Science.gov

Sample records for experimental configuration analysis

  1. Computational/experimental analysis of three low sonic boom configurations with design modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.

    1992-01-01

    The Euler code, designated AIRPLANE, which uses an unstructured tetrahedral mesh was used to compute near-field sonic boom pressure signatures on three modern low sonic boom configurations: the Mach 2, Mach 3, and Haglund models. The TEAM code which uses a multi-zoned structured grid was used to calculate pressure signatures for the Mach 2 model. The computational pressure signatures for the Mach 2 and Mach 3 models are compared with recent experimental data. The computed pressure signatures were extracted at distances less than one body length below the configuration and extrapolated to the experimental distance. The Mach 2 model was found to have larger overpressures off-ground-track than on-ground-track in both computational and experimental results. The correlations with the experiment were acceptable where the signatures were not contaminated by instrumentation and model-support hardware. AIRPLANE was used to study selected modifications to improve the overpressures of the Mach 2 model.

  2. Design and Computational/Experimental Analysis of Low Sonic Boom Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, Susan E.; Baker, Timothy J.; Hicks, Raymond M.

    1999-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that inviscid CFD codes combined with a planar extrapolation method give accurate sonic boom pressure signatures at distances greater than one body length from supersonic configurations if either adapted grids swept at the approximate Mach angle or very dense non-adapted grids are used. The validation of CFD for computing sonic boom pressure signatures provided the confidence needed to undertake the design of new supersonic transport configurations with low sonic boom characteristics. An aircraft synthesis code in combination with CFD and an extrapolation method were used to close the design. The principal configuration of this study is designated LBWT (Low Boom Wing Tail) and has a highly swept cranked arrow wing with conventional tails, and was designed to accommodate either 3 or 4 engines. The complete configuration including nacelles and boundary layer diverters was evaluated using the AIRPLANE code. This computer program solves the Euler equations on an unstructured tetrahedral mesh. Computations and wind tunnel data for the LBWT and two other low boom configurations designed at NASA Ames Research Center are presented. The two additional configurations are included to provide a basis for comparing the performance and sonic boom level of the LBWT with contemporary low boom designs and to give a broader experiment/CFD correlation study. The computational pressure signatures for the three configurations are contrasted with on-ground-track near-field experimental data from the NASA Ames 9x7 Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel. Computed pressure signatures for the LBWT are also compared with experiment at approximately 15 degrees off ground track.

  3. Absolute configurations of phytotoxic inuloxins B and C based on experimental and computational analysis of chiroptical properties.

    PubMed

    Evidente, Marco; Santoro, Ernesto; Petrovic, Ana G; Cimmino, Alessio; Koshoubu, Jun; Evidente, Antonio; Berova, Nina; Superchi, Stefano

    2016-10-01

    The absolute configuration of phytotoxins inuloxins B and C, produced by Inula viscosa, and with potential herbicidal activity for the management of parasitic plants, has been determined by Time-dependent density functional theory computational prediction of electronic circular dichroism and optical rotatory dispersion spectra. The inuloxin B has been converted to its 5-O-acetyl derivative, which due to its more constrained conformational features facilitated the computational analysis of its chiroptical properties. The analysis based on experimental and computed data led to assignment of absolute configuration to naturally occurring (+)-inuloxin B and (-)-inuloxin C as (7R,8R,10S,11S) and (5S,7S,8S,10S), respectively. PMID:27498046

  4. Experimental and numerical analysis of the wing rock characteristics of a 'wing-body-tail' configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Smith, Brooke C.; Malcolm, Gerald N.

    1993-01-01

    Free-to-roll wind tunnel tests were conducted and a computer simulation exercise was performed in an effort to investigate in detail the mechanism of wing rock on a configuration that consisted of a highly-slender forebody and a 78 deg swept delta wing. In the wind tunnel test, the roll angle and wing surface pressures were measured during the wing rock motion. A limit cycle oscillation was observed for angles of attack between 22 deg and 30 deg. In general, the wind tunnel test confirmed that the main flow phenomena responsible for the wing-body-tail wing rock are the interactions between the forebody and the wing vortices. The variation of roll acceleration (determined from the second derivative of the roll angle time history) with roll angle clearly showed the energy balance necessary to sustain the limit cycle oscillation. Pressure measurements on the wing revealed the hysteresis of the wing rock process. First, second and nth order models for the aerodynamic damping were developed and examined with a one degree of freedom computer simulation. Very good agreement with the observed behavior from the wind tunnel was obtained.

  5. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  6. An experimental and theoretical analysis of the aerodynamic characteristics of a biplane-winglet configuration. M.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gall, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Improving the aerodynamic characteristics of an airplane with respect to maximizing lift and minimizing induced and parasite drag are of primary importance in designing lighter, faster, and more efficient aircraft. Previous research has shown that a properly designed biplane wing system can perform superiorly to an equivalent monoplane system with regard to maximizing the lift-to-drag ratio and efficiency factor. Biplanes offer several potential advantages over equivalent monoplanes, such as a 60-percent reduction in weight, greater structural integrity, and increased roll response. The purpose of this research is to examine, both theoretically and experimentally, the possibility of further improving the aerodynamic characteristics of the biplanes configuration by adding winglets. Theoretical predictions were carried out utilizing vortex-lattice theory, which is a numerical method based on potential flow theory. Experimental data were obtained by testing a model in the Pennsylvania State University's subsonic wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of 510,000. The results showed that the addition of winglets improved the performance of the biplane with respect to increasing the lift-curve slope, increasing the maximum lift coefficient, increasing the efficiency factor, and decreasing the induced drag. A listing of the program is included in the Appendix.

  7. Parametric analysis of ATT configurations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a Lockheed parametric analysis of the performance, environmental factors, and economics of an advanced commercial transport envisioned for operation in the post-1985 time period. The design parameters investigated include cruise speeds from Mach 0.85 to Mach 1.0, passenger capacities from 200 to 500, ranges of 2800 to 5500 nautical miles, and noise level criteria. NASA high performance configurations and alternate configurations are operated over domestic and international route structures. Indirect and direct costs and return on investment are determined for approximately 40 candidate aircraft configurations. The candidate configurations are input to an aircraft sizing and performance program which includes a subroutine for noise criteria. Comparisons are made between preferred configurations on the basis of maximum return on investment as a function of payload, range, and design cruise speed.

  8. Experimental verification of new configurations in the piezoelectric photothermal spectroscopy of semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bychto, L.; Maliński, M.; Zakrzewski, J.; Łegowski, S.; Męczyńska, H.

    2004-10-01

    This paper presents the analysis of two experimental configurations applied in the piezoelectric spectroscopy method. The first configuration called `rear' is normally used in the field of piezoelectric spectroscopy. The second configuration called `front' is a new configuration analyzed by authors. In this paper both advantages and disadvantages of both configurations are described. In this paper both theoretical and experimental spectra measured in these two configurations are presented and compared.

  9. International Space Station Configuration Analysis and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anchondo, Rebekah

    2016-01-01

    Ambitious engineering projects, such as NASA's International Space Station (ISS), require dependable modeling, analysis, visualization, and robotics to ensure that complex mission strategies are carried out cost effectively, sustainably, and safely. Learn how Booz Allen Hamilton's Modeling, Analysis, Visualization, and Robotics Integration Center (MAVRIC) team performs engineering analysis of the ISS Configuration based primarily on the use of 3D CAD models. To support mission planning and execution, the team tracks the configuration of ISS and maintains configuration requirements to ensure operational goals are met. The MAVRIC team performs multi-disciplinary integration and trade studies to ensure future configurations meet stakeholder needs.

  10. Breast tomosynthesis imaging configuration analysis.

    PubMed

    Rayford, Cleveland E; Zhou, Weihua; Chen, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Traditional two-dimensional (2D) X-ray mammography is the most commonly used method for breast cancer diagnosis. Recently, a three-dimensional (3D) Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) system has been invented, which is likely to challenge the current mammography technology. The DBT system provides stunning 3D information, giving physicians increased detail of anatomical information, while reducing the chance of false negative screening. In this research, two reconstruction algorithms, Back Projection (BP) and Shift-And-Add (SAA), were used to investigate and compare View Angle (VA) and the number of projection images (N) with parallel imaging configurations. In addition, in order to better determine which method displayed better-quality imaging, Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) analyses were conducted with both algorithms, ultimately producing results which improve upon better breast cancer detection. Research studies find evidence that early detection of the disease is the best way to conquer breast cancer, and earlier detection results in the increase of life span for the affected person. PMID:23900440

  11. Systematic effects in CALOR simulation code to model experimental configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Job, P.K.; Proudfoot, J. ); Handler, T. . Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Gabriel, T.A. )

    1991-03-27

    CALOR89 code system is being used to simulate test beam results and the design parameters of several calorimeter configurations. It has been bench-marked against the ZEUS, D{theta} and HELIOS data. This study identifies the systematic effects in CALOR simulation to model the experimental configurations. Five major systematic effects are identified. These are the choice of high energy nuclear collision model, material composition, scintillator saturation, shower integration time, and the shower containment. Quantitative estimates of these systematic effects are presented. 23 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. An experimental study of several wind tunnel wall configurations using two V/STOL model configurations. [low speed wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binion, T. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in the low speed wind tunnel using two V/STOL models, a jet-flap and a jet-in-fuselage configuration, to search for a wind tunnel wall configuration to minimize wall interference on V/STOL models. Data were also obtained on the jet-flap model with a uniform slotted wall configuration to provide comparisons between theoretical and experimental wall interference. A test section configuration was found which provided some data in reasonable agreement with interference-free results over a wide range of momentum coefficients.

  13. Contaminant plume configuration and movement: an experimental model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alencoao, A.; Reis, A.; Pereira, M. G.; Liberato, M. L. R.; Caramelo, L.; Amraoui, M.; Amorim, V.

    2009-04-01

    The relevance of Science and Technology in our daily routines makes it compulsory to educate citizens who have both scientific literacy and scientific knowledge. These will allow them to be intervening citizens in a constantly changing society. Thus, physical and natural sciences are included in school curricula, both in primary and secondary education, with the fundamental aim of developing in the students the skills, attitudes and knowledge needed for the understanding of the planet Earth and its real problems. On the other hand, teaching in Geosciences is more and more based on practical methodologies which use didactic material, sustaining teachers' pedagogical practices and facilitating students' learning tasks suggested on the syllabus defined for each school level. Themes related to exploring the different components of the Hydrological Cycle and themes related to natural environment protection and preservation, namely water resources and soil contamination by industrial and urban sewage are examples of subject matters included on the Portuguese syllabus. These topics motivated the conception and construction of experimental models for the study of the propagation of pollutants on a porous medium. The experimental models allow inducing a horizontal flux of water though different kinds of permeable substances (e.g. sand, silt), with contamination spots on its surface. These experimental activities facilitate the student to understand the flow path of contaminating substances on the saturated zone and to observe the contaminant plume configuration and movement. The activities are explored in a teaching and learning process perspective where the student builds its own knowledge through real question- problem based learning which relate Science, Technology and Society. These activities have been developed in the framework of project ‘Water in the Environment' (CV/PVI/0854) of the POCTI Program (Programa Operacional "Ciência, Tecnologia, Inovação") financed

  14. Transonic Flow Field Analysis for Wing-Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boppe, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    A computational method for simulating the aerodynamics of wing-fuselage configurations at transonic speeds is developed. The finite difference scheme is characterized by a multiple embedded mesh system coupled with a modified or extended small disturbance flow equation. This approach permits a high degree of computational resolution in addition to coordinate system flexibility for treating complex realistic aircraft shapes. To augment the analysis method and permit applications to a wide range of practical engineering design problems, an arbitrary fuselage geometry modeling system is incorporated as well as methodology for computing wing viscous effects. Configuration drag is broken down into its friction, wave, and lift induced components. Typical computed results for isolated bodies, isolated wings, and wing-body combinations are presented. The results are correlated with experimental data. A computer code which employs this methodology is described.

  15. Configuration analysis of nickel hydrogen cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holleck, G.

    1978-01-01

    The significance of various stack configurations and components on the cycle life for nickel hydrogen cells for synchronous orbit used was evaluated. Failure modes of electrolyte management and 02 management were solved by modifications in the reservoir, the wick, and/or the stack configuration.

  16. Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durham, Michael H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Cazier, F. W., Jr.; Keller, Donald F.; Parker, Ellen C.; Wilkie, W. Keats

    1990-01-01

    The flutter characteristics of a generic arrow-wing supersonic transport configuration are studied. The wing configuration has a 3 percent biconvex airfoil and a leading-edge sweep of 73 deg out to a cranked tip with a 60 deg leading-edge sweep. The ground vibration tests and flutter test procedure are described. The effects of flutter on engine nacelles, fuel loading, wing-mounted vertical fin, wing angle-of-attack, and wing tip mass and stiffness distributions are analyzed. The data reveal that engine nacelles reduce the transonic flutter dynamic pressure by 25-30 percent; fuel loadings decrease dynamic pressures by 25 percent; 4-6 deg wing angles-of-attack cause steep transonic boundaries; and 5-10 percent changes in flutter dynamic pressures are the result of the wing-mounted vertical fin and wing-tip mass and stiffness distributions.

  17. Experimental Configuration Effects on ICE Tumble Flow Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Bryan; Puzinauskas, Paulius

    2014-11-01

    The generation of ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) in-cylinder charge motions, such as swirl and tumble, have shown positive effects on reducing fuel consumption and exhaust emission levels at partial engine loads. Tumble flow is commonly measured utilizing a steady-flow rig and two-dimensional PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) systems, among others. In order to optimize the tumble flow, it is important to retrieve accurate measurements. The tumble flow values could be affected by variations in the geometry and/or design of the steady-flow rig utilized during flow tests. In this research, a four-valve per cylinder head was tested on a steady flow bench, varying several aspects of the configuration to evaluate how they influence bulk momentum as well as PIV measurements. The configuration variations included symmetrical, asymmetrical and runner-fed configurations throughout testing. Volumetric flow rate and tumble strength flow measurements were retrieved at the selected L/D ratios. Additionally, several PIV seeding particles were characterized for size and shape. Corresponding PIV flow measurements using each type of seeding were made to evaluate how the particles influence the results. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported Bryan Santana Rivera as an REU student.

  18. CRANS - CONFIGURABLE REAL-TIME ANALYSIS SYSTEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccluney, K.

    1994-01-01

    In a real-time environment, the results of changes or failures in a complex, interconnected system need evaluation quickly. Tabulations showing the effects of changes and/or failures of a given item in the system are generally only useful for a single input, and only with regard to that item. Subsequent changes become harder to evaluate as combinations of failures produce a cascade effect. When confronted by multiple indicated failures in the system, it becomes necessary to determine a single cause. In this case, failure tables are not very helpful. CRANS, the Configurable Real-time ANalysis System, can interpret a logic tree, constructed by the user, describing a complex system and determine the effects of changes and failures in it. Items in the tree are related to each other by Boolean operators. The user is then able to change the state of these items (ON/OFF FAILED/UNFAILED). The program then evaluates the logic tree based on these changes and determines any resultant changes to other items in the tree. CRANS can also search for a common cause for multiple item failures, and allow the user to explore the logic tree from within the program. A "help" mode and a reference check provide the user with a means of exploring an item's underlying logic from within the program. A commonality check determines single point failures for an item or group of items. Output is in the form of a user-defined matrix or matrices of colored boxes, each box representing an item or set of items from the logic tree. Input is via mouse selection of the matrix boxes, using the mouse buttons to toggle the state of the item. CRANS is written in C-language and requires the MIT X Window System, Version 11 Revision 4 or Revision 5. It requires 78K of RAM for execution and a three button mouse. It has been successfully implemented on Sun4 workstations running SunOS, HP9000 workstations running HP-UX, and DECstations running ULTRIX. No executable is provided on the distribution medium; however

  19. CMS Configuration Editor: GUI based application for user analysis job

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cosa, A.

    2011-12-01

    We present the user interface and the software architecture of the Configuration Editor for the CMS experiment. The analysis workflow is organized in a modular way integrated within the CMS framework that organizes in a flexible way user analysis code. The Python scripting language is adopted to define the job configuration that drives the analysis workflow. It could be a challenging task for users, especially for newcomers, to develop analysis jobs managing the configuration of many required modules. For this reason a graphical tool has been conceived in order to edit and inspect configuration files. A set of common analysis tools defined in the CMS Physics Analysis Toolkit (PAT) can be steered and configured using the Config Editor. A user-defined analysis workflow can be produced starting from a standard configuration file, applying and configuring PAT tools according to the specific user requirements. CMS users can adopt this tool, the Config Editor, to create their analysis visualizing in real time which are the effects of their actions. They can visualize the structure of their configuration, look at the modules included in the workflow, inspect the dependences existing among the modules and check the data flow. They can visualize at which values parameters are set and change them according to what is required by their analysis task. The integration of common tools in the GUI needed to adopt an object-oriented structure in the Python definition of the PAT tools and the definition of a layer of abstraction from which all PAT tools inherit.

  20. An alternative experimental approach for subcritical configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, E.; Lee, S. M.; Pinto, L. N.; Landim, H. R.; Diniz, R.; Jerez, R.; dos Santos, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents an alternative approach for the reactivity worth experiments analysis in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor considering highly subcritical arrays. In order to reach the subcritical levels, the removal of a specific number of fuel rods is proposed. Twenty three configurations were carried out for this purpose. The control bank insertion experiment was used only as reference for the fuel rod experiment and, in addition, the control banks were maintained completely withdrawn during all the fuel rods experiment. The theoretical simulation results using the MCNP5 code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 library neutron data are in a very good agreement to experimental results.

  1. Experimental beta limits of symmetric linear heliac configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spanjers, G. G.; Nelson, B. A.; Ribe, F. L.; Jarboe, T. R.

    1994-08-01

    Helically symmetric heliac equilibria [H. P. Furth, Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion Research (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1966), Vol. 1, p. 103] are formed on the High Beta Q Machine (HBQM) [C. M. Greenfield, Phys. Fluids B 2, 133 (1990)] by using a fast-rising central conductor (hardcore) current in conjunction with a shock-heated l=1 stellarator configuration. The equilibria are found to possess a high global beta and the plasma pressure is approximately a flux-surface quantity. Under the effects of plasma, the magnetic well is found to deepen and the rotational transform is greatly increased and becomes highly sheared, owing to plasma currents induced by the fast-rising hardcore current. In the second phase of the experiment, the equilibrium fields of the symmetric heliac are lowered while maintaining the same shock heating in an attempt to raise the global beta. No substantial change in global beta is seen, indicating that the configuration forms at the beta limit in the shock-heated HBQM, and that the plasma beta seen in the first phase of the experiment is the symmetric heliac beta limit.

  2. Experimental evidence of skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Stebliy, Maxim E. Kolesnikov, Alexander G.; Davydenko, Alexander V.; Ognev, Alexey V.; Samardak, Alexander S.; Chebotkevich, Ludmila A.

    2015-05-07

    Formation and existence of magnetic skyrmion-like configurations in bilayer nanodisks (Ta(3 nm)/[Co(0.37 nm)/Ni(0.58 nm)]{sub 10}){sub 2} with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy are shown experimentally at room temperature. Magnetization reversal through the skyrmion state is studied using magnetic hysteresis measurements. An evolution of skyrmion configurations in the nanodisk structure is analyzed. Experimental methods and micromagnetic simulations help to understand the magnetization reversal processes occurring through the stable skyrmion-like configurations. Formation of the intermediate C-states during magnetization reversal is demonstrated. The skyrmion number for all possible spin configurations is calculated.

  3. Analysis of Magnetic Plucking Configurations for Frequency Up-Converting Harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, T.; Roundy, S.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetic plucking applies the strategy of frequency up-conversion in inertial energy harvesting when the energy source, such as human motion, only provides excitations with very low and irregular frequencies. This paper presents an analysis of three different magnet configurations to achieve magnetic plucking based on a three-dimensional analytical cube permanent magnet model: direct repulsive configuration, orthogonal configuration and indirect repulsive configuration. Simulation and experimental results indicate that the indirect repulsive configuration generates the largest tip displacement given the pratical constraints in designing a wearable energy harvester. We have implemented this configuration in a wrist-worn rotational energy harvester to pluck multiple piezoelectric beams. Other configurations, however, can potentially be advantageous in applications with alternative constraints.

  4. Flammability Configuration Analysis for Spacecraft Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pedley, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Fire is one of the many potentially catastrophic hazards associated with the operation of crewed spacecraft. A major lesson learned by NASA from the Apollo 204 fire in 1966 was that ignition sources in an electrically powered vehicle should and can be minimized, but can never be eliminated completely. For this reason, spacecraft fire control is based on minimizing potential ignition sources and eliminating materials that can propagate fire. Fire extinguishers are always provided on crewed spacecraft, but are not considered as part of the fire control process. "Eliminating materials that can propagate fire" does not mean eliminating all flammable materials - the cost of designing and building spacecraft using only nonflammable materials is extraordinary and unnecessary. It means controlling the quantity and configuration of such materials to eliminate potential fire propagation paths and thus ensure that any fire would be small, localized, and isolated, and would self-extinguish without harm to the crew. Over the years, NASA has developed many solutions for controlling the configuration of flammable materials (and potentially flammable materials in commercial "off-the-shelf" hardware) so that they can be used safely in air and oxygen-enriched environments in crewed spacecraft. This document describes and explains these design solutions so payload customers and other organizations can use them in designing safe and cost-effective flight hardware. Proper application of these guidelines will produce acceptable flammability configurations for hardware located in any compartment of the International Space Station or other program crewed vehicles and habitats. However, use of these guidelines does not exempt hardware organizations of the responsibility for safety of the hardware under their control.

  5. PIV experimental investigation of entrance configuration on flow maldistribution in plate-fin heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jian; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Aimin; Zhang, Ke; Wang, Jiang

    2006-01-01

    Flow characteristics of flow field in the entrance of plate-fin heat exchanger have been investigated by means of particle image velocimetry (PIV). The velocity fields were measured using the two-frame cross-correlation technique. A series of velocity vector and streamline graphs of different cross-sections are achieved in the experiment. The experimental results indicate that performance of fluid maldistribution in conventional entrance configuration is very serious, while the improved entrance configuration with punched baffle can effectively improve the performance of fluid flow distribution in the entrance. Based on the analysis of the fluid flow maldistribution, a baffle with small holes is recommended to install in the entrance configuration in order to improve the performance of flow distribution. When the punched baffle is proper in length, the small holes is distributed in staggered arrangement, and the punched ratio gradually increases from central axis to the boundary along with the baffle length, the performance of flow distribution in plate-fin heat exchanger is effectively improved by the optimum design of the entrance configuration. The flow maldistribution parameter S in plate-fin heat exchanger has been reduced from 1.21 to 0.209 and the ratio of the maximum velocity to the minimum θ is reduced from 23.2 to 1.76 by installing the punched baffle. The results validate that PIV is well suitable to investigate complex flow pattern and the conclusion of this paper is of great significance in the optimum design of plate-fin heat exchanger.

  6. Propfan experimental data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernon, David F.; Page, Gregory S.; Welge, H. Robert

    1984-01-01

    A data reduction method, which is consistent with the performance prediction methods used for analysis of new aircraft designs, is defined and compared to the method currently used by NASA using data obtained from an Ames Res. Center 11 foot transonic wind tunnel test. Pressure and flow visualization data from the Ames test for both the powered straight underwing nacelle, and an unpowered contoured overwing nacelle installation is used to determine the flow phenomena present for a wind mounted turboprop installation. The test data is compared to analytic methods, showing the analytic methods to be suitable for design and analysis of new configurations. The data analysis indicated that designs with zero interference drag levels are achieveable with proper wind and nacelle tailoring. A new overwing contoured nacelle design and a modification to the wing leading edge extension for the current wind tunnel model design are evaluated. Hardware constraints of the current model parts prevent obtaining any significant performance improvement due to a modified nacelle contouring. A new aspect ratio wing design for an up outboard rotation turboprop installation is defined, and an advanced contoured nacelle is provided.

  7. The MIRTE Experimental Program: An Opportunity to Test Structural Materials in Various Configurations in Thermal Energy Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Leclaire, Nicolas; Le Dauphin, Francois-Xavier; Duhamel, Isabelle; Briggs, Blair; Piot, Jerome; Rennesson, Malvina; Laville, Arnaud

    2014-11-04

    The MIRTE (Materials in Interacting and Reflecting configurations, all Thicknesses) program was established to answer the needs of criticality safety practitioners in terms of experimental validation of structural materials and to possibly contribute to nuclear data improvement, which ultimately supports reactor safety analysis as well. MIRTE took the shape of a collaboration between the AREVA and ANDRA French industrialists and a noncommercial international funding partner such as the U.S. Department of Energy. The aim of this paper is to present the configurations of the MIRTE 1 and MIRTE 2 programs and to highlight the results of the titanium experiments recently published in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments.

  8. Selectivity evaluation for two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample Lake Erie walleyes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Kocovsky, Patrick M.; Brenden, Travis O.; Liu, Weihai

    2011-01-01

    We used length frequencies of captured walleyes Sander vitreus to indirectly estimate and compare selectivity between two experimental gill-net configurations used to sample fish in Lake Erie: (1) a multifilament configuration currently used by the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) with stretched-measure mesh sizes ranging from 51 to 127 mm and a constant filament diameter (0.37 mm); and (2) a monofilament configuration with mesh sizes ranging from 38 to 178 mm and varying filament diameter (range = 0.20–0.33 mm). Paired sampling with the two configurations revealed that the catch of walleyes smaller than 250 mm and larger than 600 mm was greater in the monofilament configuration than in the multifilament configuration, but the catch of 250–600-mm fish was greater in the multifilament configuration. Binormal selectivity functions yielded the best fit to observed walleye catches for both gill-net configurations based on model deviances. Incorporation of deviation terms in the binormal selectivity functions (i.e., to relax the assumption of geometric similarity) further improved the fit to observed catches. The final fitted selectivity functions produced results similar to those from the length-based catch comparisons: the monofilament configuration had greater selectivity for small and large walleyes and the multifilament configuration had greater selectivity for mid-sized walleyes. Computer simulations that incorporated the fitted binormal selectivity functions indicated that both nets were likely to result in some bias in age composition estimates and that the degree of bias would ultimately be determined by the underlying condition, mortality rate, and growth rate of the Lake Erie walleye population. Before the ODNR switches its survey gear, additional comparisons of the different gill-net configurations, such as fishing the net pairs across a greater range of depths and at more locations in the lake, should be conducted to maintain congruence in

  9. Experimental and numerical study of a dual configuration for a flapping tidal current generator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihoon; Quang Le, Tuyen; Hwan Ko, Jin; Ebenezer Sitorus, Patar; Hartarto Tambunan, Indra; Kang, Taesam

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we conduct experimental and consecutive numerical analyses of a flapping tidal current generator with a mirror-type dual configuration with front-swing and rear-swing flappers. An experimental analysis of a small-scale prototype is conducted in a towing tank, and a numerical analysis is conducted by means of two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations with an in-house code. An experimental study with a controller to determine the target arm angle shows that the resultant arm angle is dependent on the input arm angle, the frequency, and the applied load, while a high pitch is obtained simply with a high input arm angle. Through a parametric analysis conducted while varying these factors, a high applied load and a high input arm angle were found to be advantageous. Moreover, the optimal reduced frequency was found to be 0.125 in terms of the power extraction. In consecutive numerical investigations with the kinematics selected from the experiments, it was found that a rear-swing flapper contributes to the total amount of power more than a front-swing flapper with a distance of two times the chord length and with a 90° phase difference between the two. The high contribution stems from the high power generated by the rear-swing flapper, which mimics the tail fin movement of a dolphin along a flow, compared to a plunge system or a front-swing system, which mimics the tail fin movement of a dolphin against a flow. It is also due to the fact that the shed vorticities of the front-swing flapper slightly affect negatively or even positively the power performance of the rear-swing system at a given distance and phase angle. PMID:26225469

  10. Modal Analysis and Correlation of International Space Station Early Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaouk, Mohamed; Shein, Shya-Ling; Kim, Hyoung M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper will summarize the modal analysis and model refinement results for the International Space Station (ISS) Flight-2A mated configuration. To maintain structural integrity of the ISS, structural loading distributions have been rigorously analyzed through numerical simulation and taken into account during the design of the structure and mission operations. The accuracy of the analysis results is directly affected by the precision of mathematical models and estimated input forces. A mathematical model of an ISS configuration is composed of individual component math models. Each component model is required to be correlated with ground test data.

  11. Preliminary results of experimental and analytical investigations of the tumbling phenomenon for an advanced configuration. [X-29 research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whipple, R. D.; Croom, M. A.; Fears, S. P.

    1984-01-01

    A sustained autorotative pitching motion usually called 'tumbling' has been observed during dynamic model tests of the X-29A configuration. The X-29 is an advanced design incorporating forward-swept wings and canards in a highly relaxed static stability condition. Beginning with a historical review of the tumbling phenomenon, this paper discusses the current experimental results of dynamic model tumbling tests of the X-29 and the initial efforts to establish an aerodynamic and mathematical model for analysis.

  12. Experimental Sonic Boom Measurements on a Mach 1.6 Cruise Low-Boom Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.; Elmiligui, Alaa, A.; Wayman, Thomas R.; Waithe, Kenrick A.; Howe, Donald C.; Bangert, Linda S.

    2012-01-01

    A wind tunnel test has been conducted by Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation (GAC) to measure the sonic boom pressure signature of a low boom Mach 1.6 cruise business jet in the Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach numbers 1.60 and 1.80. Through a cooperative agreement between GAC and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), GAC provided NASA access to some of the experimental data and NASA is publishing these data for the sonic boom research community. On-track and off-track near field sonic boom pressure signatures were acquired at three separation distances (0.5, 1.2, and 1.7 reference body lengths) and three angles of attack (-0.26deg, 0.26deg, and 0.68deg). The model was blade mounted to minimize the sting effects on the sonic boom signatures. Although no extensive data analysis is provided, selected data are plotted to illustrate salient features of the data. All of the experimental sonic boom pressure data are tabulated. Schlieren images of the configuration are also included.

  13. Aeroelastic Analysis of Aircraft: Wing and Wing/Fuselage Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, H. H.; Chang, K. C.; Tzong, T.; Cebeci, T.

    1997-01-01

    A previously developed interface method for coupling aerodynamics and structures is used to evaluate the aeroelastic effects for an advanced transport wing at cruise and under-cruise conditions. The calculated results are compared with wind tunnel test data. The capability of the interface method is also investigated for an MD-90 wing/fuselage configuration. In addition, an aircraft trim analysis is described and applied to wing configurations. The accuracy of turbulence models based on the algebraic eddy viscosity formulation of Cebeci and Smith is studied for airfoil flows at low Mach numbers by using methods based on the solutions of the boundary-layer and Navier-Stokes equations.

  14. An Experimental Investigation of the Flow Over the Rear End of a Notchback Automobile Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Luther N.

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow over the rear end of a 0.16 scale notchback automobile configuration has been conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel (BART). The objective of this work was to investigate the flow separation that occurs behind the backlight and obtain experimental data that can be used to understand the physics and time-averaged structure of the flow field. A three-component laser velocimeter was used to make non-intrusive, velocity measurements in the center plane and in a single cross-flow plane over the decklid. In addition to off-body measurements, flow conditions on the car surface were documented via surface flow visualization, boundary layer measurements, and surface pressures. The experimental data show several features previously identified by other researchers, but also reveal differences between the flow field associated with this particular configuration and the generally accepted models for the flow over a notchback rear end.

  15. Structural Configuration Systems Analysis for Advanced Aircraft Fuselage Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Welstead, Jason R.; Quinlan, Jesse R.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    Structural configuration analysis of an advanced aircraft fuselage concept is investigated. This concept is characterized by a double-bubble section fuselage with rear mounted engines. Based on lessons learned from structural systems analysis of unconventional aircraft, high-fidelity finite-element models (FEM) are developed for evaluating structural performance of three double-bubble section configurations. Structural sizing and stress analysis are applied for design improvement and weight reduction. Among the three double-bubble configurations, the double-D cross-section fuselage design was found to have a relatively lower structural weight. The structural FEM weights of these three double-bubble fuselage section concepts are also compared with several cylindrical fuselage models. Since these fuselage concepts are different in size, shape and material, the fuselage structural FEM weights are normalized by the corresponding passenger floor area for a relative comparison. This structural systems analysis indicates that an advanced composite double-D section fuselage may have a relative structural weight ratio advantage over a conventional aluminum fuselage. Ten commercial and conceptual aircraft fuselage structural weight estimates, which are empirically derived from the corresponding maximum takeoff gross weight, are also presented and compared with the FEM- based estimates for possible correlation. A conceptual full vehicle FEM model with a double-D fuselage is also developed for preliminary structural analysis and weight estimation.

  16. Navier-Stokes Computations and Experimental Comparisons for Multielement Airfoil Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. Kyle; Bonhaus, Daryl L.; McGhee, Robert; Walker, Betty

    1993-01-01

    A two-dimensional unstructured Navier-Stokes code is utilized for computing the flow around multielement airfoil configurations. Comparisons are shown for a landing configuration with an advanced-technology flap. Grid convergence studies are conducted to assess inaccuracies caused by inadequate grid resolution. Although adequate resolution is obtained for determining the pressure distributions, further refinement is needed to sufficiently resolve the velocity profiles at high angles of attack. For the advanced flap configuration, comparisons of pressure distributions and lift are made with experimental data. Here, two flap riggings and two Reynolds numbers are considered. In general, the trends caused by variations in these quantities are well predicted by the computations, although the angle of attack for maximum lift is overpredicted.

  17. Structural Configuration Analysis of Crew Exploration Vehicle Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukhopadhyay, V.

    2006-01-01

    Structural configuration modeling and finite element analysis of crew exploration vehicle (CEV) concepts are presented. In the structural configuration design approach, parametric solid models of the pressurized shell and tanks are developed. The CEV internal cabin pressure is same as in the International Space Station (ISS) to enable docking with the ISS without an intermediate airlock. Effects of this internal pressure load on the stress distribution, factor of safety, mass and deflections are investigated. Uniform 7 mm thick skin shell, 5 mm thick shell with ribs and frames, and isogrid skin construction options are investigated. From this limited study, the isogrid construction appears to provide most strength/mass ratio. Initial finite element analysis results on the service module tanks are also presented. These rapid finite element analyses, stress and factor of safety distribution results are presented as a part of lessons learned and to build up a structural mass estimation and sizing database for future technology support. This rapid structural analysis process may also facilitate better definition of the vehicles and components for rapid prototyping. However, these structural analysis results are highly conceptual and exploratory in nature and do not reflect current configuration designs being conducted at the program level by NASA and industry.

  18. ANALYSIS OF MPC WEIGHT, DIMENSIONAL ENVELOPE, AND CONFIGURATION REQUIREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    W.E. Wallin

    1995-03-03

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development Department (WPDD) in response to a request received via a QAP-3-12 Design Input Data Request from WAST Design (formerly MRSMPC Design). The request is to provide: (1) Specific MPC weight, dimensional envelope, and configuration requirements to ensure compatibility with MGDS capabilities. The objective of this analysis is to provide a response to the foregoing request. The purpose of this analysis is to provide the basis for the response. The response is stated in Section 8 herein.

  19. Analysis of transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnwell, R. W.

    1975-01-01

    An analytical solution was obtained for the perturbation velocity potential for transonic flow about lifting wing-body configurations with order-one span-length ratios and small reduced-span-length ratios and equivalent-thickness-length ratios. The analysis is performed with the method of matched asymptotic expansions. The angles of attack which are considered are small but are large enough to insure that the effects of lift in the region far from the configuration are either dominant or comparable with the effects of thickness. The modification to the equivalence rule which accounts for these lift effects is determined. An analysis of transonic flow about lifting wings with large aspect ratios is also presented.

  20. Evaluation of vapor mass transfer in various membrane distillation configurations: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannella, G. A.; La Carrubba, V.; Brucato, V.

    2012-06-01

    Vapor mass transfer phenomena in four different membrane distillation (MD) configurations were examined through a self-built laboratory scale experimental apparatus: Air Gap MD, Sweeping Gas MD, Vacuum Sweeping Gas MD and Vacuum MD. Vapor fluxes were measured and compared with those predicted by various models, showing that MD performance under usual processing conditions is severely controlled by the permeate side resistance to mass transfer.

  1. Resistance analysis of unsymmetrical trimaran model with outboard sidehulls configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanuar; Gunawan; Talahatu, M. A.; Indrawati, Ragil T.; Jamaluddin, A.

    2013-09-01

    The application of multi-hull ship or trimaran vessel as a mode of transports in both river and sea environments have grown rapidly in recent years. Trimaran vessels are currently of interest for many new high speed ship projects due to the high levels of hydrodynamic efficiency that can be achieved, compared to the mono-hull and catamaran hull forms. The purpose of this study is to identify the possible effects of using an unsymmetrical trimaran ship model with configuration ( S/ L) 0.1-0.3 and R/ L=0.1-0.2. Unsymmetrical trimaran ship model with main dimensions: L=2000mm, B=200 mm and T=45 mm. Experimental methods (towing tank) were performed in the study using speed variations at Froude number 0.1-0.6. The ship model was pulled by an electric motor whose speed could be varied and adjusted. The ship model resistance was measured precisely by using a load cell transducer. The comparison of ship resistance for each configuration with mono-hull was shown on the graph as a function of the total resistance coefficient and Froude number. The test results found that the effective drag reduction could be achieved up to 17% at Fr=0.35 with configuration S/ L=0.1.

  2. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 2: Launch vehicle aeroelastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    An exploratory analysis has been made of the aeroelastic stability of the Space Shuttle Launch Configuration, with the objective of defining critical flow phenomena with adverse aeroelastic effects and developing simple analytic means of describing the time-dependent flow-interference effects so that they can be incorporated into a computer program to predict the aeroelastic stability of all free-free modes of the shuttle launch configuration. Three critical flow phenomana have been identified: (1) discontinuous jump of orbiter wing shock, (2) inlet flow between orbiter and booster, and (3) H.O. tank base flow. All involve highly nonlinear and often discontinuous aerodynamics which cause limit cycle oscillations of certain critical modes. Given the appropriate static data, the dynamic effects of the wing shock jump and the HO tank bulbous base effect can be analyzed using the developed quasi-steady techniques. However, further analytic and experimental efforts are required before the dynamic effects of the inlet flow phenomenon can be predicted for the shuttle launch configuration.

  3. Experimental and analytical transonic flutter characteristics of a geared-elevator configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhlin, C. L.; Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Gregory, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    The flutter model represented the aft fuselage and empennage of a proposed supersonic transport airplane and had an all movable horizontal tail with a geared elevator. It was tested mounted from a sting in the transonic dynamics tunnel. Symmetric flutter boundaries were determined experimentally at Mach numbers from 0.7 to 1.14 for a geared elevator configuration (gear ratio of 2.8 to 1.0) and an ungeared elevator configuration (gear ratio of 1.0 to 1.0). Gearing the elevator increased the experimental flutter dynamic pressures about 20 percent. Flutter calculations were made for the geared elevator configuration by using two analytical methods based on subsonic lifting surface theory. Both methods analyzed the stabilizer and elevator as a single, deforming surface, but one method also allowed the elevator to be analyzed as hinged from the stabilizer. All analyses predicted lower flutter dynamic pressures than experiment with best agreement (within 12 percent) for the hinged elevator method. Considering the model as mounted from a flexible rather than rigid sting in the analyses, had only a slight effect on the flutter results but was significant in that a sting related vibration mode was identified as a potentially flutter critical mode.

  4. A comparative study of behaviors of ventilated supercavities between experimental models with different mounting configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Kawakami, Ellison; Karn, Ashish; Arndt, Roger E. A.

    2016-08-01

    Small-scale water tunnel experiments of the phenomenon of supercavitation can be carried out broadly using two different kinds of experimental models–in the first model (forward facing model, or FFM), the incoming flow first interacts with the cavitator at front, which is connected to the strut through a ventilation pipe. The second model could have the strut and the ventilation pipe preceding the cavitator (backward facing model, or BFM). This is the continuation of a water tunnel study of the effects of unsteady flows on axisymmetric supercavities. In this study, the unwanted effect of test model configuration on supercavity shape in periodic flows was explored through a comparison of FFM and BFM models. In our experiments, it was found that periodic gust flows have only a minimal effect on the maximum diameter and the cavity length can be shortened above a certain vertical velocity of periodic flows. These findings appear to be robust regardless of the model configuration.

  5. Comparative analysis of imaging configurations and objectives for Fourier microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kurvits, Jonathan A; Jiang, Mingming; Zia, Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Fourier microscopy is becoming an increasingly important tool for the analysis of optical nanostructures and quantum emitters. However, achieving quantitative Fourier space measurements requires a thorough understanding of the impact of aberrations introduced by optical microscopes that have been optimized for conventional real-space imaging. Here we present a detailed framework for analyzing the performance of microscope objectives for several common Fourier imaging configurations. To this end, we model objectives from Nikon, Olympus, and Zeiss using parameters that were inferred from patent literature and confirmed, where possible, by physical disassembly. We then examine the aberrations most relevant to Fourier microscopy, including the alignment tolerances of apodization factors for different objective classes, the effect of magnification on the modulation transfer function, and vignetting-induced reductions of the effective numerical aperture for wide-field measurements. Based on this analysis, we identify an optimal objective class and imaging configuration for Fourier microscopy. In addition, the Zemax files for the objectives and setups used in this analysis have been made publicly available as a resource for future studies. PMID:26560923

  6. Unstructured CFD Aerodynamic Analysis of a Generic UCAV Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frink, Neal T.; Tormalm, Magnus; Schmidt, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Three independent studies from the United States (NASA), Sweden (FOI), and Australia (DSTO) are analyzed to assess the state of current unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamic tools and practices for predicting the complex static and dynamic aerodynamic and stability characteristics of a generic 53-degree swept, round-leading-edge uninhabited combat air vehicle configuration, called SACCON. NASA exercised the USM3D tetrahedral cell-centered flow solver, while FOI and DSTO applied the FOI/EDGE general-cell vertex-based solver. The authors primarily employ the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) assumption, with a limited assessment of the EDGE Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) extension, to explore sensitivities to grids and turbulence models. Correlations with experimental data are provided for force and moments, surface pressure, and off-body flow measurements. The vortical flow field over SACCON proved extremely difficult to model adequately. As a general rule, the prospect of obtaining reasonable correlations of SACCON pitching moment characteristics with the RANS formulation is not promising, even for static cases. Yet, dynamic pitch oscillation results seem to produce a promising characterization of shapes for the lift and pitching moment hysteresis curves. Future studies of this configuration should include more investigation with higher-fidelity turbulence models, such as DES.

  7. Nonlinear potential analysis techniques for supersonic-hypersonic configuration design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clever, W. C.; Shankar, V.

    1983-01-01

    Approximate nonlinear inviscid theoretical techniques for predicting aerodynamic characteristics and surface pressures for relatively slender vehicles at moderate hypersonic speeds were developed. Emphasis was placed on approaches that would be responsive to preliminary configuration design level of effort. Second order small disturbance and full potential theory was utilized to meet this objective. Numerical pilot codes were developed for relatively general three dimensional geometries to evaluate the capability of the approximate equations of motion considered. Results from the computations indicate good agreement with higher order solutions and experimental results for a variety of wing, body and wing-body shapes for values of the hypersonic similarity parameter M delta approaching one. Case computational times of a minute were achieved for practical aircraft arrangements.

  8. Induction electrohydrodynamic pump in a vertical configuration: Part 2 - Experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Seyed-Yagoobi, J. ); Chato, J.C.; Crowley, J.M.; Krein, P.T. )

    1989-08-01

    An induction electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pump in axisymmetric, vertical configuration was designed and built. The flow rates were measured for various temperature profiles and several values of frequency, voltage, wavelength, and electric conductivity. The experimental data are generally in good agreement with the theoretical model presented in Part 1. With the present apparatus at relatively low voltages, velocities four times higher than natural circulation velocity are easily obtained. The external pressure load and entrance temperature profile play important roles on the operation of the pump and must be considered carefully in the design.

  9. Experimental methodologies to support aircraft icing analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John, Jr.; Kirby, Mark S.

    1987-01-01

    The experimental methodologies are illustrated by graphs, charts and line drawings. Typical ultrasonic echo signals for dry and wet ice growth, ice accretion rates for various tunnel configurations, the experimental configuration for flight tests of the ultrasonic measuring system and heat balance models used to predict ice growth are among the topics that are illustrated and briefly discussed.

  10. GPS baseline configuration design based on robustness analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yetkin, M.; Berber, M.

    2012-11-01

    The robustness analysis results obtained from a Global Positioning System (GPS) network are dramatically influenced by the configurationof the observed baselines. The selection of optimal GPS baselines may allow for a cost effective survey campaign and a sufficiently robustnetwork. Furthermore, using the approach described in this paper, the required number of sessions, the baselines to be observed, and thesignificance levels for statistical testing and robustness analysis can be determined even before the GPS campaign starts. In this study, wepropose a robustness criterion for the optimal design of geodetic networks, and present a very simple and efficient algorithm based on thiscriterion for the selection of optimal GPS baselines. We also show the relationship between the number of sessions and the non-centralityparameter. Finally, a numerical example is given to verify the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  11. An Efficient and Configurable Preprocessing Algorithm to Improve Stability Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sesia, Ilaria; Cantoni, Elena; Cernigliaro, Alice; Signorile, Giovanna; Fantino, Gianluca; Tavella, Patrizia

    2016-04-01

    The Allan variance (AVAR) is widely used to measure the stability of experimental time series. Specifically, AVAR is commonly used in space applications such as monitoring the clocks of the global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs). In these applications, the experimental data present some peculiar aspects which are not generally encountered when the measurements are carried out in a laboratory. Space clocks' data can in fact present outliers, jumps, and missing values, which corrupt the clock characterization. Therefore, an efficient preprocessing is fundamental to ensure a proper data analysis and improve the stability estimation performed with the AVAR or other similar variances. In this work, we propose a preprocessing algorithm and its implementation in a robust software code (in MATLAB language) able to deal with time series of experimental data affected by nonstationarities and missing data; our method is properly detecting and removing anomalous behaviors, hence making the subsequent stability analysis more reliable. PMID:26540679

  12. Techno-economic analysis of biofuel production considering logistic configurations.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Hu, Guiping

    2016-04-01

    In the study, a techno-economic analysis method considering logistic configurations is proposed. The economic feasibility of a low temperature biomass gasification pathway and an integrated pathway with fast pyrolysis and bio-oil gasification are evaluated and compared with the proposed method in Iowa. The results show that both pathways are profitable, biomass gasification pathway could achieve an Internal Rate of Return (IRR) of 10.00% by building a single biorefinery and integrated bio-oil gasification pathway could achieve an IRR of 3.32% by applying decentralized supply chain structure. A Monte-Carlo simulation considering interactions among parameters is also proposed and conducted, which indicates that both pathways are at high risk currently. PMID:26859327

  13. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Flow Over a Sting Mounted Planetary Probe Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holden, Michael S.; Harvey, John K.; Boyd, Iain D.; George, Jyothish; Horvath, Thomas J.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a series of experimental studies in the LENS shock tunnel and computations with DSMC and Navier Stokes codes which have been made to examine the aerothermal and flowfield characteristics of the flow over a sting-supported planetary probe configuration in hypervelocity air and nitrogen flows. The experimental program was conducted in the LENS hypervelocity shock tunnel at total enthalpies of 5and 10 MJkg for a range of reservoir pressure conditions from 70 to 500 bars. Heat transfer and pressure measurements were made on the front and rear face of the probe and along the supporting sting. High-speed and single shot schlieren photography were also employed to examine the flow over the model and the time to establish the flow in the base recirculation region. Predictions of the flowfield characteristics and the distributions of heat transfer and pressure were made with DSMC codes for rarefied flow conditions and with the Navier-Stokes solvers for the higher pressure conditions where the flows were assumed to be laminar. Analysis of the time history records from the heat transfer and pressure instrumentation on the face of the probe and in the base region indicated that the base flow was fully established in under 4 milliseconds from flow initiation or between 35 and 50 flow lengths based on base height. The measurements made in three different tunnel entries with two models of identical geometries but with different instrumentation packages, one prepared by NASA Langley and the second prepared by CUBRC, demonstrated good agreement between heat transfer measurements made with two different types of thin film and coaxial gage instrumentation. The measurements of heat transfer and pressure to the front face of the probe were in good agreement with theoretical predictions from both the DSMC and Navier Stokes codes. For the measurements made in low density flows, computations with the DSMC code were found to compare well with the

  14. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  15. Experimental Investigation of the DLR-F6 Transport Configuration in the National Transonic Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Rivers, Melissa B.; Goodliff, Scott L.; Rudnik, Ralf; Sitzmann, Martin

    2008-01-01

    An experimental aerodynamic investigation of the DLR (German Aerospace Center) F6 generic transport configuration has been conducted in the NASA NTF (National Transonic Facility) for CFD validation within the framework of the AIAA Drag Prediction Workshop. Force and moment, surface pressure, model deformation, and surface flow visualization data have been obtained at Reynolds numbers of both 3 million and 5 million. Flow-through nacelles and a side-of-body fairing were also investigated on this wing-body configuration. Reynolds number effects on trailing edge separation have been assessed, and the effectiveness of the side-of-body fairing in eliminating a known region of separated flow has been determined. Data obtained at a Reynolds number of 3 million are presented together for comparison with data from a previous wind tunnel investigation in the ONERA S2MA facility. New surface flow visualization capabilities have also been successfully explored and demonstrated in the NTF for the high pressure and moderately low temperature conditions required in this investigation. Images detailing wing surface flow characteristics are presented.

  16. Nonlinear Aeroelastic Analysis of Joined-Wing Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Rauno

    Aeroelastic design of joined-wing configurations is yet a relatively unexplored topic which poses several difficulties. Due to the overconstrained nature of the system combined with structural geometric nonlinearities, the behavior of Joined Wings is often counterintuitive and presents challenges not seen in standard layouts. In particular, instability observed on detailed aircraft models but never thoroughly investigated, is here studied with the aid of a theoretical/computational framework. Snap-type of instabilities are shown for both pure structural and aeroelastic cases. The concept of snap-divergence is introduced to clearly identify the true aeroelastic instability, as opposed to the usual aeroelastic divergence evaluated through eigenvalue approach. Multi-stable regions and isola-type of bifurcations are possible characterizations of the nonlinear response of Joined Wings, and may lead to branch-jumping phenomena well below nominal critical load condition. Within this picture, sensitivity to (unavoidable) manufacturing defects could have potential catastrophic effects. The phenomena studied in this work suggest that the design process for Joined Wings needs to be revisited and should focus, when instability is concerned, on nonlinear post-critical analysis since linear methods may provide wrong trend indications and also hide potentially catastrophical situations. Dynamic aeroelastic analyses are also performed. Flutter occurrence is critically analyzed with frequency and time-domain capabilities. Sensitivity to different-fidelity aeroelastic modeling (fluid-structure interface algorithm, aerodynamic solvers) is assessed showing that, for some configurations, wake modeling (rigid versus free) has a strong impact on the results. Post-flutter regimes are also explored. Limit cycle oscillations are observed, followed, in some cases, by flip bifurcations (period doubling) and loss of periodicity of the solution. Aeroelastic analyses are then carried out on a

  17. Theoretical, numerical, and experimental study of electrohydrodynamic pumping in vertical configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Seyed-Yagoobi, S.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    An induction electrohydrodynamic (EHD) pump is studied theoretically, numerically, and experimentally. The pump which is in an axisymmetric, vertical configuration is investigated in both forward and backward modes. The theoretical model includes the effect of entrance conditions, buoyancy effects, and secondary flow. A complete set of numerical solutions is presented to show the influence of the controlling factors in operating an induction EHD pump. The experimental results seem to be in good agreement with the numerical solutions. Velocities four times higher than the natural circulation speed were readily achieved. Experimentally, the ion drag EHD pump is briefly studied. In the past, ion drag pumps were avoided because of expected degradation of the insulating ability of fluids such as transformer oils. The effects of long term low level charge injection on liquid dielectrics at levels sufficient to be useful in a pump is investigated. The results indicate that the exposure to electrodes at high voltage decreases the electric conductivity of the oils. Direct applications of the EHD pump include cooling both high-power underground cables and electric equipment such as transformers. This work is intended to provide the necessary information on the controlling factors of an EHD pump for a better design.

  18. Experimental configuration of direct drive cylindrical implosions on the Omega Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, C.W.; Tubbs, D.L.; Beck, J.B.

    1998-12-31

    Details about the cylindrical implosions using direct-drive irradiation on the OMEGA Laser facility are provided. The experimental configuration, including orientation, construction, and mounting of the targets is described. An attempt to characterize the modulation transfer function of the primary x-ray framing camera diagnostic results in insufficient exposure contrast but relative agreement with other determinations. The x-ray intensity of the titanium backlighter driven by the 2.5-nsec linear ramp of the laser beams is described, and the relative intensity on film is compared to similar Nova experiments. The parallax effects of different length marker layers of high-opacity dichloropolystyrene is measured, resulting in the conclusion that the marker layer length should be matched to the laser drive illumination profile.

  19. Hyperfine-structure studies of Nb ii: Experimental and relativistic configuration-interaction results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, L.; Hasegawa, S.; Kurtz, C.; Datta, Debasis; Beck, Donald R.

    1995-05-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the hyperfine structure (hfs) in various metastable states in 93Nb ii. Hyperfine structures of five levels in Nb ii have been measured using a combination of the laser-rf double resonance and laser-induced fluorescence methods in a collinear laser-ion-beam geometry. Theoretically, for J=2, a multireference calculation of energies and hfs based on a relativistic configuration-interaction methodology of the lowest ten levels in the (4d+5s)4 manifold is reported. The average energy error is 450 cm-1. Many of the hyperfine constants show large changes from the Dirac-Fock values and the magnetic dipole constant has a 4% accuracy for the one J=2 level measured. We have also identified all the core-valence and core-core effects that dominate the energy differences and hfs.

  20. Experimental investigation of hypersonic buzz on a high cross-range shuttle configuration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, R. L.; Obremski, H. J.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study confirming the existence of hypersonic buzz in the separated region of a space shuttle's downward deflected control surface is described. Wind tunnel tests in helium on a 1:100 scale model of a shuttle type configuration at M = 17.5 clearly demonstrated the occurrence of large scale pressure oscillations throughout a substantial range of angles of attack and control surface deflections. Measurements of surface pressure fluctuations along with high speed schlieren photography served to delineate the boundaries of the phenomenon and to identify the physical parameters necessary for the onset of a buzz condition. Prominent spectral energy peaks were also observed in the surface pressures that could be directly correlated with the instability. These conditions were found to be strongly dependent on the presence of multiple shock interactions and the position of these interactions relative to the location of a reattaching shear layer.

  1. Experimental Investigation of a Point Design Optimized Arrow Wing HSCT Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Sundaram, P.; Agrawal, Shreekant; Cheung, S.; Arslan, A. E.; Martin, G. L.

    1999-01-01

    The M2.4-7A Arrow Wing HSCT configuration was optimized for straight and level cruise at a Mach number of 2.4 and a lift coefficient of 0.10. A quasi-Newton optimization scheme maximized the lift-to-drag ratio (by minimizing drag-to-lift) using Euler solutions from FL067 to estimate the lift and drag forces. A 1.675% wind-tunnel model of the Opt5 HSCT configuration was built to validate the design methodology. Experimental data gathered at the NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) section #2 facility verified CFL3D Euler and Navier-Stokes predictions of the Opt5 performance at the design point. In turn, CFL3D confirmed the improvement in the lift-to-drag ratio obtained during the optimization, thus validating the design procedure. A data base at off-design conditions was obtained during three wind-tunnel tests. The entry into NASA Langley UPWT section #2 obtained data at a free stream Mach number, M(sub infinity), of 2.55 as well as the design Mach number, M(sub infinity)=2.4. Data from a Mach number range of 1.8 to 2.4 was taken at UPWT section #1. Transonic and low supersonic Mach numbers, M(sub infinity)=0.6 to 1.2, was gathered at the NASA Langley 16 ft. Transonic Wind Tunnel (TWT). In addition to good agreement between CFD and experimental data, highlights from the wind-tunnel tests include a trip dot study suggesting a linear relationship between trip dot drag and Mach number, an aeroelastic study that measured the outboard wing deflection and twist, and a flap scheduling study that identifies the possibility of only one leading-edge and trailing-edge flap setting for transonic cruise and another for low supersonic acceleration.

  2. Experimental and numerical validation for the novel configuration of an arthroscopic indentation instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhonen, Rami K.; Saarakkala, Simo; Töyräs, Juha; Laasanen, Mikko S.; Kiviranta, Ilkka; Jurvelin, Jukka S.

    2003-06-01

    Softening of articular cartilage, mainly attributable to deterioration of superficial collagen network and depletion of proteoglycans, is a sign of incipient osteoarthrosis. Early diagnosis of osteoarthrosis is essential to prevent the further destruction of the tissue. During the past decade, a few arthroscopic instruments have been introduced for the measurement of cartilage stiffness; these can be used to provide a sensitive measure of cartilage status. Ease of use, accuracy and reproducibility of the measurements as well as a low risk of damaging cartilage are the main qualities needed in any clinically applicable instrument. In this study, we have modified a commercially available arthroscopic indentation instrument to better fulfil these requirements when measuring cartilage stiffness in joints with thin cartilage. Our novel configuration was validated by experimental testing as well as by finite element (FE) modelling. Experimental and numerical tests indicated that it would be better to use a smaller reference plate and a lower pressing force (3 N) than those used in the original instrument (7-10 N). The reproducibility (CV = 5.0%) of the in situ indentation measurements was improved over that of the original instrument (CV = 7.6%), and the effect of material thickness on the indentation response was smaller than that obtained with the original instrument. The novel configuration showed a significant linear correlation between the indenter force and the reference dynamic modulus of cartilage in unconfined compression, especially in soft tissue (r = 0.893, p < 0.001, n = 16). FE analyses with a transversely isotropic poroelastic model indicated that the instrument was suitable for detecting the degeneration of superficial cartilage. In summary, the instrument presented in this study allows easy and reproducible measurement of cartilage stiffness, also in thin cartilage, and therefore represents a technical improvement for the early diagnosis of

  3. Multi-Body Analysis of a Tiltrotor Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghiringhelli, G. L.; Masarati, P.; Mantegazza, P.; Nixon, M. W.

    1997-01-01

    The paper describes the aeroelastic analysis of a tiltrotor configuration. The 1/5 scale wind tunnel semispan model of the V-22 tiltrotor aircraft is considered. The analysis is performed by means of a multi-body code, based on an original formulation. The differential equilibrium problem is stated in terms of first order differential equations. The equilibrium equations of every rigid body are written, together with the definitions of the momenta. The bodies are connected by kinematic constraints, applied in form of Lagrangian multipliers. Deformable components are mainly modelled by means of beam elements, based on an original finite volume formulation. Multi-disciplinar problems can be solved by adding user-defined differential equations. In the presented analysis the equations related to the control of the swash-plate of the model are considered. Advantages of a multi-body aeroelastic code over existing comprehensive rotorcraft codes include the exact modelling of the kinematics of the hub, the detailed modelling of the flexibility of critical hub components, and the possibility to simulate steady flight conditions as well as wind-up and maneuvers. The simulations described in the paper include: 1) the analysis of the aeroelastic stability, with particular regard to the proprotor/pylon instability that is peculiar to tiltrotors, 2) the determination of the dynamic behavior of the system and of the loads due to typical maneuvers, with particular regard to the conversion from helicopter to airplane mode, and 3) the stress evaluation in critical components, such as the pitch links and the conversion downstop spring.

  4. An experimental investigation of supersonic flow past a wedge-cylinder configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnette, D. W.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of supersonic flow past double-wedge configurations was conducted. Over the range of geometries tested, it was found that, while theoretical solutions both for a Type V pattern and for a Type VI pattern could be generated for a particular flow condition (as defined by the geometry and the free-stream conditions), the weaker, Type VI pattern was observed experimentally. More rigorous flow-field solutions were developed for the flow along the wing leading-edge. Solutions were developed for the three-dimensional flow in the plane of symmetry of a swept cylinder (which represented the wing leading-edge) which was mounted on a wedge (which generated the "bow" shock wave). A numerical code was developed using integral techniques to calculate the flow in the shock layer upstream of the interaction region (i.e., near the wing root). Heat transfer rates were calculated for various free stream conditions. The present investigation was undertaken to examine the effects of crossflow on the resultant flow-field and to verify the flow model used in theoretical calculations.

  5. Configurational and conformational analysis of chiral molecules using IR and VCD spectroscopies: spiropentylcarboxylic acid methyl ester and spiropentyl acetate.

    PubMed

    Devlin, F J; Stephens, P J; Osterle, C; Wiberg, K B; Cheeseman, J R; Frisch, M J

    2002-11-15

    The chiral monosubstituted derivatives of spiropentane, spiropentylcarboxylic acid methyl ester, 1, and spiropentyl acetate, 2, have been synthesized in optically active form. Configurational and conformational analysis of 1 and 2 has been carried out using infrared (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies. Analysis of the experimental IR and VCD spectra has been carried out using ab initio density functional theory (DFT). For both 1 and 2, DFT predicts two populated conformations. Comparison to experiment of the conformationally averaged IR and VCD spectra of 1 and 2, predicted using DFT, provides unequivocal evidence of the predicted conformations and yields the absolute configurations R(-)/S(+) for 1 and R(+)/S(-) for 2. These absolute configurations are consistent with the R(-)/S(+) absolute configuration of spiropentylcarboxylic acid, assigned previously via X-ray crystallography of its alpha-phenylethylammonium salt. PMID:12423137

  6. Analysis of DNA equilibrium configuration under interfacial traction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y Z; Zhang, Q C; Wang, W; Yang, Y W

    2016-01-01

    Kirchhoff thin elastic rod models are important in the study of the mechanism determining the configurations of flexible structures not only at the macroscopic but also at the microscopic scale. In this study, the energy balance method has been well applied to analyze the configuration of a DNA elastic rod in the presence of interfacial traction. An approximate solution for the shape equations has been obtained, and the relationship between the interfacial factor and the configuration of the DNA segment is derived. The results may provide an explanation for the onset of the formation of kinks in DNA when immersed in a solution. PMID:27323042

  7. Experimental Investigation of the Low-Speed Aerodynamic Characteristics of a 5.8-Percent Scale Hybrid Wing Body Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; Vicroy, Dan D.; Carter, Melissa B.

    2012-01-01

    A low-speed experimental investigation has been conducted on a 5.8-percent scale Hybrid Wing Body configuration in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel. This Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) configuration was designed with specific intention to support the NASA Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project goals of reduced noise, emissions, and fuel burn. This HWB configuration incorporates twin, podded nacelles mounted on the vehicle upper surface between twin vertical tails. Low-speed aerodynamic characteristics were assessed through the acquisition of force and moment, surface pressure, and flow visualization data. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were investigated on this multi-component model. The effects of a drooped leading edge, longitudinal flow-through nacelle location, vertical tail shape and position, elevon deflection, and rudder deflection have been studied. The basic configuration aerodynamics, as well as the effects of these configuration variations, are presented in this paper.

  8. An experimental study of the lift, drag and static longitudinal stability for a three lifting surface configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostowari, C.; Naik, D.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental procedure and aerodynamic force and moment measurements for wind tunnel testing of the three lifting surface configuration (TLC) are described. The influence of nonelliptical lift distributions on lift, drag, and static longitudinal stability are examined; graphs of the lift coefficient versus angle of attack, the pitching moment coefficient, drag coefficient, and lift to drag ratio versus lift coefficient are provided. The TLC data are compared with the conventional tail-aft configuration and the canard-wing configuration; it is concluded that the TLC has better lift and high-lift drag characteristics, lift to drag ratio, and zero-lift moments than the other two configurations. The effects of variations in forward and tail wind incidence angles, gap, stagger, and forward wind span on the drag, lift, longitudinal stability, and zero-lift moments of the configuration are studied.

  9. Experimental and numerical investigation of the turbulent wake flow of a generic space launcher configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statnikov, V.; Saile, D.; Meiß, J.-H.; Henckels, A.; Meinke, M.; Gülhan, A.; Schröder, W.

    2015-06-01

    The turbulent wake of a generic space launcher at cold hypersonic freestream conditions is investigated experimentally and numerically to gain detailed insight into the intricate base flow phenomena of space vehicles at upper stages of the flight trajectory. The experiments are done at Ma∞ = 6 and ReD = 1.7 · 106 m-1 by the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and the corresponding computations are performed by the Institute of Aerodynamics Aachen using a zonal Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes / Large-Eddy Simulation (RANS/LES) approach. Two different aft-body geometries consisting of a blunt base and an attached cylindrical nozzle dummy are considered. It is found that the wind tunnel model support attached to the upper side of the main body has a nonnegligible impact on the wake along the whole circumference, albeit on the opposite side, the effects are minimal compared to an axisymmetric configuration. In the blunt-base case, the turbulent supersonic boundary layer undergoes a strong aftexpansion on the model shoulder leading to the formation of a confined low-pressure (p/p∞ ≈ 0.2) recirculation region. Adding a nozzle dummy causes the shear layer to reattach on the its wall at x/D ˜ 0.6 and the base pressure level to increase (p/p∞ ≈ 0.25) compared to the blunt-base case. For both configurations, the pressure fluctuations on the base wall feature dominant frequencies at SrD ≈ 0.05 and SrD ≈ 0.2-0.27, but are of small amplitudes (prms/p∞ = 0.02-0.025) compared to the main body boundary layer. For the nozzle dummy configuration, when moving downstream along the nozzle extension, the wall pressure is increasingly influenced by the reattaching shear layer and the periodic low-frequency behavior becomes less pronounced. Directly behind the reattachment point, the wall pressure reaches maximum mean and root-mean-square (rms) values of about p/p∞ = 1 and p'rms/p∞ = 0.1 and features a broadband specrms trum without distinct frequencies determined by the

  10. Unsteady loads due to propulsive lift configurations. Part D: The development of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects on propulsive lift configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haviland, J. K.; Herling, W. W.

    1978-01-01

    The design and construction of an experimental facility for the investigation of scaling effects in propulsive lift configurations are described. The facility was modeled after an existing full size NASA facility which consisted of a coaxial turbofan jet engine with a rectangular nozzle in a blown surface configuration. The flow field of the model facility was examined with and without a simulated wing surface in place at several locations downstream of the nozzle exit plane. Emphasis was placed on obtaining pressure measurements which were made with static probes and surface pressure ports connected via plastic tubing to condenser microphones for fluctuating measurements. Several pressure spectra were compared with those obtained from the NASA facility, and were used in a preliminary evaluation of scaling laws.

  11. Experimental study of jet surface structures and the influence of nozzle configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Chen; Yang, Minguan; Kang, Can; Wang, Yuli

    2016-08-01

    Under the three breakup regimes, the jet surface waves of different nozzles are captured and measured. The nozzles have different length to diameter ratios and contraction angles. The measured wavelengths are compared with the reported conclusions which were obtained by using spatial and temporal linear stability analysis. The results show that the jet wavelengths of different breakup regimes are covered by a single curve when the wavelengths are non-dimensionalized with boundary layer thickness. For the nozzle with equal length and diameter, the entire translation section starts at Re = 3 × 104 and ends at Re = 4.5 × 104. The wavelength non-dimensionalized with boundary layer thickness is independent of nozzle configuration. The ratio of initial wavelength to boundary layer thickness ranges from 2 to 4.

  12. Steady and unsteady transonic small disturbance analysis of realistic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Seidel, David A.; Bennett, Robert M.; Cunningham, Herbert J.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1989-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelastic code called CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) was developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. It permits the calculation of steady and unsteady flows about complete aircraft configurations for aeroelastic analysis of the flutter critical transonic speed range. The CAP-TSD code uses a time accurate approximate factorization algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small disturbance potential equation. An overview is given of the CAP-TSD code development effort along with recent algorithm modifications which are listed and discussed. Calculations are presented for several configurations including the General Dynamics 1/9th scale F-16C aircraft model to evaluate the algorithm and hence the reliability of the CAP-TSD code in general. Calculations are also presented for a flutter analysis of a 45 deg sweptback wing which agree well with the experimental data. Descriptions are presented of the CAP-TSD code and algorithm details along with results and comparisons which demonstrate the stability, accuracy, efficiency, and utility of CAP-TSD.

  13. ANALYSIS OF SPECIAL WASTE CONFIGURATIONS AT THE SRS WASTE MANAGEMENT FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Casella, V; Raymond Dewberry, R

    2007-05-14

    Job Control Waste (JCW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) Solid Waste Management Facilities (SWMF) may be disposed of in special containers, and the analysis of these containers requires developing specific analysis methodologies. A method has been developed for the routine assay of prohibited items (liquids, etc.) contained in a 30-gallon drum that is then placed into a 55-gallon drum. Method development consisted of system calibration with a NIST standard at various drum-to-detector distances, method verification with a liquid sample containing a known amount of Pu-238, and modeling the inner container using Ortec Isotopic software. Using this method for measurement of the known standard in the drum-in-drum configuration produced excellent agreement (within 15%) with the known value. Savannah River Site Solid Waste Management also requested analysis of waste contained in large black boxes (commonly 18-feet x 12-feet x 7-feet) stored at the SWMF. These boxes are frequently stored in high background areas and background radiation must be considered for each analysis. A detection limit of less than 150 fissile-gram-equivalents (FGE) of TRU waste is required for the black-box analyses. There is usually excellent agreement for the measurements at different distances and measurement uncertainties of about 50% are obtained at distances of at least twenty feet from the box. This paper discusses the experimental setup, analysis and data evaluation for drum-in-drum and black box waste configurations at SRS.

  14. Experimental Study on DDT Characteristics in Spiral Configuration Pulse Detonation Engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Qiu, Hua; Fan, Wei; Xiong, Cha

    2013-09-01

    This work investigated features of the deflagration to detonation transition in a curved tube. A number of experiments were performed to acquire the transition rule of DDT, which would provide the design data and theoretical basis for the curved detonation chamber. The content of research is as follows: (1) Flow resistance experiments of nine detonation chambers have been explored. The results show that the spiral configuration can reduce the axial length of DC, and the total pressure recovery coefficient increases with the spiral pitch. (2) Single-cycle detonation experiments have been conducted using the 9 tubes in the resistance experiments. Liquid-gasoline/air is used as the detonative mixture in all the experiments. The detonation experimental results indicate that there is no detonation wave formed in the straight tube, but in all the selected spiral tubes fully-developed detonation waves have been obtained; compared to the straight tube case, the DDT time decrease with the decreasing of the radius of curvature (RC) by 6.2%˜19.8% in the spiral detonation tubes.

  15. Experimental Investigation on Stirling Type Thermally Coupled Three Stage Pulse Tube Cryocoolers with 'U' Type Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badgujar, A. D.; Naik, H. B.; Atrey, M. D.

    Research on Stirling type Pulse Tube Cryocooler (PTC) is focused on achieving lower temperatures by cascading the stages or by multi-staging. Multi-staging can be done either by gas coupling or by thermal coupling of the stages. In the thermal coupling option, either a two stage cooler can pre-cool a single stage PTC to reach lower temperatures or a single stage PTC can cool a two stage PTC. In the present work, both these configurations are tested experimentally keeping the same two stage PTC. In case-1, the two stage PTC is used as a pre-cooling stage while in case-2, the single stage PTC is used as a pre-cooling stage. Length of the single stage is required and to be increased to match the two stages PTC for effective thermal coupling in case-1. The lowest temperature achieved in case-1 is 50.07 K where as in case-2 the lowest temperature achieved is 19.61 K at 17 bar charge pressure and 68 Hz frequency. The pressure drop in both the PTCs is compared to analyze the difference in performance.

  16. High-Speed Research: 1994 Sonic Boom Workshop. Configuration, Design, Analysis and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCurdy, David A. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The third High-Speed Research Sonic Boom Workshop was held at NASA Langley Research Center on June 1-3, 1994. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum for Government, industry, and university participants to present and discuss progress in their research. The workshop was organized into sessions dealing with atmospheric propagation; acceptability studies; and configuration design, and testing. Attendance at the workshop was by invitation only. The workshop proceedings include papers on design, analysis, and testing of low-boom high-speed civil transport configurations and experimental techniques for measuring sonic booms. Significant progress is noted in these areas in the time since the previous workshop a year earlier. The papers include preliminary results of sonic boom wind tunnel tests conducted during 1993 and 1994 on several low-boom designs. Results of a mission performance analysis of all low-boom designs are also included. Two experimental methods for measuring near-field signatures of airplanes in flight are reported.

  17. Configurational analysis of uranium-doped thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, A. E.; Ruiz-Hernandez, S. E.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2015-04-01

    While thorium dioxide is already used industrially in high temperature applications, more insight is needed about the behaviour of the material as part of a mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel, incorporating uranium. We have developed a new interatomic potential model, commensurate with a prominent existing UO2 potential, to conduct configurational analyses of uranium-doped ThO2 supercells. Using the GULP and Site Occupancy Disorder (SOD) computational codes, we have analysed the distribution of low concentrations of uranium in the bulk material, but have not observed the formation of uranium clusters or a single dominant configuration.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis and Optimization of Aerodynamic Configurations with Blend Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. M.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1997-01-01

    A novel (geometrical) parametrization procedure using solutions to a suitably chosen fourth order partial differential equation is used to define a class of airplane configurations. Inclusive in this definition are surface grids, volume grids, and grid sensitivity. The general airplane configuration has wing, fuselage, vertical tail and horizontal tail. The design variables are incorporated into the boundary conditions, and the solution is expressed as a Fourier series. The fuselage has circular cross section, and the radius is an algebraic function of four design parameters and an independent computational variable. Volume grids are obtained through an application of the Control Point Form method. A graphic interface software is developed which dynamically changes the surface of the airplane configuration with the change in input design variable. The software is made user friendly and is targeted towards the initial conceptual development of any aerodynamic configurations. Grid sensitivity with respect to surface design parameters and aerodynamic sensitivity coefficients based on potential flow is obtained using an Automatic Differentiation precompiler software tool ADIFOR. Aerodynamic shape optimization of the complete aircraft with twenty four design variables is performed. Unstructured and structured volume grids and Euler solutions are obtained with standard software to demonstrate the feasibility of the new surface definition.

  19. Indoor experimental facility for airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) configurations - rail-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirose, Getachew; Phelan, Brian R.; Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Ranney, Kenneth I.; Koenig, Francois; Narayanan, Ram M.

    2014-05-01

    The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing an indoor experimental facility to evaluate and assess airborne synthetic-aperture-radar-(SAR)-based detection capabilities. The rail-SAR is located in a multi-use facility that also provides a base for research and development in the area of autonomous robotic navigation. Radar explosive hazard detection is one key sensordevelopment area to be investigated at this indoor facility. In particular, the mostly wooden, multi-story building houses a two (2) story housing structure and an open area built over a large sandbox. The housing structure includes reconfigurable indoor walls which enable the realization of multiple See-Through-The-Wall (STTW) scenarios. The open sandbox, on the other hand, allows for surface and buried explosive hazard scenarios. The indoor facility is not rated for true explosive hazard materials so all targets will need to be inert and contain surrogate explosive fills. In this paper we discuss the current system status and describe data collection exercises conducted using canonical targets and frequencies that may be of interest to designers of ultra-wideband (UWB) airborne, ground penetrating SAR systems. A bi-static antenna configuration will be used to investigate the effects of varying airborne SAR parameters such as depression angle, bandwidth, and integration angle, for various target types and deployment scenarios. Canonical targets data were used to evaluate overall facility capabilities and limitations. These data is analyzed and summarized for future evaluations. Finally, processing techniques for dealing with RF multi-path and RFI due to operating inside the indoor facility are described in detail. Discussion of this facility and its capabilities and limitations will provide the explosive hazard community with a great airborne platform asset for sensor to target assessment.

  20. Lacunarity analysis of atomic configurations: Application to ethanol-water mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gereben, Orsolya

    2015-09-01

    Lacunarity analysis is a scale-dependent method quantifying the translational invariance in patterns. In this work it is used to characterize the distribution of several subsets of atoms in molecular systems. Binary clusters and one-component (ethanol or water) hydrogen-bonded clusters of ethanol-water mixtures with 0 -100 mol % ethanol content were analyzed. Molecular dynamics simulations created the configurations, and all were in good agreement with the respective experimental x-ray diffraction data. Lacunarity analysis revealed that the placement of the one-component clusters at low concentration can be described by a multifractal distribution, especially in the case of ethanol. Most of the cases these clusters are not isolated entities, but form islands in binary clusters.

  1. Detection probe-tip configuration optimization for photopyroelectric thermal-wave imaging instrument using finite-element-method analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarai, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Nakanishi, Takuji

    1995-03-01

    This paper describes detection probe-tip configuration optimization for a photopyroelectric thermal-wave imaging instrument. In order to obtain reconstructed thermal-wave tomographic images with high fidelity, it is necessary to obtain the optimum conditions of the detection probe-tip configuration. These conditions were obtained by analyzing the electric fields around a capacitive-coupled detection probe-tip using finite-element-method (FEM) analysis. Experimental results are also shown, verifying the FEM analysis results. It was also confirmed that the equivalent probe-tip diameter determined from our previous experimental work agreed almost perfectly with that obtained using FEM analysis. As a result, high-fidelity thermal-wave tomographic images were obtained.

  2. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 3-Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors. The analysis methodology selected for all the calculations in this report is based on the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of two reactor critical configurations for Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted a direct comparison of criticality calculations using the utility-calculated isotopics with those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4

  3. Analysis of surface pressure distributions on two elliptic missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, J. M.; Pittman, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The state-of-the-art methods for predicting missile aerodynamic characteristics do not accurately predict the loads of missile configurations with bodies of elliptic cross section. An investigation of this problem found significant nonlinear flow disturbance on the windward surface of a 3:1 elliptic body at Mach 2.50 in addition to the nonlinear vortical flows which develop on the leeside. A nonlinear full-potential flow method (NCOREL) was found to provide extremely accurate pressure estimates for attached-flow conditions and the vortex prediction method contained in the state-of-the-art method (NOSEVTX) was shown to accurately calculate body vortices and leeside pressures.

  4. Analysis of diffraction imaging in non-conjugate configurations.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ran; Feng, Yuanming; Sa, Yu; Lu, Jun Q; Jacobs, Kenneth M; Hu, Xin-Hua

    2014-12-15

    Diffraction imaging of scattered light allows extraction of information on scatterer's morphology. We present a method for accurate simulation of diffraction imaging of single particles by combining rigorous light scattering model with ray-tracing software. The new method has been validated by comparison to measured images of single microspheres. Dependence of fringe patterns on translation of an objective based imager to off-focus positions has been analyzed to clearly understand diffraction imaging with multiple optical elements. The calculated and measured results establish unambiguously that diffraction imaging should be pursued in non-conjugate configurations to ensure accurate sampling of coherent light distribution from the scatterer. PMID:25607106

  5. StarBooster Demonstrator Cluster Configuration Analysis/Verification Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeTurris, Dianne J.

    2003-01-01

    In order to study the flight dynamics of the cluster configuration of two first stage boosters and upper-stage, flight-testing of subsonic sub-scale models has been undertaken using two glideback boosters launched on a center upper-stage. Three high power rockets clustered together were built and flown to demonstrate vertical launch, separation and horizontal recovery of the boosters. Although the boosters fly to conventional aircraft landing, the centerstage comes down separately under its own parachute. The goal of the project has been to collect data during separation and flight for comparison with a six degree of freedom simulation. The configuration for the delta wing canard boosters comes from a design by Starcraft Boosters, Inc. The subscale rockets were constructed of foam covered in carbon or fiberglass and were launched with commercially available solid rocket motors. The first set of boosters built were 3-ft tall with a 4-ft tall centerstage, and two additional sets of boosters were made that were each over 5-ft tall with a 7.5 ft centerstage. The rocket cluster is launched vertically, then after motor bum out the boosters are separated and flown to a horizontal landing under radio-control. An on-board data acquisition system recorded data during both the launch and glide phases of flight.

  6. Spaceborne Doppler Precipitation Radar: System Configurations and Performance Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Im, Eastwood

    2004-01-01

    Knowledge of the global distribution of the vertical velocity of precipitation is important in in the study of energy transportation in the atmosphere, the climate and weather. Such knowledge can only be directly acquired with the use of spaceborne Doppler precipitation radars. Although the high relative speed of the radar with respect to the rainfall particles introduces significant broadening in the Doppler spectrum, recent studies have shown that the average vertical velocity can be measured to acceptable accuracy levels by appropriate selection of radar parameters. Furthermore, methods to correct for specific errors arising from NUBF effects and pointing uncertainties have recently been developed. In this paper we will present the results of the trade studies on the performances of a spaceborne Doppler radar with different system parameters configurations.

  7. Multirole cargo aircraft options and configurations. [economic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conner, D. W.; Vaughan, J. C., III

    1979-01-01

    A future requirements and advanced market evaluation study indicates derivatives of current wide-body aircraft, using 1980 advanced technology, would be economically attractive through 2008, but new dedicated airfreighters incorporating 1990 technology, would offer little or no economic incentive. They would be economically attractive for all payload sizes, however, if RD and T costs could be shared in a joint civil/military arrangement. For the 1994-2008 cargo market, option studies indicate Mach 0.7 propfans would be economically attractive in trip cost, aircraft price and airline ROI. Spanloaders would have an even lower price and higher ROI but would have a relatively high trip cost because of aerodynamic inefficiencies. Dedicated airfreighters using propfans at Mach 0.8 cruise, laminar flow control, or cryofuels, would not provide any great economic benefits. Air cushion landing gear configurations are identified as an option for avoiding runway constraints on airport requirements and/or operational constraints are noted.

  8. Comparative analysis of different configurations of PLC-based safety systems from reliability point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapia, Moiez A.

    1993-01-01

    The study of a comparative analysis of distinct multiplex and fault-tolerant configurations for a PLC-based safety system from a reliability point of view is presented. It considers simplex, duplex and fault-tolerant triple redundancy configurations. The standby unit in case of a duplex configuration has a failure rate which is k times the failure rate of the standby unit, the value of k varying from 0 to 1. For distinct values of MTTR and MTTF of the main unit, MTBF and availability for these configurations are calculated. The effect of duplexing only the PLC module or only the sensors and the actuators module, on the MTBF of the configuration, is also presented. The results are summarized and merits and demerits of various configurations under distinct environments are discussed.

  9. Experimental evaluation of sound produced by two cylinders in a cross flow in various configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, Michael; Kerrian, Peter; Morris, Scott

    2012-11-01

    Cylinders in a cross flow is a canonical test case that is considered representative of industrial fluid flow problems, such as heat exchangers and aircraft landing gear. The general configurations are cylinders in tandem, parallel or staggered, which lead to several interesting flow phenomena such as wake cavity/wake interaction effects (tandem), symmetric/asymmetric wake behavior (parallel) or wake interaction/coanda effects (staggered), depending on relative location of the cylinders. In many cases, it is important to not only understand the flow interaction between the cylinders but also the acoustic consequence of such configurations. However, information on the acoustical behavior based on these configurations is relatively small compared to that of the steady aerodynamic and flow interaction behavior. The present work investigates the acoustic spectral properties of these configurations in order to characterize the sound produced by cylinder proximity and wake effects. The spectra are measured using an acoustic beam-forming technique to identify the sources and remove spurious content from the spectra.

  10. Lunar lander configuration study and parametric performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Fowler, C. R.

    1993-06-01

    Future Lunar exploration plans will call for delivery of significant mounts or cargo to provide for crew habitation, surface tansportation, and scientific exploration activities. Minimization of costly surface based infrastructure is in large part directly related to the design of the cargo delivery/landing craft. This study focused on evaluating Lunar lander concepts from a logistics oriented perspective, and outlines the approach used in the development of a preferred configuration, sets forth the benefits derived from its utilization and describes the missions and system considered. Results indicate that only direct-to-surface downloading of payloads provides for unassisted cargo removal operations imperative to efficient and low risk site buildup, including the emplacement of Space Station derivative surface habitat modules, immediate cargo jettison for both descent abort and emergency surface ascent essential to piloted missions carrying cargo, and short habitat egress/ingress paths necessary to productive surface work tours for crew members carrying hand held experiments, tools and other bulky articles. Accommodating cargo in a position underneath the vehicles structural frame, landing craft described herein eliminate altogether the necessity for dedicated surface based off-loading vehicles, the operations and maintenance associated with their operation, and the precipitous ladder climbs to and from the surface that are inherent to traditional designs. Parametric evaluations illustrate performance and mass variation with respect to mission requirements.

  11. Lunar lander configuration study and parametric performance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Benjamin B.; Fowler, C. R.

    1993-01-01

    Future Lunar exploration plans will call for delivery of significant mounts or cargo to provide for crew habitation, surface tansportation, and scientific exploration activities. Minimization of costly surface based infrastructure is in large part directly related to the design of the cargo delivery/landing craft. This study focused on evaluating Lunar lander concepts from a logistics oriented perspective, and outlines the approach used in the development of a preferred configuration, sets forth the benefits derived from its utilization and describes the missions and system considered. Results indicate that only direct-to-surface downloading of payloads provides for unassisted cargo removal operations imperative to efficient and low risk site buildup, including the emplacement of Space Station derivative surface habitat modules, immediate cargo jettison for both descent abort and emergency surface ascent essential to piloted missions carrying cargo, and short habitat egress/ingress paths necessary to productive surface work tours for crew members carrying hand held experiments, tools and other bulky articles. Accommodating cargo in a position underneath the vehicles structural frame, landing craft described herein eliminate altogether the necessity for dedicated surface based off-loading vehicles, the operations and maintenance associated with their operation, and the precipitous ladder climbs to and from the surface that are inherent to traditional designs. Parametric evaluations illustrate performance and mass variation with respect to mission requirements.

  12. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 1-Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using critical configurations from commercial pressurized- water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence in SCALE-4. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code sequence was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE-4 criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for analysis of each critical configuration. Each of the five volumes comprising this report provides an overview of the methodology applied. Subsequent volumes also describe in detail the approach taken in performing criticality calculations for these PWR configurations: Volume 2 describes criticality calculations for the Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 reactor for Cycle 3; Volume 3 documents the analysis of Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 reactor for the

  13. Experimental strategies for frost analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, Daniel D.

    An area of increasing importance in the field of refrigeration is the study of frosting and defrosting. Frosting poses a concern to many refrigeration systems, as frost growth both obstructs airflow through low temperature heat exchangers and increases heat transfer resistance. Drastic decreases in system efficiency result from the compounding of these problems, and because it is difficult to prevent the frosting process, refrigeration systems must be defrosted periodically to restore optimal operating conditions. A deeper understanding of the complex physical processes of frosting and defrosting will lead to more efficient refrigeration system designs; an idea which has driven a rise in frost growth research over recent decades. Although research has shown great progress, there remain significant challenges associated with predicting the frosting and defrosting processes accurately under wide ranges of conditions. The equations governing such behavior still remain insoluble by exact analytical methods. Numerical approaches have shown the most promising results, but are yet in an early stage of development. Most research has instead been concerned with developing correlations for frost properties and growth, though few are applicable to varying conditions. The most commonly used correlations are shown to have widely different results, perhaps owing to different experimental methods used to acquire data and a lack of deeper level analysis. A new thickness correlation is proposed which attempts to reconcile to some degree the gap between theory and application. Broader ranges of data are used for fitment which enables the application of the correlation to a wider range of conditions. To improve the consistency of results in frost research, it is suggested that new forms of data acquisition be explored. Proposed alternative methods utilize high magnification imaging equipment in combination with computer based measurements, which are shown to be capable of improving

  14. Design and analysis of air acoustic vector-sensor configurations for two-dimensional geometry.

    PubMed

    Wajid, Mohd; Kumar, Arun; Bahl, Rajendar

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic vector-sensors (AVS) have been designed using the P-P method for different microphone configurations. These configurations have been used to project the acoustic intensity on the orthogonal axes through which the direction of arrival (DoA) of a sound source has been estimated. The analytical expressions for the DoA for different microphone configurations have been derived for two-dimensional geometry. Finite element method simulation using COMSOL-Multiphysics has been performed, where the microphone signals for AVS configurations have been recorded in free field conditions. The performance of all the configurations has been evaluated with respect to angular error and root-mean-square angular error. The simulation results obtained with ideal geometry for different configurations have been corroborated experimentally with prototype AVS realizations and also compared with microphone-array method, viz., Multiple Signal Classification and Generalized Cross Correlation. Experiments have been performed in an anechoic room using different prototype AVS configurations made from small size microphones. The DoA performance using analytical expressions, simulation studies, and experiments with prototype AVS in anechoic chamber are presented in the paper. The square and delta configurations are found to perform better in the absence and presence of noise, respectively. PMID:27250174

  15. Crack detection sensor layout and bus configuration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, Nathan; Kuntz, Alan; Brubaker, Cole; Amos, Stephanie; Gao, Wei; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya; Farrar, Chuck; Mascareñas, David

    2014-05-01

    In crack detection applications large sensor arrays are needed to be able to detect and locate cracks in structures. Emerging graphene-oxide paper sensing skins are a promising technology that will help enable structural sensing skins, but in order to make use of them we must consider how the sensors will be laid out and wired on the skin. This paper analyzes different sensor shapes and layouts to determine the layout which provides the preferred performance. A ‘snaked hexagon’ layout is proposed as the preferred sensor layout when both crack detection and crack location parameters are considered. In previous work we have developed a crack detection circuit which reduces the number of channels of the system by placing several sensors onto a common bus line. This helps reduce data and power consumption requirements but reduces the robustness of the system by creating the possibility of losing sensing in several sensors in the event that a single wire breaks. In this paper, sensor bus configurations are analyzed to increase the robustness of the bused sensor system. Results show that spacing out sensors in the same bus as much as possible increases the robustness of the system and that at least 3 buses are needed to prevent large segments of a structure from losing sensing in the event of a bus failure. This work is a preliminary effort toward enabling a new class of ‘networked materials’ that will be vitally important for next generation structural applications. ‘Networked materials’ have material properties related to information theoretic concepts. An example material property is ‘bandwidth’ per unit of material that might indicate the amount of information the material can provide about its state-of-health.

  16. Experimental Data for Two Different Alternator Configurations in a Solar Brayton Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Lee S.; Shaltens, Richard K.; Espinosa, William D.

    1997-01-01

    A solar dynamic (SD) space power system has been under test at the NASA Lewis Research Center since 1994. The SD Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) system includes a solar concentrator, heat receiver with thermal energy storage, Brayton power conversion unit, and radiator installed in a thermal-vacuum chamber with a solar simulator. The Brayton unit has been operated with two different turboalternator compressor (TAC) assemblies, one which included a Rice Lundell alternator and another which incorporated a permanent magnet (PM) alternator. The Rice alternator was part of the mini-Brayton rotating unit, designed and built during the 1970's and refurbished for the GTD. The PM TAC was a development unit from the Joint US/Russian SD Flight Project. This paper highlights the operational differences (and similarities) between the Rice and PM TAC configurations including a comparative evaluation of startup characteristics and operating performance. The two alternator configurations were tested under similar thermal conditions, as an interchangeable component within the SD system. The electrical characteristics of the two units, however, dictated the use of significantly different power conditioning and control strategies. The electrical control architectures are described and compared. Test data are presented on TAC startup and system operating performance for both configurations.

  17. An experimental investigation of hybrid kerosene burner configurations for TPV applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, K.L.; Rose, M.F.; Burkhalter, J.E.

    1995-01-05

    A key element in thermophotovoltaic power generation is the development of a compact and efficient configuration for the thermal source and emitter. In the present work, a hybrid configuration was investigated which was composed of a liquid fueled diffusion type burner utilizing the emitting or mantle structure as the combustion chamber. The prototype burner operates on kerosene at fuel flow rates up to 1.0 kg/hr. Fuel is atomized using an 78 kHz ultrasonic nozzle with multifuel capabilities. Combustion is stabilized and heat transfer is enhanced via forced recirculation interior to the mantle structures. These structures range in size from 600 to 1200 cm{sup 3} and are porous in nature. This paper presents an introduction to issues specific to the use of small scale liquid fueled burners for TPV applications, and burner performance data for a series of configurations, in terms of combustor surface temperature distribution, maximum mass loading and efficiency. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Configuration analysis: an energy and first cost analysis of a large office building

    SciTech Connect

    Mangnusson, M.

    1983-01-01

    In response to the need to minimize energy use in the new Social Security Administration, Northeast Program Service Center (SSA/NEPSC), now under construction in Jamaica, Queens, New York an analysis of building configuration was undertaken. The one million square foot SSA/NEPSC federal office building was originally designed for a competition won by the joint venture firms of The Gruzen Partnership and The Ehrenkrantz Group, architects and planners, and Syska and Hennessy, mechanical and electrical engineers. When completed, the building will have 3600 employees within a 900,000 GSF, eleven story structure that will form the centerpiece of the Jamaica, Queens revitalization plan. Although substantially redesigned from the competition, two important requirements for the final building design remained: low construction cost ($70/SF-1981, New York) and low yearly energy use (45,000 /SF/YR). The strict construction cost limitations necessitated extensive value engineering of the major building systems. including the configuration.

  19. Systems design analysis applied to launch vehicle configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, R.; Verderaime, V.

    1993-01-01

    As emphasis shifts from optimum-performance aerospace systems to least lift-cycle costs, systems designs must seek, adapt, and innovate cost improvement techniques in design through operations. The systems design process of concept, definition, and design was assessed for the types and flow of total quality management techniques that may be applicable in a launch vehicle systems design analysis. Techniques discussed are task ordering, quality leverage, concurrent engineering, Pareto's principle, robustness, quality function deployment, criteria, and others. These cost oriented techniques are as applicable to aerospace systems design analysis as to any large commercial system.

  20. Analysis of the deformational behaviour of a bimorph configuration with piezoelectric actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckert, Wieland; Pfundtner, Goesta

    2002-08-01

    The stimulation of controlled deformation in lightweight constructions by means of actuator units as an integrated part of the structure currently represents an attractive subject in engineering. A common design uses a piezoelectric film that is bonded to a shell component by an adhesive layer and induces a bending deformation in the structure. A simplified beam design has been used as a test set-up to characterize the actuator performance of a given system under practical conditions. The bimorph configuration consists of an actuator unit, the bonding adhesive and the substrate material from which the lateral bending deflection of the free end, induced by actuation of the piezoelectric film, is measured. An improved theoretical approach is presented that combines a comprehensive composite theory analysis of the bending with a detailed analytical approach for the gradual stress transfer from the edges of the piezoceramic induced by a deformational misfit between the layers. The results are validated by a finite element analysis of the system. They reveal a substantial influence of the assumptions for the transverse (width direction) state of deformation for which free bending appears to be the most realistic for the test geometry. The study is completed by an experimental analysis that investigates the influence of adhesive stiffness and layer thickness on the actuator performance of a system consisting of a steel substrate and a carbon fibre reinforced substrate and a prototypic PZT actuator module. The results are correlated to the model providing a confirmation of the essential trends.

  1. On the effect of natural convection on solute segregation in the horizontal Bridgman configuration: Convergence of a theoretical model with numerical and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaddeche, S.; Garandet, J. P.; Henry, D.; Hadid, H. Ben; Mojtabi, A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of natural convection on solute segregation in the horizontal Bridgman configuration is studied. The objective is to check whether a single non-dimensional number, based on the fluid flow induced interface shear stress, is able to capture the physics of the mass transport phenomena. A number of heat and mass transfer numerical simulations are carried out in the laminar convection regime, and the segregation results are found to be in good agreement with the predictions of the scaling analysis. At the higher convective levels relevant for the comparison with existing experimental data, a direct computation of the segregation phenomena is not possible, but numerical simulations accounting for turbulence modeling can provide the interface shear stress. With this procedure, a good agreement between the experimentally measured segregation and the predictions of the scaling analysis is again observed, thus validating the choice of the interface shear stress as a key parameter for the segregation studies.

  2. Experimental Aerodynamic Characteristics of a Joined-wing Research Aircraft Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Stephen C.; Stonum, Ronald K.

    1989-01-01

    A wind-tunnel test was conducted at Ames Research Center to measure the aerodynamic characteristics of a joined-wing research aircraft (JWRA). This aircraft was designed to utilize the fuselage and engines of the existing NASA AD-1 aircraft. The JWRA was designed to have removable outer wing panels to represent three different configurations with the interwing joint at different fractions of the wing span. A one-sixth-scale wind-tunnel model of all three configurations of the JWRA was tested in the Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel to measure aerodynamic performance, stability, and control characteristics. The results of these tests are presented. Longitudinal and lateral-directional characteristics were measured over an angle of attack range of -7 to 14 deg and over an angle of sideslip range of -5 to +2.5 deg at a Mach number of 0.35 and a Reynolds number of 2.2x10(6)/ft. Various combinations of deflected control surfaces were tested to measure the effectiveness and impact on stability of several control surface arrangements. In addition, the effects on stall and post-stall aerodynamic characteristics from small leading-edge devices called vortilons were measured. The results of these tests indicate that the JWRA had very good aerodynamic performance and acceptable stability and control throughout its flight envelope. The vortilons produced a profound improvement in the stall and post-stall characteristics with no measurable effects on cruise performance.

  3. Transonic pressure measurements and comparison of theory to experiment for an arrow-wing configuration. Volume 1: Experimental data report, base configuration and effects of wing twist and leading-edge configuration. [wind tunnel tests, aircraft models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manro, M. E.; Manning, K. J. R.; Hallstaff, T. H.; Rogers, J. T.

    1975-01-01

    A wind tunnel test of an arrow-wing-body configuration consisting of flat and twisted wings, as well as a variety of leading- and trailing-edge control surface deflections, was conducted at Mach numbers from 0.4 to 1.1 to provide an experimental pressure data base for comparison with theoretical methods. Theory-to-experiment comparisons of detailed pressure distributions were made using current state-of-the-art attached and separated flow methods. The purpose of these comparisons was to delineate conditions under which these theories are valid for both flat and twisted wings and to explore the use of empirical methods to correct the theoretical methods where theory is deficient.

  4. Aerodynamic Analysis of a Hale Aircraft Joined-Wing Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaji, Rangarajan; Ghia, Urmila; Ghia, Karman; Thornburg, Hugh

    2003-11-01

    Aerodynamic analysis of a high-aspect ratio, joined wing of a High-Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) aircraft is performed. The requirement of high lift over extended flight periods for the HALE aircraft leads to high-aspect ratio wings experiencing significant deflections necessitating consideration of aeroelastic effects. The finite-volume solver COBALT, with Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) capabilities, is used for the flow simulations. Calculations are performed at á = 0° and 12° for M = 0.6, at an altitude of 30,000 feet, at a Re per unit length of 5.6x106. The wing cross sections are NACA 4421 airfoils. Because of the high lift-to-drag ratio wings, an inviscid flow analysis is also performed. The inviscid surface pressure coefficient (Cp) is compared with the corresponding viscous Cp to examine the feasibility of the use of the inviscid pressure loads as an estimate of the total fluid loads on the structure. The viscous and inviscid Cp results compare reasonably only at á = 0°. The viscous flow is examined in detail via surface and field velocity vectors, vorticity, density and pressure contours. For á = 12°, the unsteady DES solutions show a weak shock at the aft-wing trailing edge. Also, the flow near the joint exhibits a region of mild separation.

  5. Analysis and Testing of Multilayer and Aerogel Insulation Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W. L.; Demko, J. A.; Fesmire, J. E.

    2010-04-01

    Multilayer insulation systems that have robust operational characteristics have long been a goal of many research projects. Such thermal insulation systems may need to offer some degree of structural support and/or mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel-based composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel blanket and multilayer insulation materials have been tested at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MLI and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenic-vacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

  6. Analysis and testing of multilayer and aerogel insulation configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W L; Demko, Jonathan A; Fesmire, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer insulation systems that have robust operational characteristics have long been a goal of many research projects. Such thermal insulation systems may need to offer some degree of structural support and/or mechanical integrity during loss of vacuum scenarios while continuing to provide insulative value to the vessel. Aerogel-based composite blankets can be the best insulation materials in ambient pressure environments; in high vacuum, the thermal performance of aerogel improves by about one order of magnitude. Standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is typically 50% worse at ambient pressure and at soft vacuum, but as much as two or three orders of magnitude better at high vacuum. Different combinations of aerogel blanket and multilayer insulation materials have been tested at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. Analysis performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed an importance to the relative location of the MLI and aerogel blankets. Apparent thermal conductivity testing under cryogenicvacuum conditions was performed to verify the analytical conclusion. Tests results are shown to be in agreement with the analysis which indicated that the best performance is obtained with aerogel layers located in the middle of the blanket insulation system.

  7. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamic effects of distributed spanwise blowing on a fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huffman, J. K.; Hahne, D. E.; Johnson, T. D., Jr.

    1948-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests at NASA Langley targeted at the performance and configurational characteristics of 0.1 and 0.13 scale model spanwise blowing (SWB) jet wing concepts are reported. The concept involves redirection of engine compressor bleed air to provide SWB at the fuselage-wing juncture near the wing leading edge. The tests covered the orientation of the outer panel nozzles, the effects of SWB operation on the performance of leading and trailing edge flaps and the effects of SWB on lateral stability. The trials were run at low speeds and angles of attack from 24-45 deg (landing). Both lift and longitudinal stability improved with the SWB, stall and leading edge vortex breakdown were delayed and performance increased with the SWB rate. Lateral stability was degraded below 20 deg angle of attack while instabilities were delayed above 20 deg due to roll damping.

  8. Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT). System Description and users guide (revision 1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, W.; Taylor, W.; Mcgarry, F. E.; Merwarth, P.

    1982-01-01

    A system description of, and user's guide for, the Configuration Analysis Tool (CAT) are presented. As a configuration management tool, CAT enhances the control of large software systems by providing a repository for information describing the current status of a project. CAT provides an editing capability to update the information and a reporting capability to present the information. CAT is an interactive program available in versions for the PDP-11/70 and VAX-11/780 computers.

  9. Experimental aerodynamic characteristics at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70 of two supersonic cruise fighter configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dollyhigh, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Two 0.085-scale full span wind-tunnel models of a Mach 1.60 design supercruiser configuration were tested at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.70. One model incorporated a varying dihedral (swept-up) wing to obtain the desired lateral-directional characteristics; the other incorporated more conventional twin vertical tails. The data from the wind-tunnel tests are presented without analysis.

  10. Determining potential 30/20 GHZ domestic satellite system concepts and establishment of a suitable experimental configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, G. H.; Anzic, G.

    1979-01-01

    NASA is conducting a series of millimeter wave satellite communication systems and market studies to: (1) determine potential domestic 30/20 GHz satellite concepts and market potential, and (2) establish the requirements for a suitable technology verification payload which, although intended to be modest in capacity, would sufficiently demonstrate key technologies and experimentally address key operational issues. Preliminary results and critical issues of the current contracted effort are described. Also included is a description of a NASA-developed multibeam satellite payload configuration which may be representative of concepts utilized in a technology flight verification program.

  11. Evaluation of different synchrotron beamline configurations for X-ray fluorescence analysis of environmental samples.

    PubMed

    Barberie, Sean R; Iceman, Christopher R; Cahill, Catherine F; Cahill, Thomas M

    2014-08-19

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) is a powerful elemental analysis tool, yet synchrotrons are large, multiuser facilities that are generally not amenable to modification. However, the X-ray beamlines from synchrotrons can be modified by simply including X-ray filters or removing monochromators to improve the SR-XRF analysis. In this study, we evaluated four easily applied beamline configurations for the analysis of three representative environmental samples, namely a thin aerosol sample, an intermediate thickness biological sample, and a thick rare earth mineral specimen. The results showed that the "white beam" configuration, which was simply the full, polychromatic output of the synchrotron, was the optimal configuration for the analysis of thin samples with little mass. The "filtered white beam" configuration removed the lower energy X-rays from the excitation beam so it gave better sensitivity for elements emitting more energetic X-rays. The "filtered white beam-filtered detector" configuration sacrifices the lower energy part of the spectrum (<15 keV) for improved sensitivity in the higher end (∼26 to 48 keV range). The use of a monochromatic beam, which tends to be the standard mode of operation for most SR-XRF analyses reported in the literature, gave the least sensitive analysis. PMID:25025342

  12. Experimental investigation of advanced hub and pylon fairing configurations to reduce helicopter drag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, D. M.; Mort, R. W.; Young, L. A.; Squires, P. K.

    1993-01-01

    New hub and pylon fairing designs were tested on a one-fifth scale Bell Helicopter Textron Model 222 helicopter with a bearingless main rotor hub. The blades were not installed for this test. The fairings were designed by NASA and Bell Helicopter Textron under a joint program and tested in the Ames Research Center 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel. All six aircraft forces and moments were measured using the tunnel scales system. Previous research has identified the integrated hub and pylon fairing approach as the most efficient in reducing helicopter drag. Three hub fairings and three pylon fairings were tested (in various combinations) resulting in a total of 16 different configurations, including the baseline helicopter model without fairings. The geometry of the new fairings is described in detail. Test results are presented in the form of plots of the six model forces and moments. The data show that model drag can be reduced by as much as 20 percent by combining a small hub fairing (that has a circular arc upper surface and a flat lower surface) integrated with a nontapered pylon fairing. To minimize drag, the gap between the lower surface of the hub and upper surface of the pylon fairing must be kept to a minimum. Results show that the aerodynamic effects of the fairings on static longitudinal and directional stability can also be important.

  13. Experimental study of non-linear effects in a typical shear lap joint configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwigsen, C. J.; Song, Y.; McFarland, D. M.; Bergman, L. A.; Vakakis, A. F.

    2004-10-01

    Although mechanical joints are integral parts of most practical structures, their modelling and their effects on structural dynamics are not yet fully understood. This represents a serious impediment to accurate modelling of the dynamics and to the development of reduced-order, finite element models capable of describing the effects of mechanical joints on the dynamics. In this work we provide an experimental study to quantify the non-linear effects of a typical shear lap joint on the dynamics of two structures: a beam with a bolted joint in its center; and a frame with a bolted joint in one of its members. Both structures are subjected to a variety of dynamical tests to determine the non-linear effects of the joints. The tests reveal several important influences on the effective stiffness and damping of the lap joints. The possibility of using Iwan models to represent the experimentally observed joint effects is discussed.

  14. An Analysis of Spatial Configuration and its Application to Research in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Nancy S.; Cole, James W. L.

    This paper presents an analysis of the spatial configuration of variables in a multivariate system. The purpose of the analysis is to make clearer the relationships among the variables by locating them in a minimally-dimensioned space. Similarly, individuals are located in the smaller space and related to each other on the basis of the variables…

  15. Investigation of lower hybrid wave coupling and current drive experiments at different configurations in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Qin, Y. L.; Li, W. K.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Hu, H. C.; Xu, G. S.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Group, EAST

    2011-08-01

    Using a 2 MW 2.45 GHz lower hybrid wave (LHW) system installed in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, we have systematically carried out LHW-plasma coupling and lower hybrid current drive experiments in both divertor (double null and lower single null) and limiter plasma configuration with plasma current (Ip) ˜ 250 kA and central line averaged density (ne) ˜ 1.0-1.3 × 1019 m-3 recently. Results show that the reflection coefficient (RC) first is flat up to some distance between plasma and LHW grill, and then increases with the distance. Studies indicate that with the same plasma parameters, the best coupling is obtained in the limiter case (with plasma leaning on the inner wall), followed by the lower single null, and the one with the worst coupling is the double null configuration, explained by different magnetic connection length. The RCs in the different poloidal rows show that they have different coupling characteristics, possibly due to local magnetic connection length. Current drive efficiency has been investigated by a least squares fit with N//peak=2.1, where N//peak is the peak value of parallel refractive index of the launched wave. Results show that there is no obvious difference in the current drive efficiency between double null and lower single null cases, whereas the efficiency is somewhat small in the limiter configuration. This is in agreement with the ray tracing/Fokker-Planck code simulation by LUKE/C3PO and can be interpreted by the power spectrum up-shift factor in different plasma configurations. A transformer recharge is realized with ˜0.8 MW LHW power and the energy conversion efficiency from LHW to poloidal field energy is about 2%.

  16. Investigation of lower hybrid wave coupling and current drive experiments at different configurations in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, B. J.; Qin, Y. L.; Li, W. K.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Hu, H. C.; Xu, G. S.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Group, EAST; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.

    2011-08-15

    Using a 2 MW 2.45 GHz lower hybrid wave (LHW) system installed in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, we have systematically carried out LHW-plasma coupling and lower hybrid current drive experiments in both divertor (double null and lower single null) and limiter plasma configuration with plasma current (I{sub p}) {approx} 250 kA and central line averaged density (n{sub e}) {approx} 1.0-1.3 x 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} recently. Results show that the reflection coefficient (RC) first is flat up to some distance between plasma and LHW grill, and then increases with the distance. Studies indicate that with the same plasma parameters, the best coupling is obtained in the limiter case (with plasma leaning on the inner wall), followed by the lower single null, and the one with the worst coupling is the double null configuration, explained by different magnetic connection length. The RCs in the different poloidal rows show that they have different coupling characteristics, possibly due to local magnetic connection length. Current drive efficiency has been investigated by a least squares fit with N{sub //}{sup peak}=2.1, where N{sub //}{sup peak} is the peak value of parallel refractive index of the launched wave. Results show that there is no obvious difference in the current drive efficiency between double null and lower single null cases, whereas the efficiency is somewhat small in the limiter configuration. This is in agreement with the ray tracing/Fokker-Planck code simulation by LUKE/C3PO and can be interpreted by the power spectrum up-shift factor in different plasma configurations. A transformer recharge is realized with {approx}0.8 MW LHW power and the energy conversion efficiency from LHW to poloidal field energy is about 2%.

  17. An experimental and numerical investigation of air side heat transfer and flow characteristics on finned plate configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lihao; Ling, Xiang; Peng, Hao

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a new type of finned plate heat exchanger (FPHE) is presented to recover the waste heat from exhaust flue gases. A finned plate configuration causes low pressure drop and it is especially appropriate for heat transfer at the flue gas side. Meanwhile, this paper presents a detailed experimental and numerical study of convection heat transfer and pressure drop of the new structure. Three-dimensional numerical simulation results using the CFD code FLUENT6.3 were compared with experimental data to select the best model. The heat transfer and pressure drop with different geometry pattern was then studied numerically using the selected model. And the velocity field and temperature distribution of air flow in the finned plate channel are presented with different geometry patterns. These results provide insight into improved designs of FPHEs.

  18. An Experimental and Analytical Evaluation of Wall And Window Retrofit Configurations: Supporting the Residential Retrofit Best Practices Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Stovall, Therese K; Petrie, Thomas; Kosny, Jan; Childs, Phillip W; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Hulvey, Kimberly D

    2007-11-01

    A Retrofit Best Practices Guide was developed to encourage homeowners to consider energy conservation issues whenever they modify their siding or windows. In support of this guide, an experimental program was implemented to measure the performance of a number of possible wall siding and window retrofit configurations. Both thermal and air-leakage measurements were made for a 2.4 x 2.4 m (8 x 8 ft) wall section with and without a 0.9 x 1.2 m (3 x 4 ft) window. The windows tested were previously well-characterized at a dedicated window test facility. A computer model was also used to provide information for the Best Practices Guide. The experimental data for walls and windows were used in conjunction with this model to estimate the total annual energy savings for several typical houses in a number of different locations.

  19. Experimental study of the formation of field-reversed configurations employing high-order multipole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1990-04-01

    A high-order multipole ``barrier'' field was applied at the vacuum tube wall in the TRX experiment [Phys. Fluids B 1, 840 (1989)] during both the preionization and field reversal phases of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation. Use of this field during field reversal resulted in a significant reduction of impurities as well as increased flux trapping. With a large enough Bθ at the wall, sheath detachment from the wall became apparent, and flux loss through the sheath became negligible (<10%). At larger wall Bθ (>1.5 kG), destructive rotational spin-up occurred, driven by Hall current forces. When the multipole barrier field was also applied during either axial discharge or ringing theta current preionization, a very symmetric and uniform breakdown of the fill gas was achieved. In particular, using ringing theta preionization, complete ionization of the fill gas was accomplished with purely inductive fields of remarkably low magnitude, where Ez≤3 V/cm, and Eθ≤20 V/cm. Due to the improved ionization symmetry, about 65% to 75% of the lift-off flux (flux remaining after field reversal) could be retained through the remaining formation processes into an equilibrium FRC. Using the multipole field during both preionization and formation, it was possible to form FRC's with good confinement with greater than 3 mWb of trapped flux at 15 mTorr D2 or H2 in a 10 cm radius device. Values of s in excess of 4 could be achieved in this manner.

  20. Concept report: Experimental vector magnetograph (EXVM) operational configuration balloon flight assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The observational limitations of earth bound solar studies has prompted a great deal of interest in recent months in being able to gain new scientific perspectives through, what should prove to be, relatively low cost flight of the magnetograph system. The ground work done by TBE for the solar balloon missions (originally planned for SOUP and GRID) as well as the rather advanced state of assembly of the EXVM has allowed the quick formulation of a mission concept for the 30 cm system currently being assembled. The flight system operational configuration will be discussed as it is proposed for short duration flight (on the order of one day) over the continental United States. Balloon hardware design requirements used in formulation of the concept are those set by the National Science Balloon Facility (NSBF), the support agency under NASA contract for flight services. The concept assumes that the flight hardware assembly would come together from three development sources: the scientific investigator package, the integration contractor package, and the NSBF support system. The majority of these three separate packages can be independently developed; however, the computer control interfaces and telemetry links would require extensive preplanning and coordination. A special section of this study deals with definition of a dedicated telemetry link to be provided by the integration contractor for video image data for pointing system performance verification. In this study the approach has been to capitalize to the maximum extent possible on existing hardware and system design. This is the most prudent step that can be taken to reduce eventual program cost for long duration flights. By fielding the existing EXVM as quickly as possible, experience could be gained from several short duration flight tests before it became necessary to commit to major upgrades for long duration flights of this system or of the larger 60 cm version being considered for eventual development.

  1. Experimental study of absorption band controllable planar metamaterial absorber using asymmetrical snowflake-shaped configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yongjun; Tian, Yiran; Wen, Guangjun; Zhu, Weiren

    2013-05-01

    In this paper, we systematically discuss a novel planar metamaterial absorber (PMA) based on asymmetrical snowflake-shaped resonators, which can exhibit two distinctly different absorption states, single- and dual-band absorptions, by controlling the branch lengths of the proposed resonators. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements are employed to investigate these two kinds of absorption characteristic in an X-band rectangular waveguide. Both results indicate that such a PMA exhibits a wide range of controllable operating frequencies for the single- and dual-band conditions. The proposed PMA is simple and easy to make, and it has wide applications in the fields of stealth technologies, thermal detectors, and imaging.

  2. Experimental characterization of Polaroid ultrasonic sensors in single and phased array configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Alex; Borenstein, Johann

    2002-07-01

    Many mobile robots use Polaroid ultrasonic sensors for obstacle avoidance. This paper describes the experimental characterization of these sensors using a unique, fully automated testbed system. Using this testbed, we gathered large data sets of 5,000-16,000 data points in every experiment for characterization purposes; in a repeatable fashion and without human supervision. In the experimental characterization reported in this paper we focused on a comparison of the beamwidth of a single sonar with that of a dual sonar phased array. For the single sonar we found that flat walls trigger echo signals up to an angle of +/- 42 degree(s), which is well beyond the traditional assumed beamwidth of +/- 15 degree(s). We determined that these echoes result from the secondary and tertiary lobe of the well known multi-lobed propagation patterns of Polaroid ultrasonic sensors. In contrast, with the dual sonar phased array echo signals were triggered only up to beamwidths of 4-6 degree(s). The results in this paper were obtained for two test targets: a specular surface and a cylindrical object.

  3. Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-200 supersonic transport configuration concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkley, K. B.; Martin, G. L.

    1979-01-01

    The design and analysis of a supersonic transport configuration was conducted using linear theory methods in conjunction with appropriate constraints. Wing optimization centered on the determination of the required twist and camber and proper integration of the wing and fuselage. Also included in the design are aerodynamic refinements to the baseline wing thickness distribution and nacelle shape. Analysis to the baseline and revised configurations indicated an improvement in lift-to-drag ratio of 0.36 at the Mach 2.7 cruise condition. Validation of the design is planned through supersonic wing tunnel tests.

  4. Steady and unsteady transonic small disturbance analysis of realistic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Seidel, David A.; Bennett, Robert M.; Cunningham, Herbert J.; Bland, Samuel R.

    1988-01-01

    A transonic unsteady aerodynamic and aeroelasticity code CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program-Transonic Small Disturbance) has been developed for application to realistic aircraft configurations. The code uses a time-accurate approximate factorization (AF) algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small-disturbance potential equation. The paper gives an overview of the CAP-TSD code development effort and reports on recent algorithm modifications. The algorithm modifications include: an Engquist-Osher (E-O) type-dependent switch to treat regions of supersonic flow, extension of the E-O switch for second-order spatial accuracy, nonisentropic effects to treat strong-shock cases, nonreflecting far field boundary conditions for unsteady applications, and several modifications to accelerate convergence to steady state. The modifications have significantly improved the stability of the AF algorithm and hence the reliability of the CAP-TSD code in general. Calculations are also presented from a flutter analysis of a 45-deg sweptback wing which agree well with experimental data. The paper present descriptions of the CAP-TSD code and algorithm details along with results.

  5. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, we find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.

  6. Analysis of hydrogen adsorption and surface binding configuration on tungsten using direct recoil spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kolasinski, R. D.; Hammond, K. D.; Whaley, J. A.; Buchenauer, D. A.; Wirth, B. D.

    2014-12-03

    In our work, we apply low energy ion beam analysis to examine directly how the adsorbed hydrogen concentration and binding configuration on W(1 0 0) depend on temperature. We exposed the tungsten surface to fluxes of both atomic and molecular H and D. We then probed the H isotopes adsorbed along different crystal directions using 1–2 keV Ne+ ions. At saturation coverage, H occupies two-fold bridge sites on W(1 0 0) at 25 °C. Moreover, the H coverage dramatically changes the behavior of channeled ions, as does reconstruction of the surface W atoms. For the exposure conditions examined here, wemore » find that surface sites remain populated with H until the surface temperature reaches 200 °C. Then, we observe H rapidly desorbing until only a residual concentration remains at 450 °C. Development of an efficient atomistic model that accurately reproduces the experimental ion energy spectra and azimuthal variation of recoiled H is underway.« less

  7. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-01

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  8. Noise characteristics of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, W. H.; Searle, N.; Blakney, D. F.; Pennock, A. P.; Gibson, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental data base was developed from the model upper surface blowing (USB) propulsive lift system hardware. While the emphasis was on far field noise data, a considerable amount of relevant flow field data were also obtained. The data were derived from experiments in four different facilities resulting in: (1) small scale static flow field data; (2) small scale static noise data; (3) small scale simulated forward speed noise and load data; and (4) limited larger-scale static noise flow field and load data. All of the small scale tests used the same USB flap parts. Operational and geometrical variables covered in the test program included jet velocity, nozzle shape, nozzle area, nozzle impingement angle, nozzle vertical and horizontal location, flap length, flap deflection angle, and flap radius of curvature.

  9. Experimental investigation of microwave interaction with magnetoplasma in miniature multipolar configuration using impedance measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Indranuj Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2014-09-15

    A miniature microwave plasma source employing both radial and axial magnetic fields for plasma confinement has been developed for micro-propulsion applications. Plasma is initiated by launching microwaves via a short monopole antenna to circumvent geometrical cutoff limitations. The amplitude and phase of the forward and reflected microwave power is measured to obtain the complex reflection coefficient from which the equivalent impedance of the plasma source is determined. Effect of critical plasma density condition is reflected in the measurements and provides insight into the working of the miniature plasma source. A basic impedance calculation model is developed to help in understanding the experimental observations. From experiment and theory, it is seen that the equivalent impedance magnitude is controlled by the coaxial discharge boundary conditions, and the phase is influenced primarily by the plasma immersed antenna impedance.

  10. Theoretical and experimental comparative study of a derivative from 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde which exhibits configurational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, Mónica A.; Soto-Monsalve, Mónica; Gutiérrez, Gustavo; D'vries, Richard F.; Chaur, Manuel N.

    2016-09-01

    The (E)-4-nitro-N‧-(pyridine-2-ylmethylene)benzohydrazide, a derivative from 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde, displays E/Z isomerization induced by ultraviolet radiation in which the process of photoisomerization was evidenced and followed by 1D 1H NMR. The structure of the compound was determined by FT-IR and NMR techniques and confirmed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The results in terms of bond angle and length, chemical shift (13C and 1H) and vibrational frequencies obtained experimentally were compared to computed values at two levels of theory (Restricted Hartree-Fock and Density Functional Theory) using different basis set. The understanding of spectroscopy and dynamic properties of these type of compounds is of importance in view of their potential use in molecular machines and electronic devices.

  11. Experimental imaging performance evaluation for alternate configurations of undersea pulsed laser serial imagers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalgleish, Fraser R.; Vuorenkoski, Anni K.; Nootz, Gero; Ouyang, Bing; Caimi, Frank M.

    2011-06-01

    This paper examines imaging performance bounds for undersea electro-optic identification (EOID) sensors that use pulsed laser line scanners to form serial images, typically utilizing one laser pulse for each formed image element. The experimental results presented include the use of two distinct imaging geometries; firstly where the laser source and single element optical detector are nearly co-aligned (near monostatic) and secondly where the laser source is deployed on a separate platform positioned closer to the target (bistatic) to minimize source-to-target beam spread, volumetric scatter and attenuation, with the detector being positioned much further from the target. The former system uses synchronous scanning in order to significantly limit the required instantaneous angular acceptance function of the detector and has the desired intention of acquiring only ballistic photons that have directly interacted with the target element and the undesirable property of acquiring snake photon contributions that indirectly arrive into the detector aperture via multiple forward scattering over the two-way propagation path. The latter system utilizes a staring detector with a much wider angular acceptance function, the objective being to deliver maximum photon density to each target element and acquire diffuse, snake and ballistic photon contributions in order to maximize the signal. The objective of this work was to experimentally investigate pulse-to-pulse detection statistics for both imaging geometries in carefully controlled particle suspensions, with and without artificially generated random uncharacterized scattering inhomogeneities to assess potential image performance in realistic conditions where large biological and mineral particles, aggregates, thin biological scattering layers and turbulence will exist. More specifically, the study investigates received pulse energy variance in clear filtered water, as well as various well-characterized particle suspensions

  12. Overview of HATP Experimental Aerodynamics Data for the Baseline F/A-18 Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert M.; Murri, Daniel G.; Erickson, Gary E.; Fisher, David F.; Banks, Daniel W.; Lanser, Wendy, R.

    1996-01-01

    Determining the baseline aerodynamics of the F/A-18 was one of the major objectives of the High-Angle-of-Attack Technology Program (HATP). This paper will review the key data bases that have contributed to our knowledge of the baseline aerodynamics and the improvements in test techniques that have resulted from the experimental program. Photographs are given highlighting the forebody and leading-edge-extension (LEX) vortices. Other data representing the impact of Mach and Reynolds numbers on the forebody and LEX vortices will also be detailed. The level of agreement between different tunnels and between tunnels and flight will be illustrated using pressures, forces, and moments measured on a 0.06-scale model tested in the Langley 7- by 10-Foot High Speed Tunnel, a 0.16-scale model in the Langley 30- by 60-Foot Tunnel, a full-scale vehicle in the Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the flight F/A-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). Next, creative use of wind tunnel resources that accelerated the validation of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes will be described. Lastly, lessons learned, deliverables, and program conclusions are presented.

  13. Loads analysis and testing of flight configuration solid rocket motor outer boot ring segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Rafiq

    1990-01-01

    The loads testing on in-house-fabricated flight configuration Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) outer boot ring segments. The tests determined the bending strength and bending stiffness of these beams and showed that they compared well with the hand analysis. The bending stiffness test results compared very well with the finite element data.

  14. Temporal Patterns of Variable Relationships in Person-Oriented Research: Longitudinal Models of Configural Frequency Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Eye, Alexander; Mun, Eun Young; Bogat, G. Anne

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews the premises of configural frequency analysis (CFA), including methods of choosing significance tests and base models, as well as protecting [alpha], and discusses why CFA is a useful approach when conducting longitudinal person-oriented research. CFA operates at the manifest variable level. Longitudinal CFA seeks to identify…

  15. Shielding Characteristics Using an Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source to Generate Modes - Experimental Measurements and Analytical Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutliff, Daniel L.; Walker, Bruce E.

    2014-01-01

    An Ultrasonic Configurable Fan Artificial Noise Source (UCFANS) was designed, built, and tested in support of the NASA Langley Research Center's 14x22 wind tunnel test of the Hybrid Wing Body (HWB) full 3-D 5.8% scale model. The UCFANS is a 5.8% rapid prototype scale model of a high-bypass turbofan engine that can generate the tonal signature of proposed engines using artificial sources (no flow). The purpose of the program was to provide an estimate of the acoustic shielding benefits possible from mounting an engine on the upper surface of a wing; a flat plate model was used as the shielding surface. Simple analytical simulations were used to preview the radiation patterns - Fresnel knife-edge diffraction was coupled with a dense phased array of point sources to compute shielded and unshielded sound pressure distributions for potential test geometries and excitation modes. Contour plots of sound pressure levels, and integrated power levels, from nacelle alone and shielded configurations for both the experimental measurements and the analytical predictions are presented in this paper.

  16. Experimental evaluation of honeycomb/screen configurations and short contraction section for NASA Lewis Research Center's altitude wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard R.; Harrington, Douglas E.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the high speed leg of the 0.1 scale model of the proposed Altitude Wind Tunnel to evaluate flow conditioner configurations in the settling chamber and their effect on the flow through the short contraction section. The lowest longitudinal turbulence intensity measured at the contraction-section entrance, 1.2%, was achieved with a honeycomb plus three fine-mesh screens. Turbulence intensity in the test section was estimated to be between 0.1 and 0.2% with the honeycomb plus three fine mesh screens in the settling chamber. Adding screens, however, adversely affected the total pressure profile, causing a small defect near the centerline at the contraction section entrance. No significant boundary layer separation was evident in the short contraction section.

  17. Interpretation of discrepancies in mass spectroscopy data obtained from different experimental configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, John M.

    1993-01-01

    Many helium mass spectrometer leak detectors at KSC employ sampling systems that feature hand held sniffer probes. Authors of general leakage-testing literature recommend sniffer probes for leak location but not for quantitative leakage measurement. Their use in the latter application at KSC involves assumptions that may be subtle. The purpose of the research effort reported herein was to establish the significance of indicated leak rates displayed by sniffer-probe equipped leak detectors and to determine whether the use of alternative hardware or testing procedures may reduce the uncertainty of leakage measurements made with them. The report classifies probe-type sampling systems for helium leak detectors according to their internal plumbing (direct or branched), presents a basic analysis of the fluid dynamics in the sampling system in the branched-conduit case, describes the usual test method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio (a.k.a permeation ratio), and describes a concept for a sponge-tipped probe whose external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio promises to be lower than that of a simple-ended probe. One conclusion is that the main source of uncertainty in the use of probe-type sampling systems for leakage measurement is uncertainty in the external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio. In contrast, the present method for measuring the internal supply-to-sample flowrate ratio is quantitative and satisfactory. The implication is that probes of lower external supply-to-sample flowrate ratio must be developed before this uncertainty may be reduced significantly.

  18. Shock unsteadiness creation and propagation: experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benay, R.; Alaphilippe, M.; Severac, N.

    2012-09-01

    The possibility of creating unsteady distortions of the tip shock by waves emitted from an aircraft is assessed experimentally. The model chosen is a cylindrical fore body equipped with a spike. This configuration is known for generating an important level of unsteadiness around the spike in supersonic regime. The wind tunnel Mach number is equal to 2. The experiments show that waves emitted from this source propagate along the tip shock and interact with it. It is then assessed that this interaction produces a periodic distortion of the shock that propagates to the external flow. Unsteady pressure sensors, high speed schlieren films, hot wire probing and laser Doppler velocimetry are used as complementary experimental means. The final result is a coherent representation of the complex mechanism of wave propagation that has been evidenced. The principle of creating unsteady shock deformation by onboard equipments could be examined as a possibly promising method of sonic boom control.

  19. Experimental investigation of the inlet detector configuration variation in the flow field at Mach 1.9

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, Kyu C.; Tiwari, Surrendra N.; Miley, Stanley J.

    1995-01-01

    In recent years, active research has been conducted to study the technological feasibility of supersonic laminar flow control on the wing of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). For this study, the F-16XL has been chosen due to its highly swept crank wing planform that closely resembles the HSCT configurations. During flights, it is discovered that the shock wave generated from the aircraft inlet introduces disturbances on the wing where the data acquisition is conducted. The flow field about a supersonic inlet is characterized by a complex three dimensional pattern of shock waves generated by the geometrical configuration of a deflector and a cowl lip. Hence, in this study, experimental method is employed to investigate the effects of the variation of deflector configuration on the flow field, and consequently, the possibility of diverting the incoming shock-disturbances away from the test section. In the present experiments, a model composed of a simple circular tube with a triangular deflector is designed to study the deflector length and the deflector base width variation in the flow field. Experimental results indicate that the lowest external pressure ratio is observed at the junction where the deflector lip and the inlet cowl lip merge. Also, it is noted that the external pressure ratio, the internal pressure ratio, the coefficient of spillage drag, and the shock standoff distance decrease as the deflector length increases. In addition, the Redefined Total Pressure Recovery Ratio (RTPRR) increases with an increase in the deflector length. Results from the study of the effect of the deflector's base width variation on the flow field indicate that the lowest external pressure ratio is observed at the junction between the inlet cowl lip and the deflector lip. As the base width of the deflector increases, the external pressure ratio at 0 rotation increases, whereas the external pressure ratio at 180 rotation decreases. In addition, the internal pressure ratio

  20. Analysis and optimization of preliminary aircraft configurations in relationship to emerging agility metrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Bauer, Brent Alan

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a FORTRAN computer code to perform agility analysis on aircraft configurations. This code is to be part of the NASA-Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. This paper begins with a discussion of contemporary agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics. The methodology, techniques and models developed for the code are then presented. Finally, example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT are illustrated. These trade studies were conducted using a Northrop F-20 Tigershark aircraft model. The studies show that the agility module is effective in analyzing the influence of common parameters such as thrust-to-weight ratio and wing loading on agility criteria. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations. In addition one study illustrates the module's ability to optimize a configuration's agility performance.

  1. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Perry A.; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics. The focus here is on those methods particularly well- suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid computational fluid dynamics in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  2. Overview of Sensitivity Analysis and Shape Optimization for Complex Aerodynamic Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, James C., III; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene J.-W.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of some of the more recent advances in steady aerodynamic shape-design sensitivity analysis and optimization, based on advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The focus here is on those methods particularly well-suited to the study of geometrically complex configurations and their potentially complex associated flow physics. When nonlinear state equations are considered in the optimization process, difficulties are found in the application of sensitivity analysis. Some techniques for circumventing such difficulties are currently being explored and are included here. Attention is directed to methods that utilize automatic differentiation to obtain aerodynamic sensitivity derivatives for both complex configurations and complex flow physics. Various examples of shape-design sensitivity analysis for unstructured-grid CFD algorithms are demonstrated for different formulations of the sensitivity equations. Finally, the use of advanced, unstructured-grid CFDs in multidisciplinary analyses and multidisciplinary sensitivity analyses within future optimization processes is recommended and encouraged.

  3. Galaxy triplets in Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 - III. Analysis of configuration and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duplancic, Fernanda; Alonso, Sol; Lambas, Diego G.; O'Mill, Ana Laura

    2015-02-01

    We analyse the spatial configuration and the dynamical properties of a sample of 92 galaxy triplets obtained from the Data Release 7 of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-DR7; SDSS-triplets) restricted to have members with spectroscopic redshifts in the range 0.01 ≤ z ≤ 0.14 and absolute r-band luminosities brighter than Mr = -20.5. The configuration analysis was performed through Agekyan & Anosova map (AA-map). We estimated dynamical parameters, namely the radius of the system, the velocity dispersion, a dimensionless crossing-time and the virial mass. We compared our results with those obtained for a sample of triplets from the catalogue `Isolated Triplets of Galaxies' (K-triplets) and a sample of Compact Groups. We have also studied a mock catalogue in order to compare real and projected configurations, and to estimate the three-dimensional dynamical parameters of the triple systems. We found that the SDSS-triplets prefer alignment configurations while K-triplets present a uniform distribution in the AA-map. From the dynamical analysis we conclude that the SDSS-triplets, K-triplets and Compact Groups present a similar behaviour comprising compact systems with low crossing-time values, with velocity dispersions and virial masses similar to those of low-mass loose groups. Moreover, we found that observed and simulated triplets present similar dynamical parameters. We also performed an analysis of the dark matter content of galaxy triplets finding that member galaxies of mock triplets belong to the same dark matter halo, showing a dynamical co-evolution of the system. These results suggest that the configuration and dynamics of triple systems favour galaxy interactions and mergers.

  4. An Experimental Analysis of Reading Fluency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Kevin M.; Wickstrom, Katherine F.; Noltemeyer, Amity L.; Brown, Shelaina M.; Schuka, Jeffrey R.; Therrien, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental analysis of academic responding has emerged as one approach to strengthening decisions related to problem analysis and treatment design. This study provided an example of how both brief and extended assessments can be used within a data based, problem solving approach to addressing reading fluency concerns. For six children with…

  5. Experimental modal analysis. [for vibrating structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental modal analysis is extremely important with regard to verification of analytical models, identification of vibration and acoustic problems, and structural modification and sensitivity analysis. With the expanding access of the testing environment to computational power, the complexity of existing approaches, as well as the development of new approaches, to the estimation of modal parameters has grown tremendously. Currently, the state of the art in experimental modal analysis involves methods that can be grouped in four categories: forced normal mode excitation method, frequency response function method, damped complex exponential function method, and mathematical input-output model methods. The theoretical basis of each of these general approaches, with appropriate references, is reviewed briefly.

  6. Experimental Investigation of a Hypersonic Glider Configuration at a Mach Number of 6 and at Full-Scale Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin; Wilkins, Max E.

    1961-01-01

    The aerodynamic characteristics of a hypersonic glider configuration, consisting of a slender ogive cylinder with three highly swept wings, spaced 120 apart, with the wing chord equal to the body length, were investigated experimentally at a Mach number of 6 and at Reynolds numbers from 6 to 16 million. The objectives were to evaluate the theoretical procedures which had been used to estimate the performance of the glider, and also to evaluate the characteristics of the glider itself. A principal question concerned the viscous drag at full-scale Reynolds number, there being a large difference between the total drags for laminar and turbulent boundary layers. It was found that the procedures which had been applied for estimating minimum drag, drag due to lift, lift curve slope, and center of pressure were generally accurate within 10 percent. An important exception was the non-linear contribution to the lift coefficient which had been represented by a Newtonian term. Experimentally, the lift curve was nearly linear within the angle-of-attack range up to 10 deg. This error affected the estimated lift-drag ratio. The minimum drag measurements indicated that substantial amounts of turbulent boundary layer were present on all models tested, over a range of surface roughness from 5 microinches maximum to 200 microinches maximum. In fact, the minimum drag coefficients were nearly independent of the surface smoothness and fell between the estimated values for turbulent and laminar boundary layers, but closer to the turbulent value. At the highest test Reynolds numbers and at large angles of attack, there was some indication that the skin friction of the rough models was being increased by the surface roughness. At full-scale Reynolds number, the maximum lift-drag ratio with a leading edge of practical diameter (from the standpoint of leading-edge heating) was 4.0. The configuration was statically and dynamically stable in pitch and yaw, and the center of pressure was less

  7. Sensitivity analysis of flexible joint nonholonomic wheeled mobile manipulator in singular configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, A. H.; Azimirad, V.; Binabaji, H.; Korayem, M. H.

    2012-03-01

    This paper proposes a method for decreasing jerk and increasing Maximum Allowable Load (MAL) of nonholonomic Wheeled Mobile Manipulator (WMM) considering flexibility of joints in singular conditions. The full dynamic model of nonholonomic WMM contains simultaneous operation of mobile base and manipulator with joint flexibility (in wheels and manipulator) which is presented here. The problem is formulated in terms of the optimal control which leads to a two point boundary value problem. Then Sobol's sensitivity analysis method is applied to determine the optimal values of flexible joint constants subject to the jerk minimization. To illustrate the proposed method, two categories of conditions are considered: conditions containing non-singular configuration and the singular conditions. An example is explained for non-singular condition of nonholonomic WMM in presence of obstacle in which a complex path is generated but there is no singularity in robot configuration. Some examples of occurring singular configuration in final point and moving boundary condition is also presented. The results show that flexibility of the joints near to singular configuration normalizes the sudden movement and jerk implied to actuators. That is why using a rotational spring with a low stiffness coefficient could be helpful to decrease the high jerk and increase the maximum allowable load in mobile robots.

  8. An experimental analysis of human straight walking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tao; Ceccarelli, Marco

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental analysis of human straight walking has been presented. Experiments on human walking were carried out by using Cassino tracking system which is a passive cable-based measuring system. This system is adopted because it is capable of both pose and wrench measurements with fairly simple monitoring of operation. By using experimental results, trajectories of a human limb extremity and its posture have been analyzed; forces that are exerted against cables by the limb of a person under test have been measured by force sensors as well. Furthermore, by using experimental tests, modeling and characterization of the human straight walking gait have been proposed.

  9. Transonic aeroelastic analysis of launch vehicle configurations. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filgueirasdeazevedo, Joao Luiz

    1988-01-01

    A numerical study of the aeroelastic stability of typical launch vehicle configurations in transonic flight is performed. Recent computational fluid dynamics techniques are used to simulate the transonic aerodynamic flow fields, as opposed to relying on experimental data for the unsteady aerodynamic pressures. The flow solver is coupled to an appropriate structural representation of the vehicle. The aerodynamic formulation is based on the thin layer approximation to the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations, where the account for turbulent mixing is done by the two-layer Baldwin and Lomax algebraic eddy viscosity model. The structural-dynamic equations are developed considering free-free flexural vibration of an elongated beam with variable properties and are cast in modal form. Aeroelastic analyses are performed by integrating simultaneously in the two sets of equations. By tracing the growth or decay of a perturbed oscillation, the aeroelastic stability of a given constant configuration can be ascertained. The method is described in detail, and results that indicate its application are presented. Applications include some validation cases for the algorithm developed, as well as the study of configurations known to have presented flutter programs in the past.

  10. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 5 - North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS 8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit for the negative reactivity of the depleted (or spent) fuel isotopics is desired, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods against spent fuel critical configurations. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWR). The analysis methodology selected for all calculations reported herein was the codes and data provided in the SCALE-4 code system. The isotopic densities for the spent fuel assemblies in the critical configurations were calculated using the SAS2H analytical sequence of the SCALE-4 system. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code module was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from the SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required by the SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of the cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of each case. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all the calculations. This volume of the report documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. This unit and cycle were chosen for a previous analysis using a different methodology because detailed isotopics from multidimensional reactor calculations were available from the Virginia Power Company. These data permitted comparison of criticality calculations directly using the utility-calculated isotopics to those using the isotopics generated by the SCALE-4 SAS2H

  11. Overview of the C-2 Field-Reversed Configuration Experimental Program and Future Plan on C-2 Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaokang; Gota, Hiroshi; Binderbauer, Michl; Tuszewski, Michel; Guo, Houyang; Garate, Eusebio; Barnes, Dan; Putvinski, Sergei; Tajima, Toshiki; Sevier, Leigh

    2014-10-01

    C-2 is the world's largest compact-toroid (CT) device at Tri Alpha Energy that produces field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmas by colliding/merging oppositely-directed CTs and seeks to study the evolution, heating and sustainment effects of neutral-beam (NB) injection into FRCs. Recently, significant progress has been made in C-2 on both technology and physics fronts, achieving ~ 5 ms stable plasmas with a dramatic improvement in confinement. FRCs are stabilized with an edge biasing using end-on plasma-guns and/or electrodes, and are partially sustained with NB injection (20 keV Hydrogen, ~ 4 MW). Recent work to reduce scrape-off layer and radiative losses has succeeded in reducing the average power balance deficit to ~ 1.5 MW. Increasing plasma pressure and electron temperature are now observed during brief periods of the discharge, which indicate a sign of NB injection effect such as accumulating fast-ions as well as heating core/edge plasmas. Highlights of these advances, broader C-2 experimental program, and future plan on upgrading the C-2 device with new NBs (15 keV, up to 10 MW injection power, selectable beam injection angle) will be presented.

  12. Modal survey and test-analysis correlation of a multiply-configured three-stage booster

    SciTech Connect

    Marek, E.L.; Branstetter, L.J. ); Freed, A.M. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes procedure used to produce a test-validated finite element model of a three-stage solid propellant booster system. A series of system-level modal tests were performed for several inert and live propellant configurations. Test-analysis models (TAMs) were used to provide pretest support of the live propellant system tests. Confidence in the model was established by a test-analysis correlation procedure. Optimization techniques were used to determine appropriate model updates. 11 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Ignitor Structural Analysis for Double X-points Configurations and Machine Cooling System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, A.; Frosi, P.; Coppi, B.

    2009-11-01

    Recent activities carried out by ANSALDO for the Ignitor program include the structural analysis of the machine Load Assembly for two new scenarios that extend the operation of the machine to H- regimes, where the plasma equilibrium configuration is of the double X- point type and the out-of-plane forces increase. A complete structural analysis was carried out for three scenarios with BT= 13 T and Ip= 9 and 10 MA and double X points just outside the plasma chamber, and Ip= 9 MA and double X points just inside the plasma chamber. The lowered values of the plasma current can offset the increase of stress due to the less favorable X-point configuration relative to the ``extended limiter'' configuration. With the cryogenic plant involving gaseous helium and studied by LINDE KRYOTECHNIK AG, the toroidal field coils reach temperatures up to 230 K and the central solenoid coils approach 220 K after a pulse at the most extreme machine parameters, while the vertical field coils remain under 100 K. Several hours are needed to re-cool the machine down to 30 K before each pulse. New calculations are underway to verify the plant cooling performance at reduced parameters but with more stringent cooling times between shots.

  14. Debris prevention analysis for DFI/OFI/OEI (STS-26 configuration only)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richi, Glen A.

    1988-01-01

    The first 3 shuttle flights to use the Redesigned Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) will utilize Development Flight Instrumentation (DFI), as well as Operational Flight Instrumentation (OFI), and Operational Environment Instrumentation (OEI). The OFI consists of high pressure transducers used on both RSRMs to monitor the igniter and motor chamber pressure. DFI consists of assorted strain gages, temperature sensors, accelerometers, girth gages, and low level pressure transducers. The latter are installed on the left hand booster to measure post-separation aerodynamic loading. OEI consistes of temperature sensors. After Flight 3, all DFI gages are to be deleted, and only OFI and OEI will be used for subsequent flights. This report deals specifically with debris prevention and hazards concernig the STS-26 flight DFI configuration only. Continued analysis is being done that will adequately address the debris hazards associated with the STS-27 and subsequent flight DFI configurations.

  15. Aero-thermal analysis of lifting body configurations in hypersonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mahulikar, Shripad P.

    2016-09-01

    The aero-thermal analysis of a hypersonic vehicle is of fundamental interest for designing its thermal protection system. The aero-thermal environment predictions over several critical regions of the hypothesized lifting body vehicle, including the stagnation region of the nose-cap, cylindrically swept leading edges, fuselage-upper, and fuselage-lower surfaces, are discussed. The drag (Λ=70°) and temperature (Λ=80°) minimized sweepback angles are considered in the configuration design of the two hypothesized lifting body shape hypersonic vehicles. The main aim of the present study is to analyze and compare the aero-thermal characteristics of these two lifting body configurations at same heat capacity. Accordingly, a Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation has been carried out at Mach number (M∞=7), H=35 km altitude with zero Angle of Attack. Finally, the material selection for thermal protection system based on these predictions and current methodology is described.

  16. Dynamic analysis of space time effects in the ISU RACE configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulik, Viktoriya V.; Lee, John C.; Beller, Denis E.

    2006-06-01

    We present reactor physics analyses for the accelerator-driven thermal reactor configuration of the Reactor-Accelerator Coupling Experiments Project (RACE) at Idaho State University. A full-core model is developed using the ERANOS deterministic code coupled with the JEF2.2 nuclear data library. A pulsed source experiment is simulated to test performance of the traditional point kinetics and space-time α-methods for reactivity determination. Analysis of the simulated 235U detector responses to a neutron source pulse indicates the inability of point kinetics theory to correctly determine the reactivity for the subcritical RACE configuration. The ERANOS simulation indicates that the traditional α-method overestimates keff by 4.5%, whereas the space-time α-method could yield significant improvements if sufficiently accurate simulations are available.

  17. The analysis of high pressure experimental data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert; Ferrante, John

    1991-01-01

    This letter is concerned with the analysis of high pressure experimental data. It is demonstrated that ln H plots based on the Vinet et al. (1988) universal equation of state are a simple sensitive means for identifying anomalous P-V data in high pressure experiments and for detecting structural and phase transitions in solids subjected to high pressure.

  18. Transient analysis and energy optimization of solar heating and cooling systems in various configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Calise, F.; Dentice d'Accadia, M.; Palombo, A.

    2010-03-15

    In this paper, a transient simulation model of solar-assisted heating and cooling systems (SHC) is presented. A detailed case study is also discussed, in which three different configurations are considered. In all cases, the SHC system is based on the coupling of evacuated solar collectors with a single-stage LiBr-H{sub 2}O absorption chiller, and a gas-fired boiler is also included for auxiliary heating, only during the winter season. In the first configuration, the cooling capacity of the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are designed on the basis of the maximum cooling load, and an electric chiller is used as the auxiliary cooling system. The second layout is similar to the first one, but, in this case, the absorption chiller and the solar collector area are sized in order to balance only a fraction of the maximum cooling load. Finally, in the third configuration, there is no electric chiller, and the auxiliary gas-fired boiler is also used in summer to feed the absorption chiller, in case of scarce solar irradiation. The simulation model was developed using the TRNSYS software, and included the analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the building in which the SHC systems were supposed to be installed. The building was simulated using a single-lumped capacitance model. An economic model was also developed, in order to assess the operating and capital costs of the systems under analysis. Furthermore, a mixed heuristic-deterministic optimization algorithm was implemented, in order to determine the set of the synthesis/design variables that maximize the energy efficiency of each configuration under analysis. The results of the case study were analyzed on monthly and weekly basis, paying special attention to the energy and monetary flows of the standard and optimized configurations. The results are encouraging as for the potential of energy saving. On the contrary, the SHC systems appear still far from the economic profitability: however, this is

  19. GAS CURTAIN EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS METHODOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    J. R. KAMM; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative relationship of numerical simulation to the physical phenomena being modeled is of paramount importance in computational physics. If the phenomena are dominated by irregular (i. e., nonsmooth or disordered) behavior, then pointwise comparisons cannot be made and statistical measures are required. The problem we consider is the gas curtain Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability experiments of Rightley et al. (13), which exhibit complicated, disordered motion. We examine four spectral analysis methods for quantifying the experimental data and computed results: Fourier analysis, structure functions, fractal analysis, and continuous wavelet transforms. We investigate the applicability of these methods for quantifying the details of fluid mixing.

  20. 1995 NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop. Volume 2; Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baize, Daniel G. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The High-Speed Research Program and NASA Langley Research Center sponsored the NASA High-Speed Research Program Sonic Boom Workshop on September 12-13, 1995. The workshop was designed to bring together NASAs scientists and engineers and their counterparts in industry, other Government agencies, and academia working together in the sonic boom element of NASAs High-Speed Research Program. Specific objectives of this workshop were to: (1) report the progress and status of research in sonic boom propagation, acceptability, and design; (2) promote and disseminate this technology within the appropriate technical communities; (3) help promote synergy among the scientists working in the Program; and (4) identify technology pacing, the development C, of viable reduced-boom High-Speed Civil Transport concepts. The Workshop was organized in four sessions: Sessions 1 Sonic Boom Propagation (Theoretical); Session 2 Sonic Boom Propagation (Experimental); Session 3 Acceptability Studies-Human and Animal; and Session 4 - Configuration Design, Analysis, and Testing.

  1. Numerical analysis of tungsten transport in drift-optimized stellarator with ergodic and nonergodic plasma configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyshkin, Oleg A.; Schneider, Ralf; Beidler, Craig D.

    2007-11-01

    The radial transport of tungsten ions in a fusion plasma of the HELIAS stellarator with five magnetic field periods is studied by means of a new numerical code. The code solves guiding center equations for test particles (tungsten ions) with the use of a Runge-Kutta integrating scheme. Coulomb scattering of the tungsten ions on the background plasma particles (electrons, deuterons and tritons) is simulated by means of a discretized collision operator based on the binomial distribution and presented in terms of pitch-angle scattering and energy slowing down and scattering. The coronal model is used to determine the mean charge state of the tungsten ion ensemble langZ(Te, ne)rang as a function of background electron temperature and density. Two plasma configurations with and without ergodic confinement regions and both with finite plasma pressure of β = 3% are considered. The nonergodic configuration possesses closed nested magnetic surfaces throughout the entire confinement volume. The ergodic magnetic field configuration is represented through additional magnetic field perturbations. Comparative analysis of the radial transport is performed for a time interval greater by a factor of 15 than the energy confinement time τE = 1.62 s required for the HELIAS reactor. In spite of the fact that the tendency of impurities to penetrate towards the plasma core is observed in both cases, the stochastic scenario exhibits reduced inward impurity flux.

  2. MEMS Functional Validation Using the Configuration Space Approach to Simulation and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.; Sacks, E.

    1999-03-09

    We have developed an interactive computer-aided design program that supports mechanical design of devices fabricated in surface micro-machining processes. The program automates kinematic analysis via a novel configuration space computation code, performs real-time simulation, and supports functional parametric design. Designers can visualize system function under a range of operating conditions, can find and correct design flaws, and can optimize performance. We used the program to detect and correct a design flaw in a micro-mechanical indexing mechanism fabricated at Sandia with the SUMMiT process.

  3. Analysis of the nuclear measurement program for an optimized BR2 core configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Van Den Branden, G.; Kalcheva, S.; Sikik, E.; Koonen, E.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the analysis of the results of the Nuclear Measurement Program (NMP) executed during the shut-down of cycle 05/2012 of the BR2 reactor. The aim of the NMP was to determine the properties of a reactor core load with a new configuration of the control rods and to evaluate/verify the predicted numerical results by MCNPX. The methods used for the interpretation of the measurement results include combinations of an analytical method for determination of the axial relative control rod efficiency and least square techniques. (authors)

  4. CFD Analysis of Flexible Thermal Protection System Shear Configuration Testing in the LCAT Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper documents results of computational analysis performed after flexible thermal protection system shear configuration testing in the LCAT facility. The primary objectives were to predict the shear force on the sample and the sensitivity of all surface properties to the shape of the sample. Bumps of 0.05, 0.10,and 0.15 inches were created to approximate the shape of some fabric samples during testing. A large amount of information was extracted from the CFD solutions for comparison between runs and also current or future flight simulations.

  5. Multiple-input experimental modal analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allemang, R. J.; Brown, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    The development of experimental modal analysis techniques is reviewed. System and excitation assumptions are discussed. The methods examined include the forced normal mode excitation method, the frequency response function method, the damped complex exponential response method, the Ibrahim time domain approach, the polyreference approach, and mathematical input-output model methods. The current trend toward multiple input utilization in the estimation of system parameters is noted.

  6. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configuration: Experimental program, high-speed force tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    The work to develop a wing-nacelle arrangement to accommodate a wide range of upper surface blown configuration is reported. Pertinent model and installation details are described. Data of the effects of a wide range of nozzle geometric variations are presented. Nozzle aspect ratio, boattail angle, and chordwise position are among the parameters investigated. Straight and swept wing configurations were tested across a range of nozzle pressure ratios, lift coefficients, and Mach numbers.

  7. Analysis of Smelting Cell Experimental Trial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J. J. J.; Taylor, M. P.

    2012-02-01

    Analysis and discussion are presented for the various schemes that may be used in evaluating results such as the current efficiency (CE) obtained from aluminum smelting cell performance trials. A conventional parametric (requiring normal distribution of data) and a nonparametric (not requiring normal distribution) statistical method are given. The analysis allows the results obtained to be expressed in statistical terms with a known level of significance, thus providing a more scientific basis for the interpretation of the results. A scheme for experimental design that takes into account inherent variations and the use of a nonparametric statistical test which does not stipulate normal distribution of data are both suggested.

  8. A finite-element analysis for steady and oscillatory supersonic flows around complex configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morino, L.; Chen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of small perturbation potential supersonic flow around complex configurations is considered. This problem requires the solution of an integral equation relating the values of the potential on the surface of the body to the values of the normal derivative, which is known from the small perturbation boundary conditions. The surface of the body is divided into small (hyperboloidal quadrilateral) surface elements, sigma sub i, which are described in terms of the Cartesian components of the four corner points. The values of the potential (and its normal derivative) within each element is assumed to be constant and equal to its value at the centroid of the element, and this yields a set of linear algebraic equations. The coefficients of the equation are given by source and doublet integrals over the surface elements, sigma sub i. The results obtained using the above formulation are compared with existing analytical and experimental results.

  9. Analysis and experimental implementation of optical beamformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Richard D.; Rolsma, Peter B.; Lee, John N.

    1987-05-01

    Most modern beamformers are implemented on a digital computer. This report examines the potential for analog optical beamforming systems to meet the proposed requirements. The report lists various beamforming algorithms and their calculational complexity; a list of the strengths and weaknesses of digital implementations is also included. Various general algorithms for time and frequency domain optical beamforming are then described. Special emphasis is placed on the importance of designing efficient interfaces between analog optical and electronic systems and digital systems. Details of three implementations of optical beamformers are presented: cross bar and partial sum time domain beamformers, and a vector matrix frequency domain beamformer. Without further research it is not possible to determine the maximum practical capability of an optical beamformer, but frequency domain optical beamforming systems look promising for systems requiring large numbers of beams. The experimental optical vector matrix processor has been designed, constructed, and configured to perform frequency domain beamforming at a rate of 2 x 10 to the 9th power 8-bit multiples/sec. It also is likely that optical beamformers can meet the low power and size requirements in certain applications such as on board processing for sonobuoys employing hydrophone arrays: an architecture has been developed with potential power consumption of less than 20mW.

  10. Thermal Analysis of the 9975 Package with the 3013 Configuration During Normal Conditions of Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Hensel, S

    1999-02-22

    Thermal analysis of the 9975 package with three configurations of the BNFL 3013 outer container (with Rocky Flats, SRS, and BNFL inner containers) have been performed for Normal Conditions of Transport (NCT) of plutonium oxide and metal. The NCT is defined in 10 CFR 71.71(c)(1) s an ambient of 100 F (38 C) in still air with 800 W/m{sup 2} and 400 W/m{sup 2} of solar heating on the drum top and sides, respectively. The 9975 drum package is considered to be in an upright position, and the drum bottom is adiabatic. The Rocky and SRS 3013 configurations with Pu metal contents (19 watts) result in acceptable (similar) packaging temperatures, however the plutonium metal temperatures are lower for the SRS design (SRS has helium fill gas whereas Rocky is essentially air filled). The BNFL configuration for Pu oxide contents (19 watts) result in acceptable temperatures and pressures based on limits in the 9975 Safety Analysis Report (SARP). However, for 30 watts of Pu oxide, the fiberboard peak temperatures are very near the SARP allowable. The pressure in the 3013 container is 688.4 psig for the 30 watt Pu oxide content and 569.5 psig for the 19 watt Pu oxide content. Gas species in the pressure computations include air, helium and hydrogen from complete radiolysis of the moisture. The oxygen generated from the radiolysis of the water is not included as a pressure contributor. The gas temperature in the pressure computations was very conservatively assumed to be the maximum plutonium temperature.

  11. Aerodynamic Shape Sensitivity Analysis and Design Optimization of Complex Configurations Using Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, James C., III; Barnwell, Richard W.

    1997-01-01

    A three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed and is extended to model geometrically complex configurations. The advantage of unstructured grids (when compared with a structured-grid approach) is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional geometry and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Simple parameterization techniques are utilized for demonstrative purposes. Once the surface has been deformed, the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR (which is an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool). To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of practical interest, the sensitivity analysis and shape optimization has been performed for a two-dimensional high-lift multielement airfoil and for a three-dimensional Boeing 747-200 aircraft.

  12. Finite element modeling and modal analysis of the human spine vibration configuration.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhang, Yi-Min; Zhang, Ming

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to investigate the modal characteristics of the human spine. A 3-D finite element model of the spine T12-Pelvis segment was used to extract resonant frequencies and modal modes of the human spine. By finite element modal analysis and harmonic response analysis, several lower vibration modes in the flexion-extension, lateral bending, and vertical directions were obtained and its vibration configurations were shown in this paper. The results indicate that the lowest resonant frequency of the model is in the flexion-extension direction. The second-order resonant frequency is in the lateral bending direction and the third-order resonant frequency of the T12-Pelvis model is in the vertical direction. The results also show that lumbar spinal vertebrae conduct the rotation action during whole body vibration (WBV). The vibration configurations of the lumbar spine can explore the motion mechanism of different lumbar components under WBV and make us to understand the vibration-induced spine diseases. The findings in this study will be helpful to understand WBV-related injury of the spine in clinics and the ergonomics design and development of mechanical production to protect human spine safety. PMID:21693412

  13. Integrated multidisciplinary design optimization using discrete sensitivity analysis for geometrically complex aeroelastic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, James Charles, III

    1997-10-01

    The first two steps in the development of an integrated multidisciplinary design optimization procedure capable of analyzing the nonlinear fluid flow about geometrically complex aeroelastic configurations have been accomplished in the present work. For the first step, a three-dimensional unstructured grid approach to aerodynamic shape sensitivity analysis and design optimization has been developed. The advantage of unstructured grids, when compared with a structured-grid approach, is their inherent ability to discretize irregularly shaped domains with greater efficiency and less effort. Hence, this approach is ideally suited for geometrically complex configurations of practical interest. In this work the time-dependent, nonlinear Euler equations are solved using an upwind, cell-centered, finite-volume scheme. The discrete, linearized systems which result from this scheme are solved iteratively by a preconditioned conjugate-gradient-like algorithm known as GMRES for the two-dimensional cases and a Gauss-Seidel algorithm for the three-dimensional; at steady-state, similar procedures are used to solve the accompanying linear aerodynamic sensitivity equations in incremental iterative form. As shown, this particular form of the sensitivity equation makes large-scale gradient-based aerodynamic optimization possible by taking advantage of memory efficient methods to construct exact Jacobian matrix-vector products. Various surface parameterization techniques have been employed in the current study to control the shape of the design surface. Once this surface has been deformed, the interior volume of the unstructured grid is adapted by considering the mesh as a system of interconnected tension springs. Grid sensitivities are obtained by differentiating the surface parameterization and the grid adaptation algorithms with ADIFOR, an advanced automatic-differentiation software tool. To demonstrate the ability of this procedure to analyze and design complex configurations of

  14. Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs

    SciTech Connect

    T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

    2005-09-01

    The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

  15. Analysis of survival curve configuration is relevant for determining pathogenesis and causation.

    PubMed

    Klinge, U; Fiebeler, A

    2009-05-01

    Improving technology helps us to identify more and more defects at the level of genes or proteins (event) as potential sources of a disease (effect), hopefully allowing more targeted cures with a "magic bullet". However, the complex interference of genes by the environment hinders the detection of strict causal relationships between defect and disease. We consider causality as temporal relationship between event and effect, thus causation is reflected by the configuration of "survival" curves. This is indicated by several survival curves of diseases with known causal relation. Furthermore, we discuss three theoretical models: a causal chain model, a causal field concept and a causal chain model with variable order, and present three assumptions about the specific consequences for configuration of outcome curves. Clinical examples of diseases that are caused by single hits reveal an S-shaped curve of cumulative incidence. In contrast, for diseases with numerous interacting pathogenetic effectors the superposition of all contributions results in widely linear cumulative incidence curves. The rare S-shaped deformation in the survival curves in patients with recurrent cancer is in conflict with our current view of recurrent cancer as mainly being a consequence of residual tumour cell load. The assumption of a "web of causation" instead of a "causal chain" reflects a more real situation for many clinical problems and can explain the widely seen absence of decisive, causally relevant conditions. As consequences for our current treatment of cancer is not insignificant, a careful analysis of the configuration of outcome curves with recognition of an S-shape may either help to identify causal therapies or may encourage more comprehensive approaches that consider the complexity of the disease. PMID:19201546

  16. Low Speed Analysis of Mission Adaptive Flaps on a High Speed Civil Transport Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Victor R.

    1999-01-01

    Thin-layer Navier-Stokes analyses were done on a high speed civil transport configuration with mission adaptive leading-edge flaps. The flow conditions simulated were Mach = 0.22 and Reynolds number of 4.27 million for angles-of-attack ranging from 0 to 18 degrees. Two turbulence closure models were used. Analyses were done exclusively with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model at low angle-of-attack conditions. At high angles-of-attack where considerable flow separation and vortices occurred the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model was also considered. The effects of flow transition were studied. Predicted aerodynamic forces, moment, and pressure are compared to experimental data obtained in the 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel at NASA Langley. The forces and moments correlated well with experimental data in terms of trends. Drag and pitching moment were consistently underpredicted. Predicted surface pressures compared well with experiment at low angles-of-attack. Above 10 angle-of-attack the pressure comparisons were not as favorable. The two turbulent models affected the pressures on the flap considerably and neither produced correct results at the high angles-of-attack.

  17. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Fernández van Raap, M. B.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.

    2013-04-01

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 μJ and 50 μJ. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu2O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu2O or Cu2O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu2O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu2O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 μJ for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu2O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 μJ threshold energy value, Cu2O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  18. Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Santillan, J. M. J.; Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B.; Fernandez van Raap, M. B.

    2013-04-07

    We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

  19. Investigation of advanced counterrotation blade configuration concepts for high speed turboprop systems. Task 5: Unsteady counterrotation ducted propfan analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Edward J.; Delaney, Robert A.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was the development of a time-marching three-dimensional Euler/Navier-Stokes aerodynamic analysis to predict steady and unsteady compressible transonic flows about ducted and unducted propfan propulsion systems employing multiple blade rows. The computer codes resulting from this study are referred to as ADPAC-AOAR\\CR (Advanced Ducted Propfan Analysis Codes-Angle of Attack Coupled Row). This document is the final report describing the theoretical basis and analytical results from the ADPAC-AOACR codes developed under task 5 of NASA Contract NAS3-25270, Unsteady Counterrotating Ducted Propfan Analysis. The ADPAC-AOACR Program is based on a flexible multiple blocked grid discretization scheme permitting coupled 2-D/3-D mesh block solutions with application to a wide variety of geometries. For convenience, several standard mesh block structures are described for turbomachinery applications. Aerodynamic calculations are based on a four-stage Runge-Kutta time-marching finite volume solution technique with added numerical dissipation. Steady flow predictions are accelerated by a multigrid procedure. Numerical calculations are compared with experimental data for several test cases to demonstrate the utility of this approach for predicting the aerodynamics of modern turbomachinery configurations employing multiple blade rows.

  20. Utilization of an agility assessment module in analysis and optimization of preliminary fighter configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngan, Angelen; Biezad, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    A study has been conducted to develop and to analyze a FORTRAN computer code for performing agility analysis on fighter aircraft configurations. This program is one of the modules of the NASA Ames ACSYNT (AirCraft SYNThesis) design code. The background of the agility research in the aircraft industry and a survey of a few agility metrics are discussed. The methodology, techniques, and models developed for the code are presented. The validity of the existing code was evaluated by comparing with existing flight test data. A FORTRAN program was developed for a specific metric, PM (Pointing Margin), as part of the agility module. Example trade studies using the agility module along with ACSYNT were conducted using a McDonnell Douglas F/A-18 Hornet aircraft model. Tile sensitivity of thrust loading, wing loading, and thrust vectoring on agility criteria were investigated. The module can compare the agility potential between different configurations and has capability to optimize agility performance in the preliminary design process. This research provides a new and useful design tool for analyzing fighter performance during air combat engagements in the preliminary design.

  1. Superposed epoch analysis of pressure and magnetic field configuration changes in the plasma sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kistler, L. M.; Baumjohann, W.; Nagai, T.; Mobius, E.

    1993-01-01

    Using data from 41 substorm events in the near-Earth magnetotail, we have combined plasma, energetic ion, and magnetic field data from the AMPTE/IRM spacecraft to perform a superposed epoch analysis of changes in the total pressure and in the magnetic field configuration as a function of time relative to substorm onset. Unloading is evident in the total pressure profile; the pressure decreases by about 20 percent. Pressure changes during the growth phase are not as uniform for the different substorms as the pressure changes during the expansion phase. To study changes in the magnetic field configuration, we have determined the development of the plasma pressure profiles in z for an average of data from 15 to 19 R(E). At substorm onset, the field line dipolarization begins on the innermost field lines and then progresses to the outer field lines. The field lines map the closest to the Earth about 45 min after substorm onset, and then begin to stretch out again during the recovery phase of the substorm.

  2. Transition Documentation on a Three-Element High-Lift Configuration at High Reynolds Numbers: Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertelrud, Arild; Anders, J. B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A 2-D high-lift system experiment was conducted in August of 1996 in the Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain transition measurements on a three element high-lift system for CFD code validation studies. A transition database has been created using the data from this experiment. The present report contains the analysis of the surface hot film data in terms of the transition locations on the three elements. It also includes relevant information regarding the pressure loads and distributions and the wakes behind the model to aid in the interpretation of the transition data. For some of the configurations the current pressure data has been compared with previous wind tunnel entries of the same model. The methodology used to determine the regions of transitional flow is outlined and each configuration tested has been analyzed. A discussion of interference effects, repeatability, and three-dimensional effects on the data is included.

  3. A grid-embedding transonic flow analysis computer program for wing/nacelle configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atta, E. H.; Vadyak, J.

    1983-01-01

    An efficient grid-interfacing zonal algorithm was developed for computing the three-dimensional transonic flow field about wing/nacelle configurations. the algorithm uses the full-potential formulation and the AF2 approximate factorization scheme. The flow field solution is computed using a component-adaptive grid approach in which separate grids are employed for the individual components in the multi-component configuration, where each component grid is optimized for a particular geometry such as the wing or nacelle. The wing and nacelle component grids are allowed to overlap, and flow field information is transmitted from one grid to another through the overlap region using trivariate interpolation. This report represents a discussion of the computational methods used to generate both the wing and nacelle component grids, the technique used to interface the component grids, and the method used to obtain the inviscid flow solution. Computed results and correlations with experiment are presented. also presented are discussions on the organization of the wing grid generation (GRGEN3) and nacelle grid generation (NGRIDA) computer programs, the grid interface (LK) computer program, and the wing/nacelle flow solution (TWN) computer program. Descriptions of the respective subroutines, definitions of the required input parameters, a discussion on interpretation of the output, and the sample cases illustrating application of the analysis are provided for each of the four computer programs.

  4. Efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karpel, M.

    1988-01-01

    A coupling method for efficient vibration mode analysis of aircraft with multiple external store configurations is presented. A set of low-frequency vibration modes, including rigid-body modes, represent the aircraft. Each external store is represented by its vibration modes with clamped boundary conditions, and by its rigid-body inertial properties. The aircraft modes are obtained from a finite-element model loaded by dummy rigid external stores with fictitious masses. The coupling procedure unloads the dummy stores and loads the actual stores instead. The analytical development is presented, the effects of the fictitious mass magnitudes are discussed, and a numerical example is given for a combat aircraft with external wing stores. Comparison with vibration modes obtained by a direct (full-size) eigensolution shows very accurate coupling results. Once the aircraft and stores data bases are constructed, the computer time for analyzing any external store configuration is two to three orders of magnitude less than that of a direct solution.

  5. Experimental Determination of the Ratio of {sup 238}U Capture to {sup 235}U Fission in LEU-HTR Pebble-Bed Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Koeberl, O.; Chawla, R.

    2004-01-15

    The shift toward low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel for gas-cooled high-temperature reactors (HTRs) has revealed a lack of experimental data for validating neutronics codes that are used for the design and licensing of such systems. In the framework of the LEU-HTR experimental program at the PROTEUS critical facility, the safety-related effects of accidental moderation increase (ingress of water or other hydrogeneous compounds) in pebble-bed HTR core configurations employing low-enriched (16.7%) fuel were investigated. An important neutron balance component in this context is the integral reaction rate ratio of {sup 238}U capture (C{sub 8}) relative to {sup 235}U fission (F{sub 5}).It was necessary to develop new experimental techniques for the accurate measurement of C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} in the doubly heterogeneous fuel pebbles. These have involved the utilization of specially prepared particle foils on the one hand and the counting of whole fuel pebbles on the other. Core-center measurements employing both experimental methods have been carried out in two different HTR-PROTEUS configurations (with and without accidental moderation increase simulation, respectively). In each case, satisfactory agreement was obtained between the experimental results based on the two techniques. By carrying out a comparison of particle-foil C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} measurements in the PROTEUS reactor's thermal column with the results of standard foil-activation measurement techniques, the systematic uncertainty (1{sigma}) of the core-center measurements could be reduced by {approx}0.6%, yielding a net experimental error of {+-}1% with either of the new methods. A comparison of the experimental results with calculations based on the MICROX-2/TWODANT codes in conjunction with JEF-1 cross sections has indicated that this calculational route overpredicts the core-center C{sub 8}/F{sub 5} value by {approx}2.5% in both the investigated configurations.

  6. Experimental analysis of computer system dependability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar, K.; Tang, Dong

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews an area which has evolved over the past 15 years: experimental analysis of computer system dependability. Methodologies and advances are discussed for three basic approaches used in the area: simulated fault injection, physical fault injection, and measurement-based analysis. The three approaches are suited, respectively, to dependability evaluation in the three phases of a system's life: design phase, prototype phase, and operational phase. Before the discussion of these phases, several statistical techniques used in the area are introduced. For each phase, a classification of research methods or study topics is outlined, followed by discussion of these methods or topics as well as representative studies. The statistical techniques introduced include the estimation of parameters and confidence intervals, probability distribution characterization, and several multivariate analysis methods. Importance sampling, a statistical technique used to accelerate Monte Carlo simulation, is also introduced. The discussion of simulated fault injection covers electrical-level, logic-level, and function-level fault injection methods as well as representative simulation environments such as FOCUS and DEPEND. The discussion of physical fault injection covers hardware, software, and radiation fault injection methods as well as several software and hybrid tools including FIAT, FERARI, HYBRID, and FINE. The discussion of measurement-based analysis covers measurement and data processing techniques, basic error characterization, dependency analysis, Markov reward modeling, software-dependability, and fault diagnosis. The discussion involves several important issues studies in the area, including fault models, fast simulation techniques, workload/failure dependency, correlated failures, and software fault tolerance.

  7. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy in open-path configuration for the analysis of distant objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallé, B.; Mauchien, P.; Maurice, S.

    2007-08-01

    A review of recent results on stand-off Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) analysis and applications is presented. Stand-off LIBS was suggested for elemental analysis of materials located in environments where any physical access was not possible but optical access could be envisaged. This review only refers to the use of the open-path LIBS configuration in which the laser beam and the returning plasma light are transmitted through the atmosphere. It does not present the results obtained with a transportation of the laser pulses to the target through an optical fiber. Open-path stand-off LIBS has mainly been used with nanosecond laser pulses for solid sample analysis at distances of tens of meters. Liquid samples have also been analyzed at distances of a few meters. The distances achievable depend on many parameters including the laser characteristics (pulse energy and power, beam divergence, spatial profile) and the optical system used to focus the pulses at a distance. A large variety of laser focusing systems have been employed for stand-off analysis comprising refracting or reflecting telescope. Efficient collection of the plasma light is also needed to obtain analytically useful signals. For stand-off LIBS analysis, a lens or a mirror is required to increase the solid angle over which the plasma light can be collected. The light collection device can be either at an angle from the laser beam path or collinear with the optical axis of the system used to focus the laser pulses on the target surface. These different configurations have been used depending on the application such as rapid sorting of metal samples, identification of material in nuclear industry, process control and monitoring in metallurgical industry, applications in future planetary missions, detection of environmental contamination or cleaning of objects of cultural heritage. Recent stand-off analyses of metal samples have been reported using femtosecond laser pulses to extend LIBS

  8. Atomic scale high-angle annular dark field STEM analysis of the N configuration in dilute nitrides of GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, M.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Morgan, D. G.; Gonzalez, D.; Pizarro, J.; Yanez, A.; Galindo, P.; Garcia, R.; Du, Mao-Hua; Zhang, S. B.; Hopkinson, M.; Browning, N. D.

    2009-01-01

    While high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) has been successfully used for the analysis of heavy atoms in a lighter matrix, the detection of light atoms in a heavy matrix remains challenging. In this paper, we show that the combination of first-principles total-energy calculations with aberration-corrected HAADF-STEM experimental and simulated images can be used to overcome this problem. The application of this methodology to the analysis of dilute nitrides of GaAs points to the existence of a major proportion of (2N{sub As})nn in the alloy, which is a relatively stable configuration in GaAsN as revealed by our energetic calculations. Our study has allowed us to shed light in the effect of the local distortion of the lattice due to different configuration of atoms in HAADF-STEM imaging.

  9. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 4: 747/orbiter aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reding, J. P.; Ericsson, L. E.

    1976-01-01

    A quasi-steady analysis of the aeroelastic stability of the lateral (antisymmetric) modes of the 747/orbiter vehicle was accomplished. The interference effect of the orbiter wake on the 747 tail furnishes an aerodynamic undamping contribution to the elastic modes. Likewise, the upstream influence of the 747 tail and aft fuselage on the orbiter beaver-tail rail fairing also is undamping. Fortunately these undamping effects cannot overpower the large damping contribution of the 747 tail and the modes are damped for the configurations analyzed. However, significant interference effects of the orbiter on the 747 tail have been observed in the pitch plane. The high response of the 747 vertical tail in the orbiter wave was also considered. Wind tunnel data points to flapping of the OMS pod wakes as the source of the wake resonance phenomenon.

  10. Low-Speed Dynamic Wind Tunnel Test Analysis of a Generic 53 Degree Swept UCAV Configuration With Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicroy, Dan D.; Huber, Kerstin C.; Rohlf, Detlef; Loser, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Several static and dynamic forced-motion wind tunnel tests have been conducted on a generic unmanned combat air vehicle (UCAV) configuration with a 53deg swept leading edge. These tests are part of an international research effort to assess and advance the state-of-art of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to predict the static and dynamic stability and control characteristics for this type of configuration. This paper describes the dynamic forced motion data collected from two different models of this UCAV configuration as well as analysis of the control surface deflections on the dynamic forces and moments.

  11. The Analysis and Design of Low Boom Configurations Using CFD and Numerical Optimization Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siclari, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) for the analysis of sonic booms generated by aircraft has been shown to increase the accuracy and reliability of predictions. CFD takes into account important three-dimensional and nonlinear effects that are generally neglected by modified linear theory (MLT) methods. Up to the present time, CFD methods have been primarily used for analysis or prediction. Some investigators have used CFD to impact the design of low boom configurations using trial and error methods. One investigator developed a hybrid design method using a combination of Modified Linear Theory (e.g. F-functions) and CFD to provide equivalent area due to lift driven by a numerical optimizer to redesign or modify an existing configuration to achieve a shaped sonic boom signature. A three-dimensional design methodology has not yet been developed that completely uses nonlinear methods or CFD. Constrained numerical optimization techniques have existed for some time. Many of these methods use gradients to search for the minimum of a specified objective function subject to a variety of design variable bounds, linear and nonlinear constraints. Gradient based design optimization methods require the determination of the objective function gradients with respect to each of the design variables. These optimization methods are efficient and work well if the gradients can be obtained analytically. If analytical gradients are not available, the objective gradients or derivatives with respect to the design variables must be obtained numerically. To obtain numerical gradients, say, for 10 design variables, might require anywhere from 10 to 20 objective function evaluations. Typically, 5-10 global iterations of the optimizer are required to minimize the objective function. In terms of using CFD as a design optimization tool, the numerical evaluation of gradients can require anywhere from 100 to 200 CFD computations per design for only 10 design variables. If one CFD

  12. A method of parameter optimization of the equipment configuration with the help of neural net and finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitnikov, A. A.; Makarova, N. A.; Kamyshov, U. N.

    2016-04-01

    The authors have developed the procedure of optimization of the equipment configuration with the help of neural net based on the results of finite element analysis. The dismembrator's characteristics for feeding slop production has been optimized. The results of the virtual experiment are displayed in diagrams of pressure and temperature of the liquid inside the operating devices. The equipment of the optimized configuration has demonstrated a number of advantages compared to the prototype.

  13. Experimental investigation of the flow-induced vibration of a curved cylinder in convex and concave configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assi, Gustavo R. S.; Srinil, Narakorn; Freire, Cesar M.; Korkischko, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Experiments have been conducted to investigate the two-degree-of-freedom vortex-induced vibration (VIV) response of a rigid section of a curved circular cylinder with low mass-damping ratio. Two curved configurations, a concave and a convex, were tested regarding the direction of the flow, in addition to a straight cylinder that served as reference. Amplitude and frequency responses are presented versus reduced velocity for a Reynolds number range between 750 and 15 000. Results for the curved cylinders with concave and convex configurations revealed significantly lower vibration amplitudes when compared to the typical VIV response of a straight cylinder. However, the concave cylinder showed relatively higher amplitudes than the convex cylinder which were sustained beyond the typical synchronisation region. We believe this distinct behaviour between the convex and the concave configurations is related to the wake interference taking place in the lower half of the curvature due to perturbations generated in the horizontal section when it is positioned upstream. Particle-image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of the separated flow along the cylinder highlight the effect of curvature on vortex formation and excitation revealing a complex fluid-structure interaction mechanism.

  14. Preliminary Computational Analysis of the (HIRENASD) Configuration in Preparation for the Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Florance, Jennifer P.; Heeg, Jennifer; Wieseman, Carol D.; Perry, Boyd P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary computational aeroelastic analysis results generated in preparation for the first Aeroelastic Prediction Workshop (AePW). These results were produced using FUN3D software developed at NASA Langley and are compared against the experimental data generated during the HIgh REynolds Number Aero- Structural Dynamics (HIRENASD) Project. The HIRENASD wind-tunnel model was tested in the European Transonic Windtunnel in 2006 by Aachen University0s Department of Mechanics with funding from the German Research Foundation. The computational effort discussed here was performed (1) to obtain a preliminary assessment of the ability of the FUN3D code to accurately compute physical quantities experimentally measured on the HIRENASD model and (2) to translate the lessons learned from the FUN3D analysis of HIRENASD into a set of initial guidelines for the first AePW, which includes test cases for the HIRENASD model and its experimental data set. This paper compares the computational and experimental results obtained at Mach 0.8 for a Reynolds number of 7 million based on chord, corresponding to the HIRENASD test conditions No. 132 and No. 159. Aerodynamic loads and static aeroelastic displacements are compared at two levels of the grid resolution. Harmonic perturbation numerical results are compared with the experimental data using the magnitude and phase relationship between pressure coefficients and displacement. A dynamic aeroelastic numerical calculation is presented at one wind-tunnel condition in the form of the time history of the generalized displacements. Additional FUN3D validation results are also presented for the AGARD 445.6 wing data set. This wing was tested in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel and is commonly used in the preliminary benchmarking of computational aeroelastic software.

  15. Experimental and analysis methods in radiochemical experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattadori, C. M.; Pandola, L.

    2016-04-01

    Radiochemical experiments made the history of neutrino physics by achieving the first observation of solar neutrinos (Cl experiment) and the first detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrinos component (Ga experiments). They measured along decades the integral νe charged current interaction rate in the exposed target. The basic operation principle is the chemical separation of the few atoms of the new chemical species produced by the neutrino interactions from the rest of the target, and their individual counting in a low-background counter. The smallness of the expected interaction rate (1 event per day in a ˜ 100 ton target) poses severe experimental challenges on the chemical and on the counting procedures. The main aspects related to the analysis techniques employed in solar neutrino experiments are reviewed and described, with a special focus given to the event selection and the statistical data treatment.

  16. A Summary of Revisions Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.; Perry, Boyd, III; Silva, Walter A.; Newman, Brett

    2014-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees-of - freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus- cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and additional output data so as to provide a more useful and precise tool for gust load analysis. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs is included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  17. An Overview of Modifications Applied to a Turbulence Response Analysis Method for Flexible Aircraft Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Christie J.

    2013-01-01

    A software program and associated methodology to study gust loading on aircraft exists for a classification of geometrically simplified flexible configurations. This program consists of a simple aircraft response model with two rigid and three flexible symmetric degrees of freedom and allows for the calculation of various airplane responses due to a discrete one-minus-cosine gust as well as continuous turbulence. Simplifications, assumptions, and opportunities for potential improvements pertaining to the existing software program are first identified, then a revised version of the original software tool is developed with improved methodology to include more complex geometries, additional excitation cases, and output data so as to provide a more useful and accurate tool for gust load analysis. Revisions are made in the categories of aircraft geometry, computation of aerodynamic forces and moments, and implementation of horizontal tail mode shapes. In order to improve the original software program to enhance usefulness, a wing control surface and horizontal tail control surface is added, an extended application of the discrete one-minus-cosine gust input is employed, a supplemental continuous turbulence spectrum is implemented, and a capability to animate the total vehicle deformation response to gust inputs in included. These revisions and enhancements are implemented and an analysis of the results is used to validate the modifications.

  18. Analysis of Plume Effects on Sonic Boom Signature for Isolated Nozzle Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castner, Raymond S.

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to study the plume effects on sonic boom signature for isolated nozzle configurations. The objectives of these analyses were to provide comparison to past work using modern CFD analysis tools, to investigate the differences of high aspect ratio nozzles to circular (axisymmetric) nozzles, and to report the effects of underexpanded nozzle operation on boom signature. CFD analysis was used to address the plume effects on sonic boom signature from a baseline exhaust nozzle. Near-field pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios (NPRs) between 6 and 10. A computer code was used to extrapolate these signatures to a ground-observed sonic boom N-wave. Trends show that there is a reduction in sonic boom N-wave signature as NPR is increased from 6 to 10. The performance curve for this supersonic nozzle is flat, so there is not a significant loss in thrust coefficient as the NPR is increased. As a result, this benefit could be realized without significant loss of performance. Analyses were also collected for a high aspect ratio nozzle based on the baseline design for comparison. Pressure signatures were collected for nozzle pressure ratios from 8 to 12. Signatures were nearly twice as strong for the two-dimensional case, and trends also show a reduction in sonic boom signature as NPR is increased from 8 to 12. As low boom designs are developed and improved, there will be a need for understanding the interaction between the aircraft boat tail shocks and the exhaust nozzle plume. These CFD analyses will provide a baseline study for future analysis efforts.

  19. Exploratory studies of the cruise performance of upper surface blown configurations. Experimental program: Test facilities, model design instrumentation, and lowspeed, high-lift tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braden, J. A.; Hancock, J. P.; Burdges, K. P.; Hackett, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The model hardware, test facilities and instrumentation utilized in an experimental study of upper surface blown configurations at cruise is described. The high speed (subsonic) experimental work, studying the aerodynamic effects of wing nacelle geometric variations, was conducted around semispan model configurations composed of diversified, interchangeable components. Power simulation was provided by high pressure air ducted through closed forebody nacelles. Nozzle geometry was varied across size, exit aspect ratio, exit position and boattail angle. Three dimensional force and two dimensional pressure measurements were obtained at cruise Mach numbers from 0.5 to 0.8 and at nozzle pressure ratios up to about 3.0. The experimental investigation was supported by an analytical synthesis of the system using a vortex lattice representation with first order power effects. Results are also presented from a compatibility study in which a short haul transport is designed on the basis of the aerodynamic findings in the experimental study as well as acoustical data obtained in a concurrent program. High lift test data are used to substantiate the projected performance of the selected transport design.

  20. Free Edge Mixed Mode Delamination Analysis of Laminated Composites with Wrap-Around Configuration: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Pannalal; Das, Subhankar; Halder, Sudipta; Pandey, Krishna Murari

    2015-12-01

    Finite element analyses of laminated composites were done in the present study with respect to suppression of free edge delamination by an innovative technique. Wrap-around configuration was considered to determine its effectiveness over the wrapper-less laminated configuration on laminated composites. Nodal stresses were generated ahead of the crack tip through finite element analysis. This was used for determining interlaminar normal stress and inter laminar shear stress distributions at the critical interface. Later virtual crack closure technique was used to estimate the strain energy release rate components for several sizes of virtual crack extensions through a single finite element analysis. Computational analysis predicts Mode-I delamination as dominant mode of failure. This mode of delamination was significantly suppressed with wrap-around configuration on laminated composites.

  1. Scale-4 Analysis of Pressurized Water Reactor Critical Configurations: Volume 4-Three Mile Island Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The requirements of ANSI/ANS-8.1 specify that calculational methods for away-from-reactor criticality safety analyses be validated against experimental measurements. If credit is to be taken for the reduced reactivity of burned or spent fuel relative to its original ''fresh'' composition, it is necessary to benchmark computational methods used in determining such reactivity worth against spent fuel reactivity measurements. This report summarizes a portion of the ongoing effort to benchmark away-from-reactor criticality analysis methods using relevant and well-documented critical configurations from commercial pressurized water reactors. The analysis methodology utilized for all calculations in this report is based on the modules and data associated with the SCALE-4 code system. Isotopic densities for spent fuel assemblies in the core were calculated using the SCALE-4 SAS2H analytical sequence. The sources of data and the procedures for deriving SAS2H input parameters are described in detail. The SNIKR code family was used to extract the necessary isotopic densities from SAS2H results and to provide the data in the format required for SCALE criticality analysis modules. The CSASN analytical sequence in SCALE-4 was used to perform resonance processing of cross sections. The KENO V.a module of SCALE-4 was used to calculate the effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for the critical configuration. The SCALE-4 27-group burnup library containing ENDF/B-IV (actinides) and ENDF/B-V (fission products) data was used for all calculations. This volume of the report documents a reactor critical calculation for GPU Nuclear Corporation's Three Mile Island Unit 1 (TMI-1) during hot, zero-power startup testing for the beginning of cycle 5. This unit and cycle were selected because of their relevance in spent fuel benchmark applications: (1) cycle 5 startup occurred after an especially long downtime of 6.6 years; and (2) the core consisted primarily (75%) of burned fuel, with

  2. Identifying the causes of water crises: A configurational frequency analysis of 22 basins world wide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, V.; Gorelick, S.; Lambin, E.; Rozelle, S.; Thompson, B.

    2010-12-01

    Freshwater "scarcity" has been identified as being a major problem world-wide, but it is surprisingly hard to assess if water is truly scarce at a global or even regional scale. Most empirical water research remains location specific. Characterizing water problems, transferring lessons across regions, to develop a synthesized global view of water issues remains a challenge. In this study we attempt a systematic understanding of water problems across regions. We compared case studies of basins across different regions of the world using configurational frequency analysis. Because water crises are multi-symptom and multi-causal, a major challenge was to categorize water problems so as to make comparisons across cases meaningful. In this study, we focused strictly on water unsustainability, viz. the inability to sustain current levels of the anthropogenic (drinking water, food, power, livelihood) and natural (aquatic species, wetlands) into the future. For each case, the causes of three outcome variables, groundwater declines, surface water declines and aquatic ecosystem declines, were classified and coded. We conducted a meta-analysis in which clusters of peer-reviewed papers by interdisciplinary teams were considered to ensure that the results were not biased towards factors privileged by any one discipline. Based on our final sample of 22 case study river basins, some clear patterns emerged. The meta-analysis suggests that water resources managers have long overemphasized the factors governing supply of water resources and while insufficient attention has been paid to the factors driving demand. Overall, uncontrolled increase in demand was twice as frequent as declines in availability due to climate change or decreased recharge. Moreover, groundwater and surface water declines showed distinct causal pathways. Uncontrolled increases in demand due to lack of credible enforcement were a key factor driving groundwater declines; while increased upstream abstractions

  3. Navier-Stokes Analysis of a High Wing Transport High-Lift Configuration with Externally Blown Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slotnick, Jeffrey P.; An, Michael Y.; Mysko, Stephen J.; Yeh, David T.; Rogers, Stuart E.; Roth, Karlin; Baker, M.David; Nash, S.

    2000-01-01

    Insights and lessons learned from the aerodynamic analysis of the High Wing Transport (HWT) high-lift configuration are presented. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD simulations using the OVERFLOW flow solver are compared with high Reynolds test data obtained in the NASA Ames 12 Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel (PWT) facility. Computational analysis of the baseline HWT high-lift configuration with and without Externally Blown Flap (EBF) jet effects is highlighted. Several additional aerodynamic investigations, such as nacelle strake effectiveness and wake vortex studies, are presented. Technical capabilities and shortcomings of the computational method are discussed and summarized.

  4. Scale-4 analysis of pressurized water reactor critical configurations: Volume 5, North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, S.M.; Suto, T. |

    1996-10-01

    ANSI/ANS 8.1 requires that calculational methods for away-from- reactor (AFR) criticality safety analyses be validated against experiment. This report summarizes part of the ongoing effort to benchmark AFR criticality analysis methods using selected critical configurations from commercial PWRs. Codes and data in the SCALE-4 code system were used. This volume documents the SCALE system analysis of one reactor critical configuration for North Anna Unit 1 Cycle 5. The KENO V.a criticality calculations for the North Anna 1 Cycle 5 beginning-of-cycle model yielded a value for k{sub eff} of 1. 0040{+-}0.0005.

  5. Pressure loads and aerodynamic force information for the -89A space shuttle orbiter configuration, volume 2. [for structural strength analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mennell, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted on an 0.0405 scale representation of the Rockwell -89A Light Weight Space Shuttle Orbiter. The test purpose was to obtain pressure loads data in the presence of the ground for orbiter structural strength analysis. Aerodynamic force data was also recorded to allow correlation with all pressure loads information. Angles of attack from minus 3 deg to 18 deg and angles of sideslip of 0 deg, plus or minus 50 deg, and plus or minus 10 deg were tested in the presence of the NAAL ground plane. Static pressure bugs were used to obtain a pressure loads survey of the basic configuration, elevon deflections of 5 deg, 10 deg, 15 deg, and minus 20 deg and a rudder deflection of minus 15 deg, at a tunnel dynamic pressure of 40 psi. The test procedure was to locate a maximum of 30 static pressure bugs on the model surface at various locations calculated to prevent aerodynamic and physical interference. Then by various combinations of location the pressure bugs output was to define a complete pressure survey for the fuselages, wing, vertical tail, and main landing gear door.

  6. SECOND WASTE PACKAGE PROBABILISTIC CRITICALITY ANALYSIS: GENERATION AND EVALUATION OF INTERNAL CRITICIALITY CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    P. Gottlieb, J.R. Massari, J.K. McCoy

    1996-03-27

    This analysis is prepared by the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) Waste Package Development (WPD) department to provide an evaluation of the criticality potential within a waste package having sonic or all of its contents degraded by corrosion and removal of neutron absorbers. This analysis is also intended to provide an estimate of the consequences of any internal criticality, particularly in terms of any increase in radionuclide inventory. These consequence estimates will be used as part of the WPD input to the Total System Performance Assessment. The ultimate objective of this analysis is to augment the information gained from the Initial Waste Package Probabilistic Criticality Analyses (Ref. 5.8 and 5.9, hereafter referred to as IPA) to a degree which will support preliminary waste package design recommendations intended to reduce the risk of waste package criticality and the risk to total repository system performance posed by the consequences of any criticality. The IPA evaluated the criticality potential under the assumption that the waste package basket retained its structural integrity, so that the assemblies retained their initial separation, even when the neutron absorbers had been leached from the basket. This analysis is based on the more realistic condition that removal of the neutron absorbers is a consequence of the corrosion of the steel in which they are contained, which has the additional consequence of reducing the structural support between assemblies. The result is a set of more reactive configurations having a smaller spacing between assemblies, or no inter-assembly spacing at all. Another difference from the IPA is the minimal attention to probabilistic evaluation given in this study. Although the IPA covered a time horizon to 100,000 years, the lack of consideration of basket degradation modes made it primarily applicable to the first 10,000 years. In contrast, this study, by focusing on the degraded modes of the basket, is primarily

  7. Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the COSMO-CLM configuration over Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesarchio, M.; Manzi, M.; Mercogliano, P.; Bucchignani, E.

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work is to analyze the sensitivity of the precipitation and the 2-meters mean temperature in response to the variation of some physical, numerical and tuning parameters in COSMO-CLM, a non-hydrostatic model for the simulation of atmospheric processes. The model has been developed by the DWD-Germany for weather forecast services; successively, the model has been updated by the CLM-Community, in order to develop also climatic applications. It is the only documented numerical model system in Europe designed for spatial resolutions down to 1km with a range of applicability encompassing operational numerical weather prediction, regional climate modelling the dispersion of trace gases and aerosol and idealised studies and applicable in all regions of the world for a wide range of available climate simulations from global climate and NWP models. The main goal is to adjust the configuration of COSMO-CLM over Italy in order to better reproduce the climate of the last thirty years of the XX century. Moreover, the crucial point of this analysis is the reduction of the precipitation bias on Alps and the understanding and improvement of the strong local temperature bias registered in specific areas such as Po Valley. In the present work, a precise sensitivity analysis has been performed on the domain 4.7-16.7°E; 40.8-48.3°N, considering the time period 1996-2000. The choice of this domain is mainly due to the availability of different observational dataset to perform the result validation: E-OBS (a European land only daily high resolution gridded dataset for precipitation and mean surface temperature covering the period 1960-2006), ETH (Alpine Precipitation Analyses from High-Resolution Rain-Gauge Observations) and ARPA EMR (high-density in situ station network of daily temperature and precipitation). More than twenty simulations have been performed, all driven by ERA40, with an update of the boundary conditions every 6 hours. In order to avoid spin

  8. Space transportation booster engine configuration study. Volume 2: Design definition document and environmental analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    The objective of the Space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study is to contribute to the Advanced Launch System (ALS) development effort by providing highly reliable, low cost booster engine concepts for both expendable and reusable rocket engines. The objectives of the space Transportation Booster Engine (STBE) Configuration Study were: (1) to identify engine configurations which enhance vehicle performance and provide operational flexibility at low cost, and (2) to explore innovative approaches to the follow-on Full-Scale Development (FSD) phase for the STBE.

  9. Constructing Flexible, Configurable, ETL Pipelines for the Analysis of "Big Data" with Apache OODT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, A. F.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Verma, R.; Zimdars, P. A.; Park, S.; Estrada, A.; Sumarlidason, A.; Gil, Y.; Ratnakar, V.; Krum, D.; Phan, T.; Meena, A.

    2013-12-01

    A plethora of open source technologies for manipulating, transforming, querying, and visualizing 'big data' have blossomed and matured in the last few years, driven in large part by recognition of the tremendous value that can be derived by leveraging data mining and visualization techniques on large data sets. One facet of many of these tools is that input data must often be prepared into a particular format (e.g.: JSON, CSV), or loaded into a particular storage technology (e.g.: HDFS) before analysis can take place. This process, commonly known as Extract-Transform-Load, or ETL, often involves multiple well-defined steps that must be executed in a particular order, and the approach taken for a particular data set is generally sensitive to the quantity and quality of the input data, as well as the structure and complexity of the desired output. When working with very large, heterogeneous, unstructured or semi-structured data sets, automating the ETL process and monitoring its progress becomes increasingly important. Apache Object Oriented Data Technology (OODT) provides a suite of complementary data management components called the Process Control System (PCS) that can be connected together to form flexible ETL pipelines as well as browser-based user interfaces for monitoring and control of ongoing operations. The lightweight, metadata driven middleware layer can be wrapped around custom ETL workflow steps, which themselves can be implemented in any language. Once configured, it facilitates communication between workflow steps and supports execution of ETL pipelines across a distributed cluster of compute resources. As participants in a DARPA-funded effort to develop open source tools for large-scale data analysis, we utilized Apache OODT to rapidly construct custom ETL pipelines for a variety of very large data sets to prepare them for analysis and visualization applications. We feel that OODT, which is free and open source software available through the Apache

  10. Innovative unmanned airship structural analysis: Dual-hull and exoskeletal configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappadona, A.; Lecca, R.; Vazzola, M.; Gili, P.; Farina, P.; Surace, C.

    2009-08-01

    The research study described concerns the design and development of an innovative airship concept which is remotely-controlled and intended to be used for monitoring, surveillance, exploration and reconnaissance missions. Two potential structural configurations have been analysed: the first consists of a dual-hull configuration, characterised by the presence of a primary support structure flanked by the two inflated sections held to the structure by appropriated bindings. The second is an exoskeletal configuration which features a single inflated section incorporating two separate elements held internally by a system of ribs. The final aim of this study is to analyse both configurations to determine the most appropriate solution in terms of performance and cost.

  11. Aerodynamic design and analysis of the AST-204, AST-205, and AST-206 blended wing-fuse large supersonic transport configuration concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, G. L.; Walkley, K. B.

    1980-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of three blended wing-fuselage supersonic cruise configurations providing four, five, and six abreast seating was conducted using a previously designed supersonic cruise configuration as the baseline. The five abreast configuration was optimized for wave drag at a Mach number of 2.7. The four and six abreast configurations were also optimized at Mach 2.7, but with the added constraint that the majority of their structure be common with the five abreast configuration. Analysis of the three configurations indicated an improvement of 6.0, 7.5, and 7.7 percent in cruise lift-to-drag ratio over the baseline configuration for the four, five, and six abreast configurations, respectively.

  12. NREL Gearbox Reliability Collaborative Experimental Data Overview and Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Oyague, F.; Gorman, D.; Sheng, S.

    2010-05-01

    Most turbines in the market today follow a modular configuration comprised of a main shaft, gearbox, high speed shaft, and generator. The gearbox has the important task of increasing the slow rotor speeds to meet the electromechanical requirements of the electromechanical. These gearboxes are commonly composed of a planetary stage and several parallel shaft stages. The planetary, or epicyclical, design of the gearbox is a feature of the design that has many advantages compared to the traditional parallel shaft arrangement. Among these are that higher gear ratios can be achieved in a single stage, they are capable to carrying higher loads, and they require less space than the traditional parallel shaft arrangement. For this reason, planetary gearboxes they are commonly used in the first stage of the wind turbine gearboxes. However, planetary stages are more complex than the typical parallel shaft arrangement, and can be affected by deflection in the planet carrier, annulus deformations and bearing clearances. Unanticipated levels of these motions can reduce their life expectancy. This paper gives a brief overview of a subset of the experimental efforts, data, and analysis of the GRC project focusing on the planet carrier deformation.

  13. Nonlinear particle dynamics in the magnetotail: A laboratory study 1. The experimental configuration and numerical simulation. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.; Bowles, J.; Holland, D.; Chen, J.; Siefring, C.

    1995-09-25

    The authors have performed the initial stages of an experiment designed to investigate particle dynamics in the magnetotail. The results of this experiment lend support to the idea that particle scattering from the magnetotail neutral sheet is not random but that there exist resonances in the number and direction of scattered particles as a function of energy. The effort began with construction and testing of the magnetic field configuration necessary to simulate the quitetime magnetotail field: a neutral sheet magnetic field profile B0(z)x with a superimposed normal field B(2)z. Once complete, electrons of variable energy were injected into the field region created and the scattered current collected by back-scattered and forward-scattered collection plates was analyzed as a function of electron energy. The experiment was used to test the hypothesis that single particle scattering from a neutral sheet type profile as described can be coherent and can, at times, demonstrate resonance effects as a function of energy.

  14. Experimental and numerical understanding of localized spin wave mode behavior in broadly tunable spatially complex magnetic configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Chunhui; Adur, Rohan; Wang, Hailong; Manuilov, Sergei A.; Yang, Fengyuan; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Hammel, P. Chris

    2014-12-01

    Spin wave modes confined in a ferromagnetic film by the spatially inhomogeneous magnetic field generated by a scanned micromagnetic tip of a ferromagnetic resonance force microscope (FMRFM) enable microscopic imaging of the internal fields and spin dynamics in nanoscale magnetic devices. Here we report a detailed study of spin wave modes in a thin ferromagnetic film localized by magnetic field configurations frequently encountered in FMRFM experiments, including geometries in which the probe magnetic moment is both parallel and antiparallel to the applied uniform magnetic field. We demonstrate that characteristics of the localized modes, such as resonance field and confinement radius, can be broadly tuned by controlling the orientation of the applied field relative to the film plane. Micromagnetic simulations accurately reproduce our FMRFM spectra allowing quantitative understanding of the localized modes. Our results reveal a general method of generating tightly confined spin wave modes in various geometries with excellent spatial resolution that significantly facilitates the broad application of FMRFM. This paves the way to imaging of magnetic properties and spin wave dynamics in a variety of contexts for uncovering new physics of nanoscale spin excitations.

  15. Experimental investigation on effects of crystal and crucible rotation on thermal convection in a model Czochralski configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ting; Wu, Chun-Mei; Zhang, Li; Li, You-Rong

    2016-03-01

    A series of experiments are presented to understand the effects of crystal and crucible rotations on the thermal convection in a model Czochralski (Cz) configuration which consists of a crucible filled with the transparent 0.65 cSt silicone oil (Pr=6.7) and a model crystal. The thermal convection is induced by the temperature difference between the crucible sidewall and the crystal sidewall. The results show that the critical Rayleigh number for the onset of instability of thermal convection increases with the increase of the crystal rotation rate without the crucible rotation. When the crucible rotates, the critical Rayleigh number is higher than that with standing crucible at small crystal rotation rates. After the flow destabilizes, a three-dimensional oscillatory convection is characterized by traveling spoke patterns at small crystal rotation rates. With the increase of the crystal rotation rate, the azimuthal propagating velocity of the spoke pattern increases. Furthermore, the spoke pattern dims gradually and gives way to the wave pattern. The crystal rotation has a slight effect on the spoke number until the spoke pattern disappears. Compared with the shallow pool, the crystal rotation makes the flow more likely to be disturbed in the deeper pool. On the contrary, the crucible rotation is more conducive to suppressing the oscillatory flow in the deeper pool.

  16. Experimental and CFD simulation studies of wall shear stress for different impeller configurations and MBR activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Chan, C C V; Bentzen, T R; Rasmussen, M R

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been used successfully in biological wastewater treatment for effective solids-liquid separation. However, a common problem encountered with MBR systems is fouling of the membrane resulting in frequent membrane cleaning and replacement which makes the system less appealing for full-scale applications. It has been widely demonstrated that the filtration performances in MBRs can be improved by understanding the shear stress over the membrane surface. Modern tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the shear stress in an MBR. Nevertheless, proper experimental validation is required to validate CFD simulation. In this work experimental measurements of shear stress induced by impellers at a membrane surface were made with an electrochemical approach and the results were used to validate CFD simulations. As good results were obtained with the CFD model (<9% error), it was extrapolated to include the non-Newtonian behaviour of activated sludge. PMID:22592479

  17. Unsteady aerodynamic flow field analysis of the space shuttle configuration. Part 1: Orbiter aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ericsson, L. E.; Reding, J. P.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis of the steady and unsteady aerodynamics of the space shuttle orbiter has been performed. It is shown that slender wing theory can be modified to account for the effect of Mach number and leading edge roundness on both attached and separated flow loads. The orbiter unsteady aerodynamics can be computed by defining two equivalent slender wings, one for attached flow loads and another for the vortex-induced loads. It is found that the orbiter is in the transonic speed region subject to vortex-shock-boundary layer interactions that cause highly nonlinear or discontinuous load changes which can endanger the structural integrity of the orbiter wing and possibly cause snap roll problems. It is presently impossible to simulate these interactions in a wind tunnel test even in the static case. Thus, a well planned combined analytic and experimental approach is needed to solve the problem.

  18. Numerical Analysis of Base Flowfield for a Four-Engine Clustered Nozzle Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    1995-01-01

    Excessive base heating has been a problem for many launch vehicles. For certain designs such as the direct dump of turbine exhaust inside and at the lip of the nozzle, the potential burning of the turbine exhaust in the base region can be of great concern. Accurate prediction of the base environment at altitudes is therefore very important during the vehicle design phase. Otherwise, undesirable consequences may occur. In this study, the turbulent base flowfield of a cold flow experimental investigation for a four-engine clustered nozzle was numerically benchmarked using a pressure-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method. This is a necessary step before the benchmarking of hot flow and combustion flow tests can be considered. Since the medium was unheated air, reasonable prediction of the base pressure distribution at high altitude was the main goal. Several physical phenomena pertaining to the multiengine clustered nozzle base flow physics were deduced from the analysis.

  19. External fixator configurations in tibia fractures: 1D optimization and 3D analysis comparison.

    PubMed

    Roseiro, Luis M; Neto, M Augusta; Amaro, Ana; Leal, Rogerio P; Samarra, Miguel C

    2014-01-01

    The use of external fixation devices in orthopedic surgery is very common in open tibial fractures. A properly applied fixator may improve the healing process while one improperly applied might delay the healing process. The several external fixator systems used in clinical today, can be categorized into uniplanar-unilateral, uniplanar-bilateral, biplanar and multiplanar. The stability on the fracture focus and, therefore, the fracture healing process, is related with the type of external fixator configuration that is selected. The aim of this study is to discuss the principles for the successful application of unilateral-uniplanar external fixation, the assembly of its components, for the case of a transverse fractures using computational models. In this context, the fixation stiffness characteristics are evaluated using a simplified 1D finite element model for the tibia and external fixator. The beams are modeled with realistic cross-sectional geometry and material properties instead of a simplified model. The VABS (the Variational Asymptotic Beam Section analysis) methodology is used to compute the cross-sectional model for the generalized Timoshenko model, which was embedded in the finite element solver FEAP. The use of Timoshenko beam theory allows accounting for several kinds of loads, including torsion moments. Optimal design is performed with respect to the assembly of fixator components using a genetic algorithm. The optimization procedure is based on the evaluation of an objective function, which is dependent on the displacement at the fracture focus. The initial and optimal results are compared by performing a 3D analysis, for which different three-dimensional finite element models are created. The geometrical model of a tibia is created on the basis of data acquired by CAT scan, made for a healthy tibia of a 22 year old male. The 3D comparison of the 1D optimal results show a clear improvement on the objective function for the several load cases and

  20. Experimental study on the effects of blast-cap configurations and charge patterns on coke descending in CDQ cooling shaft

    SciTech Connect

    Y.H. Feng; X.X. Zhang; M.L. Wu

    2008-08-15

    The coke descending behavior in a CDQ cooling shaft is studied experimentally by means of a tracing method with a digital camera. For three different blast-caps, the law of coke flow is studied under five conditions of coke charge. The experimental results show that, for the sake of the uniformity of the coke burden descending, a blast-cap with elliptical cross-section is a better choice than that with circular cross-section regardless of high or low placement. A coke charge pattern with a flat top burden surface is preferable to that with peak-valley surface, a double-peak superior to a one-peak. Trajectory and average velocity distribution of coke behavior depend weakly on whether the coke is continuously fed or not as the discharging began. The blast-caps have local effects on the descending coke and hardly affect whether the cokes flow smoothly or not in the case of coke burden with enough depth.

  1. Fuzzy modal analysis: Prediction of experimental behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massa, F.; Tison, T.; Lallemand, B.

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to numerically predict the modal behaviours of a two-plate steel structure defined with variable parameters and to validate this prediction experimentally. First, the test structure, in which geometrical and material variability has been identified, is studied using a Fuzzy Finite Element Method. This method, named PAEM, allows the fuzzy numerical eigenfrequencies and eigenvectors to be calculated. Second, the test structure is analyzed experimentally to quantify the possible variation of the eigensolutions' modal behaviours and to build the experimental fuzzy sets. Finally, the fuzzy numerical quantities are compared with the experimental quantities to highlight the efficiency of our non-deterministic model for predicting the behavioural modifications of the test structure.

  2. An Experimental Analysis of Another Privacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okouchi, Hiroto

    2006-01-01

    The present article discusses how events outside a subject's skin and not accessible to another subject but to an experimenter may contribute to experimental analyses of private events. Of 16 undergraduates, 8, referred to as instructors, first learned conditional discriminations (i.e., B1C1, B2C2, B3C3, and B4C4) in a standard matching-to-sample…

  3. Analysis of Post-Support and Wind-Tunnel Wall Interference on Flow Field About Subsonic High-Lift High-Speed Research Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lessard, Wendy B.

    2000-01-01

    The present study was performed to determine how significant the interference effects of the wind-tunnel model support system and tunnel walls can be for a high-speed configuration during takeoff and landing conditions. A 5-percent scale model of the Technology Concept Airplane was recently tested in the Langley 14- by 22-Foot Sub-sonic Tunnel. The model was numerically modeled with and without the support and tunnel walls and compared with experimental data. Detailed analysis of the flow provided additional insight concerning what effects the post support and tunnel walls had on the flow field. This study revealed that although the overall forces and moments could be experimentally accounted for, the detailed flow features, such as the surface pressure distributions, could not be accurately simulated without including the post support in the computations.

  4. CAP-TSD: A program for unsteady transonic analysis of realistic aircraft configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batina, John T.; Seidel, David A.; Bland, Samuel R.; Bennett, Robert M.

    1989-01-01

    The development of a new transonic code to predict unsteady flows about realistic aircraft configurations are described. An approximate factorization algorithm for solution of the unsteady transonic small disturbance equation is first described. Because of the superior stability characteristics of the AF algorithm, a new transonic aeroelasticity code was developed which is described in some detail. The new code was very easy to modify to include the additional aircraft components, so in a very short period of time the code was developed to treat complete aircraft configurations. Finally, applications are presented which demonstrate many of the geometry capabilities of the new code.

  5. Comparison of Experimental Data and Computations Fluid Dynamics Analysis for a Three Dimensional Linear Plug Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, J. H.; Hagemann, G.; Immich, H.

    2003-01-01

    A three dimensional linear plug nozzle of area ratio 12.79 was designed by EADS Space Transportation (former Astrium Space Infrastructure). The nozzle was tested within the German National Technology Program 'LION' in a cold air wind tunnel by TU Dresden. The experimental hardware and test conditions are described. Experimental data was obtained for the nozzle without plug side wall fences at a nozzle pressure ratio of 116 and then with plug side wall fences at NPR 110. Schlieren images were recorded and axial profiles of plug wall static pressures were measured at several spanwise locations and on the plug base. Detailed CFD analysis was performed for these nozzle configurations at NPR 116 by NASA MSFC. The CFD exhibits good agreement with the experimental data. A detailed comparison of the CFD results and the experimental plug wall pressure data are given. Comparisons are made for both the without and with plug side wall fence configurations. Numerical results for density gradient are compared to experimental Schlieren images. Experimental nozzle thrust efficiencies are calculated based on the CFD results. The CFD results are used to illustrate the plug nozzle fluid dynamics. The effect of the plug side wall is emphasized.

  6. Stereochemical analysis of menthol and menthylamine isomers using calculated and experimental optical rotation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinscheid, F.; Reinscheid, U. M.

    2016-01-01

    The complete series of menthol isomers and their corresponding amino derivatives (base and protonated/HCl forms), were investigated using experimental and theoretical data. Our study focused on the conformational and configurational analysis, and revealed that experimental data should be used in combination with calculated data. Furthermore, even in the case of the highly studied member, menthol, discrepancies were found among previously published literature values. We show that the correct determination of the population mix is a must for the correct prediction of the absolute configuration (AC) of neoisomenthol. The neoiso forms are of special interest since a number of structural inconsistences can be found in the literature. We present a stringent proof of the AC of neoisomenthol based on literature information. To the best of our knowledge, the AC of neoisomenthylamine is for the first time shown using experimental and calculated optical rotation data. A correction of a series of publications containing an important error in the assignment of (+)-menthylamine (correct: (+)-neomenthylamine) is presented. With 26 data pairs (experimental versus calculated) of optical rotation values a regression is performed. The AC of all 12 compounds, even the most difficult neoiso forms, could be predicted correctly using experimental low-temperature NMR data. Furthermore, if only experimental data with an optical rotation outside the range of -10 < [α] > +10 are used, all 12 compounds would have been correctly assigned without low-temperature NMR data as restraints.

  7. Analysis of magnetic probe signals including effect of cylindrical conducting wall for field-reversed configuration experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeyama, Taeko; Hiroi, Masanori; Nemoto, Yuuichi; Nogi, Yasuyuki

    2008-06-15

    A confinement field is disturbed by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) motions of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in a cylindrical conductor. The effect of the conductor should be included to obtain a spatial structure of the disturbed field with a good precision. For this purpose, a toroidal current in the plasma and an eddy current on a conducting wall are replaced by magnetic dipole and image magnetic dipole moments, respectively. Typical spatial structures of the disturbed field are calculated by using the dipole moments for such MHD motions as radial shift, internal tilt, external tilt, and n=2 mode deformation. Then, analytic formulas for estimating the shift distance, tilt angle, and deformation rate of the MHD motions from magnetic probe signals are derived. It is estimated from the calculations by using the dipole moments that the analytic formulas include an approximately 40% error. Two kinds of experiment are carried out to investigate the reliability of the calculations. First, a magnetic field produced by a circular current is measured in an aluminum pipe to confirm the replacement of the eddy current with the image magnetic dipole moments. The measured fields coincide well with the calculated values including the image magnetic dipole moments. Second, magnetic probe signals measured from the FRC plasma are substituted into the analytic formulas to obtain shift distance and deformation rate. The experimental results are compared to the MHD motions measured by using a radiation from the plasma. If the error included in the analytic formulas and the difference between the magnetic and optical structures in the plasma are considered, the results of the radiation measurement support well those of the magnetic analysis.

  8. Analysis and in-simulator evaluation of display and control concepts for a terminal configured vehicle in final approach in a windshear environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levison, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Display Control configurations for the Terminal configured Vehicle in approach to landing situations were analyzed. A pilot/vehicle model was used to compare with a real time simulation study. Model results are presented and extended for the approach task during wind shear and random turbulence environments. In general, model results of performance trends matched those obtained experimentally.

  9. An Empirical Analysis of an Alternative Configuration of the Academic Motivation Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kenneth J.; Davy, Jeanette A.; Rosenberg, Donald L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine an alternative configuration of the Academic Motivation Scale (AMS), a psychometric instrument used as a measure of academic motivation in various academic environments. The analyses utilised data from a convenience sample of 2354 business students, broken into two random subsamples of 1177 cases.…

  10. Analysis of high-speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P. D.; Brown, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The study of high speed growth of silicon sheet in inclined-meniscus configurations is discussed. It was concluded that the maximum growth rates in vertical and inclined growth are set by thermal-capillary limits. Also, the melt/crystal interface was determined to be flat. And, vertical growth is qualitatively modelled by one dimensional heat transfer.

  11. Aerodynamic analysis of three advanced configurations using the TranAir full-potential code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madson, M. D.; Carmichael, R. L.; Mendoza, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    Computational results are presented for three advanced configurations: the F-16A with wing tip missiles and under wing fuel tanks, the Oblique Wing Research Aircraft, and an Advanced Turboprop research model. These results were generated by the latest version of the TranAir full potential code, which solves for transonic flow over complex configurations. TranAir embeds a surface paneled geometry definition in a uniform rectangular flow field grid, thus avoiding the use of surface conforming grids, and decoupling the grid generation process from the definition of the configuration. The new version of the code locally refines the uniform grid near the surface of the geometry, based on local panel size and/or user input. This method distributes the flow field grid points much more efficiently than the previous version of the code, which solved for a grid that was uniform everywhere in the flow field. TranAir results are presented for the three configurations and are compared with wind tunnel data.

  12. Analysis of four optical distance measuring instrument configurations using electrooptical polarization modulators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez, E. N.

    1972-01-01

    Four possible optical configurations for optical distance-measuring instruments using electrooptical polarization modulators are discussed. Criteria are developed for a meaningful comparison of the four systems. A summary of the compared characteristics of the systems is given in tabular form, and the comparative merits of each system are reviewed.

  13. Optimization of Simplex Atomizer Inlet Port Configuration through Computational Fluid Dynamics and Experimental Study for Aero-Gas Turbine Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marudhappan, Raja; Chandrasekhar, Udayagiri; Hemachandra Reddy, Koni

    2016-06-01

    The design of plain orifice simplex atomizer for use in the annular combustion system of 1100 kW turbo shaft engine is optimized. The discrete flow field of jet fuel inside the swirl chamber of the atomizer and up to 1.0 mm downstream of the atomizer exit are simulated using commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The Euler-Euler multiphase model is used to solve two sets of momentum equations for liquid and gaseous phases and the volume fraction of each phase is tracked throughout the computational domain. The atomizer design is optimized after performing several 2D axis symmetric analyses with swirl and the optimized inlet port design parameters are used for 3D simulation. The Volume Of Fluid (VOF) multiphase model is used in the simulation. The orifice exit diameter is 0.6 mm. The atomizer is fabricated with the optimized geometric parameters. The performance of the atomizer is tested in the laboratory. The experimental observations are compared with the results obtained from 2D and 3D CFD simulations. The simulated velocity components, pressure field, streamlines and air core dynamics along the atomizer axis are compared to previous research works and found satisfactory. The work has led to a novel approach in the design of pressure swirl atomizer.

  14. Highly Efficient Design-of-Experiments Methods for Combining CFD Analysis and Experimental Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Haller, Harold S.

    2009-01-01

    It is the purpose of this study to examine the impact of "highly efficient" Design-of-Experiments (DOE) methods for combining sets of CFD generated analysis data with smaller sets of Experimental test data in order to accurately predict performance results where experimental test data were not obtained. The study examines the impact of micro-ramp flow control on the shock wave boundary layer (SWBL) interaction where a complete paired set of data exist from both CFD analysis and Experimental measurements By combining the complete set of CFD analysis data composed of fifteen (15) cases with a smaller subset of experimental test data containing four/five (4/5) cases, compound data sets (CFD/EXP) were generated which allows the prediction of the complete set of Experimental results No statistical difference were found to exist between the combined (CFD/EXP) generated data sets and the complete Experimental data set composed of fifteen (15) cases. The same optimal micro-ramp configuration was obtained using the (CFD/EXP) generated data as obtained with the complete set of Experimental data, and the DOE response surfaces generated by the two data sets were also not statistically different.

  15. Brief Experimental Analysis of Early Reading Interventions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petursdottir, Anna-Lind; McMaster, Kristen; McComas, Jennifer J.; Bradfield, Tracy; Braganza, Viveca; Koch-McDonald, Julie; Rodriguez, Roxana; Scharf, Haley

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how brief experimental analyses (BEAs) could be used to identify effective interventions for Kindergartners (2 girls and 2 boys, 5 years and 7-10 months old) with low performance and/or growth slope in letter sound fluency (LSF). Interventions were tested within a multielement design with brief…

  16. Experimental study of the lift and drag characteristics of a cascade of flat plates in a configuration of interest for tidal energy converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoul, Faical; Parras, Luis; Del Pino, Carlos; Fernandez-Feria, Ramon

    2012-11-01

    Wind tunnel experiments are conducted for the flow around both a single flat plate and a cascade of three parallel flat plates at different angles of incidence to compare their lift and drag coefficients in a range of Reynolds number about 105, and for two values of the aspect ratio of the flat plates. The selected cascade configuration is of interest for a particular type of tidal energy converter. The lift and drag characteristics of the central plate in the cascade are compared to those of the isolated plate, finding that there exist an angle of incidence, which depends on the Reynolds number and the aspect ratio, above which the effective lift of the plate in the cascade becomes larger than that of an isolated plate. These experimental results, which are also analyzed in the light of theoretical predictions, are used as a guide for the design of the optimum configuration of the cascade which extracts the maximum power from a tidal current for a given value of the Reynolds number. Supported by the Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion (Spain) Grant no. ENE2010-16851.

  17. Critical assessment of precracked specimen configuration and experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domack, M. S.

    1985-01-01

    A research program was conducted to critically assess the effects of precracked specimen configuration, stress intensity solutions, compliance relationships and other experimental test variables for stress corrosion testing of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy plate. Modified compact and double beam wedge-loaded specimens were tested and analyzed to determine the threshold stress intensity factor and stress corrosion crack growth rate. Stress intensity solutions and experimentally determined compliance relationships were developed and compared with other solutions available in the literature. Crack growth data suggests that more effective crack length measurement techniques are necessary to better characterize stress corrosion crack growth. Final load determined by specimen reloading and by compliance did not correlate well, and was considered a major source of interlaboratory variability. Test duration must be determined systematically, accounting for crack length measurement resolution, time for crack arrest, and experimental interferences. This work was conducted as part of a round robin program sponsored by ASTM committees G1.06 and E24.04 to develop a standard test method for stress corrosion testing using precracked specimens.

  18. Aerothermal loads analysis for high speed flow over a quilted surface configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, G. C.; Smith, R. E.

    1984-08-01

    Attention is given to hypersonic laminar flow over a quilted surface configuration that simulates an array of Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System panels bowed in a spherical shape as a result of thermal gradient through the panel thickness. Pressure and heating loads to the surface are determined. The flow field over the configuration was mathematically modeled by means of time-dependent, three-dimensional conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations. A boundary mapping technique was then used to obtain a rectangular, parallel piped computational domain, and an explicit MacCormack (1972) explicit time-split predictor corrector finite difference algorithm was used to obtain steady state solutions. Total integrated heating loads vary linearly with bowed height when this value does not exceed the local boundary layer thickness.

  19. Analysis of electronic properties of different configurations of CNTS with undoped and doped atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Varshali

    2016-04-01

    In this paper three types of carbon nanotubes, namely, zigzag (n, 0), armchair (n= m), and chiral (n, m) are investigated with and without doping using simulation technique. The electronic properties like band structure and density of states of these three configurations with different values of n and m vectors are analysed and compared using Atomistix Toolkit (ATK) software. When the band structures of the designed configurations, reported in this paper are compared, it is observed that when the value of (n-m) vector is divisible by three, the CNTs behave as metals, otherwise they behave as semiconductors. The density of states of carbon nanotubes depicts the energy gap around the Fermi level. For the tube with chiral chirality, density of states is zero near the Fermi level, for semiconductor behaviour there is small gap in density of states near Fermi level and gap increases as the behaviour changes to insulator.

  20. Analysis of Radiant Cooling System Configurations Integrated with Cooling Tower for Different Indian Climatic Zones

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, Jyotirmay; Bhandari, Mahabir S; Jain, Robin; Srivastava, Prateek

    2016-01-01

    Radiant cooling system has proven to be a low energy consumption system for building cooling needs. This study describes the use of cooling tower in radiant cooling system to improve the overall system efficiency. A comprehensive simulation feasibility study of the application of cooling tower in radiant cooling system was performed for the fifteen cities in different climatic zones of India. It was found that in summer, the wet bulb temperature (WBT) of the different climatic zones except warm-humid is suitable for the integration of cooling tower with radiant cooling system. In these climates, cooling tower can provide on average 24 C to 27 C water In order to achieve the energy saving potential, three different configurations of radiant cooling system have been compared in terms of energy consumption. The different configurations of the radiant cooling system integrated with cooling tower are: (1) provide chilled water to the floor, wall and ceiling mounted tubular installation. (2) provide chilled water to the wall and ceiling mounted tabular installation. In this arrangement a separate chiller has also been used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor mounted tubular installation. (3) provide chilled water to the wall mounted tabular installation and a separate chiller is used to provide chilled water at 16 C to the floor and ceiling mounted tabular installation. A dedicated outdoor air system is also coupled for dehumidification and ventilation in all three configurations. A conventional all-air system was simulated as a baseline to compare these configurations for assessing the energy saving potential.

  1. Configuration Analysis of the ERS Points in Large-Volume Metrology System

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhangjun; Yu, Cijun; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin

    2015-01-01

    In aircraft assembly, multiple laser trackers are used simultaneously to measure large-scale aircraft components. To combine the independent measurements, the transformation matrices between the laser trackers’ coordinate systems and the assembly coordinate system are calculated, by measuring the enhanced referring system (ERS) points. This article aims to understand the influence of the configuration of the ERS points that affect the transformation matrix errors, and then optimize the deployment of the ERS points to reduce the transformation matrix errors. To optimize the deployment of the ERS points, an explicit model is derived to estimate the transformation matrix errors. The estimation model is verified by the experiment implemented in the factory floor. Based on the proposed model, a group of sensitivity coefficients are derived to evaluate the quality of the configuration of the ERS points, and then several typical configurations of the ERS points are analyzed in detail with the sensitivity coefficients. Finally general guidance is established to instruct the deployment of the ERS points in the aspects of the layout, the volume size and the number of the ERS points, as well as the position and orientation of the assembly coordinate system. PMID:26402685

  2. CFD simulation and analysis for Savonius rotors with different blade configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Huei; Klimina, Liubov A.

    2014-12-01

    Savonius rotor is seldom applied in wind power generation system due to its lower aerodynamic efficiency. But studies about Savonius rotor still continued since the rotor structure is simpler and the manufacturing cost is lower. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are adopted to compare the output power, torque and power coefficient (Cp) for the conventional two-blade Savonius rotors with three different aspect ratios but the same swept area under the same wind condition to investigate the optimum blade configuration. The rotor with tall and thin configuration is found to have the maximum output power and Cp. The rotor with short and wide configuration has the maximum torque but the minimum Cp. The current result suggests the optimum aspect ratio is 4/1. The influence related to the circular cover plates at two ends of rotor was studied also. It reveals that both the torque and power coefficient for Savonius rotor with end-plates are larger than that without end-plates.

  3. Configuration Analysis of the ERS Points in Large-Volume Metrology System.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhangjun; Yu, Cijun; Li, Jiangxiong; Ke, Yinglin

    2015-01-01

    In aircraft assembly, multiple laser trackers are used simultaneously to measure large-scale aircraft components. To combine the independent measurements, the transformation matrices between the laser trackers' coordinate systems and the assembly coordinate system are calculated, by measuring the enhanced referring system (ERS) points. This article aims to understand the influence of the configuration of the ERS points that affect the transformation matrix errors, and then optimize the deployment of the ERS points to reduce the transformation matrix errors. To optimize the deployment of the ERS points, an explicit model is derived to estimate the transformation matrix errors. The estimation model is verified by the experiment implemented in the factory floor. Based on the proposed model, a group of sensitivity coefficients are derived to evaluate the quality of the configuration of the ERS points, and then several typical configurations of the ERS points are analyzed in detail with the sensitivity coefficients. Finally general guidance is established to instruct the deployment of the ERS points in the aspects of the layout, the volume size and the number of the ERS points, as well as the position and orientation of the assembly coordinate system. PMID:26402685

  4. Parametric Flutter Analysis of the TCA Configuration and Recommendation for FFM Design and Scaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Myles; Lenkey, Peter

    1997-01-01

    The current HSR Aeroelasticity plan to design, build, and test a full span, free flying transonic flutter model in the TDT has many technical obstacles that must be overcome for a successful program. One technical obstacle is the determination of a suitable configuration and point in the sky to use in setting the scaling point for the ASE models program. Determining this configuration and point in the sky requires balancing several conflicting requirements, including model buildability, tunnel test safety, and the ability of the model to represent the flutter mechanisms of interest. As will be discussed in detail in subsequent sections, the current TCA design exhibits several flutter mechanisms of interest. It has been decided that the ASE models program will focus on the low frequency symmetric flutter mechanism, and will make no attempt to investigate high frequency flutter mechanisms. There are several reasons for this choice. First, it is believed that the high frequency flutter mechanisms are similar in nature to classical wing bending/torsion flutter, and therefore there is more confidence that this mechanism can be predicted using current techniques. The low frequency mode, on the other hand, is a highly coupled mechanism involving wing, body, tail, and engine motion which may be very difficult to predict. Second, the high frequency flutter modes result in very small weight penalties (several hundred pounds), while suppression of the low frequency mechanism inside the flight envelope causes thousands of pounds to be added to the structure. In order to successfully test the low frequency flutter mode of interest, a suitable starting configuration and point in the sky must be identified. The configuration and point in the sky must result in a wind tunnel model that (1) represents the low-frequency wing/body/engine/empennage flutter mechanisms that are unique to HSCT configurations, (2) flutters at an acceptably low frequency in the tunnel, (3) flutters at an

  5. Performance Analysis of Two Early NACA High Speed Propellers with Application to Civil Tiltrotor Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Franklin D.

    1996-01-01

    The helicopter industry is vigorously pursuing development of civil tiltrotors. One key to efficient high speed performance of this rotorcraft is prop-rotor performance. Of equal, if not greater, importance is assurance that the flight envelope is free of aeroelastic instabilities well beyond currently envisioned cuise speeds. This later condition requires study at helical tip Match numbers well in excess of 1.0. Two 1940's 'supersonic' propeller experiments conducted by NACA have provided an immensely valuable data bank with which to study prop-rotor behavior at transonic and supersonic helical tip Mach numbers. Very accurate 'blades alone' data were obtained by using nearly an infinite hub. Tabulated data were recreated from the many thrust and power figures and are included in two Appendices to this report. This data set is exceptionally well suited to re-evaluating classical blade element theories as well as evolving computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analyses. A limited comparison of one propeller's experimental results to a modem rotorcraft CFD code is made. This code, referred to as TURNS, gives very encouraging results. Detailed analysis of the performance data from both propellers is provided in Appendix A. This appendix quantifies the minimum power required to produce usable prop-rotor thrust. The dependence of minimum profile power on Reynolds number is quantified. First order compressibility power losses are quantified as well and a first approximation to design air-foil thickness ratio to avoid compressibility losses is provided. Appendix A's results are applied to study high speed civil tiltrotor cruise performance. Predicted tiltrotor performance is compared to two turboprop commercial transports. The comparison shows that there is no fundamental aerodynamic reason why the rotorcraft industry could not develop civil tiltrotor aircraft which have competitive cruise performance with today's regional, turboprop airlines. Recommendations for future study

  6. [Experimental morphological analysis of perichondrial chondrogenesis].

    PubMed

    Bellendir, E N; Ariél', B M

    2005-01-01

    Microscopic structure of perichondrium of rabbits of different age groups was studied under normal conditions and after its ortho- and heterotopic transplantation in several variants. The results obtained showed that after isolation from its normal environment and placement into unusual conditions of survival, perichondrium maintained its capacity for growth; its cells were found to divide and differentiate actively eventually forming regular hyaline cartilage in a manner similar to that taking place during normal ontogenesis. Perichondrial chondrogenesis occured in all cases of free perichondrial transplantation, provided the experimental conditions assured the optimal vascularization of transplant bed and there were no inerference with the realization of perichondrial histoblastic potential. The most intensive and full-scale chondrogenesis was obtained in the experiments that provided the expansive growth of transplant due to availability of a free space above it. Under these conditions, the proliferation of chondroblasts occured similar to that taking place in normal articular cartilage, outer surface of which faces the free space of articular cavity. These experimental data were supported by the clinical practice, where perichondrial transplantation is successfully used for the treatment of osteoarticular pathology. PMID:16381317

  7. Theoretical and experimental analysis of mylar balloons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaguera, Antonio; Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, we present a theoretical and experimental study of the problem known as the mylar balloon shape. The problem consists of inflating a balloon made of two circular discs of an unstretchable material sewed at the edge. A solution for this problem was given by W. H. Paulsen in 1994 for constrain free. In our analyzes, we fixed the height of the balloon and measure the inflated diameter. As a result, we were able to map the constrained shape in terms of the original mylar balloon's shape. The basic assumption of this problem is that the gravitational, stretching and bending energies are negligible compared with the mechanical energy - pV . Controlling the pressure and the height of the balloon, we are able to find the condition where these assumptions fail, specially in the limit h --> 0 for fixed p. A remarkable feature of this problem is the presence of wrinkles across the equator of the balloon. A precise description for that region must include the large deformation from the flat disc initial condition. We will also present some experimental data on the wrinkle's length and its connection with the pressure and height of the balloon.

  8. Transonic Free-To-Roll Analysis of the F/A-18E and F-35 Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, D. Bruce; McConnell, Jeffrey K.; Brandon, Jay M.; Hall, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    The free-to-roll technique is used as a tool for predicting areas of uncommanded lateral motions. Recently, the NASA/Navy/Air Force Abrupt Wing Stall Program extended the use of this technique to the transonic speed regime. Using this technique, this paper evaluates various wing configurations on the pre-production F/A-18E aircraft and the Joint Strike Fighter (F-35) aircraft. The configurations investigated include leading and trailing edge flap deflections, fences, leading edge flap gap seals, and vortex generators. These tests were conducted in the NASA Langley 16-Foot Transonic Tunnel. The analysis used a modification of a figure-of-merit developed during the Abrupt Wing Stall Program to discern configuration effects. The results showed how the figure-of-merit can be used to schedule wing flap deflections to avoid areas of uncommanded lateral motion. The analysis also used both static and dynamic wind tunnel data to provide insight into the uncommanded lateral behavior. The dynamic data was extracted from the time history data using parameter identification techniques. In general, modifications to the pre-production F/A-18E resulted in shifts in angle-of-attack where uncommanded lateral activity occurred. Sealing the gap between the inboard and outboard leading-edge flaps on the Navy version of the F-35 eliminated uncommanded lateral activity or delayed the activity to a higher angle-of-attack.

  9. Development and benefit analysis of a sector design algorithm for terminal dynamic airspace configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciandra, Vincent

    The National Airspace System (NAS) is the vast network of systems enabling safe and efficient air travel in the United States. It consists of a set of static sectors, each controlled by one or more air traffic controllers. Air traffic control is tasked with ensuring that all flights can depart and arrive on time and in a safe and efficient matter. However, skyrocketing demand will only increase the stress on an already inefficient system, causing massive delays. The current, static configuration of the NAS cannot possibly handle the future demand on the system safely and efficiently, especially since it is projected to triple by 2025. To overcome these issues, the Next Generation of Air Transportation System (NextGen) is being enacted to increase the flexibility of the NAS. A major objective of NextGen is to implement Adaptable Dynamic Airspace Configuration (ADAC) which will dynamically allocate the sectors to best fit the traffic in the area. Dynamically allocating sectors will allow resources such as controllers to be better distributed to meet traffic demands. Currently, most DAC research has involved the en route airspace. This leaves the terminal airspace, which accounts for a large amount of the overall NAS complexity, in need of work. Using a combination of methods used in en route sectorization, this thesis has developed an algorithm for the dynamic allocation of sectors in the terminal airspace. This algorithm will be evaluated using metrics common in the evaluation of dynamic density, which is adapted for the unique challenges of the terminal airspace, and used to measure workload on air traffic controllers. These metrics give a better view of the controller workload than the number of aircraft alone. By comparing the test results with sectors currently used in the NAS using real traffic data, the algorithm xv generated sectors can be quantitatively evaluated for improvement of the current sectorizations. This will be accomplished by testing the

  10. An arbitrary grid CFD algorithm for configuration aerodynamics analysis. Volume 1: Theory and validations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.; Iannelli, G. S.; Manhardt, Paul D.; Orzechowski, J. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the user input and output data requirements for the FEMNAS finite element Navier-Stokes code for real-gas simulations of external aerodynamics flowfields. This code was developed for the configuration aerodynamics branch of NASA ARC, under SBIR Phase 2 contract NAS2-124568 by Computational Mechanics Corporation (COMCO). This report is in two volumes. Volume 1 contains the theory for the derived finite element algorithm and describes the test cases used to validate the computer program described in the Volume 2 user guide.