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Sample records for experimental characterization modeling

  1. Experimental Flow Models for SSME Flowfield Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, L. C.; Ramsey, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    Full scale flow models with extensive instrumentation were designed and manufactured to provide data necessary for flow field characterization in rocket engines of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) type. These models include accurate flow path geometries from the pre-burner outlet through the throat of the main combustion chamber. The turbines are simulated with static models designed to provide the correct pressure drop and swirl for specific power levels. The correct turbopump-hot gas manifold interfaces were designed into the flow models to permit parametric/integration studies for new turbine designs. These experimental flow models provide a vehicle for understanding the fluid dynamics associated with specific engine issues and also fill the more general need for establishing a more detailed fluid dynamic base to support development and verification of advanced math models.

  2. Modeling and experimental characterization of electromigration in interconnect trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, C. V.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Andleigh, V. K.

    1999-11-01

    Most modeling and experimental characterization of interconnect reliability is focussed on simple straight lines terminating at pads or vias. However, laid-out integrated circuits often have interconnects with junctions and wide-to-narrow transitions. In carrying out circuit-level reliability assessments it is important to be able to assess the reliability of these more complex shapes, generally referred to as `trees.' An interconnect tree consists of continuously connected high-conductivity metal within one layer of metallization. Trees terminate at diffusion barriers at vias and contacts, and, in the general case, can have more than one terminating branch when they include junctions. We have extended the understanding of `immortality' demonstrated and analyzed for straight stud-to-stud lines, to trees of arbitrary complexity. This leads to a hierarchical approach for identifying immortal trees for specific circuit layouts and models for operation. To complete a circuit-level-reliability analysis, it is also necessary to estimate the lifetimes of the mortal trees. We have developed simulation tools that allow modeling of stress evolution and failure in arbitrarily complex trees. We are testing our models and simulations through comparisons with experiments on simple trees, such as lines broken into two segments with different currents in each segment. Models, simulations and early experimental results on the reliability of interconnect trees are shown to be consistent.

  3. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of indoor aerosol transport

    SciTech Connect

    Konecni, S.; Whicker, J. J.; Martin, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    When a hazardous aerosol or gas is inadvertently or deliberately released in an occupied facility, the airborne material presents a hazard to people. Inadvertent accidents and exposures continue to occur in Los Alamos and other nuclear facilities despite state-of-art engineering and administrative controls, and heightened diligence. Despite the obvious need in occupational settings and for homeland defense, the body of research in hazardous aerosol dispersion and control in large, complex, ventilated enclosures is extremely limited. The science governing generation, transport, inhalation, and detection of airborne hazards is lacking and must be developed to where it can be used by engineers or safety professionals in the prediction of worker exposure, in the prevention of accidents, or in the mitigation of terrorist actions. In this study, a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, CFX5.4, and experiments were used to assess flow field characteristics, and to investigate aerosol release and transport in a large, ventilated workroom in a facility at Savannah River Site. Steady state CFD results illustrating a complex, ventilation-induced, flow field with vortices, velocity gradients, and quiet zones are presented, as are time-dependent CFD and experimental aerosol dispersion results. The comparison of response times between CFD and experimental results was favorable. It is believed that future applications of CFD and experiments can have a favorable impact on the design of ventilation (HVAC) systems and worker safety with consideration to facility costs. Ultimately, statistical methods will be used in conjunction with CFD calculations to determine the optimal number and location of detectors, as well as optimal egress routes in event of a release.

  4. Characterization of experimental dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peffley, Nicholas L.; Goumilevski, Alexei G.; Cawthrone, A. B.; Lathrop, Daniel P.

    2000-07-01

    Laboratory models of geophysical magnetic field production require new experi-mental characterization methods. Self-generating liquid metal magnetic dynamos are explored using two new experiments. Kinematic dynamo studies lead us to charac-terize the magnetic field dynamics in terms of eigenvalues and eigenfrequencies of the induction equation. Observing the decay of magnetic field pulses indicates the real part of the leading eigenvalue of the induction equation, while a chirp magnetic field diagnoses the imaginary part of the eigenvalue. Finally, a single-frequency applied magnetic field characterizes the structure of the velocity field. These measurements provide a new means to characterize and measure the approach to self-generation. We present data from numerical simulations and laboratory experiments using these techniques.

  5. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results

    PubMed Central

    Humada, Ali M.; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M.; Ahmed, Mushtaq N.

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  6. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results.

    PubMed

    Humada, Ali M; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M; Ahmed, Mushtaq N

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  7. Experimental Characterization and Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Carbon/Copper Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pauly, Christopher C.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    The results of an extensive experimental characterization and a preliminary analytical modeling effort for the elastoplastic mechanical behavior of 8-harness satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites are presented. Previous experimental and modeling investigations of woven composites are discussed, as is the evolution of, and motivation for, the continuing research on C/Cu composites. Experimental results of monotonic and cyclic tension, compression, and Iosipescu shear tests, and combined tension-compression tests, are presented. With regard to the test results, emphasis is placed on the effect of strain gauge size and placement, the effect of alloying the copper matrix to improve fiber-matrix bonding, yield surface characterization, and failure mechanisms. The analytical methodology used in this investigation consists of an extension of the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) micromechanics model, developed by Aboudi (1994), to include inhomogeneity and plasticity effects on the subcell level. The extension of the model allows prediction of the elastoplastic mechanical response of woven composites, as represented by a true repeating unit cell for the woven composite. The model is used to examine the effects of refining the representative geometry of the composite, altering the composite overall fiber volume fraction, changing the size and placement of the strain gauge with respect to the composite's reinforcement weave, and including porosity within the infiltrated fiber yarns on the in-plane elastoplastic tensile, compressive, and shear response of 8-harness satin C/Cu. The model predictions are also compared with the appropriate monotonic experimental results.

  8. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean-Hubert

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends where predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure-properties relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to "simply" support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. This manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

  9. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanics community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.

  10. Review of the synergies between computational modeling and experimental characterization of materials across length scales

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dingreville, Rémi; Karnesky, Richard A.; Puel, Guillaume; Schmitt, Jean -Hubert

    2015-11-16

    With the increasing interplay between experimental and computational approaches at multiple length scales, new research directions are emerging in materials science and computational mechanics. Such cooperative interactions find many applications in the development, characterization and design of complex material systems. This manuscript provides a broad and comprehensive overview of recent trends in which predictive modeling capabilities are developed in conjunction with experiments and advanced characterization to gain a greater insight into structure–property relationships and study various physical phenomena and mechanisms. The focus of this review is on the intersections of multiscale materials experiments and modeling relevant to the materials mechanicsmore » community. After a general discussion on the perspective from various communities, the article focuses on the latest experimental and theoretical opportunities. Emphasis is given to the role of experiments in multiscale models, including insights into how computations can be used as discovery tools for materials engineering, rather than to “simply” support experimental work. This is illustrated by examples from several application areas on structural materials. In conclusion this manuscript ends with a discussion on some problems and open scientific questions that are being explored in order to advance this relatively new field of research.« less

  11. Modeling and experimental study on characterization of micromachined thermal gas inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Rong; Ding, Henggao; Su, Yan; Yang, Yongjun

    2010-01-01

    Micromachined thermal gas inertial sensors based on heat convection are novel devices that compared with conventional micromachined inertial sensors offer the advantages of simple structures, easy fabrication, high shock resistance and good reliability by virtue of using a gaseous medium instead of a mechanical proof mass as key moving and sensing elements. This paper presents an analytical modeling for a micromachined thermal gas gyroscope integrated with signal conditioning. A simplified spring-damping model is utilized to characterize the behavior of the sensor. The model relies on the use of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer fundamentals and is validated using experimental data obtained from a test-device and simulation. Furthermore, the nonideal issues of the sensor are addressed from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. The nonlinear behavior demonstrated in experimental measurements is analyzed based on the model. It is concluded that the sources of nonlinearity are mainly attributable to the variable stiffness of the sensor system and the structural asymmetry due to nonideal fabrication. PMID:22163655

  12. Modeling and Experimental Study on Characterization of Micromachined Thermal Gas Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Rong; Ding, Henggao; Su, Yan; Yang, Yongjun

    2010-01-01

    Micromachined thermal gas inertial sensors based on heat convection are novel devices that compared with conventional micromachined inertial sensors offer the advantages of simple structures, easy fabrication, high shock resistance and good reliability by virtue of using a gaseous medium instead of a mechanical proof mass as key moving and sensing elements. This paper presents an analytical modeling for a micromachined thermal gas gyroscope integrated with signal conditioning. A simplified spring-damping model is utilized to characterize the behavior of the sensor. The model relies on the use of the fluid mechanics and heat transfer fundamentals and is validated using experimental data obtained from a test-device and simulation. Furthermore, the nonideal issues of the sensor are addressed from both the theoretical and experimental points of view. The nonlinear behavior demonstrated in experimental measurements is analyzed based on the model. It is concluded that the sources of nonlinearity are mainly attributable to the variable stiffness of the sensor system and the structural asymmetry due to nonideal fabrication. PMID:22163655

  13. Experimental and Mathematical-Modeling Characterization of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigote Motility

    PubMed Central

    Arias-del-Angel, Jorge A.; Dévora-Canales, Diego; Manning-Cela, Rebeca G.; Santana-Solano, Jesús; Santillán, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    The present work is aimed at characterizing the motility of parasite T. cruzi in its epimastigote form. To that end, we recorded the trajectories of two strains of this parasite (a wild-type strain and a stable transfected strain, which contains an ectopic copy of LYT1 gene and whose motility is known to be affected). We further extracted parasite trajectories from the recorded videos, and statistically analysed the following trajectory-step features: step length, angular change of direction, longitudinal and transverse displacements with respect to the previous step, and mean square displacement. Based on the resulting observations, we developed a mathematical model to simulate parasite trajectories. The fact that the model predictions closely match most of the experimentally observed parasite-trajectory characteristics, allows us to conclude that the model is an accurate description of T. cruzi motility. PMID:26544863

  14. Experimental comparison of rate-dependent hysteresis models in characterizing and compensating hysteresis of piezoelectric tube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljanaideh, Omar; Habineza, Didace; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Al Janaideh, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    An experimental study has been carried out to characterize rate-dependent hysteresis of a piezoelectric tube actuator at different excitation frequencies. The experimental measurements were followed by modeling and compensation of the hysteresis nonlinearities of the piezoelectric tube actuator using both the inverse rate-dependent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model (RDPI) and inverse rate-independent Prandtl-Ishlinskii model (RIPI) coupled with a controller. The comparison of hysteresis modeling and compensation of the actuator with both models is presented.

  15. Experimental characterization and numerical modelling of polymeric film damage, constituting the stratospheric super pressurized balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaabane, Makram; Chaabane, Makram; Dalverny, Olivier; Deramecourt, Arnaud; Mistou, Sébastien

    The super-pressure balloons developed by CNES are a great challenge in scientific ballooning. Whatever the balloon type considered (spherical, pumpkin...), it is necessary to have good knowledge of the mechanical behavior of the envelope regarding to the flight level and the lifespan of the balloon. It appears during the working stages of the super pressure balloons that these last can exploded prematurely in the course of the first hours of flight. For this reason CNES and LGP are carrying out research programs about experimentations and modelling in order to predict a good stability of the balloons flight and guarantee a life time in adequacy with the technical requirement. This study deals with multilayered polymeric film damage which induce balloons failure. These experimental and numerical study aims, are a better understanding and predicting of the damage mechanisms bringing the premature explosion of balloons. The following damages phenomena have different origins. The firsts are simple and triple wrinkles owed during the process and the stocking stages of the balloons. The second damage phenomenon is associated to the creep of the polymeric film during the flight of the balloon. The first experimental results we present in this paper, concern the mechanical characterization of three different damage phenomena. The severe damage induced by the wrinkles of the film involves a significant loss of mechanical properties. In a second part the theoretical study, concerns the choice and the development of a non linear viscoelastic coupled damage behavior model in a finite element code.

  16. [Characterization of an experimental model of monosodium- glutamate-induced convulsions in the amphibian Bufo spp].

    PubMed

    Alfaro, F; Blas, O; Gutiérrez-Padilla, R; Feria-Velasco, A

    1990-01-01

    In previous reports, Feria-Velasco et al. characterized an experimental model of convulsions in rats induced by monosodium glutamate (MSG) with evaluation of the motor behavior and neurochemical parameters. In the present work, MSG injected in toads (Bufo spp) reproduced the model of convulsions with some peculiarities. The electrocorticographic recordings in toads after MSG injection were similar to those obtained in rats after administration of convulsant agents. Most of the toads injected with MSG (81.8%) showed convulsions preceded by an episode of stereotyped movements and signs of hyperexcitability. Latency for convulsions and frequency of convulsive episodes were similar to what has been reported in rats injected with MSG. However, the duration of convulsive period was larger than that seen in rats, and no deaths were recorded in toads. The peculiar feature of amphibia regarding their cerebral structures and their blood-brain barrier (BBB) make the amphibian model, an interesting and valuable one in studying experimentally induced convulsions, as well as the role of BBB in these phenomena. PMID:1669233

  17. Experimental characterization and modelling of UO2 behavior at high temperatures and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Maxime; Sercombe, Jérôme; Ménard, Jean-Claude; Julien, Jérôme; Helfer, Thomas; Désoyer, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    This work presents an experimental characterization of uranium dioxide (UO2) in compression under Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) conditions. Pellet samples were tested at four temperatures (1100, 1350, 1550 and 1700 °C) and at a strain rate varying over 4 decades (10-4-10-3-10-2-10-1 /s). The experimental results show that the stress-strain curves cannot be fitted with a unique power law as it is the case at smaller strain rates (10-9-10-5 /s). A strain-hardening also appears in most of the tests. The microstructural observations show a pronounced evolution of the porosity at the pellet center during the tests. A hyperbolic sine model which accounts for volume variations (pore compressibility) was therefore proposed to describe the behavior of UO2 on a large range of temperatures (1100 - 1700 °C) and strain rates (10-9-10-1 /s). The Finite Element simulations of the compression tests lead to results (maximum stress, axial and hoop strain distribution, porosity distribution) in good agreement with the measurements. The model was then assessed on a database of more than two hundred creep tests.

  18. Modeling nonlinearities of ultrasonic waves for fatigue damage characterization: theory, simulation, and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hong, Ming; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Qiang; Cheng, Li; Qing, Xinlin

    2014-03-01

    A dedicated modeling technique for comprehending nonlinear characteristics of ultrasonic waves traversing in a fatigued medium was developed, based on a retrofitted constitutive relation of the medium by considering the nonlinearities originated from material, fatigue damage, as well as the "breathing" motion of fatigue cracks. Piezoelectric wafers, for exciting and acquiring ultrasonic waves, were integrated in the model. The extracted nonlinearities were calibrated by virtue of an acoustic nonlinearity parameter. The modeling technique was validated experimentally, and the results showed satisfactory consistency in between, both revealing: the developed modeling approach is able to faithfully simulate fatigue crack-incurred nonlinearities manifested in ultrasonic waves; a cumulative growth of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing wave propagation distance exists; such a parameter acquired via a sensing path is nonlinearly related to the offset distance from the fatigue crack to that sensing path; and neither the incidence angle of the probing wave nor the length of the sensing path impacts on the parameter significantly. This study has yielded a quantitative characterization strategy for fatigue cracks using embeddable piezoelectric sensor networks, facilitating deployment of structural health monitoring which is capable of identifying small-scale damage at an embryo stage and surveilling its growth continuously. PMID:24156928

  19. Experimental Hydromechanical Characterization and Numerical Modelling of a Fractured and Porous Sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souley, Mountaka; Lopez, Philippe; Boulon, Marc; Thoraval, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The experimental device previously used to study the hydromechanical behaviour of individual fractures on a laboratory scale, was adapted to make it possible to measure flow through porous rock mass samples in addition to fracture flows. A first series of tests was performed to characterize the hydromechanical behaviour of the fracture individually as well as the porous matrix (sandstone) comprising the fracture walls. A third test in this series was used to validate the experimental approach. These tests showed non-linear evolution of the contact area on the fracture walls with respect to effective normal stress. Consequently, a non-linear relationship was noted between the hydraulic aperture on the one hand, and the effective normal stress and mechanical opening on the other hand. The results of the three tests were then analysed by numerical modelling. The VIPLEF/HYDREF numerical codes used take into account the dual-porosity of the sample (fracture + rock matrix) and can be used to reproduce hydromechanical loading accurately. The analyses show that the relationship between the hydraulic aperture of the fracture and the mechanical closure has a significant effect on fracture flow rate predictions. By taking simultaneous measurements of flow in both fracture and rock matrix, we were able to carry out a global evaluation of the conceptual approach used.

  20. Experimental characterization and modeling of isothermal and nonisothermal physical aging in glassy polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunlong

    This dissertation focuses on nonisothermal physical aging of polymers from both experimental and theoretical aspects. The study concentrates on pure polymers rather than fiber-reinforced composites; this step removes several complicating factors to simplify the study. It is anticipated that the findings of this work can then be applied to composite materials applications. The physical aging tests in this work are performed using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA). The viscoelastic response of glassy polymers under various loading and thermal histories are observed as stress-strain data at a series of time points. The first stage of the experimental work involves the characterization of the isothermal physical aging behavior of two advanced thermoplastics. The second stage conducts tests on the same materials with varying thermal histories and with long-term test duration. This forms the basis to assess and modify a nonisothermal physical aging model (KAHR-ate model). Based on the experimental findings, the KAHR-ate model has been revised by new correlations between aging shift factors and volume response; this revised model performed well in predicting the nonisothermal physical aging behavior of glassy polymers. In the work on isothermal physical aging, short-term creep and stress relaxation tests were performed at several temperatures within 15-35°C below the glass transition temperature (Tg) at various aging times, using the short-term test method established by Struik. Stress and strain levels were such that the materials remained in the linear viscoelastic regime. These curves were then shifted together to determine momentary master curves and shift rates. In order to validate the obtained isothermal physical aging behavior, the results of creep and stress relaxation testing were compared and shown to be consistent with one another using appropriate interconversion of the viscoelastic material functions. Time-temperature superposition of the master curves

  1. Computational modeling and experimental characterization of bacterial microcolonies for rapid detection using light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Nan

    A label-free and nondestructive optical elastic forward light scattering method has been extended for the analysis of microcolonies for food-borne bacteria detection and identification. To understand the forward light scattering phenomenon, a model based on the scalar diffraction theory has been employed: a bacterial colony is considered as a biological spatial light modulator with amplitude and phase modulation to the incoming light, which continues to propagate to the far-field to form a distinct scattering 'fingerprint'. Numerical implementation via angular spectrum method (ASM) and Fresnel approximation have been carried out through Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to simulate this optical model. Sampling criteria to achieve unbiased and un-aliased simulation results have been derived and the effects of violating these conditions have been studied. Diffraction patterns predicted by these two methods (ASM and Fresnel) have been compared to show their applicability to different simulation settings. Through the simulation work, the correlation between the colony morphology and its forward scattering pattern has been established to link the number of diffraction rings and the half cone angle with the diameter and the central height of the Gaussian-shaped colonies. In order to experimentally prove the correlation, a colony morphology analyzer has been built and used to characterize the morphology of different bacteria genera and investigate their growth dynamics. The experimental measurements have demonstrated the possibility of differentiating bacteria Salmonella, Listeria, Escherichia in their early growth stage (100˜500 µm) based on their phenotypic characteristics. This conclusion has important implications in microcolony detection, as most bacteria of our interest need much less incubation time (8˜12 hours) to grow into this size range. The original forward light scatterometer has been updated to capture scattering patterns from microcolonies. Experiments have

  2. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of the Fracturing Behavior of Marcellus Shale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, C.; Li, W.; Sageman, B. B.; Cusatis, G.

    2014-12-01

    Adequate knowledge and prediction of mechanical properties of shale are pivotal to the design of hydraulic fractures. The urgent technical challenge of such an endeavor is how to translate the highly heterogeneous nature of shale into a predictive model of the mechanical properties. Our group addressed this challenge by adopting a combined experimental and numerical approach to investigate fracture processes and failure mechanisms of shale.Lattice Discrete Particle Model (LDPM), having shown superior capabilities in predicting qualitative and quantitative behavior of concrete and concrete-like materials, as shown in Fig. 1, has been adopted to simulate mesoscale behavior of shale. The polyhedral cell system defining the geometric attributes of the rock microstructure is built via a 3D tessellation procedure based on X-ray microtomography results of microstructure and grain size distribution of shale specimens. The adopted tessellation procedure makes use of well-established packing algorithms for no-contact spherical particle placement and non-overlapping volume tessellation. The polyhedral particles interact through triangular facets where appropriate measure of stresses and strains are defined. Especially, LDPM is extended to simulate transversely isotropic materials by using orientation-dependent and strain-dependent strength limits coupled with orientation-dependent normal and shear stiffnesses on each facet. Appropriate interface constitutive equations are formulated to simulate all phenomena occurring at a scale that is smaller than the resolution of LDPM system, including microscopic fracture, frictional contact, particle breakage, pore collapse, and distributed damage. Bedding planes and natural joints are characterized by greatly decreased strength limits for facets within that region. To calibrate/validate the LDPM model, microscopic and mesoscopic experiments, including Brazilian tests, uniaxial compression tests, and three point-bending tests, are

  3. Experimental Verification of Model-Based ECT Signal Interpretation for Quantitative Flaw Characterization in Steam Generator Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Eui-Lae; Chung, Tae-Eon; Yim, Chang-Jae

    2003-03-01

    The model-based inversion tools for eddy current signals have been developed by the novel combination of neural networks and finite element modeling for quantitative flaw characterization in steam generator tubes. In the present work, interpretation of experimental eddy current signals was carried out in order to validate the developed inversion tools. A database was constructed using the synthetic flaw signals generated by the finite element modeling. The hybrid neural networks of a PNN classifier and BPNN size estimators were trained using the synthetic signals. Experimental eddy current signals were obtained from axisymmetric artificial flaws. Interpretations of flaws were carried out by feeding experimental signals into the neural networks. The results of interpretations were excellent, so that the developed inversion tools would be applicable to the interpretation of experimental eddy current signals.

  4. Modeling defect cluster evolution in irradiated structural materials: Focus on comparing to high-resolution experimental characterization studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, Brian D.; Hu, Xunxiang; Kohnert, Aaron; Xu, Donghua

    2015-03-02

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes, and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors. Further, it is well recognized that these irradiation effects are a classic example of inherently multiscale phenomena and that the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This inherently multiscale evolution emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation-damaged microstructure. Lastly, this article provides a review of recent models of the defect microstructure evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, which provide good agreement with experimental measurements, and presents some outstanding challenges, which will require coordinated high-resolution characterization and modeling to resolve.

  5. Modeling defect cluster evolution in irradiated structural materials: Focus on comparing to high-resolution experimental characterization studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wirth, Brian D.; Hu, Xunxiang; Kohnert, Aaron; Xu, Donghua

    2015-03-02

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes, and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors. Further, it is well recognized that these irradiation effects are a classic example of inherently multiscale phenomena and that the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This inherently multiscale evolution emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation-damaged microstructure. Lastly,more » this article provides a review of recent models of the defect microstructure evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, which provide good agreement with experimental measurements, and presents some outstanding challenges, which will require coordinated high-resolution characterization and modeling to resolve.« less

  6. Experimental Characterization and Material-Model Development for Microphase-Segregated Polyurea: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; He, T.; Pandurangan, B.; Svingala, F. R.; Settles, G. S.; Hargather, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous experimental investigations reported in the open literature over the past decade have clearly demonstrated that the use of polyurea external coatings and/or inner layers can substantially enhance both the blast resistance (the ability to withstand shock loading) and the ballistic performance (the ability to defeat various high-velocity projectiles such as bullets, fragments, shrapnel, etc. without penetration, excessive deflection or spalling) of buildings, vehicles, combat-helmets, etc. It is also well established that the observed high-performance of polyurea is closely related to its highly complex submicron scale phase-segregated microstructure and the associated microscale phenomena and processes (e.g., viscous energy dissipation at the internal phase boundaries). As higher and higher demands are placed on blast/ballistic survivability of the foregoing structures, a need for the use of the appropriate transient nonlinear dynamics computational analyses and the corresponding design-optimization methods has become ever apparent. A critical aspect of the tools used in these analyses and methods is the availability of an appropriate physically based, high-fidelity material model for polyurea. There are presently several public domain and highly diverse material models for polyurea. In the present work, an attempt is made to critically assess these models as well as the experimental methods and results used in the process of their formulation. Since these models are developed for use in the high-rate loading regime, they are employed in the present work, to generate the appropriate shock-Hugoniot relations. These relations are subsequently compared with their experimental counterparts in order to assess the fidelity of these models.

  7. Experimental characterization of glass-ceramic seal properties and their constitutive implementation in solid oxide fuel cell stack models

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Vetrano, John S.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Chou, Y. S.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-09-05

    This paper discusses experimental determination of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) glass-ceramic seal material properties and seal/interconnect interfacial properties to support development and optimization of SOFC designs through modeling. Material property experiments such as dynamic resonance, dilatometry, flexure, creep, tensile, and shear tests were performed on PNNL’s glass-ceramic sealant material, designated as G18, to obtain property data essential to constitutive and numerical model development. Characterization methods for the physical, mechanical, and interfacial properties of the sealing material, results, and their application to the constitutive implementation in SOFC stack modeling are described.

  8. Modeling and experimental characterization on fatigue behaviour of 1-3 piezocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Y.; Jayendiran, R.; Arockiarajan, A.

    2015-04-01

    1-3 piezocomposites are very attractive materials in underwater and biomedical applications. These materials may be subjected to high electric field (2kV/mm) under continuous operation leading to deterioration in the output parameters such as remnant, saturation polarization and strain. Hence in this work, an experimental study is carried out to understand the fatigue behavior of 1-3 piezocomposites for various fiber volume fraction subjected to cyclic electric field (2kV/mm, 50Hz) up to 106 cycles. A uni-axial micro-mechanical model is developed to predict the fatigue behaviour of 1-3 piezocomposite. The novelty of this model is, the remnant polarization and strain are chosen as internal variables which is also dependent on the damage.The simulated results are compared with the experimental observations, it is observed that the proposed micro-mechanical model is able to predict the material degradation with increase in number of cycles of operation. A parametric study is also conducted for various fiber volume fraction of 1-3 piezocomposite as function of fatigue cycle it shows that the amplitude of dielectric hysteresis and butterfly loop decreases with increase in the number of cycles. The fatigue behavior has a substantial effect in the performance parameters such as coercive field, remnant polarization and the asymmetric strain behavior of 1-3 piezocomposite. This fatigue study explores the utilities of 1-3 piezocomposites in transducer applications by providing insight into the device design.

  9. Experimental characterization of rotating flow field in a model vortex burner

    SciTech Connect

    Shtork, S.I.; Cala, C.E.; Fernandes, E.C.

    2007-07-15

    Acoustic techniques, high speed filming and LDA were employed to characterize swirling jet flow in a model vortex burner. The isothermal flow conditions studied correspond to Re = 16,000 and swirl number S = 1, resulting in onset of the swirling jet breakdown. The breakdown zone exhibited distinct flow unsteadiness in the form of a precessing vortex core (PVC). Phase-averaged analysis of the LDA data was used to reveal an ''instantaneous'' flow field spatial distribution and to determine the precessing vortex characteristics. These results were compared against the time mean data to reveal the PVC's footprint in the time-averaged flow structure. In particular, this approach was shown to provide access to the precessing structure parameters making use of conventional flow field diagnostics. (author)

  10. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Barabash, R. I.; Yang, Y.; Bieler, T. R.; Crimp, M. A.; Eisenlohr, P.; Liu, W.; Ice, G. E.

    2011-03-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  11. Experimental characterization and crystal plasticity modeling of heterogeneous deformation in polycrystalline -Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Leyun; Barabash, Rozaliya; Yang, Y; Bieler, Prof T R; Crimp, Prof M A; Eisenlohr, P; Liu, W.; Ice, Gene E

    2011-01-01

    Grain-level heterogeneous deformation was studied in a polycrystalline {alpha}-Ti specimen deformed by four-point bending. Dislocation slip activity in the microstructure was investigated by surface slip trace analysis. Three-dimensional-X-ray diffraction (3D-XRD) was used to investigate subsurface lattice rotations and to identify geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). The slip systems of local GNDs were analyzed by studying the streaking directions of reflections in corresponding Laue patterns. The analysis performed in one grain indicated that the subsurface GNDs were from the same slip system identified using slip trace analysis in backscattered electron images. A crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) model was used to simulate deformation of the same microstructural region. The predictions of dislocation slip activity match the general aspects of the experimental observations, including the ability to simulate the activation of different slip systems in grains where multiple slip systems were activated. Prediction of local crystal rotations, however, was the least accurate aspect of the CPFE model.

  12. Characterization of a canine glioma cell line as related to established experimental brain tumor models.

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Koch, S; Sena-Esteves, M; Berens, M E

    2000-07-01

    A large animal tumor model for anaplastic glioma has been recently developed using immunotolerant allogeneic Beagle dogs and an established canine glioma cell line, J3T. This model offers advantages in terms of tumor morphology and similarity to human anaplastic glioma. The present study was aimed at evaluating the biological characteristics of the J3T canine glioma cell line as related to experimental gene therapy studies. Furthermore, development and morphology of canine brain tumors in a xenogeneic immunodeficient SCID mouse model was investigated. It was demonstrated that cultured J3T cells can be efficiently infected by adenovirus (AV), herpes-simplex type I (HSV), or retrovirus (RV) vectors, as well as by non-virus vectors such as cationic liposome/DNA complexes. Thus, in terms of infectability and transfectability, J3T cells seem to be closer to human glioma than the 9L rodent gliosarcoma. Cytotoxicity of selection antibiotics such as G418, puromycin, and hygromycin on J3T cells essentially resemble cytotoxicity seen with other established glioma lines, for example, 9L, U87, or U343. RV-mediated HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy demonstrated comparable LD50 for TK-expressing and control (non-expressing) J3T and 9L cells treated with Ganciclovir. Further, it was proven that J3T cells are tumorigenic and may grow heterotopically and orthotopically in a xenogeneic immunodeficient host, the SCID mouse, although morphology and growth pattern of these xenogeneic tumors differ from the demonstrated invasive phenotype in the Beagle dog. PMID:10901232

  13. Optimized method for TAG protein homology modeling: In silico and experimental structural characterization.

    PubMed

    Tomar, Jyoti Singh; Peddinti, Rama Krishna

    2016-07-01

    The DNA glycosylases cleave CN glycosyl bond to release a free base and generate abasic sites concurrently. Function and structure of these enzymes in the pathogenic bacterium Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species are not well characterized. Inhibition of TAG enzyme is a promising drug design strategy against A. baumannii. Here optimized molecular modeling approaches were used to provide a structural scaffold of TAG. The recombinant TAG protein was expressed and purified to determine oligomeric state using size exclusion chromatography, which showed the existence of TAG protein as monomer (mwt ∼21kDa). Secondary structure and substrate binding were analyzed using CD are in good agreement with the in silico predictions. Near UV-CD spectrum shows the involvement of Tyr residues in substrate recognition. Molecular docking studies were performed to understand the molecular recognition interactions and this knowledge was used to identify the potent inhibitors using virtual screening. Residues crucial for DNA holding and enzyme catalysis are reconfirmed by the in silico mutational studies. PMID:27017978

  14. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Milanesio, Daniele; Colas, Laurent; Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Heuraux, Stéphane; Kubič, Martin

    2014-06-01

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  15. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Colas, Laurent Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Kubič, Martin; Milanesio, Daniele; Heuraux, Stéphane

    2014-06-15

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing the integrated parallel electric field over long field lines as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the radio-frequency (RF)-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and Langmuir probe floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free scrape off layer outside these limiters. Moreover, the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the screen design that enhanced the plasma potential.

  16. Experimental characterization of powered Fontan hemodynamics in an idealized total cavopulmonary connection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerlo, Anna-Elodie M.; Delorme, Yann T.; Xu, Duo; Frankel, Steven H.; Giridharan, Guruprasad A.; Rodefeld, Mark D.; Chen, Jun

    2013-08-01

    A viscous impeller pump (VIP) based on the Von Karman viscous pump is specifically designed to provide cavopulmonary assist in a univentricular Fontan circulation. The technology will make it possible to biventricularize the univentricular Fontan circulation. Ideally, it will reduce the number of surgeries required for Fontan conversion from three to one early in life, while simultaneously improving physiological conditions. Later in life, it will provide a currently unavailable means of chronic support for adolescent and adult patients with failing Fontan circulations. Computational fluid dynamics simulations demonstrate that the VIP can satisfactorily augment cavopulmonary blood flow in an idealized total cavopulmonary connection (TCPC). When the VIP is deployed at the TCPC intersection as a static device, it stabilizes the four-way flow pattern and is not obstructive to the flow. Experimental studies are carried out to assess performance, hemodynamic characteristics, and flow structures of the VIP in an idealized TCPC model. Stereoscopic particle image velocimetry is applied using index-matched blood analog. Results show excellent performance of the VIP without cavitation and with reduction of the energy losses. The non-rotating VIP smoothes and accelerates flow, and decreases stresses and turbulence in the TCPC. The rotating VIP generates the desired low-pressure Fontan flow augmentation (0-10 mmHg) while maintaining acceptable stress thresholds.

  17. Radio-frequency sheaths physics: Experimental characterization on Tore Supra and related self-consistent modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquot, Jonathan; Milanesio, Daniele; Colas, Laurent; Corre, Yann; Goniche, Marc; Gunn, Jamie; Heuraux, Stéphane; Kubic, Martin

    2014-02-01

    During the 2011 experimental campaign, one of the three ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antennas in the Tore Supra (TS) tokamak was equipped with a new type of Faraday screen (FS). The new design aimed at minimizing RF sheaths as well as increasing the heat exhaust capability of the actively cooled screen. It proved to be inefficient for attenuating the RF-sheaths on the screen itself on the contrary to the heat exhaust concept that allowed operation despite higher heat fluxes on the antenna. In parallel, a new approach has been proposed to model self-consistently RF sheaths: the SSWICH (Self-consistent Sheaths and Waves for IC Heating) code. Simulations results from SSWICH coupled with the TOPICA antenna code were able to reproduce the difference between the two FS designs and part of the spatial pattern of heat loads and floating potential. The poloidal pattern is a reliable result that mainly depends on the electrical design of the antenna while the radial pattern is on the contrary highly sensitive to loosely constrained parameters such as perpendicular conductivity that generates a DC current circulation from the the private region inside the antenna limiters to the free SOL outside these limiters. Moreover the cantilevered bars seem to be the element in the design of the new screen that enhanced RF sheaths.

  18. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, C. S.; Ding, J. L.; Asay, J. R.

    2016-03-01

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPS experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. In addition, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material model for

  19. Experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of the mechanical behavior of molybdenum under electromagnetically applied compression-shear ramp loading

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alexander, C. Scott; Ding, Jow -Lian; Asay, James Russell

    2016-03-09

    Magnetically applied pressure-shear (MAPS) is a new experimental technique that provides a platform for direct measurement of material strength at extreme pressures. The technique employs an imposed quasi-static magnetic field and a pulsed power generator that produces an intense current on a planar driver panel, which in turn generates high amplitude magnetically induced longitudinal compression and transverse shear waves into a planar sample mounted on the drive panel. In order to apply sufficiently high shear traction to the test sample, a high strength material must be used for the drive panel. Molybdenum is a potential driver material for the MAPSmore » experiment because of its high yield strength and sufficient electrical conductivity. To properly interpret the results and gain useful information from the experiments, it is critical to have a good understanding and a predictive capability of the mechanical response of the driver. In this work, the inelastic behavior of molybdenum under uniaxial compression and biaxial compression-shear ramp loading conditions is experimentally characterized. It is observed that an imposed uniaxial magnetic field ramped to approximately 10 T through a period of approximately 2500 μs and held near the peak for about 250 μs before being tested appears to anneal the molybdenum panel. In order to provide a physical basis for model development, a general theoretical framework that incorporates electromagnetic loading and the coupling between the imposed field and the inelasticity of molybdenum was developed. Based on this framework, a multi-axial continuum model for molybdenum under electromagnetic loading is presented. The model reasonably captures all of the material characteristics displayed by the experimental data obtained from various experimental configurations. Additionally, data generated from shear loading provide invaluable information not only for validating but also for guiding the development of the material

  20. Experimental characterization and modeling of non-linear coupling of the LHCD power on Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect

    Preynas, M.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Litaudon, X.; Ekedahl, A.

    2014-02-12

    To achieve steady state operation on future tokamaks, in particular on ITER, the unique capability of a LHCD system to efficiently drive off-axis non-inductive current is needed. In this context, it is of prime importance to study and master the coupling of LH wave to the core plasma at high power density (tens of MW/m{sup 2}). In some specific conditions, deleterious effects on the LHCD coupling are sometimes observed on Tore Supra. At high power the waves may modify the edge parameters that change the wave coupling properties in a non-linear manner. In this way, dedicated LHCD experiments have been performed using the LHCD system of Tore Supra, composed of two different conceptual designs of launcher: the Fully Active Multijunction (FAM) and the new Passive Active Multijunction (PAM) antennas. A nonlinear interaction between the electron density and the electric field has been characterized in a thin plasma layer in front of the two LHCD antennas. The resulting dependence of the power reflection coefficient with the LHCD power, leading occasionally to trips in the output power, is not predicted by the standard linear theory of the LH wave coupling. Therefore, it is important to investigate and understand the possible origin of such non-linear effects in order to avoid their possible deleterious consequences. The PICCOLO-2D code, which self-consistently treats the wave propagation in the antenna vicinity and its interaction with the local edge plasma density, is used to simulate Tore Supra discharges. The simulation reproduces very well the occurrence of a non-linear behavior in the coupling observed in the LHCD experiments. The important differences and trends between the FAM and the PAM antennas, especially a larger increase in RC for the FAM, are also reproduced by the PICCOLO-2D simulation. The working hypothesis of the contribution of the ponderomotive effect in the non-linear observations of LHCD coupling is therefore validated through this comprehensive

  1. Modeling Atmospheric Sulfur Over the Northern Hemisphere during the Aerosol Characterization Experiment 2 Experimental Period

    SciTech Connect

    Benkovitz, C; Schwartz, Stephen E.; Jensen, Michael P.; Miller, Mark A.; Easter, Richard C.; Bates, Timothy S.

    2004-11-25

    A high-resolution (1{sup o} x 1{sup o}, 27 vertical levels) Eulerian chemical transport and transformation model for sulfate, SO{sub 2}, and related species driven by analyzed forecast meteorological data has been run for the Northern Hemisphere for June-July 1997 and extensively evaluated with observational data, mainly from air-quality and precipitation chemistry networks. For {approx}5000 evaluations, 50% of the modeled sulfate 24-h mixing ratios were within a factor of 1.85 of the observations; 50% of {approx}328 concurrent subgrid observations were within a factor of 1.33. Much greater subgrid variation for 24-h SO{sub 2} mixing ratios (50% of {approx}3552 observations were within a factor of 2.32) reflects high variability of this primary species; for {approx}12,600 evaluations 50% of modeled mixing ratios were within a factor of 2.54 of the observations. These results indicate that a substantial fraction of the modeled and observed differences is due to subgrid variation and/or measurement error. Sulfate mixing ratios are identified by source type (biogenic, volcanic, and anthropogenic) and production mechanism (primary and by gas-phase and aqueous-phase oxidation). Examination of key diagnostics showed substantial variation for the different types of sulfur, e.g., SO{sub 2} aqueous-phase oxidation rates of 29 to 102% day{sup -1}, sulfate residence times of 4 to 9 days. Volcanic emissions contributed 10% of the sulfate burden and 6% of emissions, because the elevated release allows 2 large fractional conversion of SO{sub 2} and long residence time. Biogenic SO{sub 2} was generally at lower concentrations than H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, resulting in efficient aqueous-phase oxidation; this source type contributed 13% of emissions but only 5% of sulfate burden. Anthropogenic sources were the dominant contributors to sulfur emissions, 80%, and sulfate burden, 84%.

  2. Modeling and experimental characterization of propulsion of a spiral-type microrobot for medical use in gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Alici, Gursel; Than, Trung Duc; Li, Weihua

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a spiral-type medical robot based on an endoscopic capsule was propelled in a fluidic and tubular environment using electromagnetic actuation. Both modeling and experimental methods have been employed to characterize the propulsion of the robotic capsule. The experiments were performed not only in a simulated environment (vinyl tube filled with silicone oil) but also in a real small intestine. The effects of the spiral parameters including lead, spiral height, the number of spirals, and cross section of the spirals on the propulsion efficiency of the robot are investigated. Based on the transmission efficiency from rotation to translation as well as the balancing of the microrobot in operation, it is demonstrated that the robot with two spirals could provide the best propulsion performance when its lead is slightly smaller than the perimeter of the capsule. As for the spiral height, it is better to use a larger one as long as the intestine's size allows. Based on the simulation and experimental results presented, this study quantifies the influence of the spiral structure on the capsule's propulsion. It provides a helpful reference for the design and optimization of the traction topology of the microrobot navigating inside the mucus-filled small intestine. PMID:23193447

  3. Corrosion chemistry closing comments: opportunities in corrosion science facilitated by operando experimental characterization combined with multi-scale computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Scully, John R

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in characterization tools, computational capabilities, and theories have created opportunities for advancement in understanding of solid-fluid interfaces at the nanoscale in corroding metallic systems. The Faraday Discussion on Corrosion Chemistry in 2015 highlighted some of the current needs, gaps and opportunities in corrosion science. Themes were organized into several hierarchical categories that provide an organizational framework for corrosion. Opportunities to develop fundamental physical and chemical data which will enable further progress in thermodynamic and kinetic modelling of corrosion were discussed. These will enable new and better understanding of unit processes that govern corrosion at the nanoscale. Additional topics discussed included scales, films and oxides, fluid-surface and molecular-surface interactions, selected topics in corrosion science and engineering as well as corrosion control. Corrosion science and engineering topics included complex alloy dissolution, local corrosion, and modelling of specific corrosion processes that are made up of collections of temporally and spatially varying unit processes such as oxidation, ion transport, and competitive adsorption. Corrosion control and mitigation topics covered some new insights on coatings and inhibitors. Further advances in operando or in situ experimental characterization strategies at the nanoscale combined with computational modelling will enhance progress in the field, especially if coupling across length and time scales can be achieved incorporating the various phenomena encountered in corrosion. Readers are encouraged to not only to use this ad hoc organizational scheme to guide their immersion into the current opportunities in corrosion chemistry, but also to find value in the information presented in their own ways. PMID:26114392

  4. Computational Modeling and Experimental Characterization of Martensitic Transformations in Nicoal for Self-Sensing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, T. A.; Yamakov, V. I.; Hochhalter, J. D.; Leser, W. P.; Warner, J. E.; Newman, J. A.; Purja Pun, G. P.; Mishin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Fundamental changes to aero-vehicle management require the utilization of automated health monitoring of vehicle structural components. A novel method is the use of self-sensing materials, which contain embedded sensory particles (SP). SPs are micron-sized pieces of shape-memory alloy that undergo transformation when the local strain reaches a prescribed threshold. The transformation is a result of a spontaneous rearrangement of the atoms in the crystal lattice under intensified stress near damaged locations, generating acoustic waves of a specific spectrum that can be detected by a suitably placed sensor. The sensitivity of the method depends on the strength of the emitted signal and its propagation through the material. To study the transition behavior of the sensory particle inside a metal matrix under load, a simulation approach based on a coupled atomistic-continuum model is used. The simulation results indicate a strong dependence of the particle's pseudoelastic response on its crystallographic orientation with respect to the loading direction and suggest possible ways of optimizing particle sensitivity. The technology of embedded sensory particles will serve as the key element in an autonomous structural health monitoring system that will constantly monitor for damage initiation in service, which will enable quick detection of unforeseen damage initiation in real-time and during onground inspections.

  5. Computational and experimental characterization of dVHL establish a Drosophila model of VHL syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shmueli, Merav D; Schnaider, Lee; Herzog, Gal; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) cancer syndrome is associated with mutations in the VHL gene. The pVHL protein is involved in response to changes in oxygen availability as part of an E3-ligase that targets the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor for degradation. pVHL has a molten globule configuration with marginal thermodynamic stability. The cancer-associated mutations further destabilize it. The Drosophila homolog, dVHL, has relatively low sequence similarity to pVHL, and is also involved in regulating HIF1-α. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo approaches we demonstrate high similarity between the structure and function of dVHL and pVHL. These proteins have a similar fold, secondary and tertiary structures, as well as thermodynamic stability. Key functional residues in dVHL are evolutionary conserved. This structural homology underlies functional similarity of both proteins, evident by their ability to bind their reciprocal partner proteins, and by the observation that transgenic pVHL can fully maintain normal dVHL-HIF1-α downstream pathways in flies. This novel transgenic Drosophila model is thus useful for studying the VHL syndrome, and for testing drug candidates to treat it. PMID:25310726

  6. Computational and Experimental Characterization of dVHL Establish a Drosophila Model of VHL Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shmueli, Merav D.; Schnaider, Lee; Herzog, Gal; Gazit, Ehud; Segal, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) cancer syndrome is associated with mutations in the VHL gene. The pVHL protein is involved in response to changes in oxygen availability as part of an E3-ligase that targets the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor for degradation. pVHL has a molten globule configuration with marginal thermodynamic stability. The cancer-associated mutations further destabilize it. The Drosophila homolog, dVHL, has relatively low sequence similarity to pVHL, and is also involved in regulating HIF1-α. Using in silico, in vitro and in vivo approaches we demonstrate high similarity between the structure and function of dVHL and pVHL. These proteins have a similar fold, secondary and tertiary structures, as well as thermodynamic stability. Key functional residues in dVHL are evolutionary conserved. This structural homology underlies functional similarity of both proteins, evident by their ability to bind their reciprocal partner proteins, and by the observation that transgenic pVHL can fully maintain normal dVHL-HIF1-α downstream pathways in flies. This novel transgenic Drosophila model is thus useful for studying the VHL syndrome, and for testing drug candidates to treat it. PMID:25310726

  7. Experimental characterization and micromechanical modeling of superelastic response of a porous NiTi shape-memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia; Su, Yu; Guo, Wei-Guo; Isaacs, Jon

    2005-10-01

    Porous shape-memory alloys are usually brittle due to the presence of various nickel-titanium intermetallic compounds that are produced in the course of most commonly used synthesizing techniques. We consider here a porous NiTi shape-memory alloy (SMA), synthesized by spark-plasma sintering, that is ductile and displays full shape-memory effects over the entire appropriate range of strains. The porosity however is only 12% but the basic synthesizing technique has potential for producing shape-memory alloys with greater porosity that still are expected to display superelasticity and shape-memory effects. The current material has been characterized experimentally using quasi-static and dynamic tests at various initial temperatures, mostly within the superelastic strain range, but also into the plastic deformation regime of the stress-induced martensite phase. To obtain a relatively constant strain rate in the high strain-rate tests, a novel pulse-shaping technique is introduced. The results of the quasi-static experiments are compared with the predictions by a model that can be used to calculate the stress-strain response of porous NiTi shape-memory alloys during the austenite-to-martensite and reverse phase transformations in uniaxial quasi-static loading and unloading at constant temperatures. In the austenite-to-martensite transformation, the porous shape-memory alloy is modeled as a three-phase composite with the parent phase (austenite) as the matrix and the product phase (martensite) and the voids as the embedded inclusions, reversing the roles of austenite and martensite during the reverse transformation from fully martensite to fully austenite phase. The criterion of the stress-induced martensitic transformation and its reversal is based on equilibrium thermodynamics, balancing the thermodynamic driving force for the phase transformation, associated with the reduction of Gibbs' free energy, with the resistive force corresponding to the required energy to

  8. Anti-inflammatory activity of Pistacia khinjuk in different experimental models: isolation and characterization of its flavonoids and galloylated sugars.

    PubMed

    Esmat, Ahmed; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A; Algandaby, Mardi M; Moussa, Ashaimaa Y; Labib, Rola M; Ayoub, Nahla A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2012-03-01

    The present study aimed at isolating and elucidating the structure of the main components of Pistacia khinjuk L. and exploring its potential anti-inflammatory effect in different experimental models. The extract was evaluated for anti-inflammatory activity by measuring paw volume in three experimental models. Then, prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂) level, ear edema, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, histopathology, nitric oxide (NO) level, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) level were assessed. Seven phenolic compounds, mainly flavonoids and galloylated compounds, were isolated from the aqueous methanol extract: gallic acid (1), methyl gallate (2), quercetin-3-O-β-D-⁴C₁-galactopyranoside (hyperin) (3), myricetin-3-O-α-L-¹C₄-rhamnopyranoside (myricitrin) (4), 1,6-digalloyl-β-D-glucose (5), 1,4-digalloyl-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), and 2,3-di-O-galloyl-(α/β)-⁴C₁-glucopyranose (nilocitin) (7). The anti-inflammatory activity was evidenced by decreased carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and PGE₂ elevation. In the croton oil-induced ear edema model, MPO activity was significantly inhibited, and inflammatory histopathological changes were ameliorated. In the rat air pouch model, NO generation and TNF-α release were significantly inhibited. The isolation and nuclear magnetic resonance spectral data of compound 6 from the genus Pistacia are revealed for the first time. Also, P. khinjuk L. aqueous methanol extract possesses anti-inflammatory activity in several experimental models. PMID:22082098

  9. Experimental characterization and modeling of ionic polymer-metal composites as biomimetic actuators, sensors, and artificial muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yongxian

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are soft bending actuators and sensors. A typical IPMC consists of a thin perfluorinated ionomer membrane, noble metal electrodes plated on both faces, and is neutralized with the necessary amount of cations. They respond to electric stimulus by generating large bending motions and produce electric signals upon sudden bending deformations. These actuation and sensing responses, which result from the coupled chemo-electro-mechanical interactions at the nano-scale level, depend on the structure of the ionomer, the morphology of the metal electrodes, the nature of the cations, and the degree of the hydration. IPMCs have been considered for potential applications in artificial muscles, robotic systems, medical devices, and other biomimetic applications. A series of systematic experimental characterizations are performed on both Nafion- and Flemion-based IPMCs in various cation forms. Compared with Nafion-based IPMCs, Flemion-based IPMCs with fine dendritic gold electrodes have higher ion-exchange capacity, better surface conductivity, higher hydration capacity, and higher longitudinal stiffness. Flemion-based IPMCs show a greater bending deformation towards the anode without back relaxation under a DC voltage. This displacement towards the anode is linearly related to the charge accumulation at the cathode. In contrast, Nafion-based IPMCs in alkali-metal cations initially have a fast bending towards the anode, followed by a slow relaxation in the opposite direction as charges continue to move towards the cathode boundary layer. Based on the understanding of the factors that affect IPMCs' performance, novel methods to tailor the IPMCs' electro-mechanical responses are developed. By modifying the associated cations, i.e., introducing various single cations (including alkali-metal, alkyl-ammonium, or multivalent metal cations) and cation combinations, diverse actuation behaviors can be obtained and optimized. The actuation motions of

  10. Mars Radiator Characterization Experimental Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2004-01-01

    Radiators are an enabling technology for the human exploration and development of the moon and Mars. As standard components of the heat rejection subsystem of space vehicles, radiators are used to reject waste heat to space and/or a planetary environment. They are typically large components of the thermal control system for a space vehicle or human habitation facility, and in some cases safety factors are used to oversize them when the operating environment cannot be fully characterized. Over-sizing can impose significant weight and size penalties that might be prohibitive for future missions. Radiator performance depends on the size of the radiator surface, its emittance and absorptance, the radiator temperature, the effective sky temperature surrounding the radiator, solar radiation and atmospheric irradiation levels, convection to or from the atmosphere (on Mars), and other conditions that could affect the nature of the radiator surface, such as dust accumulation. Most particularly, dust is expected to be a major contributor to the local environmental conditions on either the lunar or Martian surface. This conclusion regarding Mars is supported by measurements of dust accumulation on the Mars Sojourner Rover solar array during the Pathfinder mission. This Final Report describes a study of the effect of Martian dust accumulation on radiator performance. It is comprised of quantitative measurements of effective emittance for a range of dust accumulation levels on surfaces of known emittance under clean conditions. The test radiator coatings were Z-93P, NS-43G, and Silver Teflon (10 mil) film. The Martian dust simulant was Carbondale Red Clay. Results were obtained under vacuum conditions sufficient to reduce convection effects virtually to zero. The experiments required the development of a calorimetric apparatus that allows simultaneous measurements of the effective emittance for all the coatings at each set of experimental conditions. A method of adding dust to

  11. P2X7 receptor-mediated calcium dynamics in HEK293 cells: experimental characterization and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Garbo, A.; Alloisio, S.; Nobile, M.

    2012-04-01

    The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) induces ionotropic Ca2 + signalling in different cell types. It plays an important role in the immune response and in the nervous system. Here, the mechanisms underlying intracellular Ca2 + variations evoked by 3‧-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-ATP (BzATP), a potent agonist of the P2X7R, in transfected HEK293 cells, are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. We propose a minimal model of P2X7R that is capable of reproducing, qualitatively and quantitatively, the experimental data. This approach was also adopted for the P2X7R variant, which lacks the entire C-terminus tail (trP2X7R). Then we introduce a biophysical model describing the Ca2 + dynamics in HEK293. Our model gives an account of the ionotropic Ca2 + influx evoked by BzATP on the basis of the kinetics model of P2X7R. To explain the complex Ca2 + responses evoked by BzATP, the model predicted that an impairment in Ca2 + extrusion flux through the plasma membrane is a key factor for Ca2 + homeostasis in HEK293 cells.

  12. 3-D structural modeling of humic acids through experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation and atomistic simulations 1. Chelsea soil humic acid.

    SciTech Connect

    Gassman, Paul; Hatcher, Patrick G.; Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Simpson, Andre; Goddard, William A., III; Diallo, Mamadou S.; Johnson, James H. Jr.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated {sup 13}C NMR spectrum of an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  13. Experimental characterization and modeling of UO2 grain boundary cracking at high temperatures and high strain rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvo, Maxime; Sercombe, Jérôme; Helfer, Thomas; Sornay, Philippe; Désoyer, Thierry

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, the behavior of a dense UO2 (porosity less than 2%) was studied experimentally on a range of temperatures (1100-1700 °C) and strain rates (10-4-10-1 /s) representative of RIA loading conditions. The yield stress was found to increase with strain rate and to decrease with temperature. Macroscopic cracking of the samples was apparent after the tests at 1100 °C. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) image analyses revealed a pronounced grain boundary cracking in the core of the samples tested at 10-1 /s and at 1550-1700 °C. A hyperbolic sine model for the viscoplastic strain rate with a clear dependency on porosity was first developed. It was completed by a Drucker-Prager yield criterion with associated plastic flow to account for the porosity increase induced by grain boundary cracking. Finite Elements simulations of the compression tests on the dense UO2 were then successfully compared to the stress-strain curves, post-test diameter profiles and porosities at the pellets' center, periphery and top extremity. The response of the grain boundary cracking model was then studied in biaxial compression, this condition being closer to that of the pellet during a RIA power transient.

  14. Experimental characterization and modeling of a nanofiber-based selective emitter for thermophotovoltaic energy conversion: The effect of optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljarrah, M. T.; Wang, R.; Evans, E. A.; Clemons, C. B.; Young, G. W.

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum oxide nanofibers doped with erbium oxide have been synthesized by calcining polymer fibers made by the electrospinning technique using a mixture of aluminum acetate, erbium acetate and polyvinylpyrrolidone dissolved in ethanol. The resulting ceramic fibers are used to fabricate a free-standing selective emitter. The general equation of radiation transfer coupled with experimentally measured optical properties is used to model the net radiation obtained from these structures. It has been found that the index of refraction and the extinction coefficient are direct functions of the erbia doping level in the fibers. The fibers radiated in a selective manner at ˜1.53 μm with an efficiency of about 90%. For a fiber film on a substrate, the effect of film thickness, extinction coefficient and substrate emissivity on the overall emitter emissivity is also investigated in this study. Results show that the emissivity of the film increases as the thickness of the film increases up to a maximum value, after which increasing the film thickness had no effect on emissivity. Furthermore, it has been found that the substrate emissivity increases the amount of off-band radiation. This effect can be mitigated by controlling the film thickness.

  15. 3-D Structural Modeling of Humic Acids through Experimental Characterization, Computer Assisted Structure Elucidation and Atomistic Simulations. 1. Chelsea Soil Humic Acid

    SciTech Connect

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Simpson, Andre; Gassman, Paul L.; Faulon, Jean Loup; Johnson, Jr., James H.; Goddard, III, William A.; Hatcher, Patrick G.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes an integrated experimental and computational framework for developing 3-D structural models for humic acids (HAs). This approach combines experimental characterization, computer assisted structure elucidation (CASE), and atomistic simulations to generate all 3-D structural models or a representative sample of these models consistent with the analytical data and bulk thermodynamic/structural properties of HAs. To illustrate this methodology, structural data derived from elemental analysis, diffuse reflectance FT-IR spectroscopy, 1-D/2-D | 1H and 13C solution NMR spectroscopy, and electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI QqTOF MS) are employed as input to the CASE program SIGNATURE to generate all 3-D structural models for Chelsea soil humic acid (HA). These models are subsequently used as starting 3-D structures to carry out constant temperature-constant pressure molecular dynamics simulations to estimate their bulk densities and Hildebrand solubility parameters. Surprisingly, only a few model isomers are found to exhibit molecular compositions and bulk thermodynamic properties consistent with the experimental data. The simulated 13C NMR spectrum of * Corresponding author phone: (626)395-2730; fax: (626)585-0918; e-mail: diallo@wag.caltech.edu and mdiallo@howard.edu. Present address: Materials and Process Simulation Center,BeckmanInstitute 139-74, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125. † California Institute of Technology. ‡ Howard University. § University of Toronto. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. ^ Sandia National Laboratories. # The Ohio State University. ã xxxx American Chemical Society PAGE EST: 11 10.1021/es0259638 CCC: $25.00 Published on Web 00/00/0000 an equimolar mixture of these model isomers compares favorably with the measured spectrum of Chelsea soil HA.

  16. Experimental Characterization and Modeling Analysis on Npn AlGaN/GaN Hbt with High Ideality Factor in both Collector and Base Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shih-Wei; Lai, Shih-Wen

    2012-08-01

    Characterization and modeling analysis on both ideality factor of the collector current (ηC) and the base current (ηB) have higher than the excepted values of 1.0 and 2.0, respectively, for npn AlGaN/GaN heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) have been reported. We employ the rapid thermal process annealing (RTP-annealing) to modify the base parasitical Schottky diode (called A-HBTs) after the as-deposited Ni/Au bilayers on the base layer for electrode with no annealing (called N-HBTs) to compare with each other. For a HBT operated in Gummel-plot configuration, experimental and modeling results indicate that the base parasitical Schottky diode (BPSD) causes the base current (IB) and collector current (IC) with high ideality factor and raise the base-emitter voltage (VBE) to higher operation point, and therefore lead to more power consumption. Furthermore, the extended Ebers-Moll equivalent-circuit model together with the extracted device parameters provided simulated results that were in a good agreement with experimental ones.

  17. Experimental characterization and macro-modeling of mechanical strength of multi-sheets and multi-materials spot welds under pure and mixed modes I and II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtourou, Rim; Haugou, Gregory; Leconte, Nicolas; Zouari, Bassem; Chaari, Fahmi; Markiewicz, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Resistance Spot Welding (RSW) of multiple sheets with multiple materials are increasingly realized in the automotive industry. The mechanical strength of such new generation of spot welded assemblies is not that much dealt with. This is true in particular for experiments dedicated to investigate the mechanical strength of spot weld made by multi sheets of different grades, and their macro modeling in structural computations. Indeed, the most published studies are limited to two sheet assemblies. Therefore, in the first part of this work an advanced experimental set-up with a reduced mass is proposed to characterize the quasi-static and dynamic mechanical behavior and rupture of spot weld made by several sheets of different grades. The proposed device is based on Arcan test, the plates contribution in the global response is, thus, reduced. Loading modes I/II are, therefore, combined and well controlled. In the second part a simplified spot weld connector element (macroscopic modeling) is proposed to describe the nonlinear response and rupture of this new generation of spot welded assemblies. The weld connector model involves several parameters to be set. The remaining parameters are finally identified through a reverse engineering approach using mechanical responses of experimental tests presented in the first part of this work.

  18. Pretest characterization of WIPP experimental waste

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, J.; Davis, H.; Drez, P.E.; Devarakonda, M.

    1991-12-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico, is an underground repository designed for the storage and disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes from US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities across the country. The Performance Assessment (PA) studies for WIPP address compliance of the repository with applicable regulations, and include full-scale experiments to be performed at the WIPP site. These experiments are the bin-scale and alcove tests to be conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Prior to conducting these experiments, the waste to be used in these tests needs to be characterized to provide data on the initial conditions for these experiments. This characterization is referred to as the Pretest Characterization of WIPP Experimental Waste, and is also expected to provide input to other programmatic efforts related to waste characterization. The purpose of this paper is to describe the pretest waste characterization activities currently in progress for the WIPP bin-scale waste, and to discuss the program plan and specific analytical protocols being developed for this characterization. The relationship between different programs and documents related to waste characterization efforts is also highlighted in this paper.

  19. Characterization of atomic-level structure in Fe-based amorphous and nanocrystalline alloy by experimental and modeling methods

    SciTech Connect

    Babilas, Rafał

    2015-09-15

    The atomic structure of Fe{sub 70}Nb{sub 10}B{sub 20} alloy in “as-cast” state and after annealing was investigated using high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD), Mössbauer spectroscopy (MS) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The HRTEM observations allowed to indicate some medium-range order (MRO) regions about 2 nm in size and formation of some kinds of short-range order (SRO) structures represented by atomic clusters with diameter ca. 0.5 nm. The Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method basing on the results of XRD measurements was used in modeling the atomic structure of Fe-based alloy. The structural model was described by peak values of partial pair correlation functions and coordination numbers determined by Mössbauer spectroscopy investigations. The three-dimensional configuration box of atoms was obtained from the RMC simulation and the representative Fe-centered clusters were taken from the calculated structure. According to the Gonser et al. approach, the measured spectra of alloy studied were decomposed into 5 subspectra representing average Fe–Fe coordination numbers. Basing on the results of disaccommodation of magnetic permeability, which is sensitive to the short order of the random packing of atoms, it was stated that an occurrence of free volume is not detected after nanocrystallization process. - Highlights: • Atomic cluster model of amorphous structure was proposed for studied glassy alloy. • Short range order (ca. 0.5 nm) regions interpreted as clusters were identified by HREM. • Clusters correspond to coordination numbers (N = 4,6,8,9) calculated by using Gonser approach. • Medium-range order (ca. 2 nm) could be referred to few atomic clusters. • SRO regions are able to grow up as nuclei of crystalline bcc Fe and iron borides. • Crystalline particles have spherical morphology with an average diameter of 20 nm.

  20. Experimental characterization of the perceptron laser rangefinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kweon, I. S.; Hoffman, Regis; Krotkov, Eric

    1991-01-01

    In this report, we characterize experimentally a scanning laser rangefinder that employs active sensing to acquire three-dimensional images. We present experimental techniques applicable to a wide variety of laser scanners, and document the results of applying them to a device manufactured by Perceptron. Nominally, the sensor acquires data over a 60 deg x 60 deg field of view in 256 x 256 pixel images at 2 Hz. It digitizes both range and reflectance pixels to 12 bits, providing a maximum range of 40 m and a depth resolution of 1 cm. We present methods and results from experiments to measure geometric parameters including the field of view, angular scanning increments, and minimum sensing distance. We characterize qualitatively problems caused by implementation flaws, including internal reflections and range drift over time, and problems caused by inherent limitations of the rangefinding technology, including sensitivity to ambient light and surface material. We characterize statistically the precision and accuracy of the range measurements. We conclude that the performance of the Perceptron scanner does not compare favorably with the nominal performance, that scanner modifications are required, and that further experimentation must be conducted.

  1. Experimental characterization and modeling of the reliability of three-terminal dual-damascene Cu interconnect trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, C. L.; Thompson, C. V.; Pey, K. L.; Choi, W. K.

    2003-07-01

    Electromigration tests on Cu dual-damascene interconnect tree structures consisting of straight via-to-via (or contact-to-contact) lines with an extra via in the middle of the line have been carried out. Like Al-based interconnects, the reliability of a segment in a Cu-based interconnect tree strongly depends on the stress conditions of connected segments. The analytic model based on a nodal analysis developed for Al trees gives a conservative estimate of the lifetime of Cu-based interconnect trees. However, there are important differences in the results obtained under similar test conditions for Al-based and Cu-based interconnect trees. These differences are thought to be associated with variations in the architectural schemes of the two metallization systems. The absence of a conducting electromigration-resistant overlayer in Cu technology and the low critical stress for void nucleation at the Cu/interlevel diffusion barrier interface (e.g., the Cu/Si3N4 interface) leads to different failure modes between Cu and Al interconnects. As a result, the most highly stressed segment in a Cu-based interconnect tree is not always the least reliable. Moreover, the possibility of liner rupture at stressed dual-damascene vias lead to significant differences in tree reliabilities in Cu compared to Al. While an interconnect tree can be treated as a fundamental unit whose reliability is independent of that of other units in Al-based interconnect architectures, interconnect trees cannot be treated as fundamental units for circuit-level reliability analyses for Cu-based interconnects.

  2. Characterization of NiTinol under torsional loads through a numerical implementation of the Boyd Lagoudas constitutive model and comparison of the results with experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitiello, Antonio; Squillace, Antonino; Prisco, Umberto

    2007-02-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) are a particular family of materials, discovered during the 1930s and only now used in technological applications, with the property of returning to an imposed shape after a deformation and heating process. The study of the mechanical behaviour of SMA, through a proper constitutive model, and the possible ensuing applications form the core of an interesting research field, developed in the last few years and still now subject to studies driven by the aim of understanding and characterizing the peculiar properties of these materials. The aim of this work is to study the behaviour of SMA under torsional loads. To obtain a forecast of the mechanical response of the SMA, we utilized a numerical algorithm based on the Boyd-Lagoudas model and then we compared the results with those from some experimental tests. The experiments were conducted by subjecting helicoidal springs with a constant cross section to a traction load. It is well known, in fact, that in such springs the main stress under traction loads is almost completely a pure torsional stress field. The interest in these studies is due to the absence of data on such tests in the literature for SMA, and because there are an increasing number of industrial applications where SMA are subjected to torsional load, in particular in medicine, and especially in orthodontic drills which usually work under torsional loads.

  3. Slot film cooling: A comprehensive experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffan, Fernando

    is due to the mixing strength of each case, as well as the location of regions of strong mixing with respect to the wall. Kinematic and thermal data show that strong mixing occurs in the wall-jet away from the wall (y/s>1), while strong mixing in the wall-wake occurs much closer to the wall (y/s<1). Min-shear cases exhibit noticeably weaker mixing confined to about y/s=1. Additionally to these general observations, the experimental data obtained in this work is analyzed to reveal scaling laws for the inlets, near-wall scaling, detecting and characterizing coherent structures in the flow as well as to provide data reduction strategies for comparison to CFD models (RANS and LES).

  4. Experimental Models for Neurotrauma Research.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Johan; Risling, Mårten

    2016-01-01

    Physical trauma in the central nervous system (CNS) is usually the result of a number of forces in different directions and dimensions. A large number of experimental models have been developed to improve the possibilities to understand the outcome of CNS trauma. In this chapter, we will describe the need for a variety of experimental models for research on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and spinal cord injury (SCI). Models can serve different needs, such as: to test new treatments for injuries, to reveal thresholds for injuries, to provide a better understanding of injury mechanisms, or to test tools and methods for translation between experiments and clinical data. In this chapter, we will discuss on the validation of models and translation between experimental and clinical studies. PMID:27604724

  5. Experimental characterization of stress relaxation in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadali, Hemanth C.

    Glass viscoelasticity has gained importance in recent years as glass lens molding appeared as a valuable alternative to the traditional grinding and polishing process for manufacturing glass lenses. In the precision lens molding process, knowledge of viscoelastic properties of glass in the transition region, which affect the stress relaxation behavior, is required to precisely predict the final size and shape of molded lenses. The purpose of this study is to establish a step-by-step procedure for characterizing the viscoelastic behavior of glass in the glass transition region using a finite term Prony series of a Generalized Maxwell model. This study focuses on viscoelastic characterization of stabilized glass samples at lower stress levels between 3 and 12 MPa where it demonstrates linearity. Analysis and post-processing of creep data, performed in MATLAB and MAPLE, include displacement-to-strain conversion, determination of viscoelastic moments and constants, normalization, curve fitting and retardation-to-relaxation conversion. The process of curve fitting is carried out using a constrained optimization scheme to satisfy the constraint equations involving viscoelastic constants and functions. A set of relaxation parameters needed in numerical modeling, i.e., weights and times of the Prony series are presented in this thesis for borosilicate glass at different temperatures. Additionally, the issues related to the characterization of optical glasses were identified and discussed.

  6. Experimental characterization of continuous-variable entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W.P.; Schnabel, R.; Lam, P.K.; Ralph, T.C.

    2004-01-01

    We present an experimental analysis of quadrature entanglement produced from a pair of amplitude squeezed beams. The correlation matrix of the state is characterized within a set of reasonable assumptions, and the strength of the entanglement is gauged using measures of the degree of inseparability and the degree of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox. We introduce controlled decoherence in the form of optical loss to the entangled state, and demonstrate qualitative differences in the response of the degrees of inseparability and EPR paradox to this loss. The entanglement is represented on a photon number diagram that provides an intuitive and physically relevant description of the state. We calculate efficacy contours for several quantum information protocols on this diagram, and use them to predict the effectiveness of our entanglement in those protocols.

  7. Experimental characterization of novel microdiffuser elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, L.; Punch, J.; Jeffers, N.; Stafford, J.

    2014-07-01

    Micropumps can play a significant role in thermal management applications, as a component of microfluidic cooling systems. For next-generation high density optical communication systems, in particular, heat flux levels are sufficiently high to require a microfluidic circuit for cooling. Valveless piezoelectrically-actuated micropumps are a particularly promising technology to be deployed for this application. These pumps exploit the asymmetric flow behaviour of microdiffusers to achieve net flow. They feature no rotating or contacting parts, which make them intrinsically reliable in comparison to micropumps with active valves. In this paper, two novel microdiffuser elements are reported and characterized. The micropumps were fabricated using a 3D Printer. Each single diffuser had a length of 1800 pm and a depth of 400 pm. An experimental characterization was conducted in which the flow rate and differential pressure were measured as a function of operating frequency. In comparison with standard diffuser, both elements showed an increase in differential pressure in the range of 40 - 280 %, but only one of the elements exhibited an improved flow rate, of about 85 %.

  8. Experimental characterization of ceramic pebble beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaccari, N.; Aquaro, D.

    2009-04-01

    Several materials have been developed in Europe and Japan for the DEMO reactor that will be tested in ITER. The paper describes a solid breeder for nuclear fusion reactor exploiting ceramic pebbles made of Lithium Orthosilicate (Li 4SiO 4) and Lithium metatinate (Li 2TiO 3), with a diameter ranging between 0.5 mm and 1 mm. The main advantages of the pebbles are resistance to thermal stresses and the possibility to easily fill the complex geometries of the blanket. The results of experimental tests are presented, which enable the determination of the behaviour of single pebbles under compression and the parameters of the pebble beds needed to define their constitutive equations. Several standard tests on samples of pebble beds were performed: triaxial, direct shear and compression. The parameters of the Cam-Clay model were obtained from these tests. This model is normally used to describe soil materials (clay, sand) but in our case was used to simulate the triaxial tests with a finite elements computer code. The numerical results show a good agreement with the theoretical ones. Therefore this model could be used to determine the mechanical behaviour of the solid breeding blanket under normal and accidental conditions.

  9. The updated experimental proteinoid model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, S. W.; Nakashima, T.; Przybylski, A.; Syren, R. M.

    1982-01-01

    The experimental proteinoid model includes new results indicating that polymers sufficiently rich in basic amino acid catalyze the synthesis of peptides from ATP and amino acids and of oligonucleotides from ATP. The need for simulation syntheses of amino acids yielding significant proportions of basic amino acids is now in focus. The modeled simultaneous protocellular synthesis of peptides and polynucleotides is part of a more comprehensive proposal for the origin of the coded genetic mechanism. The finding of membrane and action potentials in proteinoid microspheres, with or without added lecithin, is reported. The crucial nature of a nonrandom matrix for protocells is developed.

  10. Experimental Trauma Models: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Frink, Michael; Andruszkow, Hagen; Zeckey, Christian; Krettek, Christian; Hildebrand, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of polytrauma patients remains a medical as well as socioeconomic challenge. Although diagnostics and therapy improved during the last decades, multiple injuries are still the major cause of fatalities in patients below 45 years of age. Organ dysfunction and organ failure are major complications in patients with major injuries and contribute to mortality during the clinical course. Profound understanding of the systemic pathophysiological response is crucial for innovative therapeutic approaches. Therefore, experimental studies in various animal models are necessary. This review is aimed at providing detailed information of common trauma models in small as well as in large animals. PMID:21331361

  11. EXPERIMENTAL MODELLING OF AORTIC ANEURYSMS

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Barry J; Corbett, Timothy J; Cloonan, Aidan J; O’Donnell, Michael R; Walsh, Michael T; Vorp, David A; McGloughlin, Timothy M

    2009-01-01

    A range of silicone rubbers were created based on existing commercially available materials. These silicones were designed to be visually different from one another and have distinct material properties, in particular, ultimate tensile strengths and tear strengths. In total, eleven silicone rubbers were manufactured, with the materials designed to have a range of increasing tensile strengths from approximately 2-4MPa, and increasing tear strengths from approximately 0.45-0.7N/mm. The variations in silicones were detected using a standard colour analysis technique. Calibration curves were then created relating colour intensity to individual material properties. All eleven materials were characterised and a 1st order Ogden strain energy function applied. Material coefficients were determined and examined for effectiveness. Six idealised abdominal aortic aneurysm models were also created using the two base materials of the study, with a further model created using a new mixing technique to create a rubber model with randomly assigned material properties. These models were then examined using videoextensometry and compared to numerical results. Colour analysis revealed a statistically significant linear relationship (p<0.0009) with both tensile strength and tear strength, allowing material strength to be determined using a non-destructive experimental technique. The effectiveness of this technique was assessed by comparing predicted material properties to experimentally measured methods, with good agreement in the results. Videoextensometry and numerical modelling revealed minor percentage differences, with all results achieving significance (p<0.0009). This study has successfully designed and developed a range of silicone rubbers that have unique colour intensities and material strengths. Strengths can be readily determined using a non-destructive analysis technique with proven effectiveness. These silicones may further aid towards an improved understanding of the

  12. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L.; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  13. Experimental models of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Newell, Philippa; Villanueva, Augusto; Friedman, Scott L; Koike, Kazuhiko; Llovet, Josep M

    2008-05-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common and deadly cancer whose pathogenesis is incompletely understood. Comparative genomic studies from human HCC samples have classified HCCs into different molecular subgroups; yet, the unifying feature of this tumor is its propensity to arise upon a background of inflammation and fibrosis. This review seeks to analyze the available experimental models in HCC research and to correlate data from human populations with them in order to consolidate our efforts to date, as it is increasingly clear that different models will be required to mimic different subclasses of the neoplasm. These models will be instrumental in the evaluation of compounds targeting specific molecular pathways in future preclinical studies. PMID:18314222

  14. Experimental seismic investigations for porous media characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senechal, P.; Bordes, C.; Barrière, J.; Garambois, S.; Brito, D.

    2009-12-01

    During decades, seismic investigations were based on the hypothesis of elastic media which is generally appropriate for geological imaging. Nevertheless, the necessity to improve non destructive geophysical methods for reservoir characterization implies to take into account the role of pore fluids for the seismic propagation. On the one hand, the water saturation modifies porous media bulk moduli and density and implies strong phase velocity variations. On the other hand, mechanical couplings between solid and fluid phases which can have inertial or viscous origin, generates attenuation and dispersion phenomena. In order to study these phenomena, we develop laboratory experiments for the measurement of seismic propagation in controlled porous media. We choose to work in a broad band [100-10 000 Hz] which includes Biot's frequency by using different seismic source (launched ball, pendulum, piezoelectric spherical source). These investigations are performed on various media from suspension (fresh concrete) to continuous framework (sand). Seismic propagation is recorded by accelerometers, discussed in term of frequency content, velocity analyses, attenuation and dispersion and compared to theoretical models. Moreover, seismoelectric measurements are used to study fluid displacements (filtration) associated to the seismic propagation.

  15. Experimental characterization of spin motor nozzle flow.

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Rocky J.; Peterson, Carl Williams; Henfling, John Francis

    2006-11-01

    The Mach number in the inviscid core of the flow exiting scarfed supersonic nozzles was measured using pitot probes. Nozzle characterization experiments were conducted in a modified section of an obsolete M = 7.3 test section/nozzle assembly on Sandia's Hypersonic Wind Tunnel. By capitalizing on existing hardware, the cost and time required for tunnel modifications were significantly reduced. Repeatability of pitot pressure measurements was excellent, and instrumentation errors were reduced by optimizing the pressure range of the transducers used for each test run. Bias errors in probe position prevented us from performing a successful in situ calibration of probe angle effects using pitot probes placed at an angle to the nozzle centerline. The abrupt throat geometry used in the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles modeled the throat geometry of the flight vehicle's spin motor nozzles. Survey data indicates that small (''unmeasurable'') differences in the nozzle throat geometries produced measurable flow asymmetries and differences in the flow fields generated by supposedly identical nozzles. Therefore, data from the Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles cannot be used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code validation. Configuration C and D nozzles replaced the abrupt throat geometry of Baseline and Configuration A and B nozzles with a 0.500-inch streamwise radius of curvature in the throat region. This throat geometry eliminated the flow asymmetries, flow separation in the nozzle throat, and measurable differences between the flow fields from identical nozzles that were observed in Baseline/A/B nozzles. Data from Configuration C and D nozzles can be used for CFD code validation.

  16. Experimental Characterization of Gas/Gas Injector Flowfields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Cramer, John M.; Pal, Sibtosh; Santoro, Robert J.; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides information on activities pertaining to the experimental characterization of gas/gas injector flowfields. An experimental testbed for uni-element gas/gas injector studies at realistic conditions has been fabricated and verified. Experiments for characterizing mixing/combustion of gas/gas injectors with raman spectroscopy have been initiated.

  17. Experimental "evolutional machines": mathematical and experimental modeling of biological evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilkov, A. V.; Loginov, I. A.; Morozova, E. V.; Shuvaev, A. N.; Pechurkin, N. S.

    Experimentalists possess model systems of two major types for study of evolution continuous cultivation in the chemostat and long-term development in closed laboratory microecosystems with several trophic structure If evolutionary changes or transfer from one steady state to another in the result of changing qualitative properties of the system take place in such systems the main characteristics of these evolution steps can be measured By now this has not been realized from the point of view of methodology though a lot of data on the work of both types of evolutionary machines has been collected In our experiments with long-term continuous cultivation we used the bacterial strains containing in plasmids the cloned genes of bioluminescence and green fluorescent protein which expression level can be easily changed and controlled In spite of the apparent kinetic diversity of evolutionary transfers in two types of systems the general mechanisms characterizing the increase of used energy flow by populations of primer producent can be revealed at their study According to the energy approach at spontaneous transfer from one steady state to another e g in the process of microevolution competition or selection heat dissipation characterizing the rate of entropy growth should increase rather then decrease or maintain steady as usually believed The results of our observations of experimental evolution require further development of thermodynamic theory of open and closed biological systems and further study of general mechanisms of biological

  18. Computational and Experimental Characterization of RNA Cubic Nanoscaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Afonin, Kirill A.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Bindewald, Eckart; Puppala, Praneet S.; Diehl, Alex R.; Hall, Kenneth T.; Kim, Tae Jin; Zimmermann, Michael T.; Jernigan, Robert L.; Jaeger, Luc; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    The fast-developing field of RNA nanotechnology requires the adoption and development of novel and faster computational approaches to modeling and characterization of RNA-based nano-objects. We report the first application of Elastic Network Modeling (ENM), a structure-based dynamics model, to RNA nanotechnology. With the use of an Anisotropic Network Model (ANM), a type of ENM, we characterize the dynamic behavior of non-compact, multi-stranded RNA-based nanocubes that can be used as nano-scale scaffolds carrying different functionalities. Modeling the nanocubes with our tool NanoTiler and exploring the dynamic characteristics of the models with ANM suggested relatively minor but important structural modifications that enhanced the assembly properties and thermodynamic stabilities. In silico and in vitro, we compared nanocubes having different numbers of base pairs per side, showing with both methods that the 10 bp-long helix design leads to more efficient assembly, as predicted computationally. We also explored the impact of different numbers of single-stranded nucleotide stretches at each of the cube corners and showed that cube flexibility simulations help explain the differences in the experimental assembly yields, as well as the measured nanomolecule sizes and melting temperatures. This original work paves the way for detailed computational analysis of the dynamic behavior of artificially designed multi-stranded RNA nanoparticles. PMID:24189588

  19. Ultrastructural characterization of craniopharyngioma at the tumor boundary: A structural comparison with an experimental toxic model using "oil machinery" fluid, with emphasis on Rosenthal fibers.

    PubMed

    Tena-Suck, Martha Lilia; Morales-Del Ángel, Andrea Y; Hernández-Campos, María Elena; Fernández-Valverde, Francisca; Ortíz-Plata, Alma; Hernández, Alma Delia; Santamaría, Abel

    2015-10-01

    Craniopharyngiomas (CPs) are cystic, encapsulated, slow-growing epithelial tumors. CPs can be aggressive forms invading and resorting surrounding structures of adjacent brain tissue, where Rosenthal fibers (RFs) are expressed. The aim of this study was to investigate the ultrastructure of these fibers in human biopsies and compare it with an experimental toxic model produced by the cortical infusion of the oil cyst fluid ("Oil machinery" fluid or OMF) from CPs to rats. For this purpose, the CPs from ten patients were examined by light and electron microscopy. OMF was administered to rats intracortically. Immunohistochemical detection of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin was assessed. In both freshly obtained CPs and rat brain tissue, the presence of abundant cellular debris, lipid-laden macrophages, reactive gliosis, inflammation and extracellular matrix destruction were seen. Ultrastructural results suggest focal pathological disturbances and an altered microenvironment surrounding the tumor-brain junction, with an enhanced presence of RFs in human tumors. In contrast, in the rat brain different degrees of cellular disorganization with aberrant filament-filament interactions and protein aggregation were seen, although RFs were absent. Our immunohistochemical findings in CPs also revealed an enhanced expression of GFAP and vimentin in RFs at the peripheral, but not at the central (body) level. Through these findings we hypothesize that the continuous OMF release at the CPs boundary may cause tissue alterations, including damaging of the extracellular matrix, and possibly contributing to RFs formation, a condition that was not possible to reproduce in the experimental model. The presence of RFs at the CPs boundary might be considered as a major criterion for the degree of CPs invasiveness to normal tissue. The lack of RFs reactivity in the experimental model reveals that the invasive component of CPs is not present in the OMF, although the fluid

  20. Experimental Modelling of Debris Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paleo Cageao, P.; Turnbull, B.; Bartelt, P.

    2012-04-01

    Debris flows are gravity-driven mass movements typically containing water, sediments, soil and rocks. These elements combine to give a flow complex phenomenology that exhibits characteristics common to diverse geophysical flows from dry granular media (e.g. levee formation) to viscous gravity currents (viscous fingering and surge instabilities). The exceptional speeds and range debris flows can achieve motivate the need for a co-ordinated modelling approach that can provide insight into the key physical processes that dictate the hazard associated with the flows. There has been recent progress in theoretical modelling approaches that capture the details of the multi-component nature of debris flows. The promise of such models is underlined by their qualitatively successful comparison with field-scale experimental data. The aim of the present work is to address the technical difficulties in achieving a controlled and repeatable laboratory-scale experiment for robust testing of these multi-component models. A laboratory experiment has been designed and tested that can provide detailed information of the internal structure of debris flows. This constitutes a narrow Perspex chute that can be tilted to any angle between 0° and ≈ 60°. A mixture of glycerine and glass balls was initially held behind a lock-gate, before being released down the chute. The evolving flow was captured through high speed video, analysed with a Particle Image Velocimetry algorithm to provide the changing velocity field. A wide parameter space has been tested, allowing variations in particle size, dispersity, surface roughness, fluid viscosity, slope angle and solid volume fraction. While matching key similarity criteria, such as Froude number, with a typical field event, these experiments allow close examination of a wide range of physical scenarios for the robust testing of new multi-component flow models. Further diagnostics include force plate and pore pressure measurements, with a view

  1. Experimental modeling of pulmonary barotrauma.

    PubMed

    Siermontowski, Piotr; Kozłowski, Wojciech; Pedrycz, Agnieszka; Krefft, Karolina; Kaczerska, Dorota

    2015-01-01

    The main causes of pulmonary barotrauma include loss of consciousness or panic attack of a diver and emergence from underwater with a constricted glottis. However, numerous publications and our observations indicate that the majority of fully symptomatic cases of pulmonary barotrauma develop without any evident errors in the ascending technique. Therefore, an attempt was made to examine such cases using the experimental model of pulmonary barotrauma designed by the authors. The experiment was conducted on 32 rabbits divided into three groups: Group C--not subjected to any treatment; Group E--with induced pulmonary barotrauma; and Group CT--subjected only to compression followed by quick decompression. In Groups E and CT, the same morphological markers of pulmonary barotrauma were detected in the lungs, although their severity varied. Morphological markers of pulmonary barotrauma were observed both in the group where the tube was not ob-structed (E) and in animals exposed only to rapid decompression (CT) PMID:26094289

  2. Experimental models of liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Crespo Yanguas, Sara; Cogliati, Bruno; Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2016-05-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  3. Experimental models of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Willebrords, Joost; Maes, Michaël; Colle, Isabelle; van den Bossche, Bert; de Oliveira, Claudia Pinto Marques Souza; Andraus, Wellington; Alves, Venâncio Avancini Ferreira; Leclercq, Isabelle; Vinken, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic fibrosis is a wound healing response to insults and as such affects the entire world population. In industrialized countries, the main causes of liver fibrosis include alcohol abuse, chronic hepatitis virus infection and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. A central event in liver fibrosis is the activation of hepatic stellate cells, which is triggered by a plethora of signaling pathways. Liver fibrosis can progress into more severe stages, known as cirrhosis, when liver acini are substituted by nodules, and further to hepatocellular carcinoma. Considerable efforts are currently devoted to liver fibrosis research, not only with the goal of further elucidating the molecular mechanisms that drive this disease, but equally in view of establishing effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The present paper provides a state-of-the-art overview of in vivo and in vitro models used in the field of experimental liver fibrosis research. PMID:26047667

  4. The water dimer I: Experimental characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Anamika; Cole, William T. S.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2015-07-01

    As the archetype of water hydrogen bonding, the water dimer has been studied extensively by both theory and experiment for nearly seven decades. In this article, we present a detailed chronological review of the experimental dimer studies and the insights into the complex nature of water and hydrogen bonding gained from them. A subsequent letter will review the corresponding theoretical advances.

  5. An experimental characterization of human torso motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cafolla, Daniele; Chen, I.-Ming; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2015-12-01

    The torso plays an important role in the human-like operation of humanoids. In this paper, a method is proposed to analyze the behavior of the human torso by using inertial and magnetic sensing tools. Experiments are conducted to characterize the motion performance of the human torso during daily routine operations. Furthermore, the forces acting on the human body during these operations are evaluated to design and validate the performance of a humanoid robot.

  6. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  7. Experimental and computing strategies in advanced material characterization problems

    SciTech Connect

    Bolzon, G.

    2015-10-28

    The mechanical characterization of materials relies more and more often on sophisticated experimental methods that permit to acquire a large amount of data and, contemporarily, to reduce the invasiveness of the tests. This evolution accompanies the growing demand of non-destructive diagnostic tools that assess the safety level of components in use in structures and infrastructures, for instance in the strategic energy sector. Advanced material systems and properties that are not amenable to traditional techniques, for instance thin layered structures and their adhesion on the relevant substrates, can be also characterized by means of combined experimental-numerical tools elaborating data acquired by full-field measurement techniques. In this context, parameter identification procedures involve the repeated simulation of the laboratory or in situ tests by sophisticated and usually expensive non-linear analyses while, in some situation, reliable and accurate results would be required in real time. The effectiveness and the filtering capabilities of reduced models based on decomposition and interpolation techniques can be profitably used to meet these conflicting requirements. This communication intends to summarize some results recently achieved in this field by the author and her co-workers. The aim is to foster further interaction between engineering and mathematical communities.

  8. Experimental Characterization and Modeling of the Anisotropy and Tension-Compression Asymmetry of Polycrystalline Molybdenum for Strain Rates Ranging from Quasi-static to Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiser, Geremy; Revil-Baudard, Benoit; Cazacu, Oana; Pasiliao, Crystal L.

    2015-11-01

    A systematic experimental investigation of the room-temperature quasi-static behavior and dynamic mechanical response of polycrystalline commercially pure molybdenum is presented. It was established that the material has ductility in tension at 10-5/s and that the failure strain is strongly dependent on the orientation. A specimen taken along the rolling direction (RD) sustains large axial strains (20%), while a specimen taken at an angle of 45° to the RD could only sustain 5% strain. It was observed that irrespective of the loading orientation the yield stress in uniaxial compression is larger than in uniaxial tension. While in tension, the material has a strong anisotropy in Lankford coefficients, while in uniaxial compression, it displays weak strain-anisotropy. Due to the material's limited tensile ductility, successfully acquiring data for impact conditions is very challenging. For the first time, Taylor impact tests were successfully conducted on this material for impact velocities in the range 140-165 m/s. For impact velocities beyond this range, the very high tensile pressures generated in the specimen immediately after impact lead to failure. An elastic-plastic anisotropic model that accounts for all the specificities of the plastic deformation of the material was developed. Validation of the model was done through comparison with data on quasi-static notched specimens and Taylor impact specimens. Quantitative agreement with both global and local strain fields was obtained. In particular, the effect of loading orientation on the response was very well described for all strain rates.

  9. Experimental characterization of CANDELA photo-injector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travier, C.; Devanz, G.; Leblond, B.; Mouton, B.

    1997-02-01

    CANDELA photo-injector is made of a 2-cell S-band RF gun, using a dispenser cathode illuminated by a Ti : sapphire laser. This electron source provides a single bunch (at 12.5 Hz), with a charge of 1 nC and an energy of 2 MeV. After recalling the experimental set-up, this paper presents some results concerning mainly energy and bunch length measurements, and also comparisons with simulations done with the PARMELA code. Measured pulse durations of less than 10 ps show for the first time that dispenser photocathodes are "fast response" cathodes.

  10. Experimental characterization and atomistic modeling of interfacial void formation and detachment in short pulse laser processing of metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Eaman T.; Shugaev, Maxim V.; Wu, Chengping; Lin, Zhibin; Matsumoto, Hisashi; Conneran, Maria; Kleinert, Jan; Hainsey, Robert F.; Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    2016-04-01

    The short pulse laser interaction with metal surfaces covered by solid transparent overlayers is investigated in experiments and atomistic simulations, with a particular aim of revealing the mechanisms responsible for structural modification of the metal-overlayer interfacial regions. Experimental characterization of Al-silica targets modified by single-pulse laser irradiation with the pulse duration of 10 ps reveals the transitions from the generation of extended interfacial voids with internal nanoscale surface roughness to the partial detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate, and to the cracking/chipping or complete removal of the overlayer as the laser fluence increases. The mechanisms responsible for the appearance, growth, and percolation of the interfacial voids leading to the detachment of the overlayer from the metal substrate are investigated in a large-scale atomistic simulation. The results of the simulation demonstrate that the processes of nucleation and growth of the interfacial voids are driven by the dynamic relaxation of laser-induced stresses proceeding simultaneously with rapid phase transformations and temperature variation in the interfacial region. The growth and coalescence of the interfacial voids results in the formation of liquid bridges connecting the overlayer and the metal substrate, whereas solidification of the transient liquid structures produced by the breakup of the liquid bridges may be responsible for the formation of the nanoscale roughness of the interfacial voids observed in experiments. Computational analysis of the effect of preexisting interfacial voids reveals a complex dynamic picture of the initial expansion and subsequent compaction of the surface region of the metal substrate and suggests a possible scenario for the formation of voids below the metal-overlayer interface.

  11. Micromechanical finite element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone:hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-01-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30% HA by volume. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30 respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 MPa to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical finite element analysis (FEA) model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any loading of HA to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. Results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient and site-specific composite tissue engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. PMID:22522129

  12. Micromechanical finite-element modeling and experimental characterization of the compressive mechanical properties of polycaprolactone-hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds prepared by selective laser sintering for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Eshraghi, Shaun; Das, Suman

    2012-08-01

    Bioresorbable scaffolds with mechanical properties suitable for bone tissue engineering were fabricated from polycaprolactone (PCL) and hydroxyapatite (HA) by selective laser sintering (SLS) and modeled by finite-element analysis (FEA). Both solid gage parts and scaffolds having 1-D, 2-D and 3-D orthogonal, periodic porous architectures were made with 0, 10, 20 and 30 vol.% HA. PCL:HA scaffolds manufactured by SLS had nearly full density (99%) in the designed solid regions and had excellent geometric and dimensional control. Through optimization of the SLS process, the compressive moduli for our solid gage parts and scaffolds are the highest reported in the literature for additive manufacturing. The compressive moduli of solid gage parts were 299.3, 311.2, 415.5 and 498.3 MPa for PCL:HA loading at 100:0, 90:10, 80:20 and 70:30, respectively. The compressive effective stiffness tended to increase as the loading of HA was increased and the designed porosity was lowered. In the case of the most 3-D porous scaffold, the compressive modulus more than doubled from 14.9 to 36.2 MPa when changing the material from 100:0 to 70:30 PCL:HA. A micromechanical FEA model was developed to investigate the reinforcement effect of HA loading on the compressive modulus of the bulk material. Using a first-principles based approach, the random distribution of HA particles in a solidified PCL matrix was modeled for any HA loading to predict the bulk mechanical properties of the composites. The bulk mechanical properties were also used for FEA of the scaffold geometries. The results of the FEA were found to be in good agreement with experimental mechanical testing. The development of patient- and site-specific composite tissue-engineering constructs with tailored properties can be seen as a direct extension of this work on computational design, a priori modeling of mechanical properties and direct digital manufacturing. PMID:22522129

  13. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  14. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of a Cylindrical Blackbody Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.; Horn, Thomas J.

    2000-01-01

    During hypersonic flight, high temperatures and high heat fluxes are generated on the surfaces of vehicles. The Flight Loads Laboratory (FLL) at Dryden Flight Research Center (DFRC) is equipped with a calibration furnace, capable of calibrating heat flux gages up to 1100kW per square meters, and temperature sensors up to 2600 C. One heating configuration of the calibration furnace is a cylindrical blackbody cavity. Throughout the blackbody there are temperature gradients due to various boundary conditions. These boundary conditions include resistance heating, radiant heat transfer, and conduction to water-cooled electrodes. Also, an inert gas is purged through the graphite blackbody to prevent it from oxidizing. Consequently, the various modes of heat transfer present during operation of the blackbody cavity must be well understood in order to produce accurate heat flux gage and temperature sensor calibrations for use in ground testing or flight testing of hypersonic vehicles. The first step towards understanding the heat transfer in the blackbody cavity was to perform experiments at 1100 C, with and without outer surface insulation, while taking detailed temperature measurements inside the blackbody cavity. Steady state thermal models of the blackbody cavity were then developed. These models included detailed thermal analysis using commercial thermal analysis software. Conduction, radiation, and convection were considered in the thermal models for two cases: one with the outside of the blackbody cavity insulated and the second without insulation. This paper describes the experimental and numerical efforts used to characterize the steady state operation of the blackbody cavity. It describes the analysis of the test measurements, the boundary conditions used in the numerical models, and how the models were calibrated to fit the experimental data. Effects of various uncertainties, such as material properties, and convection are discussed.Initial thermal models

  15. Experimental Explosive Characterization for Counterterrorist Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etayo, D.; Maestrojuan, I.; Teniente, J.; Ederra, I.; Gonzalo, R.

    2013-08-01

    A THz spectral characterization of different explosives of special interest for the Spanish National Security Forces "Guardia Civil" is presented in this paper. This forensic analysis has been done in the frequency range from 0.060 THz to 3.5 THz using the Teraview TPS Spectra 3000 system in laboratory conditions. With this equipment the refractive index, absorbance and complex permittivity of the explosive samples have been obtained. In this study, some of the most common used explosives (Bullet gunpowder, mine gunpowder, PETN, TNT, RDX) are analysed paying special attention to differences related to the manufacturing process used to elaborate some of them and to the purity of the samples. The different fabrication processes of the explosives lead to the same spectral behaviour and characteristics. At the same time, the inclusion of some additives in the explosive samples does not alter their main electromagnetic properties. The sensitivity limit of the measurement system has been found to be to 10 mg of explosives. These results will be used to design future THz imaging systems that allow to detect and identify them in security and defence applications and/or to complete laboratory studies after a terrorist action.

  16. Experimental characterization of vegetation uprooting by flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmaier, K.; Crouzy, B.; Perona, P.

    2015-09-01

    We investigate vegetation uprooting by flow for Avena sativa seedlings with stem-to-sediment size ratio close to unity and vanishing obstacle-induced scouring. By inducing parallel riverbed erosion within an experimental flume, we measure the time-to-uprooting in relation to root anchoring and flow drag forces. We link the erosion rate to the uprooting timescales for seedlings with varying mean root length. We show that the process of continuous erosion leading to uprooting resembles that of mechanical fatigue where system collapsing occurs after a given exposure time. By this analogy, we also highlight the nonlinear role of the residual root anchoring versus the flow drag acting on the canopy when uprooting occurs. As a generalization, we propose a framework to extend our results to time-dependent erosion rates, which typically occur for real river hydrographs. Finally, we discuss how the characteristic timescale of plant uprooting by flow erosion suggests that vegetation survival is conditioned by multiple erosion events and their interarrival time.

  17. Experimental characterization of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine array performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Aliseda, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    Three scale model horizontal axis MHK turbines (1:45) were tested in a flume at various array spacings. The scale rotors are based on the full-scale Department of Energy Reference Model 1, modified to reproduce the hydrodynamic performance of the full-scale turbine at the reduced experimental Reynolds number (105 vs 106, based on chord length). Flow incident on the turbines and in the wakes was characterized via PIV and ADV measurements. Tip speed ratio (TSR) similarity of the turbines is achieved by controlling the applied load with magnetic particle brakes. Single turbines were characterized at various mean freestream velocities to explore the effect of Reynolds number on turbine performance. Measured turbine efficiencies of ~40% are similar to efficiencies predicted from full-scale simulations, indicating similar energy extraction at scale. Wake characteristics and turbine efficiencies have been investigated at a range of TSRs, with the goal of determining array spacing and operating conditions that maximize overall array efficiency. Free surface deformations were measured near the rotor plane for various vertical positions of the turbine relative to the free surface and compared to numerical simulation results.

  18. Experimental characterization of deployable trusses and joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ikegami, R.; Church, S. M.; Keinholz, D. A.; Fowler, B. L.

    1987-01-01

    The structural dynamic properties of trusses are strongly affected by the characteristics of joints connecting the individual beam elements. Joints are particularly significant in that they are often the source of nonlinearities and energy dissipation. While the joints themselves may be physically simple, direct measurement is often necessary to obtain a mathematical description suitable for inclusion in a system model. Force state mapping is a flexible, practical test method for obtaining such a description, particularly when significant nonlinear effects are present. It involves measurement of the relationship, nonlinear or linear, between force transmitted through a joint and the relative displacement and velocity across it. An apparatus and procedure for force state mapping are described. Results are presented from tests of joints used in a lightweight, composite, deployable truss built by the Boeing Aerospace Company. The results from the joint tests are used to develop a model of a full 4-bay truss segment. The truss segment was statically and dynamically tested. The results of the truss tests are presented and compared with the analytical predictions from the model.

  19. Experimental realization of the topological Haldane model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messer, Michael; Jotzu, Gregor; Desbuquois, Rémi; Lebrat, Martin; Uehlinger, Thomas; Görg, Frederik; Greif, Daniel; Esslinger, Tilman

    2015-05-01

    The Haldane model is a fundamental example of a Hamiltonian exhibiting topologically distinct phases of matter and featuring a quantum Hall effect without a net magnetic field. We report on the experimental realization of the Haldane model and the characterization of its topological band-structure, using non-interacting ultracold fermionic atoms in a periodically modulated honeycomb lattice. Here the inertial force generated by circular modulation of the lattice position breaks time-reversal symmetry and leads to complex next-nearest-neighbor tunneling. We explore the resulting Berry-curvatures of the lowest band and map out topological phase transitions connecting distinct regimes. Furthermore we extend our method to create spin dependent effective Hamiltonians by periodic modulation of a magnetic field gradient. For each spin state, the differing band structure can be characterized either by measuring the expansion of an atomic cloud in the lattice, or by a measurement of the effective mass through dipole oscillations. Our method can be used to create systems where one state is pinned to the lattice, while the other remains itinerant.

  20. Experimental and numerical characterization of turbulent slot film cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Carlos A.

    This study presents an experimental and numerical characterization of the turbulent mixing in two-dimensional slot film cooling flows. Three different flows are considered by varying the coolant to mainstream velocity ratio (VR): a wall jet case (VR ≈ 2.0), a boundary layer case (VR ≈ 1.0) and a wall-wake case (VR ≈ 0.5). For each flow, detailed measurements of the film cooling effectiveness, the heat flux, and the heat transfer coefficient are obtained for adiabatic and backside cooled wall conditions. Additionally, detailed flow velocity and temperature are measured under hot conditions using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and a micro-thermocouple probe, respectively. These comprehensive measurements provide a unique data set for characterizing the momentum and thermal mixing of the turbulent flows, and for validating turbulence models in Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) simulations and large-eddy simulations (LES). The three flow families display different performances. The mixing of the film is strongly influenced by the mean shear between the coolant and the hot mainstream, thus explaining that the boundary layer case provides the best effectiveness. Initially governed by the film kinematics at the injection point, the convective heat transfer is influence by the mainstream when the film mixes. Additionally, measurements indicate that semi-empirical correlations largely overpredict the mixing of the film. The results obtained with the Spalart-Allmaras RANS model compare favorably with the measurements, thereby proving that this model is a viable alternative to using correlations for the film cooling effectiveness. A Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) with the dynamic models is performed for the wall jet case under adiabatic wall conditions with inflow conditions prescribed from precursor simulations. The LES results show good agreement with measured adiabatic wall temperatures and provide unique insight into the turbulent transport mechanism and

  1. Experimental Characterization of Wind Turbine Blade Aerodynamic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingemanson, Megan Lynn

    Wind turbine noise at low frequencies less than 300Hz is not only annoying to humans but has been proven to cause serious health issues. Additionally, animals are severely affected by wind turbines because a small increase in ambient noise (as is produced by wind turbines) significantly reduces their listening ability. In an attempt to better understand and characterize the aerodynamic noise of wind turbine blades, experimental testing was completed on PowerWorks 100kW and GudCraft WG700 blade specimens in the University of California, Davis Transportation Noise Control Center's anechoic chamber. Experimental testing and data analysis proved approximately 4.0dB to 6.0dB was produced due to the blades' geometric design for both blade specimens at low frequencies. This noise was maximized at the blades' leading edge along the central portion of the blades' radius. Theoretical prediction models have been used to determine that, for typical wind speeds and low frequencies, noise generated due to the tip passing frequency is clearly predominant.

  2. Crystallized Silicon Nanostructures - Experimental Characterization and Atomistic Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Agbo, Solomon; Sutta, Pavol; Calta, Pavel; Biswas, Rana; Pan, Bicai

    2014-07-01

    We have synthesized silicon nanocrystalline structures from thermal annealing of thin film amorphous silicon-based multilayers. The annealing procedure that was carried out in vacuum at temperatures up to 1100 °C is integrated in a X-ray diffraction (XRD) setup for real-time monitoring of the formation phases of the nanostructures. The microstructure of the crystallized films is investigated through experimental measurements combined with atomistic simulations of realistic nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) models. The multilayers consisting of uniformly alternating thicknesses of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and silicon oxide (SiO2) were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition on crystalline silicon and Corning glass substrates. The crystallized structure consisting of nc-Si structures embedded in an amorphous matrix were further characterized through XRD, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared measurements. We are able to show the different stages of nanostructure formation and how the sizes and the crystallized mass fraction can be controlled in our experimental synthesis. The crystallized silicon structures with large crystalline filling fractions exceeding 50% have been simulated with a robust classical molecular dynamics technique. The crystalline filling fractions and structural order of nc-Si obtained from this simulation are compared with our Raman and XRD measurements.

  3. Experimental characterization of a nonlinear vibration absorber using free vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Bin; Brennan, M. J.; Gatti, G.; Ferguson, N. S.

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of the nonlinear characteristics of a vibration absorber is important if its performance is to be predicted accurately when connected to a host structure. This can be achieved theoretically, but experimental validation is necessary to verify the modelling procedure and assumptions. This paper describes the characterization of such an absorber using a novel experimental procedure. The estimation method is based on a free vibration test, which is appropriate for a lightly damped device. The nonlinear absorber is attached to a shaker which is operated such that the shaker works in its mass-controlled regime, which means that the shaker dynamics, which are also included in the measurement, are considerably simplified, which facilitates a simple estimation of the absorber properties. From the free vibration time history, the instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous damped natural frequency are estimated using the Hilbert transform. The stiffness and damping of the nonlinear vibration absorber are then estimated from these quantities. The results are compared with an analytical solution for the free vibration of the nonlinear system with cubic stiffness and viscous damping, which is also derived in the paper using an alternative approach to the conventional perturbation methods. To further verify the approach, the results are compared with a method in which the internal forces are balanced at each measured instant in time.

  4. Experimental characterization of Gaussian quantum-communication channels

    SciTech Connect

    Di Guglielmo, James; Hage, Boris; Franzen, Alexander; Schnabel, Roman; Fiurasek, Jaromir

    2007-07-15

    We present a full experimental characterization of continuous-variable quantum-communication channels established by shared entanglement together with local operations and classical communication. The resulting teleportation channel was fully characterized by measuring all elements of the covariance matrix of the shared two-mode squeezed Gaussian state. From the experimental data we determined the lower bound to the quantum channel capacity, the teleportation fidelity of coherent states, and the logarithmic negativity and purity of the shared state. Additionally, a positive secret key rate was obtained for two of the established channels.

  5. Experimental Validation of a Thermoelastic Model for SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Travis L.

    2001-01-01

    This study presents results from experimental validation of a recently developed model for predicting the thermomechanical behavior of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures, composite structures with an embedded SMA constituent. The model captures the material nonlinearity of the material system with temperature and is capable of modeling constrained, restrained, or free recovery behavior from experimental measurement of fundamental engineering properties. A brief description of the model and analysis procedures is given, followed by an overview of a parallel effort to fabricate and characterize the material system of SMAHC specimens. Static and dynamic experimental configurations for the SMAHC specimens are described and experimental results for thermal post-buckling and random response are presented. Excellent agreement is achieved between the measured and predicted results, fully validating the theoretical model for constrained recovery behavior of SMAHC structures.

  6. In Silico Experimental Modeling of Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Trisilowati; Mallet, D. G.

    2012-01-01

    In silico experimental modeling of cancer involves combining findings from biological literature with computer-based models of biological systems in order to conduct investigations of hypotheses entirely in the computer laboratory. In this paper, we discuss the use of in silico modeling as a precursor to traditional clinical and laboratory research, allowing researchers to refine their experimental programs with an aim to reducing costs and increasing research efficiency. We explain the methodology of in silico experimental trials before providing an example of in silico modeling from the biomathematical literature with a view to promoting more widespread use and understanding of this research strategy. PMID:22523709

  7. Validation of an Experimentally Derived Uncertainty Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, K. B.; Cox, D. E.; Balas, G. J.; Juang, J.-N.

    1996-01-01

    The results show that uncertainty models can be obtained directly from system identification data by using a minimum norm model validation approach. The error between the test data and an analytical nominal model is modeled as a combination of unstructured additive and structured input multiplicative uncertainty. Robust controllers which use the experimentally derived uncertainty model show significant stability and performance improvements over controllers designed with assumed ad hoc uncertainty levels. Use of the identified uncertainty model also allowed a strong correlation between design predictions and experimental results.

  8. An Experimental Study and Constitutive Modeling of Saturated Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, S. Y.; Shao, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the experimental characterization and constitutive modeling of saturated porous rocks. A typical porous chalk is investigated. Drained hydrostatic and triaxial compression tests are first performed to characterize the basic mechanical behavior of chalk. Drained triaxial tests with constant interstitial pressure are then carried out to study the effects of interstitial pressure on the plastic deformation and failure criterion. Finally, undrained triaxial compression tests are performed to investigate poromechanical coupling in saturated conditions. Based on the experimental data and some relevant micromechanical considerations, a micromechanics-based plastic model is proposed and extended to poroplastic coupling using the effective stress concept. The proposed model is verified through comparisons between the numerical results and experimental data for both drained and undrained tests.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SEEDED FEL AMPLIFIER AT THE NSLS SDL.

    SciTech Connect

    WATANABE, T.; LIU, D.; MURPHY, J.B.; ROSE, J.; SHAFTAN, T.; TSANG, T.; WANG, X.J.; YU, L.H.

    2005-08-21

    Experimental characterization of a near-IR FEL amplifier at the NSLS SDL is presented in this report. SASE was observed from 0.8-1 {micro}m with 5 orders of magnitude gain. We have experimentally demonstrated saturation of a laser seeded FEL amplifier and control of the FEL output by the seed laser. Nonlinear harmonics have also been explored. The FEL pulse length for the first three harmonics was experimentally characterized and the increase of the FEL pulse length with harmonic number was observed for the first time. Computer simulation confirmed that the observed wide spectrum of the laser seeded FEL is due to the positive chirp of the seed laser.

  10. Characterization of Highly Nonlinear and Anisotropic Vascular Tissues from Experimental Inflation Data: a Validation Study Towards the Use of Clinical Data for In-vivo Modeling and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kinon, Chen; Fata, Bahar; Einstein, Daniel R.

    2008-10-01

    A new ¯nite element (FE) modeling approach is proposed to model blood vessel by using data from blood vessel during in°ation instead of using data from biaxial test to estimate the tissue property. A particular constitutive equation is used to model the tissue property as a dispersed transverse isotropic hyperelastic material under both single-layer and multi-layer assumption for comparison. In order to compensate the drawback of using this type of data that does not provide su±cient information to estimate the tissue property in axial direction, the axial/circumferential elastic moduli ratio is being constrained in a typical range. The semi-global inverse method is applied with the pressure-diameter test data from porcine thoracic aorta to esti- mate the optimal tissue property. The simulated data of all cases is then compared with the biaxial test data. It is found that the single-layer model without the con- straint ¯ts well with the pressure-diameter test data but not with the biaxial test data at the axial direction, so it is suitable only for pressure-diameter analysis. The multi-layer model with the constraint ¯ts well with the pressure-diameter data and also the biaxial test data, so it is suitable to estimate the tissue property and for stress-strain analysis. The constitutive equation and the semi-global inverse method are found e±cient in this study. We believe that this new approach that uses this type of data, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data that could be ob- tained non-invasive in vivo, is time-e±cient and would be bene¯cial for pre-surgical analysis.

  11. High heat flux measurements and experimental calibrations/characterizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kidd, Carl T.

    1992-01-01

    Recent progress in techniques employed in the measurement of very high heat-transfer rates in reentry-type facilities at the Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) is described. These advances include thermal analyses applied to transducer concepts used to make these measurements; improved heat-flux sensor fabrication methods, equipment, and procedures for determining the experimental time response of individual sensors; performance of absolute heat-flux calibrations at levels above 2,000 Btu/cu ft-sec (2.27 kW/cu cm); and innovative methods of performing in-situ run-to-run characterizations of heat-flux probes installed in the test facility. Graphical illustrations of the results of extensive thermal analyses of the null-point calorimeter and coaxial surface thermocouple concepts with application to measurements in aerothermal test environments are presented. Results of time response experiments and absolute calibrations of null-point calorimeters and coaxial thermocouples performed in the laboratory at intermediate to high heat-flux levels are shown. Typical AEDC high-enthalpy arc heater heat-flux data recently obtained with a Calspan-fabricated null-point probe model are included.

  12. ESA Intermediate Experimental Vehicle. Independent Aerothermodynamic Characterization And Aerodatabase Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rufolo, Giuseppe C.; Di Benedetto, Sara; Walpot, Louis; Roncioni, Pietro; Marini, Marco

    2011-05-01

    In the frame of the Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle (IXV) project, the European Space Agency (ESA) is coordinating a series of technical assistance activities aimed at verifying and supporting the IXV industrial design and development process. The technical assistance is operated with the support of the Italian Space Agency (ASI), by means of the Italian Aerospace Research Center (CIRA), and the European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) under the super visioning and coordination of ESA IXV team. One of the purposes of the activity is to develop an independent capability for the assessment and verification of the industrial results with respect to the aerothermodynamic characterization of the IXV vehicle. To this aim CIRA is developing and independent AeroThermodynamics DataBase (ATDB), intended as a tool generating in output the time histories of local quantities (heat flux, pressure, skin friction) for each point of the IXV vehicle and for each trajectory (in a pre-defined envelope), together with an uncertainties model. The reference Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions needed for the development of the tool have been provided by ESA-ESTEC (with the CFD code LORE) and CIRA (with the CFD code H3NS).

  13. Experimental Modeling of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy. An Experimental Morphological Study.

    PubMed

    Khoroshilova-Maslova, I P; Leparskaya, N L; Nabieva, M M; Andreeva, L D

    2015-05-01

    A model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy induced by simultaneous intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-1β and platelet concentrate is created and its main morphological manifestations are studied on Chinchilla rabbits. The model reflects pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy: epiretinal membrane with the formation of retinal plication, traction detachment of the retina; moderate inflammatory reaction in the uveal tract, in the optic nerve infundibulum, in the vitreous body; intact structural elements of the retina, dissociation of the retinal pigmented epithelium cells with their subsequent migration. The model is adequate to the clinical picture of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in humans, which recommends it for experimental studies of the efficiency of drug therapy and prevention of this disease. PMID:26033599

  14. Enhancement of soil retention for phenanthrene in binary cationic gemini and nonionic surfactant mixtures: characterizing two-step adsorption and partition processes through experimental and modeling approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shan; Huang, Gordon; An, Chunjiang; Wei, Jia; Yao, Yao

    2015-04-01

    The enhancement of soil retention for phenanthrene (PHE) through the addition of a binary mixture of cationic gemini (12-2-12) and nonionic surfactants (C12E10) was investigated. The maximum apparent sorption coefficient Kd(*) reached 4247.8 mL/g through the addition of mixed 12-2-12 gemini and C12E10 surfactants, which was markedly higher than the summed individual results in the presence of individual 12-2-12 gemini (1148.6 mL/g) or C12E10 (210.0 mL/g) surfactant. However, the sorption of 12-2-12 gemini was inhibited by the increasing C12E10 dose; and a higher initial 12-2-12 gemini dose showed a higher "desorption" rate. The present study also addressed the sorption behavior of the single 12-2-12 gemini surfactant at the soil/aqueous interface. The sorption isotherm was divided into two steps to elucidate the sorption process; and the sorption schematics were proposed to elaborate the growth of surfactant aggregates corresponding to the various steps of the sorption isotherm. Finally, a two-step adsorption and partition model (TAPM) was developed to simulate the sorption process. Analysis of the equilibrium data indicated that the sorption isotherms of 12-2-12 gemini fitted the TAPM model better. Thermodynamic calculations confirmed that the 12-2-12 gemini sorption at the soil/aqueous interface was spontaneous and exothermic from 288 to 308K. PMID:25576782

  15. Improving the physiological realism of experimental models.

    PubMed

    Vinnakota, Kalyan C; Cha, Chae Y; Rorsman, Patrik; Balaban, Robert S; La Gerche, Andre; Wade-Martins, Richard; Beard, Daniel A; Jeneson, Jeroen A L

    2016-04-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) project aims to develop integrative, explanatory and predictive computational models (C-Models) as numerical investigational tools to study disease, identify and design effective therapies and provide an in silico platform for drug screening. Ultimately, these models rely on the analysis and integration of experimental data. As such, the success of VPH depends on the availability of physiologically realistic experimental models (E-Models) of human organ function that can be parametrized to test the numerical models. Here, the current state of suitable E-models, ranging from in vitro non-human cell organelles to in vivo human organ systems, is discussed. Specifically, challenges and recent progress in improving the physiological realism of E-models that may benefit the VPH project are highlighted and discussed using examples from the field of research on cardiovascular disease, musculoskeletal disorders, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27051507

  16. Transitional Employment Experimental Model (TEEM). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Personnel Board, Sacramento.

    The final report of the Transitional Employemnt Experimental Model (TEEM) Project, a research and development project providing a potential model for a large scale manpower absorption program in times of economic need, is presented. One major purpose of the project was to demonstrate the viability of providing suitable job placement for the…

  17. Comparing fluid mechanics models with experimental data.

    PubMed Central

    Spedding, G R

    2003-01-01

    The art of modelling the physical world lies in the appropriate simplification and abstraction of the complete problem. In fluid mechanics, the Navier-Stokes equations provide a model that is valid under most circumstances germane to animal locomotion, but the complexity of solutions provides strong incentive for the development of further, more simplified practical models. When the flow organizes itself so that all shearing motions are collected into localized patches, then various mathematical vortex models have been very successful in predicting and furthering the physical understanding of many flows, particularly in aerodynamics. Experimental models have the significant added convenience that the fluid mechanics can be generated by a real fluid, not a model, provided the appropriate dimensionless groups have similar values. Then, analogous problems can be encountered in making intelligible but independent descriptions of the experimental results. Finally, model predictions and experimental results may be compared if, and only if, numerical estimates of the likely variations in the tested quantities are provided. Examples from recent experimental measurements of wakes behind a fixed wing and behind a bird in free flight are used to illustrate these principles. PMID:14561348

  18. Experimental and analytical characterization of triaxially braided textile composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.; Fedro, Mark J.; Ifju, Peter G.

    1993-01-01

    There were two components, experimental and analytical, to this investigation of triaxially braided textile composite materials. The experimental portion of the study centered on measuring the materials' longitudinal and transverse tensile moduli, Poisson's ratio, and strengths. The identification of the damage mechanisms exhibited by these materials was also a prime objective of the experimental investigation. The analytical portion of the investigation utilized the Textile Composites Analysis (TECA) model to predict modulus and strength. The analytical and experimental results were compared to assess the effectiveness of the analysis. The figures contained in this paper reflect the presentation made at the conference. They may be divided into four sections: a definition of the material system tested; followed by a series of figures summarizing the experimental results (these figures contain results of a Moire interferometry study of the strain distribution in the material, examples and descriptions of the types of damage encountered in these materials, and a summary of the measured properties); a description of the TECA model follows the experimental results (this includes a series of predicted results and a comparison with measured values); and finally, a brief summary completes the paper.

  19. Experimental models of hepatic encephalopathy: ISHEN guidelines.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Roger F; Norenberg, Michael D; Felipo, Vicente; Ferenci, Peter; Albrecht, Jan; Blei, Andres T

    2009-07-01

    Objectives of the International Society for Hepatic Encephalopathy and Nitrogen Metabolism Commission were to identify well-characterized animal models of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) and to highlight areas of animal modelling of the disorder that are in need of development. Features essential to HE modelling were identified. The best-characterized animal models of HE in acute liver failure, the so-called Type A HE, were found to be the hepatic devascularized rat and the rat with thioacetamide-induced toxic liver injury. In case of chronic liver failure, surgical models in the rat involving end-to-side portacaval anastomosis or bile duct ligation were considered to best model minimal/mild (Type B) HE. Unfortunately, at this time, there are no satisfactory animal models of Type C HE resulting from end-stage alcoholic liver disease or viral hepatitis, the most common aetiologies encountered in patients. The commission highlighted the urgent need for such models and of improved models of HE in chronic liver failure in general as well as a need for models of post-transplant neuropsychiatric disorders. Studies of HE pathophysiology at the cellular and molecular level continue to benefit from in vitro and or ex vivo models involving brain slices or exposure of cultured cells (principally cultured astrocytes) to toxins such as ammonia, manganese and pro-inflammatory cytokines. More attention could be paid in the future to in vitro models involving the neurovascular unit, microglia and neuronal co-cultures in relation to HE pathogenesis. PMID:19638106

  20. Experimental Models of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Janice C

    2010-01-01

    Despite being a leading cause of death in the West, the pathophysiology of abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) is still incompletely understood. Pharmacotherapy to reduce the growth of small AAAs is limited and techniques for repairing aneurysms continue to evolve. Experimental models play a key role in AAA research, as they allow a detailed evaluation of the pathogenesis of disease progression. This review focuses on in vivo experimental models, which have improved our understanding of the potential mechanisms of AAA development and contributed to the advancement of new treatments. PMID:21270944

  1. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1999-01-01

    This termination report covers the latter part of a single research effort spanning several grant cycles. During this time there was a single title, "Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites", but there were several contract numbers as the mode and location of NASA contract administration changed. Initially, the project was funded as an increment to the PI's other grant, "Early Differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and Modeling Studies", but subsequently it became an independent grant. Table 1 contains a brief summary of the dates and contract numbers.

  2. Analytical and experimental characterization of metasurfaces with normal polarizability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaluški, Davor; Grbic, Anthony; Hrabar, Silvio

    2016-04-01

    To date, research on metasurfaces has predominantly focused on those with polarizabilities that are tangent to the metasurface. Only a few theoretical works have characterized metasurfaces with normal polarizabilities. Here, we provide full analytical, numerical, and experimental characterizations of a metasurface that can be described with polarizabilities in all three spatial directions. First, a set of equations is derived that allows a surface distribution of scatterers to be replaced by a sheet boundary condition. It is shown that the extraction of unknown polarizabilities in the normal direction necessarily requires scattering parameters obtained from oblique incidence. Closed-form expressions that relate scattering parameters to surface susceptibilities in all three spatial directions are given. It is shown that the reflection and transmission properties of the metasurface can be predicted, for an arbitrary angle of incidence, from the sheet parameters. In addition, we report the experimental characterization of a metasurface with polarizabilities in the normal direction. The free-space measurements were performed on a recently proposed DB metasurface at 10 GHz. Experiments confirmed that the sheet parameters do not change with angle of incidence. Consequently, it was possible to extract surface susceptibilities in the normal direction from measured transmission parameters alone.

  3. Experimental and modeling study on char combustion

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yu; M.C. Zhang

    2009-05-15

    In this study, on the basis of experimental verifications with an FTIR online measurement system, theoretical calculations by using the strict continuous-film model were first compared with those by the simple single-film model that is still widely used in mathematical modeling of pulverized coal flames. The results indicated that the single-film model has some significant errors in its predictions of the ignition temperature and the combustion following ignition and hence should have some restrictions on its application. Then an improved char combustion model has been presented, taking into consideration the influence of the finite-rate heterogeneous reduction and oxidation reactions. This model gives the explicit algebraic expressions for the overall rate of combustion, the surface temperature of the particle, and the gas temperature at the flame sheet. Compared with the single-film model, predictions by the present model were in much better agreement with those predicted by the continuous-film model and the experimental data. The novel model is also much easier to be integrated into the comprehensive computing codes for industrial pulverized coal flame than the continuous-film model. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  4. Experimental characterization of peripheral photocurrent in CMOS photodiodes down to 65 nm technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Filgueira, B.; López, P.; Roldán, J. B.

    2013-04-01

    In this work, an in-depth experimental characterization of submicron CMOS p-n+ junction photodiodes operating under uniform illumination in the visible range is performed. The experimental measurements are used to validate a previous two-dimensional analytical model for the photoresponse estimation of these structures, which pays special attention to the lateral collection and was verified by means of device simulations. To do so, square p-n+ junction photodiodes with different sizes down to an active area of 0.56 μm wide have been fabricated in 180 and 65 nm technological nodes and characterized under blue, green and red light sources. As a result, the importance of the lateral collection in the overall response for small photodiodes that was previously theoretically reported is confirmed. The experimentally validated two-dimensional analytical model is a powerful tool that can be employed for the design of CMOS imagers and related electronics circuits.

  5. [Experimental models of human skin aging].

    PubMed

    Nikolakis, G; Zoschke, C; Makrantonaki, E; Hausmann, C; Schäfer-Korting, M; Zouboulis, C C

    2016-02-01

    The skin is a representative model for the study of human aging. Despite the high regenerative capacity of the skin, skin physiology changes over the course of life. Medical and cosmetic research is trying to prevent aging, to slow, to stop, or to reverse it. Effects of age-related DNA damage and of changing skin structure on pharmacological parameters are largely unknown. This review article summarizes the state of scientific knowledge in the field of experimental models of human skin aging and shows approaches to improve organotypic skin models, to develop predictive models of aging, and improve aging research. PMID:26743051

  6. Direct experimental characterization of photoemission charge-transfer satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiland, Conan; Rumaiz, Abdul; Woicik, Joseph

    Energy-loss satellites in photoelectron spectroscopy often arise due to different charge-transfer states in condensed matter systems. The specific characterization of these satellites, however, has been controversial, and different theoretical approaches may lead to contradictory characterizations. Here we demonstrate the ability of high energy resonant photoelectron spectroscopy to provide direct experimental evidence of the nature of charge transfer satellites. Analysis of the Ti 1 s core line in SrTiO3 reveals two satellites, located approximately 5 eV and 13 eV lower kinetic energy than the main line. High energy resonant photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that these two peaks originate from ligand 2 p t2 g to metal 3 d t2 g and ligand 2 p eg to metal 3 d eg charge-transfer excitations.

  7. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it possible to determine these values, and thereby identify an optimal experimental design. After describing the method, it is demonstrated in two content areas in cognitive psychology in which models are highly competitive: retention (i.e., forgetting) and categorization. The optimal design is compared with the quality of designs used in the literature. The findings demonstrate that design optimization has the potential to increase the informativeness of the experimental method. PMID:19618983

  8. Optimal Experimental Design for Model Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myung, Jay I.; Pitt, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Models of a psychological process can be difficult to discriminate experimentally because it is not easy to determine the values of the critical design variables (e.g., presentation schedule, stimulus structure) that will be most informative in differentiating them. Recent developments in sampling-based search methods in statistics make it…

  9. Modeling, Robust Control, and Experimental Validation of a Supercavitating Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar Sanabria, David

    This dissertation considers the mathematical modeling, control under uncertainty, and experimental validation of an underwater supercavitating vehicle. By traveling inside a gas cavity, a supercavitating vehicle reduces hydrodynamic drag, increases speed, and minimizes power consumption. The attainable speed and power efficiency make these vehicles attractive for undersea exploration, high-speed transportation, and defense. However, the benefits of traveling inside a cavity come with difficulties in controlling the vehicle dynamics. The main challenge is the nonlinear force that arises when the back-end of the vehicle pierces the cavity. This force, referred to as planing, leads to oscillatory motion and instability. Control technologies that are robust to planing and suited for practical implementation need to be developed. To enable these technologies, a low-order vehicle model that accounts for inaccuracy in the characterization of planing is required. Additionally, an experimental method to evaluate possible pitfalls in the models and controllers is necessary before undersea testing. The major contribution of this dissertation is a unified framework for mathematical modeling, robust control synthesis, and experimental validation of a supercavitating vehicle. First, we introduce affordable experimental methods for mathematical modeling and controller testing under planing and realistic flow conditions. Then, using experimental observations and physical principles, we create a low-order nonlinear model of the longitudinal vehicle motion. This model quantifies the planing uncertainty and is suitable for robust controller synthesis. Next, based on the vehicle model, we develop automated tools for synthesizing controllers that deliver a certificate of performance in the face of nonlinear and uncertain planing forces. We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the proposed controllers ensure higher performance when the uncertain planing dynamics are

  10. Design and experimental characterization of a multifrequency flexural ultrasonic actuator.

    PubMed

    Iula, Antonio

    2009-08-01

    In this work, a multifrequency flexural ultrasonic actuator is proposed, designed, and experimentally characterized. The actuator is composed of a Langevin transducer and of a displacement amplifier. The displacement amplifier is able to transform the almost flat axial displacement provided by the Langevin transducer at its back end into a flexural deformation that produces the maximum axial displacement at the center of its front end. Design and analysis of the actuator have been performed by using finite element method software. In analogy to classical power actuators that use sectional concentrators, the design criterion that has been followed was to design the Langevin transducer and the flexural amplifier separately at the same working frequency. As opposed to sectional concentrators, the flexural amplifier has several design parameters that allow a wide flexibility in the design. The flexural amplifier has been designed to produce a very high displacement amplification. It has also been designed in such a way that the whole actuator has 2 close working frequencies (17.4 kHz and 19.2 kHz), with similar flexural deformations of the front surface. A first prototype of the actuator has been manufactured and experimentally characterized to validate the numerical analysis. PMID:19686988

  11. Damage Characterization in Copper Deformed Under Hydrostatic Stress - Experimental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flater, Philip; de Angelis, Robert; House, Joel

    2005-07-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation to characterize the effect of damage created by hydrostatic tensile loading on the properties of copper. Three metallurgical conditions were investigated: half-hard OFHC copper in the as worked, annealed 2hr at 400°C (˜40 micron grain diameter), and annealed 2hr at 800^ oC (˜80 micron grain diameter). Quasi-static testing of each condition included uniaxial tension and compression, round notched bar tension, and flat tapered bar tension. Dynamic properties under uniaxial tension and compression were tested using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar. Damaged structures were created employing Taylor impact tests and rod-on-rod impact experiments. The resulting damage was characterized employing optical and scanning electron microscopy. Quasi-static compression samples machined from recovered samples were tested to determine the influence of damage on deformation behavior and elastic modulus. The compression experimental results will be discussed in relationship to the starting microstructure and subsequent damaged material.

  12. Review: avian models for experimental myopia.

    PubMed

    Lauber, J K

    1991-01-01

    Myopia poses a serious threat to unaided vision among the human population, affecting as much as fifty per cent or more of individuals in some subpopulations and at some age levels. Because the etiology of the condition remains obscure, attention has been directed toward a search for experimental animal models for myopia: the hope is that any environmental or experimental intervention found to increase eye size, especially axial length, or to lead to negative refractive error, may suggest some parallels in clinical experience. As well, the availability of myopic animal subjects affords the opportunity to test the efficacy of both preventative and pharmacological measures as they become available. PMID:1783857

  13. Macrophages and Uveitis in Experimental Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Mérida, Salvador; Palacios, Elena; Bosch-Morell, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Resident and infiltrated macrophages play relevant roles in uveitis as effectors of innate immunity and inductors of acquired immunity. They are major effectors of tissue damage in uveitis and are also considered to be potent antigen-presenting cells. In the last few years, experimental animal models of uveitis have enabled us to enhance our understanding of the leading role of macrophages in eye inflammation processes, including macrophage polarization in experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis and the major role of Toll-like receptor 4 in endotoxin-induced uveitis. This improved knowledge should guide advantageous iterative research to establish mechanisms and possible therapeutic targets for human uveitis resolution. PMID:26078494

  14. Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

  15. Irradiation Design for an Experimental Murine Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ballesteros-Zebadua, P.; Moreno-Jimenez, S.; Suarez-Campos, J. E.; Celis, M. A.; Larraga-Gutierrez, J. M.; Garcia-Garduno, O. A.; Rubio-Osornio, M. C.; Custodio-Ramirez, V.; Paz, C.

    2010-12-07

    In radiotherapy and stereotactic radiosurgery, small animal experimental models are frequently used, since there are still a lot of unsolved questions about the biological and biochemical effects of ionizing radiation. This work presents a method for small-animal brain radiotherapy compatible with a dedicated 6MV Linac. This rodent model is focused on the research of the inflammatory effects produced by ionizing radiation in the brain. In this work comparisons between Pencil Beam and Monte Carlo techniques, were used in order to evaluate accuracy of the calculated dose using a commercial planning system. Challenges in this murine model are discussed.

  16. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Al-Awar, Amin; Kupai, Krisztina; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  17. Experimental Diabetes Mellitus in Different Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Al-awar, Amin; Veszelka, Médea; Szűcs, Gergő; Attieh, Zouhair; Murlasits, Zsolt; Török, Szilvia; Pósa, Anikó; Varga, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    Animal models have historically played a critical role in the exploration and characterization of disease pathophysiology and target identification and in the evaluation of novel therapeutic agents and treatments in vivo. Diabetes mellitus disease, commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood glucose levels for a prolonged time. To avoid late complications of diabetes and related costs, primary prevention and early treatment are therefore necessary. Due to its chronic symptoms, new treatment strategies need to be developed, because of the limited effectiveness of the current therapies. We overviewed the pathophysiological features of diabetes in relation to its complications in type 1 and type 2 mice along with rat models, including Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, BB rats, LEW 1AR1/-iddm rats, Goto-Kakizaki rats, chemically induced diabetic models, and Nonobese Diabetic mouse, and Akita mice model. The advantages and disadvantages that these models comprise were also addressed in this review. This paper briefly reviews the wide pathophysiological and molecular mechanisms associated with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, particularly focusing on the challenges associated with the evaluation and predictive validation of these models as ideal animal models for preclinical assessments and discovering new drugs and therapeutic agents for translational application in humans. PMID:27595114

  18. Modeling biomedical experimental processes with OBI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Experimental descriptions are typically stored as free text without using standardized terminology, creating challenges in comparison, reproduction and analysis. These difficulties impose limitations on data exchange and information retrieval. Results The Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI), developed as a global, cross-community effort, provides a resource that represents biomedical investigations in an explicit and integrative framework. Here we detail three real-world applications of OBI, provide detailed modeling information and explain how to use OBI. Conclusion We demonstrate how OBI can be applied to different biomedical investigations to both facilitate interpretation of the experimental process and increase the computational processing and integration within the Semantic Web. The logical definitions of the entities involved allow computers to unambiguously understand and integrate different biological experimental processes and their relevant components. Availability OBI is available at http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/obi/2009-11-02/obi.owl PMID:20626927

  19. Experimental Animal Models in Periodontology: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Struillou, Xavier; Boutigny, Hervé; Soueidan, Assem; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    In periodontal research, animal studies are complementary to in vitro experiments prior to testing new treatments. Animal models should make possible the validation of hypotheses and prove the safety and efficacy of new regenerating approaches using biomaterials, growth factors or stem cells. A review of the literature was carried out by using electronic databases (PubMed, ISI Web of Science). Numerous animal models in different species such as rats, hamsters, rabbits, ferrets, canines and primates have been used for modeling human periodontal diseases and treatments. However, both the anatomy and physiopathology of animals are different from those of humans, making difficult the evaluation of new therapies. Experimental models have been developed in order to reproduce major periodontal diseases (gingivitis, periodontitis), their pathogenesis and to investigate new surgical techniques. The aim of this review is to define the most pertinent animal models for periodontal research depending on the hypothesis and expected results. PMID:20556202

  20. Experimental tests of proton spin models

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, G.P. . Dept. of Physics Argonne National Lab., IL . High Energy Physics Div.)

    1989-11-03

    We have developed models for the spin-weighted quark and gluon distribution in a longitudinally polarized proton. The model parameters are determined from current algebra sum rules and polarized deep-inelastic scattering data. A number of different scenarios are presented for the fraction of spin carried the constituent parton distributions. A possible long-range experimental program is suggested for measuring various hard scattering processes using polarized lepton and proton beams. With the knowledge gained from these experiments, we can begin to understand the parton contributions to the proton spin. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Modeling Graves' Orbitopathy in Experimental Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Banga, J P; Moshkelgosha, S; Berchner-Pfannschmidt, U; Eckstein, A

    2015-09-01

    Graves' orbitopathy (GO), also known as thyroid eye disease is an inflammatory disease of the orbital tissue of the eye that arises as a consequence of autoimmune thyroid disease. The central feature of the disease is the production of antibodies to the thyrotropin hormone receptor (TSHR) that modulate the function of the receptor leading to autoimmune hyperthyroidism and GO. Over the years, all viable preclinical models of Graves' disease have been incomplete and singularly failed to progress in the treatment of orbital complications. A new mouse model of GO based upon immunogenic presentation of human TSHR A-subunit plasmid by close field electroporation is shown to lead to induction of prolonged functional antibodies to TSHR resulting in chronic disease with subsequent progression to GO. The stable preclinical GO model exhibited pathologies reminiscent of human disease characterized by orbital remodeling by inflammation and adipogenesis. Inflammatory lesions characterized by CD3+ T cells and macrophages were localized in the orbital muscle tissue. This was accompanied by extensive adipogenesis of orbital fat in some immune animals. Surprisingly, other signs of orbital involvement were reminiscent of eyelid inflammation involving chemosis, with dilated and congested orbital blood vessels. More recently, the model is replicated in the author's independent laboratories. The pre-clinical model will provide the basis to study the pathogenic and regulatory roles of immune T and B cells and their subpopulations to understand the initiation, pathophysiology, and progression of GO. PMID:26287396

  2. [Experimental model of ocular ischemic diseases].

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, T N; Chudin, A V

    2014-01-01

    The review presents the most common methods of modeling of retinal ischemia in vitro (chemical ischemia with iodoacetic acid, incubation of the retinal pigment epithelium cells with oligomycin, deprivation of oxygen and glucose) and in vivo (a model with increased intraocular pressure, cerebral artery occlusion, chronic ligation of the carotid arteries, photocoagulation of the retinal vessels, occlusion of the central retinal artery, endothelin-1 administration). Modeling ischemic injury in rats is the most frequently used method in studies, because the blood supply of their eyes is similar to blood flow in the human eyes. Each method has its own advantages and disadvantages. Application of methods depends on the purpose of the experimental study. Currently model of ocular ischemic disease can be obtained easily by injecting vasoconstrictive drug endothelin-1. It is the most widely used method of high intraocular pressure induced ocular ischemic damage similar to glaucoma, occlusion of central retinal artery or ophthalmic artery in human. The development of experimental models of ocular ischemic diseases and detailed investigation of mechanisms of impairment of microcirculation are useful for improve the efficiency of diagnostic and treatment of ischemic diseases of retina and optic nerve. PMID:25971134

  3. Current Experimental Methods for Characterizing Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Li, Qing; Wang, Renxiao

    2016-04-19

    Protein molecules often interact with other partner protein molecules in order to execute their vital functions in living organisms. Characterization of protein-protein interactions thus plays a central role in understanding the molecular mechanism of relevant protein molecules, elucidating the cellular processes and pathways relevant to health or disease for drug discovery, and charting large-scale interaction networks in systems biology research. A whole spectrum of methods, based on biophysical, biochemical, or genetic principles, have been developed to detect the time, space, and functional relevance of protein-protein interactions at various degrees of affinity and specificity. This article presents an overview of these experimental methods, outlining the principles, strengths and limitations, and recent developments of each type of method. PMID:26864455

  4. Characterization and electrical modeling of semiconductors bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, K.D.; Bickes, R.W. Jr.; Wackerbarth, D.E.

    1997-03-01

    Semiconductor bridges (SCBs) are finding increased use as initiators for explosive and pyrotechnic devices. They offer advantages in reduced voltage and energy requirements, coupled with excellent safety features. The design of explosive systems which implement either SCBs or metal bridgewires can be facilitated through the use of electrical simulation software such as the PSpice{reg_sign} computer code. A key component in the electrical simulation of such systems is an electrical model of the bridge. This report has two objectives: (1) to present and characterize electrical data taken in tests of detonators which employ SCBs with BNCP as the explosive powder; and (2) to derive appropriate electrical models for such detonators. The basis of such models is a description of the resistance as a function of energy deposited in the SCB. However, two important features which must be added to this are (1) the inclusion of energy loss through such mechanisms as ohmic heating of the aluminum lands and heat transfer from the bridge to the surrounding media; and (2) accounting for energy deposited in the SCB through heat transfer to the bridge from the explosive powder after the powder ignites. The modeling procedure is entirely empirical; i.e., models for the SCB resistance and the energy gain and loss have been estimated from experimental data taken over a range of firing conditions. We present results obtained by applying the model to the simulation of SCB operation in representative tests.

  5. Metallurgical characterization of experimental Ag-based soldering alloys

    PubMed Central

    Ntasi, Argyro; Al Jabbari, Youssef S.; Silikas, Nick; Al Taweel, Sara M.; Zinelis, Spiros

    2014-01-01

    Aim To characterize microstructure, hardness and thermal properties of experimental Ag-based soldering alloys for dental applications. Materials and methods Ag12Ga (AgGa) and Ag10Ga5Sn (AgGaSn) were fabricated by induction melting. Six samples were prepared for each alloy and microstructure, hardness and their melting range were determined by, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) microanalysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vickers hardness testing and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Results Both alloys demonstrated a gross dendritic microstructure while according to XRD results both materials consisted predominately of a Ag-rich face centered cubic phase The hardness of AgGa (61 ± 2) was statistically lower than that of AgGaSn (84 ± 2) while the alloys tested showed similar melting range of 627–762 °C for AgGa and 631–756 °C for AgGaSn. Conclusion The experimental alloys tested demonstrated similar microstructures and melting ranges. Ga and Sn might be used as alternative to Cu and Zn to modify the selected properties of Ag based soldering alloys. PMID:25382945

  6. Modelling an experimental methane fuel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Tin; Chen, Yih-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Liu, Yen-Chun; Lee, Chiou-Hwang

    Steady-state models are developed to describe an experimental methane fuel processor that is intended to provide hydrogen for a fuel cell system for power generation (2-3 kW). First-principle reactor models are constructed to describe a series of reactions, i.e., steam and autothermal reforming (SR/ATR), high- and low-temperature water-gas shift (HTS/LTS) reactions and preferential oxidation (PROX) reactions, at different sectors of the reactor system for methane reforming as well as gas cleaning. The pre-exponential factors of the rate constants are adjusted to fit the experimental data and the resultant reactor model provides a reasonably good description of steady-state behaviour. Next, sensitivity analyses are performed to locate the optimum operating point of the fuel processor. The objective function of the optimization is fuel processor efficiency. The dominating optimization variables include: the ratios of water and oxygen to the hydrocarbon feed to the autothermal reforming reactor and the inlet temperature of the reactor. The results indicate that further improvement in fuel processor efficiency can be made with a reliable process model.

  7. Nonlinear hierarchical modeling of experimental infection data.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michael D; Breheny, Patrick J

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a nonlinear hierarchical model (NLHM) for analyzing longitudinal experimental infection (EI) data. The NLHM offers several improvements over commonly used alternatives such as repeated measures analysis of variance (RM-ANOVA) and the linear mixed model (LMM). It enables comparison of relevant biological properties of the course of infection including peak intensity, duration and time to peak, rather than simply comparing mean responses at each observation time. We illustrate the practical benefits of this model and the insights it yields using data from experimental infection studies on equine arteritis virus. Finally, we demonstrate via simulation studies that the NLHM substantially reduces bias and improves the power to detect differences in relevant features of the infection response between two populations. For example, to detect a 20% difference in response duration between two groups (n=15) in which the peak time and peak intensity were identical, the RM-ANOVA test had a power of just 11%, and LMM a power of just 12%. By comparison, the nonlinear model we propose had a power of 58% in the same scenario, while controlling the Type I error rate better than the other two methods. PMID:27435656

  8. [New experimental models in microbial ecology].

    PubMed

    Liz'ko, N N

    1989-06-01

    Peculiar features of dysbiosis development in persons under extreme conditions were studied. It was shown that a number of extreme factors participated in formation of dysbiotic disorders in intestinal microflora. Of paramount importance was the neuro-emotional stress. Lability of bifido- and lactoflora was considered as the starting mechanism in dysbacteriosis under the extreme conditions. In the experimental models with rats SPF and Primates during flights of biosatellites of the Kosmos series the role of indigenous++ microflora in maintaining the microecological homeostasis, as well as the need for development of artificial and controlled intestinal microflora promising in prophylaxis of dysbacteriosis under extreme conditions was shown. The theoretical and experimentally grounded necessity of maintaining constant intestine microbiocenosis was confirmed by the practice of using the system of measures for recovery, stabilization and optimization of microflora in persons under extreme conditions. PMID:2802876

  9. Experimental characterization of vertical-axis wind turbine noise.

    PubMed

    Pearson, C E; Graham, W R

    2015-01-01

    Vertical-axis wind turbines are wind-energy generators suitable for use in urban environments. Their associated noise thus needs to be characterized and understood. As a first step, this work investigates the relative importance of harmonic and broadband contributions via model-scale wind-tunnel experiments. Cross-spectra from a pair of flush-mounted wall microphones exhibit both components, but further analysis shows that the broadband dominates at frequencies corresponding to the audible range in full-scale operation. This observation has detrimental implications for noise-prediction reliability and hence also for acoustic design optimization. PMID:25618090

  10. Multifragment emission and the experimental characterization of breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez Heimann, D.; Pacheco, A. J.; Arazi, A.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.; Figueira, J. M.; Negri, A.; Capurro, O. A.; Carnelli, P.; Cardona, M. A.; Barbara, E. de; Fimiani, L.; Hojman, D. L.; Marti, G. V.

    2010-08-04

    The production of three or more particles in nuclear reactions is discussed in terms of physically meaningful variables for the description of the asymptotic exit-channel configuration. The emphasis is placed in a direct comparison between these basic variables obtained in a purely experimental way and the corresponding results of generic model calculations. Applications of this approach to a few examples of recent inclusive and exclusive measurements of breakup reactions in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 144}Sm systems are presented.

  11. Experimental alveolitis in rats: microbiological, acute phase response and histometric characterization of delayed alveolar healing

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Moacyr Tadeu Vicente; CARDOSO, Camila Lopes; de CARVALHO, Paulo Sérgio Perri; CESTARI, Tânia Mary; FERES, Magda; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier; FERREIRA JÚNIOR, Osny

    2011-01-01

    The pathogenesis of alveolitis is not well known and therefore experimental situations that mimic some features of this disease should be developed. Objective In this study, the evolution of the experimentally induced infection in rat sockets is characterized, which leads to clinical signs of suppurative alveolitis with remarkable wound healing disturbs. Material and methods Non-infected (Group I) and experimentally infected sockets in Rattus novergicus (Group II) were histometrically evaluated regarding the kinetics of alveolar healing. In addition, the characterization of the present bacteria in inoculation material and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were performed. The detected species were Capnocytophaga ochracea, Fusobacterium nucleatum ss nucleatum, Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus anginosus, Treponema socranskii and Streptococcus sanguis. Results All experimentally infected rats developed suppurative alveolitis, showing higher levels of CRP in comparison to those non-infected ones. Furthermore, infected rats presented a significant delayed wound healing as measured by the histometric analysis (higher persistent polymorphonuclear infiltrate and lower density of newly formed bone). Conclusion These findings indicate that rat sockets with experimentally induced infection produced higher levels of serum CRP, showing the potential of disseminated infection and a disturb in the alveolar repair process in an interesting experimental model for alveolitis studies. PMID:21625744

  12. A mechanical diode: Comparing numerical and experimental characterizations

    SciTech Connect

    Simmermacher, T.; Segalman, D.; Sagartz, M.

    1997-12-01

    The predictive modeling of vibration of many structural systems is crippled by an inability to predictively model the mechanics of joints. The lack of understanding of joint dynamics is evidenced by the substantial uncertainty of joint compliances in the numerical models and by the complete inability to predict joint damping. The lore is that at low amplitudes, joint mechanics are associated with Coulomb friction and stick-slip phenomena and that at high amplitudes, impact processes result in dissipation as well as shift of energy to other frequencies. Inadequate understanding of the physics precludes reliable predictions. In this introductory work, joint compliance is studied in both a numerical and experimental setting. A simple bolted interface is used as the test article and compliance is measured for the joint in both compression and in tension. This simple interface is shown to exhibit a strong non-linearity near the transition from compression to tension (or vice-versa). Modeling issues pertaining to numerically solving for the compliance are addressed. It is shown that the model predicts the experimental strains and compliance fairly well. It will be seen that the joint behavior is a mechanical analogy to a diode. In compression, the joint is very stiff, acting almost as a rigid link, while in tension the joint is soft, acting as a soft spring. Although there have been many other studies performed on bolted joints, the variety of joint geometries has demonstrated large variations in behavior. This study is an attempt to quantify the behavior of typical joints found in today`s weapon systems.

  13. Visceral leishmaniasis: experimental models for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Suman

    2011-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) or kala-azar is a chronic protozoan infection in humans associated with significant global morbidity and mortality. The causative agent is a haemoflagellate protozoan Leishmania donovani, an obligate intracellular parasite that resides and multiplies within macrophages of the reticulo-endothelial system. Most of the existing anti-leishmanial drugs have serious side effects that limit their clinical application. As an alternate strategy, vaccination is also under experimental and clinical trials. The in vitro evaluation designed to facilitate rapid testing of a large number of drugs has been focussed on the promastigotes milt little attention on the clinically relevant parasite stage, amastigotes. Screening designed to closely reflect the situation in vivo is currently time consuming, laborious, and expensive, since it requires intracellular amastigotes and animal model. The ability to select transgenic Leishmania expressing reporter proteins, such as the green fluorescent proteins (GFP) or the luciferase opened up new possibilities for the development of drug screening models. Many experimental animal models like rodents, dogs and monkeys have been developed, each with specific features, but none accurately reproduces what happens in humans. Available in vitro and in vivo methodologies for antileishmanial drug screening and their respective advantages and disadvantages are reviewed. PMID:21321417

  14. Modeling of Experimental Atherosclerotic Plaque Delamination.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaochang; Chen, Xin; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2015-12-01

    A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate atherosclerotic plaque delamination experiments in mouse abdominal aorta specimens. A three-dimensional finite element model is developed for the experiments. The aortic wall is treated as a fiber-reinforced, highly deformable, incompressible material, and the Holzapfel-Gasser-Ogden (HGO) model is adopted for the aortic bulk material behavior. Cohesive elements are placed along the plaque-media interface along which delamination occurs. The 3D specimen geometry is created based on images from the experiments and certain simplifying approximations. A set of HGO and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with experimental measurements for one loading-delamination-unloading cycle. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for four other loading-delamination-unloading cycles are obtained, which show good agreement with experimental measurements. The findings of the current study demonstrate the applicability of the CZM approach in arterial tissue failure simulations. PMID:26101030

  15. Analysis, design and experimental characterization of electrostatically actuated gas micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astle, Aaron A.

    This work goal is to realize a high-performance, multi-stage micropump integrated within a wireless micro gas chromatograph (muGC) for measuring airborne environment pollutants. The work described herein focuses on the development of high-fidelity mathematical and physical design models, and the testing and validation of the most promising models with large-scale and micro-scale (MEMS) pump prototypes. It is shown that an electrostatically-actuated, multistage, diaphragm micropump with active valve control provides the best expected performance for this application. A hierarchy of models is developed to characterize the various factors governing micropump performance. This includes a thermodynamic model, an idealized reduced-order model and a reduced-order model that incorporates realistic valve flow effects and accounts for fluidic load. The reduced-order models are based on fundamental fluid dynamic principles and allow predictions of flow rate and pressure rise as a function of geometric design variables, and drive signal. The reduced order models are validated in several tests. Two-stage, 20x scale pump results reveal the need to incorporate realistic valve flow effects and the output load for accurate modeling. The more realistic reduced order model is then validated using micropumps with two and four pumping stages. The reduced order model captures the micropump performance accurately, provided that separate measurements of valve pressure losses and pump geometry are used. The four-stage micropump fabricated using theoretical model guidelines from this research provides a maximum flow rate and pressure rise of 3 cm 3/min and 1.75 kPa/stage respectively with a power consumption of only 4 mW per stage. The four-stage micropump occupies and area of 54 mm 2. Each pumping cavity has a volume of 6x10-6 m 3. This performance indicates that this pump design will be sufficient to meet the requirements for extended field operation of a wireless integrated muGC. During

  16. ProGlycProt: a repository of experimentally characterized prokaryotic glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Aadil H.; Mondal, Homchoru; Chauhan, Jagat S.; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.; Methi, Amrish; Rao, Alka

    2012-01-01

    ProGlycProt (http://www.proglycprot.org/) is an open access, manually curated, comprehensive repository of bacterial and archaeal glycoproteins with at least one experimentally validated glycosite (glycosylated residue). To facilitate maximum information at one point, the database is arranged under two sections: (i) ProCGP—the main data section consisting of 95 entries with experimentally characterized glycosites and (ii) ProUGP—a supplementary data section containing 245 entries with experimentally identified glycosylation but uncharacterized glycosites. Every entry in the database is fully cross-referenced and enriched with available published information about source organism, coding gene, protein, glycosites, glycosylation type, attached glycan, associated oligosaccharyl/glycosyl transferases (OSTs/GTs), supporting references, and applicable additional information. Interestingly, ProGlycProt contains as many as 174 entries for which information is unavailable or the characterized glycosites are unannotated in Swiss-Prot release 2011_07. The website supports a dedicated structure gallery of homology models and crystal structures of characterized glycoproteins in addition to two new tools developed in view of emerging information about prokaryotic sequons (conserved sequences of amino acids around glycosites) that are never or rarely seen in eukaryotic glycoproteins. ProGlycProt provides an extensive compilation of experimentally identified glycosites (334) and glycoproteins (340) of prokaryotes that could serve as an information resource for research and technology applications in glycobiology. PMID:22039152

  17. Hazards Response of Energetic Materials - Initiation Mechanisms, Experimental Characterization, and Development of Predictive Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Maienschein, J; Nichols III, A; Reaugh, J; McClelland, M; Hsu, P C

    2005-04-15

    We present our approach to develop a predictive capability for hazards -- thermal and non-shock impact -- response of energetic material systems based on: (A) identification of relevant processes; (B) characterization of the relevant properties; (C) application of property data to predictive models; and (D) application of the models into predictive simulation. This paper focuses on the first two elements above, while a companion paper by Nichols et al focuses on the final two elements. We outline the underlying mechanisms of hazards response and their interactions, and present our experimental work to characterize the necessary material parameters, including thermal ignition, thermal and mechanical properties, fracture/fragmentation behavior, deflagration rates, and the effect of material damage. We also describe our validation test, the Scaled Thermal Explosion Experiment. Finally, we integrate the entire collection of data into a qualitative understanding that is useful until such time as the predictive models become available.

  18. Experimental application of ultrafast imaging to spectral tissue characterization.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Duitama, Julian; Chayer, Boris; Han, Aiguo; Garcia, Damien; Oelze, Michael L; Cloutier, Guy

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound ultrafast imaging (UI) allows acquisition of thousands of frames per second with a sustained image quality at any depth in the field of view. Therefore, it would be ideally suited to obtain good statistical sampling of fast-moving tissues using spectral-based techniques to derive the backscatter coefficient (BSC) and associated quantitative parameters. In UI, an image is formed by insonifying the medium with plane waves steered at different angles, beamforming them and compounding the resulting radiofrequency images. We aimed at validating, experimentally, the effect of these beamforming protocols on the BSC, under both isotropic and anisotropic conditions. Using UI techniques with a linear array transducer (5-14 MHz), we estimated the BSCs of tissue-mimicking phantoms and flowing porcine blood at depths up to 35 mm with a frame rate reaching 514 Hz. UI-based data were compared with those obtained using single-element transducers and conventional focusing imaging. Results revealed that UI compounded images can produce valid estimates of BSCs and effective scatterer size (errors less than 2.2 ± 0.8 and 0.26 ± 0.2 dB for blood and phantom experiments, respectively). This work also describes the use of pre-compounded UI images (i.e., steered images) to assess the angular dependency of circulating red blood cells. We have concluded that UI data sets can be used for BSC spectral tissue analysis and anisotropy characterization. PMID:26119459

  19. Experimental characterization of nonlinear processes of whistler branch waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejero, E. M.; Crabtree, C.; Blackwell, D. D.; Amatucci, W. E.; Ganguli, G.; Rudakov, L.

    2016-05-01

    Experiments in the Space Physics Simulation Chamber at the Naval Research Laboratory isolated and characterized important nonlinear wave-wave and wave-particle interactions that can occur in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts by launching predominantly electrostatic waves in the intermediate frequency range with wave normal angle greater than 85 ° and measuring the nonlinearly generated electromagnetic scattered waves. The scattered waves have a perpendicular wavelength that is nearly an order of magnitude larger than that of the pump wave. Calculations of scattering efficiency from experimental measurements demonstrate that the scattering efficiency is inversely proportional to the damping rate and trends towards unity as the damping rate approaches zero. Signatures of both wave-wave and wave-particle scatterings are also observed in the triggered emission process in which a launched wave resonant with a counter-propagating electron beam generates a large amplitude chirped whistler wave. The possibility of nonlinear scattering or three wave decay as a saturation mechanism for the triggered emission is suggested. The laboratory experiment has inspired the search for scattering signatures in the in situ data of chorus emission in the radiation belts.

  20. Experimental High Temperature Characterization of a Magnetic Bearing for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montague, Gerald; Jansen, Mark; Provenza, Andrew; Palazzolo, Alan; Jansen, Ralph; Ebihara, Ben

    2003-01-01

    Open loop, experimental force and power measurements of a radial, redundant-axis, magnetic bearing at temperatures to 1000 F (538 C) and rotor speeds to 15,000 RPM along with theoretical temperature and force models are presented in this paper. The experimentally measured force produced by a single C-core using 22A was 600 lb. (2.67 kN) at room temperature and 380 lb. (1.69 kN) at 1000 F (538 C). These values were compared with force predictions based on a 1D magnetic circuit analysis and a thermal analysis of gap growth as a function of temperature. Tests under rotating conditions showed that rotor speed has a negligible effect on the bearing s load capacity. One C-core required approximately 340 W of power to generate 190 lb. (8.45 kN) of magnetic force at 1000 F (538 C); however the magnetic air gap was much larger than at room temperature. The data presented is after the bearing had already operated six thermal cycles and eleven total (not consecutive) hours at 1000 F (538 C).

  1. Experimental Flow Characterization of a Flow Diverting Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, Eph; Chow, Ricky; Campbell, Gary; Divani, Afshin; Sheng, Jian

    2012-11-01

    Flow diverters, such as the Pipeline Embolization Device, are a new class of endovascular devices for the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. While clinical studies have demonstrated safety and efficacy, their impact on intra-aneurysmal flow is not confirmed experimentally. As such, optimization of the flow diversion behavior is not currently possible. A quasi-3D PIV technique was developed and applied in various glass models at Re = 275 and 550 to determine the changes to flow characteristics due to the deployment of a flow diverter across the aneurysm neck. Outcomes such as mean velocity, wall shear stress, and others metrics will be presented. Glass models with varying radii of curvature and aneurysm locations will be examined. Experiments were performed in a fully index-matched flow facility using ~10 μm diameter polystyrene particles doped with Rhodium 6G dye. The particles were illuminated with a 532nm laser sheet and observed with a CCD camera and a 592nm +/-43 nm bandpass filter. A quasi 3D flow field was reconstructed from multiple orthogonal planes (spaced 0.4mm apart) encompassing the entire glass model. Wall stresses were evaluated from the near-wall flow viscous stresses.

  2. Experimental characterization of extra-focal radiation in CT scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Bruce R.; Porras-Chaverri, Mariela A.; Evans, Joshua D.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) applications based on statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms require accurate models of the CT acquisition process, with a key component being the x-ray fan beam intensity. We present a method to experimentally determine the extra-focal radiation profile incident on individual CT detectors. Using a tungsten cylinder as a knife edge, a super-sampled signal was created from sinogram data, which traced the "occlusion" of the x-ray source as seen by a detector. By differentiating this signal and correcting for finite detector size and motion blur, the effective source profile can be recovered. Extra-focal scatter was found to be on the order of 1-3 percent of the focal beam intensity, with lower relative magnitude at the isocenter and increasing towards the edge of the fan beam, with its profile becoming asymmetric at large angles. The implications for reconstruction algorithms and QCT applications will be discussed.

  3. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L; Crosby, Jessi R; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R; Tedesco, Andrew S; Slepian, Marvin J; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties. PMID:25985458

  4. Conformal piezoelectric systems for clinical and experimental characterization of soft tissue biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Shi, Yan; Joe, Pauline; Ghaffari, Roozbeh; Balooch, Guive; Usgaonkar, Karan; Gur, Onur; Tran, Phat L.; Crosby, Jessi R.; Meyer, Marcin; Su, Yewang; Chad Webb, R.; Tedesco, Andrew S.; Slepian, Marvin J.; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A.

    2015-07-01

    Mechanical assessment of soft biological tissues and organs has broad relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment of disease. Existing characterization methods are invasive, lack microscale spatial resolution, and are tailored only for specific regions of the body under quasi-static conditions. Here, we develop conformal and piezoelectric devices that enable in vivo measurements of soft tissue viscoelasticity in the near-surface regions of the epidermis. These systems achieve conformal contact with the underlying complex topography and texture of the targeted skin, as well as other organ surfaces, under both quasi-static and dynamic conditions. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the responses of piezoelectric actuator-sensor pairs laminated on a variety of soft biological tissues and organ systems in animal models provide information on the operation of the devices. Studies on human subjects establish the clinical significance of these devices for rapid and non-invasive characterization of skin mechanical properties.

  5. Colonic perianastomotic carcinogenesis in an experimental model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Holanda, Sergio; Rodrigo, Luis; Pinyol-Felis, Carme; Vinyas-Salas, Joan

    2008-01-01

    Background To examine the effect of anastomosis on experimental carcinogenesis in the colon of rats. Methods Forty-three 10-week-old male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were operated on by performing an end-to-side ileorectostomy. Group A:16 rats received no treatment. Group B: 27 rats received 18 subcutaneous injections weekly at a dose of 21 mg/kg wt of 1–2 dimethylhydrazine (DMH), from the eighth day after the intervention. Animals were sacrificed between 25–27 weeks. The number of tumours, their localization, size and microscopic characteristics were recorded. A paired chi-squared analysis was performed comparing tumoral induction in the perianastomotic zone with the rest of colon with faeces. Results No tumours appeared in the dimethylhydrazine-free group. The percentage tumoral area was greater in the perianastomotic zone compared to tumours which had developed in the rest of colon with faeces (p = 0.014). Conclusion We found a cocarcinogenic effect due to the creation of an anastomosis, when using an experimental model of colonic carcinogenesis induced by DMH in rats. PMID:18667092

  6. Experimental source characterization techniques for studying the acoustic properties of perforates under high level acoustic excitation.

    PubMed

    Bodén, Hans

    2011-11-01

    This paper discusses experimental techniques for obtaining the acoustic properties of in-duct samples with non-linear acoustic characteristic. The methods developed are intended both for studies of non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics for samples only accessible from one side such as wall treatment in aircraft engine ducts or automotive exhaust systems and for samples accessible from both sides such as perforates or other top sheets. When harmonic sound waves are incident on the sample nonlinear energy transfer results in sound generation at higher harmonics at the sample (perforate) surface. The idea is that these sources can be characterized using linear system identification techniques similar to one-port or two-port techniques which are traditionally used for obtaining source data for in-duct sources such as IC-engines or fans. The starting point will be so called polyharmonic distortion modeling which is used for characterization of nonlinear properties of microwave systems. It will be shown how acoustic source data models can be expressed using this theory. Source models of different complexity are developed and experimentally tested. The results of the experimental tests show that these techniques can give results which are useful for understanding non-linear energy transfer to higher harmonics. PMID:22087890

  7. Numerical modeling of experimental human fibrous cap delamination.

    PubMed

    Leng, Xiaochang; Davis, Lindsey A; Deng, Xiaomin; Sutton, Michael A; Lessner, Susan M

    2016-06-01

    Fibrous cap delamination is a critical process during the rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, which often leads to severe life-threatening clinical consequences such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this study a finite element modeling and simulation approach is presented that enables the study of fibrous cap delamination experiments for the purpose of understanding the fibrous cap delamination process. A cohesive zone model (CZM) approach is applied to simulate delamination of the fibrous cap from the underlying plaque tissue. A viscoelastic anisotropic (VA) model for the bulk arterial material behavior is extended from existing studies so that the hysteresis phenomenon observed in the fibrous cap delamination experiments can be captured. A finite element model is developed for the fibrous cap delamination experiments, in which arterial layers (including the fibrous cap and the underlying plaque tissue) are represented by solid elements based on the VA model and the fibrous cap-underlying plaque tissue interface is characterized by interfacial CZM elements. In the CZM, the delamination process is governed by an exponential traction-separation law which utilizes critical energy release rates obtained directly from the fibrous cap delamination experiments. A set of VA model parameter values and CZM parameter values is determined based on values suggested in the literature and through matching simulation predictions of the load vs. load-point displacement curve with one set of experimental measurements. Using this set of parameter values, simulation predictions for other sets of experimental measurements are obtained and good agreement between simulation predictions and experimental measurements is observed. Results of this study demonstrate the applicability of the viscoelastic anisotropic model and the CZM approach for the simulation of diseased arterial tissue failure processes. PMID:26897094

  8. Experimental Characterization of Radiation Forcing due to Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivas, K. R.; Singh, D. K.; Ponnulakshmi, V. K.; Subramanian, G.

    2011-11-01

    Micro-meteorological processes in the nocturnal atmospheric boundary layer (NBL) including the formation of radiation-fog and the development of inversion layers are controlled by heat transfer and the vertical temperature distribution close to the ground. In a recent study, it has been shown that the temperature profile close to the ground in stably-stratified, NBL is controlled by the radiative forcing due to suspended aerosols. Estimating aerosol forcing is also important in geo-engineering applications to evaluate the use of aerosols to mitigate greenhouse effects. Modeling capability in the above scenarios is limited by our knowledge of this forcing. Here, the design of an experimental setup is presented which can be used for evaluating the IR-radiation forcing on aerosols under either Rayleigh-Benard condition or under conditions corresponding to the NBL. We present results indicating the effect of surface emissivities of the top and bottom boundaries and the aerosol concentration on the temperature profiles. In order to understand the observed enhancement of the convection-threshold, we have determined the conduction-radiation time constant of an aerosol laden air layer. Our results help to explain observed temperature profiles in the NBL, the apparent stability of such profiles and indicate the need to account for the effect of aerosols in climatic/weather models.

  9. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Thyparambil, Aby A; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure-function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  10. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  11. Numerical and experimental characterizations of low frequency MEMS AE sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saboonchi, Hossain; Ozevin, Didem

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, new MEMS Acoustic Emission (AE) sensors are introduced. The transduction principle of the sensors is capacitance due to gap change. The sensors are numerically modeled using COMSOL Multiphysics software in order to estimate the resonant frequencies and capacitance values, and manufactured using MetalMUMPS process. The process includes thick metal layer (20 μm) made of nickel for freely vibration layer and polysilicon layer as the stationary layer. The metal layer provides a relatively heavy mass so that the spring constant can be designed high for low frequency sensor designs in order to increase the collapse voltage level (proportional to the stiffness), which increases the sensor sensitivity. An insulator layer is deposited between stationary layer and freely vibration layer, which significantly reduces the potential of stiction as a failure mode. As conventional AE sensors made of piezoelectric materials cannot be designed for low frequencies (<300 kHz) with miniature size, the MEMS sensor frequencies are tuned to 50 kHz and 200 kHz. The each sensor contained several parallel-connected cells with an overall size of approximately 250μm × 500 μm. The electromechanical characterizations are performed using high precision impedance analyzer and compared with the numerical results, which indicate a good fit. The initial mechanical characterization tests in atmospheric pressure are conducted using pencil lead break simulations. The proper sensor design reduces the squeeze film damping so that it does not require any vacuum packaging. The MEMS sensor responses are compared with similar frequency piezoelectric AE sensors.

  12. Effects of Anethole in Nociception Experimental Models

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  13. Effects of anethole in nociception experimental models.

    PubMed

    Ritter, Alessandra Mileni Versuti; Ames, Franciele Queiroz; Otani, Fernando; de Oliveira, Rubia Maria Weffort; Cuman, Roberto Kenji Nakamura; Bersani-Amado, Ciomar Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive activity of anethole (anethole 1-methoxy-4-benzene (1-propenyl)), major compound of the essential oil of star anise (Illicium verum), in different experimental models of nociception. The animals were pretreated with anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) one hour before the experiments. To eliminate a possible sedative effect of anethole, the open field test was conducted. Anethole (62.5, 125, 250, and 500 mg/kg) showed an antinociceptive effect in the writhing model induced by acetic acid, in the second phase of the formalin test (125 and 250 mg/kg) in the test of glutamate (62.5, 125, and 250 mg/kg), and expresses pain induced by ACF (250 mg/kg). In contrast, anethole was not able to increase the latency time on the hot plate and decrease the number of flinches during the initial phase of the formalin test in any of the doses tested. It was also demonstrated that anethole has no association with sedative effects. Therefore, these data showed that anethole, at all used doses, has no sedative effect and has an antinociceptive effect. This effect may be due to a decrease in the production/release of inflammatory mediators. PMID:25506382

  14. Structural analysis and experimental characterization of cylindrical lithium-ion battery cells subject to lateral impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdeev, Ilya; Gilaki, Mehdi

    2014-12-01

    We report on modeling mechanical response of cylindrical lithium-ion battery cells that are commonly used in automotive applications when subjected to impact testing. The developed homogenized model that accurately captures mechanical response of a cell to lateral crash is reported. The proposed model was validated using static and dynamic experimental testing. Highly nonlinear mechanical deformations of the cells were captured experimentally using a high-speed camera and later characterized through computer tomography. Numerically, we have investigated the feasibility of using explicit finite element code for accurate modeling of impact on one cell, so it can be used for an entire battery pack that consists of hundreds or thousands of cells. In this study, we have developed and compared two homogenization methods for the jellyroll in a cylindrical lithium-ion battery cell. Homogenization was conducted in a lateral/radial direction. Based on the results of the homogenization, the material model utilizing crushable foam constitutive behavior was then developed for simulations. Experimental results showed a very good agreement with simulations, thus validating the proposed approach and giving us confidence to move forward with the crush simulations of an entire battery pack. Zones of potential electric shortages were determined based on the experiments and simulations.

  15. Experimental characterization of collision avoidance in pedestrian dynamics.

    PubMed

    Parisi, Daniel R; Negri, Pablo A; Bruno, Luciana

    2016-08-01

    In the present paper, the avoidance behavior of pedestrians was characterized by controlled experiments. Several conflict situations were studied considering different flow rates and group sizes in crossing and head-on configurations. Pedestrians were recorded from above, and individual two-dimensional trajectories of their displacement were recovered after image processing. Lateral swaying amplitude and step lengths were measured for free pedestrians, obtaining similar values to the ones reported in the literature. Minimum avoidance distances were computed in two-pedestrian experiments. In the case of one pedestrian dodging an arrested one, the avoidance distance did not depend on the relative orientation of the still pedestrian with respect to the direction of motion of the first. When both pedestrians were moving, the avoidance distance in a perpendicular encounter was longer than the one obtained during a head-on approach. It was found that the mean curvature of the trajectories was linearly anticorrelated with the mean speed. Furthermore, two common avoidance maneuvers, stopping and steering, were defined from the analysis of the acceleration and curvature in single trajectories. Interestingly, it was more probable to observe steering events than stopping ones, also the probability of simultaneous steering and stopping occurrences was negligible. The results obtained in this paper can be used to validate and calibrate pedestrian dynamics models. PMID:27627328

  16. Experimental characterization of Fresnel-Köhler concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Pablo; Benítez, Pablo; Mohedano, Rubén; Cvetković, Aleksandra; Vilaplana, Juan; Li, Yang; Hernández, Maikel; Chaves, Julio; Miñano, Juan C.

    2012-01-01

    Most cost-effective concentrated photovoltaics (CPV) systems are based on an optical train comprising two stages, the first being a Fresnel lens. Among them, the Fresnel-Köhler (FK) concentrator stands out owing to both performance and practical reasons. We describe the experimental measurements procedure for FK concentrator modules. This procedure includes three main types of measurements: electrical efficiency, acceptance angle, and irradiance uniformity at the solar cell plane. We have collected here the performance features of two different FK prototypes (ranging different f-numbers, concentration ratios, and cell sizes). The electrical efficiencies measured in both prototypes are high and fit well with the models, achieving values up to 32.7% (temperature corrected, and with no antireflective coating on SOE or POE surfaces) in the best case. The measured angular transmission curves show large acceptance angles, again perfectly matching the expected values [measured concentration acceptance product (CAP) values over 0.56]. The irradiance pattern on the cell (obtained with a digital camera) shows an almost perfectly uniform distribution, as predicted by raytrace simulations. All these excellent on-sun results confirm the FK concentrator as a potentially cost-effective solution for the CPV market.

  17. Dynamic Characterization and Modeling of Potting Materials for Electronics Assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Vasant; Lee, Gilbert; Santiago, Jaime

    2015-06-01

    Prediction of survivability of encapsulated electronic components subject to impact relies on accurate modeling. Both static and dynamic characterization of encapsulation material is needed to generate a robust material model. Current focus is on potting materials to mitigate high rate loading on impact. In this effort, encapsulation scheme consists of layers of polymeric material Sylgard 184 and Triggerbond Epoxy-20-3001. Experiments conducted for characterization of materials include conventional tension and compression tests, Hopkinson bar, dynamic material analyzer (DMA) and a non-conventional accelerometer based resonance tests for obtaining high frequency data. For an ideal material, data can be fitted to Williams-Landel-Ferry (WLF) model. A new temperature-time shift (TTS) macro was written to compare idealized temperature shift factor (WLF model) with experimental incremental shift factors. Deviations can be observed by comparison of experimental data with the model fit to determine the actual material behavior. Similarly, another macro written for obtaining Ogden model parameter from Hopkinson Bar tests indicates deviations from experimental high strain rate data. In this paper, experimental results for different materials used for mitigating impact, and ways to combine data from resonance, DMA and Hopkinson bar together with modeling refinements will be presented.

  18. A human experimental model of episodic pain.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Laura; Hennings, Kristian; Li, Xi; Negro, Francesco; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2014-12-01

    An experimental model of daily episodic pain was developed to investigate peripheral sensitization and cortical reorganization in healthy individuals. Two experiments (A and B) were conducted. Experiments A and B consisted of one and five consecutive days, respectively, in which the participants were subjected to 45 min of intense painful cutaneous electrical stimulation (episodic pain session), using a stimulus paradigm that in animals has been shown to induce long-term potentiation. These electrical stimulations produced a verbal pain rating of approximately 85 on a 0-100 verbal rating scale (VRS). Physiological (blood flow and axon flare reflex), psychophysical (perception threshold and verbal pain ratings) and electrophysiological (128 channels recorded somatosensory evoked potential (SEP)) measurements were recorded. The stimulation evoked a visible axon flare reflex and caused significantly increased cutaneous blood flow around the site of the stimulation. Axon flare reflex and blood flow reached a plateau on day one in all the subjects and no significant changes between the days were observed. The results showed that the effect of the electrical stimulations changed over the five days; pain potentiation was induced on the first day (significant increase in the verbal pain ratings during the 45 min stimulation) but not on any of the subsequent days. After five days of subsequent pain induction, the global field power showed a significant reduction in P2 amplitude in the late stage (200-370 ms, in the central-parietal area). In conclusion, the results suggest that in healthy individuals this model of episodic pain produces a rapid adaptation after day one and that generates significant SEP changes at day five. PMID:25128903

  19. Experimental, Numerical and Observational Models in Geodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, Carolina

    2015-04-01

    Geodynamics, the study of the forces that drives all Earth's processes is a rich field that deeply connects all aspects of geological and geophysical studies, from surface observations of the sedimentary record to knowledge of deep Earth structure from mineral physics and seismology. In the context of the solid Earth geodynamics primarily focuses on lithosphere and mantle dynamics, while core dynamics is the purview of geomagnetism. I will focus this talk on the former, its historical context and future developments. We have known the equations of motion and mechanics for ~200 years, but only relatively recently can they be solved with enough accuracy and resolution to do geology. We have made great strides since Arthur Holmes conceptual models of mantle flow, thanks to computational and experimental advances. We can know model plate boundaries globally with resolutions in the order of a few kms and image temperature and velocity simultaneously in the laboratory in 3D and non-intrusively. We have also learned a great deal about the physics of the Earth, from composition to rheology. New theories on plate boundary rheology are paving the way for self-consistent generation of plates from mantle flow. New computational methods allow for adaptive meshing, fabric development and history, so we can study deformation and compare directly to geological observations in mountain ranges and continental rifts. We can use ever more sophisticated images of mantle structure from seismic and other geophysical data to probe the relationship between melting, flow and dynamical processes. We can reconstruct landscapes and relief, plate motions and sedimentation and ask how much the mantle has contributed to drainage reversal, sedimentation and climate change. The future of the field is ever brighter.

  20. Experimental characterization of the transfer function for a Silver-dielectric superlens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-03-12

    We describe a technique for experimentally determining the spatial-frequency modulation transfer function for near-field super-resolution imaging systems and present such a modulation transfer function for a 20|40|20 nm poly(vinyl alcohol)~(PVA)|Silver|PVA superlens exposed to 365 nm wavelength (i-line) radiation through a 50-nm thick tungsten mask. An extensive spectral characterization is achieved from only two exposures, with transmission coefficients determined for spatial frequencies as high as 13 µm-1, corresponding to λ / 4.75. The resulting transfer function is in good agreement with analytical models that incorporate the effects of mask-superlens interactions. PMID:22418523

  1. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Characterization of Slosh Dynamics Applied to In-Space Propellant Storage, Management and Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storey, Jedediah M.; Kirk, Daniel; Gutierrez, Hector; Marsell, Brandon; Schallhorn, Paul; Lapilli, Gabriel D.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental and numerical results are presented from a new cryogenic fluid slosh program at the Florida Institute of Technology (FIT). Water and cryogenic liquid nitrogen are used in various ground-based tests with an approximately 30 cm diameter spherical tank to characterize damping, slosh mode frequencies, and slosh forces. The experimental results are compared to a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for validation. An analytical model is constructed from prior work for comparison. Good agreement is seen between experimental, numerical, and analytical results.

  2. Experimental modelling of outburst flood - bed interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrivick, J. L.; Xie, Z.; Sleigh, A.; Hubbard, M.

    2009-04-01

    Outburst floods are a sudden release and advancing wave of water and sediment, with a peak discharge that is often several orders of magnitude greater than perennial flows. Common outburst floods from natural sources include those from glacial and moraine-impounded lakes, freshwater dyke and levee bursts, volcanic debris dams, landslides, avalanches, coastal bay-bars, and those from tree or vegetation dams. Outburst flood hazards are regularly incorporated into risk assessments for urban, coastal and mountainous areas, for example. Outburst flood hazards are primarily due to direct impacts, caused by a frontal surge wave, from debris within a flow body, and from the mass and consistency of the flows. A number of secondary impacts also pose hazards, including widespread deposition of sediment and blocked tributary streams. It is rapid landscape change, which is achieved the mobilization and redistribution of sediment that causes one of the greatest hazards due to outburst floods. The aim of this project is therefore to parameterise hydrodynamic - sedimentary interactions in experimental outburst floods. Specifically, this project applies laboratory flume modelling, which offers a hitherto untapped opportunity for examining complex interactions between water and sediment within outburst floods. The experimental set-up is of a tradition lock-gate design with a straight 4 m long tank. Hydraulics are scaled at 1:20 froude scale and the following controls on frontal wave flow-bed interactions and hence on rapid landscape change are being investigated: 1. Pre-existing mobile sediment effects, fixed bed roughness effects, sediment concentration effects, mobile bed effects. An emphasis is being maintained on examining the downstream temporal and spatial change in physical character of the water / sediment frontal wave. Facilities are state-of-the-art with a fully-automated laser bed-profiler to measure bed elevation after a run, Seatek arrays to measure transient flow

  3. Recycle polymer characterization and adhesion modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbery, James David

    Contaminants from paper product producers that adversely affect fiber yield have been collected from mills located in three North American geographic regions. Samples have been fractionated using a modified solvent extraction process and subsequently quantitatively characterized and it was found that agglomerates were comprised of the following: approximately 30% extractable polymeric material, 25--35% fiber, 12--15% inorganic material, 15% non-extractable high molecular-weight polyethylene or cross-linked polymers, and 2--4% starch residue. Three representative polymers, paraffin, low-molecular weight polyethylene, and a commercial hot-melt adhesive were selected for further analysis to model the attractive and repulsive behavior using Scanning Probe Microscopy in an aqueous cell. Scanning force probes were characterized using an original technique utilizing a nano-indentation apparatus that is non-destructive and is accurate to within 10% for probes with force constants as low as 1 N/m. Surface force measurements were performed between a Poly (Styrene/30% Butyl Methacrylate) sphere and substrates produced from paraffin, polyethylene, and a commercial hot-melt adhesive in solutions ranging in NaF ionic concentrations from 0.001M to 1M. Reasonable theoretical agreement with experimental data has been shown between a combined model applying van der Waals force contributions using the Derjaguin approximation and electrostatic contributions as predicted by a Debye-Huckel linearization of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation utilizing Hamaker constants derived from critical surface energies determined from Zisman and Lifshitz-van der Waals energy approaches. This model has been applied to measured data and indicates the strength of adhesion for the hot-melt to be 0.14 nN while that of paraffin is 1.9 nN and polyethylene 2.8 nN. Paraffin and polyethylene are 13.5 and 20 times greater in attraction than the hot-melt adhesive. Hot-melt adhesive repulsion is predicted to be 220

  4. Distributed-Channel Bipolar Device: Experimentation, Analytical Modeling and Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Fenglai

    Experimental results and theoretical modeling for four terminal distributed channel bipolar devices (DCBD) are presented. The DCBD device is comprised of an interwoven BJT and MOSFET. The device may be characterized as a MOSFET with a bipolar transistor source distributed under the MOSFET channel. Alternatively, the device may be represented as a BJT where a MOSFET channel provides the current collection function. The physical layout of the device is that of a n-channel MOSFET placed above a p-Si epitaxial base region which was grown on an n^+-Si substrate emitter. Distributed electronic behavior exhibits itself through self-biasing influences of the channel-collected current on the channel-base junction bias. For appropriate biasing, the MOSFET channel divides itself into two regions exhibiting forward active and saturation BJT behavior. Both experimental results and theoretical modeling are provided. Experimental results for "large area" rectangular gate, circular gate and trapezoidal gate DCBD are reported. The experimental results exhibit the transconductance threshold voltage, beta fall off and transconductance fall-off features reported previously by others. A "large area" trapezoidal gate structure is incorporated to illustrate the gate area influences on the electrical characteristics and to provide a model sensitive structure for evaluating the validity of the theory developed in the dissertation. An analytical model based on conventional MOSFET and bipolar theories is developed. The analytical model is applied to the large gate area devices (example: 0.127 mm rectangular gate length) and smaller dimensional gate devices down to 0.9 micron rectangular gate length. The theoretical results show good agreement with the large gate area experimental results. Application examples are provided. The use of the base current invariant transconductance threshold voltage as a reference voltage is discussed. Comparison of the transconductance threshold voltage

  5. Robustness and modeling error characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtomaki, N. A.; Castanon, D. A.; Sandell, N. R., Jr.; Levy, B. C.; Athans, M.; Stein, G.

    1984-01-01

    The results on robustness theory presented here are extensions of those given in Lehtomaki et al., (1981). The basic innovation in these new results is that they utilize minimal additional information about the structure of the modeling error, as well as its magnitude, to assess the robustness of feedback systems for which robustness tests based on the magnitude of modeling error alone are inconclusive.

  6. Characterizing and Modeling Ferrite-Core Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbagh, Harold A.; Murphy, R. Kim; Sabbagh, Elias H.; Aldrin, John C.

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we accurately and carefully characterize a ferrite-core probe that is widely used for aircraft inspections. The characterization starts with the development of a model that can be executed using the proprietary volume-integral code, VIC-3D©, and then the model is fitted to measured multifrequency impedance data taken with the probe in freespace and over samples of a titanium alloy and aluminum. Excellent results are achieved, and will be discussed.

  7. Experimental and theoretical characterization of the voltage distribution generated by deep brain stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Miocinovic, Svjetlana; Lempka, Scott F.; Russo, Gary S.; Maks, Christopher B.; Butson, Christopher R.; Sakaie, Ken E.; Vitek, Jerrold L.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2008-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and shows great promise for numerous other disorders. While the fundamental purpose of DBS is to modulate neural activity with electric fields, little is known about the actual voltage distribution generated in the brain by DBS electrodes and as a result it is difficult to accurately predict which brain areas are directly affected by the stimulation. The goal of this study was to characterize the spatial and temporal characteristics of the voltage distribution generated by DBS electrodes. We experimentally recorded voltages around active DBS electrodes in either a saline bath or implanted in the brain of a non-human primate. Recordings were made during voltage-controlled and current-controlled stimulation. The experimental findings were compared to volume conductor electric field models of DBS parameterized to match the different experiments. Three factors directly affected the experimental and theoretical voltage measurements: 1) DBS electrode impedance, primarily dictated by a voltage drop at the electrode-electrolyte interface and the conductivity of the tissue medium, 2) capacitive modulation of the stimulus waveform, and 3) inhomogeneity and anisotropy of the tissue medium. While the voltage distribution does not directly predict the neural response to DBS, the results of this study do provide foundational building blocks for understanding the electrical parameters of DBS and characterizing its effects on the nervous system. PMID:19118551

  8. Thermomechanical characterization and modeling for TSV structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Tengfei; Zhao, Qiu; Im, Jay; Ho, Paul S.; Ryu, Suk-Kyu; Huang, Rui

    2014-06-19

    Continual scaling of devices and on-chip wiring has brought significant challenges for materials and processes beyond the 32-nm technology node in microelectronics. Recently, three-dimensional (3-D) integration with through-silicon vias (TSVs) has emerged as an effective solution to meet the future technology requirements. Among others, thermo-mechanical reliability is a key concern for the development of TSV structures used in die stacking as 3-D interconnects. This paper presents experimental measurements of the thermal stresses in TSV structures and analyses of interfacial reliability. The micro-Raman measurements were made to characterize the local distribution of the near-surface stresses in Si around TSVs. On the other hand, the precision wafer curvature technique was employed to measure the average stress and deformation in the TSV structures subject to thermal cycling. To understand the elastic and plastic behavior of TSVs, the microstructural evolution of the Cu vias was analyzed using focused ion beam (FIB) and electron backscattering diffraction (EBSD) techniques. Furthermore, the impact of thermal stresses on interfacial reliability of TSV structures was investigated by a shear-lag cohesive zone model that predicts the critical temperatures and critical via diameters.

  9. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  10. Selective experimental review of the Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, E.D.

    1985-02-01

    Before disussing experimental comparisons with the Standard Model, (S-M) it is probably wise to define more completely what is commonly meant by this popular term. This model is a gauge theory of SU(3)/sub f/ x SU(2)/sub L/ x U(1) with 18 parameters. The parameters are ..cap alpha../sub s/, ..cap alpha../sub qed/, theta/sub W/, M/sub W/ (M/sub Z/ = M/sub W//cos theta/sub W/, and thus is not an independent parameter), M/sub Higgs/; the lepton masses, M/sub e/, M..mu.., M/sub r/; the quark masses, M/sub d/, M/sub s/, M/sub b/, and M/sub u/, M/sub c/, M/sub t/; and finally, the quark mixing angles, theta/sub 1/, theta/sub 2/, theta/sub 3/, and the CP violating phase delta. The latter four parameters appear in the quark mixing matrix for the Kobayashi-Maskawa and Maiani forms. Clearly, the present S-M covers an enormous range of physics topics, and the author can only lightly cover a few such topics in this report. The measurement of R/sub hadron/ is fundamental as a test of the running coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub s/ in QCD. The author will discuss a selection of recent precision measurements of R/sub hadron/, as well as some other techniques for measuring ..cap alpha../sub s/. QCD also requires the self interaction of gluons. The search for the three gluon vertex may be practically realized in the clear identification of gluonic mesons. The author will present a limited review of recent progress in the attempt to untangle such mesons from the plethora q anti q states of the same quantum numbers which exist in the same mass range. The electroweak interactions provide some of the strongest evidence supporting the S-M that exists. Given the recent progress in this subfield, and particularly with the discovery of the W and Z bosons at CERN, many recent reviews obviate the need for further discussion in this report. In attempting to validate a theory, one frequently searches for new phenomena which would clearly invalidate it. 49 references, 28 figures.

  11. Peripapillary and posterior scleral mechanics--part II: experimental and inverse finite element characterization.

    PubMed

    Girard, Michaël J A; Downs, J Crawford; Bottlang, Michael; Burgoyne, Claude F; Suh, J-K Francis

    2009-05-01

    The posterior sclera likely plays an important role in the development of glaucoma, and accurate characterization of its mechanical properties is needed to understand its impact on the more delicate optic nerve head--the primary site of damage in the disease. The posterior scleral shells from both eyes of one rhesus monkey were individually mounted on a custom-built pressurization apparatus. Intraocular pressure was incrementally increased from 5 mm Hg to 45 mm Hg, and the 3D displacements were measured using electronic speckle pattern interferometry. Finite element meshes of each posterior scleral shell were reconstructed from data generated by a 3D digitizer arm (shape) and a 20 MHz ultrasound transducer (thickness). An anisotropic hyperelastic constitutive model described in a companion paper (Girard, Downs, Burgoyne, and Suh, 2009, "Peripapillary and Posterior Scleral Mechanics--Part I: Development of an Anisotropic Hyperelastic Constitutive Model," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 131, p. 051011), which includes stretch-induced stiffening and multidirectional alignment of the collagen fibers, was applied to each reconstructed mesh. Surface node displacements of each model were fitted to the experimental displacements using an inverse finite element method, which estimated a unique set of 13 model parameters. The predictions of the proposed constitutive model matched the 3D experimental displacements well. In both eyes, the tangent modulus increased dramatically with IOP, which indicates that the sclera is mechanically nonlinear. The sclera adjacent to the optic nerve head, known as the peripapillary sclera, was thickest and exhibited the lowest tangent modulus, which might have contributed to the uniform distribution of the structural stiffness for each entire scleral shell. Posterior scleral deformation following acute IOP elevations appears to be nonlinear and governed by the underlying scleral collagen microstructure as predicted by finite element modeling. The

  12. Experimental characterization of high speed centrifugal compressor aerodynamic forcing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, Kirk

    The most common and costly unexpected post-development gas turbine engine reliability issue is blade failure due to High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). HCF in centrifugal compressors is a coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem for which understanding of the phenomenological root causes is incomplete. The complex physics of this problem provides significant challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. Furthermore, the available literature fails to address the flow field associated with the diffuser potential field, a primary cause of forced impeller vibration. Because of the serious nature of HCF, the inadequacy of current design approaches to predict HCF, and the fundamental lack of benchmark experiments to advance the design practices, there exists a need to build a database of information specific to the nature of the diffuser generated forcing function as a foundation for understanding flow induced blade vibratory failure. The specific aim of this research is to address the fundamental nature of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction phenomena inherent in high-speed centrifugal compressors wherein the impeller exit flow field is dynamically modulated by the vaned diffuser potential field or shock structure. The understanding of this unsteady aerodynamic interaction is fundamental to characterizing the impeller forcing function. Unsteady static pressure measurement at several radial and circumferential locations in the vaneless space offer a depiction of pressure field radial decay, circumferential variation and temporal fluctuation. These pressure measurements are coupled with high density, full field measurement of the velocity field within the diffuser vaneless space at multiple spanwise positions. The velocity field and unsteady pressure field are shown to be intimately linked. A strong momentum gradient exiting the impeller is shown to extend well across the vaneless space and interact with the diffuser vane leading edge. The deterministic unsteady

  13. Characterization of animal models for primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)

    PubMed Central

    Fickert, Peter; Pollheimer, Marion J.; Beuers, Ulrich; Lackner, Carolin; Hirschfield, Gideon; Housset, Chantal; Keitel, Verena; Schramm, Christoph; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Karlsen, Tom H.; Melum, Espen; Kaser, Arthur; Eksteen, Bertus; Strazzabosco, Mario; Manns, Michael; Trauner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a chronic cholangiopathy characterized by biliary fibrosis, development of cholestasis and end stage liver disease, high risk of malignancy, and frequent need for liver transplantation. The poor understanding of its pathogenesis is also reflected in the lack of effective medical treatment. Well-characterized animal models are utterly needed to develop novel pathogenetic concepts and study new treatment strategies. Currently there is no consensus on how to evaluate and characterize potential PSC models, which makes direct comparison of experimental results and effective exchange of study material between research groups difficult. The International Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Study Group (IPSCSG) has therefore summarized these key issues in a position paper proposing standard requirements for the study of animal models of PSC. PMID:24560657

  14. Tupaia belangeri as an experimental animal model for viral infection.

    PubMed

    Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko; Kohara, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    Tupaias, or tree shrews, are small mammals that are similar in appearance to squirrels. The morphological and behavioral characteristics of the group have been extensively characterized, and despite previously being classified as primates, recent studies have placed the group in its own family, the Tupaiidae. Genomic analysis has revealed that the genus Tupaia is closer to humans than it is to rodents. In addition, tupaias are susceptible to hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus. The only other experimental animal that has been demonstrated to be sensitive to both of these viruses is the chimpanzee, but restrictions on animal testing have meant that experiments using chimpanzees have become almost impossible. Consequently, the development of the tupaia for use as an animal infection model could become a powerful tool for hepatitis virus research and in preclinical studies on drug development. PMID:25048261

  15. Combined numerical and experimental biomechanical characterization of soft collagen hydrogel substrate.

    PubMed

    Castro, A P G; Laity, P; Shariatzadeh, M; Wittkowske, C; Holland, C; Lacroix, D

    2016-04-01

    This work presents a combined experimental-numerical framework for the biomechanical characterization of highly hydrated collagen hydrogels, namely with 0.20, 0.30 and 0.40% (by weight) of collagen concentration. Collagen is the most abundant protein in the extracellular matrix of animals and humans. Its intrinsic biocompatibility makes collagen a promising substrate for embedding cells within a highly hydrated environment mimicking natural soft tissues. Cell behaviour is greatly influenced by the mechanical properties of the surrounding matrix, but the biomechanical characterization of collagen hydrogels has been challenging up to now, since they present non-linear poro-viscoelastic properties. Combining the stiffness outcomes from rheological experiments with relevant literature data on collagen permeability, poroelastic finite element (FE) models were developed. Comparison between experimental confined compression tests available in the literature and analogous FE stress relaxation curves showed a close agreement throughout the tests. This framework allowed establishing that the dynamic shear modulus of the collagen hydrogels is between 0.0097 ± 0.018 kPa for the 0.20% concentration and 0.0601 ± 0.044 kPa for the 0.40% concentration. The Poisson's ratio values for such conditions lie within the range of 0.495-0.485 for 0.20% and 0.480-0.470 for 0.40%, respectively, showing that rheology is sensitive enough to detect these small changes in collagen concentration and thus allowing to link rheology results with the confined compression tests. In conclusion, this integrated approach allows for accurate constitutive modelling of collagen hydrogels. This framework sets the grounds for the characterization of related hydrogels and to the use of this collagen parameterization in more complex multiscale models. PMID:26914710

  16. Global Characterization of Model Parameter Space Using Information Topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Transtrum, Mark

    A generic parameterized model is a mapping between parameters and data and is naturally interpreted as a prediction manifold embedded in data space. In this interpretation, known as Information Geometry, the Fisher Information Matrix (FIM) is a Riemannian metric that measures the identifiability of the model parameters. Varying the experimental conditions (e.g., times at which measurements are made) alters both the FIM and the geometric properties of the model. However, several global features of the model manifold (e.g., edges and corners) are invariant to changes in experimental conditions as long as the FIM is not singular. Invariance of these features to changing experimental conditions generates an ''Information Topology'' that globally characterizes a model's parameter space and reflects the underlying physical principles from which the model was derived. Understanding a model's information topology can give insights into the emergent physics that controls a system's collective behavior, identify reduced models and describe the relationship among them, and determine which parameter combinations will be difficult to identify for various experimental conditions.

  17. Experimentally Induced Mammalian Models of Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitomi, Takeshi; Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi

    2015-01-01

    A wide variety of animal models have been used to study glaucoma. Although these models provide valuable information about the disease, there is still no ideal model for studying glaucoma due to its complex pathogenesis. Animal models for glaucoma are pivotal for clarifying glaucoma etiology and for developing novel therapeutic strategies to halt disease progression. In this review paper, we summarize some of the major findings obtained in various glaucoma models and examine the strengths and limitations of these models. PMID:26064891

  18. Experimental characterization of edge force on the Crookes radiometer

    SciTech Connect

    Ventura, Austin L.; Ketsdever, Andrew D.; Gimelshein, Natalia E.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.

    2014-12-09

    The contribution of edge force on the Crookes radiometer is experimentally investigated with three vane geometries. This work examines increasing the force per unit weight of a radiometer vane for applications such as near-space propulsion by increasing the vane’s perimeter while decreasing the total surface area of the vane by means of machined holes in the vanes. Experimental results are given for three vane geometries. These results indicate that although force to vane weight ratios can be improved, the maximum force is achieved by a vane geometry that contains no hole features.

  19. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-01-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed model frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems, and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental model data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  20. Dual-porosity poroviscoelasticity and quantitative hydromechanical characterization of the brain tissue with experimental hydrocephalus data.

    PubMed

    Mehrabian, Amin; Abousleiman, Younane N; Mapstone, Timothy B; El-Amm, Christian A

    2015-11-01

    Hydromechanical brain models often involve constitutive relations which must account for soft tissue deformation and creep, together with the interstitial fluid movement and exchange through capillaries. The interaction of rather unknown mechanisms which produce, absorb, and circulate the cerebrospinal fluid within the central nervous system can further add to their complexity. Once proper models for these phenomena or processes are selected, estimation of the associated parameters could be even more challenging. This paper presents the results of a consistent, coupled poroviscoelastic modeling and characterization of the brain tissue as a dual-porosity system. The model draws from Biot's theory of poroviscoelasticity, and adopts the generalized Kelvin's rheological description of the viscoelastic tissue behavior. While the interstitial space serves as the primary porosity through which the bulk flow of the interstitial fluid occurs, a secondary porosity network comprising the capillaries and venous system allows for its partial absorption into the blood. The correspondence principle is used in deriving a time-dependent analytical solution to the proposed model. It allows for identical poroelastic formulation of the original poroviscoelastic problem in the Laplace transform space. Hydrocephalus generally refers to a class of medical conditions which share the ventricles enlargement as a common feature. A set of published data from induced hydrocephalus and follow-up perfusion of cats' brains is used for quantitative characterization of the proposed model. A selected portion of these data including the ventricular volume and rate of fluid absorption from the perfused brain, together with the forward model solution, is utilized via an inverse problem technique to find proper estimations of the model parameters. Results show significant improvement in model predictions of the experimental data. The convoluted and coupled solution results are presented through the time

  1. Experimental characterization of West African Newcastle disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four West African strains and one South African strain of virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were characterized through a two-phase experiment. Strains investigated were Burkina Faso/2415-580/2008, Nigeria/228-7/2006, Niger/1377/2006, and Goose/South Africa/08100426/2008. Phylogenetic analysis s...

  2. Topological Characterization of Extended Quantum Ising Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Song, Z.

    2015-10-01

    We show that a class of exactly solvable quantum Ising models, including the transverse-field Ising model and anisotropic X Y model, can be characterized as the loops in a two-dimensional auxiliary space. The transverse-field Ising model corresponds to a circle and the X Y model corresponds to an ellipse, while other models yield cardioid, limacon, hypocycloid, and Lissajous curves etc. It is shown that the variation of the ground state energy density, which is a function of the loop, experiences a nonanalytical point when the winding number of the corresponding loop changes. The winding number can serve as a topological quantum number of the quantum phases in the extended quantum Ising model, which sheds some light upon the relation between quantum phase transition and the geometrical order parameter characterizing the phase diagram.

  3. Topological Characterization of Extended Quantum Ising Models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G; Song, Z

    2015-10-23

    We show that a class of exactly solvable quantum Ising models, including the transverse-field Ising model and anisotropic XY model, can be characterized as the loops in a two-dimensional auxiliary space. The transverse-field Ising model corresponds to a circle and the XY model corresponds to an ellipse, while other models yield cardioid, limacon, hypocycloid, and Lissajous curves etc. It is shown that the variation of the ground state energy density, which is a function of the loop, experiences a nonanalytical point when the winding number of the corresponding loop changes. The winding number can serve as a topological quantum number of the quantum phases in the extended quantum Ising model, which sheds some light upon the relation between quantum phase transition and the geometrical order parameter characterizing the phase diagram. PMID:26551140

  4. Toxin-Induced Experimental Models of Learning and Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    More, Sandeep Vasant; Kumar, Hemant; Cho, Duk-Yeon; Yun, Yo-Sep; Choi, Dong-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Animal models for learning and memory have significantly contributed to novel strategies for drug development and hence are an imperative part in the assessment of therapeutics. Learning and memory involve different stages including acquisition, consolidation, and retrieval and each stage can be characterized using specific toxin. Recent studies have postulated the molecular basis of these processes and have also demonstrated many signaling molecules that are involved in several stages of memory. Most insights into learning and memory impairment and to develop a novel compound stems from the investigations performed in experimental models, especially those produced by neurotoxins models. Several toxins have been utilized based on their mechanism of action for learning and memory impairment such as scopolamine, streptozotocin, quinolinic acid, and domoic acid. Further, some toxins like 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) and amyloid-β are known to cause specific learning and memory impairment which imitate the disease pathology of Parkinson's disease dementia and Alzheimer's disease dementia. Apart from these toxins, several other toxins come under a miscellaneous category like an environmental pollutant, snake venoms, botulinum, and lipopolysaccharide. This review will focus on the various classes of neurotoxin models for learning and memory impairment with their specific mechanism of action that could assist the process of drug discovery and development for dementia and cognitive disorders. PMID:27598124

  5. Experimental studies toward the characterization of Inmetro's circulating water channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, A. M.; Alho, A. T. P.; Garcia, D. A.; Farias, M. H.; Massari, P. L.; Silva, V. V. S.

    2016-07-01

    Circulating water channels are facilities which can be used for conducting environmental, metrological and engineering studies. The Brazilian National Institute of Metrology-INMETRO has a water channel of innovative design, and the present work deals with the prior experimental investigation of its hydrodynamics performance. By using the optical technique PIV - Particle Image Velocimetry, under certain conditions, the velocity profile behavior in a region inside the channel was analyzed in order to evaluate the scope of applicability of such bench.

  6. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  7. Combined experimental/analytical modeling using component mode synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L.; Miller, A.K.

    1984-04-01

    This study evaluates the accuracy of computed modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained from a combined experimental/analytical model for a simple beam structure. The structure was divided into two subsystems and one subsystem was tested to obtain its free-free modes. Using a Component Mode Synthesis (CMS) technique, the experimental modal data base for one subsystem was directly coupled with a finite element model of the other subsystem to create an experimental/analytical model of the total structure. Both the translational and rotational elements of the residual flexibilities and mode shapes at the interface of the experimental subsystem were measured and used in the coupling. The modal frequencies and mode shapes obtained for the combined experimental/analytical model are compared to those for a reference finite element model of the entire structure. The sensitivity of the CMS model predictions to errors in the modal parameters and residual flexibilities, which are required to define a subsystem, is also examined.

  8. Experimental techniques in ultrasonics for NDE and material characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittmann, B. R.

    A development status evaluation is presented for ultrasonics NDE characterization of aerospace alloys and composites in such application as the Space Shuttle, Space Station Freedom, and hypersonic aircraft. The use of such NDE techniques extends to composite-cure monitoring, postmanufacturing quality assurance, and in-space service inspection of such materials as graphite/epoxy, Ti alloys, and Al honeycomb. Attention is here given to the spectroscopy of elastically scattered wave pulses from flaws, the acoustical imaging of flaws in honeycomb structures, and laser-based ultrasonics for the noncontact inspection of composite structures.

  9. Experimental characterization of solid propellants combustion by digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun; Powell, Michael; Gao, Jian; Gunduz, Ibrahim; Guildenbecher, Daniel; Son, Steve

    2014-11-01

    Aluminum and other additions are widely used in solid propellants to improve performance. In this study, we apply digital holography as a three-dimensional diagnostic tool to characterize the burning of composite solid propellants with addition of different composite particles. Structures around the burning surfaces and reaction zones are identified, whereas the drop morphologies and their size/velocity distributions are quantified. The nano-second exposure of this imaging technique enables time-freezing measurements of the highly dynamic combustion process. The results are compared with discoveries from high-speed imaging. This technique is also applied to study the combustions of solid propellants under high-pressure environment.

  10. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb-mass/yr. to about 1 lb-mass/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  11. Analytical and Experimental Studies of Leak Location and Environment Characterization for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.; Abel, Joshua C.; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system.An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (directionality).The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbmyr. to about 1 lbmday. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ramwake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  12. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    SciTech Connect

    Woronowicz, Michael; Blackmon, Rebecca; Brown, Martin; Abel, Joshua; Hawk, Doug; Autrey, David; Glenn, Jodie; Bond, Tim; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; Ma, Jonathan; Rossetti, Dino; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Mohammed, Jelila; Montt de Garcia, Kristina; Perry, Radford; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-09

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH{sub 3} coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations (“directionality”). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lb{sub m/}/yr. to about 1 lb{sub m}/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  13. Analytical and experimental studies of leak location and environment characterization for the international space station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woronowicz, Michael; Abel, Joshua; Autrey, David; Blackmon, Rebecca; Bond, Tim; Brown, Martin; Buffington, Jesse; Cheng, Edward; DeLatte, Danielle; Garcia, Kelvin; Glenn, Jodie; Hawk, Doug; Ma, Jonathan; Mohammed, Jelila; de Garcia, Kristina Montt; Perry, Radford; Rossetti, Dino; Tull, Kimathi; Warren, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The International Space Station program is developing a robotically-operated leak locator tool to be used externally. The tool would consist of a Residual Gas Analyzer for partial pressure measurements and a full range pressure gauge for total pressure measurements. The primary application is to demonstrate the ability to detect NH3 coolant leaks in the ISS thermal control system. An analytical model of leak plume physics is presented that can account for effusive flow as well as plumes produced by sonic orifices and thruster operations. This model is used along with knowledge of typical RGA and full range gauge performance to analyze the expected instrument sensitivity to ISS leaks of various sizes and relative locations ("directionality"). The paper also presents experimental results of leak simulation testing in a large thermal vacuum chamber at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This test characterized instrument sensitivity as a function of leak rates ranging from 1 lbm//yr. to about 1 lbm/day. This data may represent the first measurements collected by an RGA or ion gauge system monitoring off-axis point sources as a function of location and orientation. Test results are compared to the analytical model and used to propose strategies for on-orbit leak location and environment characterization using the proposed instrument while taking into account local ISS conditions and the effects of ram/wake flows and structural shadowing within low Earth orbit.

  14. Experimental characterization of commercially practical magnetorheological fluid damper technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelso, Shawn P.

    2001-06-01

    As technologies for magnetorheological (MR) fluid hardware further evolve towards commercial adoption, the appeal for simpler, more cost-effective solutions becomes evident. While the skills involved in methods of manufacturing and cost-reduction efforts for mass production lie with the manufacturing community, practical and cost-effective MR technologies must first exist. As part of a 'whole approach' MR solution, the MR damper technology presented in this paper illustrates the development of a fast-response, low-power, cost-effective solution. Fundamentally, a competitive 'whole approach' active or semi-active MR solution can be viewed as system of separate components: parameter sensing, intelligent control, power delivery, and MR hardware technology. The development of any one single component should not successfully evolve without the addressing the cost efficiency and commercialization concerns of the other three. The MR hardware component should be predictable in performance behavior, capable of high damping force at minimal power, and fast in time response to complement simplified control schemes. The design effort is further challenged to meet these requirements within a simple, cost-effective package that holds commercial development appeal. This research includes the characterization of a new prototype MR damper including a description of the device technology, characterization test results and current work. It is evident by these results that this MR technology, comprising simple, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components where possible, presents an attractive, practical and cost effective component of the 'whole approach' MR solution.

  15. Experimental verification of the SP-100 TEM pump analytical models

    SciTech Connect

    Salamah, S.A.; Miller, D.D.; Sinha, U.N.; Narkiewicz, R.S. )

    1993-01-15

    Validation of the TEM pump analytical model is conducted via experimental verification of the model prediction. Two key tests that have provided essential information toward this objective are the Magnetic Bench Test (MBT) and the ElectroMagnetic Integration Test (EMIT). The tests are briefly described and experimental results are compared with predictions of simulation models that form part of overall TEM pump performance model.

  16. Experimental characterization of variable output refractive beamshapers using freeform elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Jason A.; Smilie, Paul J.; Dutterer, Brian S.; Davies, Matthew A.; Suleski, Thomas J.

    2014-09-01

    We present experimental results from variable output refractive beam shapers based on freeform optical surfaces. Two freeform elements in close proximity comprise a beam shaper that maps a circular Gaussian input to a circular `flat-top' output. Different lateral relative shifts between the elements result in a varying output diameter while maintaining the uniform irradiance distribution. We fabricated the beam shaping elements in PMMA using multi-axis milling on a Moore Nanotech 350FG diamond machining center and tested with a 632.8 nm Gaussian input. Initial optical testing confirmed both the predicted beam shaping and variable functionality, but with poor output uniformity. The effects of surface finish on optical performance were investigated using LightTrans VirtualLabTM to perform physical optics simulations of the milled freeform surfaces. These simulations provided an optimization path for determining machining parameters to improve the output uniformity of the beam shaping elements. A second variable beam shaper based on a super-Gaussian output was designed and fabricated using the newly determined machining parameters. Experimental test results from the second beam shaper showed outputs with significantly higher quality, but also suggest additional areas of study for further improvements in uniformity.

  17. Experimental characterization of a binary actuated parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppe, Carbone

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the BAPAMAN (Binary Actuated Parallel MANipulator) series of parallel manipulators that has been conceived at Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM). Basic common characteristics of BAPAMAN series are described. In particular, it is outlined the use of a reduced number of active degrees of freedom, the use of design solutions with flexural joints and Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators for achieving miniaturization, cost reduction and easy operation features. Given the peculiarities of BAPAMAN architecture, specific experimental tests have been proposed and carried out with the aim to validate the proposed design and to evaluate the practical operation performance and the characteristics of a built prototype, in particular, in terms of operation and workspace characteristics.

  18. Nonlinear acoustics experimental characterization of microstructure evolution in Inconel 617

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Xiaochu; Liu, Yang; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2014-02-18

    Inconel 617 is a candidate material for the intermediate heat exchanger in a very high temperature reactor for the next generation nuclear power plant. This application will require the material to withstand fatigue-ratcheting interaction at temperatures up to 950°C. Therefore nondestructive evaluation and structural health monitoring are important capabilities. Acoustic nonlinearity (which is quantified in terms of a material parameter, the acoustic nonlinearity parameter, β) has been proven to be sensitive to microstructural changes in material. This research develops a robust experimental procedure to track the evolution of damage precursors in laboratory tested Inconel 617 specimens using ultrasonic bulk waves. The results from the acoustic non-linear tests are compared with stereoscope surface damage results. Therefore, the relationship between acoustic nonlinearity and microstructural evaluation can be clearly demonstrated for the specimens tested.

  19. Experimental characterization of a binary actuated parallel manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuseppe, Carbone

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the BAPAMAN (Binary Actuated Parallel MANipulator) series of parallel manipulators that has been conceived at Laboratory of Robotics and Mechatronics (LARM). Basic common characteristics of BAPAMAN series are described. In particular, it is outlined the use of a reduced number of active degrees of freedom, the use of design solutions with flexural joints and Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) actuators for achieving miniaturization, cost reduction and easy operation features. Given the peculiarities of BAPAMAN architecture, specific experimental tests have been proposed and carried out with the aim to validate the proposed design and to evaluate the practical operation performance and the characteristics of a built prototype, in particular, in terms of operation and workspace characteristics.

  20. Experimental Dynamic Characterization of a Reconfigurable Adaptive Precision Truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkle, J. D.; Peterson, L. D.

    1994-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a reconfigurable adaptive truss structure with non-linear joints is investigated. The objective is to experimentally examine the effects of the local non-linearities on the global dynamics of the structure. Amplitude changes in the frequency response functions are measured at micron levels of motion. The amplitude and frequency variations of a number of modes indicate a non-linear Coulomb friction response. Hysteretic bifurcation behavior is also measured at an amplitude approximately equal to the specified free-play in the joint. Under the 1 g pre-load, however, the non-linearity was dominantly characteristic of Coulomb friction with little evidence of free-play stiffening.

  1. Accurate theoretical and experimental characterization of optical grating coupler.

    PubMed

    Fesharaki, Faezeh; Hossain, Nadir; Vigne, Sebastien; Chaker, Mohamed; Wu, Ke

    2016-09-01

    Periodic structures, acting as reflectors, filters, and couplers, are a fundamental building block section in many optical devices. In this paper, a three-dimensional simulation of a grating coupler, a well-known periodic structure, is conducted. Guided waves and leakage characteristics of an out-of-plane grating coupler are studied in detail, and its coupling efficiency is examined. Furthermore, a numerical calibration analysis is applied through a commercial software package on the basis of a full-wave finite-element method to calculate the complex propagation constant of the structure and to evaluate the radiation pattern. For experimental evaluation, an optimized grating coupler is fabricated using electron-beam lithography technique and plasma etching. An excellent agreement between simulations and measurements is observed, thereby validating the demonstrated method. PMID:27607706

  2. Experimental characterization of the water transport properties of PEM fuel cells diffusion media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Sole, Joshua D.; Hernandez-Guerrero, Abel; Ellis, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    A full experimental characterization of the liquid water transport properties of Toray TGP-090 paper is carried out in this work. Porosity, capillary pressure curves (capillary pressure-saturation relationships), absolute permeability, and relative permeability are obtained via experimental procedures. Porosity was determined using two methods, both aimed to obtain the solid volume of the network of fibers comprising the carbon paper. Capillary pressure curves were obtained using a gas displacement porosimeter where liquid water is injected using a syringe pump and the capillary pressure is recorded using a differential pressure transducer. Absolute and relative permeability were also measured with an apparatus designed at Virginia Tech. Absolute permeability was calculated at different flow rates using nitrogen. On the other hand, relative permeability was a more complicated task to carry out giving the complexity (two-phase flow condition) of this property. All of the water transport properties of Toray TGP-090 were studied under the effects of wet-proofing (PTFE treatment) and compression. Some observations were that wet-proofing reduces the porosity of the raw material, increases the hydrophobicity (Pc-S curves), and reduces the permeability of the material. Similar effects were observed for compression, where compressed material exhibited trends similar to those of wet-proofing effects. The results presented here will allow a more accurate modeling of PEMFCs, providing an experimentally verified alternative to the assumptions frequently employed.

  3. Finding the right balance between groundwater model complexity and experimental effort via Bayesian model selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöniger, Anneli; Illman, Walter A.; Wöhling, Thomas; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater modelers face the challenge of how to assign representative parameter values to the studied aquifer. Several approaches are available to parameterize spatial heterogeneity in aquifer parameters. They differ in their conceptualization and complexity, ranging from homogeneous models to heterogeneous random fields. While it is common practice to invest more effort into data collection for models with a finer resolution of heterogeneities, there is a lack of advice which amount of data is required to justify a certain level of model complexity. In this study, we propose to use concepts related to Bayesian model selection to identify this balance. We demonstrate our approach on the characterization of a heterogeneous aquifer via hydraulic tomography in a sandbox experiment (Illman et al., 2010). We consider four increasingly complex parameterizations of hydraulic conductivity: (1) Effective homogeneous medium, (2) geology-based zonation, (3) interpolation by pilot points, and (4) geostatistical random fields. First, we investigate the shift in justified complexity with increasing amount of available data by constructing a model confusion matrix. This matrix indicates the maximum level of complexity that can be justified given a specific experimental setup. Second, we determine which parameterization is most adequate given the observed drawdown data. Third, we test how the different parameterizations perform in a validation setup. The results of our test case indicate that aquifer characterization via hydraulic tomography does not necessarily require (or justify) a geostatistical description. Instead, a zonation-based model might be a more robust choice, but only if the zonation is geologically adequate.

  4. Multimode model based defect characterization in composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, R.; Holland, S.; Gregory, E.

    2016-02-01

    A newly-initiated research program for model-based defect characterization in CFRP composites is summarized. The work utilizes computational models of the interaction of NDE probing energy fields (ultrasound and thermography), to determine 1) the measured signal dependence on material and defect properties (forward problem), and 2) an assessment of performance-critical defect properties from analysis of measured NDE signals (inverse problem). Work is reported on model implementation for inspection of CFRP laminates containing delamination and porosity. Forward predictions of measurement response are presented, as well as examples of model-based inversion of measured data for the estimation of defect parameters.

  5. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, N. A. S.; Rokosz, M. K.; Correia, T. M.

    2014-07-01

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  6. Experimentally validated finite element model of electrocaloric multilayer ceramic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, N. A. S. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk Correia, T. M. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk; Rokosz, M. K. E-mail: maciej.rokosz@npl.co.uk

    2014-07-28

    A novel finite element model to simulate the electrocaloric response of a multilayer ceramic capacitor (MLCC) under real environment and operational conditions has been developed. The two-dimensional transient conductive heat transfer model presented includes the electrocaloric effect as a source term, as well as accounting for radiative and convective effects. The model has been validated with experimental data obtained from the direct imaging of MLCC transient temperature variation under application of an electric field. The good agreement between simulated and experimental data, suggests that the novel experimental direct measurement methodology and the finite element model could be used to support the design of optimised electrocaloric units and operating conditions.

  7. Dynamic mechanical characterization and modelling of polypropylene based organoclay nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kui; Matadi Boumbimba, Rodrigue; Bahlouli, Nadia; Ahzi, Said; Muller, René

    2015-09-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic behaviour of polypropylene based organoclay nanocomposite, the polypropylene matrix and a master batch of polypropylene modified anhydrid maleic were mixed by means of melt mixing technique. The experimental characterization was performed by using split Hopkinson pressure bars (SHPB), at different strain rates and temperatures. A significant increase of the yield stress of nanocomposite was shown with the present of organoclay, comparing to neat PP. A three-phase approach based on the micromechanical formulation of the cooperative model is proposed to model the yield behaviour of the polymer nanocomposite. Our proposed approach accounts for strain rate and temperature effects as well as the organoclay exfoliation effect. The predictions of models for the nanocomposite yield behaviour showed a good agreement with experimental data.

  8. Preform Characterization in VARTM Process Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimsley, Brian W.; Cano, Roberto J.; Hubert, Pascal; Loos, Alfred C.; Kellen, Charles B.; Jensen, Brian J.

    2004-01-01

    Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) is a Liquid Composite Molding (LCM) process where both resin injection and fiber compaction are achieved under pressures of 101.3 kPa or less. Originally developed over a decade ago for marine composite fabrication, VARTM is now considered a viable process for the fabrication of aerospace composites (1,2). In order to optimize and further improve the process, a finite element analysis (FEA) process model is being developed to include the coupled phenomenon of resin flow, preform compaction and resin cure. The model input parameters are obtained from resin and fiber-preform characterization tests. In this study, the compaction behavior and the Darcy permeability of a commercially available carbon fabric are characterized. The resulting empirical model equations are input to the 3- Dimensional Infiltration, version 5 (3DINFILv.5) process model to simulate infiltration of a composite panel.

  9. A new laboratory-scale experimental facility for detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Garcia, Fabrisio; Santiago, Sergio; Luque, Salvador; Romero, Manuel; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Jose

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes a new modular laboratory-scale experimental facility that was designed to conduct detailed aerothermal characterizations of volumetric absorbers for use in concentrating solar power plants. Absorbers are generally considered to be the element with the highest potential for efficiency gains in solar thermal energy systems. The configu-ration of volumetric absorbers enables concentrated solar radiation to penetrate deep into their solid structure, where it is progressively absorbed, prior to being transferred by convection to a working fluid flowing through the structure. Current design trends towards higher absorber outlet temperatures have led to the use of complex intricate geometries in novel ceramic and metallic elements to maximize the temperature deep inside the structure (thus reducing thermal emission losses at the front surface and increasing efficiency). Although numerical models simulate the conjugate heat transfer mechanisms along volumetric absorbers, they lack, in many cases, the accuracy that is required for precise aerothermal validations. The present work aims to aid this objective by the design, development, commissioning and operation of a new experimental facility which consists of a 7 kWe (1.2 kWth) high flux solar simulator, a radiation homogenizer, inlet and outlet collector modules and a working section that can accommodate volumetric absorbers up to 80 mm × 80 mm in cross-sectional area. Experimental measurements conducted in the facility include absorber solid temperature distributions along its depth, inlet and outlet air temperatures, air mass flow rate and pressure drop, incident radiative heat flux, and overall thermal efficiency. In addition, two windows allow for the direct visualization of the front and rear absorber surfaces, thus enabling full-coverage surface temperature measurements by thermal imaging cameras. This paper presents the results from the aerothermal characterization of a siliconized silicon

  10. Experimental characterization of wingtip vortices in the near field using smoke flow visualizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano-Aguilera, J. J.; García-Ortiz, J. Hermenegildo; Gallardo-Claros, A.; Parras, L.; del Pino, C.

    2016-08-01

    In order to predict the axial development of the wingtip vortices strength, an accurate theoretical model is required. Several experimental techniques have been used to that end, e.g. PIV or hot-wire anemometry, but they imply a significant cost and effort. For this reason, we have performed experiments using the smoke-wire technique to visualize smoke streaks in six planes perpendicular to the main stream flow direction. Using this visualization technique, we obtained quantitative information regarding the vortex velocity field by means of Batchelor's model for two chord-based Reynolds numbers, Re_c=3.33× 10^4 and 10^5. Therefore, this theoretical vortex model has been introduced in the integration of ordinary differential equations which describe the temporal evolution of streak lines as function of two parameters: the swirl number, S, and the virtual axial origin, overline{z_0}. We have applied two different procedures to minimize the distance between experimental and theoretical flow patterns: individual curve fitting at six different control planes in the streamwise direction and the global curve fitting which corresponds to all the control planes simultaneously. Both sets of results have been compared with those provided by del Pino et al. (Phys Fluids 23(013):602, 2011b. doi: 10.1063/1.3537791), finding good agreement. Finally, we have observed a weak influence of the Reynolds number on the values S and overline{z_0} at low-to-moderate Re_c. This experimental technique is proposed as a low cost alternative to characterize wingtip vortices based on flow visualizations.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Characterization of the Pediatric Pump-Lung

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhongjun J; Gellman, Barry; Zhang, Tao; Taskin, M Ertan; Dasse, Kurt A.; Griffith, Bartley P.

    2014-01-01

    The pediatric pump-lung (PediPL) is a miniaturized integrated pediatric pump-oxygenator specifically designed for cardiac or cardiopulmonary support for patients weighing 5-20 kg to allow mobility and extended use for 30 days. The PediPL incorporates a magnetically levitated impeller with uniquely configured hollow fiber membranes into a single unit capable of performing both pumping and gas exchange. A combined computational and experimental study was conducted to characterize the functional and hemocompatibility performances of this newly developed device. The three-dimensional flow features of the PediPL and its hemolytic characteristics were analyzed using computational fluid dynamics based modeling. The oxygen exchange was modeled based on a convection-diffusion-reaction process. The hollow fiber membranes were modeled as a porous medium which incorporates the flow resistance in the bundle by an added momentum sink term. The pumping function was evaluated for the required range of operating conditions (0.5-2.5 L/min and 1000-3000 rpm). The blood damage potentials were further analyzed in terms of flow and shear stress fields, and the calculations of hemolysis index. In parallel, the hydraulic pump performance, oxygen transfer and hemolysis level were quantified experimentally. Based on the computational and experimental results, the PediPL device is found to be functional to provide necessary oxygen transfer and blood pumping requirements for the pediatric patients. Smooth blood flow characteristics and low blood damage potential were observed in the entire device. The in-vitro tests further confirmed that the PediPL can provide adequate blood pumping and oxygen transfer over the range of intended operating conditions with acceptable hemolytic performance. The rated flow rate for oxygenation is 2.5 L/min. The normalized index of hemolysis is 0.065 g/100L at 1.0 L/min and 3000 rpm. PMID:24839468

  12. A new experimental method for the accelerated characterization of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeow, Y. T.; Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of composite materials for a variety of practical structural applications is presented and the need for an accelerated characterization procedure is assessed. A new experimental and analytical method is presented which allows the prediction of long term properties from short term tests. Some preliminary experimental results are presented.

  13. Material characterization and modeling with shear ography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Callahan, Virginia

    1993-01-01

    Shearography has emerged as a useful technique for nondestructible evaluation and materials characterization of aerospace materials. A suitable candidate for the technique is to determine the response of debonds on foam-metal interfaces such as the TPS system on the External Tank. The main thrust is to develop a model which allows valid interpretation of shearographic information on TPS type systems. Confirmation of the model with shearographic data will be performed.

  14. Gear Windage Modeling Progress - Experimental Validation Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunz, Rob; Handschuh, Robert F.

    2008-01-01

    In the Subsonics Rotary Wing (SRW) Project being funded for propulsion work at NASA Glenn Research Center, performance of the propulsion system is of high importance. In current rotorcraft drive systems many gearing components operate at high rotational speed (pitch line velocity > 24000 ft/ min). In our testing of high speed helical gear trains at NASA Glenn we have found that the work done on the air - oil mist within the gearbox can become a significant part of the power loss of the system. This loss mechanism is referred to as windage. The effort described in this presentation is to try to understand the variables that affect windage, develop a good experimental data base to validate, the analytical project being conducted at Penn State University by Dr. Rob Kunz under a NASA SRW NRA. The presentation provides an update to the status of these efforts.

  15. The experimental determination of coal models

    SciTech Connect

    Bollinger, K.; Snowden, H.

    1983-06-01

    This paper describes the experimental measurement of coal-mill transfer functions at a 380 Mw steam turbine generator of TransAlta Utilities in Canada. Measurement equipment was used that estimated the parameters of the transfer functions from digitized transients obtained during on-site tests. These preliminary tests were part of a sequence of tests that were undertaken to evaluate the use of feedforward control to maintain the output temperature of the coal-air mixture at a fixed level. The measurement technique used to obtain the coal-mill transfer functions utilizes Least Squares Parameter Estimation (LSPE) concepts. The microprocessor-based system with the LSPE algorithm enabled the parameters to be obtained while the coal-mill was operating online. The transfer functions obtained during these field tests allowed feedforward controllers to be designed that gave improved performance of the coal-mill.

  16. Ideal Experimental Rat Models for Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Woo; Kim, Sung Hoon; Min, Seon Ok; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2011-05-01

    There are many limitations for conducting liver disease research in human beings due to the high cost and potential ethical issues. For this reason, conducting a study that is difficult to perform in humans using appropriate animal models, can be beneficial in ascertaining the pathological physiology, and in developing new treatment modalities. However, it is difficult to determine the appropriate animal model which is suitable for research purposes, since every patient has different and diverse clinical symptoms, adverse reactions, and complications due to the pathological physiology. Also, it is not easy to reproduce identically various clinical situations in animal models. Recently, the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals has tightened up the regulations, and therefore it is advisable to select the appropriate animals and decide upon the appropriate quantities through scientific and systemic considerations before conducting animal testing. Therefore, in this review article the authors examined various white rat animal testing models and determined the appropriate usable rat model, and the pros and cons of its application in liver disease research. The authors believe that this review will be beneficial in selecting proper laboratory animals for research purposes. PMID:26421020

  17. Experimental evaluations of the microchannel flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, K. J.

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances have enabled a new wave of biomechanics measurements, and have renewed interest in selecting appropriate rheological models for soft tissues such as the liver, thyroid, and prostate. The microchannel flow model was recently introduced to describe the linear response of tissue to stimuli such as stress relaxation or shear wave propagation. This model postulates a power law relaxation spectrum that results from a branching distribution of vessels and channels in normal soft tissue such as liver. In this work, the derivation is extended to determine the explicit link between the distribution of vessels and the relaxation spectrum. In addition, liver tissue is modified by temperature or salinity, and the resulting changes in tissue responses (by factors of 1.5 or greater) are reasonably predicted from the microchannel flow model, simply by considering the changes in fluid flow through the modified samples. The 2 and 4 parameter versions of the model are considered, and it is shown that in some cases the maximum time constant (corresponding to the minimum vessel diameters), could be altered in a way that has major impact on the observed tissue response. This could explain why an inflamed region is palpated as a harder bump compared to surrounding normal tissue.

  18. Characterization of experimentally induced, nonaflatoxigenic variant strains of Aspergillus parasiticus.

    PubMed Central

    Kale, S P; Cary, J W; Bhatnagar, D; Bennett, J W

    1996-01-01

    Six previously isolated, nonaflatoxigenic variants of Aspergillus parasiticus, designated sec mutants, were characterized morphologically by electron microscopy, biochemically by biotransformation studies with an aflatoxin precursor, and genetically by Northern (RNA) hybridization analysis of aflatoxin biosynthetic gene transcripts. Scanning electron micrographs clearly demonstrated that compared with the parental sec+ forms, the variant sec forms had an abundance of vegetative mycelia, orders of magnitude reduced number of conidiophores and conidia, and abnormal metulae. Conidiospores were detected in sec cultures only at higher magnifications (x 500), in contrast to the sec+ (wild-type) strain, in which abundant conidiospores (masking the vegetative mycelia) were observed at even lower magnifications (x 300). All sec+ forms, but none of the sec forms, showed bioconversion of sterigmatocystin to aflatoxins. Northern blots probed with pathway genes demonstrated lack of expression of both the aflatoxin biosynthetic pathway structural (nor-1 and omtA) and regulatory (aflR) genes in the sec forms; PCR and Southern hybridization analysis confirmed the presence of the genes in the sec genomes. Thus, the loss of aflatoxigenic capabilities in the sec form is correlated with alterations in the conidial morphology of the fungus, suggesting that the regulation of aflatoxin synthesis and conidiogenesis may be interlinked. PMID:8795232

  19. Experimental characterization of PZT fibers using IDE electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyckoff, Nicholas; Ben Atitallah, Hassene; Ounaies, Zoubeida

    2016-04-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) fibers are mainly used in active fiber composites (AFC) where they are embedded in a polymer matrix. Interdigitated electrodes (IDE) along the direction of the fibers are used to achieve planar actuation, hereby exploiting the d33 coefficient of PZT. When embedded in the AFC, the PZT fibers are subjected to mechanical loading as well as non-uniform electric field as a result of the IDEs. Therefore, it is important to characterize the electrical and electromechanical behavior of these fibers ex-situ using the IDE electrodes to assess the impact of nonuniform electric field on the properties of the fibers. For that reason, this work aims at quantifying the impact of IDE electrodes on the electrical and electromechanical behavior of PZT fibers, which is necessary for their successful implementation in devices like AFC. The tested fibers were purchased from Advanced Cerametrics and they have an average diameter of 250 micrometers. The IDE electrodes were screen printed on an acrylic substrate. The PZT fibers were subjected to frequency sweeps at low voltages to determine permittivity for parallel and interdigitated electrodes. The piezoelectric e33 constant is determined from electromechanical testing of PZT fibers in parallel electrodes to compare the electromechanical behavior for PZT in bulk and fiber form. The dielectric constant and e33 were found to be lower for the IDE and parallel electrodes compared to bulk but comparable to results published in literature.

  20. High temperature experimental characterization of microscale thermoelectric effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favaloro, Tela

    Thermoelectric devices have been employed for many years as a reliable energy conversion technology for applications ranging from the cooling of sensors or charge coupled devices to the direct conversion of heat into electricity for remote power generation. However, its relatively low conversion efficiency has limited the implementation of thermoelectric materials for large scale cooling and waste heat recovery applications. Recent advances in semiconductor growth technology have enabled the precise and selective engineering of material properties to improve the thermoelectric figure of merit and thus the efficiency of thermoelectric devices. Accurate characterization at the intended operational temperature of novel thermoelectric materials is a crucial component of the optimization process in order to fundamentally understand material behavior and evaluate performance. The objective of this work is to provide the tools necessary to characterize high efficiency bulk and thin-film materials for thermoelectric energy conversion. The techniques developed here are not bound to specific material or devices, but can be generalized to any material system. Thermoreflectance imaging microscopy has proven to be invaluable for device thermometry owing to its high spatial and temporal resolutions. It has been utilized in this work to create two-dimensional temperature profiles of thermoelectric devices during operation used for performance analysis of novel materials, identification of defects, and visualization of high speed transients in a high-temperature imaging thermostat. We report the development of a high temperature imaging thermostat capable of high speed transient thermoelectric characterization. In addition, we present a noninvasive method for thermoreflectance coefficient calibration ideally suited for vacuum and thus high temperature employment. This is the first analysis of the thermoreflectance coefficient of commonly used metals at high-temperatures. High

  1. Experimental Design and Multiplexed Modeling Using Titrimetry and Spreadsheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Peter De B.; Kolbrich, Erin; Cline, Jennifer

    2002-07-01

    The topics of experimental design and modeling are important for inclusion in the undergraduate curriculum. Many general chemistry and quantitative analysis courses introduce students to spreadsheet programs, such as MS Excel. Students in the laboratory sections of these courses use titrimetry as a quantitative measurement method. Unfortunately, the only model that students may be exposed to in introductory chemistry courses is the working curve that uses the linear model. A novel experiment based on a multiplex model has been devised for titrating several vinegar samples at a time. The multiplex titration can be applied to many other routine determinations. An experimental design model is fit to titrimetric measurements using the MS Excel LINEST function to estimate concentration from each sample. This experiment provides valuable lessons in error analysis, Class A glassware tolerances, experimental simulation, statistics, modeling, and experimental design.

  2. Cholinesterase in porcine saliva: Analytical characterization and behavior after experimental stress.

    PubMed

    Tecles, Fernando; Escribano, Damián; Martínez-Miró, Silvia; Hernández, Fuensanta; Contreras, María Dolores; Cerón, José Joaquín

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure and characterize the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) in porcine saliva, as well as to evaluate its behavior in experimental stressful conditions. The results of ChE characterization by using different substrates and the selective inhibitors ethopropazine and physostigmine showed that the main enzyme existing in porcine saliva was butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). An automated assay using butyrylthiocholine iodide as substrate was validated providing adequate reproducibility, linearity results and limit of detection. Salivary ChE was measured using the validated assay in two models of acute stress: twenty pigs stressed for 2min with a nasal snare and other twenty pigs subjected to a short-term road transport. Salivary ChE significantly increased after restraint and transport stress in pigs, as well as the ChE to total protein ratio. In conclusion, BChE is the predominant isoenzyme in porcine saliva, it can be measured by the fast, simple and automated method described in this paper and it increases in the models of stress used in this study. PMID:27234531

  3. Experimental Studies on Magnetorheological Model Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendler, Alexandra-Maria; Böse, Holger

    Magnetorheological model suspensions with different contents of iron particles have been investigated. The results show an increase of the shear stress by increasing the magnetic field and the solid content, which was mathematically modelled. The influence of the solid content is approximately exponential without magnetic field and linear in strong magnetic fields. The effect of the temperature and of the base oil viscosity on the shear stress is negligible in the field but decisive without field. The sedimentation behavior also strongly depends on the iron particle content, where MR fluids with a higher concentration settle with a lower intensity due to the higher sediment height. The response time of the magnetorheological model suspensions could not be clearly determined, but it is less than 10 milliseconds.

  4. Experimental and Numerical Characterization of High Heat Fluxes During Transient Blackbody Calibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdelmessih, Amanie N.; Horn, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    High heat fluxes are encountered in numerous applications, such as hypersonic vehicles in flight, fires, and engines, Calibration of heat flux gages may be performed in a dual cavity cylindrical blackbody resulting in a transient calibration environment. To characterize the transient heat fluxes. experiments were performed on a dual cavity cylindrical blackbody at nominal temperatures varying from 800 C to 1900 C in increments of 100 C. Based on experiments, the optimum heat flux sensor insertion location as measured from the center partition was determined. The pre-insertion steady state axial temperature profile is compared experimentally, numerically, and analytically. The effect of convection in the blackbody cavity during the insertion is calculated and found to be less than 2 per cent. Also, an empirical correlation for predicting the emissivity of the blackbody is included. Detailed transient thermal models have been developed to simulate the heat flux calibration process at two extreme fluxes. The high (1MW/sq m) and relatively low (70 kw/sq m) fluxes are reported in this article. The transient models show the effect of inserting a heat flux gage at room temperature on the thermal equilibrium of the blackbody at 1800 C and 800 C nominal temperatures, respectively. Also, heat flux sensor outputs are derived from computed sensor temperature distributions and compared to experimental results.

  5. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  6. New experimental correlations to characterize compressible flow losses at 90-degree T-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Garcia, J.; Viedma, A.

    2009-01-15

    New experimental correlations to characterize energy losses in adiabatic compressible flow at 90-degree T-junctions and their expanded uncertainties are presented. These new correlations are based on a new linking between branches coefficient definition, K, and show a logarithmic relationship with mass flow rate ratio between branches, q, and the extrapolated Mach number in the common branch, M{sub 3}{sup *}, for all the different flow types studied. The extrapolated properties up to the junction are calculated, from measurement sections, subtracting the frictional losses using the Fanno fluid flow model. These two parameters or global correlations, K = K(M{sub 3}{sup *},q), can be easily implemented as boundary conditions into 1-D global simulation codes. (author)

  7. Software reliability: Repetitive run experimentation and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Skrivan, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    A software experiment conducted with repetitive run sampling is reported. Independently generated input data was used to verify that interfailure times are very nearly exponentially distributed and to obtain good estimates of the failure rates of individual errors and demonstrate how widely they vary. This fact invalidates many of the popular software reliability models now in use. The log failure rate of interfailure time was nearly linear as a function of the number of errors corrected. A new model of software reliability is proposed that incorporates these observations.

  8. Determining the representative volume element size for three-dimensional microstructural material characterization. Part 2: Application to experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.

    2015-05-01

    Improved microstructural imaging and characterization methods have recently opened the door for quantitative evaluation of microstructures of such functional materials as solid oxide fuel cell and battery electrodes and composite gas separation membranes. Accurate quantitative characterization of these structures relies on the concept of a representative volume element (RVE) to provide a sufficiently large sample to be statistically representative of the material. In Part 1 of this work, several models were described to determine the RVE size for several common microstructural properties: volume fraction, particle size, and network contiguity. In this work, extensive synchrotron X-ray nanotomography imaging of a multiphase composite gas separation membrane is used to provide an experimental comparison to the model predictions. Results suggest that the models provide a reasonable estimate of RVE size, and can serve as a starting point for researchers planning imaging and characterization experiments.

  9. Experimental Control of Simple Pendulum Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medina, C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper conveys information about a Physics laboratory experiment for students with some theoretical knowledge about oscillatory motion. Students construct a simple pendulum that behaves as an ideal one, and analyze model assumption incidence on its period. The following aspects are quantitatively analyzed: vanishing friction, small amplitude,…

  10. Experimental and numerical characterization of the structural dynamics of flapping beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcelik, Orhan; Attar, Peter J.; Altan, M. Cengiz; Johnston, Jordan W.

    2013-10-01

    The nonlinear structural dynamics of a slender beam in flapping motion is examined both experimentally and computationally. In the experiments the periodic flapping motion is imposed on the clamped edge of the cantilever beam using a 4-bar crank-and-rocker mechanism. Aluminum beams with nominal dimensions of 150 mm×25 mm×0.4 mm are tested in air over a range of flapping frequencies up to 1.3 times the linear first modal frequency at two different flapping amplitudes, 15° and 30°. The response of the beam is characterized experimentally through bending strain and tip displacement data obtained from foil strain gage and high-speed camera, respectively. It was determined that for the particular combination of beam specimen (dimensions, material properties) and forcing parameters investigated, all experimental responses were periodic. The frequency response curves based upon the experimental bending strain data reveal a secondary superharmonic peak in addition to the primary resonance peak. As the flapping frequency is increased, the response of the beam is observed to change from symmetric (with respect to equilibrium position) periodic vibrations with a period equal to the flapping period to asymmetric periodic vibrations with higher harmonic content featuring local oscillations in the time histories. Experimental tip displacement results show that the beam spends more time during stroke reversals when the flapping frequency is near primary and secondary resonance regions. In addition to experiment, numerical simulations are performed using two-node, isoparametric degenerate-continuum based geometrically nonlinear beam elements. The HHT-α version of the Newmark finite difference scheme is used to discretize the problem in time and a linear viscous damping model is assumed. Overall the numerical simulations agree well with the experiments and capture most of the nonlinear dynamical features of the beam response. It is, however, found that in resonance regions the