel element burnup accumulated during 1991-1998 was calculated with the TRIGLAV in-house-developed fuel management two-dimensional multigroup diffusion code. The burned fuel isotopic composition was calculated with the WIMSD4 code and compared to the ORIGEN2 calculations. Extensive comparison of burned fuel material composition was performed for both codes for burnups up to 20% burned {sup 235}U, and the differences were evaluated in terms of reactivity. The WIMSD4 and ORIGEN2 results agreed well for all isotopes important in reactivity calculations, giving increased confidence in the WIMSD4 calculation of the burned fuel material composition. The k{sub eff} calculated with the combined WIMSD4 and MCNP4B calculations showed good agreement with the experimental values. This shows that linking of WIMSD4 with MCNP4B for criticality calculations with burned fuel is feasible and gives reliable results.

  14. Electronic Transitions as a Probe of Tetrahedral versus Octahedral Coordination in Nickel(II) Complexes: An Undergraduate Inorganic Chemistry Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filgueiras, Carlos A. L.; Carazza, Fernando

    1980-01-01

    Discusses procedures, theoretical considerations, and results of an experiment involving the preparation of a tetrahedral nickel(II) complex and its transformation into an octahedral species. Suggests that fundamental aspects of coordination chemistry can be demonstrated by simple experiments performed in introductory level courses. (Author/JN)

  15. The Charged Aerosol Release Experiment (Care II) to Study Artificial Dusty Plasmas in the Upper Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, P. A.; Siefring, C. L.; Gatling, G.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Vierinen, J.; Bhatt, A.; Holzworth, R. H., II; McCarthy, M.; Gustavsson, B.; La Hoz, C.; Latteck, R.

    2015-12-01

    A sounding rocket launched from Andoya, Norway in September 2015 carried 37 rocket motors and a multi-instrument daughter payload into the ionosphere to study the generation of plasma wave electric fields and ionospheric density disturbances by the high-speed injection of dust particles. The primary purpose of the CARE II mission is to validate the dress-particle theory of enhanced incoherent scatter from a dusty plasma and to validate models of plasma instabilities driven by high-speed charged particles. The CARE II chemical payload produces 66 kg of micron-sized dust particles composed of aluminium oxide. In addition to the dust, simple molecular combustion products such as N2, H2, CO2, CO, H20 and NO will be injected into the bottomside of the F-layer. Charging of the dust and ion charge exchange with the molecules yields plasma particles moving at hypersonic velocities. Streaming instabilities and shear electric fields causes plasma turbulence that can be detected using ground radars and in situ plasma instruments. The instrument payload was separated from the chemical release payload soon after launch to measure electric field vectors, electron and ion densities, and integrated electron densities from the rocket to the ground. The chemical release of high speed dust was directed upward on the downleg of the rocket trajectory to intersect the F-Layer. The instrument section was about 600 meters from the dust injection module at the release time. Ground HF and UHF radars were operated to detected scatter and refraction by the modified ionosphere. Optical instruments from airborne and ground observatories were used to map the dispersal of the dust using scattered sunlight. The plasma interactions are being simulated with both fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) codes. CARE II is a follow-on to the CARE I rocket experiment conducted from Wallops Island Virginia in September 2009.

  16. Lower-hybrid-heating experiments on the Alcator C and the Versator II Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porkolab, M.; Schuss, J. J.; Takase, Y.; Texter, S.; Fiore, C. L.; Gandy, R.; Greenwald, M. J.; Gwinn, D. A.; Lipschultz, B.; Marmar, E. S.

    Initial results from lower hybrid wave heating experiments carried out on the MIT Alcator-C and Versator II Tokamak are reported. In the Alcator-C experiments a 4 waveguide array, with internally brazed ceramic windows was used to inject 160 kW of microwave power at 4.6 GHz into the plasma with nO less than or equal to 1 x 10(15) cm(+3), and BO less than or equal to 12 T. The RF coupling studies show optimal coupling when the local density at the waveguide mouth is 25 to 50 times overdense. Heating experiments show an ion tail formation in hydrogen discharge peaking at a density of anti-n approx. = 2.7 x 10(14) cm(+3) at B = 8.9 T, and bulk ion heating at a density of anti n approx. = 1.5 x 10(14) c(+3) at B approx. = 11 T. Evidence of RF current enhancement has been observed at a density of n approx. = 3 x 10(13) cm (+3). Doppler broadening of the OVII and NVI lines shows a (RADICAL)T/sub i/= 50 eV rise in the bulk ion temperature. A significant RF produced ion tail is also observed by charge exchange analysis. A toroidal ray tracing code and a 1-D transport code to study the heating density bands and heating efficiencies were successfully combined.

  17. Simulation and modeling of the Gamble II self-pinched ion beam transport experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, D.V.; Ottinger, P.F.; Hinshelwood, D.D.

    1999-07-01

    Progress in numerical simulations and modeling of the self-pinched ion beam transport experiment at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) is reviewed. In the experiment, a 1.2-MeV, 100-kA proton beam enters a 1-m long, transport region filled with a low pressure gas (30--250 mTorr helium, or 1 Torr air). The time-dependent velocity distribution function of the injected ion beam is determined from an orbit code that uses a pinch-reflex ion diode model and the measured voltage and current from this diode on the Gamble II generator at NRL. This distribution function is used as the beam input condition for numerical simulations carried out using the hybrid particle-in-cell code IPROP. Results of the simulations will be described, and detailed comparisons will be made with various measurements, including line-integrated electron-density, proton-fluence, and beam radial-profile measurements. As observed in the experiment, the simulations show evidence of self-pinching for helium pressures between 35 and 80 mTorr. Simulations and measurements in 1 Torr air show ballistic transport. The relevance of these results to ion-driven inertial confinement fusion will be discussed.

  18. Microwave experiments in He II. New features of undamped superfluid flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybalko, A. S.; Rubets, S. P.; Rudavskiĭ, É. Ya.; Tikhiĭ, V. A.; Tarapov, S. I.; Golovashchenko, R. V.; Derkach, V. N.

    2008-07-01

    The stability and oscillatory properties of superfluid ring flow arising around the cylindrical surface of a disk-shaped dielectric resonator immersed in liquid helium are studied experimentally. The velocity of superfluid flow is controlled with special heat guns, placed in He II and generating counterflows of the normal and superfluid components, directed along the tangent to the cylindrical surface of the resonator. In the experiment the amplitude of the microwave signal passing through the resonator is measured and the effect of the phase and dynamic states of the liquid on the signal amplitude is studied. It is found that periodic oscillations of the signal are observed in the He II state, and each period starts with a sharp spike of the amplitude. It is proposed that this behavior signifies instability of superfluid ring flow due to a change in the number of circulation quanta of the superfluid velocity over a very short time. Another effect is due to the appearance of new periodically repeating resonance peaks, together with the ordinary whispering gallery modes, in the system. The effect is absent above λ point and is attributed to characteristic oscillatory modes of the undamped superfluid flow. Possible reasons for the observed features are analyzed.

  19. Combustion of Solids in Microgravity: Results from the BASS-II Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferkul, Paul V.; Bhattacharjee, Subrata; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Miller, Fletcher; Olson, Sandra L.; Takahashi, Fumiaki; T’ien, James S.

    2014-01-01

    The Burning and Suppression of Solids-II (BASS-II) experiment was performed on the International Space Station. Microgravity combustion tests burned thin and thick flat samples, acrylic slabs, spheres, and cylinders. The samples were mounted inside a small wind tunnel which could impose air flow speeds up to 53 cms. The wind tunnel was installed in the Microgravity Science Glovebox which supplied power, imaging, and a level of containment. The effects of air flow speed, fuel thickness, fuel preheating, and oxygen concentration on flame appearance, growth, spread rate, and extinction were examined in both the opposed and concurrent flow configuration. The flames are quite sensitive to air flow speed in the range 0 to 5 cms. They can be sustained at very low flow speeds of less than 1 cms, when they become dim blue and stable. In this state they are not particularly dangerous from a fire safety perspective, but they can flare up quickly with a sudden increase in air flow speed. Including earlier BASS-I results, well over one hundred tests have been conducted of the various samples in the different geometries, flow speeds, and oxygen concentrations. There are several important implications related to fundamental combustion research as well as spacecraft fire safety. This work was supported by the NASA Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Applications Division (SLPSRA).

  20. Latest Results of the Edelweiss-II Dark Matter Search Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, P.

    2011-04-27

    A search for WIMP dark matter has been undertaken with new-generation germanium heat-and-ionization cryogenic detectors in the EDELWEISS-II experiment. The InterDigit bolometers, with an interleaved electrode design, have proven excellent rejection performance against gamma-ray and surface event backgrounds which are limiting germanium bolometer dark matter searches. One year of continuous operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane has been achieved with an array of ten 400 g detectors. Preliminary resultats for WIMP search are presented with an effective exposure of 322 kg.days, which corresponds to a 5x10{sup -8} pb sensitivity to the spin independant WIMP-nucleon cross-section at 90% C.L. for a WIMP mass of 80 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. Searches for New Physics Using High Mass Dimuons at the CDF II Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Karagoz Unel, Muge

    2004-12-01

    This work describes the measurement of inclusive jets cross section in the D0 experiment. This cross section is computed as a function of jet transverse momentum, in several rapidity intervals. This quantity is sensitive to the proton structure and is crucial for the determination of parton distribution functions (PDF), essentially for the gluon at high proton momentum fraction. The measurement presented here gives the first values obtained for Tevatron Run II for the cross section in several rapidity intervals, for an integrated luminosity of 143 pb{sup -1}. The results are in agreement, within the uncertainties, with theoretical Standard Model predictions, showing no evidence for new physics. This work points out the aspects of the detector which need better understanding to reach Run I precision and to constrain the PDFs.

  2. Target diagnostics for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the diagnostics used at Sandia National Laboratories to measure the parameters of intense lithium ion-beam hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target temperature and x-ray output. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved I-D streaked imaging, diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing, incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrograph, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven-element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven-element PIN diode detector array. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density can be measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line emission and neutron emission.

  3. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Fielding, Randall S.; Porter, Douglas L.; Meyer, Mitchell K.; Makenas, Bruce J.

    2009-08-01

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  4. Health as Submission and Social Responsibilities: Embodied Experiences of Javanese Women With Type II Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pitaloka, Dyah; Hsieh, Elaine

    2015-08-01

    By examining women's experiences with type II diabetes, we explore how illness can provide resources to construct meanings of everyday life in Javanese culture. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 female participants in Central Java, Indonesia, and adopted grounded theory for data analysis. We identified four themes that diabetes serves as resources for women in Indonesia to (a) normalize suffering, (b) resist social control, (c) accept fate, and (d) validate faith. We concluded by noting three unique aspects of Javanese women's illness management. First, through the performance of submission, our participants demonstrated spirituality and religiosity as essential elements of health. Second, diabetes empowers individuals in everyday suffering through two divergent processes: embracing submission and resisting control. Finally, diabetes provides opportunities for individuals within a social network to (re)negotiate social responsibilities. In summary, diabetes provides unique resources to empower our participants to obtain voices that they otherwise would not have had. PMID:25810467

  5. Latest Results of the Edelweiss-II Dark Matter Search Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loaiza, P.

    2011-04-01

    A search for WIMP dark matter has been undertaken with new-generation germanium heat-and-ionization cryogenic detectors in the EDELWEISS-II experiment. The InterDigit bolometers, with an interleaved electrode design, have proven excellent rejection performance against gamma-ray and surface event backgrounds which are limiting germanium bolometer dark matter searches. One year of continuous operation at the Laboratoire Souterrain de Modane has been achieved with an array of ten 400 g detectors. Preliminary resultats for WIMP search are presented with an effective exposure of 322 kg.days, which corresponds to a 5×10-8 pb sensitivity to the spin independant WIMP-nucleon cross-section at 90% C.L. for a WIMP mass of 80 GeV/c2.

  6. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, Emily; Snelson, Catherine M; Chipman, Veraun D; Emer, Dudley; White, Bob; Emmit, Ryan; Wright, Al; Drellack, Sigmund; Huckins-Gang, Heather; Mercadante, Jennifer; Floyd, Michael; McGowin, Chris; Cothrun, Chris; Bonal, Nedra

    2013-12-05

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined.

  7. Intercomparison of stratospheric water vapor observed by satellite experiments: Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II versus Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere and Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chiou, E.W.; Larsen, J.C. ); McCormick, M.P.; McMaster, L.R.; Chu, W.P. ); Rind, D. ); Oltmans, S. )

    1993-03-20

    This paper presents a comparison of the stratospheric water vapor measurements made by the satellite-borne sensors the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II), the Nimbus 7 Limb Infrared Monitor of the Stratosphere (LIMS), and the Spacelab 3 Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) experiment. LIMS obtained data for 7 months between November 1978 and May 1979; ATMOS was carried on Shuttle and observed eight profiles from April 30 to May 6, 1985 at approximately 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S; and, SAGE II continues to make measurements since its launch in October 1984. For both 30[degrees]N and 50[degrees]S in May, the comparisons between SAGE II and ATMOS show agreement within the estimated combined uncertainty of the two experiments. Several important features identified by LIMS observations have been confirmed by SAGE II: a well-developed hygropause in the lower stratosphere at low- to mid-latitudes, a poleward latitudinal gradient, increasing water vapor mixing ratios with altitude in the tropics, and the transport of dry lower stratospheric water vapor upward and southward in May, and upward and northward in November. A detailed comparative study also indicates that the two previously suggested corrections for LIMS, a correction in tropical lower stratosphere due to a positive temperature bias and the correction above 28 km based on improved emissivities will bring LIMS measurements much closer to those of SAGE II. The only significant difference occurs at high southern latitudes in May below 18 km, where LIMS measurements are 2-3 ppmv greater. It should be noted that LIMS observations are from 16 to 50 km, ATMOS from 14 to 86 km, and SAGE II from mid-troposphere to 40 km. With multiyear coverage, SAGE II observations should be useful for studying tropospheric-stratospheric exchange, for stratospheric transport, and for preparing water vapor climatologies for the stratosphere and the upper troposphere. 32 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Aspen FACE Experiment (FACTS II)

    DOE Data Explorer

    DOE has conducted trace gas enrichment experiments since the mid 1990s. The FACE Data Management System is a central repository and archive for Free-Air Carbon Dioxide Enrichment (FACE) data, as well as for the related open-top chamber (OTC) experiments. FACE Data Management System is located at DOE’s Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). While the data from the various FACE sites, each one a unique user facility, are centralized at CDIAC, each of the FACE sites presents its own view of its activities and information. For that reason, DOE Data Explorer users are advised to see both the central repository at http://public.ornl.gov/face/index.shtml and the individual home pages of each site. FACTS II, the Aspen FACE Experiment is a multidisciplinary study to assess the effects of increasing tropospheric ozone and carbon dioxide levels on the structure and function of northern forest ecosystems. The Aspen FACE facility is located at the Harshaw Experimental Forest near Rhinelander, Wisconsin. It consists of twelve 30m rings in which the concentrations of carbon dioxide and tropospheric ozone can be controlled. The design provides the ability to assess the effects of these gasses alone, and in combination, on many ecosystem attributes, including growth, leaf development, root characteristics, and soil carbon. Each ring consists of a series of vertical ventpipes which disperse carbon dioxide, ozone or normal air into the center of the ring. This computer controlled system uses signal feedback technology to adjust gas release each second in order to maintain a stable, elevated concentration of carbon dioxide and/or ozone throughout the experimental plot. Because there is no confinement, there is no significant change in the natural, ambient environment other than elevating these trace gas concentrations. [copied from http://aspenface.mtu.edu/index.html] Ring maps, lists of publications, data from the experiments, newsletters, protocol and performance

  9. Seed-to-Seed-to-Seed Growth and Development of Arabidopsis in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Link, Bruce M.; Busse, James S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves. Key Words: Arabidopsis—Branch—Inflorescence—Microgravity—Morphology—Seed—Space. Astrobiology 14, 866–875. PMID:25317938

  10. Seed-to-seed-to-seed growth and development of Arabidopsis in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Link, Bruce M; Busse, James S; Stankovic, Bratislav

    2014-10-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana was grown from seed to seed wholly in microgravity on the International Space Station. Arabidopsis plants were germinated, grown, and maintained inside a growth chamber prior to returning to Earth. Some of these seeds were used in a subsequent experiment to successfully produce a second (back-to-back) generation of microgravity-grown Arabidopsis. In general, plant growth and development in microgravity proceeded similarly to those of the ground controls, which were grown in an identical chamber. Morphologically, the most striking feature of space-grown Arabidopsis was that the secondary inflorescence branches and siliques formed nearly perpendicular angles to the inflorescence stems. The branches grew out perpendicularly to the main inflorescence stem, indicating that gravity was the key determinant of branch and silique angle and that light had either no role or a secondary role in Arabidopsis branch and silique orientation. Seed protein bodies were 55% smaller in space seed than in controls, but protein assays showed only a 9% reduction in seed protein content. Germination rates for space-produced seed were 92%, indicating that the seeds developed in microgravity were healthy and viable. Gravity is not necessary for seed-to-seed growth of plants, though it plays a direct role in plant form and may influence seed reserves. PMID:25317938

  11. Anti-cyanobacterial activity of Moringa oleifera seeds

    PubMed Central

    Beekman, Wendy

    2009-01-01

    Filtrates from crushed Moringa oleifera seeds were tested for their effects on growth and Photosystem II efficiency of the common bloom-forming cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa. M. aeruginosa populations exhibited good growth in controls and treatments with 4- and 8-mg crushed Moringa seeds per liter, having similar growth rates of 0.50 (±0.01) per day. In exposures of 20- to 160-mg crushed Moringa seeds L−1, growth rates were negative and on average −0.23 (±0.05) .day−1. Presumably, in the higher doses of 20- to 160-mg crushed seeds per liter, the cyanobacteria died, which was supported by a rapid drop in the Photosystem II efficiency (ΦPSII), while the ΦPSII was high and unaffected in 0, 4, and 8 mg L−1. High-density populations of M. aeruginosa (chlorophyll-a concentrations of ∼270 µg L−1) were reduced to very low levels within 2 weeks of exposure to ≥80-mg crushed seeds per liter. At the highest dosage of 160 mg L−1, the ΦPSII dropped to zero rapidly and remained nil during the course of the experiment (14 days). Hence, under laboratory conditions, a complete wipeout of the bloom could be achieved. This is the first study that yielded evidence for cyanobactericidal activity of filtrate from crushed Moringa seeds, suggesting that Moringa seed extracts might have a potential as an effect-oriented measure lessening cyanobacterial nuisance. PMID:20676212

  12. The Plume Impingement Contamination II Experiment: Motivation, Design, and Implementation Plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumpkin, Forrest E., III; Albyn, Keith C.; Farrell, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will have a long service life during which it must be able to serve as a capable platform for a wide variety of scientific investigations. In order to provide this capability, the ISS has, at the system level, a design requirement of no more than 100 Angstroms of contaminant deposition per year from "non-quiescent" sources. Non-quiescent sources include the plumes resulting from the firing of reaction control system (ReS) engines on space vehicles visiting the ISS as well as the engines on the ISS itself. Unfortunately, good general plume contamination models do not yet exist. This is due both to the complexity of the problem, making the analytic approach difficult, and to the difficulty in obtaining empirical measurements of contaminant depositions. To address this lack of flight data, NASA Johnson Space Center is planning to fly an experiment, Plume Impingement Contamination-II, to measure the contamination deposition from the Shuttle Orbiter's primary RCS engines as a function angle from plume centerline. This represents the first direct on-orbit measurement of plume impingement contamination away from the nozzle centerline ever performed, and as such is extremely important in validating mathematical models which will be used to quantify the cumulative plume impingement contamination to the ISS over its lifetime. The paper will elaborate further upon the motivation behind making these measurements as well as present the design and implementation plan of this planned experiment.

  13. Startup experience at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Thomas L.; Wehring, Bernard W.

    1992-07-01

    After eight years of singular effort, the UT-TRIGA Mark II research reactor was licensed and is fully operational. This reactor is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located at the Balcones Research Center, a north Austin campus of The University of Texas at Austin. The UT-TRIGA reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation and 3 dollar pulsing. A startup program was implemented upon receipt of the facility license on January 17, 1992. Several facility features are unique to this startup. Among these were the use of fuel with various burnup and a digital control system. The reactor laboratory staff with assistance from a General Atomics instrumentation engineer performed all phases of the startup program. Core loading began in February 1992 with final testing completed in May 1992. Several unusual problems were encountered during this time. Experiment authorizations have been written to resume Neutron Activation Analysis programs and isotope production. Several neutron beam tube experiments are in the design and test phase. (author)

  14. RF Cell Modeling and Experiments for Wakefield Minimization in DARHT-II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Scott

    Electron beams of linear induction accelerators experience deflective forces caused by RF fields building up as a result of accelerating cavities of finite size. These forces can significantly effect the beam when a long linac composed of identical cells is assembled. Recent techniques in computational modeling, simulation, and experiments for 20 MeV DARHT-II (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test) accelerator cells were found to reduce the wakefield impedance of the cells from 800 ohms/meter to 350 ohms/meter and experimental results confirm the results of the modeling efforts. Increased performance of the cell was obtained through a parametric study of the accelerator structure, materials, material tuning, and geometry. As a result of this effort, it was found that thickness-tuned ferrite produced a 50% deduction in the wakefield impedance in the low frequency band and was easily tunable based on the material thickness. It was also found that shaped metal sections allow for high-Q resonances to be de-tuned, thus decreasing the amplitude of the resonance and increasing the cell s performance. For the geometries used for this cell, a roughly 45 degree angle had the best performance in affecting the wakefield modes.

  15. Lower-hybrid-heating experiments on the Alcator C and the Versator II tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    ,; Takase, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Initial results are reported from lower hybrid wave heating experiments carried out on the MIT Alcator C and Versator II tokamaks. In the Alcator C experiments a 4 waveguide array, with internally brazed ceramic windows has been used to inject 160 kW of microwave power at 4.6 GHz into the plasma with n/sub 0/ less than or equal to 1 x 10/sup 15/ cm/sup -3/, and B/sub 0/ less than or equal to 12 T. An RF power density of 8 kW/cm/sup 2/ has been transmitted into the plasma without RF breakdown. RF coupling studies show optimal coupling (R less than or equal to 10%) when the local density at the waveguide mouth is 25 to 50 times overdense. Initial heating experiments show an ion tail formation in hydrogen discharge peaking at a density of anti n approx. = 2.7 x 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -3/ at B = 8.9 T, and bulk ion heating at a density of anti n approx. = 1.5 x 10/sup 14/ c/sup -3/ at B approx. = 11 T. Evidence of RF current enhancement has been observed at a density of n approx. = 3 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/. In the Versator II tokamak initial ion heating studies have been carried out using an 800 MHz, 140 kW klystron. With 50 kW of net RF power injected through a 4 waveguide grill at B = 1.3 T and anti n = 2.5 x 10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/, Doppler broadening of the OVII and NVI lines shows a ..delta..T/sub i/ = 50 eV rise in the bulk ion temperature. A significant RF produced ion tail is also observed by charge exchange analysis. We have succeeded in combining a toroidal ray-tracing code and a 1-D transport code to study the heating density bands and heating efficiencies.

  16. Outstanding in the Field II: Citizen Science Experiences for Middle Schools in Northeast Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case Hanks, A. T.; Bhattacharjee, J.; Clark, L.; Pugh, A.

    2012-12-01

    In order to prepare middle school teachers for the next generation sciences standards and the new common core, the University of Louisiana at Monroe (ULM) Colleges of Arts and Sciences and Education and Human Development launched the Outstanding in the Field II program. Through the creation of a mesonet with the weather stations at middle school sites, this project aims to foster and enrich the experience of teacher/student-collected data while logging the data into a larger scientific database, producing citizen scientists. By empowering students and teachers to actively participate in 'real science', they generate data to be analyzed from both the physical and life science perspective and thus, highlight the next generation science standards and core disciplinary ideas. This project also promotes collaboration between the life and physical sciences while highlighting scientific practices and cross-cutting concepts within science and literacy. To ensure the successful implementation of the program, faculty and will provide several follow-up workshops during the academic year. These workshops will focus on the common core connections of math and literacy as well as ways in which the project can be supported at each site through face-to-face observations and online collaborations. This year-long program began with a field intensive workshop in July 2012 and enrolled 30 6th, 7th, and 8th science teachers from the Northeast region of Louisiana to provide a genuine scientific experience that would be taken back and applied within the classroom. By becoming students, teachers began by collecting data in the field and establishing and refining the intricate connection between real- world experiments and science taught in classrooms. . They returned to the ULM campus to build and deploy weather stations. Teachers were then tasked with the development of a plan to install the weather station and collect data at their school site with emphasis on implementation within their

  17. Site Characterization of the Source Physics Experiment Phase II Location Using Seismic Reflection Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sexton, E. A.; Snelson, C. M.; Chipman, V.; Emer, D. F.; White, R. L.; Emmitt, R.; Wright, A. A.; Drellack, S.; Huckins-Gang, H.; Mercadante, J.; Floyd, M.; McGowin, C.; Cothrun, C.; Bonal, N.

    2013-12-01

    An objective of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is to identify low-yield nuclear explosions from a regional distance. Low-yield nuclear explosions can often be difficult to discriminate among the clutter of natural and man-made explosive events (e.g., earthquakes and mine blasts). The SPE is broken into three phases. Phase I has provided the first of the physics-based data to test the empirical models that have been used to discriminate nuclear events. The Phase I series of tests were placed within a highly fractured granite body. The evolution of the project has led to development of Phase II, to be placed within the opposite end member of geology, an alluvium environment, thereby increasing the database of waveforms to build upon in the discrimination models. Both the granite and alluvium sites have hosted nearby nuclear tests, which provide comparisons for the chemical test data. Phase III of the SPE is yet to be determined. For Phase II of the experiment, characterization of the location is required to develop the geologic/geophysical models for the execution of the experiment. Criteria for the location are alluvium thickness of approximately 170 m and a water table below 170 m; minimal fracturing would be ideal. A P-wave mini-vibroseis survey was conducted at a potential site in alluvium to map out the subsurface geology. The seismic reflection profile consisted of 168 geophone stations, spaced 5 m apart. The mini-vibe was a 7,000-lb peak-force source, starting 57.5 m off the north end of the profile and ending 57.5 m past the southern-most geophone. The length of the profile was 835 m. The source points were placed every 5 m, equally spaced between geophones to reduce clipping. The vibroseis sweep was from 20 Hz down to 180 Hz over 8 seconds, and four sweeps were stacked at each shot location. The shot gathers show high signal-to-noise ratios with clear first arrivals across the entire spread and the suggestion of some shallow reflectors. The data were

  18. Permanent prostate implant using high activity seeds and inverse planning with fast simulated annealing algorithm: A 12-year Canadian experience

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Andre-Guy; Roy, Jean; Beaulieu, Luc; Pouliot, Jean; Harel, Francois; Vigneault, Eric . E-mail: Eric.Vigneault@chuq.qc.ca

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: To report outcomes and toxicity of the first Canadian permanent prostate implant program. Methods and Materials: 396 consecutive patients (Gleason {<=}6, initial prostate specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 and stage T1-T2a disease) were implanted between June 1994 and December 2001. The median follow-up is of 60 months (maximum, 136 months). All patients were planned with fast-simulated annealing inverse planning algorithm with high activity seeds ([gt] 0.76 U). Acute and late toxicity is reported for the first 213 patients using a modified RTOG toxicity scale. The Kaplan-Meier biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) is reported according to the ASTRO and Houston definitions. Results: The bFFS at 60 months was of 88.5% (90.5%) according to the ASTRO (Houston) definition and, of 91.4% (94.6%) in the low risk group (initial PSA {<=}10 and Gleason {<=}6 and Stage {<=}T2a). Risk factors statistically associated with bFFS were: initial PSA >10, a Gleason score of 7-8, and stage T2b-T3. The mean D90 was of 151 {+-} 36.1 Gy. The mean V100 was of 85.4 {+-} 8.5% with a mean V150 of 60.1 {+-} 12.3%. Overall, the implants were well tolerated. In the first 6 months, 31.5% of the patients were free of genitourinary symptoms (GUs), 12.7% had Grade 3 GUs; 91.6% were free of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIs). After 6 months, 54.0% were GUs free, 1.4% had Grade 3 GUs; 95.8% were GIs free. Conclusion: The inverse planning with fast simulated annealing and high activity seeds gives a 5-year bFFS, which is comparable with the best published series with a low toxicity profile.

  19. Seed-cotton Cleaning Effects on Seed Coat Fragments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Processing problems in textile mills have been linked to seed coat fragments (SCF), so cotton ginning facilities should take steps to prevent them from forming. The objective of this experiment was to determine if the use of seed-cotton cleaners prior to the extractor-feeder/gin stand caused increa...

  20. Silicon strip tracking detector development and prototyping for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuehn, S.

    2016-07-01

    In about ten years from now, the Phase-II upgrade of the LHC will be carried out. Due to increased luminosity, a severe radiation dose and high particle rates will occur for the experiments. In consequence, several detector components will have to be upgraded. In the ATLAS experiment, the current inner detector will be replaced by an all-silicon tracking detector with the goal of at least delivering the present detector performance also in the harsh Phase-II LHC conditions. This report presents the current planning and results from first prototype measurements of the upgrade silicon strip tracking detector.

  1. Chemical fate and settling of mineral dust in surface seawater after atmospheric deposition observed from dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, K.; Leblond, N.; Wagener, T.; Nguyen, E. B.; Guieu, C.

    2014-03-01

    We report here the elemental composition of sinking particles in sediment traps and in the water column following 4 artificial mineral dust seedings (representing a flux of 10 g m-2) in mesocosms, simulating dry or wet dust deposition into oligotrophic marine waters. These data were used to examine the rates and mechanisms of total mass, particulate organic carbon (POC) and elemental (Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Nd, P, S, Sr and Ti) transfer from the surface to the sediment traps after dust deposition. The dust additions were carried out with fresh or artificially aged dust (i.e. enriched in nitrate and sulfate by mimicking cloud processing) for various biogeochemical conditions, enabling us to test the effect of these parameters on the chemical evolution and settling of dust after deposition. Whatever the type of seeding (using fresh dust to simulate dry deposition or artificially aged dust to simulate wet deposition), the dust was predominant in the particulate phase in the sediment traps at the bottom of mesocosms and within the water column during each experiment. 15% of initial dust mass was dissolved in the water column in the first 24 h after seeding. For artificially aged dust, this released fraction was mainly nitrate, sulfate and calcium and hence represented a significant source of new N for the marine biota. Except for Ca, S and N, the elemental composition of dust particles was constant during their settling, showing the relevance of using interelemental ratios, such as Ti/Al or Ba/Al as proxy of lithogenic fluxes or of productivity. After 7 days, between 30 and 68% of added dust was still in suspension in the mesocosms depending on the experiment. This difference in the dust settling was directly associated to a difference in POC export, since POC fluxes were highly correlated to dust lithogenic fluxes signifying a ballast effect of dust. The highest fraction of remaining dust in the mesocosm at the end of the experiment was found

  2. Data and safety monitoring in social behavioral intervention trials: the REACH II experience

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J; Schulz, Richard; Belle, Steven H; Burgio, Louis D; Armstrong, Nell; Gitlin, Laura N; Coon, David W; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Klinger, Julie; Stahl, Sidney M

    2006-01-01

    variability in practices for data safety and monitoring across psychosocial intervention trials. Conclusions Overall, the REACH II experience demonstrates that existing guidelines regarding safety monitoring and adverse event reporting pose unique challenges for social/behavioral intervention trials. Challenges encountered in the REACH II program included defining and classifying adverse events, defining “resolution” of adverse events and attributing causes for events that occurred. These challenges are highlighted and recommendations for addressing them in future studies are discussed. PMID:16773953

  3. The remarkable effect of FeSO4 seed aerosols on secondary organic aerosol formation from photooxidation of α-pinene/NOx and toluene/NOx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Biwu; Hao, Jiming; Takekawa, Hideto; Li, Junhua; Wang, Kun; Jiang, Jingkun

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of Fe(II) and Fe(III) ions on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation, we conducted a series of photooxidation experiments with α-pinene and toluene in the presence of nitric oxides (NOx) with/without FeSO4 or Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols. The FeSO4 seed aerosols suppressed SOA formation, while Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols did not display a noticeable effect on SOA formation. We did not observe effects of FeSO4 and Fe2(SO4)3 seed aerosols on gas phase compounds, including ozone, NOx, and hydrocarbons (HCs). The negative effect of Fe(II)-containing seed aerosols on SOA formation due to the reduction of condensable compounds (CCs) generated from hydrocarbon oxidation is discussed. The mean molecular weight of CCs reduced by Fe(II) is tentatively estimated to be larger than 300, indicating a possibility that many of the CCs reduced by Fe(II) are oligomers. Reduction of oligomer precursors may interrupt the oligomerization of other aldehyde products. If Fe(II) regeneration from photoreduction of Fe(III) is considered, the estimated mean molecular weight of the CCs reduced would be smaller. However, the negligible effect of Fe(III)-containing seed aerosols on SOA formation indicates that Fe(III) photoreduction is negligible in our experiments.

  4. Differential predation of forage seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent field experiments we observed that the main invertebrate seed predators of overseeded tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.) or Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum Lam.) seed in unimproved pastures were harvester ants (Pogonomyrmex sp.) and common field crickets (Gryllus sp.) To determ...

  5. Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutov, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.; Chunyaev, E.I.; Marshall, A.C.; Sapir, J.L.; Pelowitz, D.B.

    1995-01-20

    Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  6. Chemical fate and settling of mineral dust in surface seawater after atmospheric deposition observed from dust seeding experiments in large mesocosms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desboeufs, K.; Leblond, N.; Wagener, T.; Bon Nguyen, E.; Guieu, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report here the elemental composition of sinking particles in sediment traps and in the water column following four artificial dust seeding experiments (each representing a flux of 10 g m-2). Dry or wet dust deposition were simulated during two large mesocosms field campaigns that took place in the coastal water of Corsica (NW Mediterranean Sea) representative of oligotrophic conditions. The dust additions were carried out with fresh or artificially aged dust (i.e., enriched in nitrate and sulfate by mimicking cloud processing) for various biogeochemical conditions, enabling us to test the effect of these parameters on the chemical composition and settling of dust after deposition. The rates and mechanisms of total mass, particulate organic carbon (POC) and chemical elements (Al, Ba, Ca, Co, Cu, Fe, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Mo, N, Nd, P, S, Sr and Ti) transfer from the mesocosm surface to the sediment traps installed at the base of the mesocosms after dust deposition show that (1) 15% of the initial dust mass was dissolved in the water column in the first 24 h after seeding. Except for Ca, S and N, the elemental composition of dust particles was constant during their settling, showing the relevance of using interelemental ratios, such as Ti/Al as proxy of lithogenic fluxes. (2) Whatever the type of seeding (using fresh dust to simulate dry deposition or artificially aged dust to simulate wet deposition), the particulate phase both in the water column and in the sediment traps was dominated by dust particles. (3) Due to the high Ba content in dust, Ba/Al cannot be used as productivity proxy in the case of high dust input in the sediment traps. Instead, our data suggests that the ratio Co/Al could be a good productivity proxy in this case. (4) After 7 days, between 30 and 68% of added dust was still in suspension in the mesocosms. This difference in the dust settling was directly associated with a difference in POC export, since POC fluxes were highly correlated to dust

  7. Two-colour pump–probe experiments with a twin-pulse-seed extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Allaria, E.; Bencivenga, F.; Borghes, R.; Capotondi, F.; Castronovo, D.; Charalambous, P.; Cinquegrana, P.; Danailov, M. B.; De Ninno, G.; Demidovich, A.; Di Mitri, S.; Diviacco, B.; Fausti, D.; Fawley, W. M.; Ferrari, E.; Froehlich, L.; Gauthier, D.; Gessini, A.; Giannessi, L.; Ivanov, R.; Kiskinova, M.; Kurdi, G.; Mahieu, B.; Mahne, N.; Nikolov, I.; Masciovecchio, C.; Pedersoli, E.; Penco, G.; Raimondi, L.; Serpico, C.; Sigalotti, P.; Spampinati, S.; Spezzani, C.; Svetina, C.; Trovò, M.; Zangrando, M.

    2013-01-01

    Exploring the dynamics of matter driven to extreme non-equilibrium states by an intense ultrashort X-ray pulse is becoming reality, thanks to the advent of free-electron laser technology that allows development of different schemes for probing the response at variable time delay with a second pulse. Here we report the generation of two-colour extreme ultraviolet pulses of controlled wavelengths, intensity and timing by seeding of high-gain harmonic generation free-electron laser with multiple independent laser pulses. The potential of this new scheme is demonstrated by the time evolution of a titanium-grating diffraction pattern, tuning the two coherent pulses to the titanium M-resonance and varying their intensities. This reveals that an intense pulse induces abrupt pattern changes on a time scale shorter than hydrodynamic expansion and ablation. This result exemplifies the essential capabilities of the jitter-free multiple-colour free-electron laser pulse sequences to study evolving states of matter with element sensitivity. PMID:24048228

  8. Toward Reanalysis of the Tight-Pitch HCLWR-PROTEUS Phase II Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perret, Grégory; Vlassopoulos, Efstathios; Hursin, Mathieu; Pautz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The HCLWR-Proteus Phase II experiments were conducted from 1985 to 1990 in the zero-power reactor Proteus at PSI in Switzerland. The experimental program was dedicated to the physics of high conversion light water reactors and in particular to the measurement of reactor parameters such as reaction rate traverses, spectral indices, absorber reactivity worths and void coefficients. The HCLWR experiments are especially interesting because they generated knowledge in the epithermal range of the neutron flux spectrum, for which little integral experimental data is available. In an effort to assess the interest of this experimental data to validate modern nuclear data and improve their uncertainties, a preliminary re-analysis of selected configurations was conducted with Monte-Carlo codes (MCNP6/SERPENT2) and modern nuclear data libraries (ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1.1 and JENDL-4.0). The spectral ndices, flux spectra and sensitivity coefficients on k∞ were calculated using cell models representative of the tight-pitch measurement configurations containing 11% PuO2-UO2 fuel rods in different moderation conditions (air, water and dowtherm). Spectral index predictions using the three nuclear data libraries agreed within two standard deviations with the measured values. The only exception is the Pu-242-capture-to-Pu-239-fission ratio, which was overestimated with all libraries by more than four standard deviations, i.e. 13%, in the non-moderated configuration. In this configuration, Pu-242 captures are few since the flux spectrum in the Pu-242 capture resonance region (between 1eV and 1keV) is small making this spectral index hard to measure. Sensitivity coefficient predictions with both MCNP6 and SERPENT2 were in good agreement.

  9. New results on low-mass dark matter from the CRESST-II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petricca, F.; Angloher, G.; Bento, A.; Bucci, C.; Canonica, L.; Defay, X.; Erb, A.; Feilitzsch, F. v.; Ferreiro Iachellini, N.; Gorla, P.; Gütlein, A.; Hauff, D.; Jochum, J.; Kiefer, M.; Kluck, H.; Kraus, H.; Lanfranchi, J. C.; Loebell, J.; Münster, A.; Pagliarone, C.; Potzel, W.; Pröbst, F.; Reindl, F.; Schäffner, K.; Schieck, J.; Schönert, S.; Seidel, W.; Stodolsky, L.; Strandhagen, C.; Strauss, R.; Tanzke, A.; Trinh Thi, H. H.; Türkoğlu, C.; Uffinger, M.; Ulrich, A.; Usherov, I.; Wawoczny, S.; Willers, M.; Wüstrich, M.; Zoller, A.

    2016-05-01

    The CRESST-II experiment is searching for dark matter particles via their elastic scattering off nuclei in a target material. The CRESST target consists of scintillating CaW04 crystals which are operated as cryogenic calorimeters at millikelvin temperatures and read out by transition edge sensors. Each interaction in the CaW04 target crystal produces a phonon signal and also a light signal that is measured by a secondary cryogenic calorimeter. The low energy thresholds of these detectors, combined with the presence of light nuclei in the target material, allow to probe the low-mass region of the parameter space for spin-independent dark matter-nucleon scattering with high sensitivity. In this contribution results from a blind analysis of one detector module operated in the latest measurement campaign are presented. An unprecedented sensitivity for the light dark matter has been obtained with 52kg live days and a threshold of 307eV for nuclear recoils, extending the reach of direct dark matter searches to the sub-GeV/c2 region.

  10. The effects of pollen and seed migration on nuclear-dicytoplasmic systems. II. A new method for estimating plant gene flow from joint nuclear-cytoplasmic data.

    PubMed Central

    Orive, M E; Asmussen, M A

    2000-01-01

    A new maximum-likelihood method is developed for estimating unidirectional pollen and seed flow in mixed-mating plant populations from counts of joint nuclear-cytoplasmic genotypes. Data may include multiple unlinked nuclear markers with a single maternally or paternally inherited cytoplasmic marker, or with two cytoplasmic markers inherited through opposite parents, as in many conifer species. Migration rate estimates are based on fitting the equilibrium genotype frequencies under continent-island models of plant gene flow to the data. Detailed analysis of their equilibrium structures indicates when each of the three nuclear-cytoplasmic systems allows gene flow estimation and shows that, in general, it is easier to estimate seed than pollen migration. Three-locus nuclear-dicytoplasmic data only increase the conditions allowing seed migration estimates; however, the additional dicytonuclear disequilibria allow more accurate estimates of both forms of gene flow. Estimates and their confidence limits for simulated data sets confirm that two-locus data with paternal cytoplasmic inheritance provide better estimates than those with maternal inheritance, while three-locus dicytonuclear data with three modes of inheritance generally provide the most reliable estimates for both types of gene flow. Similar results are obtained for hybrid zones receiving pollen and seed flow from two source populations. An estimation program is available upon request. PMID:10835403