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Sample records for experimental background due

  1. Experimental background due to particle induced gas desorption in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang,S.Y.; Trbojevic, D.

    2008-08-10

    Beam-gas collision created experimental background, i.e., singles, has affected heavy ion and polarized proton operations in Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The gas molecules in interaction region are mainly caused by the electron induced gas desorption. and the electrons are produced from the beam induced electron multipacting, or called electron cloud. The background has a dependence on the usual electron cloud related parameters, such as the bunch intensity, bunch spacing, and the solenoid field. With the RHIC upgrade plan, the experimental background may become a luminosity limiting factor. Mitigations are discussed.

  2. Experimental limits of the extreme ultraviolet background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wulf-Mathies, C.; Grewing, M.; Kraemer, G.; Schulz-Luepertz, E.; Kimble, R.; Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.

    1983-01-01

    Photometric observations of the diffuse extreme ultraviolet background with two photometers having bandpasses of 750-940 A and 1040-1080 A are reported. The payload, which was flown aboard an ARIES sounding rocket in June 1982, is described, including the electron detectors, filters, and calibration. The operation of the probe during the experiment, including its motions, are described. The primary experiment involved spectroscopic observation of the hot white dwarf HZ43. The photometer count rate is shown and the measurements of the diffuse background are compared with theoretical predictions. Despite the lower limits obtained using a narrowband detector, the measurements are not sensitive enough to draw any relevant astrophysical conclusions.

  3. Alternatives to animal experimentation: The regulatory background

    SciTech Connect

    Garthoff, Bernward . E-mail: bernward.garthoff@bayercropscience.com

    2005-09-01

    The framework, in which alternatives to animal experiments can be developed, standardized, respectively formally validated, has to be seen in a global context. The ever increasing demand of testing for hazard and risk assessment in health and environment, exemplified by the EU REACH program, subsequently triggers laboratory animal testing. This holds especially true, if no valid alternative methods agreed to by the regulatory authorities and the scientific community are available. At least for regulatory toxicity testing, the global frame and network are given by institutions such as OECD, ICH, and alike. However, due to the necessity of global consent of states, organizations, and stakeholders, the time gap between availability of a novel alternative test method and its final acceptance by authorities and implementation thereafter is widening. The lack of new technologies or opportunities for alternative method application such as, for example, the broad use of transgenic animals for refinement of existing tests, adds to the problem. The bare existence of certain in vivo tests increases also the gap between public demands for testing versus availability of alternative tests. Industries operating on a worldwide basis support the alternative test development in their respective area of research and operational business. However, a more coordinating approach such as that of the ecopa-organization (European Consensus Platform on Alternatives) is needed to exploit the existing possibilities within the current regulatory framework. This will speed up the process of acceptance and challenge the political worldto feel responsible for the sequels of their demanding more testing, that is, by funding alternative method development in academia and industry.

  4. On the degradation of asteroid astrometry due to background objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivantsov, Anatoliy; Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Thuillot, William; Assafin, Marcelo

    2015-08-01

    The fact that images where an asteroid is apparently close to a star or another background object can cause a potential degradation of astrometric accuracy has received little attention so far. The reason for this bias lies in the non-zero background gradient that will change the brightness distribution in the image of the asteroid. This leads to an apparent shift in its position in the direction of the nearby object. In the worst case reduction software suites can no longer differentiate between the sources representing the asteroid and the background star which results in a complete misidentification. Since today many astrometric measurements are conducted on an automated basis, such a problem has to be taken seriously. While there is a possibility for observers to identify these problematic measurements using the observational notes by the IAU Minor Planet Centre (MPC) in the current observational format, this option has not been used efficiently. In fact, we have conducted a search for problematic configurations in all asteroid positions observed during the last 30 years that are listed in the MPC database. To this end we have cataloged stars and non-stellar objects from the PPMXL, UCAC4, NOMAD, USNO-B1.0, SDSS catalogs within 8″ of all astrometric measurements of asteroids. We have found more than 2 million cases within 3.5″ where astrometric measurements should have been compromised. Using statistics on residuals from observations of the MPC, and some assumptions, we have identified those observations which may contain the aforementioned bias. The elimination of this error is possible by jointly modeling the images of the asteroid and the background stars present in the measuring aperture. We provide an expression for the correction of this error using additional information about the measurement details. We recommend that images containing background sources close to the asteroid's position should either receive lower weights in the orbital fitting

  5. Injection Related Background due to the Transverse Feedback

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.J.; Akre, R.; Fisher, A.; Iverson, R.; Weaver, M.; /SLAC

    2008-03-18

    The background in the BaBar detector is especially high during injection, when most components are actually having reduced voltages. The situation is worse for the beam in High Energy Ring (HER) when the LER beam is present. It was found that the transverse feedback system plays an important role when stacking more charge on top of existing bunches. Lowering the feedback gain helped and it was realized later that the best scenario would be to gate off the feedback for only the one bunch, which got additional charge injected into it. The explanation is that the blown-up, but centered, original HER bunch plus the small injected off-axis bunch (each with half the charge) would stay in the ring if not touched, but the feedback system sees half the offset and wants to correct it, therefore disturbing and scraping the blown-up part.

  6. Detection of dynamic background due to swaying movements from motion features.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duc-Son; Arandjelović, Ognjen; Venkatesh, Svetha

    2015-01-01

    Dynamically changing background (dynamic background) still presents a great challenge to many motion-based video surveillance systems. In the context of event detection, it is a major source of false alarms. There is a strong need from the security industry either to detect and suppress these false alarms, or dampen the effects of background changes, so as to increase the sensitivity to meaningful events of interest. In this paper, we restrict our focus to one of the most common causes of dynamic background changes: 1) that of swaying tree branches and 2) their shadows under windy conditions. Considering the ultimate goal in a video analytics pipeline, we formulate a new dynamic background detection problem as a signal processing alternative to the previously described but unreliable computer vision-based approaches. Within this new framework, we directly reduce the number of false alarms by testing if the detected events are due to characteristic background motions. In addition, we introduce a new data set suitable for the evaluation of dynamic background detection. It consists of real-world events detected by a commercial surveillance system from two static surveillance cameras. The research question we address is whether dynamic background can be detected reliably and efficiently using simple motion features and in the presence of similar but meaningful events, such as loitering. Inspired by the tree aerodynamics theory, we propose a novel method named local variation persistence (LVP), that captures the key characteristics of swaying motions. The method is posed as a convex optimization problem, whose variable is the local variation. We derive a computationally efficient algorithm for solving the optimization problem, the solution of which is then used to form a powerful detection statistic. On our newly collected data set, we demonstrate that the proposed LVP achieves excellent detection results and outperforms the best alternative adapted from existing art in

  7. The Distortion of the Cosmic Microwave Background Spectrum Due to Intergalactic Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imara, Nia; Loeb, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    Infrared emission from intergalactic dust might compromise the ability of future experiments to detect subtle spectral distortions in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) from the early universe. We provide the first estimate of foreground contamination of the CMB signal due to diffuse dust emission in the intergalactic medium. We use models of the extragalactic background light to calculate the intensity of intergalactic dust emission and find that emission by intergalactic dust at z ≲ 0.5 exceeds the sensitivity of the planned Primordial Inflation Explorer to CMB spectral distortions by 1–3 orders of magnitude. In the frequency range ν = 150–2400 GHz, we place an upper limit of 0.06% on the contribution to the far-infrared background from intergalactic dust emission.

  8. Public exposure due to external gamma background radiation in boundary areas of Iran.

    PubMed

    Pooya, S M Hosseini; Dashtipour, M R; Enferadi, A; Orouji, T

    2015-09-01

    A monitoring program in boundary areas of a country is an appropriate way to indicate the level of public exposure. In this research, gamma background radiation was measured using TL dosimeters at 12 boundary areas as well as in the capital city of Iran during the period 2010 to 2011. The measurements were carried out in semi-annual time intervals from January to June and July to December in each year. The maximum average dose equivalent value measured was approximately 70 μSv/month for Tehran city. Also, the average dose values obtained were less than 40 μSv/month for all the cities located at the sea level except that of high level natural radiation area of Ramsar, and more than 55 μSv/month for the higher elevation cities. The public exposure due to ambient gamma dose equivalent in Iran is within the levels reported by UNSCEAR. PMID:26057985

  9. Estimation of collective effective dose due to natural background radiation in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henaish, B. A.; Tawfik, A. A.; Abu Zaid, H.; Gomaa, M. A.

    1994-07-01

    During the last few years, worldwide attention has been directed towards the estimation of natural background radiation levels. Several environmental monitoring networks have been established for systematic data collection and exchange of information.In the present study, measurements of annual effective dose from terrestrial γ-rays are carried out at pre-selected sites within several Egyptian governorates by using a calibrated gas-filled GM-detector connected to a microcomputer system. Contribution of the secondary cosmic-rays, which is of prime importance at sea level, is achieved by carrying out computation based on theoretical considerations.Terrestrial effective dose in Egypt is found to be between 106 and 371 μSv/yr, meanwhile the computed cosmic rays contribution is 260-296 μSv/yr. Accordingly, the annual collective effective dose due to natural background radiation is about 27,253 Man Sv for the last Egyptian population count (1989) considering 0.8 and 0.2 indoor and outdoor occupancy factors.

  10. Respiratory rate detection algorithm based on RGB-D camera: theoretical background and experimental results.

    PubMed

    Benetazzo, Flavia; Freddi, Alessandro; Monteriù, Andrea; Longhi, Sauro

    2014-09-01

    Both the theoretical background and the experimental results of an algorithm developed to perform human respiratory rate measurements without any physical contact are presented. Based on depth image sensing techniques, the respiratory rate is derived by measuring morphological changes of the chest wall. The algorithm identifies the human chest, computes its distance from the camera and compares this value with the instantaneous distance, discerning if it is due to the respiratory act or due to a limited movement of the person being monitored. To experimentally validate the proposed algorithm, the respiratory rate measurements coming from a spirometer were taken as a benchmark and compared with those estimated by the algorithm. Five tests were performed, with five different persons sat in front of the camera. The first test aimed to choose the suitable sampling frequency. The second test was conducted to compare the performances of the proposed system with respect to the gold standard in ideal conditions of light, orientation and clothing. The third, fourth and fifth tests evaluated the algorithm performances under different operating conditions. The experimental results showed that the system can correctly measure the respiratory rate, and it is a viable alternative to monitor the respiratory activity of a person without using invasive sensors. PMID:26609383

  11. Experimental Characterization of Radiation Forcing due to Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas, K. R.; Singh, D. K.; Ponnulakshmi, V. K.; Subramanian, G.

    2011-11-01

    Micro-meteorological processes in the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer (NBL) including the formation of radiation-fog and the development of inversion layers are controlled by heat transfer and the vertical temperature distribution close to the ground. In a recent study, it has been shown that the temperature profile close to the ground in stably-stratified, NBL is controlled by the radiative forcing due to suspended aerosols. Estimating aerosol forcing is also important in geo-engineering applications to evaluate the use of aerosols to mitigate greenhouse effects. Modeling capability in the above scenarios is limited by our knowledge of this forcing. Here, the design of an experimental setup is presented which can be used for evaluating the IR-radiation forcing on aerosols under either Rayleigh-Benard condition or under conditions corresponding to the NBL. We present results indicating the effect of surface emissivities of the top and bottom boundaries and the aerosol concentration on the temperature profiles. In order to understand the observed enhancement of the convection-threshold, we have determined the conduction-radiation time constant of an aerosol laden air layer. Our results help to explain observed temperature profiles in the NBL, the apparent stability of such profiles and indicate the need to account for the effect of aerosols in climatic/weather models.

  12. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; et al

    2016-02-18

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observedmore » magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.« less

  13. Detection of Enhancement in Number Densities of Background Galaxies due to Magnification by Massive Galaxy Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, I.

    2015-10-06

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z≃0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian≃0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian≃1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit NFW models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83±0.24(stat)±0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We also use our best-fit η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. Our work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  14. Detection of enhancement in number densities of background galaxies due to magnification by massive galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Dietrich, J. P.; Mohr, J.; Applegate, D. E.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Bayliss, M. B.; Bocquet, S.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Capasso, R.; Desai, S.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Gupta, N.; Hennig, C.; Hoekstra, H.; von der Linden, A.; Liu, J.; McDonald, M.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Schrabback, T.; Strazzullo, V.; Stubbs, C. W.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-04-01

    We present a detection of the enhancement in the number densities of background galaxies induced from lensing magnification and use it to test the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (SZE-) inferred masses in a sample of 19 galaxy clusters with median redshift z ≃ 0.42 selected from the South Pole Telescope SPT-SZ survey. These clusters are observed by the Megacam on the Magellan Clay Telescope though gri filters. Two background galaxy populations are selected for this study through their photometric colours; they have median redshifts zmedian ≃ 0.9 (low-z background) and zmedian ≃ 1.8 (high-z background). Stacking these populations, we detect the magnification bias effect at 3.3σ and 1.3σ for the low- and high-z backgrounds, respectively. We fit Navarro, Frenk and White models simultaneously to all observed magnification bias profiles to estimate the multiplicative factor η that describes the ratio of the weak lensing mass to the mass inferred from the SZE observable-mass relation. We further quantify systematic uncertainties in η resulting from the photometric noise and bias, the cluster galaxy contamination and the estimations of the background properties. The resulting η for the combined background populations with 1σ uncertainties is 0.83 ± 0.24(stat) ± 0.074(sys), indicating good consistency between the lensing and the SZE-inferred masses. We use our best-fitting η to predict the weak lensing shear profiles and compare these predictions with observations, showing agreement between the magnification and shear mass constraints. This work demonstrates the promise of using the magnification as a complementary method to estimate cluster masses in large surveys.

  15. Changes in US background ozone due to global anthropogenic emissions from 1970 to 2020

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nopmongcol, Uarporn; Jung, Jaegun; Kumar, Naresh; Yarwood, Greg

    2016-09-01

    Estimates of North American and US Background (NAB and USB) ozone (O3) are critical in setting and implementing the US National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) and therefore influence population exposure to O3 across the US. NAB is defined as the O3 concentration in the absence of anthropogenic O3 precursor emissions from North America whereas USB excludes anthropogenic emissions inside the US alone. NAB and USB vary geographically and with time of year. Analyses of O3 trends at rural locations near the west coast suggest that background O3 is rising in response to increasing non-US emissions. As the O3 NAAQS is lowered, rising background O3 would make attaining the NAAQS more difficult. Most studies of changing US background O3 have inferred trends from observations whereas air quality management decisions tend to rely on models. Thus, it is important that the models used to develop O3 management strategies are able to represent the changes in background O3 in order to increase confidence that air quality management strategies will succeed. We focus on how changing global emissions influence USB rather than the effects of inter-annual meteorological variation or long-term climate change. We use a regional model (CAMx) nested within a global model (GEOS-Chem) to refine our grid resolution over high terrain in the western US and near US borders where USB tends to be higher. We determine USB from CAMx simulations that exclude US anthropogenic emissions. Over five decades, from 1970 to 2020, estimated USB for the annual fourth highest maximum daily 8-h average O3 (H4MDA8) in the western US increased from mostly in the range of 40-55 ppb to 45-60 ppb, but remained below 45 ppb in the eastern US. USB increases in the southwestern US are consistent with rising emissions in Asia and Mexico. USB decreases in the northeast US after 1990 follow declining Canadian emissions. Our results show that the USB increases both for the top 30 MDA8 days and the H4MDA8 (the former

  16. Finding False Positives Planet Candidates Due To Background Eclipsing Binaries in K2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullally, Fergal; Thompson, Susan E.; Coughlin, Jeffrey; DAVE team

    2016-06-01

    We adapt the difference image centroid approach, used for finding background eclipsing binaries, to vet K2 planet candidates. Difference image centroids were used with great success to vet planet candidates in the original Kepler mission, where the source of a transit could be identified by subtracting images of out-of-transit cadences from in-transit cadences. To account for K2's roll pattern, we reconstruct out-of-transit images from cadences that are nearby in both time and spacecraft roll angle. We describe the method and discuss some K2 planet candidates which this method suggests are false positives.

  17. Defocusing of an ion beam propagating in background plasma due to two-stream instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokluoglu, Erinc; Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2015-04-01

    The current and charge neutralization of charged particle beams by background plasma enable ballistic beam propagation and have a wide range of applications in inertial fusion and high energy density physics. However, the beam-plasma interaction can result in the development of collective instabilities that may have deleterious effects on ballistic propagation of an ion beam. In the case of fast, light-ion beams, non-linear fields created by instabilities can lead to significant defocusing of the beam. We study an ion beam pulse propagating in a background plasma, which is subjected to two-stream instability between the beam ions and plasma electrons, using PIC code LSP. The defocusing effects of the instability on the beam can be much more pronounced in small radius beams. We show through simulations that a beamlet produced from an ion beam passed through an aperture can be used as a diagnostic tool to identify the presence of the two-stream instability and quantify its defocusing effects. The effect can be observed on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II facility by measuring the spot size of the extracted beamlet propagating through several meters of plasma.

  18. Defocusing of an ion beam propagating in background plasma due to two-stream instability

    SciTech Connect

    Tokluoglu, Erinc; Kaganovich, Igor D.

    2015-04-15

    The current and charge neutralization of charged particle beams by background plasma enable ballistic beam propagation and have a wide range of applications in inertial fusion and high energy density physics. However, the beam-plasma interaction can result in the development of collective instabilities that may have deleterious effects on ballistic propagation of an ion beam. In the case of fast, light-ion beams, non-linear fields created by instabilities can lead to significant defocusing of the beam. We study an ion beam pulse propagating in a background plasma, which is subjected to two-stream instability between the beam ions and plasma electrons, using PIC code LSP. The defocusing effects of the instability on the beam can be much more pronounced in small radius beams. We show through simulations that a beamlet produced from an ion beam passed through an aperture can be used as a diagnostic tool to identify the presence of the two-stream instability and quantify its defocusing effects. The effect can be observed on the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II facility by measuring the spot size of the extracted beamlet propagating through several meters of plasma.

  19. IS THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ASYMMETRY DUE TO THE KINEMATIC DIPOLE?

    SciTech Connect

    Naselsky, P.; Zhao, W.; Kim, J.; Chen, S.

    2012-04-10

    Parity violation found in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation is a crucial clue for the non-standard cosmological model or the possible contamination of various foreground residuals and/or calibration of the CMB data sets. In this paper, we study the directional properties of the CMB parity asymmetry by excluding the m = 0 modes in the definition of parity parameters. We find that the preferred directions of the parity parameters coincide with the CMB kinematic dipole, which implies that the CMB parity asymmetry may be connected with the possible contamination of the residual dipole component. We also find that such tendency is not only localized at l = 2, 3, but in the extended multipole ranges up to l {approx} 22.

  20. Beam loss and backgrounds in the CDF and D0 detectors due to nuclear elastic beam-gas scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandr I. Drozhdin; Valery A. Lebedev; Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-05-27

    Detailed simulations were performed on beam loss rates in the vicinity of the Tevatron Collider detectors due to beam-gas nuclear elastic interactions. It turns out that this component can drive the accelerator-related background rates in the CDF and D0 detectors, exceeding those due to outscattering from collimation system, inelastic beam-gas interactions and other processes [1, 2]. Results of realistic simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes are presented for the interaction region components and the CDF and D0 detectors. It is shown that a steel mask placed upstream of the detectors can reduce the background rates by almost an order of magnitude.

  1. Experimental characterization of broadband electrostatic noise due to plasma compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuBois, Ami M.; Thomas, Edward; Amatucci, William E.; Ganguli, Gurudas

    2014-07-01

    For a wide variety of laboratory and space plasma environments, theoretical predictions state that plasmas are unstable to inhomogeneous flows over a very broad frequency range. Such sheared flows are generated in the Earth's magnetosphere and intensify during active periods. Specifically, for a velocity shear oriented perpendicular to a uniform background magnetic field, the shear scale length (LE) compared to the ion gyroradius (ρi) determines the character of the shear-driven instability that may prevail. An interpenetrating plasma configuration is used to create a transverse velocity shear profile in a magnetized plasma column, a condition similar to that found in the natural boundary layers. The continuous variation of ρi/LE and the associated transition of the instability regimes driven by the shear flow mechanism are demonstrated in a single laboratory experiment. Broadband wave emission correlated to increasing/decreasing stress (i.e., ρi/LE), a characteristic signature of a boundary layer crossing, is found under controlled and repeatable conditions. This result holds out the promise for understanding the cause and effect of the in situ observation of broadband electrostatic noise.

  2. Experimental and theoretical studies of particle generation afterlaser ablation of copper with background gas at atmosphericpressure

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Sy-Bor; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2007-05-31

    Laser ablation has proven to be an effective method for generating nanoparticles; particles are produced in the laser induced vapor plume during the cooling stage. To understand the in-situ condensation process, a series of time resolved light scattering images were recorded and analyzed. Significant changes in the condensation rate and the shape of the condensed aerosol plume were observed in two background gases, helium and argon. The primary particle shape and size distribution were measured using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and a differential mobility analyzer (DMA). The gas dynamics simulation included nucleation and coagulation within the vapor plume, heat and mass transfer from the vapor plume to the background gas, and heat transfer to the sample. The experimental data and the calculated evolution of the shape of the vapor plume showed the same trend for the spatial distribution of the condensed particles in both background gases. The simulated particle size distribution also qualitatively agreed with the experimental data. It was determined that the laser energy, the physical properties of the background gas (conductivity, diffusivity and viscosity), and the shape of the ablation system (ablation chamber and the layout of the sample) have strong effects on the condensation process and the subsequent sizes, shapes and degree of aggregation of the particles.

  3. Promoting menstrual health among persian adolescent girls from low socioeconomic backgrounds: a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Research in the past decade has revealed average to poor menstrual health among many Iranian girls. The present study investigated the effectiveness of a health promotion project on improving menstrual health in adolescent girls in Iran. Methods A quasi-experimental study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the health intervention program. A total of 698 students (study participants and controls) in several schools in Mazandaran province, Iran were included. The project comprised 10 two-hour educational sessions. Educational topics included the significance of adolescence, physical and emotional changes during adolescence, pubertal and menstruation health and premenstrual syndrome. A self-administered questionnaire measuring demographic characteristics, behaviors during menstruation, menstrual patterns, sources of information about menstruation and personal health data was administered. The questionnaire was administered to all participating students after the experimental group received the training. Results Among the most significant results was the impact of educational sessions on bathing and genital hygiene. A total of 61.6% in the experimental group compared with 49.3% in the control group engaged in usual bathing during menstruation (p = 0.002). Individual health status was significantly statistically correlated with menstrual health. Attitude towards menstruation was also significantly related to menstrual health. Conclusions The present study confirms that educational interventions, such as the health promotion project in this study, can be quite effective in promoting menstrual health. PMID:22420743

  4. Testing the Role of Genetic Background in Parallel Evolution Using the Comparative Experimental Evolution of Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Vogwill, Tom; Kojadinovic, Mila; Furió, Victoria; MacLean, R. Craig

    2014-01-01

    Parallel evolution is the independent evolution of the same phenotype or genotype in response to the same selection pressure. There are examples of parallel molecular evolution across divergent genetic backgrounds, suggesting that genetic background may not play an important role in determining the outcome of adaptation. Here, we measure the influence of genetic background on phenotypic and molecular adaptation by combining experimental evolution with comparative analysis. We selected for resistance to the antibiotic rifampicin in eight strains of bacteria from the genus Pseudomonas using a short term selection experiment. Adaptation occurred by 47 mutations at conserved sites in rpoB, the target of rifampicin, and due to the high diversity of possible mutations the probability of within-strain parallel evolution was low. The probability of between-strain parallel evolution was only marginally lower, because different strains substituted similar rpoB mutations. In contrast, we found that more than 30% of the phenotypic variation in the growth rate of evolved clones was attributable to among-strain differences. Parallel molecular evolution across strains resulted in divergent phenotypic evolution because rpoB mutations had different effects on growth rate in different strains. This study shows that genetic divergence between strains constrains parallel phenotypic evolution, but had little detectable impact on the molecular basis of adaptation in this system. PMID:25228081

  5. Uncertainty in techno-economic estimates of cellulosic ethanol production due to experimental measurement uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cost-effective production of lignocellulosic biofuels remains a major financial and technical challenge at the industrial scale. A critical tool in biofuels process development is the techno-economic (TE) model, which calculates biofuel production costs using a process model and an economic model. The process model solves mass and energy balances for each unit, and the economic model estimates capital and operating costs from the process model based on economic assumptions. The process model inputs include experimental data on the feedstock composition and intermediate product yields for each unit. These experimental yield data are calculated from primary measurements. Uncertainty in these primary measurements is propagated to the calculated yields, to the process model, and ultimately to the economic model. Thus, outputs of the TE model have a minimum uncertainty associated with the uncertainty in the primary measurements. Results We calculate the uncertainty in the Minimum Ethanol Selling Price (MESP) estimate for lignocellulosic ethanol production via a biochemical conversion process: dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment of corn stover followed by enzymatic hydrolysis and co-fermentation of the resulting sugars to ethanol. We perform a sensitivity analysis on the TE model and identify the feedstock composition and conversion yields from three unit operations (xylose from pretreatment, glucose from enzymatic hydrolysis, and ethanol from fermentation) as the most important variables. The uncertainty in the pretreatment xylose yield arises from multiple measurements, whereas the glucose and ethanol yields from enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation, respectively, are dominated by a single measurement: the fraction of insoluble solids (fIS) in the biomass slurries. Conclusions We calculate a $0.15/gal uncertainty in MESP from the TE model due to uncertainties in primary measurements. This result sets a lower bound on the error bars of the TE model predictions

  6. Experimental methods in aquatic respirometry: the importance of mixing devices and accounting for background respiration.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, G G; Tenzing, P; Clark, T D

    2016-01-01

    In light of an increasing trend in fish biology towards using static respirometry techniques without the inclusion of a mixing mechanism and without accurately accounting for the influence of microbial (background) respiration, this paper quantifies the effect of these approaches on the oxygen consumption rates (ṀO2 ) measured from juvenile barramundi Lates calcarifer (mean ± s.e. mass = 20·31 ± 0·81 g) and adult spiny chromis damselfish Acanthochromis polyacanthus (22·03 ± 2·53 g). Background respiration changed consistently and in a sigmoidal manner over time in the treatment with a mixing device (inline recirculation pump), whereas attempts to measure background respiration in the non-mixed treatment yielded highly variable estimates of ṀO2 that were probably artefacts due to the lack of water movement over the oxygen sensor during measurement periods. This had clear consequences when accounting for background respiration in the calculations of fish ṀO2 . Exclusion of a mixing device caused a significantly lower estimate of ṀO2 in both species and reduced the capacity to detect differences between individuals as well as differences within an individual over time. There was evidence to suggest that the magnitude of these effects was dependent on the spontaneous activity levels of the fish, as the difference between mixed and non-mixed treatments was more pronounced for L. calcarifer (sedentary) than for A. polyacanthus (more spontaneously active). It is clear that respirometry set-ups for sedentary species must contain a mixing device to prevent oxygen stratification inside the respirometer. While more active species may provide a higher level of water mixing during respirometry measurements and theoretically reduce the need for a mixing device, the level of mixing cannot be quantified and may change with diurnal cycles in activity. To ensure consistency across studies without relying on fish activity levels, and to enable accurate assessments of

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Interaction of Blast Waves Generated by Exploding Wires using Background Oriented Schlieren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Jonathan; Eliasson, Veronica

    2015-11-01

    Work has been performed to experimentally characterize the interaction of a multiple blast waves. The blast waves were generated using an exploding wire system. This system can store up to 400 J of energy in a high voltage capacitor bank. By discharging the capacitors through wires of a diameter of 150 μm it was possible to produce blast waves with Mach numbers as high as 2.3 at a distance of 40 mm from the center of the blast. A parametric study was performed to measure the behavior of the shocks for a variety of wire thicknesses, voltages, and separation distances. Additionally a background oriented schlieren system was used to quantify the flowfield behind the shocks. The interaction of the shocks featured expected nonlinear phenomena such as the presence of Mach stems, and showed good agreement with results in the shock wave literature. This investigation lays the groundwork for subsequent research that will use exploding wires to experimentally reproduce conditions investigated numerically, in which the effects of multiple converging blast waves on a central target were investigated.

  8. Experimental investigation of plasma relaxation using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott; University of New Mexico Collaboration; Los Alamos National Laboratory Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation in a low density background plasma. Experiments are being conducted in the linear HelCat device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes within the intergalactic medium. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5-10 kV and ~100 kA. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities ~1.2Cs and densities ~1020 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  9. Experimental Study of Loosening of Threaded Fasteners due to Dynamic Shear Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    PAI, N. G.; HESS, D. P.

    2002-06-01

    This paper presents a study on loosening of threaded fasteners subjected to dynamic shear loads. A fundamental analysis of loosening reveals that a fastener can loosen at lower loads than previously expected due to localized slip at the contact surfaces. Four different loosening processes of a screw under different conditions of slip at the head and thread contact regions are identified. Experimental results illustrating these loosening processes are presented. In addition, the minimum dynamic shear force required to initiate loosening is determined experimentally.

  10. Small-scale anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background: Experimental and theoretical perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, Eric R.

    2008-06-01

    In this thesis, we consider both theoretical and experimental aspects of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy for [cursive l] > 500. Part one addresses the process by which the universe first became neutral, its recombination history. The work described here moves closer to achieving the precision needed for upcoming small-scale anisotropy experiments. Part two describes experimental work with the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), designed to measure these anisotropies, and focuses on its electronics and software, on the site stability, and on calibration and diagnostics. Cosmological recombination occurs when the universe has cooled sufficiently for neutral atomic species to form. The atomic processes in this era determine the evolution of the free electron abundance, which in turn determines the optical depth to Thomson scattering. The Thomson optical depth drops rapidly (cosmologically) as the electrons are captured. The radiation is then decoupled from the matter, and so travels almost unimpeded to us today as the CMB. Studies of the CMB provide a pristine view of this early stage of the universe (at around 300,000 years old), and the statistics of the CMB anisotropy inform a model of the universe which is precise and consistent with cosmological studies of the more recent universe from optical astronomy. The recombination history is the largest known uncertainty in the standard cosmological model for CMB anisotropy formation. Here we investigate the formation of neutral helium during cosmological recombination and find that it is significantly different than was previously understood. We show that several new effects produce a modest (~ 0.5% at [cursive l] = 3000) change in the CMB anisotropy that should be included in the analysis of data from small-scale anisotropy experiments. These small scales contain further information from the primary CMB and from interactions of the CMB with intervening matter as it travels from the recombination era to

  11. Experimental assessment of energy saving due to trains regenerative braking in an electrified subway line

    SciTech Connect

    Adinolfi, A.; Lamedica, R.; Modesto, C.; Prudenzi, A.; Vimercati, S.

    1998-10-01

    The paper deals with the research activity conducted in order to determine the impact of regenerative braking techniques adopted on board of trains operating in subway electrified systems. Even though systems adopting this technique are very diffuse world wide, experimental results demonstrating the impact on energy consumption are rarely made available for the scientific community. The paper reports the results of an extensive experimental activity conducted on an electrified subway line in Rome, in order to estimate the energy saving due to the techniques above mentioned. Since the monitoring activity of the system demand in absence of regenerative braking had to be limited to the traffic peak hours of only two subsequent days, an available model, being able to simulate the instantaneous demand profile of DC electrified subway power systems, has been used in order to extend the numerical evaluations based on the experimental activity to a whole day of operation.

  12. Low background techniques and experimental challenges for Borexino and its nylon vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pocar, Andrea Pietro

    Borexino is an experiment for low energy (<1 MeV) solar neutrino spectroscopy approaching completion at the underground Gran Sasso laboratories in Italy. It is specifically designed to measure in real time the flux of mono-energetic {berillium} neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the Sun. Its 300-ton liquid scintillator target is contained in an 8.5 meter diameter nylon inner vessel (IV) and is surrounded by 1000 tons of buffer fluid. A second, 11.5 meter diameter concentric nylon outer vessel (OV) around the IV serves as a barrier for radon emanated at the periphery of the detector. Borexino requires unprecedented low levels of radioactive impurities to be a success (˜1 background event/day in the central 100-tons of scintillator). The IV, which is in direct contact with the scintillator, also has to meet extremely stringent radioactive and cleanliness requirements. Intrinsic levels ˜10 -12 g/g for U and Th and ˜10-8 g/g for K are needed. The vessels, assembled in a clean room in Princeton, made of a 125 micron-thick membrane, need to be leak tight at the 10-2 cc/s and 1 cc/s level for the IV and OV respectively, and have to withstand mechanical stresses due to density differences and temperature gradients between the fluids they contain. Their requirements and assembly process are presented in detail. An upper limit on the inner vessel leak rate of 10-3 cc/s was measured. The performance of a matrix of light sources, placed on both vessels for monitoring its shape with digital cameras, is demonstrated. The problem of surface contamination by radon in the air is extensively addressed, strategies for minimizing it are analysed and the effectiveness of their application evaluated. In particular, an original radon filter based on vacuum swing adsorption on activated charcoal has been developed for use in connection with the clean room. Such a technique yielded radon abatement factors in excess of 104 in a small-scale prototype, and ˜100 in the final system

  13. Experimental study of neutron induced background noise on gated x-ray framing cameras

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N.; Hagmann, C.; Stone, G.; Hey, D.; Glenn, S.; Conder, A.; Teruya, A.; Sorce, C.; Tommasini, R.; Stoeffl, W.; Springer, P.; Landen, O. L.; Eckart, M.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Koch, J. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bahukutumbi, R.; and others

    2010-10-15

    A temporally gated x-ray framing camera based on a proximity focus microchannel plate is one of the most important diagnostic tools of inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, fusion neutrons produced in imploded capsules interact with structures surrounding the camera and produce background to x-ray signals. To understand the mechanisms of this neutron induced background, we tested several gated x-ray cameras in the presence of 14 MeV neutrons produced at the Omega laser facility. Differences between background levels observed with photographic film readout and charge-coupled-device readout have been studied.

  14. Experimental study of variations in background radiation and the effect on Nuclear Car Wash sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Church, J; Slaughter, D; Norman, E; Asztalos, S; Biltoft, P

    2007-02-07

    Error rates in a cargo screening system such as the Nuclear Car Wash [1-7] depend on the standard deviation of the background radiation count rate. Because the Nuclear Car Wash is an active interrogation technique, the radiation signal for fissile material must be detected above a background count rate consisting of cosmic, ambient, and neutron-activated radiations. It was suggested previously [1,6] that the Corresponding negative repercussions for the sensitivity of the system were shown. Therefore, to assure the most accurate estimation of the variation, experiments have been performed to quantify components of the actual variance in the background count rate, including variations in generator power, irradiation time, and container contents. The background variance is determined by these experiments to be a factor of 2 smaller than values assumed in previous analyses, resulting in substantially improved projections of system performance for the Nuclear Car Wash.

  15. Experimental Background Studies in the Two Photon Exchange (TPE) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Pena, Cristian; Brooks, W. K.; Hakobyan, Hayk

    2010-08-04

    This work is based on the improvement of an existing simulation for the two photon exchange (TPE) experiment at Jefferson Lab developed within the GEANT4 framework. This experiment will determine the ratio of the positron-proton elastic scattering cross section and the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section with high precision. To accomplish this measurement requires the use of a variety of devices and complex arrangements, creating background particles that manage to reach the detector system (CLAS). A number of test runs have identified the sources of background in the detector guided by previous simulations. Even so, the remaining background can be reduced considerably by the microscopic identification and locating of the background sources performed by our new simulation.

  16. Experimental Background Studies in the Two Photon Exchange (TPE) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Cristian Peña, W. K. Brooks, Hayk Hakobyan

    2010-08-01

    This work is based on the improvement of an existing simulation for the two photon exchange (TPE) experiment at Jefferson Lab developed within the GEANT4 framework. This experiment will determine the ratio of the positron-proton elastic scattering cross section and the electron-proton elastic scattering cross section with high precision. To accomplish this measurement requires the use of a variety of devices and complex arrangements, creating background particles that manage to reach the detector system (CLAS). A number of test runs have identified the sources of background in the detector guided by previous simulations. Even so, the remaining background can be reduced considerably by the microscopic identification and locating of the background sources performed by our new simulation.

  17. Phase speed saturation of Farley-Buneman waves due to stochastic, self-induced fluctuations in the background flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, E. L.; Young, M. A.; Hysell, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    The phase speed saturation of Farley-Buneman waves is studied as an interaction with the random turbulent fluctuations in the background. We used the formalism of stochastic differential equations to model the complex interactions with a linearized system plus a stochastic term. Applying an averaging technique, we can obtain an augmented linear system that depends on the random behavior of the waves. The results show that following this approach we can obtain phase velocities that saturate close to the ion acoustic speed (Cs). This approach seems promising for the study of the influence of plasma turbulence generated by different kinds of instabilities on the mean state of the ionosphere.

  18. HerMES: A Deficit in the Surface Brightness of the Cosmic Infrared Background due to Galaxy Cluster Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemcov, M.; Blain, A.; Cooray, A.; Béthermin, M.; Bock, J.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Dowell, C. D.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Marsden, G.; Nguyen, H. T.; Oliver, S. J.; Richard, J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Schulz, B.; Scott, Douglas; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Valtchanov, I.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Wardlow, J.

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I_{250 \\, \\mu {m}} \\gt 0.69_{-0.03}^{+0.03} ({stat.}) _{-0.06}^{+0.11} ({sys.}) MJy sr-1, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  19. HerMES: A DEFICIT IN THE SURFACE BRIGHTNESS OF THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND DUE TO GALAXY CLUSTER GRAVITATIONAL LENSING

    SciTech Connect

    Zemcov, M.; Cooray, A.; Bock, J.; Dowell, C. D.; Nguyen, H. T.; Blain, A.; Bethermin, M.; Conley, A.; Glenn, J.; Conversi, L.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S. J.; Roseboom, I. G.; Griffin, M.; Halpern, M.; Marsden, G.; Jullo, E.; Kneib, J.-P.; Richard, J.; and others

    2013-06-01

    We have observed four massive galaxy clusters with the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory and measure a deficit of surface brightness within their central region after removing detected sources. We simulate the effects of instrumental sensitivity and resolution, the source population, and the lensing effect of the clusters to estimate the shape and amplitude of the deficit. The amplitude of the central deficit is a strong function of the surface density and flux distribution of the background sources. We find that for the current best fitting faint end number counts, and excellent lensing models, the most likely amplitude of the central deficit is the full intensity of the cosmic infrared background (CIB). Our measurement leads to a lower limit to the integrated total intensity of the CIB of I{sub 250{mu}m}>0.69{sub -0.03}{sup +0.03}(stat.){sub -0.06}{sup +0.11}(sys.) MJy sr{sup -1}, with more CIB possible from both low-redshift sources and from sources within the target clusters. It should be possible to observe this effect in existing high angular resolution data at other wavelengths where the CIB is bright, which would allow tests of models of the faint source component of the CIB.

  20. Vibrations inside buildings due to subway railway traffic. Experimental validation of a comprehensive prediction model.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Patrícia; Ruiz, Jésus Fernández; Alves Costa, Pedro; Medina Rodríguez, L; Cardoso, António Silva

    2016-10-15

    The present paper focuses on the experimental validation of a numerical approach previously proposed by the authors for the prediction of vibrations inside buildings due to railway traffic in tunnels. The numerical model is based on the concept of dynamic substructuring and is composed by three autonomous models to simulate the following main parts of the problem: i) generation of vibrations (train-track interaction); ii) propagation of vibrations (track-tunnel-ground system); iii) reception of vibrations (building coupled to the ground). The experimental validation consists in the comparison between the results predicted by the proposed numerical model and the measurements performed inside a building due to the railway traffic in a shallow tunnel located in Madrid. Apart from the brief description of the numerical model and of the case study, the main options and simplifications adopted on the numerical modeling strategy are discussed. The balance adopted between accuracy and simplicity of the numerical approach proved to be a path to follow in order to transfer knowledge to engineering practice. Finally, the comparison between numerical and experimental results allowed finding a good agreement between both, fact that ensures the ability of the proposed modeling strategy to deal with real engineering practical problems. PMID:26589136

  1. Placement error due to charging in EBL: experimental verification of a new correction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babin, Sergey; Borisov, Sergey; Kimura, Yasuki; Kono, Kenji; Militsin, Vladimir; Yamamoto, Ryuuji

    2012-06-01

    Placement error due to charging in electron beam lithography has been identified as the most important factor limiting placement accuracy in EBL, which is especially important in the fabrication of masks for double patterning. Published results from a few major companies demonstrated that the placement errors due to charging are far larger than 10 nm. Here, we will describe the results of predicting the charging placement error based on a significantly improved physical model. Specially designed patterns were used to characterize the details of the charging placement error. Reference marks were exposed before the exposure of the test pattern, during the exposure, and after the exposure was completed. The experimental results were used to calibrate the parameters of the physical model. Furthermore, the DISPLACE software was used to predict the placement error maps for other experiments. The results of the measurements and simulations are presented in this paper. The results produced by the software were in good agreement with the experimental measurements. When the amplitude and the direction of the placement error due to charging is predicted, it can be easily corrected using readily available software for mask data preparation, or directly in EBL writers.

  2. Can the cosmic x ray and gamma ray background be due to reflection of a steep power law spectrum and Compton scattering by relativistic electrons?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zycki, Piotr T.; Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Svensson, Roland

    1991-01-01

    We reconsider the recent model for the origin in the cosmic X-ray and gamma-ray background by Rogers and Field. The background in the model is due to an unresolved population of AGNs. An individual AGN spectrum contains three components: a power law with the energy index of alpha = 1.1, an enhanced reflection component, and a component from Compton scattering by relativistic electrons with a low energy cutoff at some minimum Lorentz factor, gamma(sub min) much greater than 1. The MeV bump seen in the gamma-ray background is then explained by inverse Compton emission by the electrons. We show that the model does not reproduce the shape of the observed X-ray and gamma-ray background below 10 MeV and that it overproduces the background at larger energies. Furthermore, we find the assumptions made for the Compton component to be physically inconsistent. Relaxing the inconsistent assumptions leads to model spectra even more different from that of the observed cosmic background. Thus, we can reject the hypothesis that the high-energy cosmic background is due to the described model.

  3. Experimental evidence of lateral flow in unsaturated homogeneous isotropic sloping soil due to rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinai, G.; Dirksen, C.

    2006-12-01

    This paper describes laboratory experimental evidence for lateral flow in the top layer of unsaturated sloping soil due to rainfall. Water was applied uniformly on horizontal and V-shaped surfaces of fine sand, at rates about 100 times smaller than the saturated hydraulic conductivity. Flow regimes near the surface and in the soil bulk were studied by using dyes. Streamlines and streak lines and wetting fronts were visually studied and photographed through a vertical glass wall. Near wetting fronts the flow direction was always perpendicular to the fronts owing to dominant matrix potential gradients. Thus, during early wetting of dry sloping sand, the flow direction is directed upslope. Far above a wetting front the flow was vertical due to the dominance of gravity. Downslope flow was observed during decreasing rainfall and dry periods. The lateral movement was largest near the soil surface and decayed with soil depth. Unstable downslope lateral flow close to the soil surface was attributed to non-Darcian flow due to variable temporal and spatial raindrop distributions. The experiments verify the theory that predicts unsaturated downslope lateral flow in sloping soil due to rainfall dynamics only, without apparent soil texture difference or anisotropy. This phenomenon could have significant implications for hillside hydrology, desert agriculture, irrigation management, etc., as well as for the basic mechanisms of surface runoff and erosion.

  4. Uncertainty in the Extinction-to-Reddening Ratio Due to Uncertainty in the Main-Sequence Spectral Type of a Background Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Kristen A.

    2014-01-01

    Accurate and precise knowledge of extinction by foreground dust is necessary in many fields of astronomy. This study uses photometric models of main-sequence background stars to investigate the uncertainty in the measured extinction-to-reddening ratio, RV. When RV is calculated from reddening ratios, the uncertainty in RV due to possible error in the assumed background spectral type is not symmetric and depends strongly on spectral type itself. The true uncertainty in RV calculated from reddening ratios must include the effect of uncertainty in the background star spectral type, but this study also shows that in all but the lowest extinction lines of sight and lines of sight to very late-type stars, values of RV that deviate significantly from the Galactic average are likely real, not caused by uncertainty in background spectral type.

  5. Experimental and theoretical backgrounds for generation of dibaryons in NN and 3N interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukulin, V. I.; Pomerantsev, V. N.

    2010-04-01

    Numerous experimental and theoretical arguments in favor of the intermediate dibaryon generation in NN and 3N interactions are presented. Using some specific mechanism for the scalar field production when the 2ħω-excited multi-quark system deexcites to the ground state one formulates a concept for σ-dressed dibaryon as a carrier of intermediate-range attraction and a reason for short-range repulsion in NN-interaction. It is argued that the basic mechanisms responsible for large lowering of the Roper-resonance and the dressed dibaryon masses should be very similar. The modern experimental data of a few groups seem to confirm strongly the dibaryon picture in NN and 3N-interactions. Some important common features of the dibaryon and pomeron in highenergy NN scattering are discussed.

  6. Achromatic half-wave plate for submillimeter instruments in cosmic microwave background astronomy: experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Pisano, Giampaolo; Savini, Giorgio; Ade, Peter A R; Haynes, Vic; Gear, Walter K

    2006-09-20

    An achromatic half-wave plate (HWP) to be used in millimeter cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization experiments has been designed, manufactured, and tested. The design is based on the 5-plates Pancharatnam recipe and it works in the frequency range 85-185 GHz. A model has been used to predict the transmission, reflection, absorption, and phase shift as a function of frequency. The HWP has been tested by using coherent radiation from a back-wave oscillator to investigate its modulation efficiency and with incoherent radiation from a polarizing Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) to explore its frequency behavior. The FTS measurements have been fitted with an optical performance model which is in excellent agreement with the data. A detailed analysis of the data also allows a precise determination of the HWP fast and slow axes in the frequency band of operation. A list of the HWP performance characteristics is reported including estimates of its cross polarization. PMID:16946775

  7. Center of Pressure Displacement of Standing Posture during Rapid Movements Is Reorganised Due to Experimental Lower Extremity Muscle Pain

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background Postural control during rapid movements may be impaired due to musculoskeletal pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of experimental knee-related muscle pain on the center of pressure (CoP) displacement in a reaction time task condition. Methods Nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (dominant side shoulder flexion and bilateral heel lift) before, during, and after experimental pain induced in the dominant side vastus medialis or the tibialis anterior muscles by hypertonic saline injections. The CoP displacement was extracted from the ipsilateral and contralateral side by two force plates and the net CoP displacement was calculated. Results Compared with non-painful sessions, tibialis anterior muscle pain during the peak and peak-to-peak displacement for the CoP during anticipatory postural adjustments (APAs) of the shoulder task reduced the peak-to-peak displacement of the net CoP in the medial-lateral direction (P<0.05). Tibialis anterior and vastus medialis muscle pain during shoulder flexion task reduced the anterior-posterior peak-to-peak displacement in the ipsilateral side (P<0.05). Conclusions The central nervous system in healthy individuals was sufficiently robust in maintaining the APA characteristics during pain, although the displacement of net and ipsilateral CoP in the medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions during unilateral fast shoulder movement was altered. PMID:26680777

  8. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Pressure Wave Attenuation due to Bubbly Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaprakash, Arvind; Fourmeau, Tiffany; Hsiao, Chao-Tsung; Chahine, Georges; Dynaflow Inc. Team

    2013-03-01

    In this work, the effects of dispersed microbubbles on a steep pressure wave and its attenuation are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations were carried out using a compressible Euler equation solver, where the liquid-gas mixture was modeled using direct numerical simulations involving discrete deforming bubbles. To reduce computational costs a 1D configuration is used and the bubbles are assumed distributed in layers and the initial pressure profile is selected similar to that of a one-dimensional shock tube problem. Experimentally, the pressure pulse was generated using a submerged spark electric discharge, which generates a large vapor bubble, while the microbubbles in the bubbly layer are generated using electrolysis. High speed movies were recorded in tandem with high fidelity pressure measurements. The dependence of pressure wave attenuation on the bubble radii, the void fraction, and the bubbly layer thickness were parametrically studied. It has been found that the pressure wave attenuation can be seen as due to waves reflecting and dispersing in the inter-bubble regions, with the energy absorbed by bubble volume oscillations and re-radiation. Layer thickness and small bubble sizes were also seen as having a strong effect on the attenuation with enhanced attenuation as the bubble size is reduced for the same void fraction. This study was supported by the Department of Energy, under SBIR Phase II Contract DE-FG02-07ER84839.

  9. Systematic errors in conductimetric instrumentation due to bubble adhesions on the electrodes: An experimental assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neelakantaswamy, P. S.; Rajaratnam, A.; Kisdnasamy, S.; Das, N. P.

    1985-02-01

    Systematic errors in conductimetric measurements are often encountered due to partial screening of interelectrode current paths resulting from adhesion of bubbles on the electrode surfaces of the cell. A method of assessing this error quantitatively by a simulated electrolytic tank technique is proposed here. The experimental setup simulates the bubble-curtain effect in the electrolytic tank by means of a pair of electrodes partially covered by a monolayer of small polystyrene-foam spheres representing the bubble adhesions. By varying the number of spheres stuck on the electrode surface, the fractional area covered by the bubbles is controlled; and by measuring the interelectrode impedance, the systematic error is determined as a function of the fractional area covered by the simulated bubbles. A theoretical model which depicts the interelectrode resistance and, hence, the systematic error caused by bubble adhesions is calculated by considering the random dispersal of bubbles on the electrodes. Relevant computed results are compared with the measured impedance data obtained from the electrolytic tank experiment. Results due to other models are also presented and discussed. A time-domain measurement on the simulated cell to study the capacitive effects of the bubble curtain is also explained.

  10. Experimental analysis of thread movement in bolted connections due to vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, G. ED; Jenkins, Robert C.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report of research project NAS8-39131 #33 sponsored by NASA's George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and carried out by the Civil Engineering Department of Auburn University (Auburn, Alabama) and personnel of MSFC. The objective of this study was to identify the main design parameters contributing to the loosening of bolts due to vibration and to identify their relative importance and degree of contribution to bolt loosening. Vibration testing was conducted on a shaketable with a controlled-random input in the dynamic testing laboratory of the Structural Test Division of MSFC. Test specimens which contained one test bolt were vibrated for a fixed amount of time and a percentage of pre-load loss was measured. Each specimen tested implemented some combination of eleven design parameters as dictated by the design of experiment methodology employed. The eleven design parameters were: bolt size (diameter), lubrication on bolt, hole tolerance, initial pre-load, nut locking device, grip length, thread pitch, lubrication between mating materials, class of fit, joint configuration, and mass of configuration. These parameters were chosen for this experiment because they are believed to be the design parameters having the greatest impact on bolt loosening. Two values of each design parameter were used and each combination of parameters tested was subjected to two different directions of vibration and two different g-levels of vibration. One replication was made for each test to gain some indication of experimental error and repeatability and to give some degree of statistical credibility to the data, resulting in a total of 96 tests being performed. The results of the investigation indicated that nut locking devices, joint configuration, fastener size, and mass of configuration were significant in bolt loosening due to vibration. The results of this test can be utilized to further research the complex problem of bolt loosening due to vibration.

  11. Experimental analysis of thread movement in bolted connections due to vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramey, G. ED; Jenkins, Robert C.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the main design parameters contributing to loosening of bolts due to vibration and to identify their relative importance and degree of contribution to bolt loosening. Vibration testing was conducted on a shaketable with a controlled-random input in the dynamic testing laboratory of the Structural Test Division of MSFC. Test specimens which contained one test bolt were vibrated for a fixed amount of time and percentage of pre-load loss was measured. Each specimen tested implemented some combination of eleven design parameters as dictated by the design of experiment methodology employed. The eleven design parameters were: bolt size (diameter), lubrication on bolt, hole tolerance, initial pre-load, nut locking device, grip length, thread pitch, lubrication between mating materials, class of fit, joint configuration and mass of configuration. These parameters were chosen for this experiment because they are believed to be the design parameters having the greatest impact on bolt loosening. Two values of each design parameter were used and each combination of parameters tested was subjected to two different directions of vibration and two different g-levels of vibration. One replication was made for each test to gain some indication of experimental error and repeatability and to give some degree of statistical credibility to the data, resulting in a total of 96 tests being performed. The results of the investigation indicated that nut locking devices, joint configuration, fastener size, and mass of configuration were significant in bolt loosening due to vibration. The results of this test can be utilized to further research the complex problem of bolt loosening due to vibration.

  12. Experimental Evaluation of the Change in Fracture Geometry and Permeability Due to Shearing.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crandall, D.; Gill, M.; Moore, J.; Tennant, B.; Bromhal, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Fractures often provide the preferential flow paths through geologic media. As such, an understanding of what influences fracture permeability is critically important to describing sub-surface flows. Numerous studies have been reported which illustrate the importance of rock fracture geometry on the permeability of fractures, in particular the influence of zero aperture locations within the fracture aperture. increasing the tortuosity of flow through a fracture and subsequently decreasing the fracture permeability. Fractures and faults can shear due to increased transverse stresses, or an increase of fluid pressure within a fracture reducing the effective forces stopping fracture slippage. This behavior has been widely observed in many seismic events. How small scale shearing events influence the permeability of fracture is not well known though, as few experimental tests have been performed that enable the dynamic change in a fractured rock position while simultaneously measuring the permeability across the fracture. This talk describes resent research at the National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown, West Virginia where fractured rock cores have been experimentally sheared and the permeability through the fracture has been measured. In addition, these fractured cores were imaged with computed tomography scanning to understand what geometric alterations to the fracture structure influence the shearing induced changes to fracture permeability. Both shale and sandstone fractured cores have been evaluated with this unique core flow apparatus, and relationships between the shearing distance, rock type, and initial fracture geometry are being developed to provide guidance on understanding and modeling sheared fracture permeability changes in CO2 sequestration and other sub-surface activities.

  13. Experimental analysis of the structure-borne tyre/road noise due to road discontinuities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kindt, P.; Berckmans, D.; De Coninck, F.; Sas, P.; Desmet, W.

    2009-11-01

    Tyre/road noise has become the major source of traffic noise in urban regions. Although tyre/road noise has been studied for decades, little can be found in the literature about the noise resulting from crossing road discontinuities such as expansion joints, railway crossings, and potholes. Both vehicle interior and exterior noise can reach significant peak levels as a result of crossing such a pavement discontinuity. This paper presents an experimental analysis of the generating phenomena of structure borne tyre/road noise due to a road discontinuity. Both exterior and interior tyre/road noise are considered. The influence of driving speed, cleat dimension, inflation pressure, tyre temperature and preload onto the noise generating phenomena is investigated. A novel test setup was designed and built at the K.U. Leuven Noise and Vibration Engineering Laboratory in order to measure the structural and acoustic response of a tyre rolling over a cleat. The vehicle interior noise is analysed by means of a test circuit cleat test.

  14. Performance comparison of background-oriented schlieren and fringe deflection in temperature measurement, part 2: experimental evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Alan; Barrientos, Bernardino; Mares, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    In part 1 of the study, background-oriented schlieren (BOS) and fringe deflection (FD) were numerically compared when used for the measurement of temperature. The aim of this part is to experimentally corroborate the obtained numerical results. In this regard, we analyze an axisymmetric flame issued by a gas nozzle. Fringe deflection and BOS images are recorded at two different points in time and the corresponding displacement results are compared. Furthermore, we implement a variation of the techniques that allows us to carry out simultaneous displacement measurements by them. In this case, the signals of the techniques are encoded on the RGB channels of a color background image. The results confirm that FD slightly outperforms BOS, in particular for images that contain relatively high temperature gradients or regions with low contrast.

  15. Background considerations for the 2H(7Be,3H)6Be experimental data II: Three-body continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, K. Y.; Guimarães, V.

    2015-11-01

    The present article reports second background considerations for the experimentally obtained 2H(7Be,3H)6Be differential cross sections. The one-neutron transfer reaction was measured in inverse kinematics by using radioactive 7Be ( t 1/2 = 53.2 days) beams at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2004 in order to search for the resonances in the unbound 6Be nucleus. Resonances in this nucleus would affect the 3He(3He,2 p)4He reaction rate of the proton-proton chain occurring in stars such as our sun. The result shows, however, that the direct transfer to 6Be resonances is not particularly strong compared to other reaction channels that can produce tritons in the exit channels. The goals of the present work is to better understand the cross section data from transfer reaction measurements by adopting background considerations using the three-body continuum.

  16. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum - Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Van Fossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation on leading edge heat transfer is presented. Experimental and numerical results are given for a circular leading edge and for a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. It is demonstrated that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  17. Inhalation exposures due to radon and thoron ((222)Rn and (220)Rn): Do they differ in high and normal background radiation areas in India?

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rosaline; Sapra, B K; Prajith, R; Rout, R P; Jalaluddin, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-09-01

    In India, High Background Radiation Areas (HBRAs) due to enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides in soil (thorium and, to a lesser extent, uranium), are located along some parts of the coastal tracts viz. the coastal belt of Kerala, Tamilnadu and Odisha. It is conjectured that these deposits will result in higher emissions of radon isotopes ((222)Rn and (220)Rn) and their daughter products as compared to Normal Background Radiation Areas (NBRAs). While the annual external dose rates contributed by gamma radiations in these areas are about 5-10 times higher, the extent of increase in the inhalation dose rates attributable to (222)Rn and (220)Rn and their decay products is not well quantified. Towards this, systematic indoor surveys were conducted wherein simultaneous measurements of time integrated (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay product concentrations was carried out in around 800 houses in the HBRAs of Kerala and Odisha to estimate the inhalation doses. All gas measurements were carried out using pin-hole cup dosimeters while the progeny measurements were with samplers and systems based on the Direct radon/thoron Progeny sensors (DRPS/DTPS). To corroborate these passive measurements of decay products concentrations, active sampling was also carried out in a few houses. The results of the surveys provide a strong evidence to conclude that the inhalation doses due to (222)Rn and (220)Rn gas and their decay products in these HBRAs are in the same range as observed in the NBRAs in India. PMID:26065929

  18. Photoacoustic Experimental System to Confirm Infrared Absorption Due to Greenhouse Gases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Monjushiro, Hideaki; Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kasai, Toshio; Harris, Harold H.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental system for detecting infrared absorption using the photoacoustic (PA) effect is described. It is aimed for use at high-school level to illustrate the difference in infrared (IR) absorption among the gases contained in the atmosphere in connection with the greenhouse effect. The experimental system can be built with readily…

  19. Efficacy of garenoxacin in treatment of experimental endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus or viridans group streptococci.

    PubMed

    Entenza, José M; Vouillamoz, Jacques; Glauser, Michel P; Moreillon, Philippe

    2004-01-01

    The activity of garenoxacin was investigated in rats with experimental endocarditis due to staphylococci and viridans group streptococci (VGS). The staphylococci tested comprised one ciprofloxacin-susceptible and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) isolate (isolate 1112), one ciprofloxacin-susceptible but methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolate (isolate P8), and one ciprofloxacin-resistant mutant (grlA) of P8 (isolate P8-4). The VGS tested comprised one penicillin-susceptible isolate and one penicillin-resistant isolate (Streptococcus oralis 226 and Streptococcus mitis 531, respectively). To simulate the kinetics of drugs in humans, rats were infused intravenously with garenoxacin every 24 h (peak and trough levels in serum, 6.1 and 1.0 mg/liter, respectively; area under the concentration-time curve [AUC], 63.4 mg. h/liter) or levofloxacin every 12 h (peak and trough levels in serum, 7.3 and 1.5 mg/liter, respectively; AUC, 55.6 mg. h/liter) for 3 or 5 days. Flucloxacillin, vancomycin, and ceftriaxone were used as control drugs. Garenoxacin, levofloxacin, flucloxacillin, and vancomycin sterilized >/=70% of the vegetations infected with both ciprofloxacin-susceptible staphylococcal isolates (P < 0.05 versus the results for the controls). Garenoxacin and vancomycin also sterilized 70% of the vegetations infected with ciprofloxacin-resistant MRSA isolate P8-4, whereas treatment with levofloxacin failed against this organism (cure rate, 0%; P < 0.05 versus the results obtained with the comparator drugs). Garenoxacin did not select for resistant derivatives in vivo. In contrast, levofloxacin selected for resistant variants in four of six rats infected with MRSA isolate P8-4. Garenoxacin sterilized 90% of the vegetations infected with both penicillin-susceptible and penicillin-resistant isolates of VGS. Levofloxacin sterilized only 22 and 40% of the vegetations infected with penicillin-susceptible S. oralis 226 and penicillin-resistant S. mitis

  20. Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT) as a preventive method for space motion sickness: Background and experimental design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.

    1993-01-01

    Finding an effective treatment for the motion sickness-like symptoms that occur in space has become a high priority for NASA. The background research is reviewed and the experimental design of a formal life sciences shuttle flight experiment designed to prevent space motion sickness in shuttle crew members is presented. This experiment utilizes a behavioral medicine approach to solving this problem. This method, Autogenic-Feedback Training (AFT), involves training subjects to voluntarily control several of their own physiological responses to environmental stressors. AFT has been used reliably to increase tolerance to motion sickness during ground-based tests in over 200 men and women under a variety of conditions that induce motion sickness, and preliminary evidence from space suggests that AFT may be an effective treatment for space motion sickness as well. Proposed changes to this experiment for future manifests are included.

  1. Experimental study of flow due to an isolated suction hole and a partially plugged suction slot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, G. L.; Wilkinson, S. P.

    1980-01-01

    Details for construction of a model of a partially plugged, laminar flow control, suction slot and an isolated hole are presented. The experimental wind tunnel facility and instrumentation is described. Preliminary boundary layer velocity profiles (without suction model) are presented and shown to be in good agreement with the Blasius laminar profile. Recommendations for the completion of the study are made. An experimental program for study of transition on a rotating disk is described along with preliminary disturbance amplification rate data.

  2. Virulence Differences among Melissococcus plutonius Strains with Different Genetic Backgrounds in Apis mellifera Larvae under an Improved Experimental Condition.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keiko; Yamazaki, Yuko; Shiraishi, Akiyo; Kobayashi, Sota; Harada, Mariko; Yoshiyama, Mikio; Osaki, Makoto; Okura, Masatoshi; Takamatsu, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    European foulbrood (EFB) caused by Melissococcus plutonius is an important bacterial disease of honeybee larvae. M. plutonius strains can be grouped into three genetically distinct groups (CC3, CC12 and CC13). Because EFB could not be reproduced in artificially reared honeybee larvae by fastidious strains of CC3 and CC13 previously, we investigated a method to improve experimental conditions using a CC3 strain and found that infection with a potassium-rich diet enhanced proliferation of the fastidious strain in larvae at the early stage of infection, leading to the appearance of clear clinical symptoms. Further comparison of M. plutonius virulence under the conditions revealed that the representative strain of CC12 was extremely virulent and killed all tested bees before pupation, whereas the CC3 strain was less virulent than the CC12 strain, and a part of the infected larvae pupated. In contrast, the tested CC13 strain was avirulent, and as with the non-infected control group, most of the infected brood became adult bees, suggesting differences in the insect-level virulence among M. plutonius strains with different genetic backgrounds. These strains and the improved experimental infection method to evaluate their virulence will be useful tools for further elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of EFB. PMID:27625313

  3. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change

    PubMed Central

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  4. Live Fast, Die Young: Experimental Evidence of Population Extinction Risk due to Climate Change.

    PubMed

    Bestion, Elvire; Teyssier, Aimeric; Richard, Murielle; Clobert, Jean; Cote, Julien

    2015-10-01

    Evidence has accumulated in recent decades on the drastic impact of climate change on biodiversity. Warming temperatures have induced changes in species physiology, phenology, and have decreased body size. Such modifications can impact population dynamics and could lead to changes in life cycle and demography. More specifically, conceptual frameworks predict that global warming will severely threaten tropical ectotherms while temperate ectotherms should resist or even benefit from higher temperatures. However, experimental studies measuring the impacts of future warming trends on temperate ectotherms' life cycle and population persistence are lacking. Here we investigate the impacts of future climates on a model vertebrate ectotherm species using a large-scale warming experiment. We manipulated climatic conditions in 18 seminatural populations over two years to obtain a present climate treatment and a warm climate treatment matching IPCC predictions for future climate. Warmer temperatures caused a faster body growth, an earlier reproductive onset, and an increased voltinism, leading to a highly accelerated life cycle but also to a decrease in adult survival. A matrix population model predicts that warm climate populations in our experiment should go extinct in around 20 y. Comparing our experimental climatic conditions to conditions encountered by populations across Europe, we suggest that warming climates should threaten a significant number of populations at the southern range of the distribution. Our findings stress the importance of experimental approaches on the entire life cycle to more accurately predict population and species persistence in future climates. PMID:26501958

  5. Reorganised anticipatory postural adjustments due to experimental lower extremity muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Shiozawa, Shinichiro; Hirata, Rogerio Pessoto; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Automated movements adjusting postural control may be hampered during musculoskeletal pain leaving a risk of incomplete control of balance. This study investigated the effect of experimental muscle pain on anticipatory postural adjustments by reaction task movements. While standing, nine healthy males performed two reaction time tasks (shoulder flexion of dominant side and bilateral heel lift) before, during and after experimental muscle pain. On two different days experimental pain was induced in the m. vastus medialis (VM) or the m. tibialis anterior (TA) of the dominant side by injections of hypertonic saline (1ml, 5.8%). Isotonic saline (1ml, 0.9%) was used as control injection. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded from 13 muscles. EMG onset, EMG amplitude, and kinematic parameters (shoulder and ankle joint) were extracted. During shoulder flexion and VM pain the onset of the ipsilateral biceps femoris was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions. During heels lift in the VM and TA pain conditions the onset of the contralateral TA was significantly faster than baseline and post injection sessions in bilateral side. VM pain significantly reduced m. quadriceps femoris activity and TA pain significantly reduced ipsilateral VM activity and TA activity during bilateral heel lift. The EMG reaction time was delayed in bilateral soleus muscles during heels lift with VM and TA pain. The faster onset of postural muscle activity during anticipatory postural adjustments may suggest a compensatory function to maintain postural control whereas the reduced postural muscle activity during APAs may indicate a pain adaptation strategy to avoid secondary damage. PMID:24071550

  6. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  7. [Zinc homeostasis and indicators of muscle activity in experimental graduated exercise on the background of zinc asparaginate].

    PubMed

    Skalny, A A; Tinkov, A A; Medvedeva, Yu S; Alchinova, I B; Bonitenko, E Yu; Karganov, M Yu; Nikonorov, A A

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a regular (for 7 and 14 days) 10-minute dosed exercise in isolation and on the background of intragastric administration of 5 and 15 mg/kg of zinc (II) asparaginate on the distribution of this metal in the organs and tissues of experimental animals and the indicators of muscle activity such as the level of lactate, creatinine and creatine kinase (EC 2.7.3.2.) serum were studied. It has been shown that exercise stress for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in homeostasis Zn, compared with 7 day, it is reflected in increased levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. It has been shown that graduated exercise for 14 days causes a more pronounced change in Zn homeostasis, compared with 7 day that expressed in increased its levels in the kidney, serum, liver, skeletal muscle and fur animals. Introduction zinc (II) asparaginate accompanied by an increase of its content in the liver, kidneys, hair and serum, but not skeletal and cardiac muscle. The combination of physical activity and the introduction of zinc positive effect on homeostasis of Zn, and the terms of muscle activity. The protective effect of zinc asparaginate with graduated exercise in the experiment was concluded. PMID:27116879

  8. Experimental Studies of Dynamic Fault Weakening Due to Thermal Pore-Fluid Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsby, D. L.; Tullis, T. E.; Okazaka, K.; Platt, J. D.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    Thermal pressurization is a co-seismic weakening mechanism driven by the thermal expansion of native pore fluids, which leads to elevated pore pressures and significant co-seismic weakening. While thermal pressurization has been studied theoretically for many decades, and has been invoked in recent earthquake simulations, its activation in laboratory experiments has remained elusive. Several high-speed friction experiments yield indirect evidence for thermal pressurization, yet none have directly linked with existing theoretical models or the relevant physical parameters -- such as permeability, slip, and slip rate - that control the weakening rate. We are conducting thermal pressurization experiments on fluid-saturated, low-permeability rocks (primarily Fredrick diabase; also SAFOD gouge) at slip rates up to ~5 mm/s, with constant confining pressures in the range 21-149 MPa and initial pore pressures in the range 10-25 MPa. The impractically low permeability of the diabase, ~10-23 m2, is increased prior to the friction test by thermally cracking the samples, yielding measured permeabilities in the range 1.3*10-18 to 6.1*10-19 m2. These permeabilites are high enough to allow sample saturation over one to several days, but also low enough to confine pore pressure rises during rapid sliding and allow thermal pressurization to occur. In recent experiments we also embed a thermocouple ~1-2 mm from the sliding surface, and use the resulting data to calibrate a finite element model that calculates the sliding surface temperature. One experiment revealed a rapid decay of shear stress by ~25% following a step-change in velocity from 10 μm/s to 4.8 mm/s. For the first 28 mm of slip the experimentally measured shear stress agrees closely with the theoretical solution for slip on a plane (Rice [2006]) with an inferred slip weakening distance of ~500 mm, which is in the range predicted by inserting laboratory determined rock and fluid properties into the formula for L* from

  9. New experimental method of visualizing the electric field due to surface charges on circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Rebecca; de Salazar, Alex; Nassar, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Although static surface charges on circuit elements are of enormous interest, recent papers and textbooks have only discussed the problem theoretically using analytical or numerical approaches. The only well-known experimental method to visualize the structure of electric fields around circuit elements was reported by Jefimenko almost half a century ago. In our paper, we report on a simple method to visualize the electric field produced by static surface charges on current-carrying circuit elements. Our method uses a mixture of PTFE (Teflon) sealant and mineral oil, a copper wire placed in the mixture's container, and two 6 kV power supplies. We believe that our new method can be used directly in the classroom.

  10. Experimental and analytical comparison of constraint effects due to biaxial loading and shallow-flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Theiss, T.J.; Bass, B.R.; Bryson, J.W.

    1993-12-31

    A program to develop and evaluate fracture methodologies for the assessment of crack-tip constraint effects on fracture toughness of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels has been initiated in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program. The focus of studies described herein is on the evaluation of a micromechanical scaling model based on critical stressed volumes for quantifying crack-tip constraint through applications to experimental data. Data were utilized from single-edge notch bend (SENB) specimens and HSST-developed cruciform beam specimens that were tested in HSST shallow-crack and biaxial testing programs. Shallow-crack effects and far-field tensile out-of-plane biaxial loading have been identified as constraint issues that influence both fracture toughness and the extent of the toughness scatter band. Results from applications indicate that the micromechanical scaling model can be used successfully to interpret experimental data from the shallow- and deep-crack SENB specimen tests. When applied to the uniaxially and biaxially loaded cruciform specimens, the two methodologies showed some promising features, but also raised several questions concerning the interpretation of constraint conditions in the specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Crack-tip constraint analyses of the shallow-crack cruciform specimen based on near-tip stress fields. Crack-tip constraint analyses of the shallow-crack cruciform specimen subjected to uniaxial or biaxial loading conditions are shown to represent a significant challenge for these methodologies. Unresolved issued identified from these analyses require resolution as part of a validation process for biaxial loading applications.

  11. An experimental investigation of the changes of VLBI time delays due to antenna structural deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoshi, T. Y.; Young, L. E.

    1982-01-01

    Structural deformations primarily occur as functions of antenna elevation angle due to gravity loading. For a Cassegrain antenna, one of the major effects of structural deformation on measured VLBI time delays are those delay changes associated with axial subreflector displacement from its nominal position. Two types of time delay changes that occur when the subreflector is axially defocused are: a change which is a linear function of subreflector defocus position; and a cyclical change caused by multipath. Test results show that for the 64-m DSN antenna, the linear change is 1.8 times the subreflector defocus position, while the peak-to-peak change in cyclical variation is about + or - 3 cm when a spanned bandwidth of 38 MHz at 2290 MHz is used.

  12. A case of severe anal injury in an adolescent male due to bestial sexual experimentation.

    PubMed

    Blevins, Roger O

    2009-10-01

    This report delineates a case of anal injury in a 12-year-old boy who gave a detailed history of bestial behavior with a male bulldog. The child described how he had seen this behavior modeled on the internet and subsequently initiated contact with his own dog, causing the dog to penetrate him anally. This type of juvenile bestial behavior with injury has only been reported once previously in the medical literature. Zoophilia, along with a number of other paraphilias, frequently has its onset in the adolescent age group. Adolescents evidencing paraphilic behaviors require thorough psychological evaluation. Spontaneous sexual assault of a human by a canine has never been described in the human or veterinary medical literature, nor is such a thing likely. A clinician involved in evaluating serious ano-genital injury in a child reportedly due to spontaneous canine sexual assault must consider other possible traumatic etiologies including sexual abuse. Investigation in any such case is essential. PMID:19733331

  13. Changes in quartz solubility and porosity due to effective stress: An experimental investigation of pressure solution

    SciTech Connect

    Elias, B.P.; Hajash, A. Jr. )

    1992-05-01

    Experimental compaction of quartz sand was conducted in semistatic flow-through systems at 150C to examine the chemical and physical processes associated with pressure solution. Pore-fluid chemistry and porosity were monitored through time to investigate the role of effective stress on silica solubility and compaction rate. The concentration of silica in the pore fluid varied directly with effective stress at constant pore-fluid pressure, but not in a linear fashion. Increases in silica were not transient and could be partially reversed by removal of the effective stress. Porosity decreased steadily under constant nonzero effective stress at 150C, but remained essentially constant under identical loading conditions at room temperature. Initial compaction rates increased linearly with effective stress. Deformed samples show indented contacts with fractures and dissolution features, healed microfractures, and a decrease in average grain size. Multiple mechanisms (pressure solution, subcritical crack growth, crack healing) appear to operate at grain contacts during compaction. The authors interpret long-term, time-dependent compaction accompanied by stress-induced changes in fluid chemistry as evidence for pressure solution.

  14. Experimental measurements of frequency transfer function due to smoothing by spectral dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, Jacques; Penninckx, Denis

    2013-02-01

    In order to avoid propagation nonlinearities (Kerr effect, Raman and Brillouin scattering) and optical damage, nanosecond high power lasers such as the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ) amplify quasi-monochromatic pulses. But they generate a static speckle pattern in the focal spot. This speckle pattern needs to be smoothed in order to lower high intensity peaks which are detrimental during the propagation and the interaction with the plasma in the target. Different techniques are implemented to smooth the intensity nevertheless all high power lasers carry at least smoothing by spectral dispersion. It consists in broadening the spectrum through a phase modulator and focusing the different wavelengths at slightly different positions using a diffractive element such as a grating. In the temporal domain, it has been theoretically shown that the pulse power is thus filtered between near field and far field [1, 2]. The filtering allows techniques such as "picket fence" to increase conversion efficiency [1] and reduces detrimental effects of unwanted intensity distortions called FM-AM conversion [2, 3]. Here, to the best of our knowledge we show the first experimental measurement of the frequency transfer function of this filtering. Measurements are in perfect agreement with the numerical calculations.

  15. An experimental investigation of the sources of propeller noise due to turbulence ingestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharpf, Daniel Francis

    Experimental measurements were performed on a four-bladed, 10-inch diameter marine propeller operating in a new open-jet, anechoic wind tunnel. A significant portion of the work consisted of the design, construction, and calibration of the wind tunnel facility. The wind tunnel could be operated from 5-100 ft/s with open-jet lengths from 2-7 feet. When the wind tunnel was installed the majority of the chamber had a low-frequency cut-off of 150 Hz. The freestream velocity and propeller rotational speed were 33 ft/s and 3000 RPM, respectively. Turbulence was generated at the exit plane of the wind tunnel inlet by square-mesh grids composed of cylindrical rods which resulted in turbulence levels at the propeller location from 0.2-5.5 percent. Measurements included steady thrust and torque, detailed hot wire surveys of the incoming flow and propeller wake, and sound pressure levels detailing the acoustic spectra and directivity. Bicoherence measurements in the propeller wake showed high coherence between the blade passage harmonics and the broadband frequencies near the hub and tip regions of the blades which indicated that the wake interactions were primarily non-linear. Inflow turbulence reduced this coherence. The integrated broad-band sound pressure level increased by approximately 2 dB for every 1 percent increase in the turbulence. These increases were decomposed into smaller frequency bandwidths and related to the inflow turbulence spectrum.

  16. Experimental Studies of Dynamic Fault Weakening Due to Thermal Pressurization of Pore Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsby, David; Tullis, Terry; Platt, John; Okazaki, Keishi

    2016-04-01

    mm, which is in the range predicted by inserting laboratory-determined rock and fluid properties into the formula for L* from Rice [2006]. In another test, steps from 10 μm/s to three different velocities (1.2 mm/s, 2.4 mm/s, and 4.8 mm/s) all fit the Rice solution with values of L* that varied systematically with velocity as predicted by the theory. Deviations from the theoretical prediction occur at displacements larger than 28 mm, since the experimental sample is not a semi-infinite half space, as assumed in the models, and heat is lost to the high-conductivity steel of the sample assembly. To our knowledge, this is the best experimental validation of thermal pressurization to date.

  17. An Experimental Study of the Noise Due to Traffic in a Congested Urban Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangeetha, M.; Sankar, P.

    2016-03-01

    Noise pollution in an urban environment is an issue of serious concern in the major cities of India. There are various factors that contribute to the increase of noise levels in urban areas. The intensity of traffic is one of the factors which contributes to a drastic increase in environmental noise. The management of noise pollution has to be considered in the decision making process. In this paper, an attempt is made to study the existing noise level due to the traffic in Velachery which is declared as a sensitive area by the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (MoEF). The noise level data is collected using the MS6710 digital sound meter. The Custic simulation software version 3.2 is used for finding the propagation of noise. The spatial patterns of measurement were also calculated, in the sub-urban area of Velachery, Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. A means of transmitting this data to vehicles moving in the area, through a wireless medium is simulated using NCTUns 6.0 (network simulator), to enable drivers to understand the environmental conditions. A hardware was also designed which can be used to transmit and receive the noise data using the Zigbee module. A noise transmitting station is placed at a junction, so that it can transmit this noise data to the receivers which are fitted inside the vehicles.

  18. Experimental observations of turbulent mixing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the OMEGA Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Schilling, O.; Wallace, R.; Elbaz, Y.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-09-01

    Shear-flow, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) turbulent mixing experiments were performed on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in which laser-driven shock waves propagated through a low-density plastic foam placed on top of a higher-density plastic foil. The plastic foil was comprised a thin iodine-doped plastic tracer layer bonded on each side to an undoped density-matched polyamide-imide plastic. Behind the shock front, lower-density foam plasma flowed over the higher-density plastic plasma, such that the interface between the foam and plastic was KH unstable. The initial perturbations consisted of pre-imposed, sinusoidal 2D perturbations, and broadband 3D perturbations due to surface roughness at the interface between the plastic and foam. KH instability growth was measured using side-on radiography with a point-projection 5-keV vanadium backlighter. Time-integrated images were captured on D-8 x-ray film. Spatial density profiles of iodine-doped plastic mixed with foam were inferred using x-ray radiographs. The mixing layer ensuing from the KH instability with layer width up to ˜100 μm was observed at a location ˜1 mm behind the shock front. The measured mixing layer width was in good agreement with predictions based on a simple self-similar model of KH instability growth using an estimate of the shear velocity obtained from numerical simulations of the experiments.

  19. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic analysis on a business jet with a wing glove attached to one wing is presented and discussed. If a wing glove is placed over a portion of one wing, there will be asymmetries in the aircraft as well as overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to make sure the wing glove does not have a drastic effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR, a non-linear full potential solver was used to analyze a full aircraft, with and without a glove, at a variety of flight conditions and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag and side force, along with roll, pitch and yawing moment are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove and its fairing are discussed. Results show that the glove used here does not present a drastic change in forces and moments on the aircraft, but an added torsional moment around the quarter-chord of the wing may be a cause for some structural concerns.

  20. Analysis of Asymmetric Aircraft Aerodynamics Due to an Experimental Wing Glove

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartshorn, Fletcher

    2011-01-01

    Aerodynamic computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wing glove attached to one wing of a business jet is presented and discussed. A wing glove placed on only one wing will produce asymmetric aerodynamic effects that will result in overall changes in the forces and moments acting on the aircraft. These changes, referred to as deltas, need to be determined and quantified to ensure that the wing glove does not have a significant effect on the aircraft flight characteristics. TRANAIR (Calmar Research Corporation, Cato, New York), a nonlinear full potential solver, and Star-CCM+ (CD-adapco, Melville, New York), a finite volume full Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes computational fluid dynamics solver, are used to analyze a full aircraft with and without the glove at a variety of flight conditions, aircraft configurations, and angles of attack and sideslip. Changes in the aircraft lift, drag, and side force along with roll, pitch, and yaw are presented. Span lift and moment distributions are also presented for a more detailed look at the effects of the glove on the aircraft. Aerodynamic flow phenomena due to the addition of the glove are discussed. Results show that the glove produces only small changes in the aerodynamic forces and moments acting on the aircraft, most of which are insignificant.

  1. Experimental observations of turbulent mixing due to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability on the OMEGA Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Smalyuk, V. A.; Hansen, J. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Langstaff, G.; Martinez, D.; Park, H.-S.; Raman, K.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Schilling, O.; Wallace, R.; Elbaz, Y.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Di Stefano, C.; Drake, R. P.; Marion, D.; Krauland, C. M.; Kuranz, C. C.

    2012-09-15

    Shear-flow, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) turbulent mixing experiments were performed on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] in which laser-driven shock waves propagated through a low-density plastic foam placed on top of a higher-density plastic foil. The plastic foil was comprised a thin iodine-doped plastic tracer layer bonded on each side to an undoped density-matched polyamide-imide plastic. Behind the shock front, lower-density foam plasma flowed over the higher-density plastic plasma, such that the interface between the foam and plastic was KH unstable. The initial perturbations consisted of pre-imposed, sinusoidal 2D perturbations, and broadband 3D perturbations due to surface roughness at the interface between the plastic and foam. KH instability growth was measured using side-on radiography with a point-projection 5-keV vanadium backlighter. Time-integrated images were captured on D-8 x-ray film. Spatial density profiles of iodine-doped plastic mixed with foam were inferred using x-ray radiographs. The mixing layer ensuing from the KH instability with layer width up to {approx}100 {mu}m was observed at a location {approx}1 mm behind the shock front. The measured mixing layer width was in good agreement with predictions based on a simple self-similar model of KH instability growth using an estimate of the shear velocity obtained from numerical simulations of the experiments.

  2. Electron Beam Distruption due to Ion Release from Targets - Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermare, Christophe; Davis, Harold A.; Hughes, Thomas P.; Moir, David C.; Olson, Russell; Wood, W. Monty

    2001-10-01

    A major concern for the new generation radiography facilities like DARHT and AIRIX is that ions or ionized neutrals released from solid surfaces by beam impact can be accelerated and trapped by the beam potential. This time-dependent positive-charge distribution, inside the beam channel, can disrupt the beam. Possible release mechanisms include electron induced desorption of neutrals or ions, thermal desorption due to beam-target heating, and melting or vaporization of the solid target. To study this, we have performed experiments on the DARHT first axis (1.7 kA, 20. MeV, 60 ns). Here, the beam, focused to a range of diameters, is transmitted through a thin target made of various materials. The time evolution of the beam radial profile is measured downstream of the target. For low current density, the downstream-beam radial profile is time invariant as expected. At higher current density, the downstream beam radial profile is clearly disrupted during the pulse including a large transverse instability.

  3. Colon Necrosis Due to Sodium Polystyrene Sulfonate with and without Sorbitol: An Experimental Study in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ayoub, Isabelle; Oh, Man S.; Gupta, Raavi; McFarlane, Michael; Babinska, Anna; Salifu, Moro O.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Based on a single rat study by Lillemoe et al, the consensus has been formed to implicate sorbitol rather than sodium polystyrene sulfonate (SPS) as the culprit for colon necrosis in humans treated with SPS and sorbitol. We tested the hypothesis that colon necrosis by sorbitol in the experiment was due to the high osmolality and volume of sorbitol rather than its chemical nature. Methods 26 rats underwent 5/6 nephrectomy. They were divided into 6 groups and given enema solutions under anesthesia (normal saline, 33% sorbitol, 33% mannitol, SPS in 33% sorbitol, SPS in normal saline, and SPS in distilled water). They were sacrificed after 48 hours of enema administration or earlier if they were very sick. The gross appearance of the colon was visually inspected, and then sliced colon tissues were examined under light microscopy. Results 1 rat from the sorbitol and 1 from the mannitol group had foci of ischemic colonic changes. The rats receiving SPS enema, in sorbitol, normal saline, distilled water, had crystal deposition with colonic necrosis and mucosal erosion. All the rats not given SPS survived until sacrificed at 48 h whereas 11 of 13 rats that received SPS in sorbitol, normal saline or distilled water died or were clearly dying and sacrificed sooner. There was no difference between sorbitol and mannitol when given without SPS. Conclusions In a surgical uremic rat model, SPS enema given alone or with sorbitol or mannitol seemed to cause colon necrosis and high mortality rate, whereas 33% sorbitol without SPS did not. PMID:26413782

  4. Therapy of visceral leishmaniasis due to Leishmania infantum: experimental assessment of efficacy of AmBisome.

    PubMed Central

    Gangneux, J P; Sulahian, A; Garin, Y J; Farinotti, R; Derouin, F

    1996-01-01

    The tolerance and efficacy of amphotericin B (AmB) deoxycholate (Fungizone) were compared with those of liposomal AmB (AmBisome) in a murine model of visceral leishmaniasis induced by Leishmania infantum. Control groups consisted of untreated mice and mice treated with a pentavalent antimonial (Glucantime). BALB/c mice were infected intravenously on day 0 with 10(7) promastigotes of L. infantum and then treated from day 7 to 17 (early treatment group) or from day 60 to 70 (delayed treatment group). The pentavalent antimonial was administered daily by intraperitoneal injection, whereas AmB formulations were administered intravenously on alternate days. On days 20, 60, and 120 (early treatment group) and on days 72 and 125 (delayed treatment group), parasite burdens in the liver, spleen, and lungs were determined by subculturings using a microtitration method. A dose range study showed that administration of AmBisome at the well-tolerated doses of 5 or 50 mg/kg of body weight completely eradicated the parasites from the tissues. At 0.8 mg/kg, AmBisome proved more efficacious than AmB deoxycholate administered at the same dose. We also compared the levels of AmB deoxycholate and AmBisome in plasma and tissue. Mice treated with AmBisome had levels of AmB in tissue much higher than did AmB deoxycholate-treated mice with persistent detectable levels 14 weeks after treatment. These results seem to account for the remarkable efficacy of the liposomal formulation of AmB in the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis due to L. infantum. PMID:8723469

  5. Experimental response of Salix cuttings to different flow regimes due to human activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorla, Lorenzo; Signarbieux, Constant; Turberg, Pascal; Buttler, Alexandre; Perona, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    Hydropower production and other human activities change the natural flow regime of rivers, in turn impacting the riparian environment. The main challenge in order to define eco-sustainable flows is to quantify the effects in terms of geomorphology and ecosystem adaptation. We present 2-years controlled experiments to investigate riparian vegetation (Salix Viminalis) response to forced water table changing dynamics, from one water regime to another, in a temperate region (Switzerland). Three synthetic flow regimes have been simulated and applied to three batteries of Salix cuttings growing outdoor within plastic pots, each about 1 meter tall. In 2012 one treatment simulated a minimal flow policy for small run-of-river hydropower plants, which drastically impacts the low and the medium-low components of the hydrograph, but not the extremes. In 2013 we confirmed and completed some of 2012 results, by reproducing typical hydropeaking effects due to dam management and focusing on daily water table variations and offsets. For both the seasons, after an initial period where all pots undergone the same oscillations in order to uniform the plants initial conditions, the experiment started, and the water dynamic was changed. Cuttings transitory response dynamics has been quantified by continuous sap flow and water potential measurements, and by regularly collecting growth parameters, as well as leaves photosynthesis, fluorescence, and pictures of each plant. At the end of the experiment, all cuttings were carefully removed and the both above and below ground biomass analyzed in detail. Particularly, the 3D root structure was obtained by High Resolution Computer Tomography. Our analyses revealed a clear dependence between roots distribution and water regime reflecting the need for adaptation, in agreement with field observations of Pasquale et al. (2012). In particular, an initial strong difference in terms of stress and growth performances was then followed by a later

  6. Experimental observation of increased threshold electric field for runaway generation due to synchrotron radiation losses in the FTU tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Solis, Jose Ramon; Sanchez, Raul; Esposito, Basilio

    2010-01-01

    The threshold electric field for runaway generation has been investigated during runaway suppression experiments by means of electron-cyclotron-resonance heating in the flattop phase of FTU discharges. Runaway suppression has been experimentally found to occur at electric fields substantially larger than those predicted by the relativistic collisional theory of runaway generation, E{sub R} = n{sub e}e{sup 3}ln{Lambda}/4{pi}{var_epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}c{sup 2}. These experimental results are consistent with an increase of the critical electric field due to the electron synchrotron radiation losses. No runaway electrons are found in FTU experiments below the radiation threshold. These results support evidence for a new threshold electric field for runaway generation that accounts for the effect of the synchrotron losses, and which should be considered when making predictions on runaway generation and mitigation in devices such as ITER.

  7. Experimental evidence of the increased transport due to the wall bounded magnetic drift in low temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gaboriau, F. Baude, R.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.

    2014-05-26

    This paper presents experimental results on plasma transport across the magnetic field (B) in magnetized low-temperature plasma sources. Due to the presence of chamber walls, this transport can be complex even in a non-turbulent regime. In particular, in configurations without cylindrical symmetry, the magnetic drifts tend to be bounded by the chamber walls, thereby inducing plasma asymmetry and reducing magnetic confinement. In this work, we measure electron and ion current densities at metal chamber walls bounding a rectangular magnetic filter and demonstrate that these current densities are asymmetrically nonuniform. We also provide an experimental confirmation of model predictions of increased cross-field electron transport in such filter configuration, scaling as 1/B rather than the classical 1/B{sup 2} scaling.

  8. Reverse and pseudo redistribution of thallium-201 in healed myocardial infarction and normal and negative thallium-201 washout in ischemia due to background oversubtraction

    SciTech Connect

    Lear, J.L.; Raff, U.; Jain, R.

    1988-09-15

    While the interpolative background subtraction used in quantitative planar thallium scanning can significantly overestimate the background overlying the heart, the effects of background oversubtraction on quantitative analysis have not been well defined. A mathematical model that relates myocardial washout determined using interpolative background subtraction to true myocardial washout is presented. The model was validated using phantoms and applied to myocardial and pulmonary thallium kinetic data in 100 patients, 85 with and 15 without coronary artery disease. The model showed that when using interpolative background subtraction, measured washout equals true washout in normally perfused myocardium; however, depending on the relation between myocardial and pulmonary thallium clearance, myocardial washout in ischemic regions and areas of infarction can be substantially over- or underestimated. Based on generally accepted quantitative criteria, this incorrect washout determination can at times lead to misdiagnosis of infarction as ischemia and ischemia as normally perfused tissue. It can also cause both ''reverse redistribution'' and ''pseudo redistribution'' of thallium in myocardial infarction in the absence of a physiologic basis.

  9. Comparative Evaluation of Enalapril and Losartan in Pharmacological Correction of Experimental Osteoporosis and Fractures of Its Background

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, D. S. R.; Faitelson, A. V.; Gudyrev, O. S.; Dubrovin, G. M.; Pokrovski, M. V.; Ivanov, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    In the experiment on the white Wistar female rats (222 animals), the osteoprotective effect of enalapril and losartan was studied on experimental models of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. It was revealed that in rats after ovariectomy, the endothelial dysfunction of microcirculation vessels of osteal tissue develops, resulting in occurrence of osteoporosis and delay of consolidation of experimental fractures. Enalapril and losartan prevented the reduction of microcirculation in bone, which was reflected in slowing the thinning of bone trabeculae and in preventing the occurrence of these microfractures, as well as increasing quality of experimental fractures healing. PMID:23401845

  10. Comparative evaluation of enalapril and losartan in pharmacological correction of experimental osteoporosis and fractures of its background.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, D S R; Faitelson, A V; Gudyrev, O S; Dubrovin, G M; Pokrovski, M V; Ivanov, A V

    2013-01-01

    In the experiment on the white Wistar female rats (222 animals), the osteoprotective effect of enalapril and losartan was studied on experimental models of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures. It was revealed that in rats after ovariectomy, the endothelial dysfunction of microcirculation vessels of osteal tissue develops, resulting in occurrence of osteoporosis and delay of consolidation of experimental fractures. Enalapril and losartan prevented the reduction of microcirculation in bone, which was reflected in slowing the thinning of bone trabeculae and in preventing the occurrence of these microfractures, as well as increasing quality of experimental fractures healing. PMID:23401845

  11. A brief background on the U.S. Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed 1857

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Watershed research is critical for quantifying the unique characteristics of hydrologic processes worldwide and especially in semiarid regions. In 1953, the United States Department of Agriculture established the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW) near Tombstone, Arizona, to conduct hydrolog...

  12. EVIDENCE OF FEED CONTAMINATION DUE TO SAMPLE HANDLING AND PREPARATION DURING A MASS BALANCE STUDY OF DIOXINS IN LACTATING COWS IN BACKGROUND CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a mass balance study of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and dibenzofurans (CDFs) in lactating cows in background conditions. The field portion of the study occurred at the US Department of A...

  13. Volume Changes of Experimental Carotid Sidewall Aneurysms Due to Embolization with Liquid Embolic Agents: A Multidetector CT Angiography Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dudeck, O. Okuducu, A. F.; Jordan, O.; Tesmer, K.; Pech, M.; Weigang, E.; Ruefenacht, D. A.; Doelker, E.; Felix, R.

    2006-12-15

    Iodine-containing polyvinyl alcohol polymer (I-PVAL) is a novel precipitating liquid embolic that allows for artifact-free evaluation of CT angiography (CTA). As accurate aneurysm volumetry can be performed with multidetector CTA, we determined volumes of experimental aneurysms before, immediately after, and 4 weeks after embolization of 14 porcine experimental carotid sidewall aneurysms with this liquid embolic. An automated three-dimensional software measurement tool was used for volumetric analysis of volume-rendering CTA data. Furthermore, intra-aneurysmal pressure changes during liquid embolization were measured in four silicone aneurysms and potential polymer volume changes within 4 weeks were assessed in vitro. Liquid embolic injection was performed during temporary balloon occlusion of the aneurysm neck, resulting in a mean occlusion rate of 98.3%. Aneurysms enlarged significantly during embolization by 61.1 {+-} 28.9%, whereas a significant shrinkage of 5.6 {+-} 2.7% was observed within the follow-up period. Histologic analysis revealed an inflammatory foreign body reaction with partial polymer degradation. In silicone aneurysm models, intra-aneurysmal pressure remained unchanged during liquid embolic injection, whereas balloon inflation resulted in a mean pressure increase of 31.2 {+-} 0.7%. No polymer shrinkage was observed in vitro. The aneurysm enlargement noted was presumably due to pressure elevation after balloon inflation, which resulted in dilatation of the weak venous wall of the newly constructed aneurysm-another shortcoming of this experimental aneurysm model. The volume decrease after 4 weeks expressed partial polymer degradation.

  14. Increased heat transfer to elliptical leading edges due to spanwise variations in the freestream momentum: Numerical and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rigby, D. L.; Vanfossen, G. J.

    1992-01-01

    A study of the effect of spanwise variation in momentum on leading edge heat transfer is discussed. Numerical and experimental results are presented for both a circular leading edge and a 3:1 elliptical leading edge. Reynolds numbers in the range of 10,000 to 240,000 based on leading edge diameter are investigated. The surface of the body is held at a constant uniform temperature. Numerical and experimental results with and without spanwise variations are presented. Direct comparison of the two-dimensional results, that is, with no spanwise variations, to the analytical results of Frossling is very good. The numerical calculation, which uses the PARC3D code, solves the three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, assuming steady laminar flow on the leading edge region. Experimentally, increases in the spanwise-averaged heat transfer coefficient as high as 50 percent above the two-dimensional value were observed. Numerically, the heat transfer coefficient was seen to increase by as much as 25 percent. In general, under the same flow conditions, the circular leading edge produced a higher heat transfer rate than the elliptical leading edge. As a percentage of the respective two-dimensional values, the circular and elliptical leading edges showed similar sensitivity to span wise variations in momentum. By equating the root mean square of the amplitude of the spanwise variation in momentum to the turbulence intensity, a qualitative comparison between the present work and turbulent results was possible. It is shown that increases in leading edge heat transfer due to spanwise variations in freestream momentum are comparable to those due to freestream turbulence.

  15. Long-length, long-lived flow-shear stabilized Z-pinches: Background and Experimental plans for scaling studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, B. A.; Shumlak, U.; Golingo, R. P.; Claveau, E. L.; McLean, H. S.; Schmidt, A. E.

    2015-11-01

    The ZaP experiment produces long-lived sheared-flow-stabilized Z-pinch plasmas up to 126 cm in length for several flow-through times, and up to thousands of Alfvén times. Experimental measurements of the magnetic structure along the full length of the plasma column show an axially uniform Z-pinch plasma during the observed quiescent period. Interferometry, fast-framing images, and Rogowskii coils corroborate the existence of a pinched plasma during this quiescent period of time. Detailed two-dimensional non-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) calculations have been performed showing the formation and assembly of long-length, long-lived Z-pinches. Experimentally-observed plasma lifetimes and velocity-shear profiles are shown to be consistent with calculations of viscous-damping timescales based on the measured plasma parameters. A newly-funded ARPA-E ALPHA project, the Fusion Z-pinch Experiment ``FuZE'' is being constructed at the University of Washington, in collaboration with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. FuZE will study scaling and stability of the successful ZaP experiment to higher pinch currents. The FuZE experimental design, goals, and plans, based on ZaP experimental results, will be presented.

  16. The field-dependent shock profiles of a magnetorhelogical damper due to high impact: an experimental investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hwan-Choong; Oh, Jong-Seok; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2015-02-01

    This work proposes a new damper featuring magnetorheological fluid (MR damper) and presents its field-dependent damping forces due to high impact. To achieve this goal, a large MR damper, which can produce a damping force of 100 kN at 6 A, is designed and manufactured based on the analysis of the magnetic flux intensity of the damper. After identifying the field-dependent damping force levels of the manufactured MR damper, a hydraulic horizontal shock tester is established. This shock testing system consists of a velocity generator, impact mass, shock programmer, and test mass. The MR damper is installed at the end of the wall in the shock tester and tested under four different experimental conditions. The shock profile characteristics of the MR damper due to different impact velocities are investigated at various input current levels. In addition, the inner pressure of the MR damper during impact, which depends on the input’s current level, is evaluated at two positions that can represent the pressure drop that generates the damping force of the MR damper. It is demonstrated from this impact testing that the shock profiles can be changed by the magnitude of the input current applied to the MR damper. It directly indicates that a desired shock profile can be achieved by installing the MR damper associated with appropriate control logics to adjust the magnitude of the input current.

  17. Experimental investigation in plasma relaxation by using a compact coaxial magnetized plasma gun in a background plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Lynn, Alan; Gilmore, Mark; Hsu, Scott

    2012-10-01

    A compact coaxial plasma gun is employed for experimental studies of plasma relaxation process being conducted in the HELCAT device at UNM. These studies will advance the knowledge of basic plasma physics in the areas of magnetic relaxation and space and astrophysical plasmas, including the evolution of active galactic jets/radio lobes. The gun is powered by a 120pF ignitron-switched capacitor bank which is operated in a range of 5 - 10kV. Multiple diagnostics are employed to investigate plasma relaxation process. Magnetized Argon plasma bubbles with velocities 1.2Cs and densities 10e20 m-3 have been achieved. Different distinct regimes of operation with qualitatively different dynamics are identified by fast CCD camera images, with the parameter lambda determining the operation regime. Additionally, a B-dot probe array is employed to measure the spatial toroidal and poloidal magnetic flux evolution to identify detached plasma bubble configurations. Experimental data and analysis will be presented.

  18. A search for the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at millimeter wavelengths. [cosmic background photon energy increase due to Compton scattering by high temperature galactic cluster plasma electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, S. S.; Jeffries, A. D.; Weiss, R.

    1983-01-01

    It is believed that X-ray emission from clusters of galaxies represents thermal bremsstrahlung from a hot plasma. According to Sunyaev and Zel'dovich (1972), the plasma column density and temperature derived from this model imply a measurable distortion of the cosmic background radiation (CBR) in the cluster direction. This distortion results from the Compton scattering of the CBR photons by the electrons in the plasma, resulting in an average increase of each photon. This process, known as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect, is photon conserving and 'shifts' the CBR spectrum to higher frequencies. The result is a decrease of flux at frequencies below 7.5 per cm (the Rayleigh-Jeans region), and an increase above. The investigation is concerned with measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect at frequencies in the range from 3 to 10 per cm. Attention is given to the employed observing and analysis technique, and an initial null result for the cluster Abell 1795.

  19. Phenotypes of Campylobacter jejuni luxS Mutants Are Depending on Strain Background, Kind of Mutation and Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Linda; Alter, Thomas; Sharbati, Soroush; Gölz, Greta

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery that Campylobacter (C.) jejuni produces Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), various studies have been conducted to explore the function and role of AI-2 in C. jejuni. However, the interpretation of these analyses has been complicated by differences in strain backgrounds, kind of mutation and culture conditions used. Furthermore, all research on AI-2 dependent phenotypes has been conducted with AI-2 synthase (luxS) mutants. This mutation also leads to a disruption of the activated-methyl-cycle. Most studies lack sufficient complementation resulting in not knowing whether phenotypes of luxS mutants depend on disrupted metabolism or lack of AI-2. Additionally, no AI-2 receptor has been found yet. All this contributes to an intensive discussion about the exact role of AI-2 in C. jejuni. Therefore, we examined the impact of different experiment settings on three different C. jejuni luxS mutants on growth and motility (37°C and 42°C). Our study showed that differing phenotypes of C. jejuni luxS mutants depend on strain background, mutation strategy and culture conditions. Furthermore, we complemented experiments with synthetic AI-2 or homocysteine as well as the combination of both. Complementation with AI-2 and AI-2+homocysteine significantly increased the cell number of C. jejuni NCTC 11168ΔluxS in stationary phase compared to the non-complemented C. jejuni NCTC 11168ΔluxS mutant. Genetic complementation of both C. jejuni 81-176 luxS mutants resulted in wild type comparable growth curves. Also swarming ability could be partially complemented. While genetic complementation restored swarming abilities of C. jejuni 81-176ΔluxS, it did not fully restore the phenotype of C. jejuni 81-176::luxS, which indicates that compensatory mutations in other parts of the chromosome and/or potential polar effects may appear in this mutant strain. Also with neither synthetic complementation, the phenotype of the wild type-strains was achieved, suggesting yet another reason for

  20. Changes of soil pore system due to soil macrofauna: an experimental approach to study the contribution of different taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Buscemi, Gilda; Mele, Giacomo; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Soil fauna contributes to the ecosystem functioning, for example, by means of its direct influence on soil structure which modifies the physical environment of the microbial community. Changes in habitat structure due to soil fauna activities can influence resource availability, species' abundances, and community composition of soil microorganisms. X-ray tomography has been increasingly used to obtain precise and non-destructive analysis mostly of the macroporosity resulting from earthworm activity in repacked soil cores. However also other macrofauna species contribute in different manner and extent to the modification of soil pore system, and then to the soil functioning, by means of their burrows and bioturbation activity. In this work we have developed an experimental approach based on the use of repacked soil mesocosms specifically constructed for the purpose of distinguish separately the contribution to soil structure changes of different organisms naturally present in field or inoculated in laboratory. Six different orders of macrofauna were studied and after four weeks of fauna activity the cores were imaged using a medical X-ray tomograph. Three-dimensional image processing was used in order to obtain 3D reconstructions and preliminary analysis of the identified biopores. In addition to the earthworms (Haplotaxida, genus Lombricus), among the studied taxa, Embioptera showed the most intense burrowing activity, while Coleoptera larvae (sp. Elater sanguineus) and Julida (class Diplopoda) produced the thickest pore network in our mesocosms. The used experimental approach showed a promising potential to provide new useful information about the widely differentiated contribution of many types of macrofauna to the modification of soil pore system.

  1. Evaluation of bacteriophages for prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli O149 infection of pigs.

    PubMed

    Jamalludeen, Nidham; Johnson, Roger P; Shewen, Patricia E; Gyles, Carlton L

    2009-04-14

    The objective of this study was to determine the efficacy of selected phages individually and in combination in prevention and treatment of diarrhea due to experimental O149:H10:F4 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in weaned pigs. For prophylaxis, the phages were administered orally shortly after challenge, and for therapeutic use, were given 24h after challenge, following the onset of diarrhea. The parameters used to assess outcomes were weight change, duration of diarrhea, severity of diarrhea, composite diarrhea score, and extent of shedding of the challenge ETEC over 6 days. Six phages that were tested individually in a prophylactic mode were effective as determined by a significant change in each of the parameters, although the phages were not present at titres greater than 10(3)PFU/g of feces. A modified protocol involving pre-treatment of the pigs with florfenicol and oral administration of sodium bicarbonate prior to the ETEC challenge and phage administration resulted in high levels of phages in the feces. Using this protocol, a combination of three phages that was tested in the prophylactic mode significantly reduced the severity of diarrhea and the composite diarrhea score. A mixture of two phages given therapeutically significantly improved each of the outcome parameters, without perturbation of the total fecal E. coli flora. Enumeration of phages in feces after treatment indicated that the phages were replicating to high titres in the intestinal tract of ETEC infected pigs within 1-2 days before declining progressively. These findings indicate that the selected phages were effective in moderating the course of experimental O149:H10:F4 ETEC diarrhea in weaned pigs when given prophylactically or therapeutically. PMID:19058927

  2. A modified Glenn shunt reduces venous congestion during acute right ventricular failure due to pulmonary banding: a randomized experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Vikholm, Per; Schiller, Petter; Hellgren, Laila

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Right ventricular failure after left ventricular assist device implantation is a serious complication with high rates of mortality and morbidity. It has been demonstrated in experimental settings that volume exclusion of the right ventricle with a modified Glenn shunt can improve haemodynamics during ischaemic right ventricular failure. However, the concept of a modified Glenn shunt is dependent on a normal pulmonary vascular resistance, which can limit its use in some patients. The aim of this study was to explore the effects of volume exclusion with a modified Glenn shunt during right ventricular failure due to pulmonary banding, and to study the alterations in genetic expression in the right ventricle due to pressure and volume overload. METHODS Experimental right ventricular failure was induced in pigs (n = 11) through 2 h of pulmonary banding. The pigs were randomized to either treatment with a modified Glenn shunt and pulmonary banding (n = 6) or solely pulmonary banding (n = 5) as a control group. Haemodynamic measurements, blood samples and right ventricular biopsies for genetic analysis were sampled at baseline, at right ventricular failure (i.e. 2 h of pulmonary banding) and 1 h post-right ventricular failure in both groups. RESULTS Right atrial pressure increased from 10 mmHg (9.0–12) to 18 mmHg (16–22) (P < 0.01) and the right ventricular pressure from 31 mmHg (26–35) to 57 mmHg (49–61) (P < 0.01) after pulmonary banding. Subsequent treatment with the modified Glenn shunt resulted in a decrease in right atrial pressure to 13 mmHg (11–14) (P = 0.03). In the control group, right atrial pressure was unchanged at 19 mmHg (16–20) (P = 0.18). At right heart failure, there was an up-regulation of genes associated with heart failure, inflammation, angiogenesis, negative regulation of cell death and proliferation. CONCLUSIONS Volume exclusion with a modified Glenn shunt during right ventricular failure reduced venous congestion compared

  3. Experimental and numerical study on the effect due to passengers on flexural vibrations in railway vehicle carbodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomioka, Takahiro; Takigami, Tadao

    2015-05-01

    The effects of passengers on vertical flexural vibrations of railway vehicle carbodies have been investigated experimentally and numerically. The primary focus is the damping effect caused by passengers. Vibration measurement tests, including stationary excitation tests and a running test on a commercial line, were conducted on three different types of actual railway vehicles for varying the numbers, postures and distributions of passengers. The measurement results showed that the peak frequencies in the measured FRF (frequency response function) and acceleration PSD (power spectral density) in response to excitation force or acceleration changed only a little; in contrast large reduction of the peak values was observed when passengers were aboard. These results show that passengers behave not as additional mass but as damping elements upon the carbody flexural vibrations. The damping effect by passengers appeared over several flexural modes and was significantly induced even by few passengers. Numerical studies were also carried out to develop analytical models for representing the measured results of the vibrations of carbody with passengers. It was shown that the change of the carbody FRF due to passengers could be simulated well by using a simple one-degree-of-freedom passenger model comprising a mass-spring-dashpot with a large damping ratio.

  4. Theory and experimental verifications of the resonator Q and equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic and mounting supports losses.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yook-Kong; Patel, Mihir S; Tanaka, Masako

    2010-08-01

    A novel analytical/numerical method for calculating the resonator Q and its equivalent electrical parameters due to viscoelastic, conductivity, and mounting supports losses is presented. The method presented will be quite useful for designing new resonators and reducing the time and costs of prototyping. There was also a necessity for better and more realistic modeling of the resonators because of miniaturization and the rapid advances in the frequency ranges of telecommunication. We present new 3-D finite elements models of quartz resonators with viscoelasticity, conductivity, and mounting support losses. The losses at the mounting supports were modeled by perfectly matched layers (PMLs). A previously published theory for dissipative anisotropic piezoelectric solids was formulated in a weak form for finite element (FE) applications. PMLs were placed at the base of the mounting supports to simulate the energy losses to a semi-infinite base substrate. FE simulations were carried out for free vibrations and forced vibrations of quartz tuning fork and AT-cut resonators. Results for quartz tuning fork and thickness shear AT-cut resonators were presented and compared with experimental data. Results for the resonator Q and the equivalent electrical parameters were compared with their measured values. Good equivalences were found. Results for both low- and high-Q AT-cut quartz resonators compared well with their experimental values. A method for estimating the Q directly from the frequency spectrum obtained for free vibrations was also presented. An important determinant of the quality factor Q of a quartz resonator is the loss of energy from the electrode area to the base via the mountings. The acoustical characteristics of the plate resonator are changed when the plate is mounted onto a base substrate. The base affects the frequency spectra of the plate resonator. A resonator with a high Q may not have a similarly high Q when mounted on a base. Hence, the base is an

  5. Light and Nutrient Dependent Responses in Secondary Metabolites of Plantago lanceolata Offspring Are Due to Phenotypic Plasticity in Experimental Grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Miehe-Steier, Annegret; Roscher, Christiane; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Unsicker, Sybille B.

    2015-01-01

    A few studies in the past have shown that plant diversity in terms of species richness and functional composition can modify plant defense chemistry. However, it is not yet clear to what extent genetic differentiation of plant chemotypes or phenotypic plasticity in response to diversity-induced variation in growth conditions or a combination of both is responsible for this pattern. We collected seed families of ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata) from six-year old experimental grasslands of varying plant diversity (Jena Experiment). The offspring of these seed families was grown under standardized conditions with two levels of light and nutrients. The iridoid glycosides, catalpol and aucubin, and verbascoside, a caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycoside, were measured in roots and shoots. Although offspring of different seed families differed in the tissue concentrations of defensive metabolites, plant diversity in the mothers' environment did not explain the variation in the measured defensive metabolites of P. lanceolata offspring. However secondary metabolite levels in roots and shoots were strongly affected by light and nutrient availability. Highest concentrations of iridoid glycosides and verbascoside were found under high light conditions, and nutrient availability had positive effects on iridoid glycoside concentrations in plants grown under high light conditions. However, verbascoside concentrations decreased under high levels of nutrients irrespective of light. The data from our greenhouse study show that phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental variation rather than genetic differentiation in response to plant community diversity is responsible for variation in secondary metabolite concentrations of P. lanceolata in the six-year old communities of the grassland biodiversity experiment. Due to its large phenotypic plasticity P. lanceolata has the potential for a fast and efficient adjustment to varying environmental conditions in plant communities of

  6. Numerical and experimental quantification of snow albedo reduction due to black carbon impurities for various snow types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haussener, S.; Hadley, O. L.; Gergely, M.; Schneebeli, M.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2012-12-01

    The presence of black carbon (BC) and other impurities in snow changes its radiative properties, i.e. reduces the snow albedo, and consequently affects the energy and mass balance of the snowpack. The accurate quantification of BC-related snow albedo reduction is of interest in a wide range of areas such as climate modeling, remote sensing, and snow melting. The radiative behavior of BC-laden snow depends on the coupled influence of snow type, i.e. ice grain morphology, and spectral ice and BC characteristics (bulk properties and BC morphology). Correspondingly, the use of environmental measurement to understand the effect of BC on snow is questionable due to masking by variables like snow microstructure, impurity characteristics, and angular and spatial solar intensity. Similarly, numerical models using simplified snow morphology do not account for possible coupled morphology-impurity effects. We present a tomography-based multi-scale and multi-phase methodology for the numerical determination of the spectral macroscopic optical properties of BC-laden snow. The methodology consists of: (i) obtaining the 3D microstructure of snow samples by computed tomography; (ii) using the snow's digital 3D microstructure and the impurity characteristics in direct numerical simulations for solving the radiative transfer equations (RTEs) and determining the effective spectral radiative properties of the snowpack; (iii) incorporation of the effective radiative properties in the solution of the volume-averaged RTEs at the continuum scale to determine (surface) radiative properties such as albedo. The numerical effort is accompanied by complementary laboratory measurements of various natural BC-free snow types, and machine-made BC-laden snow. The machine-made snow samples are generated with aqueous suspensions of BC that are sprayed into a freezing chamber. The BC is produced by using an inverted methane flame. Spectrally resolved snow albedo is quantified with a calibrated

  7. Quantifying flow retention due to vegetation in an earthen experimental channel using the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) dilution approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carling, Paul; Kleinhans, Maarten; Leyland, Julian; Besozzi, Louison; Duranton, Pierre; Trieu, Hai; Teske, Roy

    2014-05-01

    Understanding of flow resistance of forested floodplains is essential for floodplain flow routing and floodplain reforestation projects. Although the flow resistance of grass-lined channels is well-known, flow retention due to flow-blocking by trees is poorly understood. Flow behaviour through tree-filled channels or over forested floodplain surfaces has largely been addressed using laboratory studies of artificial surfaces and vegetation. Herein we take advantage of a broad, shallow earthen experimental outdoor channel with headwater and tailwater controls. The channel was disused and left undisturbed for more than 20 years. During this time period, small deciduous trees and a soil cover of grass, herbs and leaf-litter established naturally. We measured flow resistance and fluid retention in fifteen controlled water discharge experiments for the following conditions: (a) natural cover of herbs and trees; (b) trees only and; (c) earthen channel only. In the b-experiments the herbaceous groundcover was first removed carefully and in the c-experiments the trees were first cut flush with the earthen channel floor. Rhodamine-B dye was used to tag the flow and the resultant fluorescence of water samples were systematically assayed through time at two stations along the length of the channel. Dilution-curve data were analysed within the Aggregated Dead Zone (ADZ) framework to yield bulk flow parameters including dispersion, fluid retention and flow resistance parameters after the procedure of Richardson & Carling (2006). The primary response of the bulk flow to vegetation removal was an increase in bulk velocity, with depth and wetted width decreasing imperceptibly at the resolution of measurement. An overall reduction in flow resistance and retention occurred as discharge increased in all experiments and flow retention. Retentiveness was more prominent during low flow and for all three experimental conditions tended to converge on a constant low value for high

  8. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Correlation of Cefquinome Against Experimental Catheter-Associated Biofilm Infection Due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Shi, Wei; Yu, Yang; Tao, Meng-Ting; Xiong, Yan Q.; Sun, Jian; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formations play an important role in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and contribute to antibiotic treatment failures in biofilm-associated infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profiles of cefquinome against an experimental catheter-related biofilm model due to S. aureus, including three clinical isolates and one non-clinical isolate. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC), biofilm bactericidal concentration (BBC), minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) and biofilm prevention concentration (BPC) and in vitro time-kill curves of cefquinome were studied in both planktonic and biofilm cells of study S. aureus strains. The in vivo post-antibiotic effects (PAEs), PK profiles and efficacy of cefquinome were performed in the catheter-related biofilm infection model in murine. A sigmoid Emax model was utilized to determine the PK/PD index that best described the dose-response profiles in the model. The MICs and MBICs of cefquinome for the four S. aureus strains were 0.5 and 16 μg/mL, respectively. The BBCs (32–64 μg/mL) and MBECs (64–256 μg/mL) of these study strains were much higher than their corresponding BPC values (1–2 μg/mL). Cefquinome showed time-dependent killing both on planktonic and biofilm cells, but produced much shorter PAEs in biofilm infections. The best-correlated PK/PD parameters of cefquinome for planktonic and biofilm cells were the duration of time that the free drug level exceeded the MIC (fT > MIC, R2 = 96.2%) and the MBIC (fT > MBIC, R2 = 94.7%), respectively. In addition, the AUC24h/MBIC of cefquinome also significantly correlated with the anti-biofilm outcome in this model (R2 = 93.1%). The values of AUC24h/MBIC for biofilm-static and 1-log10-unit biofilm-cidal activity were 22.8 and 35.6 h; respectively. These results indicate that the PK/PD profiles of cefquinome could be used as valuable guidance for

  9. Peak shifted properties of the "low background NaI(Tl) detectors": An experimental study of response function behavior in different temperature and acquisition time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaei Moghaddam, Y.; Rafat Motavalli, L.; Miri Hakimabadi, H.

    2016-09-01

    Due to the necessity of using low background NaI detector in sensitive and accurate measurements, study on the response function variations in different conditions is very important. These types of detectors have different responses in various measurement conditions, including time, temperature and high voltage. In this study, the response function of 76 B 76 LB NaI (SCIONIX) in different conditions is discussed. According to the channel shifting in these detectors and its direct effect on degrading the resolution, the most convenient measurement condition for these detectors, is proposed. Finally, it is recommended that before long-time measurements a "waiting time" is needed to avoid the channel shifting effects.

  10. Genetic background can result in a marked or minimal effect of gene knockout (GPR55 and CB2 receptor) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sisay, Sofia; Pryce, Gareth; Jackson, Samuel J; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A; Michael, Gregory J; Selwood, David L; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2 (tm1Zim)) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2 (Dgen)) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2 (tm1Zim) mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  11. Genetic Background Can Result in a Marked or Minimal Effect of Gene Knockout (GPR55 and CB2 Receptor) in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Models of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Tanner, Carolyn; Ross, Ruth A.; Michael, Gregory J.; Selwood, David L.; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David

    2013-01-01

    Endocannabinoids and some phytocannabinoids bind to CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors, transient receptor potential vanilloid one (TRPV1) receptor and the orphan G protein receptor fifty-five (GPR55). Studies using C57BL/10 and C57BL/6 (Cnr2tm1Zim) CB2 cannabinoid receptor knockout mice have demonstrated an immune-augmenting effect in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models of multiple sclerosis. However, other EAE studies in Biozzi ABH mice often failed to show any treatment effect of either CB2 receptor agonism or antagonism on inhibition of T cell autoimmunity. The influence of genetic background on the induction of EAE in endocannabinoid system-related gene knockout mice was examined. It was found that C57BL/6.GPR55 knockout mice developed less severe disease, notably in female mice, following active induction with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein 35-55 peptide. In contrast C57BL/6.CB2 (Cnr2Dgen) receptor knockout mice developed augmented severity of disease consistent with the genetically and pharmacologically-distinct, Cnr2tm1Zim mice. However, when the knockout gene was bred into the ABH mouse background and EAE induced with spinal cord autoantigens the immune-enhancing effect of CB2 receptor deletion was lost. Likewise CB1 receptor and transient receptor potential vanilloid one knockout mice on the ABH background demonstrated no alteration in immune-susceptibility, in terms of disease incidence and severity of EAE, in contrast to that reported in some C57BL/6 mouse studies. Furthermore the immune-modulating influence of GPR55 was marginal on the ABH mouse background. Whilst sedative doses of tetrahydrocannabinol could induce immunosuppression, this was associated with a CB1 receptor rather than a CB2 receptor-mediated effect. These data support the fact that non-psychoactive doses of medicinal cannabis have a marginal influence on the immune response in MS. Importantly, it adds a note of caution for the translational value of some

  12. Experimental demonstration and modeling of the internal light scattering profile within solar cells due to random dielectric scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Munday, Jeremy N.

    2016-01-01

    Many photovoltaic technologies are shifting toward thin-film devices to simultaneously reduce costs and improve carrier collection efficiencies; however, the need for nearly complete light absorption within the semiconductor to achieve large short-circuit currents constrains this thickness reduction. Light trapping strategies can be employed to increase absorption in thinner devices. Random scattering coatings offer a simple, cost-effective way to increase solar cell absorption without the drawback of increased surface recombination or reduced bandwidth that occurs when using surface texturing or gratings. However, coatings that show excellent performance as scatterers in free space generally do not enhance device absorption as much as an ideal Lambertian scatterer. Here, we present an experimental technique and theoretical model that accurately describes the absorption improvement that is achievable with coatings based on random ensembles of dielectric scatterers. We find that the ideal Lambertian model substantially overestimates the experimental scattering results, but significant path length enhancements are still achievable. The experimental techniques presented here should enable the testing of various optical models that attempt to surpass the ray optics light trapping limit, which have in many cases been hindered by the experimental difficulty of coupling the incident light into the optical modes of the absorber.

  13. Impairment of the Vascular KATP Channel Imposes Fatal Susceptibility to Experimental Diabetes Due to Multi-Organ Injuries.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Shan; Cui, Ningren; Yang, Yang; Trower, Timothy C; Wei, Yu-Min; Wu, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Jin, Xin; Jiang, Chun

    2015-12-01

    The vascular isoform of ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP ) channels regulates blood flow to all organs. The KATP channel is strongly inhibited by reactive oxygen and carbonyl species produced in diabetic tissue inflammation. To address how such channel inhibition impacts vascular regulation as well as tissue viability, we performed studies in experimental diabetic mice. Strikingly, we found that knockout of the Kcnj8 encoding Kir6.1 subunit (Kcnj8-KO) caused mice to be fatally susceptible to diabetes. Organ perfusion studies suggested that the lack of this vascular K(+) channel handicapped activity-dependent vasodilation, leading to hypoperfusion, tissue hypoxia, and multi-organ failure. Morphologically, Kcnj8-KO mice showed greater inflammatory cell infiltration, higher levels of expression of inflammation indicator proteins, more severe cell apoptosis, and worse tissue disruptions. These were observed in the kidney, liver, and heart under diabetic condition in parallel comparison to tissues from WT mice. Patch clamping and molecular studies showed that the KATP channel was S-glutathionylated in experimental diabetes contributing to the inhibition of channel activity as well as the reduced arterial responses to vasodilators. These results suggest that the vascular KATP channel is organ protective in diabetic condition, and since the channel is suppressed by diabetic oxidative stress, therapeutical interventions to the maintenance of functional KATP channels may help to lower or prevent diabetic organ dysfunction. PMID:25825210

  14. Effects of nutritional supplementation with l-arginine on repair of injuries due to muscle strain: experimental study on rats☆

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Lauren Izabel Medeiros; Wuicik, William Luiz; Kuhn, Ivan; Capriotti, Juan Rodolfo Vilela; Repka, João Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the influence of oral supplementation with arginine on regeneration of injuries due to straining of the anterior tibial muscle of rats. Methods Twenty-four Wistar rats of weight 492.5 ± 50.45 g were used. Injuries were induced through straining the anterior tibial muscles. The rats were separated into three groups of eight rats each. In the untreated group (UTG), after induction of injuries, the rats were observed for 24 h. In the simulation group (SG) and the arginine group (AG) respectively, the rats received isotonic saline solution and arginine solution via direct gavage, over a seven-day period. At the end of the period, blood samples were collected for serum evaluations of creatine kinase (CK), lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and C-reactive protein (CRP). The right and left anterior tibial muscles were resected for histopathological evaluations on the muscle injuries, investigating edema, hemorrhage and disorganization or morphometric alteration of the muscle fibers. The tissue repair was investigated in terms of proliferation of adipose tissue, angiogenesis and collagen fibers. The ANOVA and Student's t methods were used and p ≤ 0.05 was taken to be statistically significant. Results In the serum evaluations, the AG showed lower CK assay values and higher AST values. In the histopathological evaluation, the UTG presented edema and hemorrhage compatible with injuries due to strain; the SG presented edema and hemorrhage with proliferation of adipose tissue and collagen fibers; and the AG presented not only the findings of the SG but also, especially, intense angiogenesis. Conclusion Oral supplementation with arginine did not cause any significant metabolic alterations that would contraindicate its use and it induced angiogenesis during the repair of muscles injured due to strain. PMID:26401505

  15. AN EXPERIMENTAL PROPOSAL TO STUDY HEAVY-ION COOLING IN THE AGS DUE TO BEAM GAS OR THE INTRABEAM SCATTERING.

    SciTech Connect

    TRBOJEVIC, D.; AHERNS, L.; ROSER, T.; MACKAY, W.; BRENNAN, J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; PARZEN, G.; BEEBE-WANG, J.

    2006-06-23

    Low emittance of not-fully-stripped gold (Z=79) Au{sup +77} Helium-like ion beams from the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) could be attributed to the cooling phenomenon due to inelastic intrabeam scattering [1,2] or due to electron de-excitations from collisions with the residual gas [3]. The low emittance gold beams have always been observed at injection in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). There have been previous attempts to attribute the low emittance to a cooling due to the exchange of energy between ions during the inelastic intrabeam scattering. The Fano-Lichten theory [4] of electron promotion might be applied during inelastic collisions between helium like gold ions in the AGS. The two K-shell electrons in gold Au{sup +77} could get promoted if the ions reach the critical distance of the closest approach during intra-beam scattering or collisions with the residual gas. During collisions if the ion energy is large enough, a quasi-molecule could be formed, and electron excitation could occur. During de-excitations of electrons, photons are emitted and a loss of total bunch energy could occur. This would lead to smaller beam size. We propose to inject gold ions with two missing electrons into RHIC, at injection energy, and study the beam behavior with bunched and de-bunched beam, varying the RF voltage and the beam intensity. If the ''cooling'' is observed additional X-ray detectors could be installed to observe emitted photons.

  16. Dose perturbations due to contrast medium and air in MammoSite registered treatment: An experimental and Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.-W.; Mitra, R.; Allen Li, X.; Das, Indra J.

    2005-07-15

    In the management of early breast cancer, a partial breast irradiation technique called MammoSite registered (Proxima Therapeutic Inc., Alpharetta, GA) has been advocated in recent years. In MammoSite, a balloon implanted at the surgical cavity during tumor excision is filled with a radio-opaque solution, and radiation is delivered via a high dose rate brachytherapy source situated at the center of the balloon. Frequently air may be introduced during placement of the balloon and/or injection of the contrast solution into the balloon. The purpose of this work is to quantify as well as to understand dose perturbations due to the presence of a high-Z contrast medium and/or an air bubble with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. In addition, the measured dose distribution is compared with that obtained from a commercial treatment planning system (Nucletron PLATO system). For a balloon diameter of 42 mm, the dose variation as a function of distance from the balloon surface is measured for various concentrations of a radio-opaque solution (in the range 5%-25% by volume) with a small volume parallel plate ion chamber and a micro-diode detector placed perpendicular to the balloon axis. Monte Carlo simulations are performed to provide a basic understanding of the interaction mechanism and the magnitude of dose perturbation at the interface near balloon surface. Our results show that the radio-opaque concentration produces dose perturbation up to 6%. The dose perturbation occurs mostly within the distances <1 mm from the balloon surface. The Plato system that does not include heterogeneity correction may be sufficient for dose planning at distances {>=}10 mm from the balloon surface for the iodine concentrations used in the MammoSite procedures. The dose enhancement effect near the balloon surface (<1 mm) due to the higher iodine concentration is not correctly predicted by the Plato system. The dose near the balloon surface may be increased by 0.5% per cm{sup 3} of air

  17. A comparison of experimental and calculated thin-shell leading-edge buckling due to thermal stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Jerald M.

    1988-01-01

    High-temperature thin-shell leading-edge buckling test data are analyzed using NASA structural analysis (NASTRAN) as a finite element tool for predicting thermal buckling characteristics. Buckling points are predicted for several combinations of edge boundary conditions. The problem of relating the appropriate plate area to the edge stress distribution and the stress gradient is addressed in terms of analysis assumptions. Local plasticity was found to occur on the specimen analyzed, and this tended to simplify the basic problem since it effectively equalized the stress gradient from loaded edge to loaded edge. The initial loading was found to be difficult to select for the buckling analysis because of the transient nature of thermal stress. Multiple initial model loadings are likely required for complicated thermal stress time histories before a pertinent finite element buckling analysis can be achieved. The basic mode shapes determined from experimentation were correctly identified from computation.

  18. VERIFICATION OF NUMERICAL MODEL FOR URBAN INUNDATION DUE TO TORRENTIAL RAINFALL USING PHYSICAL EXPERIMENTAL FLUME WITH A SEWER PIPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaike, Kenji; Shimizu, Atsushi; Baba, Yasuyuki; Nakagawa, Hajime; Takeda, Makoto

    In this paper, in order to verify the stormwater exchange model between ground surface and sewerage system in integrated urban inundation model, we conducted experiments of urban inundation using a flat basin with a sewer pipe and rainfall supplier, and those results are compared with numerical simulation results. From the comparison between them, it is obvious that stormwater drainage and overflow discharge in urban area can be estimated exactly by using step-down formula and overflow formula in steady flow cases. In unsteady flow cases, however, calculated inundation water depth on the ground surface responses to piezometric head of the sewer pipe too quickly than experimental results, which requires much smaller values of the coefficients in those formula.

  19. SCH 56592, Amphotericin B, or Itraconazole Therapy of Experimental Murine Cerebral Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Ramichloridium obovoideum (“Ramichloridium mackenziei”)

    PubMed Central

    Al-Abdely, Hail M.; Najvar, Laura; Bocanegra, Rosie; Fothergill, Annette; Loebenberg, David; Rinaldi, Michael G.; Graybill, John R.

    2000-01-01

    Ramichloridium obovoideum (“Ramichloridium makenziei”) is a rare cause of lethal cerebral phaeohyphomycosis. It has been, so far, geographically restricted to the Middle East. BALB/c mice were inoculated with two strains of R. obovoideum intracranially. Therapy with amphotericin B, itraconazole, or the investigational triazole SCH 56592 was conducted for 10 days. Half the mice were monitored for survival and half were killed for determination of the fungal load in brain tissue. Recipients of SCH 56592 had significantly prolonged survival and lower brain fungal burden, and this result was found for mice infected with both of the fungal strains tested. Itraconazole reduced the brain fungal load in mice infected with one strain but not the other, while amphotericin B had no effect on brain fungal concentrations. This study indicates a possible role of SCH 56592 in the treatment of the serious cerebral phaeohyphomycosis due to R. obovoideum. PMID:10770745

  20. Experimental investigation of the sources of propeller noise due to the ingestion of turbulence at low speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharpf, D. F.; Mueller, T. J.

    1995-02-01

    Noise radiation from a four bladed, 10 in. diameter propeller operating in air at a rotational speed of 3000 RPM and a freestream velocity of 33 ft/s was experimentally analyzed using hot-wire and microphone measurements in an anechoic wind tunnel. Turbulence levels from 0.2 to 5.5% at the propeller location were generated by square-mesh grids upstream of the propeller. Autobicoherence measurements behind the blade trailing edges near the hub and tip showed regions of high phase-coherence between the blade-passage harmonics and the broadband frequencies. Inflow turbulence reduced this coherence. By relating the fluctuation velocities in the propeller wake to the unsteady blade forces, the primary regions of tonal noise generation have been identified as the hub and tip regions, while the midspan has been identified as a region responsible for broadband noise generation. These measurements were complimented by cross-spectra between the propeller wake-flow and the measured sound. The effect of turbulence on the radiated noise level showed an overall increase of 2 dB in the broadband levels for every 1% increase in turbulence. This effect varied for different frequency bands in the acoustic spectrum.

  1. Multivariate Phenotypic Divergence Due to the Fixation of Beneficial Mutations in Experimentally Evolved Lineages of a Filamentous Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Dali, Rola; Rundle, Howard D.; Kassen, Rees

    2012-01-01

    The potential for evolutionary change is limited by the availability of genetic variation. Mutations are the ultimate source of new alleles, yet there have been few experimental investigations of the role of novel mutations in multivariate phenotypic evolution. Here, we evaluated the degree of multivariate phenotypic divergence observed in a long-term evolution experiment whereby replicate lineages of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans were derived from a single genotype and allowed to fix novel (beneficial) mutations while maintained at two different population sizes. We asked three fundamental questions regarding phenotypic divergence following approximately 800 generations of adaptation: (1) whether divergence was limited by mutational supply, (2) whether divergence proceeded in relatively many (few) multivariate directions, and (3) to what degree phenotypic divergence scaled with changes in fitness (i.e. adaptation). We found no evidence that mutational supply limited phenotypic divergence. Divergence also occurred in all possible phenotypic directions, implying that pleiotropy was either weak or sufficiently variable among new mutations so as not to constrain the direction of multivariate evolution. The degree of total phenotypic divergence from the common ancestor was positively correlated with the extent of adaptation. These results are discussed in the context of the evolution of complex phenotypes through the input of adaptive mutations. PMID:23185601

  2. Identification of source velocities on 3D structures in non-anechoic environments: Theoretical background and experimental validation of the inverse patch transfer functions method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aucejo, M.; Totaro, N.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2010-08-01

    In noise control, identification of the source velocity field remains a major problem open to investigation. Consequently, methods such as nearfield acoustical holography (NAH), principal source projection, the inverse frequency response function and hybrid NAH have been developed. However, these methods require free field conditions that are often difficult to achieve in practice. This article presents an alternative method known as inverse patch transfer functions, designed to identify source velocities and developed in the framework of the European SILENCE project. This method is based on the definition of a virtual cavity, the double measurement of the pressure and particle velocity fields on the aperture surfaces of this volume, divided into elementary areas called patches and the inversion of impedances matrices, numerically computed from a modal basis obtained by FEM. Theoretically, the method is applicable to sources with complex 3D geometries and measurements can be carried out in a non-anechoic environment even in the presence of other stationary sources outside the virtual cavity. In the present paper, the theoretical background of the iPTF method is described and the results (numerical and experimental) for a source with simple geometry (two baffled pistons driven in antiphase) are presented and discussed.

  3. Alteration of Fractured Rocks Due to Coupled Chemical and Mechanical Processes: High-Resolution Simulations and Experimental Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameli, Pasha

    Engineering activities such as enhanced geothermal energy production and improved oil recovery techniques are heavily dependent on the permeability of the subsurface, while others such as CO2 sequestration and nuclear waste disposal rely on the efficiency of rock formations as transport barriers. In either case fractures provide the main pathways for fluid flow and transport, especially in rocks with lower matrix porosity. Laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying the chemo-mechanical responses of fractures have shown a range of results, some of which contradict simple conceptual models. For example, under conditions favoring mineral dissolution, where one would expect an overall increase in permeability, experiments show that permeability increases under some conditions and decreases under others. Recent experiments have attempted to link these core-scale observations to the relevant small-scale processes occurring within fractures. Results suggest that the loss of mechanical strength in asperities due to chemical alteration may cause non-uniform deformation and alteration of fracture apertures. However, due to the lack of direct micro-scale measurements of the coupled chemical and mechanical processes that lead to alteration of contacting fracture surfaces, our ability to predict the long-term evolution of fractures is still limited. To explore the processes that control permeability evolution, I developed a computational model that uses micro-scale surface roughness and explicitly couples dissolution and elastic deformation to calculate local alterations in fracture aperture under chemical and mechanical stresses. A depth-averaged algorithm of fracture flow is used to model reactive transport and chemical alteration of the fracture surfaces. Then, I deform the resulting altered fracture-surfaces using an algorithm that calculates the elastic deformation. The results of the model are compared with flow-through experiments conducted on fractured limestone. The

  4. Enhancement of photodynamic therapy due to hyperbaric hyperoxia: an experimental study of Walker 256 tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicola, Jorge H.; Colussi, Valdir C.; Nicola, Ester M. D.; Metze, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT), which is now an approved treatment for many types of cancers, is based on the simultaneous involvement of three factors, namely: tumor tissue retention of a specific photosensitizer; local illumination of the lesion with a visible light source and the occurrence of oxygen in the triplet state. Theoretically, a change in any one of these factors may be compensated by a change in the other two factors, leading to the same therapeutic result. In practice, this is not true, since we are dealing with living tissue, but we may expect to find an ideal combination of these three factors which may give the best clinical results. In this work we present experimental results of PDT under Hyperbaric hyperoxia (HBO) in tumor masses of the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of rats. These tumors were created by previous inoculation of 'Walker 256' neoplastic cells Hematoporphyrin Ester (HpE) was administered as the photosensitizer. The rats were pressurized at up to 3 atm with a 100 percent continuous oxygen ventilation environment in a specially designed hyperbaric chamber. The skin area above the tumor was photosensitized for 45 minutes with a 7 mw HeNe laser. Twenty four hours later, the tumor was removed for study. In all the animals treated with PDT/HBO histology revealed a very important reduction in the number of tumor cells as compared with the PDT controls in normal atmospheric condition, showing numerous apoptotic as well as necrotic cells at the border of the radiated area. The observed enhancement in the PDT for this situation is, of course, related to the extra oxygen in the circulatory system.

  5. Full-scale experimental and numerical study about structural behaviour of a thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground settlements due to land subsidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. A.; Hernández, L. A.; Hernández, M.; Pacheco, J.; Zermeño, M. E.; Salinas, R.

    2015-11-01

    Land subsidence due to ground water withdrawal is a problem in many places around the world (Poland, 1984). This causes differential ground settlements that affect masonry structures, because these structural materials do not exhibit an adequate performance beyond a certain level of angular distortion. This work presents the experimental and numerical results about a study regarding the performance of a full-scale thin-walled cold-formed steel building affected by ground differential settlements due to land subsidence. The experimental stage consisted in the construction of a test-building to be subjected to differential settlements in laboratory. The numerical stage consisted in performing a numerical non-linear static pull-down analysis simulating the differential ground settlements of the test-building. The results show that the structural performance of the tested building was very suitable in terms of ductility.

  6. Effect of gentamicin dosing interval on efficacy of penicillin or ceftriaxone treatment of experimental endocarditis due to penicillin-susceptible, ceftriaxone-tolerant viridans group streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, C M; Warner, C B; Rouse, M S; Steckelberg, J M; Wilson, W R

    1996-01-01

    The efficacy of ceftriaxone or penicillin alone or combined with gentamicin at different dosing intervals was evaluated in experimental endocarditis due to a penicillin-susceptible, ceftriaxone-tolerant strain of Streptococcus sanguis I. The difference between monotherapy with ceftriaxone and procaine penicillin approached statistical significance (P = 0.052). Ceftriaxone combined with gentamicin administered as a single daily dose was less effective than was procaine penicillin combined with gentamicin administered in a single daily dose or in three divided doses. PMID:9124865

  7. An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux

    SciTech Connect

    Hockaday, M.Y.P.

    1987-06-01

    The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5/sup 0/ and 10/sup 0/ to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm/sup 2/ and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Efficacy of Ciprofloxacin-Releasing Bioabsorbable Osteoconductive Bone Defect Filler for Treatment of Experimental Osteomyelitis Due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koort, Jyri K.; Mäkinen, Tatu J.; Suokas, Esa; Veiranto, Minna; Jalava, Jari; Knuuti, Juhani; Törmälä, Pertti; Aro, Hannu T.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of local antibiotic delivery via biodegradable bone defect fillers with multifunctional properties for the treatment of bone infections is highly appealing. Fillers can be used to obliterate surgical dead space and to provide targeted local bactericidal concentrations in tissue for extended periods. Eventually, the osteoconductive component of the filler could guide the healing of the bone defect. The present experimental study was carried out to test this concept in a localized Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis model in the rabbit (n = 31). A metaphyseal defect of the tibia was filled with a block of bone cement, followed by insertion of a bacterial inoculum. After removal of the bone cement and surgical debridement at 2 weeks, the defect was filled with a ciprofloxacin-containing (7.6% ± 0.1%, by weight) composite (treated-infection group) or with a composite without antibiotic (sham-treated group). Both a positive control group (untreated-infection group) and a negative control group were also produced. The treatment response, monitored by positron emission tomography (PET) with fluorine-18-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose ([18F]FDG) at 3 and 6 weeks, showed rapidly decreasing amounts of [18F]FDG uptake in the treated-infection group (P = 0.001 compared with the results for the untreated-infection group at 6 weeks). The bacteriological analysis confirmed the eradication of the bone pathogen in the treated-infection group. However, three animals had culture-positive soft tissue infections. All animals in the sham-treated and untreated-infection groups had culture-positive bone infections with typical radiographic changes of osteomyelitis. Histomorphometry, peripheral quantitative computed tomography, and backscattered electron imaging of scanning electron microscopy images verified the osteoconductive properties of the bioactive glass microspheres within the composite. The median bone ciprofloxacin concentrations were 1.2 and 2.1 μg/g at two anatomic

  9. Background Underground at WIPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esch, Ernst-Ingo; Hime, A.; Bowles, T. J.

    2001-04-01

    Recent interest to establish a dedicated underground laboratory in the United States prompted an experimental program at to quantify the enviromental backgrounds underground at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. An outline of this program is provided along with recent experimental data on the cosmic ray muon flux at the 650 meter level of WIPP. The implications of the cosmic ray muon and fast neutron background at WIPP will be discussed in the context of new generation, low background experiments envisioned in the future.

  10. Calibrating cosmological radiative transfer simulations with Ly α forest data: evidence for large spatial UV background fluctuations at z ˜ 5.6-5.8 due to rare bright sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chardin, Jonathan; Haehnelt, Martin G.; Aubert, Dominique; Puchwein, Ewald

    2015-11-01

    We calibrate here cosmological radiative transfer simulations with ATON/RAMSES with a range of measurements of the Ly α opacity from Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) absorption spectra. We find the Ly α opacity to be very sensitive to the exact timing of hydrogen reionization. Models reproducing the measured evolution of the mean photoionization rate and average mean free path reach overlap at z ˜ 7 and predict an accelerated evolution of the Ly α opacity at z > 6 consistent with the rapidly evolving luminosity function of Ly α emitters in this redshift range. Similar to `optically thin' simulations our full radiative transfer simulations fail, however, to reproduce the high-opacity tail of the Ly α opacity PDF (probability distribution function) at z > 5. We argue that this is due to spatial UV fluctuations in the post-overlap phase of reionization on substantially larger scales than predicted by our source model, where the ionizing emissivity is dominated by large numbers of sub-L* galaxies. We further argue that this suggests a significant contribution to the ionizing UV background by much rarer bright sources at high redshift.

  11. Background Checks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fields, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    In this era when many Americans seem resigned to greater encroachments on their personal privacy due to the growth and ubiquity of electronic databases with information about almost every aspect of their lives, a recent statement from the American Association of University Professors (AAUP) seems timely. The statement highlighted the issue of…

  12. A Quasi-Experimental Study into the Relations between Families' Social and Cultural Background and Children's Creche Experience and Global Cognitive Competence in Primary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burger, Kaspar

    2012-01-01

    This study analysed the role of both sociocultural background and exposure to a creche on children's development of cognitive competence in Switzerland. Data were derived from a survey on children's cognitive proficiency after enrolment to primary school. Correlations and multiple linear regressions indicate that creche experience was not related…

  13. EVALUATION OF SCIENCE INSTRUCTION IN SPANISH FOR STUDENTS OF SPANISH SPEAKING BACKGROUND--STEPS IN IMPLEMENTING EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT (FOR SCHOOL INFORMATION).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LORETAN, JOSEPH O.; AND OTHERS

    A PROJECT WHOSE PURPOSES WERE TO FOSTER BILINGUALISM, FORESTALL ANTICIPATED DIFFICULTIES IN SCIENCE, AND PROVIDE THE MOTIVATION AND COURSE REQUIREMENTS ESSENTIAL FOR SUCCESS IN HIGH SCHOOL IS DESCRIBED AND ASSESSED IN THIS REPORT. TWO SEVENTH-GRADE CLASSES OF SIMILAR AGE, LANGUAGE BACKGROUND, AND ABILITIES WERE GIVEN THE SAME OR EQUIVALENT PROGRAM…

  14. Electron heating enhancement due to plasma series resonance in a capacitively coupled RF discharge: Electrical modeling and comparison to experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Minglu; Lu, Yijia; Cheng, Jia; Ji, Linhong

    2016-09-01

    The electron heating enhancement due to the self-excitation of the plasma series resonance in capacitively coupled plasmas is revisited by a combination of an equivalent circuit model and experiments. To improve the model accuracy, measured voltage waveforms at the powered electrode are used instead of prescribing a sinusoidal voltage supply in series with a bias capacitance. The results calculated from the electrical model are consistent with the experimental measurements performed by a Langmuir probe with verification of a microwave interferometer, at pressures of 0.2 and 0.3 Torr. High harmonics occurring in the discharge currents agree with observations in previous research. The nonlinear plasma series resonance effect is found to have a notable contribution to both ohmic and stochastic heating evaluated by the electron heating efficiencies.

  15. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO2 Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Larin, I. K.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO2 vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO2 were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO2 content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO2 vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO2 content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  16. Experimental and Model Study of Changes in Spectral Solar Irradiance in the Atmosphere of Large City due to Tropospheric NO{sub 2} Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chubarova, N. Ye.; Lebedev, V. V.; Partola, V. S.; Larin, I. K.; Lezina, Ye. A.; Rublev, A. N.

    2009-03-11

    An experimental and model approach has been used to study the NO{sub 2} vertical profiles and its effect on solar irradiance. The profiles of NO{sub 2} were obtained using gas analyzers, which had been installed at different levels at the Moscow State University (MSU) located at the south-western part of Moscow and at the Ostankino tower located at the north of Moscow up to the height of 350 m. Using these data diurnal and spatial variability of the NO{sub 2} content in the most polluted part of planetary boundary layer (PBL) has been analyzed within the large megalopolis. On the base of photochemical modeling we have simulated the diurnal cycle of NO{sub 2} vertical profiles for summer and winter conditions and have compared the results with the experimental ones. Using the RT modeling with input gaseous and aerosol parameters of the atmosphere obtained from the MSU Meteorological Observatory we have estimated the attenuation of spectral solar irradiance in UV and visible region of spectrum due to the NO{sub 2} content in the polluted atmosphere for different seasons.

  17. Experimental estimation of tungsten impurity sputtering due to Type I ELMs in JET-ITER-like wall using pedestal electron cyclotron emission and target Langmuir probe measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillemaut, C.; Jardin, A.; Horacek, J.; Borodkina, I.; Autricque, A.; Arnoux, G.; Boom, J.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; De La Luna, E.; Devaux, S.; Eich, T.; Harting, D.; Kirschner, A.; Lipschultz, B.; Matthews, G. F.; Meigs, A.; Moulton, D.; O'Mullane, M.; Stamp, M.; contributors, JET

    2016-02-01

    The ITER baseline scenario, with 500 MW of DT fusion power and Q = 10, will rely on a Type I ELMy H-mode and will be achieved with a tungsten (W) divertor. W atoms sputtered from divertor targets during mitigated ELMs are expected to be the dominant source in ITER. W impurity concentration in the plasma core can dramatically degrade its performance and lead to potentially damaging disruptions. Understanding the physics of the target W source due to sputtering during ELMs and inter-ELMs is important and can be helped by experimental measurements with improved precision. It has been established that the ELMy target ion impact energy has a simple linear dependence with the pedestal electron temperature measured by Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE). It has also been shown that Langmuir Probes (LP) ion flux measurements are reliable during ELMs due to the surprisingly low electron temperature. Therefore, in this paper, LP and ECE measurements in JET-ITER-Like-Wall (ILW) unseeded Type I ELMy H-mode experiments have been used to estimate the W sputtering flux from divertor targets in ELM and inter-ELM conditions. Comparison with similar estimates using W I spectroscopy measurements shows a reasonable agreement for the ELM and inter-ELM W source. The main advantage of the method involving LP measurements is the very high time resolution of the diagnostic (˜10 μs) allowing very precise description of the W sputtering source during ELMs.

  18. Background Strain and the Differential Susceptibility of Podocyte-Specific Deletion of Myh9 on Murine Models of Experimental Glomerulosclerosis and HIV Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Duncan B.; Ikizler, Omer; Zhang, Jidong; Holzman, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    We previously reported that podocyte-specific deletion of Myh9 (conventional myosin heavy chain 2A) in C57BL/6 mice does not cause spontaneous kidney disease but instead results in a predisposition to glomerulosclerosis in response to a second model of glomerular injury. In contrast, other investigators reported that podocyte-specific deletion of Myh9 (PodΔMyh9) resulted in spontaneous glomerulosclerosis in mice on a mixed background, suggesting that the glomerulosclerosis is dependent on background strain. In order to elucidate the cause of this strain dependent effect Podocin::Cre and Myh9flox alleles were backcrossed to mouse strain FVB/N, which is highly susceptible to glomerulosclerosis, with the aim of intercrossing susceptible FVB/N and resistant C57BL/6 mice in subsequent congenic analyses. However, after backcrossing mice to FVB/N and aging mice to 28 weeks, we found no evidence of glomerular disease in PodΔMyh9 mice vs control littermates (urine MAC ratio all p>0.05). We also tested C57BL/6 PodΔMyh9 mice for a predisposition to injury from models other than Adriamycin including HIV nephropathy (HIVAN), puromycin nephropathy, and sheep nephrotoxic serum. In the Tg26 model of HIVAN, we found that podocyte-specific deletion of Myh9 resulted in a modest hypersensitivity in adults compared to Tg26+ control littermates (urine MAC ratio, p<0.05 or less). In contrast, we found that PodΔMyh9 mice were not predisposed to injury in response to other injury models including puromycin nephropathy and sheep nephrotoxic serum. While the mechanism of injury in these models is not fully understood, we conclude that PodΔMyh9 results in a variable susceptibility to glomerulosclerosis in response to different models of glomerular injury. In addition, based on the lack of a spontaneous phenotype of glomerulosclerosis in both C57BL/6 and FVB/N mice, we propose that Myh9 is not absolutely required in adult podocytes. PMID:23874454

  19. Background issues for defensive interceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Canavan, G.H.

    1991-03-01

    Mean nuclear backgrounds are large, but are arguably amenable to frame-to-frame subtraction. Striated backgrounds on the sensors for defensive interceptors could, however, cause clutter leak-through, which could make detection and track difficult. Nominal motions and backgrounds give signal to clutter ratios too low to be useful. Clutter leakage due to line-of-sight drift can be reduced by stabilizing the line of sight around the background clutter itself. Current interceptors have detector arrays large enough for operation independent of nuclear backgrounds in their fields of view. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Mismatch-induced lethality due to a defect in Escherichia coli RecQ helicase in exonuclease-deficient background: Dependence on MutS and UvrD functions.

    PubMed

    Yamana, Yoshimasa; Sonezaki, Shuji; Ogawa, Hiroaki I; Kusano, Kohji

    2010-05-01

    Escherichia coli DNA-unwinding protein RecQ has roles in the regulation of general recombination and the processing of stalled replication forks. In this study, we found that knockout of the recQ gene in combination with xonA xseA recJ mutations, which inhibit methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR), caused about 100-fold increase in sensitivity to a purine analog 2-aminopurine (2AP). Intriguingly, inactivation of a MMR initiator due to the either mutation mutS or uvrD completely suppressed the 2AP sensitivity caused by recQ xonA xseA recJ mutations, suggesting that RecQ helicase might act on the DNA structures that are generated by the processing of DNA by the MutSLH complex and UvrD helicase. Moreover, the recQ gene knockout in combination with xonA xseA recJ mutations enhanced 2AP-induced filament formation, and increased by twofold the rate of spontaneous forward mutations in the thyA locus but did not increase the rate of rifampicin-resistant mutations. We discuss about the possible interplay between E. coli RecQ helicase and mismatch recognition factors. PMID:20018207

  1. Evaluation of physical health effects due to volcanic hazards: the use of experimental systems to estimate the pulmonary toxicity of volcanic ash

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, T.R.; Wehner, A.P.; Butler, J.

    1986-03-01

    Shortly after Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, a number of laboratories began to investigate the effects of volcanic ash in a variety of experimental systems in attempts to predict effects that might occur in the lung of humans exposed to volcanic ash. The published results are remarkably consistent, despite the use of non-uniform ash samples and variability in the experimental approaches used. The data indicate that volcanic ash, even in high concentrations, causes little toxicity to lung cells in vitro and in vivo, as compared with effects of free crystalline silica, which is known to be highly fibrogenic. Volcanic ash does not appear to be entirely inert, however, possibly because of low concentrations of free crystalline silica in the ash. The published experimental studies suggest that inhaled volcanic ash is not likely to be harmful to the lungs of healthy humans, but the potential effects of volcanic ash in patients with pre-existing lung diseases are more difficult to ascertain from these studies.

  2. Evaluation of physical health effects due to volcanic hazards: the use of experimental systems to estimate the pulmonary toxicity of volcanic ash.

    PubMed

    Martin, T R; Wehner, A P; Butler, J

    1986-03-01

    Shortly after Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980, a number of laboratories began to investigate the effects of volcanic ash in a variety of experimental systems in attempts to predict effects that might occult in the lungs of humans exposed to volcanic ash. The published results are remarkably consistent, despite the use of non-uniform ash samples and variability in the experimental approaches used. The data indicate that volcanic ash, even in high concentrations, causes little toxicity to lung cells in vitro and in vivo, as compared with effects of free crystalline silica, which is known to be highly fibrogenic. Volcanic ash does not appear to be entirely inert, however, possibly because of low concentrations of free crystalline silica in the ash. The published experimental studies suggest that inhaled volcanic ash is not likely to be harmful to the lungs of healthy humans, but the potential effects of volcanic ash in patients with pre-existing lung diseases are more difficult to ascertain from these studies. PMID:3080911

  3. Detailed investigation of the phase transition in KxP4W8O32 and experimental arguments for a charge density wave due to hidden nesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolincio, Kamil; Pérez, Olivier; Hébert, Sylvie; Fertey, Pierre; Pautrat, Alain

    2016-06-01

    Detailed structural and magnetotransport properties of monophosphate tungsten bronze Kx(PO2)4(WO3)8 single crystals are reported. Both galvanomagnetic and thermal properties are shown to be consistent with a charge density wave electronic transition due to hidden nesting of the quasi-1D portion of the Fermi surface. We also observe the enhancement of electronic anisotropy due to reconstruction of the Fermi surface at the Peierls transition. The resistivity presents a thermal hysteresis suggesting a first-order nature characteristic of a strong-coupling scenario. However, other measurements such as the change of carrier density demonstrate a second-order Peierls scenario with weak-coupling features. We suggest that the structural transition driven by the residual strain in the K-P-O environment is responsible for the resistivity hysteresis and modifies the Fermi surface which then helps the rise to the second-order Peierls instability.

  4. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, A. J.; Kuffner, I. B.; MacKenzie, F. T.; Jokiel, P. L.; Rodgers, K. S.; Tan, A.

    2009-08-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (n=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NEC=CaCO3 production - dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at -0.04 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  5. Net Loss of CaCO3 from a subtropical calcifying community due to seawater acidification: Mesocosm-scale experimental evidence

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersson, A.J.; Kuffner, I.B.; MacKenzie, F.T.; Jokiel, P.L.; Rodgers, K.S.; Tan, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acidification of seawater owing to oceanic uptake of atmospheric CO 2 originating from human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and land-use changes has raised serious concerns regarding its adverse effects on corals and calcifying communities. Here we demonstrate a net loss of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) material as a result of decreased calcification and increased carbonate dissolution from replicated subtropical coral reef communities (N=3) incubated in continuous-flow mesocosms subject to future seawater conditions. The calcifying community was dominated by the coral Montipora capitata. Daily average community calcification or Net Ecosystem Calcification (NECC=CaCO3 production - dissolution) was positive at 3.3 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under ambient seawater pCO2 conditions as opposed to negative at -0.04 mmol CaCO3 m-2 h-1 under seawater conditions of double the ambient pCO2. These experimental results provide support for the conclusion that some net calcifying communities could become subject to net dissolution in response to anthropogenic ocean acidification within this century. Nevertheless, individual corals remained healthy, actively calcified (albeit slower than at present rates), and deposited significant amounts of CaCO3 under the prevailing experimental seawater conditions of elevated pCO2.

  6. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  7. Inhibition of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase in the hypothalamus, pons and cerebellum of the offspring rat due to experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Tsela, Smaragda; Zissis, Konstantinos M; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Skandali, Nikolina; Voumvourakis, Konstantinos; Carageorgiou, Haris; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2015-08-01

    Neurodevelopment is known to be particularly susceptible to thyroid hormone insufficiency and can result in extensive structural and functional deficits within the central nervous system (CNS), subsequently leading to the establishment of cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The current study evaluated the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism (as a suggestive multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes that has been developed and characterized by the authors) on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a CNS region-specific manner. The activities of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase in the offspring hypothalamus, cerebellum and pons were assessed. The study demonstrated that maternal exposure to PTU (0.05% w/v in the drinking water) during the critical periods of neurodevelopment can result in an inhibition of hypothalamic, pontine and cerebellar Na(+),K(+)-ATPase; a major marker of neuronal excitability and metabolic energy production as well as an important regulator of important systems of neurotransmission. On the other hand, no significant changes in the activities of the herein offspring CNS regions' AChE and Mg(2+)-ATPase were recorded. The observed Na(+),K(+)-ATPase inhibition: (i) is region-specific (and non-detectable in whole brain homogenetes), (ii) could constitute a central event in the pathophysiology of clinically-relevant hypothyroidism-associated developmental neurotoxicity, (iii) occurs under all examined experimental schemes, and (iv) certainly deserves further clarification at a molecular and histopathological level. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they also underline the need for the adoption and further study of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity as a consistent neurochemical marker within the context of a systematic

  8. Experimental evaluation of decrease in the activities of polyphosphate/glycogen-accumulating organisms due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-06-15

    Decrease in bacterial activity (biomass decay) in activated sludge can result from cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The goal of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as the cause of decrease in bacterial activity. By means of measuring maximal anaerobic phosphate release rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the decay rates and death rates of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system and a laboratory phosphate removing sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system were determined, respectively, under famine conditions. In addition, the decay rate and death rate of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in a SBR system with an enrichment culture of GAOs were also measured under famine conditions. Hereto the maximal anaerobic volatile fatty acid uptake rates, live/dead staining, and FISH were used. The experiments revealed that in the BNR and enriched PAO-SBR systems, activity decay contributed 58% and 80% to the decreased activities of PAOs, and that cell death was responsible for 42% and 20% of decreases in their respective activities. In the enriched GAOs system, activity decay constituted a proportion of 74% of the decreased activity of GAOs, and cell death only accounted for 26% of the decrease of their activity. PMID:20178124

  9. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part C: Development of experimental techniques for investigation of unsteady pressures behind a cold model jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Schroeder, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    As part of an overall study of the scaling laws for the fluctuating pressures induced on the wings and flaps of STOL aircraft by jet engine impingement, an experimental investigation was made of the near field fluctuating pressures behind a cold circular jet, both when it was free and when it was impinging on a flat plate. Miniature static pressure probes were developed for measurements in the free jet and on the flat plate which were connected by plastic tubing to 1/8 inch microphones and acted as pressure transducers. Using a digital correlator together with an FFT program on the CDC 6400 computer, spectral densities, relative amplitudes, phase lags, and coherences were also obtained for the signals from pairs of these probes, and were used to calibrate these probes directly against microphones. This system of instrumentation was employed to obtain single point rms and third octave surveys of the static pressures in the free jet and on the surface of the plate.

  10. Pre- and post-experimental manipulation assessments confirm the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes

    PubMed Central

    Cuatianquiz Lima, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds breed in holes that they do not excavate themselves. This is possible where there are large trees whose size and age permit the digging of holes by primary excavators and only rarely happens in forest plantations, where we expected a deficit of both breeding holes and SCN species. We assessed whether the availability of tree cavities influenced the number of SCNs in two temperate forest types, and evaluated the change in number of SCNs after adding nest boxes. First, we counted all cavities within each of our 25-m radius sampling points in mature and young forest plots during 2009. We then added nest boxes at standardised locations during 2010 and 2011 and conducted fortnightly bird counts (January–October 2009–2011). In 2011 we added two extra plots of each forest type, where we also conducted bird counts. Prior to adding nest boxes, counts revealed more SCNs in mature than in young forest. Following the addition of nest boxes, the number of SCNs increased significantly in the points with nest boxes in both types of forest. Counts in 2011 confirmed the increase in number of birds due to the addition of nest boxes. Given the likely benefits associated with a richer bird community we propose that, as is routinely done in some countries, forest management programs preserve old tree stumps and add nest boxes to forest plantations in order to increase bird numbers and bird community diversity. PMID:26998410

  11. Experimental study on rock-water interaction due to CO2 injection under in-situ P-T condition of the Altmark gas reservoir, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huq, F.; Blum, P.; Nowak, M.; Haderlein, S.; Grathwohl, P.

    2012-04-01

    CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoir is an economically feasible option to mitigate global warming. The Altmark gas reservoir, located in the western part of the northeast German basin, was selected for enhanced gas recovery (EGR) by injecting CO2. Under reservoir conditions (50 bars and 125°C), the injected CO2 has very high solubility leading to subsequent dissolution and precipitation of minerals of the surrounding rock matrix. Therefore, the main objective of the current study is to investigate the geochemical changes in fluid composition due to dissolution of minerals under controlled laboratory conditions. Dry sandstone sample from the Altmark reservoir was mounted in an autoclave system and flushed by a pre-equilibrated mixture of water saturated with CO2 at a constant flow rate at 50 bars and 125°C. The experiment was conducted for 100 hours during which fluid samples were collected at regular intervals and analyzed by Ion Chromatography (IC) and Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). pH was also measured in partially de-gassed samples. Fluid analysis showed an increased concentration of Ca and SO4 at the beginning of the reaction time indicating the early dissolution of anhydrite. However, the Ca/SO4 molar ratio (>1) proved the dissolution of both calcite and anhydrite. The source of Na and K could be the dissolution of feldspars (albite and K-feldspar). Low concentrations of these two elements reflect the lower solubility and slow dissolution kinetics of feldspar minerals. Moreover, trace amounts of Mn, Mg, Zn, Cu and Fe might be derived from the dissolution of trace minerals in the sandstone. Besides, thermodynamic calculations of mineral saturation indices enabled an evaluation of the CO2-water-rock interactions and highlighted the dissolution of the Ca-bearing minerals in the studied solution.

  12. Heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a laser is mainly due to emission to the environment: an experimental ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, A; Ocker, M; Bartsch, D K; Quint, K

    2014-05-01

    Laser-directed resection of lung metastases is performed more frequently in recent years. The energy-loaded laser rays heat up the lung tissue, considerably. It is still unclear which mechanism is more important for tissue heat dissipation: the lung perfusion or the tissue emission. Therefore, we created a special experimental model to investigate the spontaneous heat dissipation after nonanatomical lung resection using a diode-pumped laser with a high output power. Experiments were conducted on paracardiac pig lung lobes (n = 12) freshly dissected at the slaughterhouse. Nonanatomical resection of lung parenchyma was performed without lobe perfusion in group 1 (n = 6), while group 2 (n = 6) was perfused at a physiological pressure of 25 cm H2O at 37 °C with saline via the pulmonary artery. For this, we used a diode-pumped neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) LIMAX® 120 laser (Gebrüder Martin GmbH & Co. KG, Tuttlingen, Germany) with a wavelength of 1,318 nm and a power output of 100 W. Immediately after completing laser resection, the lungs were monitored with an infrared camera (Type IC 120LV; Trotec, Heinsberg, Germany) while allowed to cool down. The resection surface temperature was taken at 10-s intervals and documented in a freeze-frame until a temperature of 37 °C had been reached. The temperature drop per time unit was analyzed in both groups. Immediately after laser resection, the temperature at the lung surface was 84.33 ± 8.08 °C in group 1 and 76.75 ± 5.33 °C in group 2 (p = 0.29). Group 1 attained the final temperature of 37 °C after 182.95 ± 53.76 s, and group 2 after 121.70 ± 16.02 s (p = 0.01). The temperature drop occurred exponentially in both groups. We calculated both groups' decays using nonlinear regression, which revealed nearly identical courses. The mean time of tissue temperature of >42 °C, as a surrogate marker for tissue damage, was 97.14 ± 26.90 s in group 1 and 65.00 ± 13.78 s in group 2 (p = 0.02). Heat

  13. Background sources at PEP

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, H.; Schwitters, R.F.; Toner, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    Important sources of background for PEP experiments are studied. Background particles originate from high-energy electrons and positrons which have been lost from stable orbits, ..gamma..-rays emitted by the primary beams through bremsstrahlung in the residual gas, and synchrotron radiation x-rays. The effect of these processes on the beam lifetime are calculated and estimates of background rates at the interaction region are given. Recommendations for the PEP design, aimed at minimizing background are presented. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Building Background Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Susan B.; Kaefer, Tanya; Pinkham, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    This article make a case for the importance of background knowledge in children's comprehension. It suggests that differences in background knowledge may account for differences in understanding text for low- and middle-income children. It then describes strategies for building background knowledge in the age of common core standards.

  15. Papilledema Due to Mirtazapine

    PubMed Central

    Ceylan, Mehmet Emin; Evrensel, Alper; Cömert, Gökçe

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mirtazapine is a tetracyclic antidepressant that enhances both noradrenergic and serotonergic transmission. The most common cause of papilledema is increased intracranial pressure due to brain tumor. Also it may occur as a result of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, pseudo tumor cerebri). Moreover, papilledema may also develop due to retinitis, vasculitis, Graves’ disease, hypertension, leukemia, lymphoma, diabetes mellitus and radiation. Case Report: In this article, a patient who developed papilledema while under treatment with mirtazapine (30 mg/day) for two years and recovered with termination of mirtazapine treatment was discussed to draw the attention of clinicians to this side effect of mirtazapine. Conclusion: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and papilledema due to psychotropic drugs has been reported in the literature. Mirtazapine may rarely cause peripheral edema. However, papilledema due to mirtazapine has not been previously reported. Although papilledema is a very rare side effect of an antidepressant treatment, fundoscopic examinations of patients must be performed regularly. PMID:27308085

  16. EPR Line Shifts and Line Shape Changes Due to Heisenberg Spin Exchange and Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Nitroxide Free Radicals in Liquids: 8. Further Experimental and Theoretical Efforts to Separate the Effects of the Two Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Peric, Mirna; Bales, Barney L; Peric, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    The work in Part 6 of this series (J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 4930), addressing the task of separating the effects of Heisenberg spin exchange (HSE) and dipole-dipole (DD) interactions on EPR spectra of nitroxide spin probes in solution, is extended experimentally and theoretically. Comprehensive measurements of perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDT) in squalane, a viscous alkane, paying special attention to lower temperatures and lower concentrations were carried out in an attempt to focus on DD, the lesser understood of the two interactions. Theoretically, the analysis has been extended to include the recent comprehensive treatment by Salikhov (Appl. Magn. Reson. 2010, 38, 237). In dilute solutions, both interactions (1) introduce a dispersion component, (2) broaden the lines, and (3) shift the lines. DD introduces a dispersion component proportional to the concentration and of opposite sign to that of HSE. Equations relating the EPR spectral parameters to the rate constants due HSE and DD have been derived. By employing non-linear least-squares fitting of theoretical spectra to a simple analytical function and the proposed equations, the contributions of the two interactions to items (1)–(3) may be quantified and compared with the same parameters obtained by fitting experimental spectra. This comparison supports the theory in its broad predictions, however, at low temperatures, the DD contribution to the experimental dispersion amplitude does not increase linearly with concentration. We are unable to deduce if this discrepancy is due to inadequate analysis of the experimental data or an incomplete theory. A key new aspect of the more comprehensive theory is that there is enough information in the experimental spectra to find items (1)–(3) due to both interactions; however, in principle, appeal must be made to a model of molecular diffusion to separate the two. The permanent diffusion model is used to illustrate the separation in this

  17. Electron paramagnetic resonance line shifts and line shape changes due to heisenberg spin exchange and dipole-dipole interactions of nitroxide free radicals in liquids 8. Further experimental and theoretical efforts to separate the effects of the two interactions.

    PubMed

    Peric, Mirna; Bales, Barney L; Peric, Miroslav

    2012-03-22

    The work in part 6 of this series (J. Phys. Chem. A 2009, 113, 4930), addressing the task of separating the effects of Heisenberg spin exchange (HSE) and dipole-dipole interactions (DD) on electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of nitroxide spin probes in solution, is extended experimentally and theoretically. Comprehensive measurements of perdeuterated 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-oxopiperidine-1-oxyl (pDT) in squalane, a viscous alkane, paying special attention to lower temperatures and lower concentrations, were carried out in an attempt to focus on DD, the lesser understood of the two interactions. Theoretically, the analysis has been extended to include the recent comprehensive treatment by Salikhov (Appl. Magn. Reson. 2010, 38, 237). In dilute solutions, both interactions (1) introduce a dispersion component, (2) broaden the lines, and (3) shift the lines. DD introduces a dispersion component proportional to the concentration and of opposite sign to that of HSE. Equations relating the EPR spectral parameters to the rate constants due to HSE and DD have been derived. By employing nonlinear least-squares fitting of theoretical spectra to a simple analytical function and the proposed equations, the contributions of the two interactions to items 1-3 may be quantified and compared with the same parameters obtained by fitting experimental spectra. This comparison supports the theory in its broad predictions; however, at low temperatures, the DD contribution to the experimental dispersion amplitude does not increase linearly with concentration. We are unable to deduce whether this discrepancy is due to inadequate analysis of the experimental data or an incomplete theory. A new key aspect of the more comprehensive theory is that there is enough information in the experimental spectra to find items 1-3 due to both interactions; however, in principle, appeal must be made to a model of molecular diffusion to separate the two. The permanent diffusion model is used to

  18. Gamma-ray Background Spectrum and Annihilation Rate in the Baryon-symmetric Big-bang Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puget, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt was made to acquire experimental information on the problem of baryon symmetry on a large cosmological scale by observing the annihilation products. Data cover absorption cross sections and background radiation due to other sources for the two main products of annihilation, gamma rays and neutrinos. Test results show that the best direct experimental test for the presence of large scale antimatter lies in the gamma ray background spectrum between 1 and 70 MeV.

  19. The Cosmic Background Explorer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gulkis, Samuel; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Outlines the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) mission to measure celestial radiation. Describes the instruments used and experiments involving differential microwave radiometers, and a far infrared absolute spectrophotometer. (YP)

  20. γ-Ray background sources in the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.

    2009-09-01

    An investigation of the gamma background was carried out in the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. This study, performed with a yttrium-aluminum-perovskite (YAP) scintillator, follows high resolution pulse height measurements of the gamma background carried out on the same instrument with the use of a high-purity germanium detector. In this experimental work, a mapping of the gamma background was attempted, trying to find the spatial distribution and degree of directionality of the different contributions identified in the previous study. It is found that the gamma background at low times is highly directional and mostly due to the gamma rays generated in the moderator-decoupler system. The other contributions, consistently to the findings of a previous experiment, are identified as a nearly isotropic one due to neutron absorption in the walls of the experimental hall, and a directional one coming from the beam dump.

  1. Backgrounds in Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, John C.; Long, Barbara K.

    "Backgrounds in Language," a field-tested inservice course designed for use by groups of 15 or 25 language arts teachers, provides the subject matter background teachers need to make informed decisions about what curriculum materials to use in what way, at what time, and with which students. The course is comprised of eight 2-hour sessions,…

  2. Correlators in nontrivial backgrounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mello Koch, Robert de; Ives, Norman; Stephanou, Michael

    2009-01-15

    Operators in N=4 super Yang-Mills theory with an R-charge of O(N{sup 2}) are dual to backgrounds which are asymtotically AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}. In this article we develop efficient techniques that allow the computation of correlation functions in these backgrounds. We find that (i) contractions between fields in the string words and fields in the operator creating the background are the field theory accounting of the new geometry, (ii) correlation functions of probes in these backgrounds are given by the free field theory contractions but with rescaled propagators and (iii) in these backgrounds there are no open string excitations with their special end point interactions; we have only closed string excitations.

  3. The cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dar, Arnon

    1991-01-01

    The cosmic neutrino background is expected to consist of relic neutrinos from the big bang, of neutrinos produced during nuclear burning in stars, of neutrinos released by gravitational stellar collapse, and of neutrinos produced by cosmic ray interactions with matter and radiation in the interstellar and intergalactic medium. Formation of baryonic dark matter in the early universe, matter-antimatter annihilation in a baryonic symmetric universe, and dark matter annihilation could have also contributed significantly to the cosmic neutrino background. The purpose of this paper is to review the properties of these cosmic neutrino backgrounds, the indirect evidence for their existence, and the prospects for their detection.

  4. Adaptive background model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaochun; Xiao, Yijun; Chai, Zhi; Wang, Bangping

    2007-11-01

    An adaptive background model aiming at outdoor vehicle detection is presented in this paper. This model is an improved model of PICA (pixel intensity classification algorithm), it classifies pixels into K-distributions by color similarity, and then a hypothesis that the background pixel color appears in image sequence with a high frequency is used to evaluate all the distributions to determine which presents the current background color. As experiments show, the model presented in this paper is a robust, adaptive and flexible model, which can deal with situations like camera motions, lighting changes and so on.

  5. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J.F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Mizuno, T.; Ritz, S.; /NASA, Goddard

    2007-10-17

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  6. The GLAST Background Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ormes, J. F.; Atwood, W.; Burnett, T.; Grove, E.; Longo, F.; McEnery, J.; Ritz, S.; Mizuno, T.

    2007-07-12

    In order to estimate the ability of the GLAST/LAT to reject unwanted background of charged particles, optimize the on-board processing, size the required telemetry and optimize the GLAST orbit, we developed a detailed model of the background particles that would affect the LAT. In addition to the well-known components of the cosmic radiation, we included splash and reentrant components of protons, electrons (e+ and e-) from 10 MeV and beyond as well as the albedo gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with the atmosphere. We made estimates of the irreducible background components produced by positrons and hadrons interacting in the multilayered micrometeorite shield and spacecraft surrounding the LAT and note that because the orbital debris has increased, the shielding required and hence the background are larger than were present in EGRET. Improvements to the model are currently being made to include the east-west effect.

  7. Background Studies for the pn-CCD Detector of CAST

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, A.; Beltran, B.; Cebrian, S.; Gomez, H.; Irastorza, I. G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, J.; Ruz, J.; Villar, J. A.; Hartmann, R.; Kotthaus, R.; Klose, C.; Kuster, M.; Strueder, L.

    2007-03-28

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) experiment searches for axions from the Sun converted into photons with energies up to around 10 keV via the inverse Primakoff effect in the high magnetic field of a superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) prototype magnet. A backside illuminated pn-CCD detector in conjunction with an X-ray mirror optics is one of the three detectors used in CAST to register the expected photon signal. Since this signal is very rare a detailed study of the detector background has been undertaken with the aim to understand and further reduce the background level of the detector. The analysis is based on measured data taken during the data taking period of 2003 and 2004 of CAST and on Monte Carlo simulations of background with different origin. The background study performed for this detector show that the level of background (8.00{+-}0.07)x10-5 counts cm-2 s-1 keV-1 between 1 and 7 keV is dominated by the external gamma background due to natural activities at the experimental site, while radioactive impurities in the detector itself and cosmic neutrons contribute with a smaller fraction.

  8. The Cosmic Background Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulkis, Samuel; Lubin, Philip M.; Meyer, Stephan S.; Silverberg, Robert F.

    1990-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (CBE), NASA's cosmological satellite which will observe a radiative relic of the big bang, is discussed. The major questions connected to the big bang theory which may be clarified using the CBE are reviewed. The satellite instruments and experiments are described, including the Differential Microwave Radiometer, which measures the difference between microwave radiation emitted from two points on the sky, the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer, which compares the spectrum of radiation from the sky at wavelengths from 100 microns to one cm with that from an internal blackbody, and the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment, which searches for the radiation from the earliest generation of stars.

  9. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-17

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  10. Berkeley Low Background Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, K. J.; Smith, A. R.; Poon, A. W. P.; Chan, Y. D.; Norman, E. B.; Lesko, K. T.

    2015-08-01

    The Berkeley Low Background Facility (BLBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background laboratory on the surface at LBNL and at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products; active screening via neutron activation analysis for U,Th, and K as well as a variety of stable isotopes; and neutron flux/beam characterization measurements through the use of monitors. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities will be presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be described including an overview of the recently installed counting system at SURF (recently relocated from Oroville, CA in 2014), the installation of a second underground counting station at SURF in 2015, and future plans. The BLBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  11. China: Background Notes Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reams, Joanne Reppert

    Concise background information on the People's Republic of China is provided. The publication begins with a profile of the country, outlining the people, geography, economy, and membership in international organizations. The bulk of the document then discusses in more detail China's people, geography, history, government, education, economy, and…

  12. Monitored background radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruel, C.; Larouche, M.; Donato, M.

    1986-01-01

    The infrared (IR) testing of the Olympus thermal model has provided a capability to perform cost effective thermal balance testing of satellites and satellite components. A high-accuracy monitored background radiometer was developed for the measurement of absorbed radiation heat flux encountered during IR thermal vacuum testing of spacecraft. The design, development, and calibration of this radiometer is described.

  13. Nonthermal cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    We point out that, for Dirac neutrinos, in addition to the standard thermal cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ), there could also exist a nonthermal neutrino background with comparable number density. As the right-handed components are essentially decoupled from the thermal bath of standard model particles, relic neutrinos with a nonthermal distribution may exist until today. The relic density of the nonthermal (nt) background can be constrained by the usual observational bounds on the effective number of massless degrees of freedom Neff and can be as large as nν nt≲0.5 nγ. In particular, Neff can be larger than 3.046 in the absence of any exotic states. Nonthermal relic neutrinos constitute an irreducible contribution to the detection of the C ν B and, hence, may be discovered by future experiments such as PTOLEMY. We also present a scenario of chaotic inflation in which a nonthermal background can naturally be generated by inflationary preheating. The nonthermal relic neutrinos, thus, may constitute a novel window into the very early Universe.

  14. Foregrounding the Background.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    Argues that when introductory activities to the classics begin with background information, it can upstage or confine the life of the story, and shows little faith in the students as readers or in the literature itself. Suggests sometimes letting the literature begin, and then helping students make sense of it. Discusses examples from "To Kill a…

  15. Background illumination simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Towry, E.R.

    1992-05-12

    This patent describes a testing apparatus for testing and evaluating the performance of laser seeking warheads for missiles, under simulated weather conditions. It comprises support means for supporting a warhead seeker; laser means for generating a laser beam and for directing a laser beam towards the seeker; a diffusion screen interposed between the seeker support means and the laser means for diffusing the laser beam; a collimating lens interposed between the diffusion screen and the seeker support means for collimating the diffused laser beam and for directing the collimated laser beam onto a warhead seeker, supported in the seeker support; background illuminator means for illuminating the seeker support and a seeker disposed therein, supported for movement into and out of an operating position between the diffusion means and the collimating lens for providing background lighting in simulation of weather lighting conditions; and control means for controlling the intensity of the light provided by the illuminator means to simulate various weather conditions.

  16. Some background about satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Joseph A.

    1986-01-01

    Four tables of planetary and satellite data are presented which list satellite discoveries, planetary parameters, satellite orbits, and satellite physical properties respectively. A scheme for classifying the satellites is provided and it is noted that most known moons fall into three general classes: regular satellites, collisional shards, and irregular satellites. Satellite processes are outlined with attention given to origins, dynamical and thermal evolution, surface processes, and composition and cratering. Background material is provided for each family of satellites.

  17. Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, William A.; Gursky, Herbert; Heckathorn, Harry M.; Lucke, Bob L.; Dorland, Bryan N.; Kessel, R. A.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.

    1994-09-01

    The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) is the designated archive for backgrounds data collected by Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) programs, some of which include ultraviolet sensors. Currently, the BDC holds ultraviolet data from the IBSS, UVPI, UVLIM, and FUVCAM sensors. The BDC will also be the prime archive for Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) data and is prepared to negotiate with program managers to handle other datasets. The purpose of the BDC is to make data accessible to users and to assist them in analyzing it. The BDC maintains the Science Catalog Information Exchange System (SCIES) allowing remote users to log in, read or post notices about current programs, search the catalogs for datasets of interest, and submit orders for data. On-site facilities are also available for the analysis of data, and consist of VMS and UNIX workstations with access to software analysis packages such as IDL, IRAF, and Khoros. Either on-site or remotely, users can employ the BDC-developed graphical user interface called the Visual Interface for Space and Terrestrial Analysis (VISTA) to generate catalog queries and to display and analyze data. SCIES and VISTA permit nearly complete access to BDC services and capabilities without the need to be physically present at the data center.

  18. The Backgrounds Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, W. A.; Gursky, H.; Heckathorn, H. M.; Lucke, R. L.; Berg, S. L.; Dombrowski, E. G.; Kessel, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization has created data centers for midcourse, plumes, and backgrounds phenomenologies. The Backgrounds Data Center (BDC) has been designated as the prime archive for data collected by SDIO programs. The BDC maintains a Summary Catalog that contains 'metadata,' that is, information about data, such as when the data were obtained, what the spectral range of the data is, and what region of the Earth or sky was observed. Queries to this catalog result in a listing of all data sets (from all experiments in the Summary Catalog) that satisfy the specified criteria. Thus, the user can identify different experiments that made similar observations and order them from the BDC for analysis. On-site users can use the Science Analysis Facility (SAFE for this purpose. For some programs, the BDC maintains a Program Catalog, which can classify data in as many ways as desired (rather than just by position, time, and spectral range as in the Summary Catalog). For example, data sets could be tagged with such diverse parameters as solar illumination angle, signal level, or the value of a particular spectral ratio, as long as these quantities can be read from the digital record or calculated from it by the ingest program. All unclassified catalogs and unclassified data will be remotely accessible.

  19. Stochastic gravitational wave background from light cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    DePies, Matthew R.; Hogan, Craig J.

    2007-06-15

    Spectra of the stochastic gravitational wave backgrounds from cosmic strings are calculated and compared with present and future experimental limits. Motivated by theoretical expectations of light cosmic strings in superstring cosmology, improvements in experimental sensitivity, and recent demonstrations of large, stable loop formation from a primordial network, this study explores a new range of string parameters with masses lighter than previously investigated. A standard 'one-scale' model for string loop formation is assumed. Background spectra are calculated numerically for dimensionless string tensions G{mu}/c{sup 2} between 10{sup -7} and 10{sup -18}, and initial loop sizes as a fraction of the Hubble radius {alpha} from 0.1 to 10{sup -6}. The spectra show a low frequency power-law tail, a broad spectral peak due to loops decaying at the present epoch (including frequencies higher than their fundamental mode, and radiation associated with cusps), and a flat (constant energy density) spectrum at high frequencies due to radiation from loops that decayed during the radiation-dominated era. The string spectrum is distinctive and unlike any other known source. The peak of the spectrum for light strings appears at high frequencies, significantly affecting predicted signals. The spectra of the cosmic string backgrounds are compared with current millisecond pulsar limits and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) sensitivity curves. For models with large stable loops ({alpha}=0.1), current pulsar-timing limits exclude G{mu}/c{sup 2}>10{sup -9}, a much tighter limit on string tension than achievable with other techniques, and within the range of current models based on brane inflation. LISA may detect a background from strings as light as G{mu}/c{sup 2}{approx_equal}10{sup -16}, corresponding to field theory strings formed at roughly 10{sup 11} GeV.

  20. Video coding with dynamic background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Manoranjan; Lin, Weisi; Lau, Chiew Tong; Lee, Bu-Sung

    2013-12-01

    Motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation (MC) using variable block size, sub-pixel search, and multiple reference frames (MRFs) are the major reasons for improved coding performance of the H.264 video coding standard over other contemporary coding standards. The concept of MRFs is suitable for repetitive motion, uncovered background, non-integer pixel displacement, lighting change, etc. The requirement of index codes of the reference frames, computational time in ME & MC, and memory buffer for coded frames limits the number of reference frames used in practical applications. In typical video sequences, the previous frame is used as a reference frame with 68-92% of cases. In this article, we propose a new video coding method using a reference frame [i.e., the most common frame in scene (McFIS)] generated by dynamic background modeling. McFIS is more effective in terms of rate-distortion and computational time performance compared to the MRFs techniques. It has also inherent capability of scene change detection (SCD) for adaptive group of picture (GOP) size determination. As a result, we integrate SCD (for GOP determination) with reference frame generation. The experimental results show that the proposed coding scheme outperforms the H.264 video coding with five reference frames and the two relevant state-of-the-art algorithms by 0.5-2.0 dB with less computational time.

  1. Maritime infrared background clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwering, Piet B. W.

    1996-06-01

    The detection of small targets in maritime infrared surveillance is hampered by the presence of clutter. Sea surface structure, reflection and emission changes related to incident angle variations and surface effects are standard features governing the clutter behavior. Also special effects as sun glint and horizon effects play an important role for clutter. In order to optimize the detection process, quantitative clutter estimates are of use for filter settings. We have recorded a large amount of infrared backgrounds in the last few years, during common NATO trials. A large amount of different meteorological conditions took place during the various experiments. A first set of these data have been analyzed to obtain statistical data that represent the infrared scene. We have derived vertical temperature profiles, vertical fluctuation profiles, horizontal correlation coefficients and temporal correlation functions. In this paper we present the first analysis of these data. We are in the process of obtaining a condensed database of information to regenerate clutter images from bulk meteo parameters, and clutter parameters. The clutter and meteo parameters have been used to simulate various infrared scenes. Examples of this simulation process are shown in the presentation. The simulated images are statistically similar to the original images that were used to derive the parameters. A description of the image- generation is presented. Future expansions of the model are discussed.

  2. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  3. The cosmic background explorer

    SciTech Connect

    Gulkis, G. ); Lubin, P.M. ); Meyer, S.S. ); Silverberg, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Late last year the National Aeronautics and Space Administration launched its first satellite dedicated to the study of phenomena related to the origins of the universe. The satellite, called the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), carries three complementary detectors that will make fundamental measurements of the celestial radiation. Part of that radiation is believed to have originated in processes that occurred at the very dawn of the universe. By measuring the remnant radiation at wavelengths from one micrometer to one centimeter across the entire sky, scientists hope to be able to solve many mysteries regarding the origin and evolution of the early universe. Unfortunately, these radiative relics of the early universe are weak and veiled by local astrophysical and terrestrial sources of radiation. The wavelengths of the various cosmic components may also overlap, thereby making the understanding of the diffuse celestial radiation a challenge. Nevertheless, the COBE instruments, with their full-sky coverage, high sensitivity to a wide range of wavelengths and freedom from interference from the earth's atmosphere, will constitute for astrophysicists an observatory of unprecedented sensitivity and scope. The interesting cosmic signals will then be separated from one another and from noncosmic radiation sources by a comprehensive analysis of the data.

  4. Genetical background of intelligence.

    PubMed

    Junkiert-Czarnecka, Anna; Haus, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Intelligence as an ability to reason, think abstractly and adapt effectively to the environment is a subject of research in the field of psychology, neurobiology, and in the last twenty years genetics as well. Genetical testing of twins carried out from XX century indicated heritebility of intelligence, therefore confirmed an influence of genetic factor on cognitive processes. Studies on genetic background of intelligence focus on dopaminergic (DRD2, DRD4, COMT, SLC6A3, DAT1, CCKAR) and adrenergic system (ADRB2, CHRM2) genes as well as, neutrofins (BDNF) and oxidative stress genes (LTF, PRNP). Positive effect of investigated gene polymorphism was indicated by variation c.957C>T DRD2 gene (if in polymorphic site is thymine), polymorphism c.472G>A COMT gene (presence of adenine) and also gene ADRB2 c.46A->G (guanine), CHRM2 (thymine in place c.1890A>T) and BDNF (guanine in place c.472G>A) Obtained results indicate that intelligence is a feature dependent not only on genetic but also an environmental factor. PMID:27333929

  5. Characterization and Prediction of the SPI Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Jean, P.; Knodlseder, J.; Skinner, G. K.; Weidenspointer, G.

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Spectrometer, like most gamma-ray instruments, is background dominated. Signal-to-background ratios of a few percent are typical. The background is primarily due to interactions of cosmic rays in the instrument and spacecraft. It characteristically varies by +/- 5% on time scales of days. This variation is caused mainly by fluctuations in the interplanetary magnetic field that modulates the cosmic ray intensity. To achieve the maximum performance from SPI it is essential to have a high quality model of this background that can predict its value to a fraction of a percent. In this poster we characterize the background and its variability, explore various models, and evaluate the accuracy of their predictions.

  6. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  7. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  8. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  9. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  10. 32 CFR 770.42 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ACCESS TO PARTICULAR INSTALLATIONS Base Entry Regulations for Naval Submarine Base New London, Groton, Connecticut § 770.42 Background. Naval Submarine Base New London maintains and operates facilities to support training and experimental operations of the submarine force including providing support to...

  11. Background sources in optical communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The characterization and measurement of background radiation relevant to optical communications system performance is addressed. The necessary optical receiver parameters are described, and radiometric concepts required for the calculation of collected background power are developed. The most important components of optical background power are discussed, and their contribution to the total collected background power in various communications scenarios is examined.

  12. High-energy radiation background in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr. (Editor); Trombka, J. I. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The radiation environment of near-earth space and its effects on biological and hardware systems are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to particle interactions and propagation, data bases, instrument background and dosimetry, detectors and experimental progress, biological effects, and future needs and strategies. Particular attention is given to angular distributions and spectra of geomagnetically trapped protons in LEO, bremsstrahlung production by electrons, nucleon-interaction data bases for background estimates, instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, the GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica, space protons and brain tumors, a new radioprotective antioxidative agent, LEO radiation measurements on the Space Station, and particle-background effects on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Lyman FUV Spectroscopic Explorer.

  13. High-energy radiation background in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rester, A. C., Jr.; Trombka, J. I.

    The radiation environment of near-earth space and its effects on biological and hardware systems are examined in reviews and reports. Sections are devoted to particle interactions and propagation, data bases, instrument background and dosimetry, detectors and experimental progress, biological effects, and future needs and strategies. Particular attention is given to angular distributions and spectra of geomagnetically trapped protons in LEO, bremsstrahlung production by electrons, nucleon-interaction data bases for background estimates, instrumental and atmospheric background lines observed by the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer, the GRAD high-altitude balloon flight over Antarctica, space protons and brain tumors, a new radioprotective antioxidative agent, LEO radiation measurements on the Space Station, and particle-background effects on the Hubble Space Telescope and the Lyman FUV Spectroscopic Explorer.

  14. Holographic thermalization in a quark confining background

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, D. S. Aref’eva, I. Ya.

    2015-03-15

    We study holographic thermalization of a strongly coupled theory inspired by two colliding shock waves in a vacuum confining background. Holographic thermalization means a black hole formation, in fact, a trapped surface formation. As the vacuum confining background, we considered the well-know bottom-up AdS/QCD model that provides the Cornell potential and reproduces the QCD β-function. We perturb the vacuum background by colliding domain shock waves that are assumed to be holographically dual to heavy ions collisions. Our main physical assumption is that we can make a restriction on the time of trapped surface formation, which results in a natural limitation on the size of the domain where the trapped surface is produced. This limits the intermediate domain where the main part of the entropy is produced. In this domain, we can use an intermediate vacuum background as an approximation to the full confining background. We find that the dependence of the multiplicity on energy for the intermediate background has an asymptotic expansion whose first term depends on energy as E{sup 1/3}, which is very similar to the experimental dependence of particle multiplicities on the colliding ion energy obtained from the RHIC and LHC. However, this first term, at the energies where the approximation of the confining metric by the intermediate background works, does not saturate the exact answer, and we have to take the nonleading terms into account.

  15. 16 CFR 1402.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ANTENNAS, TV ANTENNAS, AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES § 1402.2 Background. As a result of numerous electrocutions which have occurred when consumers contacted powerlines with CB base station and outside TV... antennas, outside TV antennas, and supporting structures due to contact with overhead powerlines....

  16. 16 CFR 1402.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ANTENNAS, TV ANTENNAS, AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES § 1402.2 Background. As a result of numerous electrocutions which have occurred when consumers contacted powerlines with CB base station and outside TV... antennas, outside TV antennas, and supporting structures due to contact with overhead powerlines....

  17. 16 CFR 1402.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ANTENNAS, TV ANTENNAS, AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES § 1402.2 Background. As a result of numerous electrocutions which have occurred when consumers contacted powerlines with CB base station and outside TV... antennas, outside TV antennas, and supporting structures due to contact with overhead powerlines....

  18. 16 CFR 1402.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ANTENNAS, TV ANTENNAS, AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES § 1402.2 Background. As a result of numerous electrocutions which have occurred when consumers contacted powerlines with CB base station and outside TV... antennas, outside TV antennas, and supporting structures due to contact with overhead powerlines....

  19. 16 CFR 1402.2 - Background.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ANTENNAS, TV ANTENNAS, AND SUPPORTING STRUCTURES § 1402.2 Background. As a result of numerous electrocutions which have occurred when consumers contacted powerlines with CB base station and outside TV... antennas, outside TV antennas, and supporting structures due to contact with overhead powerlines....

  20. Neurobiological background of negative symptoms.

    PubMed

    Galderisi, Silvana; Merlotti, Eleonora; Mucci, Armida

    2015-10-01

    Studies investigating neurobiological bases of negative symptoms of schizophrenia failed to provide consistent findings, possibly due to the heterogeneity of this psychopathological construct. We tried to review the findings published to date investigating neurobiological abnormalities after reducing the heterogeneity of the negative symptoms construct. The literature in electronic databases as well as citations and major articles are reviewed with respect to the phenomenology, pathology, genetics and neurobiology of schizophrenia. We searched PubMed with the keywords "negative symptoms," "deficit schizophrenia," "persistent negative symptoms," "neurotransmissions," "neuroimaging" and "genetic." Additional articles were identified by manually checking the reference lists of the relevant publications. Publications in English were considered, and unpublished studies, conference abstracts and poster presentations were not included. Structural and functional imaging studies addressed the issue of neurobiological background of negative symptoms from several perspectives (considering them as a unitary construct, focusing on primary and/or persistent negative symptoms and, more recently, clustering them into factors), but produced discrepant findings. The examined studies provided evidence suggesting that even primary and persistent negative symptoms include different psychopathological constructs, probably reflecting the dysfunction of different neurobiological substrates. Furthermore, they suggest that complex alterations in multiple neurotransmitter systems and genetic variants might influence the expression of negative symptoms in schizophrenia. On the whole, the reviewed findings, representing the distillation of a large body of disparate data, suggest that further deconstruction of negative symptomatology into more elementary components is needed to gain insight into underlying neurobiological mechanisms. PMID:25797499

  1. CERN-derived analysis of lunar radiation backgrounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Thomas L.; Svoboda, Robert

    1993-01-01

    The Moon produces radiation which background-limits scientific experiments there. Early analyses of these backgrounds have either failed to take into consideration the effect of charm in particle physics (because they pre-dated its discovery), or have used branching ratios which are no longer strictly valid (due to new accelerator data). We are presently investigating an analytical program for deriving muon and neutrino spectra generated by the Moon, converting an existing CERN computer program known as GEANT which does the same for the Earth. In so doing, this will (1) determine an accurate prompt neutrino spectrum produced by the lunar surface; (2) determine the lunar subsurface particle flux; (3) determine the consequence of charm production physics upon the lunar background radiation environment; and (4) provide an analytical tool for the NASA astrophysics community with which to begin an assessment of the Moon as a scientific laboratory versus its particle radiation environment. This will be done on a recurring basis with the latest experimental results of the particle data groups at Earth-based high-energy accelerators, in particular with the latest branching ratios for charmed meson decay. This will be accomplished for the first time as a full 3-dimensional simulation.

  2. Binarization algorithm for document image with complex background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Shaojun; Lu, Tongwei; Min, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The most important step in image preprocessing for Optical Character Recognition (OCR) is binarization. Due to the complex background or varying light in the text image, binarization is a very difficult problem. This paper presents the improved binarization algorithm. The algorithm can be divided into several steps. First, the background approximation can be obtained by the polynomial fitting, and the text is sharpened by using bilateral filter. Second, the image contrast compensation is done to reduce the impact of light and improve contrast of the original image. Third, the first derivative of the pixels in the compensated image are calculated to get the average value of the threshold, then the edge detection is obtained. Fourth, the stroke width of the text is estimated through a measuring of distance between edge pixels. The final stroke width is determined by choosing the most frequent distance in the histogram. Fifth, according to the value of the final stroke width, the window size is calculated, then a local threshold estimation approach can begin to binaries the image. Finally, the small noise is removed based on the morphological operators. The experimental result shows that the proposed method can effectively remove the noise caused by complex background and varying light.

  3. Beam induced backgrounds: CDF experience

    SciTech Connect

    Tesarek, R.J.; /Fermilab

    2008-05-01

    We summarize the experiences of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment in the presence of backgrounds originating from the counter circulating beams in the Fermilab Tevatron. These backgrounds are measured and their sources identified. Finally, we outline the strategies employed to reduce the effects of these backgrounds on the experiment.

  4. Resonant Raman scattering background in XRF spectra of binary samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Héctor Jorge; Leani, Juan José

    2015-02-01

    In x-ray fluorescence analysis, spectra present singular characteristics produced by the different scattering processes. When atoms are irradiated with incident energy lower and close to an absorption edge, scattering peaks appear due to an inelastic process known as resonant Raman scattering. In this work we present theoretical calculations of the resonant Raman scattering contributions to the background of x-ray fluorescence spectra of binary samples of current technological or biological interest. On one hand, a binary alloy of Fe with traces of Mn (Mn: 0.01%, Fe: 99.99%) was studied because of its importance in the stainless steels industries. On the second hand a pure sample of Ti with V traces (Ti: 99%, V: 1%) was analyzed due to the current relevance in medical applications. In order to perform the calculations the Shiraiwa and Fujino's model was used to calculate characteristic intensities and scattering interactions. This model makes certain assumptions and approximations to achieve the calculations, especially in the case of the geometrical conditions and the incident and take-off beams. For the binary sample studied in this work and the considered experimental conditions, the calculations show that the resonant Raman scattering background is significant under the fluorescent peak, affects the symmetry of the peaks and, depending on the concentrations, overcomes the enhancements contributions (secondary fluorescence).

  5. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-03-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  6. Extragalactic background light measurements and applications

    PubMed Central

    Cooray, Asantha

    2016-01-01

    This review covers the measurements related to the extragalactic background light intensity from γ-rays to radio in the electromagnetic spectrum over 20 decades in wavelength. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) remains the best measured spectrum with an accuracy better than 1%. The measurements related to the cosmic optical background (COB), centred at 1 μm, are impacted by the large zodiacal light associated with interplanetary dust in the inner Solar System. The best measurements of COB come from an indirect technique involving γ-ray spectra of bright blazars with an absorption feature resulting from pair-production off of COB photons. The cosmic infrared background (CIB) peaking at around 100 μm established an energetically important background with an intensity comparable to the optical background. This discovery paved the way for large aperture far-infrared and sub-millimetre observations resulting in the discovery of dusty, starbursting galaxies. Their role in galaxy formation and evolution remains an active area of research in modern-day astrophysics. The extreme UV (EUV) background remains mostly unexplored and will be a challenge to measure due to the high Galactic background and absorption of extragalactic photons by the intergalactic medium at these EUV/soft X-ray energies. We also summarize our understanding of the spatial anisotropies and angular power spectra of intensity fluctuations. We motivate a precise direct measurement of the COB between 0.1 and 5 μm using a small aperture telescope observing either from the outer Solar System, at distances of 5 AU or more, or out of the ecliptic plane. Other future applications include improving our understanding of the background at TeV energies and spectral distortions of CMB and CIB. PMID:27069645

  7. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    DOE PAGESBeta

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutronmore » background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.« less

  8. Enhancements to the MCNP6 background source

    SciTech Connect

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.

    2015-10-19

    The particle transport code MCNP has been used to produce a background radiation data file on a worldwide grid that can easily be sampled as a source in the code. Location-dependent cosmic showers were modeled by Monte Carlo methods to produce the resulting neutron and photon background flux at 2054 locations around Earth. An improved galactic-cosmic-ray feature was used to model the source term as well as data from multiple sources to model the transport environment through atmosphere, soil, and seawater. A new elevation scaling feature was also added to the code to increase the accuracy of the cosmic neutron background for user locations with off-grid elevations. Furthermore, benchmarking has shown the neutron integral flux values to be within experimental error.

  9. Neutrino refraction by the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, J. S.; Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2016-03-01

    We have determined the dispersion relation of a neutrino test particle propagating in the cosmic neutrino background. Describing the relic neutrinos and antineutrinos from the hot big bang as a dense medium, a matter potential or refractive index is obtained. The vacuum neutrino mixing angles are unchanged, but the energy of each mass state is modified. Using a matrix in the space of neutrino species, the induced potential is decomposed into a part which produces signatures in beta-decay experiments and another part which modifies neutrino oscillations. The low temperature of the relic neutrinos makes a direct detection extremely challenging. From a different point of view, the identified refractive effects of the cosmic neutrino background constitute an ultralow background for future experimental studies of nonvanishing Lorentz violation in the neutrino sector.

  10. An analytical approach for treating background in spectral analysis measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Ian; Holmes, Thomas W.; Gardner, Robin P.

    2015-11-01

    A method of determining the spectral shape of background radiation present in experimental spectra via a mathematical approach is presented. Elements of interest will be subtracted from an experimental spectrum using the linear correlation coefficient across a characteristic peak to determine their contribution. Once all elements of interest are removed, the remainder of the experimental spectrum should represent an approximation of the background. This approximation can then be used in conjunction with library least-squares to determine the background and elemental contributions to the unknown spectrum.

  11. Current relaxation due to hot carrier scattering in graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Dong; Divin, Charles; Mihnev, Momchil; Winzer, Torben; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas; Sipe, John E.; Berger, Claire; de Heer, Walt A.; First, Phillip N.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we present direct time-domain investigations of the relaxation of electric currents in graphene due to hot carrier scattering. We use coherent control with ultrashort optical pulses to photoinject a current and detect the terahertz (THz) radiation emitted by the resulting current surge. We pre-inject a background of hot carriers using a separate pump pulse, with a variable delay between the pump and current-injection pulses. We find the effect of the hot carrier background is to reduce the current and hence the emitted THz radiation. The current damping is determined simply by the density (or temperature) of the thermal carriers. The experimental behavior is accurately reproduced in a microscopic theory, which correctly incorporates the nonconservation of velocity in scattering between Dirac fermions. The results indicate that hot carriers are effective in damping the current, and are expected to be important for understanding the operation of high-speed graphene electronic devices.

  12. Diffuse Cosmic Infrared Background Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, Eli

    2002-01-01

    The diffuse cosmic infrared background (CIB) consists of the cumulative radiant energy released in the processes of structure formation that have occurred since the decoupling of matter and radiation following the Big Bang. In this lecture I will review the observational data that provided the first detections and limits on the CIB, and the theoretical studies explaining the origin of this background. Finally, I will also discuss the relevance of this background to the universe as seen in high energy gamma-rays.

  13. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Bruce; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean; Jordan, David; Kulisek, Jonathan; Stewart, Trevor; Seifert, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km - 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRlS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  14. Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

    2014-06-13

    Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

  15. Measuring anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Safdi, Benjamin R.; Tully, Christopher G.

    2014-10-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (C ν B ). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are antialigned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, C ν B observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the C ν B is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain nonstandard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neutrinos.

  16. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, R.L.; Ambrose, W.P.; Demas, J.N.; Goodwin, P.M.; Johnson, M.E.; Keller, R.A.; Petty, J.T.; Schecker, J.A.; Wu, M.

    1998-11-10

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region. 6 figs.

  17. Apparatus for reducing solvent luminescence background emissions

    DOEpatents

    Affleck, Rhett L.; Ambrose, W. Patrick; Demas, James N.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Johnson, Mitchell E.; Keller, Richard A.; Petty, Jeffrey T.; Schecker, Jay A.; Wu, Ming

    1998-01-01

    The detectability of luminescent molecules in solution is enhanced by reducing the background luminescence due to impurity species also present in the solution. A light source that illuminates the solution acts to photolyze the impurities so that the impurities do not luminesce in the fluorescence band of the molecule of interest. Molecules of interest may be carried through the photolysis region in the solution or may be introduced into the solution after the photolysis region.

  18. Natural inflation in 5D warped backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Felipe, R.; Santos, N. M. C.

    2008-07-01

    In light of the five-year data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), we discuss models of inflation based on the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone potential predicted in five-dimensional gauge theories for different backgrounds: flat Minkowski, anti de Sitter, and dilatonic spacetime. In this framework, the inflaton potential is naturally flat due to shift symmetries and the mass scales associated with it are related to 5D geometrical quantities.

  19. Background reduction in cryogenic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Daniel A.; /Fermilab

    2005-04-01

    This paper discusses the background reduction and rejection strategy of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment. Recent measurements of background levels from CDMS II at Soudan are presented, along with estimates for future improvements in sensitivity expected for a proposed SuperCDMS experiment at SNOLAB.

  20. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  1. Computerized Placement Tests: Background Readings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, Princeton, NJ.

    This document is a compilation of background readings for the user of Computerized Placement Tests (CPTs) developed by the College Board for student placement purposes. CPTs are computerized adaptive tests that test the individual abilities and backgrounds of examinees. CPTs are part of the ACCUPLACER student information management system. The…

  2. FAMILY BACKGROUND OF RURAL YOUTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    COPP, JAMES H.

    FAMILY BACKGROUNDS OF RURAL YOUTH ARE DISCUSSED. THE BACKGROUND PROVIDED BY THE FAMILY HAS IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ADJUSTMENT OF RURAL YOUTH IN AN URBANIZED, HIGHLY TECHNICAL SOCIETY. THE BASIC ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS OF RURAL AREAS INFLUENCE THE RATE OF SOCIAL CHANGE, THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FAMILY AS A SOCIAL UNIT, AND THE ORIENTATION TOWARD LEGAL…

  3. Background Television and Reading Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, G. Blake; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Tests G. Armstrong's and B. Greenberg's model of the effect of background television on cognitive performance, applied to reading comprehension and memory. Finds significant deleterious effects of background television, stronger and more consistent effects when testing immediately after reading, and more consistently negative effects resulting…

  4. Background events in microchannel plates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; Vallerga, J.; Wargelin, B.

    1988-01-01

    Measurements have been made to assess the characteristics and origins of background events in microchannel plates (MCPs). An overall background rate of about 0.4 events/sq cm persec has been achieved consistently for MCPs that have been baked and scrubbed. The temperature and gain of the MCPs are found to have no significant effect on the background rate. Detection of 1.46-MeV gamma rays from the MCP glass confirms the presence of K-40, with a concentration of 0.0007 percent, in MCP glass. It is shown that beta decay from K-40 is sufficient to cause the background rate and spectrum observed. Anticoincidence measurements indicate the the background rate caused by cosmic ray interactions is small (less than 0.016 events/sq cm per sec).

  5. Visual signal detection in structured backgrounds. II. Effects of contrast gain control, background variations, and white noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckstein, M. P.; Ahumada, A. J. Jr; Watson, A. B.

    1997-01-01

    Studies of visual detection of a signal superimposed on one of two identical backgrounds show performance degradation when the background has high contrast and is similar in spatial frequency and/or orientation to the signal. To account for this finding, models include a contrast gain control mechanism that pools activity across spatial frequency, orientation and space to inhibit (divisively) the response of the receptor sensitive to the signal. In tasks in which the observer has to detect a known signal added to one of M different backgrounds grounds due to added visual noise, the main sources of degradation are the stochastic noise in the image and the suboptimal visual processing. We investigate how these two sources of degradation (contrast gain control and variations in the background) interact in a task in which the signal is embedded in one of M locations in a complex spatially varying background (structured background). We use backgrounds extracted from patient digital medical images. To isolate effects of the fixed deterministic background (the contrast gain control) from the effects of the background variations, we conduct detection experiments with three different background conditions: (1) uniform background, (2) a repeated sample of structured background, and (3) different samples of structured background. Results show that human visual detection degrades from the uniform background condition to the repeated background condition and degrades even further in the different backgrounds condition. These results suggest that both the contrast gain control mechanism and the background random variations degrade human performance in detection of a signal in a complex, spatially varying background. A filter model and added white noise are used to generate estimates of sampling efficiencies, an equivalent internal noise, an equivalent contrast-gain-control-induced noise, and an equivalent noise due to the variations in the structured background.

  6. A review on natural background radiation

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Gholami, Mehrdad; Setayandeh, Samaneh

    2013-01-01

    The world is naturally radioactive and approximately 82% of human-absorbed radiation doses, which are out of control, arise from natural sources such as cosmic, terrestrial, and exposure from inhalation or intake radiation sources. In recent years, several international studies have been carried out, which have reported different values regarding the effect of background radiation on human health. Gamma radiation emitted from natural sources (background radiation) is largely due to primordial radionuclides, mainly 232Th and 238U series, and their decay products, as well as 40K, which exist at trace levels in the earth's crust. Their concentrations in soil, sands, and rocks depend on the local geology of each region in the world. Naturally occurring radioactive materials generally contain terrestrial-origin radionuclides, left over since the creation of the earth. In addition, the existence of some springs and quarries increases the dose rate of background radiation in some regions that are known as high level background radiation regions. The type of building materials used in houses can also affect the dose rate of background radiations. The present review article was carried out to consider all of the natural radiations, including cosmic, terrestrial, and food radiation. PMID:24223380

  7. Background reduction in the SNO+ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segui, L.

    2015-08-01

    SNO+ is a large multi-purpose liquid scintillator experiment, which first aim is to detect the neutrinoless double beta decay of 130Te. It is placed at SNOLAB, at 6000 m.w.e. and it is based on the SNO infrastructure. SNO+ will contain approximately 780 tonnes of liquid scintillator, loaded with 130Te inside an acrylic vessel (AV) with an external volume of ultra pure water to reduce the external backgrounds. Light produced in the scintillator by the interaction of particles will be detected with about 9,000 photomultiplier's. For the neutrinoless double beta decay phase, due to its the extremely low rate expected, the control, knowledge and reduction of the background is essential. Moreover, it will also benefit other phases of the experiment focused on the study of solar neutrinos, nucleon decay, geoneutrinos and supernovae. In order to reduce the internal background level, a novel purification technique for tellurium loaded scintillators has been developed by the collaboration that reduces the U/Th concentration and several cosmic-activated isotopes by at least a factor 102 -103 in a single pass. In addition, different rejection techniques have been developed for the remaining internal backgrounds based on Monte-Carlo simulations. In this work, the scintillator purification technique and the levels obtained with it will be discussed. Furthermore, an overview of the different backgrounds for the double-beta phase will be presented, highlighting some of the techniques developed to reject the remained decays based on their expected timing differences.

  8. The background in the experiment Gerda

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, M.; Allardt, M.; Andreotti, E.; Bakalyarov, A. M.; Balata, M.; Barabanov, I.; Barnabé Heider, M.; Barros, N.; Baudis, L.; Bauer, C.; Becerici-Schmidt, N.; Bellotti, E.; Belogurov, S.; Belyaev, S. T.; Benato, G.; Bettini, A.; Bezrukov, L.; Bode, T.; Brudanin, V.; Brugnera, R.; Budjáš, D.; Caldwell, A.; Cattadori, C.; Chernogorov, A.; Cossavella, F.; Demidova, E. V.; Domula, A.; Egorov, V.; Falkenstein, R.; Ferella, A.; Freund, K.; Frodyma, N.; Gangapshev, A.; Garfagnini, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabmayr, P.; Gurentsov, V.; Gusev, K.; Guthikonda, K. K.; Hampel, W.; Hegai, A.; Heisel, M.; Hemmer, S.; Heusser, G.; Hofmann, W.; Hult, M.; Inzhechik, L. V.; Ioannucci, L.; Csáthy, J. Janicskó; Jochum, J.; Junker, M.; Kihm, T.; Kirpichnikov, I. V.; Kirsch, A.; Klimenko, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Kochetov, O.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kuzminov, V. V.; Laubenstein, M.; Lazzaro, A.; Lebedev, V. I.; Lehnert, B.; Liao, H. Y.; Lindner, M.; Lippi, I.; Liu, X.; Lubashevskiy, A.; Lubsandorzhiev, B.; Lutter, G.; Macolino, C.; Machado, A. A.; Majorovits, B.; Maneschg, W.; Nemchenok, I.; Nisi, S.; O'Shaughnessy, C.; Palioselitis, D.; Pandola, L.; Pelczar, K.; Pessina, G.; Pullia, A.; Riboldi, S.; Sada, C.; Salathe, M.; Schmitt, C.; Schreiner, J.; Schulz, O.; Schwingenheuer, B.; Schönert, S.; Shevchik, E.; Shirchenko, M.; Simgen, H.; Smolnikov, A.; Stanco, L.; Strecker, H.; Tarka, M.; Ur, C. A.; Vasenko, A. A.; Volynets, O.; von Sturm, K.; Wagner, V.; Walter, M.; Wegmann, A.; Wester, T.; Wojcik, M.; Yanovich, E.; Zavarise, P.; Zhitnikov, I.; Zhukov, S. V.; Zinatulina, D.; Zuber, K.; Zuzel, G.

    2014-04-01

    The GERmanium Detector Array ( Gerda) experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) of INFN is searching for neutrinoless double beta () decay of Ge. The signature of the signal is a monoenergetic peak at 2039 keV, the value of the decay. To avoid bias in the signal search, the present analysis does not consider all those events, that fall in a 40 keV wide region centered around . The main parameters needed for the analysis are described. A background model was developed to describe the observed energy spectrum. The model contains several contributions, that are expected on the basis of material screening or that are established by the observation of characteristic structures in the energy spectrum. The model predicts a flat energy spectrum for the blinding window around with a background index ranging from 17.6 to 23.8 cts/(keV kg yr). A part of the data not considered before has been used to test if the predictions of the background model are consistent. The observed number of events in this energy region is consistent with the background model. The background at is dominated by close sources, mainly due to K, Bi, Th, Co and emitting isotopes from the Ra decay chain. The individual fractions depend on the assumed locations of the contaminants. It is shown, that after removal of the known peaks, the energy spectrum can be fitted in an energy range of 200 keV around with a constant background. This gives a background index consistent with the full model and uncertainties of the same size.

  9. MiniCLEAN surface backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Boqian; Schnee, Richard; Deap/Clean Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    MiniCLEAN is a dark matter experiment using 150kg fiducial mass of liquid cryogen (argon or neon) to search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). MiniCLEAN seeks to detect scintillation photons from WIMP-induced argon recoils. A potentially dominant background is from alpha decays on the inner surfaces of the containment vessel. Such events can mimic the prompt signal characteristic of nuclear recoils. This talk will show the expected background rates, methods of background discrimination, and their expected effectiveness.

  10. Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, Paniez; Starck, Jean-Luc Starck

    2012-03-01

    About 400,000 years after the Big Bang the temperature of the Universe fell to about a few thousand degrees. As a result, the previously free electrons and protons combined and the Universe became neutral. This released a radiation which we now observe as the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The tiny fluctuations* in the temperature and polarization of the CMB carry a wealth of cosmological information. These so-called temperature anisotropies were predicted as the imprints of the initial density perturbations which gave rise to the present large-scale structures such as galaxies and clusters of galaxies. This relation between the present-day Universe and its initial conditions has made the CMB radiation one of the most preferred tools to understand the history of the Universe. The CMB radiation was discovered by radio astronomers Arno Penzias and Robert Wilson in 1965 [72] and earned them the 1978 Nobel Prize. This discovery was in support of the Big Bang theory and ruled out the only other available theory at that time - the steady-state theory. The crucial observations of the CMB radiation were made by the Far-Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite [86]- orbited in 1989-1996. COBE made the most accurate measurements of the CMB frequency spectrum and confirmed it as being a black-body to within experimental limits. This made the CMB spectrum the most precisely measured black-body spectrum in nature. The CMB has a thermal black-body spectrum at a temperature of 2.725 K: the spectrum peaks in the microwave range frequency of 160.2 GHz, corresponding to a 1.9mmwavelength. The results of COBE inspired a series of ground- and balloon-based experiments, which measured CMB anisotropies on smaller scales over the next decade. During the 1990s, the first acoustic peak of the CMB power spectrum (see Figure 5.1) was measured with increasing sensitivity and by 2000 the BOOMERanG experiment [26] reported

  11. Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard; Bruekner, Johnnes; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

  12. Search for the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faessler, A.; Hodak, R.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.

    2015-02-01

    One expects three Cosmic Backgrounds: (1) The Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) originated 380000 years after the Big Bang (BB). (2) The Neutrino Background decoupled about one second after the BB, while (3) the Cosmic Gravitational Wave Background created by the inflationary expansion decoupled directly after the BB. Only the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) has been detected and is well studied. Its spectrum follows Planck's black body radiation formula and shows a remarkable constant temperature of T0γ ≈ 2.7 K independent of the direction. The present photon density is about 370 photons per cm3. The size of the hot spots, which deviates only in the fifth decimal of the temperature from the average value, tells us, that the universe is flat. About 380 000 years after the Big Bang at a temperature of T0γ = 3000 K already in the matter dominated era the electrons combine with the protons and 4He and the photons move freely in the neutral universe and form the CMB. So the temperature and distribution of the photons give us information of the universe 380 000 years after the Big Bang. The Cosmic Neutrino Background (CνB) decoupled from matter already one second after the BB at a temperature of about 1010 K. Today their temperature is ~ 1.95 K and the average density is 56 electron-neutrinos and the total density of all neutrinos about 336 per cm3. Measurement of these neutrinos is an extremely challenging experimental problem which can hardly be solved with the present technologies. On the other hand it represents a tempting opportunity to check one of the key elements of the Big Bang Cosmology and to probe the early stages of the universe. The search for the CνB with the induced beta decay νe+3H → 3He + e- using KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment) is the topic of this contribution.

  13. Background suppression in MAS NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Jeffery L.; Beck, Larry W.; Ferguson, David B.; Haw, James F.

    Pulse sequences for suppressing background signals from spinning modules used in magic-angle spinning NMR are described. These pulse sequences are based on spatially selective composite 90° pulses originally reported by Bax, which provide for no net excitation of spins outside the homogeneous region of the coil. We have achieved essentially complete suppression of background signals originating from our Vespel spinning module (which uses a free-standing coil) in both 1H and 13C spectra without notable loss in signal intensity. Successful modification of both Bloch decay and cross-polarization pulse sequences to include spatially selective pulses was essential to acquire background-free spectra for weak samples. Background suppression was also found to be particularly valuable for both T1 and T1 ϱ, relaxation measurements.

  14. Bringing genetic background into focus.

    PubMed

    Chow, Clement Y

    2016-02-01

    Researchers should embrace differences in genetic background to build richer disease models that more accurately reflect the level of variation in the human population, posits Clement Chow. PMID:26659016

  15. The disease-modifying effects of a Sativex-like combination of phytocannabinoids in mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis are preferentially due to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol acting through CB1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Martet, Miguel; Feliú, Ana; Espejo-Porras, Francisco; Mecha, Miriam; Carrillo-Salinas, Francisco J; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guaza, Carmen; de Lago, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Sativex(®), an equimolecular combination of Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol-botanical drug substance (Δ(9)-THC-BDS) and cannabidiol-botanical drug substance (CBD-BDS), is a licensed medicine that may be prescribed for alleviating specific symptoms of multiple sclerosis (MS) such as spasticity and pain. However, further evidence suggest that it could be also active as disease-modifying therapy given the immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties of their two major components. In this study, we investigated this potential in the experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE) model of MS in mice. We compared the effect of a Sativex-like combination of Δ(9)-THC-BDS (10 mg/kg) and CBD-BDS (10 mg/kg) with Δ(9)-THC-BDS (20 mg/kg) or CBD-BDS (20 mg/kg) administered separately by intraperitoneal administration to EAE mice. Treatments were initiated at the time that symptoms appear and continued up to the first relapse of the disease. The results show that the treatment with a Sativex-like combination significantly improved the neurological deficits typical of EAE mice, in parallel with a reduction in the number and extent of cell aggregates present in the spinal cord which derived from cell infiltration to the CNS. These effects were completely reproduced by the treatment with Δ(9)-THC-BDS alone, but not by CBD-BDS alone which only delayed the onset of the disease without improving disease progression and reducing the cell infiltrates in the spinal cord. Next, we investigated the potential targets involved in the effects of Δ(9)-THC-BDS by selectively blocking CB(1) or PPAR-γ receptors, and we found a complete reversion of neurological benefits and the reduction in cell aggregates only with rimonabant, a selective CB(1) receptor antagonist. Collectively, our data support the therapeutic potential of Sativex as a phytocannabinoid formulation capable of attenuating EAE progression, and that the active compound was Δ(9)-THC-BDS acting through CB(1

  16. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  17. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K) or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.

  18. Low Background Counting at LBNL

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Smith, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Norman, E. B.; Chan, Y. D.; Lesko, K. T.; Hurley, D. L.

    2015-03-24

    The Low Background Facility (LBF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California provides low background gamma spectroscopy services to a wide array of experiments and projects. The analysis of samples takes place within two unique facilities; locally within a carefully-constructed, low background cave and remotely at an underground location that historically has operated underground in Oroville, CA, but has recently been relocated to the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) in Lead, SD. These facilities provide a variety of gamma spectroscopy services to low background experiments primarily in the form of passive material screening for primordial radioisotopes (U, Th, K)more » or common cosmogenic/anthropogenic products, as well as active screening via Neutron Activation Analysis for specific applications. The LBF also provides hosting services for general R&D testing in low background environments on the surface or underground for background testing of detector systems or similar prototyping. A general overview of the facilities, services, and sensitivities is presented. Recent activities and upgrades will also be presented, such as the completion of a 3π anticoincidence shield at the surface station and environmental monitoring of Fukushima fallout. The LBF is open to any users for counting services or collaboration on a wide variety of experiments and projects.« less

  19. Does your gene need a background check? How genetic background impacts the analysis of mutations, genes, and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Christopher H.; Chari, Sudarshan; Dworkin, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The premise of genetic analysis is that a causal link exists between phenotypic and allelic variation. Yet it has long been documented that mutant phenotypes are not a simple result of a single DNA lesion, but rather are due to interactions of the focal allele with other genes and the environment. Although an experimentally rigorous approach focused on individual mutations and isogenic control strains has facilitated amazing progress within genetics and related fields, a glimpse back suggests that a vast complexity has been omitted from our current understanding of allelic effects. Armed with traditional genetic analyses and the foundational knowledge they have provided, we argue that the time and tools are ripe to return to the under-explored aspects of gene function and embrace the context-dependent nature of genetic effects. We assert that a broad understanding of genetic effects and the evolutionary dynamics of alleles requires identifying how mutational outcomes depend upon the “wild-type” genetic background. Furthermore, we discuss how best to exploit genetic background effects to broaden genetic research programs. PMID:23453263

  20. Reducing background neutron rates in NERO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, Eric

    2003-10-01

    The experimental study of neutron rich nuclei can provide important data to better model the production and abundances of heavy elements from the r-process. In order to measure low emission rates of neutrons in certain nuclei, efforts have been made to reduce background rates in NERO (1). Simulations were done to calculate effective passive shielding and testing was carried out to evaluate it. Also, an active shielding system was designed to detect cosmic ray muons in an effort to create a veto in the data acquisition. The results of these efforts are presented here. 1. http://www.nscl.msu.edu/tech/devices/nero/

  1. Spectrum of the microwave background radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, P.L.

    1982-04-01

    A review is given of the present status of measurements of the spectrum of the microwave background. Factors which limit experimental accuracy are discussed with particular reference to high frequency measurements. A selection of the available measurements yields a data set which is reasonably consistent with the blackbody spectrum for a temperature of 2.9 K. A simple statistical analysis suggests either that there are errors in the data set, or that deviations from a blackbody spectrum exist. The difficulties inherent in property averaging the results from different observers are described. Prospects for improved measurements will be summarized.

  2. Spectrum of the microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, P. L.

    1982-01-01

    A review is given of the present status of measurements of the spectrum of the microwave background. Factors that limit experimental accuracy are discussed with particular reference to high-frequency measurements. A selection of the available measurements yields a data set that is reasonably consistent with the black-body spectrum for a temperature of 2.9 K. A simple statistical analysis suggests either that there are errors in the data set, or that deviations from a black-body spectrum exist. The difficulties inherent in properly averaging the results from different observers are described. Prospects for improved measurements are summarized.

  3. Low Background Micromegas in CAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garza, J. G.; Aune, S.; Aznar, F.; Calvet, D.; Castel, J. F.; Christensen, F. E.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Decker, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Galán, J.; García, J. A.; Giomataris, I.; Hill, R. M.; Iguaz, F. J.; Irastorza, I. G.; Jakobsen, A. C.; Jourde, D.; Mirallas, H.; Ortega, I.; Papaevangelou, T.; Pivovaroff, M. J.; Ruz, J.; Tomás, A.; Vafeiadis, T.; Vogel, J. K.

    2015-11-01

    Solar axions could be converted into x-rays inside the strong magnetic field of an axion helioscope, triggering the detection of this elusive particle. Low background x-ray detectors are an essential component for the sensitivity of these searches. We report on the latest developments of the Micromegas detectors for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), including technological pathfinder activities for the future International Axion Observatory (IAXO). The use of low background techniques and the application of discrimination algorithms based on the high granularity of the readout have led to background levels below 10-6 counts/keV/cm2/s, more than a factor 100 lower than the first generation of Micromegas detectors. The best levels achieved at the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC) are as low as 10-7 counts/keV/cm2/s, showing good prospects for the application of this technology in IAXO. The current background model, based on underground and surface measurements, is presented, as well as the strategies to further reduce the background level. Finally, we will describe the R&D paths to achieve sub-keV energy thresholds, which could broaden the physics case of axion helioscopes.

  4. Dim point target detection against bright background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Qiheng; Xu, Zhiyong; Xu, Junping

    2010-05-01

    For target detection within a large-field cluttered background from a long distance, several difficulties, involving low contrast between target and background, little occupancy, illumination ununiformity caused by vignetting of lens, and system noise, make it a challenging problem. The existing approaches to dim target detection can be roughly divided into two categories: detection before tracking (DBT) and tracking before detection (TBD). The DBT-based scheme has been widely used in practical applications due to its simplicity, but it often requires working in the situation with a higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In contrast, the TBD-based methods can provide impressive detection results even in the cases of very low SNR; unfortunately, the large memory requirement and high computational load prevents these methods from real-time tasks. In this paper, we propose a new method for dim target detection. We address this problem by combining the advantages of the DBT-based scheme in computational efficiency and of the TBD-based in detection capability. Our method first predicts the local background, and then employs the energy accumulation and median filter to remove background clutter. The dim target is finally located by double window filtering together with an improved high order correlation which speeds up the convergence. The proposed method is implemented on a hardware platform and performs suitably in outside experiments.

  5. Gravitino condensation in fivebrane backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitazawa, Noriaki

    2002-04-01

    We calculate the tension of the D3-brane in the fivebrane background which is described by the exactly solvable SU(2)k×U(1) world-sheet conformal field theory with large Kač-Moody level k. The D3-brane tension is extracted from the amplitude of one closed string exchange between two parallel D3-branes, and the amplitude is calculated by utilizing the open-closed string duality. The tension of the D3-brane in the background does not coincide with the one in the flat space-time even in the flat space-time limit: k-->∞. The finite curvature effect should vanish in the flat space-time limit and only the topological effect can remain. Therefore, the deviation suggests the condensation of the gravitino and/or dilatino which has been expected in the fivebrane background as a gravitational instanton.

  6. Ion Beam Scattering by Background Helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillet, Anne; Hughes, Thomas; Boerner, Jeremiah

    2015-11-01

    The presence of background gases can cause charged particle beams to become more diffuse due to scattering. Calculations for the transport of an ion beam have been performed using Aleph, a particle-in-cell plasma modeling code, and verified against a general envelop equation for charged particle beams. We have investigated the influence of background helium on the coherence and transmitted current of the ion beam. Collisions between ions and neutral particles were calculated assuming isotropic elastic scattering. Since this tends to predict larger scattering angles than are expected at high energies, these are conservative estimates for beam scattering. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration.

  7. Background music and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Angel, Leslie A; Polzella, Donald J; Elvers, Greg C

    2010-06-01

    The present experiment employed standardized test batteries to assess the effects of fast-tempo music on cognitive performance among 56 male and female university students. A linguistic processing task and a spatial processing task were selected from the Criterion Task Set developed to assess verbal and nonverbal performance. Ten excerpts from Mozart's music matched for tempo were selected. Background music increased the speed of spatial processing and the accuracy of linguistic processing. The findings suggest that background music can have predictable effects on cognitive performance. PMID:20865993

  8. Generative electronic background music system

    SciTech Connect

    Mazurowski, Lukasz

    2015-03-10

    In this short paper-extended abstract the new approach to generation of electronic background music has been presented. The Generative Electronic Background Music System (GEBMS) has been located between other related approaches within the musical algorithm positioning framework proposed by Woller et al. The music composition process is performed by a number of mini-models parameterized by further described properties. The mini-models generate fragments of musical patterns used in output composition. Musical pattern and output generation are controlled by container for the mini-models - a host-model. General mechanism has been presented including the example of the synthesized output compositions.

  9. Detector Background at Muon Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhov, N.V.; Striganov, S.I.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    Physics goals of a Muon Collider (MC) can only be reached with appropriate design of the ring, interaction region (IR), high-field superconducting magnets, machine-detector interface (MDI) and detector. Results of the most recent realistic simulation studies are presented for a 1.5-TeV MC. It is shown that appropriately designed IR and MDI with sophisticated shielding in the detector have a potential to substantially suppress the background rates in the MC detector. The main characteristics of backgrounds are studied.

  10. The cosmic microwave background radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    A review the implications of the spectrum and anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background for cosmology. Thermalization and processes generating spectral distortions are discussed. Anisotropy predictions are described and compared with observational constraints. If the evidence for large-scale power in the galaxy distribution in excess of that predicted by the cold dark matter model is vindicated, and the observed structure originated via gravitational instabilities of primordial density fluctuations, the predicted amplitude of microwave background anisotropies on angular scales of a degree and larger must be at least several parts in 10 exp 6.