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Sample records for experimental field studies

  1. Experimental studies of sound field suppression at discrete frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiks, I. Sh.; Korotin, P. I.; Potapov, O. A.; Fiks, G. E.

    2016-03-01

    Practical implementation of an active sound control system ensuring sound suppression in outer space is described as applied to sound insulation problems for equipment whose total noise level is mainly due to low-frequency discrete spectral components. The operational principle of the proposed system is based on inverse field generation with respect to the field of the initial source of quasi-monochromatic signals. The inverse field is formed by a set of radiators, which are controlled by the signals of pressure receivers positioned in the near field of the source. Experimental studies carried out with the proposed sound control system demonstrate its efficiency and testify to the stability of its operation.

  2. Experimental and Numerical Study of Free-Field Blast Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. M.; Kirkpatrick, D. J.; Longbottom, A. W.; Milne, A. M.; Bourne, N. K.

    2004-07-01

    The development of a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms governing the attenuation of explosives effects by a surrounding mitigant material or system would benefit many civilian and military applications. Current approaches rely almost exclusively on empirical data, few if any truly predictive models exist. Dstl has recently pursued an experimental programme investigating the mitigation of effects from detonating explosives in support of general requirements to attenuate blast and fragmentation. The physical properties of a range of mitigant materials have been studied at a more fundamental level, both experimentally and numerically. A preliminary numerical parameter study has been undertaken by FGE using two-phase numerical simulations to complement the experimental studies. Initial work used idealised equations of state for generic mitigants but more recently material characterisation experiments have been undertaken at RMCS. Results confirm that porosity and particle density are dominant factors affecting the efficiency of the mitigant in reducing free-field blast.

  3. Experimental studies of plasma wake-field acceleration and focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cole, B.; Ho, C.; Gai, W.; Konecny, R.; Mtingwa, S.; Norem, J.; Rosing, M.; Schoessow, P.; Simpson, J.

    1989-07-18

    More than four years after the initial proposal of the Plasma Wake-field Accelerator (PWFA), it continues to be the object of much investigation, due to the promise of the ultra-high accelerating gradients that can exist in relativistic plasma waves driven in the wake of charged particle beams. These large amplitude plasma wake-fields are of interest in the laboratory, both for the wealth of basic nonlinear plasma wave phenomena which can be studied, as well as for the applications of acceleration of focusing of electrons and positrons in future linear colliders. Plasma wake-field waves are also of importance in nature, due to their possible role in direct cosmic ray acceleration. The purpose of the present work is to review the recent experimental advances made in PWFA research at Argonne National Laboratory, in which many interesting beam and plasma phenomena have been observed. Emphasis is given to discussion of the nonlinear aspects of the PWFA beam-plasma interaction. 29 refs., 13 figs.

  4. Review of Experimental Concepts for Studying the Quantum Vacuum Field

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E. W.; Puthoff, H. E.; Teofilo, V. L.; Nickisch, L. J.; Rueda, A.; Cole, D. C.

    2006-01-20

    We review concepts that provide an experimental framework for exploring the possibility and limitations of accessing energy from the space vacuum environment. Quantum electrodynamics (QED) and stochastic electrodynamics (SED) are the theoretical approaches guiding this experimental investigation. This investigation explores the question of whether the quantum vacuum field contains useful energy that can be exploited for applications under the action of a catalyst, or cavity structure, so that energy conservation is not violated. This is similar to the same technical problem at about the same level of technology as that faced by early nuclear energy pioneers who searched for, and successfully discovered, the unique material structure that caused the release of nuclear energy via the neutron chain reaction.

  5. Feasibility Study for the Establishment of Experimental Field Study Centers (Beachhead Colleges). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antioch Coll., Yellow Springs, OH.

    The Union for Research and Experimentation in Higher Education, a consortium of 10 colleges, initiated an experimental study of a new model for off-campus education in selected problematic areas. The model places students and faculty members in Field Study Centers-- or Beachhead Colleges --to help solve local problems through interaction between…

  6. An experimental field study of weight salience and food choice.

    PubMed

    Incollingo Rodriguez, Angela C; Finch, Laura E; Buss, Julia; Guardino, Christine M; Tomiyama, A Janet

    2015-06-01

    Laboratory research has found that individuals will consume more calories and make unhealthy food choices when in the presence of an overweight individual, sometimes even regardless of what that individual is eating. This study expanded these laboratory paradigms to the field to examine how weight salience influences eating in the real world. More specifically, we tested the threshold of the effect of weight salience of food choice to see if a more subtle weight cue (e.g., images) would be sufficient to affect food choice. Attendees (N = 262) at Obesity Week 2013, a weight-salient environment, viewed slideshows containing an image of an overweight individual, an image of a thin individual, or no image (text only), and then selected from complimentary snacks. Results of ordinal logistic regression analysis showed that participants who viewed the image of the overweight individual had higher odds of selecting the higher calorie snack compared to those who viewed the image of the thin individual (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = [1.04, 3.04]), or no image (OR = 2.42, 95% CI = [1.29, 4.54]). Perceiver BMI category did not moderate the influence of image on food choice, as these results occurred regardless of participant BMI. These findings suggest that in the context of societal weight salience, weight-related cues alone may promote unhealthy eating in the general public. PMID:25698080

  7. Experimental study of flow field around a plunging flexible hydrofoil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin-Alarcon, Leonardo; Yang, Tao; Shu, Fangjun; Wei, Mingjun

    2011-11-01

    Recent developments in micro air vehicles (MAVs) have led to the improvement of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations capable of simulating flexible flapping wing phenomena. For validation of these simulations, an experimental methodology is applied to characterize the flow physics involved with an immersed flexible flapping hydrofoil. Using a one-degree of freedom crank-shaft system, a silicone hydrofoil was actuated to flap under various kinematic conditions. The hydrofoil was subject to active plunging and passive pitching motion in both water and aqueous glycerin solutions. Phase-locked particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements were obtained around the flapping hydrofoil. These measurements, along with force measurements using a six-axis load cell, are used to compare the results with those of the numerical simulations. By comparing the hydrofoil deformation, vortex evolution and force generation, good agreements between CFD and experimental results were observed. Supported by Army High Performance Computing Research Center.

  8. Experimental studies on ion acceleration and stream line detachment in a diverging magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Terasaka, K.; Yoshimura, S.; Ogiwara, K.; Aramaki, M.; Tanaka, M. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The flow structure of ions in a diverging magnetic field has been experimentally studied in an electron cyclotron resonance plasma. The flow velocity field of ions has been measured with directional Langmuir probes calibrated with the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy. For low ion-temperature plasmas, it is concluded that the ion acceleration due to the axial electric field is important compared with that of gas dynamic effect. It has also been found that the detachment of ion stream line from the magnetic field line takes place when the parameter |fciLB∕Vi| becomes order unity, where fci, LB, and Vi are the ion cyclotron frequency, the characteristic scale length of magnetic field inhomogeneity, and the ion flow velocity, respectively. In the detachment region, a radial electric field is generated in the plasma and the ions move straight with the E×B rotation driven by the radial electric field. PMID:20838424

  9. Experimental Study of Magnetic Field Effect on dc Corona Discharge in Low Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabbas, K.

    2014-09-01

    In the present paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effect of applying a transverse magnetic field on the dc corona discharge behavior in low vacuum. In general, two experiments were carried out in this work: the first is the ionization-region magnetic field experiment, and the second was the drift region magnetic field experiment. In these experiments, permanent magnets were used to produce magnetic field. The degree of vacuum used in this test was 0.4×105 Pa. It is found that the effect of the magnetic field increases as the degree of vacuum increases. It is also seen from this study that the corona current values are higher with magnetic fields than without magnetic fields. The experimental results indicate that the enhancement of the magnetic field near the wire discharge electrode has a significant influence on the increment of the discharge current. The effect of the magnetic field on the discharge current is the most significant with the negative corona discharges rather than with positive corona discharge. In contrast to, the curves were demonstrated that the application of magnetic fields in drift region magnetic field does not significantly change the corona discharge current. Discharge characteristics of magnetically enhanced corona discharges, extracted from this study, can be applied to various industrial applications, such as, in an electrostatic enhancement filter for the purpose of capturing fine particles, and as effective method for production of high ozone concentrations in a generator as compared to the ultraviolet (UV) radiation method.

  10. Argand-plane vorticity singularities in complex scalar optical fields: an experimental study using optical speckle.

    PubMed

    Rothschild, Freda; Bishop, Alexis I; Kitchen, Marcus J; Paganin, David M

    2014-03-24

    The Cornu spiral is, in essence, the image resulting from an Argand-plane map associated with monochromatic complex scalar plane waves diffracting from an infinite edge. Argand-plane maps can be useful in the analysis of more general optical fields. We experimentally study particular features of Argand-plane mappings known as "vorticity singularities" that are associated with mapping continuous single-valued complex scalar speckle fields to the Argand plane. Vorticity singularities possess a hierarchy of Argand-plane catastrophes including the fold, cusp and elliptic umbilic. We also confirm their connection to vortices in two-dimensional complex scalar waves. The study of vorticity singularities may also have implications for higher-dimensional fields such as coherence functions and multi-component fields such as vector and spinor fields. PMID:24663998

  11. Experimental studies of collective excitations of a BEC in light-induced gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuan-Hsun; Niffenegger, Robert; Blasing, David; Olson, Abraham; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-05-01

    We present our experimental studies of collective modes including spin dipole mode and scissors mode of a 87Rb Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in the presence of Raman light-induced gauge fields and synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC). By Raman dressing the mf spin states within the F =1 manifold, we engineer atoms' energy-momentum dispersion to create synthetic SOC, and spin dependent synthetic electric and magnetic fields. We have used spin dependent synthetic electric fields to make two BECs with different spins oscillate and collide in the optical trap. We have studied the effects of SOC on both the momentum damping and thermalization behaviors of the BECs when undergoing such spin dipole oscillations. We have also used spatially dependent synthetic electric fields to excite the scissors mode, which has been used as a probe for superfluidity. We have investigated the effects of the synthetic gauge fields and SOC on the measured scissors mode.

  12. Experimental studies of zonal flow and field in compact helical system plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, A.; Itoh, K.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Ohshima, S.; Iguchi, H.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.; Minami, T.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Ida, K.; Toi, K.; Takahashi, C.; Kojima, M.; Nishimura, S.; Isobe, M.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Ido, T.

    2008-05-15

    The experimental studies on zonal flows and turbulence have been carried out in Compact Helical System [K. Matsuoka, S. Kubo, M. Hosokawa et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, Proc. 12th Int. Conf., Nice, 1988 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1989, Vol. 2, p. 411] using twin heavy ion beam probes. The paper presents the experimental observations of stationary zonal flow, nonlinear couplings between zonal flow and turbulence, and the role of zonal flow in the improved confinement, together with the recent discovery of zonal magnetic field. The presented experimental results strongly support the new paradigm that the plasma transport should be considered as a system of drift wave and zonal flows, and provides the first direct evidence for turbulence dynamo that the structured magnetic field can be really generated by turbulence.

  13. Experimental studies on remanence acquisition processes and regional geomagnetic field variability from archeointensity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Ritayan

    The dissertation comprises two separate topics. Chapters 2 and 3 are experimental studies on remanence acquisition processes. Chapters 4 and 5 investigate the geomagnetic field variability in Africa and India between 1000 BCE and 1000 CE. Chapter 2 is a study in which the role of flocculation in sedimentary magnetization is analyzed with the help of laboratory redeposition experiments and a simple numerical model. At small floc sizes DRM acquisition is likely to be non-linear but it may record the directions with higher fidelity. In environments having bigger flocs the sediments are likely to record either intensities or directions with high fidelity, but not both. Also flocculation may inhibit a large fraction of magnetic grains from contributing to the net remanence and this might have consequences for intensity normalization in sediments. Chapter 3 presents a fresh perspective on the long standing debate of the nature of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Mid-Ocean Ridge Basalts (MORBs). A new parameter, IRAT, defined as the ratio of the isothermal remanences in antiparallel directions is used to differentiate between uniaxial single domain grains (IRAT ˜1) and multiaxial single domain grains (IRAT<1). The theoretical predictions were first validated with standard samples and then multiple MORB samples were analyzed. The observed IRAT ratios indicate a dominant non-uniaxial anisotropy in the MORBs. Chapters 4 and 5 are archeointensity studies from two data poor regions of the world viz., Africa and India. With stringent data selection criteria and well established archeological constraints these datasets provide important constraints on the field intensity from 1000 BCE to 1000 CE in Africa and 500 BCE to 1000 CE in India. The African dataset has a higher age resolution than the Indian dataset. The African dataset matches well with the global CALS3k.4 model and shows significant non-axial-dipolar contribution in the region. The Indian dataset is not of a similar

  14. Experimental study of the formation of field-reversed configurations employing high-order multipole fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slough, J. T.; Hoffman, A. L.

    1990-04-01

    A high-order multipole ``barrier'' field was applied at the vacuum tube wall in the TRX experiment [Phys. Fluids B 1, 840 (1989)] during both the preionization and field reversal phases of field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation. Use of this field during field reversal resulted in a significant reduction of impurities as well as increased flux trapping. With a large enough Bθ at the wall, sheath detachment from the wall became apparent, and flux loss through the sheath became negligible (<10%). At larger wall Bθ (>1.5 kG), destructive rotational spin-up occurred, driven by Hall current forces. When the multipole barrier field was also applied during either axial discharge or ringing theta current preionization, a very symmetric and uniform breakdown of the fill gas was achieved. In particular, using ringing theta preionization, complete ionization of the fill gas was accomplished with purely inductive fields of remarkably low magnitude, where Ez≤3 V/cm, and Eθ≤20 V/cm. Due to the improved ionization symmetry, about 65% to 75% of the lift-off flux (flux remaining after field reversal) could be retained through the remaining formation processes into an equilibrium FRC. Using the multipole field during both preionization and formation, it was possible to form FRC's with good confinement with greater than 3 mWb of trapped flux at 15 mTorr D2 or H2 in a 10 cm radius device. Values of s in excess of 4 could be achieved in this manner.

  15. Experimental studies of far-field superlens for sub-diffractional optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaowei; Durant, Stéphane; Lee, Hyesog; Pikus, Yuri; Xiong, Yi; Sun, Cheng; Zhang, Xiang

    2007-05-01

    Contrary to the conventional near-field superlensing, subwavelength superlens imaging is experimentally demonstrated in the far-field. The key element is termed as a Far-field SuperLens (FSL) which consists of a conventional superlens and a nanoscale coupler. The evanescent fields from the object are enhanced and then converted into propagating fields by the FSL. By only measuring the propagating field in the far-field, the object image can be reconstructed with subwavelength resolution. As an example of this concept, we design and fabricate a silver structured one dimensional FSL. Experimental results show that feature resolution of better than 50nm is possible using current FSL design.

  16. Combining experimental evolution and field population assays to study the evolution of host range breadth.

    PubMed

    Fellous, S; Angot, G; Orsucci, M; Migeon, A; Auger, P; Olivieri, I; Navajas, M

    2014-05-01

    Adapting to specific hosts often involves trade-offs that limit performance on other hosts. These constraints may either lead to narrow host ranges (i.e. specialists, able to exploit only one host type) or wide host ranges often leading to lower performance on each host (i.e. generalists). Here, we combined laboratory experiments on field populations with experimental evolution to investigate the impact of adaptation to the host on host range evolution and associated performance over this range. We used the two-spotted spider mite, Tetranychus urticae, a model organism for studies on the evolution of specialization. Field mite populations were sampled on three host plant species: tomato, citrus tree and rosebay (Nerium oleander). Testing these populations in the laboratory revealed that tomato populations of mites could exploit tomato only, citrus populations could exploit citrus and tomato whereas Nerium populations could exploit all three hosts. Besides, the wider niche ranges of citrus and Nerium populations came at the cost of low performance on their non-native hosts. Experimental lines selected to live on the same three host species exhibited similar patterns of host range and relative performance. This result suggests that adaptation to a new host species may lead to wider host ranges but at the expense of decreased performance on other hosts. We conclude that experimental evolution may reliably inform on evolution in the field. PMID:24689448

  17. Experimental and theoretical study on field emission properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles decorated carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Zhou, Wei-Man; Liu, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    Field emission properties of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) decorated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are investigated experimentally and theoretically. CNTs are in situ decorated with ZnO NPs during the growth process by chemical vapor deposition using a carbon source from the iron phthalocyanine pyrolysis. The experimental field emission test shows that the ZnO NP decoration significantly improves the emission current from 50 μA to 275 μA at 550 V and the reduced threshold voltage from 450 V to 350 V. The field emission mechanism of ZnO NPs on CNTs is theoretically studied by the density functional theory (DFT) combined with the Penn-Plummer method. The ZnO NPs reconstruct the ZnO-CNT structure and pull down the surface barrier of the entire emitter system to 0.49 eV so as to reduce the threshold electric field. The simulation results suggest that the presence of ZnO NPs would increase the LDOS near the Fermi level and increase the emission current. The calculation results are consistent with the experiment results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 91123018, 61172040, and 61172041) and the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7277).

  18. An Experimental Study of the Effects of A Rotating Magnetic Field on Electrically Conducting Aqueous Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran Narayanan; Mazuruk, Konstantin

    1998-01-01

    The use of a rotating magnetic field for stirring metallic melts has been a commonly adopted practice for a fairly long period. The elegance of the technique stems from its non-intrusive nature and the intense stirring it can produce in an electrically conducting medium. A further application of the method in recent times has been in the area of crystal growth from melts (e.g. germanium). The latter experiments have been mainly research oriented in order to understand the basic physics of the process and to establish norms for optimizing such a technique for the commercial production of crystals. When adapted for crystal growth applications, the rotating magnetic field is used to induce a slow flow or rotation in the melt which in effect significantly curtails temperature field oscillations in the melt. These oscillations are known to cause dopant striations and thereby inhomogeneities in the grown crystal that essentially degrades the crystal quality. The applied field strength is typically of the order of milli-Teslas with a frequency range between 50-400 Hz. In this investigation, we report findings from experiments that explore the feasibility of applying a rotating magnetic field to aqueous salt solutions, that are characterized by conductivities that are several orders of magnitude smaller than semi-conductor melts. The aim is to study the induced magnetic field and consequently the induced flow in such in application. Detailed flow field description obtained through non-intrusive particle displacement tracking will be reported along with an analytical assessment of the results. It is anticipated that the obtained results will facilitate in establishing a parameter range over which the technique can be applied to obtain a desired flow field distribution. This method can find applicability in the growth of crystals from aqueous solutions and give an experimenter another controllable parameter towards improving the quality of the grown crystal.

  19. Experimental Study of Soil Organic Matter Loss From Cultivated Field Plots In The Venezuelan Andes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellanger, B.; Huon, S.; Velasquez, F.; Vallès, V.; Girardin A, C.; Mariotti, A. B.

    The question of discriminating sources of organic matter in suspended particles of stream flows can be addressed by using total organic carbon (TOC) concentration and stable isotope (13C, 15N) measurements when constant fluxes of organic matter supply can be assumed. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic matter release during soil erosion and on the temporal stability of its isotopic signature. In this study, we have monitored soil organic carbon loss and water runoff using natural rainfall events on three experimental field plots with different vegetation cover (bare soil, maize and coffee fields), set up on natural slopes of a tropical mountainous watershed in NW Venezuela (09°13'32'' ­ 09°10'00''N, 70°13'49'' ­ 70°18'34''W). Runoff and soil loss are markedly superior for the bare field plot than for the coffee field plot: by a factor 15 ­ 36, respectively, for the five-month experiment, and by a factor 30 ­ 120, respectively, during a single rainfall event experiment. Since runoff and soil organic matter loss are closely linked during most of the flow (at the time scales of this study), TOC concentration in suspended matter is constant. Furthermore, stable isotope compositions reflect those of top-soil organic matter from which they originate.

  20. Lignin fate in soils studied at the long-term experimental field of "Les Closeaux" (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dignac, M.-F.; Thevenot, M.; Bahri, H.; Rasse, D. P.; Rumpel, C.

    2009-04-01

    Lignins are one of the most abundant plant molecules in soils and are considered as having a great impact on the soil organic matter (SOM) content and fate. However, the dynamics and turnover of lignins in soils are not clear on the long-term basis. Some studies suggest that lignins turnover could be faster than that of the bulk SOM (Lobe et al., 2002; Dignac et al., 2005), whereas other studies suggest the opposite (Hoffman et al., 2009). The lignin fate in soils and their role in the SOM dynamics require further elucidation. To this end, a long-term study based on a wheat-maize transition chronosequence was set up in 1993, at the "Les Closeaux" experimental field in Versailles (France). In this field the C3 to C4 vegetation change makes it possible to use stable isotopes to study bulk and molecular SOM turnover. The influence of maize cropping on lignin and SOM dynamics was studied using the CuO oxidation and chromatographic methods coupled with isotopic measurements. Based on this experimental setup and methodology, we calculated a lignin turnover of 47% over a 9-year period, when 9% of the bulk soil organic matter had turned over. Moreover, we showed (Bahri et al., 2006) that the turnover of lignins is monomer specific. A simple two-pool model calibrated on the lignin-specific 13C isotopic analyses was developed to quantify the lignin turnover rates (Rasse et al., 2006). The first results obtained suggest that only 8% of the lignins applied to the soil is retained, the mechanisms of stabilization being to be elucidated. The "Les Closeaux" experimental field has already furnished much information on lignin fate in soils and will be used in the future to elucidate further the processes of lignin degradation in soil. Bahri H., Dignac M.-F., Rumpel C., Rasse D.P., Chenu C., Mariotti A., 2006. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38, 1977-1988. Dignac M.-F, Bahri H., Rumpel C., Rasse D.P., Bardoux G., Balesdent J., Girardin C., Chenu C., Mariotti A., 2005. Geoderma 128, 3

  1. An Experimental Field Study of Delayed Density Dependence in Natural Populations of Aedes albopictus

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Rachael K.; Bradley, Caitlin; Apperson, Charles S.; Gould, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Aedes albopictus, a species known to transmit dengue and chikungunya viruses, is primarily a container-inhabiting mosquito. The potential for pathogen transmission by Ae. albopictus has increased our need to understand its ecology and population dynamics. Two parameters that we know little about are the impact of direct density-dependence and delayed density-dependence in the larval stage. The present study uses a manipulative experimental design, under field conditions, to understand the impact of delayed density dependence in a natural population of Ae. albopictus in Raleigh, North Carolina. Twenty liter buckets, divided in half prior to experimentation, placed in the field accumulated rainwater and detritus, providing oviposition and larval production sites for natural populations of Ae. albopictus. Two treatments, a larvae present and larvae absent treatment, were produced in each bucket. After five weeks all larvae were removed from both treatments and the buckets were covered with fine mesh cloth. Equal numbers of first instars were added to both treatments in every bucket. Pupae were collected daily and adults were frozen as they emerged. We found a significant impact of delayed density-dependence on larval survival, development time and adult body size in containers with high larval densities. Our results indicate that delayed density-dependence will have negative impacts on the mosquito population when larval densities are high enough to deplete accessible nutrients faster than the rate of natural food accumulation. PMID:22563428

  2. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1-3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200-600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  3. Experimental study of the nonlinear diffusion of a magnetic field and skin explosion of cylindrical conductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chaikovsky, S. A.; Datsko, I. M.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Rybka, D. V.; Ratakhin, N. A.; Oreshkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the skin explosion of cylindrical conductors of diameter 1–3 mm (copper, aluminum, titanium, steel 3, and stainless steel) at a peak magnetic field of 200–600 T. The experiments were carried out on the MIG pulsed power generator at a current of up to 2.5 MA and a current rise time of 100 ns. The surface explosion of a conductor was identified by the appearance of a flash of extreme ultraviolet radiation. A minimum magnetic induction has been determined below which no plasma is generated at the conductor surface. For copper, aluminum, steel 3, titanium, and stainless steel, the minimum magnetic induction has been estimated to be (to within 10%) 375, 270, 280, 220, and 245 T, respectively.

  4. Experimental studies of the pressures generated by a liquid oxygen slug in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulware, Jeffrey C.; Ban, Heng; Jensen, Scott; Wassom, Steve

    2010-07-01

    The strong paramagnetic susceptibility of liquid oxygen (LOX) has established it as a good candidate for a cryogenic magnetic fluid system. While its properties have been known for several decades, a fundamental understanding of the behavior of LOX in a magnetically controlled fluid system is needed for the development of a suitable space application that can operate reliably and efficiently. This study conducted quantitative experiments on the dynamics of a LOX slug in a tube when subjected to electrically-induced magnetic fields within a solenoid. The experiments used a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 1.9 mm and LOX slugs of 0.6, 1.3, 1.9, 2.5, and 3.2 mm length at various initial positions relative to the solenoid. The pressures generated by the motion of the LOX slug under the magnetic force were recorded to characterize the pressure differential generated and the breakdown of the slug. The highest attainable pressure differential was found to be 1.45 kPa, which correlated well to theoretical predictions once the analysis accounted for the resistance heating of the solenoid. The noted differences between experimental results and theory could also be attributed to impeded slug motion from shear and mass forces. Within the workable pressure range, however, an optimal slug length was found which appropriately balances the pressure, shear, and magnetic forces in the system. This paper presents the experimental data on the dynamics and the maximum pressure differential generated by a LOX slug in a magnetic field and discusses the viability of LOX in a magnetic fluid management system intended for space applications.

  5. Experimental and numerical studies on plasma behavior flowing across perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezaki, T.; Takahashi, K.; Sasaki, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Harada, N.

    2016-05-01

    To understand particle acceleration mechanisms in a collisionless shock, we have investigated the behaviors of a one-dimensional fast plasma flow in a perpendicular magnetic field by experimental and numerical simulations in a laboratory scale experiment. The velocity of the plasma flow generated by a taper-cone-shaped plasma focus device has varied by the gradient of the perpendicular magnetic field. The plasma flow has accelerated by applying the magnetic field with the negative gradient. To clarify the behavior of the plasma flow in the perpendicular magnetic field, numerical simulations based on an electromagnetic hybrid particle-in-cell (PIC) method have been carried out. These results indicate that the magnetic field gradient affects the plasma flow velocity.

  6. Analytical and experimental study of axisymmetric truncated plug nozzle flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, T. J.; Sule, W. P.; Fanning, A. E.; Giel, T. V.; Galanga, F. L.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental and analytical investigation of the flow field and base pressure of internal-external-expansion truncated plug nozzles are discussed. Experimental results for two axisymmetric, conical plug-cylindrical shroud, truncated plug nozzles are presented for both open and closed wake operations. These results include extensive optical and pressure data covering nozzle flow field and base pressure characteristics, diffuser effects, lip shock strength, Mach disc behaviour, and the recompression and reverse flow regions. Transonic experiments for a special planar transonic section are presented. An extension of the analytical method of Hall and Mueller to include the internal shock wave from the shroud exit is presented for closed wake operation. Results of this analysis include effects on the flow field and base pressure of ambient pressure ratio, nozzle geometry, and the ratio of specific heats. Static thrust is presented as a function of ambient pressure ratio and nozzle geometry. A new transonic solution method is also presented.

  7. An Experimental Study of the Near Field Region of a Free Jet with Passive Mixing Tabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohl, D. G.; Foss, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the flow characteristics of a tabbed free jet. Results were acquired in the near field (nominally 2 tab widths upstream to 2 tab widths downstream of the exit plane) of a tabbed jet. Upstream pressure results showed static pressure distributions in both the x-and y-directions along the top surface of the tunnel. Hot-wire measurements showed rapid expansion of the core fluid into the ambient region. Two counter rotating regions of streamwise vorticity were shown on each side of the primary tab. An enhancement of the tabbed jet concept was proposed and tested. Specifically, two tabs, half the scale of the primary tab, were added to the primary tab to provide attachment surfaces for the normally occurring ejection of fluid. The secondary tabs caused a slight increase in the streamwise vorticity created from the upstream static pressure gradient while significantly increasing the re-oriented boundary layer vorticity. The combined pumping effect of the two counter rotating regions of vorticity caused a significant increase in the transport of the jet core fluid into the surrounding region.

  8. Experimental Study of Dispersion Control Utilizing both Magnetic and Electric Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Mikio; Ikegami, Masahiro; Noda, Akira; Shirai, Toshiyuki; Souda, Hikaru; Tongu, Hiromu; Shibuya, Shinji; Noda, Koji

    2006-03-20

    An experiment to control dispersion of beams in one bending section has been carried out. This experiment is based on a theory that the dispersion of accumulated beams can be controlled, if they are bent by a cross field composed of magnetic and an electric fields. Suppression of the dispersion can ease a shear which affects the 3-dimensionally ordered structure of the ultimate-low-temperature beams. In order to realize this scheme experimentally, we have manufactured a set of electrodes to create precise electric fields whose strength is 6.6 x 104 V/m for 24Mg+, 35keV beam. The electrodes have been inserted to the gap of dipole magnet. 3-dimensional field calculation shows that the error of the electric fields is less than 0.1% within {+-} 5mm from the reference orbit. We also tested the effect of the electric field using a single set of bending elements. The result showed that the linear dispersion can be controlled or canceled by changing the ratio of magnetic and electric fields.

  9. The biomineralization and fossilization of magnetotactic bacteria: Insights from experimental and field studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Y.; LI, J.; Menguy, N.; Deng, C.; Kissel, C.; Liu, Q.; Zhu, R.

    2015-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are widespread prokaryotes which can navigate along the Earth's magnetic field lines and produce tens to hundreds of nanocrystals of magnetite (Fe3O4) or/and greigite (Fe3S4) aligned in chain(s) within a cell. The remains of MTB (i.e. magnetofossils) within geological records have therefore been considered as potential recorders of paleomagnetic, paleoenvironmental and ancient-life signals. These intracellularly-formed nanocrystals, called magnetosomes, generally have distinctively physical, chemical and crystallographic features from those magnetic minerals produced by abiotic or extracellular mineralization processes, and therefore could be distinguished by rock magnetic and electron microscopic approaches. However, identification and quantification of magnetofossils from sediments or sedimentary rocks are nevertheless not straightforward not only due to their tiny sizes, relatively low concentration, always mixing with abiotic magnetic minerals, but also the chain collapse and crystal maghemization during post-depositional processes. Comprehensive studies on the biomineralization and fossilization of magnetosomes are therefore essential for unambiguously identifying and quantitating magnetofossils from geologic samples. In this presentation, we summarize the biomineralization processes and magnetic properties of magnetosome chains within modern cultured and uncultured MTB. Experimental studies on the effects of the chain aligning and collapsing on the magnetic properties of magnetosomes are discussed, which give useful clues to understand the possible occurrence of magnetofossils within natural materials and their corresponding magnetic changes. Recent findings in magnetofossils from marine and lake sediments, showing how to identify magnetofossils from sediments by using the comprehensive rock magnetism, ferromagnetic resonance, and transmission electron microscopy approaches, as well as their implications for sedimentary magnetism

  10. Experimental Study of Entropy Production in Cells under Alternating Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Chang-Jiang; Luo, Liao-Fu

    2012-08-01

    We put forward a new method for measuring the entropy production in the living cell. It involves heating the sample by alternating the electric field and recording the outward heat flow. The entropy production in a normal cell MCF10A and a cancerous cell MDA-MB-231 were measured and compared. The results show that the method is effective for the entropy measurement of a living organism. The scaled electro-induced entropy production rate (SEEP) of MDA-MB-231 monotonically increases with the electric field strength at 5-40 V/cm. While that of MCF10A changes non-monotonically and there exists a peak at 5-30 V/cm. The electro-induced entropy production ratio (EEPR) is smaller than 1 in a large range of field strengths, from 5 to 25 V/cm, which reveals that under 5-25 V/cm electric field exposure, the direction of the entropy flow may be changed from normal tissue to cancerous cells. We present a facile and effective strategy for experimentally investigating the thermodynamic properties of the cell and give a deeper insight into the physical difference between normal and cancerous cells under electric field exposure.

  11. Experimental and numerical study of error fields in the CNT stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, K. C.; Anichowski, A.; Brenner, P. W.; Pedersen, T. S.; Raftopoulos, S.; Traverso, P.; Volpe, F. A.

    2016-07-01

    Sources of error fields were indirectly inferred in a stellarator by reconciling computed and numerical flux surfaces. Sources considered so far include the displacements and tilts of the four circular coils featured in the simple CNT stellarator. The flux surfaces were measured by means of an electron beam and fluorescent rod, and were computed by means of a Biot–Savart field-line tracing code. If the ideal coil locations and orientations are used in the computation, agreement with measurements is poor. Discrepancies are ascribed to errors in the positioning and orientation of the in-vessel interlocked coils. To that end, an iterative numerical method was developed. A Newton–Raphson algorithm searches for the coils’ displacements and tilts that minimize the discrepancy between the measured and computed flux surfaces. This method was verified by misplacing and tilting the coils in a numerical model of CNT, calculating the flux surfaces that they generated, and testing the algorithm’s ability to deduce the coils’ displacements and tilts. Subsequently, the numerical method was applied to the experimental data, arriving at a set of coil displacements whose resulting field errors exhibited significantly improved agreement with the experimental results.

  12. Experimental study of stratified jet by simultaneous measurements of velocity and density fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Duo; Chen, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Stratified flows with small density difference commonly exist in geophysical and engineering applications, which often involve interaction of turbulence and buoyancy effect. A combined particle image velocimetry (PIV) and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) system is developed to measure the velocity and density fields in a dense jet discharged horizontally into a tank filled with light fluid. The illumination of PIV particles and excitation of PLIF dye are achieved by a dual-head pulsed Nd:YAG laser and two CCD cameras with a set of optical filters. The procedure for matching refractive indexes of two fluids and calibration of the combined system are presented, as well as a quantitative analysis of the measurement uncertainties. The flow structures and mixing dynamics within the central vertical plane are studied by examining the averaged parameters, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and modeling of momentum flux and buoyancy flux. At downstream, profiles of velocity and density display strong asymmetry with respect to its center. This is attributed to the fact that stable stratification reduces mixing and unstable stratification enhances mixing. In stable stratification region, most of turbulence production is consumed by mean-flow convection, whereas in unstable stratification region, turbulence production is nearly balanced by viscous dissipation. Experimental data also indicate that at downstream locations, mixing length model performs better in mixing zone of stable stratification regions, whereas in other regions, eddy viscosity/diffusivity models with static model coefficients represent effectively momentum and buoyancy flux terms. The measured turbulent Prandtl number displays strong spatial variation in the stratified jet.

  13. Simulation and experimental study of DC electric field distribution characteristics of rat hippocampal slices in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yu; Dong, Lei; Gao, Yang; Qiu, Qian; Li, Ze-yan; Zhao, Zhe; Chen, Rui-juan; Wang, Hui-quan

    2016-06-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field is a noninvasive neuromodulation tool that can inhibit or facilitate excitability of neurons. Despite its efficacy, the dielectric constant of artificial cerebrospinal fluid and the position and direction of brain slices and other factors can affect the field intensity and distribution acting on the surface of rat hippocampus slices, thus causing errors. In this study, we describe a new analytical method optimized for DC electric fields acting on brain slices, and the design of an external DC electric field stimulator to allow scientific evaluation of brain slices. We investigated parameters regarding the uniformity of electric field distribution and identified the maximal parameters using the finite element method. Then, we selected and simplified slice images using magnetic resonance imaging data and calculated the electric field intensity of the original and simplified models. The electric field simulator induced action potential and excitatory postsynaptic current with intensities of 1, 5, and 10 V/m. This study describes the development of a new electric field stimulator and successfully demonstrates its practicability for scientific evaluation of tissue slices.

  14. Modeling and experimental study on near-field acoustic levitation by flexural mode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pinkuan; Li, Jin; Ding, Han; Cao, Wenwu

    2009-12-01

    Near-field acoustic levitation (NFAL) has been used in noncontact handling and transportation of small objects to avoid contamination. We have performed a theoretical analysis based on nonuniform vibrating surface to quantify the levitation force produced by the air film and also conducted experimental tests to verify our model. Modal analysis was performed using ANSYS on the flexural plate radiator to obtain its natural frequency of desired mode, which is used to design the measurement system. Then, the levitation force was calculated as a function of levitation distance based on squeeze gas film theory using measured amplitude and phase distributions on the vibrator surface. Compared with previous fluid-structural analyses using a uniform piston motion, our model based on the nonuniform radiating surface of the vibrator is more realistic and fits better with experimentally measured levitation force. PMID:20040404

  15. Experimental studies of protozoan response to intense magnetic fields and forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevorkian, Karine

    Intense static magnetic fields of up to 31 Tesla were used as a novel tool to manipulate the swimming mechanics of unicellular organisms. It is shown that homogenous magnetic fields alter the swimming trajectories of the single cell protozoan Paramecium caudatum, by aligning them parallel to the applied field. Immobile neutrally buoyant paramecia also oriented in magnetic fields with similar rates as the motile ones. It was established that the magneto-orientation is mostly due to the magnetic torques acting on rigid structures in the cell body and therefore the response is a non-biological, passive response. From the orientation rate of paramecia in various magnetic field strengths, the average anisotropy of the diamagnetic susceptibility of the cell was estimated. It has also been demonstrated that magnetic forces can be used to create increased, decreased and even inverted simulated gravity environments for the investigation of the gravi-responses of single cells. Since the mechanisms by which Earth's gravity affects cell functioning are still not fully understood, a number of methods to simulate different strength gravity environments, such as centrifugation, have been employed. Exploiting the ability to exert magnetic forces on weakly diamagnetic constituents of the cells, we were able to vary the gravity from -8 g to 10 g, where g is Earth's gravity. Investigations of the swimming response of paramecia in these simulated gravities revealed that they actively regulate their swimming speed to oppose the external force. This result is in agreement with centrifugation experiments, confirming the credibility of the technique. Moreover, the Paramecium's swimming ceased in simulated gravity of 10 g, indicating a maximum possible propulsion force of 0.7 nN. The magnetic force technique to simulate gravity is the only earthbound technique that can create increased and decreased simulated gravities in the same experimental setup. These findings establish a general

  16. Ex-situ experimental studies on serpentine flow field design for redox flow battery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothi Latha, T.; Jayanti, S.

    2014-02-01

    Electrolyte distribution using parallel flow field for redox flow battery (RFB) applications shows severe non-uniformity, while the conventional design of using the carbon felt itself as the flow distributor gives too high pressure drop. An optimized flow field design for uniform flow distribution at a minimal parasitic power loss is therefore needed for RFB systems. Since the materials and geometrical dimensions in RFBs are very different from those used in fuel cells, the hydrodynamics of the flow fields in RFBs is likely to be very different. In the present paper, we report on a fundamental study of the hydrodynamics of a serpentine flow field relevant to RFB applications. The permeability of the porous medium has been measured under different compression ratios and this is found to be in the range of 5-8 × 10-11 m2. The pressure drop in two serpentine flow fields of different geometric characteristics has been measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. Further analysis using computational fluid dynamics simulations brings out the importance of the compression of the porous medium as an additional parameter in determining the flow distribution and pressure drop in these flow fields.

  17. Experimental study of near-field air entrainment by subsonic volcanic jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The flow structure in the developing region of a turbulent jet has been examined using particle image velocimetry methods, considering the flow at steady state conditions. The velocity fields were integrated to determine the ratio of the entrained air speed to the jet speed, which was approximately 0.03 for a range of Mach numbers up to 0.89 and. Reynolds numbers up to 217,000. This range of experimental Mach and Reynolds numbers is higher than previously considered for high-accuracy entrainment measures, particularly in the near-vent region. The entrainment values are below those commonly used for geophysical analyses of volcanic plumes, suggesting that existing 1-D models are likely to understate the tendency for column collapse. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Rocks observed by the Viking Landers and Pathfinder Lander/Sojourner rover exhibit a suite of perplexing rock textures. Among these are pits, spongy textures, penetrative flutes, lineaments, crusts, and knobs Fluvial, impact, chemical alteration, and aeolian mechanisms have been proposed for many of these. In an effort to better understand the origin and characteristics of Martian rock textures, abraded rocks in the Mojave Desert and other regions have been studied. We find that most Martian rock textures, as opposed to just a few, bear close resemblance to terrestrial aeolian textures and can most easily be explained by wind, not other, processes. Flutes, grooves, and some pits on Mars are consistent with abrasion by saltating particles, as described previously. However, many other rock textures probably also have an aeolian origin. Sills at the base of rocks that generally lie at high elevations, such as Half Dome, are consistent with such features on Earth that are related to moats or soil ramps that shield the basal part of the rock from erosion. Crusts consisting of fluted fabrics, such as those on Stimpy and Chimp, are similar to fluted crusts on Earth that spall off over time. Knobby and lineated rocks are similar to terrestrial examples of heterogeneous rocks that differentially erode. The location of specific rock textures on Mars also gives insight into their origin. Many of the most diagnostic ventifacts found at the Pathfinder site are located on rocks that lie near the crests or the upper slopes of ridges. On Earth, the most active ventifact formation occurs on sloped or elevated topography, where windflow is accelerated and particle kinetic energy and flux are increased. Integrated 0 together, these observations point to significant aeolian 0 modification of rocks on Mars and cast doubt on whether many primary textures resulting from other processes are preserved. Experimental simulations of abrasion in the presence of abundant sand indicate that

  19. Experimental and theoretical pore-scale study of thermal field responses to drying of porous surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aminzadeh, M.; Or, D.

    2015-12-01

    The drying of porous surfaces involves pores invasion at a sequence reflecting their respective capillary size (large pores invaded first similar to drainage). The emptying of an evaporating pore is accompanied by changes in the thermal field forming on the surface around the invaded pore that consequently affects surface temperature and energy partitioning over the drying surface. A novel experimental system was designed to systematically evaluate the coupling between surface temperature and evaporative flux from individual and clusters of pores drilled into rough glass surfaces connected to a liquid reservoir. Details of thermal fields around individual evaporating pores were observed for sparse and dense pore spacings including measurements of evaporating flux dynamics and results were compared with PCEB model [Aminzadeh and Or, 2014] predictions. We observed drying-induced pore emptying sequences of sintered glass bead surfaces by visual and thermal imaging using high resolution infrared imager. The links between pore emptying sequence at a drying surface inferred from pore size distribution, and surface temperature dynamics offer a possibility of predicting energy partitioning over drying terrestrial surfaces.

  20. Experimental research on electric propulsion. Note 5: Experimental study of a magnetic field stabilized arc-jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robotti, A. C.; Oggero, M.

    1984-01-01

    The possibility of using an electric arc under the influence of a magnetic field in ambient air to transform the heat energy of the working fluid arc into the kinetic energy of the jet was investigated. A convergent-divergent type nozzle was used. Variation of specific thrust and chamber pressure are discussed. Nitrogen was the propellant used.

  1. Experimental study of the flow field induced by a resonating piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidakhvidi, M. Ahmadi; Shirzadeh, R.; Steenackers, G.; Vanlanduit, S.

    2013-11-01

    Flexible plate structures with integrated piezoelectric patches offer interesting possibilities when considered as actuation mechanisms for energy harvesting devices, cooling devices and propulsion devices of micro-aerial vehicles. Most of the studies reported in literature are based on the assumption of a 2D aerodynamic flow. However, the flow behind a finite span wing is significantly more complex than that of an infinite span wing. In order to corroborate this statement, the present experimental study contains high-speed particle image velocimetry measurements performed on a piezoelectric finite span wing oscillating in air, at 84.8 Hz. The paper focuses on the situation of low Keulegan-Carpenter numbers (KC < 3). The dimensionless KC number describes the relative importance of the drag forces over inertia forces for objects that oscillate in a fluid flow at rest. The evolution of the unsteady vortex structures near the plate is characterized for different conditions. This allows a better understanding of the unsteady aerodynamics of flapping flight. The accomplished experimental data analysis has shown that the flow phenomena are strongly dependent on the KC values.

  2. Low dose short duration pulsed electromagnetic field effects on cultured human chondrocytes: An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Anbarasan, Selvam; Baraneedharan, Ulaganathan; Paul, Solomon FD; Kaur, Harpreet; Rangaswami, Subramoniam; Bhaskar, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) is used to treat bone and joint disorders for over 30 years. Recent studies demonstrate a significant effect of PEMF on bone and cartilage proliferation, differentiation, synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) and production of growth factors. The aim of this study is to assess if PEMF of low frequency, ultralow field strength and short time exposure have beneficial effects on in-vitro cultured human chondrocytes. Materials and Methods: Primary human chondrocytes cultures were established using articular cartilage obtained from knee joint during joint replacement surgery. Post characterization, the cells were exposed to PEMF at frequencies ranging from 0.1 to 10 Hz and field intensities ranging from 0.65 to 1.95 μT for 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days to analyze the viability, ECM component synthesis, proliferation and morphology related changes post exposure. Association between exposure doses and cellular effects were analyzed with paired't’ test. Results: In-vitro PEMF exposure of 0.1 Hz frequency, 1.95 μT and duration of 60 min/day for 3 consecutive days produced the most favorable response on chondrocytes viability (P < 0.001), ECM component production (P < 0.001) and multiplication. Exposure of identical chondrocyte cultures to PEMFs of 0.65 μT field intensity at 1 Hz frequency resulted in less significant response. Exposure to 1.3 μT PEMFs at 10 Hz frequency does not show any significant effects in different analytical parameters. Conclusions: Short duration PEMF exposure may represent a new therapy for patients with Osteoarthritis (OA). PMID:26955182

  3. Experimental study of the reduction of field emission by gas injection in vacuum for accelerator applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaksour, K.; Kirkpatrick, M. J.; Dessante, Ph.; Odic, E.; Simonin, A.; de Esch, H. P. L.; Lepetit, B.; Alamarguy, D.; Bayle, F.; Teste, Ph.

    2014-10-01

    Field emission current from surfaces under vacuum and at high field strengths can be reduced by the injection of gas into the evacuated volume. In this paper, the effects of H2, He, N2, and Ar on this "dark" current emitted from a tungsten carbide point cathode for 2 cm gap distance is studied. Exposure to any of these gases at pressures on the order of 10-3-10-2 Pa was found to reduce the emission current by up to 90% with a time constant on the order of ˜1 minute as compared to the current at 10-6 Pa. The effect was strongly dependent on the gas nature, with Ar and N2 having larger effects at lower pressures than He and H2. The reduction was reversible, with the current increasing to near its original value with a time constant on the order of ˜1-10 minutes after pumping down. The effect of the gas remained in the absence of electric field, whatever the gas pressure. Mechanisms for these and related phenomena are discussed.

  4. Experimental study of the magnetic field enhanced Payne effect in magnetorheological elastomers.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Vladislav V; Ecker, Eva; Stepanov, Gennady V; Shamonin, Mikhail; Monkman, Gareth J; Kramarenko, Elena Yu; Khokhlov, Alexei R

    2014-11-21

    The dynamic modulus and the loss factor of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) of various compositions and anisotropies are studied by dynamic torsion oscillations performed in the absence and in the presence of an external magnetic field. The emphasis is on the Payne effect, i.e. the dependence of the elastomer magnetorheological characteristics on the strain amplitude and their evolution with cyclically increasing and decreasing strain amplitudes. MREs are based on two silicone matrices differing in storage modulus (soft, G' ∼ 10(3) Pa, and hard, G' ∼ 10(4) Pa, matrices). For each matrix, the concentration of carbonyl iron particles with diameters of 3-5 μm was equal to 70 and 82 mass% (22 and 35 vol%, respectively) in the composite material. Samples for each filler content, isotropic and aligned-particles, are investigated. It is found that the Payne effect significantly increases in the presence of an external magnetic field and varies with the cyclical loading which reaches saturation after several cycles. The results are interpreted as the processes of formation-destruction-reformation of the internal filler structure under the simultaneously applied mechanical force and magnetic field. Impacts of matrix elasticity and magnetic interactions on the filler alignment are elucidated. PMID:25278263

  5. An experimental study of gas-bubble evolution on a single exposure to a variable pressure field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, A. V.; Shestachenko, O. E.; Tyaktev, A. A.; Piskunov, Yu A.; Popov, V. N.; Bugaenko, I. L.; Sviridov, E. V.; Andreev, A. M.; Baishev, A. I.; Medvedev, V. M.

    2013-07-01

    This paper gives experimental results on the geometry of a gas bubble upfloating in a liquid for the case of a single exposure to a pressure pulse. An apparatus operated in the mode of rarefaction-compression wave generation in a liquid was used for experiments with two media: gas-air and liquid-water. Geometrical sizes were registered with the help of the optical shadow method. Experimental results were used to study how the evolution of dimensionless volume of the upfloating gas bubble depends on time (V(t)/V0) in the case of exposure to a variable dimensionless pressure field in time P(t)/P0.

  6. Mother-calf vocal communication in Atlantic walrus: a first field experimental study.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Isabelle; Aubin, Thierry; Mathevon, Nicolas

    2010-05-01

    In all colonial pinnipeds studied, mother-young vocal recognition exists and allows rapid and reliable meetings in spite of the confusing environment of the breeding colony. The efficiency of this recognition process guarantees pup survival, especially in species where females alternate foraging sea trips and lactation periods on land. The Atlantic Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus rosmarus) is a highly gregarious pinniped with females attending their calves for an extended period of time (2-3 years). Although we expect mother-calf vocal recognition to occur in this species due to the high density of individuals packed in herds, it has never been experimentally demonstrated. Here, we assessed the individual stereotypy of both mother and calf barks recorded in the wild by measuring frequency and temporal acoustic parameters. Both discriminant function and artificial neural network analyses resulted in high correct classification rates, underlying a well-defined individual stereotypy in parameters related to frequency modulation and frequency values. Playback experiments showed that mothers were more responsive to the barks of their own calf than to those of unrelated young. Finally, propagation experiments revealed that barks propagate at greater distances over water surface than over ice, acoustic features such as frequency modulation and frequency spectrum being highly resistant to degradation during propagation. Thus, acoustic analysis and propagation experiments suggest that these frequency parameters might be the key acoustic features involved in the individual identification process. This experimental study clearly demonstrates that Atlantic walrus has developed a highly reliable mother-calf vocal communication allowing such strong social bond. PMID:19960216

  7. Experimental study of the turbulent field behind a perforated vortex generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habchi, C.; Lemenand, T.; Della Valle, D.; Al Shaer, A.; Peerhossaini, H.

    2015-07-01

    The influence of the wake vortex arising behind a perforated tab on the mixing process in heat exchangers and chemical reactors is analyzed. The preliminary step of this study, i.e., investigation of the turbulent field generated by a single perforated tab, is presented here. For this aim, laser Doppler velocimetry measurements are conducted downstream from a perforated trapezoidal vortex generator placed in a wind tunnel. It is shown that two shear layers are generated by the tab. The first shear layer is located at the upper edge of the tab, and the other is ejected from the perforation edges. These shear layers are characterized by high turbulent kinetic energy levels, which are profitable for meso-mixing enhancement. Finally, a spectral study shows that the turbulent macro-scale is nearly the same for typical locations in the shear layers shed from the tab and perforation edges.

  8. An Experimental Study of Boiling in Reduced and Zero Gravity Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usiskin, C. M.; Siegel, R.

    1961-01-01

    A pool boiling apparatus was mounted on a counterweighted platform which could be dropped a distance of nine feet. By varying the size of the counterweight, the effective gravity field on the equipment was adjusted between zero and unity. A study of boiling burnout in water indicated that a variation in the critical heat flux according to the one quarter power of gravity was reasonable. A consideration of the transient burnout process was necessary in order to properly interpret the data. A photographic study of nucleate boiling showed how the velocity of freely rising vapor bubbles decreased as gravity was reduced. The bubble diameters at the time of breakoff from the heated surface were found to vary inversely as gravity to the 1/3.5 power. Motion pictures were taken to illustrate both nucleate and film boiling in the low gravity range.

  9. Experimental and Field Studies of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in White-Tailed Deer

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, John R.; Zhao, Tong; Doyle, Michael P.; Goldberg, Martin R.; Brown, Cathy A.; Sewell, Christopher T.; Kavanaugh, Darrell M.; Bauman, Christopher D.

    2001-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate fecal shedding of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in a small group of inoculated deer, determine the prevalence of the bacterium in free-ranging white-tailed deer, and elucidate relationships between E. coli O157:H7 in wild deer and domestic cattle at the same site. Six young, white-tailed deer were orally administered 108 CFU of E. coli O157:H7. Inoculated deer were shedding E. coli O157:H7 by 1 day postinoculation (DPI) and continued to shed decreasing numbers of the bacteria throughout the 26-day trial. Horizontal transmission to an uninoculated deer was demonstrated. Although E. coli O157:H7 bacteria were recovered from the gastrointestinal tracts of deer necropsied from 4 to 26 DPI, attaching and effacing lesions were not apparent in any deer. Results are similar to those of inoculation studies in calves and sheep. In field studies, E. coli O157 was not detected in 310 fresh deer fecal samples collected from the ground. It was detected in feces, but not in meat, from 3 of 469 free-ranging deer in 1997. In 1998, E. coli O157 was not detected in 140 deer at the single positive site found in 1997; however, it was recovered from 13 of 305 dairy and beef cattle at the same location. Isolates of E. coli O157:H7 from deer and cattle at this site differed with respect to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns and genes encoding Shiga toxins. The low overall prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 and the identification of only one site with positive deer suggest that wild deer are not a major reservoir of E. coli O157:H7 in the southeastern United States. However, there may be individual locations where deer sporadically harbor the bacterium, and venison should be handled with the same precautions recommended for beef, pork, and poultry. PMID:11229913

  10. Experimental study of near-field entrainment of moderately overpressured jets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solovitz, S.A.; Mastin, L.G.; Saffaraval, F.

    2011-01-01

    Particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments have been conducted to study the velocity flow fields in the developing flow region of high-speed jets. These velocity distributions were examined to determine the entrained mass flow over a range of geometric and flow conditions, including overpressured cases up to an overpressure ratio of 2.83. In the region near the jet exit, all measured flows exhibited the same entrainment up until the location of the first shock when overpressured. Beyond this location, the entrainment was reduced with increasing overpressure ratio, falling to approximately 60 of the magnitudes seen when subsonic. Since entrainment ratios based on lower speed, subsonic results are typically used in one-dimensional volcanological models of plume development, the current analytical methods will underestimate the likelihood of column collapse. In addition, the concept of the entrainment ratio normalization is examined in detail, as several key assumptions in this methodology do not apply when overpressured.

  11. Experimental and theoretical study on nonsequential double ionization of carbon disulfide in strong near-IR laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wanlong; Ben, Shuai; Lv, Hang; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xue-Shen; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    Nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of carbon disulfide CS2 in strong 800-nm laser fields is studied experimentally and theoretically. A knee structure is observed in the intensity-dependent double ionization (DI) yield in linearly polarized laser fields, which exhibits a strong dependence on the laser ellipticity. The electron momentum distributions and energy trajectories after DI in both linearly and circularly polarized laser fields are investigated by employing the two-dimensional classical ensemble method. The results clearly show the evidence of NSDI in the strong-field DI of CS2 molecules. It is demonstrated that, similar to that of atoms, NSDI of CS2 molecules is produced via laser-driven electron recollision with the ion core and presents electron-electron correlations in the process. Analysis indicates that both mechanisms in atomic strong-field NSDI, i.e., recollision impact ionization and recollision excitation with subsequent ionization, may also be contributed to NSDI of CS2 in strong laser fields. Further studies are no doubt necessary for a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanism of molecular strong-field NSDI, due to the multicenter character of the molecular structure and the complex molecular excited states that could be involved in the ionization.

  12. An experimental setup to study the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off plasma plume in variable transverse magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajai; Chaudhari, Vishnu; Patel, Kiran; George, Sony; Sunil, S.; Singh, R. K.; Singh, Ranjeet

    2009-03-01

    In the present work we report generation of uniform and variable pulsed magnetic field in synchronization with pulsed plasma for the study of the expansion dynamics of laser blow-off (LBO) plasma plume. The experimental procedure for optimizing various parameters of the setup, e.g., the production of pulsed field and its synchronization with pulsed plasma and diagnostics system, is also reported. Until now the effect of magnetic field was studied using fixed field. The present setup, however, provides variable and uniform field in synchronization with the setup. A low cost time sequencing control module has been developed for the above purpose. Although the main emphasis is on the technical aspect of the setup, salient features of the effect of transverse magnetic field on the evolution features of the neutral and ionic species are also reported briefly. It is observed that LBO generated plume have a stronger correlation with the magnetic field in comparison to the conventional laser produced plasma experiments as reported earlier.

  13. Plastic Responses of a Sessile Prey to Multiple Predators: A Field and Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Cayon, David; Svanbäck, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Background Theory predicts that prey facing a combination of predators with different feeding modes have two options: to express a response against the feeding mode of the most dangerous predator, or to express an intermediate response. Intermediate phenotypes protect equally well against several feeding modes, rather than providing specific protection against a single predator. Anti-predator traits that protect against a common feeding mode displayed by all predators should be expressed regardless of predator combination, as there is no need for trade-offs. Principal Findings We studied phenotypic anti-predator responses of zebra mussels to predation threat from a handling-time-limited (crayfish) and a gape-size-limited (roach) predator. Both predators dislodge mussels from the substrate but diverge in their further feeding modes. Mussels increased expression of a non-specific defense trait (attachment strength) against all combinations of predators relative to a control. In response to roach alone, mussels showed a tendency to develop a weaker and more elongated shell. In response to crayfish, mussels developed a harder and rounder shell. When exposed to either a combination of predators or no predator, mussels developed an intermediate phenotype. Mussel growth rate was positively correlated with an elongated weaker shell and negatively correlated with a round strong shell, indicating a trade-off between anti-predator responses. Field observations of prey phenotypes revealed the presence of both anti-predator phenotypes and the trade-off with growth, but intra-specific population density and bottom substrate had a greater influence than predator density. Conclusions Our results show that two different predators can exert both functionally equivalent and inverse selection pressures on a single prey. Our field study suggests that abiotic factors and prey population density should be considered when attempting to explain phenotypic diversity in the wild. PMID

  14. An experimental correlation study between field-target overlap and sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance biosensors based on sandwiched immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yeonsoo; Moon, Seyoung; Oh, Youngjin; Kim, Yonghwi; Kim, Donghyun

    2012-10-01

    In this report, we have studied the effectiveness of field-target overlap to evaluate detection sensitivity of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors. The investigation used theoretical analysis based on the transfer matrix method, which was experimentally confirmed by thin film-based detection in sandwich and reverse sandwich immunoglobulin G (IgG) assays. Both theoretical and experimental results show that strong correlation exists between the overlap and the sensitivity with the coefficient of correlation higher than 95% in all the cases that we have considered. We have also confirmed the correlation in diffraction grating-based SPR measurement of IgG/anti-IgG interactions. The correlation elucidates the mechanism behind the far-field detection sensitivity of SPR biosensors and can lead to the enhancement of SPR biosensing with molecular scale sensitivity.

  15. Effects of Prompting in Reflective Learning Tools: Findings from Experimental Field, Lab, and Online Studies

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Bettina; Prilla, Michael; Cress, Ulrike; Kimmerle, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Reflective learning is an important type of learning both in formal and informal situations—in school, higher education, at the workplace, and in everyday life. People may benefit from technical support for reflective learning, in particular when supporting each other by reflecting not only upon their own but also upon other people’s problems. We refer to this collective approach where people come together to think about experiences and find solutions to problems as “collaborative reflection.” We present three empirical studies about the effects of prompting in reflective learning tools in such situations where people reflect on others’ issues. In Study 1 we applied a three-stage within-group design in a field experiment, where 39 participants from two organizations received different types of prompts while they used a reflection app. We found that prompts that invited employees to write down possible solutions led to more comprehensive comments on their colleagues’ experiences. In Study 2 we used a three-stage between-group design in a laboratory experiment, where 78 university students were invited to take part in an experiment about the discussion of problems at work or academic studies in online forums. Here we found that short, abstract prompts showed no superiority to a situation without any prompts with respect to quantity or quality of contributions. Finally, Study 3 featured a two-stage between-group design in an online experiment, where 60 participants received either general reflection instructions or detailed instructions about how to reflect on other people’s problems. We could show that detailed reflection instructions supported people in producing more comprehensive comments that included more general advice. The results demonstrate that to increase activity and to improve quality of comments with prompting tools require detailed instructions and specific wording of the prompts. PMID:27303361

  16. Experimental study of temperature fields and thermal fluxes in the electrode walls of an MGD accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Alferov, V.I.; Vitkovskaya, O.N.; Panfilova, O.V.; Rudakova, A.P.; Sukhobokov, A.D.; Shcherbakov, G.I.

    1980-07-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study of the features of heat transfer from a flow of air with KNa admixture to the electrode walls of an MGD accelerator in a wide range of operating modes (B=1--2.5 T,j=4--45 A/cm/sup 2/,P/sub st/0.2=(en-dash0.5)x10/sup 5/ Pa). Data are obtained on the size and distribution of the thermal fluxes in different zones of an MGD channel and over the electrodes, taken separately. Methods are chosen for calculating the convective thermal flux on the electrode walls over the entire length of the accelerator channel, and the values of the thermal flux in the discharge zone due to processes at the electrodes are determined. A possible explanation is proposed for the difference between the values of the thermal fluxes at the electrode walls over different portions of the MGD channel, which is based on features of the behavior of microarcs on the surface of the electrodes.

  17. Experimental Study of Corona Properties with a Heated Discharge Electrode and Crossed Magnetic Fields Individually

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Elabass, Karim

    2015-07-01

    This work involves ac and dc corona in air with heated discharge electrode, and breakdown streamers in corona in a crossed magnetic field. At first, the triggering of the breakdown streamers in positive and ac corona are governed by the temperature of the discharge electrode. In the negative corona, however, the breakdown streamers found to be practically independent of the temperature of the discharge electrode. Then, the transverse magnetic field, applied perpendicularly to the electric field, result in an improvement in pre-breakdown characteristic of the wire-tube gap. The application of the transverse field has the effect of increasing the corona onset voltage and the breakdown voltage. Also the transverse applied field has the effect of decreasing the corona current. It has been observed that triggering of the breakdown streamers in negative corona is affected appreciably by the transverse magnetic field.

  18. Experimental Study of a Two-Dimensional Applied-Field Magnetoplasmadynamic Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakawa, Akira; Nakata, Daisuke; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    A two-dimensional applied-field magnetoplasmadynamic thruster (2D AF-MPDT) has been developed. A strong crossed magnetic field of more than 1 T can be applied to the 2D AF-MPDT. A thrust measurement system was newly developed. Successful operation with several applied magnetic field strengths from 0 T to 1 T was achieved and acceptable thrust efficiency was obtained. The discharge voltage increased when the magnetic field was applied. The thrust efficiency improves with increasing magnetic field. An operation limit such as a voltage hash was not observed. In this paper, the results indicate that the thrust efficiency of the 2D AF-MPDT can be improved with a strong applied crossed magnetic field.

  19. Experimental Study on Current Decay Characteristics of Persistent Current HTS Magnet by Alternating Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Young Gun; Lee, Chang Young; Hwang, Young Jin; Lee, Woo Seung; Lee, Jiho; Jo, Hyun Chul; Chung, Yoon Do; Ko, Tae Kuk

    This paper deals with a current decay characteristics of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet operated in persistent current mode (PCM). In superconducting synchronous machine applications such as linear synchronous motor (LSM), the superconducting coil is designed to operate in the PCM to obtain steady magnetic field with DC transport current. This superconducting magnet operates on a direct current, but it can be exposed to alternating magnetic field due to the armature winding. When the magnet is subjected to an external time-varying magnetic field, it is possible to result in a decay of the current in PCM system due to AC loss. In this research, a PCM system with armature coil which generates time-varying magnetic field was fabricated to verify current decay characteristics by external alternating magnetic field. The current decay rate was measured by using a hall sensor as functions of amplitude and frequency of armature coil.

  20. Experimental study of cooling enhancement using a Fe3O4 magnetic nanofluid, in an applied magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoian, F. D.; Holotescu, S.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study that envisaged the evaluation of the cooling capabilities of a transformer oil based magnetic nanofluid with the solid volume fraction of magnetite nanoparticles equal to 0.0162, in an AC applied magnetic field (f = 50 Hz). The heating and cooling regimes of a coil immersed in the magnetic nanofluid were compared to that corresponding to the base fluid (transformer oil). The results of our study indicate that the temperature rise rate of the magnetic nanofluid is lower than that corresponding to the transformer oil and a lower stationary temperature is obtained in the coil core, where the magnetic flux density is the largest.

  1. Experimental study of the flow field inside a whirling annular seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Gerald L.; Deotte, Robert E., Jr.; Thames, H. Davis, III

    1992-01-01

    The flow field inside a whirling annular seal was measured using a 3-D Laser Doppler Anemometer (LDA) system. The seal investigated has a clearance of 1.27 mm, a length of 37.3 mm, and is mounted on a drive shaft with a 50 percent eccentricity ratio. This results in the rotor whirling at the same speed as the shaft rotation (whirl ratio = 1.0). The seal is operated at Reynolds number of 12,000 and a Taylor number of 6,300 (3,600 rpm). The 3-D LDA system is equipped with a rotary encoding system which is used to produce phase averaged measurements of the entire mean velocity vector field and Reynolds stress tensor field from 0.13 mm upstream to 0.13 mm downstream of the seal. The mean velocity field reveals a highly three dimensional flow field with large radial velocities near the inlet of the seal as well as a recirculation zone on the rotor surface. The location of maximum mean axial velocity migrates from the pressure side of the rotor at the inlet to the suction side at turbulence kinetic energy. However, turbulence production and dissipation attain equilibrium fairly quickly with remaining relatively constant over the last half of the seal.

  2. Validation of in situ networks via field sampling: case study in the South Fork Experimental Watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration and validation of soil moisture remote sensing products is complicated by the logistics of installing a soil moisture network for a long term period in an active landscape. Therefore, these stations are located along field boundaries or in non-representative sites with regards to so...

  3. Experimental and computational studies of the relative flow field in a centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Ng, B T; Chan, W K; Yu, S C; Li, H D

    2000-01-01

    The relative flow field within the impeller passage of a centrifugal blood pump had been examined using flow visualization technique and computational fluid dynamics. It was found that for a seven-blade radial impeller design, the required flow rate and static pressure rise across the pump could be achieved but the flow field within the blades was highly undesirable. Two vortices were observed near the suction side and these could lead to thrombus formation. Preliminary results presented in this article are part of our overall effort to minimize undesirable flow patterns such flow separation and high shear stress regions within the centrifugal blood pump. This will facilitate the future progress in developing a long-term clinically effective blood pump. PMID:10999375

  4. Validation of in Situ Networks Via Field Sampling: Case Study in the South Fork Experimental Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosh, M. H.; McKee, L.; Bindlish, R.; Coopersmith, E. J.; Jackson, T. J.; Prueger, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    The calibration and validation of soil moisture remote sensing products is complicated by the logistics of installing a soil moisture network for a long term period in an active landscape. Therefore, these stations are located along field boundaries or in non-representative sites with regards to soil type or soil moisture. The representative character of this network can only be established by large scale field sampling to provide a calibration dataset. A team of samplers were deployed twice a week for the summer of 2014 to collect surface soil moisture data across a variety of land covers at 44 sites. These samples were compared and scaled to the domain to get a better understanding of the large scale soil moisture distributions and dynamics. In addition, comparisons are made to the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) soil moisture product for the length of the network installation.

  5. Experimental study on a Nb3Al insert coil under high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guang; Dai, Yinming; Cheng, Junsheng; Chang, Kun; Liu, Jianhua; Wang, Qiuliang; Pan, Xifeng; Li, Chao

    2016-06-01

    Nb3Al is one of the most promising superconductors to replace Nb3Sn in large scale, high field superconducting magnet. Since the complicated conductor manufacturing process, long and stable Nb3Al conductor is difficult to acquire in a commercial scale. Based on a 70 m length of Nb-Al precursor conductor, we designed and fabricated a Nb3Al coil. The coil winding, low temperature diffusion heat treatment and epoxy impregnation are described in detail. The finished Nb3Al coil is tested as an insert in a background magnet. The test is performed at the background field from 7 T to 15 T. The test results are analyzed and presented in this paper.

  6. Automatic recognition of intermittent failures - An experimental study of field data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iyer, Ravishankar K.; Young, Luke T.; Krishna Iyer, P. V.

    1990-01-01

    A methodology is proposed for recognizing the symptoms of persistent problems in large systems. The system error rate is used to identify the error states among which relationships may exist. Statistical techniques are used to validate and quantify the strength of the relationship among these error states. As input, the approach takes the raw error logs containing a single entry for each error that is detected as an isolated event. As output, it produces a list of symptoms that characterize persistent errors. Thus, given a failure, it is determined whether the failure is an intermittent manifestation of a common fault or whether it is an isolated (transient) incident. The technique is shown to work on two CYBER systems and an IBM 3081 multiprocessor system. Comparisons to real failure/repair information obtained from field engineers show that, in about 85 percent of the cases, the error symptoms recognized by this approach correspond to real problems. The remaining 15 percent of the cases, although not directly supported by field data, are confirmed as being valid problems.

  7. Experimental studies of a gyroklystron operating in the field of a permanent magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antakov, I. I.; Gachev, I. G.; Zasypkin, E. V.

    2011-08-01

    We have developed and tested a gyroklystron operating with the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency at a frequency of 32.3 GHz in the field of a permanent magnet. In the two-and three-cavity versions of the gyroklystron, the peak power of the output radiation reached 320 kW with an efficiency of 30%, an amplification coefficient of 20-25 dB, and an operating frequency bandwidth of 0.05%. In the wide-band version of the gyroklystron, the amplification bandwidth was equal to 0.27% for an output power of 200 kW and an amplification coefficient of 13 dB.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Study of Wind and Turbulence in a Near-Field Dispersion Campaign at an Inhomogeneous Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiao; Dupont, Eric; Gilbert, Eric; Musson-Genon, Luc; Carissimo, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    We present a detailed experimental and numerical study of the local flow field for a pollutant dispersion experimental program conducted at SIRTA (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Télédétection Atmosphérique), a complex and intensively instrumented site in a southern suburb of Paris. Global analysis of continuous measurements over 2 years highlights the impact of terrain heterogeneity on wind and turbulence. It shows that the forest to the north of the experimental field induces strong directional shear and wind deceleration below the forest canopy height. This directional shear is stronger with decreasing height and decreasing distance from the forest edge. Numerical simulations are carried out using Code_Saturne, a computational fluid dynamics code, in Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes mode with a standard k{-}\\varepsilon closure and a canopy model, in neutral and stable stratifications. These simulations are shown to reproduce globally well the characteristics of the mean flow, especially the directional wind shear in northeasterly and northwesterly cases and the turbulent kinetic energy increase induced by the forest. However, they slightly underestimate wind speed and the directional shear of the flow below the forest canopy height. Sensitivity studies are performed to investigate the influence of leaf area density, inlet stability condition, and roughness length. These studies show that the typical features of the canopy flow become more pronounced as canopy density increases. Performance statistics indicate that the impact of the forest and adequate inlet profiles are the most important factors in the accurate reproduction of flow at the site, especially under stable stratification.

  9. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  10. Effects of a tattoo on men's behavior and attitudes towards women: An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Guéguen, Nicolas

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have indicated negative evaluations of women with tattoos. However, a study by Swami and Furnham (2007) showed that tattooed women were rated as less physically attractive but more sexually promiscuous. Given that men interpret women's sexual intent according to their physical appearance, we predicted that women with tattoos would be more favorably approached by men. A temporary tattoo was placed on confederates' lower back, or not, and all confederates were instructed to read a book while lying flat on their stomach on a well-known beach. Two experiments were conducted. The first experiment showed that more men (N = 220) approached the tattooed confederates and that the mean latency of their approach was quicker. A second experiment showed that men (N = 440) estimated to have more chances to have a date and to have sex on the first date with tattooed confederates. However, the level of physical attractiveness attributed to the confederate was not influenced by the tattoo condition. These results were discussed with respect to men's possible misinterpretation of women wearing tattoos and the risks associated with this misinterpretation. PMID:23657810

  11. The impact of nutritional labels and socioeconomic status on energy intake. An experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Crockett, Rachel A; Jebb, Susan A; Hankins, Matthew; Marteau, Theresa M

    2014-10-01

    There is some evidence for paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake particularly amongst restrained eaters and those with a higher body mass index (BMI) resulting in greater consumption of energy from foods with a positive health message (e.g. "low-fat") compared with the same foods, unlabelled. This study aimed to investigate, in a UK general population sample, the likelihood of paradoxical effects of nutritional labelling on energy intake. Participants (n = 287) attended a London cinema and were offered a large tub of salted or toffee popcorn. Participants were randomised to receive their selected flavour with one of three labels: a green low-fat label, a red high-fat label or no label. Participants watched two film clips while completing measures of demographic characteristics, emotional state and taste of the popcorn. Following the experiment, popcorn consumption was measured. There were no main effects of nutritional labelling on consumption. Contrary to predictions neither BMI nor weight concern moderated the effect of label on consumption. There was a three-way interaction between low-fat label, weight concern and socioeconomic status (SES) such that weight-concerned participants of higher SES who saw a low-fat label consumed more than weight unconcerned participants of similar SES (t = -2.7, P = .04). By contrast, weight-concerned participants of lower SES seeing either type of label, consumed less than those seeing no label (t = -2.04, P = .04). Nutritional labelling may have different effects in different socioeconomic groups. Further studies are required to understand fully the possible contribution of food labelling to health inequalities. PMID:24879885

  12. Analytical and experimental study of the acoustics and the flow field characteristics of cavitating self-resonating water jets

    SciTech Connect

    Chahine, G.L.; Genoux, P.F.; Johnson, V.E. Jr.; Frederick, G.S.

    1984-09-01

    Waterjet nozzles (STRATOJETS) have been developed which achieve passive structuring of cavitating submerged jets into discrete ring vortices, and which possess cavitation incipient numbers six times higher than obtained with conventional cavitating jet nozzles. In this study we developed analytical and numerical techniques and conducted experimental work to gain an understanding of the basic phenomena involved. The achievements are: (1) a thorough analysis of the acoustic dynamics of the feed pipe to the nozzle; (2) a theory for bubble ring growth and collapse; (3) a numerical model for jet simulation; (4) an experimental observation and analysis of candidate second-generation low-sigma STRATOJETS. From this study we can conclude that intensification of bubble ring collapse and design of highly resonant feed tubes can lead to improved drilling rates. The models here described are excellent tools to analyze the various parameters needed for STRATOJET optimizations. Further analysis is needed to introduce such important factors as viscosity, nozzle-jet interaction, and ring-target interaction, and to develop the jet simulation model to describe the important fine details of the flow field at the nozzle exit.

  13. Effect of pulsed electromagnetic field therapy on experimental pain: A double-blind, randomized study in healthy young adults.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Karen; Beland, Patricia; Pinard, Marilee; Handfield, Guilène; Handfield, Nicole; Goffaux, Philippe; Corriveau, Hélène; Léonard, Guillaume

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies suggested that pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) therapy can decrease pain. To date, however, it remains difficult to determine whether the analgesic effect observed in patients are attributable to a direct effect of PEMF on pain or to an indirect effect of PEMF on inflammation and healing. In the present study, we used an experimental pain paradigm to evaluate the direct effect of PEMF on pain intensity, pain unpleasantness, and temporal summation of pain. Twenty-four healthy subjects (mean age 22 ± 2 years; 9 males) participated in the experiment. Both real and sham PEMF were administered to every participant using a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. For each visit, PEMF was applied for 10 minutes on the right forearm using a portable device. Experimental pain was evoked before (baseline) and after PEMF with a 9 cm(2) Pelletier-type thermode, applied on the right forearm (120 s stimulation; temperature individually adjusted to produce moderate baseline pain). Pain intensity and unpleasantness were evaluated using a 0-100 numerical pain rating scale. Temporal summation was evaluated by comparing pain intensity ratings obtained at the end of tonic nociceptive stimulation (120 s) with pain intensity ratings obtained after 60 s of stimulation. When compared to baseline, there was no change in pain intensity and unpleasantness following the application of real or sham PEMF. PEMF did not affect temporal summation. The present observations suggest that PEMF does not directly influence heat pain perception in healthy individuals. PMID:27014804

  14. Long lifetimes of high molecular Rydberg states in crossed magnetic and electric fields: An experimental and classical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlpfordt, Annette; Even, U.; Rabani, Eran; Levine, R. D.

    1995-05-01

    Crossed magnetic and electric fields are observed to extend the lifetime of high molecular Rydberg states of DABCO (1,4-Diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) well into the microsecond range. The experimental and computational (using classical mechanics and for a diatomic polar core) results agree both on the magnitude of the effect and on its decrease with increasing electrical field. Theoretical considerations suggest that this time-stretching effect is only present for high Rydberg states and/or for not too weak fields. The computed lifetime increases as the magnetic-field strength is decreased but it requires a finite magnetic field for the onset of the effect. The experimental technique of detection of the surviving Rydberg states via their ionization in a delayed field pulse (known as ZEKE spectroscopy) is most easily implemented for high (say, n>100) but not too high (n<400) Rydberg states. In this regime, the magnetic field required for the additional time stretching is larger than that due to the earth but can be significantly weaker than that required to induce extensive chaotic behavior. The results of the numerically exact classical simulations are interpreted using equations of motion, cast in the form of a mapping, which retain terms up to second order in the fields. (The first-order terms are qualitatively and quantitatively not, by themselves, sufficient.) As is to be expected on physical grounds, the origin of the effect is the slow, periodic modulation of the magnitude of the magnetic quantum number ml of the electron due to terms second order in the magnetic field. Since the angular momentum l of the electron is bounded from below by ml, and since it requires a low l for the electron to couple effectively to the molecular core, the presence of the magnetic field provides for an elongation of the time scale which is over and above that made possible due to the periodic motion of l due to the dc electric field.

  15. Experimental study on the effect of applying a crossed magnetic field on the insulator flashover behavior in high vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abu-Elabass, K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a possible method of reducing the flashover stress is achieved by the effect of an additional magnetic field in the transverse direction on the main applied electric field. The degree of vacuum used in this study was 5×10-5 Pa. The magnetic flux density B employed in this study extends from 4×10-3 to 24×10-3 T. From the results obtained throughout this work, the transverse magnetic field increases the flashover voltage and decreases the leakage current. The effect of the transverse magnetic field on the surface flashover of the dielectric solid in vacuum shows a marked dependence on the material and the thickness of the test specimen, the vacuum degree, the type of electric field (AC or DC) as well as the type of magnetic field (AC or DC).

  16. An experimental study using flow visualization on the effect of an acoustic field on heat transfer from spheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, W. W.; Baroth, E. C.

    1986-01-01

    The physical mechanisms responsible for the heat transfer process in a thermal-acoustic field were investigated using the technique of holographic interferometry for flow visualization. Experimental results were obtained with sound pressure levels in the range of 120 to 150 decibels, relative to a pressure of 0.0002 dynes/sq cm. Steady state laminar flow was observed when the vibrational Reynolds number was below 400; separated flow was observed when it was above 400. In the presence of a horizontal sound field, the data indicate that the relation between the vibrational Nusselt number, Nu(v) and the vibrational Reynolds number, Re(v) is given by Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.22. In the presence of a vertical sound field, the corresponding relation is Nu(v) = Re(v) exp 0.15.

  17. Experimental and theoretical study on effects of magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Li Hong; Ning Zhongxi; Yan Guojun; Wu Zhiwen

    2009-10-15

    An experiment has been made to investigate the effect of curved magnetic field topology on near wall conductivity in the ion acceleration region of Hall thrusters. The experimental results show that the electron current due to near wall conductivity is of the minimum in the case of focused topology and increases in the cases of both less-focus and over-focus topologies. This finding cannot be explained properly by the magnetic mirror effect, which is the one and only reported effect related to the magnetic field curvature so far. Based on the analysis of interaction between the plasma and the wall, a new physical effect is proposed. The difference of magnetic field topology causes different electric potential distribution, leads to different ion flux to the wall, results in the change of sheath property and secondary electron emission, and finally affects the electron current due to near wall conductivity. This effect is further justified by the agreement between the experiment and simulation which is performed with a particle-in-cell model. Therefore, we conclude that the ion flow injection is a significant effect to near wall conductivity in the scope of curved magnetic field topology besides the magnetic mirror effect. Moreover, we find that the focus topology of magnetic field is favorable to obtain a high thruster performance from both the ion acceleration aspect and the electron conduction aspect and so is useful practically for thruster optimization.

  18. Near-field effects in Green's function retrieval from cross-correlation of elastic fields: experimental study with application to elastography.

    PubMed

    Benech, N; Brum, J; Catheline, S; Gallot, T; Negreira, C

    2013-05-01

    In a lossless system, the causal and acausal Green's function for elastic waves can be retrieved by cross-correlating the elastic field at two positions. This field, composed of converging and diverging waves, is interpreted in the frame of a time-reversal process. In this work, the near-field effects on the spatio-temporal focusing of elastic waves are analyzed through the elastodynamic Green's function. Contrary to the scalar field case, the spatial focusing is not symmetric preserving the directivity pattern of a simple source. One important feature of the spatial asymmetry is its dependency on the Poisson ratio of the solid. Additionally, it is shown that the retrieval of the bulk wave speed values is affected by diffraction. The correction factor depends on the relative direction between the source and the observed field. Experimental verification of the analysis is carried out on the volume of a soft-solid. A low-frequency diffuse-like field is generated by random impacts at the sample's free surface. The displacement field is imaged using ultrasound by a standard speckle tracking technique. One important application of this work is in the estimation of the shear elastic modulus in soft biological tissues, whose quantification can be useful in non-invasive diagnosis of various diseases. PMID:23654383

  19. Engineering of electric field distribution in GaN(cap)/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures: theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gladysiewicz, M.; Janicki, L.; Misiewicz, J.; Sobanska, M.; Klosek, K.; Zytkiewicz, Z. R.; Kudrawiec, R.

    2016-09-01

    Polarization engineering of GaN-based heterostructures opens a way to develop advanced transistor heterostructures, although measurement of the electric field in such heterostructures is not a simple task. In this work, contactless electroreflectance (CER) spectroscopy has been applied to measure the electric field in GaN-based heterostructures. For a set of GaN(d  =  0, 5, 15, and 30 nm)/AlGaN(20 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of electric field in the GaN(cap) layer from 0.66 MV cm‑1 to 0.27 MV cm‑1 and an increase of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 0.57 MV cm‑1 to 0.99 MV cm‑1 have been observed with the increase in the GaN(cap) thickness from 5–30 nm. For a set of GaN(20 nm)/AlGaN(d  =  10, 20, 30, and 40 nm)/GaN(buffer) heterostructures a decrease of the electric field in the AlGaN layer from 1.77 MV cm‑1 to 0.64 MV cm‑1 and an increase of the electric field in the GaN layer from 0.57 MV cm‑1 to 0.99 MV cm‑1 were observed with the increase in the AlGaN thickness from 10–40 nm. To determine the distribution of the electric field in these heterostructures the Schrödinger and Poisson equations are solved in a self-consistent manner and matched with experimental data. It is shown that the built-in electric field in the GaN(cap) and AlGaN layers obtained from measurements does not reach values of electric field resulting only from polarization effects. The measured electric fields are smaller due to a screening of polarization effects by free carriers, which are inhomogeneously distributed across the heterostructure and accumulate at interfaces. The results clearly demonstrate that CER measurements supported by theoretical calculations are able to determine the electric field distribution in GaN-based heterostructures quantitatively, which is very important for polarization engineering in this material system.

  20. Experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes and computer aided design of electron guns for microwave power devices, exploring these cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Y.A.; Petrosyan, A.I.; Penzyakov, V.V.; Pimenov, V.G.; Rogovin, V.I.; Shesterkin, V.I.; Kudryashov, V.P.; Semyonov, V.C.

    1997-03-01

    The experimental study of matrix carbon field-emission cathodes (MCFECs), which has led to the stable operation of the cathodes with current emission values up to 100 mA, is described. A method of computer aided design of TWT electron guns (EGs) with MCFEC, based on the results of the MCFEC emission experimental study, is presented. The experimental MCFEC emission characteristics are used to define the field gain coefficient K and the cathode effective emission area S{sub eff}. The EG program computes the electric field upon the MCFEC surface, multiplies it by the K value and uses the Fowler{endash}Nordheim law and the S{sub eff} value to calculate the MCFEC current; the electron trajectories are computed as well. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Vacuum Society.}

  1. Establishment of a large semi-field system for experimental study of African malaria vector ecology and control in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Heather M; Ng'habi, Kija R; Walder, Thomas; Kadungula, Demetrius; Moore, Sarah J; Lyimo, Issa; Russell, Tanya L; Urassa, Honorathy; Mshinda, Hassan; Killeen, Gerry F; Knols, Bart GJ

    2008-01-01

    Background Medical entomologists increasingly recognize that the ability to make inferences between laboratory experiments of vector biology and epidemiological trends observed in the field is hindered by a conceptual and methodological gap occurring between these approaches which prevents hypothesis-driven empirical research from being conducted on relatively large and environmentally realistic scales. The development of Semi-Field Systems (SFS) has been proposed as the best mechanism for bridging this gap. Semi-field systems are defined as enclosed environments, ideally situated within the natural ecosystem of a target disease vector and exposed to ambient environmental conditions, in which all features necessary for its life cycle completion are present. Although the value of SFS as a research tool for malaria vector biology is gaining recognition, only a few such facilities exist worldwide and are relatively small in size (< 100 m2). Methods The establishment of a 625 m2 state-of-the-art SFS for large-scale experimentation on anopheline mosquito ecology and control within a rural area of southern Tanzania, where malaria transmission intensities are amongst the highest ever recorded, is described. Results A greenhouse frame with walls of mosquito netting and a polyethylene roof was mounted on a raised concrete platform at the Ifakara Health Institute. The interior of the SFS was divided into four separate work areas that have been set up for a variety of research activities including mass-rearing for African malaria vectors under natural conditions, high throughput evaluation of novel mosquito control and trapping techniques, short-term assays of host-seeking behaviour and olfaction, and longer-term experimental investigation of anopheline population dynamics and gene flow within a contained environment that simulates a local village domestic setting. Conclusion The SFS at Ifakara was completed and ready for use in under two years. Preliminary observations

  2. The Blacktail Creek Tuff: an analytical and experimental study of rhyolites from the Heise volcanic field, Yellowstone hotspot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolte, Torsten; Holtz, Francois; Almeev, Renat; Nash, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The magma storage conditions of the 6.62 Ma Blacktail Creek Tuff eruption, belonging to the Heise volcanic field (6.62-4.45 Ma old) of the Yellowstone hotspot system, have been investigated by combining thermobarometric and experimental approaches. The results from different geothermometers (e.g., Fe-Ti oxides, feldspar pairs, apatite and zircon solubility, and Ti in quartz) indicate a pre-eruptive temperature in the range 825-875 °C. The temperature estimated using two-pyroxene pairs varies in a range of 810-950 °C, but the pyroxenes are probably not in equilibrium with each other, and the analytical results of melt inclusion in pyroxenes indicate a complex history for clinopyroxene, which hosts two compositionally different inclusion types. One natural Blacktail Creek Tuff rock sample has been used to determine experimentally the equilibrium phase assemblages in the pressure range 100-500 MPa and a water activity range 0.1-1.0. The experiments have been performed at fluid-present conditions, with a fluid phase composed of H2O and CO2, as well as at fluid-absent conditions. The stability of the quartzo-feldspathic phases is similar in both types of experiments, but the presence of mafic minerals such as biotite and clinopyroxene is strongly dependent on the experimental approach. Possible explanations are given for this discrepancy which may have strong impacts on the choice of appropriate experimental approaches for the determination of magma storage conditions. The comparison of the composition of natural phases and of experimentally synthesized phases confirms magma storage temperatures of 845-875 °C. Melt water contents of 1.5-2.5 wt% H2O are required to reproduce the natural Blacktail Creek Tuff mineral assemblage at these temperatures. Using the Ti-in-quartz barometer and the Qz-Ab-Or proportions of natural matrix glasses, coexisting with quartz, plagioclase and sanidine, the depth of magma storage is estimated to be in a pressure range between 130 and

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic generator experimental studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, E. S.

    1972-01-01

    The results for an experimental study of a one wavelength MHD induction generator operating on a liquid flow are presented. First the design philosophy and the experimental generator design are summarized, including a description of the flow loop and instrumentation. Next a Fourier series method of treating the fact that the magnetic flux density produced by the stator is not a pure traveling sinusoid is described and some results summarized. This approach appears to be of interest after revisions are made, but the initial results are not accurate. Finally, some of the experimental data is summarized for various methods of excitation.

  4. Theoretical and experimental studies of electric field distribution in N-polar GaN/AlGaN/GaN heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Gladysiewicz, M. Janicki, L.; Kudrawiec, R.; Siekacz, M.; Cywinski, G.

    2015-12-28

    Electric field distribution in N-polar GaN(channel)/AlGaN/GaN(buffer) heterostructures was studied theoretically by solving Schrodinger and Poisson equations in a self-consistent manner for various boundary conditions and comparing results of these calculations with experimental data, i.e., measurements of electric field in GaN(channel) and AlGaN layers by electromodulation spectroscopy. A very good agreement between theoretical calculations and experimental data has been found for the Fermi-level located at ∼0.3 eV below the conduction band at N-polar GaN surface. With this surface boundary condition, the electric field distribution and two dimensional electron gas concentration are determined for GaN(channel)/AlGaN/GaN(buffer) heterostructures of various thicknesses of GaN(channel) and AlGaN layers.

  5. An experimental study of the effect of magnet length on the performance of a multi-cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Mao, Wei; Yu, Daren

    2016-07-01

    The multi-cusped field thruster is a novel concept in electric propulsion, which employs alternating permanent polarity magnets to create a periodic magnetic field. As an important factor for the optimal design, the magnet length of a low-power thruster is designed to be changeable. The effects of the ultimate stage length (L u) and the middle stage length (L m) on the performance characteristics are studied in a series of experiments. The results show that increasing L u could prolong the axial motion range of the electrons and promote the ionization process. In addition, it can enlarge the relative distance between the ionization and the acceleration regions. Both of these aspects can help improve the thrust and the anode efficiency. With regard to he reverse trend, wefound that the longer L m leads to a reduction of the thruster’s performance for the enhanced ion loss to the wall. Overall this study can provide some optimal design ideas on the magnet length to improve the total performance of the multi-cusped field thruster.

  6. The effects of beliefs regarding drug assignment in experimental and field studies of nicotine delivery devices: a review.

    PubMed

    Dar, Reuven; Barrett, Sean P

    2014-11-01

    The placebo effect of a psychoactive drug can be defined as the effect of expecting the drug in the absence of its pharmacological actions. As nicotine is widely believed to be the primary factor driving cigarette smoking, smokers are likely to expect nicotine to alleviate craving and withdrawal. The present review examines the extent to which any observed effects of nicotine, and especially its craving- and withdrawal-reducing effects, can be attributed to placebo. We begin by reviewing studies that examined the placebo effects of nicotine in the laboratory and follow with a review of potential placebo effects that are typically not controlled in placebo-controlled studies of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). In laboratory studies, nicotine instructions decrease tobacco smoking, craving and/or withdrawal, while nicotine-specific effects have not been consistently reported. In field trials of NRT, there is a general failure to assess smokers' beliefs regarding their drug assignment. This omission makes it difficult to unequivocally attribute findings of placebo-controlled NRT studies to the physiological effects of nicotine. In sum, our review indicates that the placebo effects of nicotine, and specifically nicotine content expectations, may account for many of the benefits associated with nicotine delivery devices in both laboratory and field studies. PMID:25253274

  7. Lethal effects of experimental warming approximating a future climate scenario on southern African quartz-field succulents: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Musil, Charles F; Schmiedel, Ute; Midgley, Guy F

    2005-02-01

    Here we examine the response of succulents in a global biodiversity hot spot to experimental warming consistent with a future African climate scenario. Passive daytime warming (averaging 5.5 degrees C above ambient) of the natural vegetation was achieved with 18 transparent hexagonal open-top chamber arrays randomized in three different quartz-field communities. After 4-months summer treatment, the specialized-dwarf and shrubby succulents displayed between 2.1 and 4.9 times greater plant and canopy mortalities in the open-top chambers than in the control plots. Those surviving in cooler ventilated areas and shaded refuges in the chambers had lower starch concentrations and water contents; the shrubby succulents also exhibited diminished chlorophyll concentrations. It is concluded that current thermal regimes are likely to be closely proximate to tolerable extremes for many endemic succulents in the region, and that anthropogenic warming could significantly exceed their thermal thresholds. Further investigation is required to elucidate the importance of associated moisture deficits in these warming experiments, a potential consequence of supplementary (fog and dew) precipitation interception by open-top chambers and higher evaporation therein, on plant mortalities. PMID:15720664

  8. An experimental study of the flow field surrounding a subsonic jet in a cross flow. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennis, Robert Foster

    1993-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the flow interaction of a 5.08 cm (2.00 in.) diameter round subsonic jet exhausting perpendicularly to a flat plate in a subsonic cross flow was conducted in the NASA Ames 7x1O ft. Wind Tunnel Number One. Flat plate surface pressures were measured at 400 locations in a 30.48 cm (12.0 in.) concentric circular array surrounding the jet exit. Results from these measurements are provided in tabular and graphical form for jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12, and for jet exit Mach numbers ranging from 0.50 to 0.93. Laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) three component velocity measurements were made in selected regions in the developed jet plume and near the flat plate surface, at a jet Mach number of 0.50 and jet-to-crossflow velocity ratios of 6 and 8. The results of both pressure and LDV measurements are compared with the results of previous experiments. In addition, pictures of the jet plume shape at jet velocity ratios ranging from 4 to 12 were obtained using schleiren photography. The LDV measurements are consistent with previous work, but more extensive measurements will be necessary to provide a detailed picture of the flow field. The surface pressure results compare closely with previous work and provide a useful characterization of jet induced surface pressures. The results demonstrate the primary influence of jet velocity ratio and the secondary influence of jet Mach number in determining such surface pressures.

  9. Collective Experimentation: Lessons from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misiko, M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to document smallholder experiences during a participatory experimental initiative and draw useful lessons for field practitioners. The main methods used to collect data were participant observation, in-depth interviews among 40 farmers, and analyses of notes taken during participatory monitoring and evaluation. These…

  10. An Experimental Study of Continuous Plasma Flows Driven by a Confined Arc in a Transverse Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.; Brooks, J. D.; Beasley, W. D.

    1961-01-01

    A crossed-field, continuous-flow plasma accelerator has been built and operated. The highest measured velocity of the flow, which was driven by the interaction of the electric and magnetic fields, was about 500 meters per second. Some of the problems discussed are ion slip, stability and uniformity of the discharge, effect of the magnetic field on electron emission, use of preionization, and electrode contamination.

  11. Experimental studies on power frequency breakdown voltage of CF3I/N2 mixed gas under different electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoxing; Xiao, Song; Han, Yefei; Cressault, Yann

    2016-02-01

    To verify the feasibility of replacing SF6 by CF3I/N2, we compared their power frequency breakdown performance with the influence of gas pressure, mixing ratio, and electric field utilization coefficient. Under different electric fields and mixing ratios, the power frequency breakdown voltage of CF3I/N2 increases linearly along with gas pressure. Besides, with the rise of the electric field utilization coefficient, the linear growth rate of breakdown voltage along with gas pressure gradually rises. The sensitivity of pure CF3I to electric field is particularly high and can be improved by the addition of N2. The mixture 30% CF3I/70% N2 at 0.3 MPa could replace pure SF6 in equipment requiring a low insulation, but the gas pressure or the content of CF3I need to be increased for higher insulation requirements.

  12. Effects of Experimental Learning--Outcomes of an Empirical Study in the Vocational Field of Structural Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bünning, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Pedagogic approaches to TVET offer a limited range of teaching strategies which make use of experimental learning. Thus experiments were developed for teachers of structural engineering and timber processing technologies and were subject to empirical evaluation by a researcher at the Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg and Kassel University.…

  13. Divergent effects of urban particulate air pollution on allergic airway responses in experimental asthma: a comparison of field exposure studies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increases in ambient particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 μm (PM2.5) are associated with asthma morbidity and mortality. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that PM2.5 derived from two distinct urban U.S. communities would induce variable responses to aggravate airway symptoms during experimental asthma. Methods We used a mobile laboratory to conduct community-based inhalation exposures to laboratory rats with ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease. In Grand Rapids exposures were conducted within 60 m of a major roadway, whereas the Detroit was located in an industrial area more than 400 m from roadways. Immediately after nasal allergen challenge, Brown Norway rats were exposed by whole body inhalation to either concentrated air particles (CAPs) or filtered air for 8 h (7:00 AM - 3:00 PM). Both ambient and concentrated PM2.5 was assessed for mass, size fractionation, and major component analyses, and trace element content. Sixteen hours after exposures, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and lung lobes were collected and evaluated for airway inflammatory and mucus responses. Results Similar CAPs mass concentrations were generated in Detroit (542 μg/m3) and Grand Rapids (519 μg/m3). Exposure to CAPs at either site had no effects in lungs of non-allergic rats. In contrast, asthmatic rats had 200% increases in airway mucus and had more BALF neutrophils (250% increase), eosinophils (90%), and total protein (300%) compared to controls. Exposure to Detroit CAPs enhanced all allergic inflammatory endpoints by 30-100%, whereas inhalation of Grand Rapids CAPs suppressed all allergic responses by 50%. Detroit CAPs were characterized by high sulfate, smaller sized particles and were derived from local combustion sources. Conversely Grand Rapids CAPs were derived primarily from motor vehicle sources. Conclusions Despite inhalation exposure to the same mass concentration of urban PM2.5, disparate health

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of high-magnetic-field XMCD spectra at the L2,3 absorption edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotani, Akio; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Nojiri, Hiroyuki

    2009-11-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism(XMCD) spectra at the L2,3 edges of mixed-valence rare-earth compounds in high magnetic fields are studied both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical study is based on a new framework proposed recently by Kotani. The Zeeman splitting of 4f states, the mixed-valence character of 4f states, and the 4f-5d exchange interaction are incorporated into a single impurity Anderson model. New XMCD experiments in high magnetic fields up to 40 T are carried out for the mixed-valence compounds EuNi2(Si0.18Ge0.82)2 and YbInCu4 by using a miniature pulsed magnet, which was developed recently by Matsuda et al. The XMCD data are taken at 5 K by transmission measurements for incident X-rays with ± helicities at BL39XU in SPring-8. After giving a survey on recent developments in the theory of XMCD spectra for mixed-valence Ce and Yb compounds, we calculate the XMCD spectra of YbInCu4 at the field-induced valence transition around 32 T by applying the recent theoretical framework and by newly introducing at 32 T a discontinuous change in the Yb 4f level and that in the hybridization strength between the Yb 4f and conduction electrons. The calculated results are compared with the experimental ones.

  15. An experimental study on the effects of tip clearance on flow field and losses in an axial flow compressor rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakshminarayana, B.; Zhang, J.; Murthy, K. N. S.

    1987-01-01

    Detailed measurement of the flow field in the tip region of a compressor rotor was carried out using a Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) and a Kiel probe at two different tip clearance heights. At both clearance sizes, the relative stagnation pressure and the axial and tangential components of relative velocities were measured upstream, inside the passage and downstream of the rotor, up to about 20 percent of the blade span from the annulus wall. The velocities, outlet angles, losses, momentum thickness, and force defect thickness are compared for the two clearances. A detailed interpretation of the effect of tip clearance on the flow field is given. There are substantial differences in flow field, on momentum thickness, and performance as the clearance is varied. The losses increase linearly within the passage and their values increase in direct proportion to tip clearance height. No discernable vortex (discrete) is observed downstream of the rotor.

  16. The Impact of Global Warming on the Carbon Cycle of Arctic Permafrost: An Experimental and Field Based Study

    SciTech Connect

    Onstott, Tullis C; Pffifner, Susan M; Chourey, Karuna

    2014-11-07

    Our results to date indicate that CO2 and CH4 fluxes from organic poor, Arctic cryosols on Axel Heiberg Island are net CH4 sinks and CO2 emitters in contrast to organic-rich peat deposits at sub-Arctic latitudes. This is based upon field observations and a 1.5 year long thawing experiment performed upon one meter long intact cores. The results of the core thawing experiments are in good agreement with field measurements. Metagenomic, metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic analyses indicate that high affinity aerobic methanotrophs belong to the uncultivated USCalpha are present in <1% abundance in these cryosols are are active in the field during the summer and in the core thawing experiments. The methanotrophs are 100 times more abundant than the methanogens. As a result mineral cryosols, which comprise 87% of Arctic tundra, are net methane sinks. Their presence and activity may account for the discrepancies observed between the atmospheric methane concentrations observed in the Arctic predicted by climate models and the observed seasonal fluctuations and decadal trends. This has not been done yet.

  17. Experimental study of the ponderomotive effects of a large amplitude microwave field on a magnetized electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjoudj, Y.; Pierre, T.; Heuraux, S.; Leclert, G.

    1995-11-01

    Charged particles propagating in an inhomogeneous large amplitude microwave field experience a nonlinear force called the ponderomotive force. This effect can be theoretically evaluated either from the single particle or the fluid theories. For magnetized particles, these two descriptions predict quite different behaviors. A previous experiment [J. Vaclavik {ital et} {ital al}., Phys. Fluids {bold 29}, 2034 (1986)] has shown results in agreement with the fluid theory. Here, an experiment with a magnetized electron beam is described, which brings out a ponderomotive deflection in agreement with the single particle theory. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  18. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Fleischmann, Pauline; Rössler, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database. PMID:25977753

  19. Ant-App-DB: a smart solution for monitoring arthropods activities, experimental data management and solar calculations without GPS in behavioral field studies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Fleischmann, Pauline; Rössler, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Field studies on arthropod ecology and behaviour require simple and robust monitoring tools, preferably with direct access to an integrated database. We have developed and here present a database tool allowing smart-phone based monitoring of arthropods. This smart phone application provides an easy solution to collect, manage and process the data in the field which has been a very difficult task for field biologists using traditional methods. To monitor our example species, the desert ant Cataglyphis fortis, we considered behavior, nest search runs, feeding habits and path segmentations including detailed information on solar position and azimuth calculation, ant orientation and time of day. For this we established a user friendly database system integrating the Ant-App-DB with a smart phone and tablet application, combining experimental data manipulation with data management and providing solar position and timing estimations without any GPS or GIS system. Moreover, the new desktop application Dataplus allows efficient data extraction and conversion from smart phone application to personal computers, for further ecological data analysis and sharing. All features, software code and database as well as Dataplus application are made available completely free of charge and sufficiently generic to be easily adapted to other field monitoring studies on arthropods or other migratory organisms. The software applications Ant-App-DB and Dataplus described here are developed using the Android SDK, Java, XML, C# and SQLite Database. PMID:25977753

  20. Experimental and numerical study of pollution process in an aquifer in relation to a garbage dump field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Changli, Liu; Feng-E, Zhang; Yun, Zhang; Shuhong, Song; Sheng, Zhang; Hao, Ye; Hongbing, Hou; Lijuan, Yang; Ming, Zhang

    2005-10-01

    The water quality of shallow aquifers that have direct relationship to human heath and ecological safety has been seriously threatened by widespread dumping of industrial solid waste, urban and rural garbage. A garbage dump field with hydrogeological, environ-geological characteristics typical of the Beijing plain was selected for investigation. A hydrogeological model was constructed and the equations used to describe pollutant transport in one-dimensional (1D) steady, uniform groundwater flow to investigate the transport/diffusion processes. In addition to the coefficients for calculation, diffusion coefficient and other coefficients of the aquifer were obtained by conducting in situ diffusion experiments and sample tests. Velocity and scope of pollutant transport/diffusion process were calculated. Accordingly, the real pollution situation in the aquifer was evaluated through in situ drilling and sample testing. Transport/diffusion processes of pollutants within the aquifer abide by the solute equation applicable to 1D steady flow. The transport and diffusion dominate in the direction of groundwater flowing at a speed of about 120 m per year. Comparably, the lateral diffusive width is much smaller. Pollution degree decreases by the law of Y=1.08 exp(33.533/ X), where Y is the distance from the garbage dump field and X is the overall pollution index.

  1. Experimental study on vertical scaling of InAs-on-insulator metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, SangHyeon E-mail: sh-kim@kist.re.kr; Yokoyama, Masafumi; Nakane, Ryosho; Takenaka, Mitsuru; Takagi, Shinichi; Ichikawa, Osamu; Osada, Takenori; Hata, Masahiko

    2014-06-30

    We have investigated effects of the vertical scaling on electrical properties in extremely thin-body InAs-on-insulator (-OI) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). It is found that the body thickness (T{sub body}) scaling provides better short channel effect (SCE) control, whereas the T{sub body} scaling also causes the reduction of the mobility limited by channel thickness fluctuation (δT{sub body}) scattering (μ{sub fluctuation}). Also, in order to achieve better SCEs control, the thickness of InAs channel layer (T{sub channel}) scaling is more favorable than the thickness of MOS interface buffer layer (T{sub buffer}) scaling from a viewpoint of a balance between SCEs control and μ{sub fluctuation} reduction. These results indicate necessity of quantum well channel structure in InAs-OI MOSFETs and these should be considered in future transistor design.

  2. An experimental and numerical study of the urban wind field at the university site Tübingen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bahlouli, Asmae; Bange, Jens

    2015-04-01

    This study examines the wind energy potential close to energy consumers inside cities, i.e. between buildings at the university site in the city of Tübingen. The study area is characterized by cubic shaped buildings, related to the university and located on top of a hill in an outlying district in the city of Tübingen. A majority of the buildings is higher than 20 meters with 3 of them around 50 meters. This investigation combines a full-scale experiment and a numerical study. A common technique to calculate the energy potential includes wind measurements at least for an annual cycle. For our study, the measurement campaign started in April 2014 and should last until mid of 2015. Six stations with sonic anemometers were installed. These anemometers are providing measurements of wind speed and wind direction with a high temporal resolution (10 Hz). On the one hand, the measured data are used for a determination of the inflow boundary conditions for our simulations. On the other hand, the wind data will be used to verify the numerical model inside the domain. A wide variety of numerical simulations based on Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes Equations (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES) models have been conducted (cf. Tutar and Oguz (2002)). From these numerical studies it has been concluded that the LES approach seems to be more suitable for studies of airflows around buildings. Consequently we decided to conduct our calculations by means of a LES using OpenFOAM software. This study will help us to identify locations with the most qualified conditions for producing electrical energy using small building-mounted wind turbines. Tutar, M., Oguz, G. (2002). Large eddy simulation of flow around parallel buildings with varying configurations. Fluid Dynamic Research 31, p289-315.

  3. Experimental and Computational Studies of the Control of Convection of Non-Conducting Liquids During solidification by Means of a Magnetic Field Gradient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seybert, C. D.; Evans, J. W.; Leslie, F.; Jones, W. K., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    The elimination of convection is essential in experimental investigations of diffusive transport (of heat and matter) during solidification. One classical approach to damping convection in a conducting liquid is the application of a magnetic field. The damping phenomenon is the induction, by the motion of a conductor in a magnetic field, of currents which interact with the field to produce Lorentz forces that oppose the flow. However, there are many liquids which are not sufficiently conducting to exploit this phenomenon; examples include the transparent liquids (such as succinonitrile-acetone) that are used as "model alloys" in fundamental solidification studies. There have been several investigations of the solidification of these liquids that have been carried out in orbiting laboratories to eliminate natural convection. The paper describes an investigation of an alternative approach whereby a magnetic field gradient is applied to the liquid. A magnetic body force then arises which is dependent on the susceptibility of the liquid and thereby on the temperature and or concentration. With the field gradient aligned vertically and of correct magnitude, the variation of gravitational body force due to temperature/concentration dependent density can be counterbalanced by a variation in magnetic body force. Experiments have been carried out in a super-conducting magnet at Marshall Space Flight Center to measure velocities in an aqueous manganese chloride solution. The solution was contained in a chamber with temperature controlled end walls and glass side walls. Velocities were measured by particle image velocimetry. Starting from zero current in the magnet (zero field gradient) flow driven by the temperature difference between the end walls was measured. At a critical current the flow was halted. At higher currents the normal convection was reversed. The experiments included ones where the solution was solidified and were accompanied by solution of the flow

  4. An experimental study into the influence of aquatic plant motion characteristics on the generation of a fluvial turbulent flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, R. J.; Marjoribanks, T.; Parsons, D. R.; Thomas, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Aquatic vegetation has a determining effect on flow and consequently sediment transport as it generates both skin friction and form drag. The measurement of flow above the vegetation canopy has received much attention and there is now a good process understanding of mean and turbulent flow, although, much of this research has focused on rigid vegetation with relatively simple morphology. However, vegetation immersed in a flow experiences several forces (buoyancy; drag; virtual mass; Basset; and Saffman) which are counteracted by the properties of the vegetation (flexural rigidity; modulus of elasticity; the plant area exposed to the flow and; the packing density of the stems). The ratio of these forces determines the plant motion characteristics which are generally classified as either i) erect with no movement; ii) gently swaying; iii) strong, coherent swaying or; iv) prone. Here we report on an investigation into the influence of plant motion on the turbulence structure in the mixing zone as vortices in this region have been shown to account for the majority of the momentum transport between the canopy and the open flow. We report on a series of flume experiments where flow over a canopy of surrogate aquatic vegetation was measured using PIV at a spatial resolution of ~1mm2 and at a temporal resolution of 100 Hz. This provided whole flow field measurements for all three components of flow over the vegetation canopy. Plant motion characteristics were altered by modifying the flow Reynolds number through both velocity and depth. The influences of plant stem length were also assessed. The measured flows were analysed by standard Reynolds decomposition approaches and Eulerian and Lagrangian coherent flow structure identification methods. Kelvin-Helmholtz and Görtler-type vortices were identified within the canopy shear layer that are generated close to the canopy top and evolve downstream into span-wise roller vortices, which expand with both distance and time. When

  5. Experimental Study to Produce Multiple Focal Points of Acoustic Field for Active Path Selection of Microbubbles through Multi-bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koda, Ren; Koido, Jun; Ito, Takumi; Mochizuki, Takashi; Masuda, Kohji; Ikeda, Seiichi; Arai, Fumihito; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Chiba, Toshio

    2013-07-01

    We previously reported our attempt to propel microbubbles in a flow by a primary Bjerknes force, which is a physical phenomenon where an acoustic wave pushes an obstacle along its direction of propagation. However, when ultrasound was emitted from the surface of the body, controlling bubbles in an against-flow was necessary. It is unpractical to use multiple transducers to produce the same number of focal points because single-element transducers cannot produce more than two focal points. In this study, we introduced a complex artificial blood vessel according to a capillary model and a two-dimensional (2D) array transducer to produce multiple focal points for the active control of microbubbles in an against-flow. From the results, about 15% more microbubbles were led to the desired path with multiple focal points of ultrasound relative to the no-emission case.

  6. Experimental results for a hypersonic nozzle/afterbody flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaid, Frank W.; Keener, Earl R.; Hui, Frank C. L.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to experimentally characterize the flow field created by the interaction of a single-expansion ramp-nozzle (SERN) flow with a hypersonic external stream. Data were obtained from a generic nozzle/afterbody model in the 3.5 Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at the NASA Ames Research Center, in a cooperative experimental program involving Ames and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. The model design and test planning were performed in close cooperation with members of the Ames computational fluid dynamics (CFD) team for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) program. This paper presents experimental results consisting of oil-flow and shadow graph flow-visualization photographs, afterbody surface-pressure distributions, rake boundary-layer measurements, Preston-tube skin-friction measurements, and flow field surveys with five-hole and thermocouple probes. The probe data consist of impact pressure, flow direction, and total temperature profiles in the interaction flow field.

  7. Health responses to a new high-voltage power line route: design of a quasi-experimental prospective field study in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background New high-voltage power transmission lines will be introduced due to increasing demand for reliable and renewable energy supplies. Some residents associate non-specific health complaints with exposure to electromagnetic fields from nearby power lines. This study protocol describes the design and rationale of a prospective study investigating whether the introduction of a new power line triggers health responses in residents living nearby. Methods/Design The study is designed as a quasi-experimental field study with two pretests during the construction of a new power line route, and two posttests after it has been put into operation. Key outcomes are self-reported non-specific somatic and cognitive health complaints, and attribution of these health complaints to a power line. The main determinant is proximity to the new power line route. One member of every household (n = 2379) residing in close proximity (0-500 meters) to the overhead parts of a new power line route in the Netherlands is invited to participate, as well as a sample of household members (n = 2382) residing farther away (500-2000 meters). Multilevel analysis will be employed to test whether an increase in key outcome measures is related to proximity to the line. Longitudinal structural equation models will be applied to test to what extent health responses are mediated by psychosocial health mechanisms and moderated by negative oriented personality traits. Discussion This is the first study to investigate health responses to a new power line route in a prospective manner. The results will provide theoretical insight into psychosocial mechanisms operating during the introduction of an environmental health risk, and may offer suggestions to policymakers and other stakeholders for minimizing adverse health responses when introducing new high-voltage power lines. PMID:24606914

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of the Transonic Flow Field and Associated Boundary Conditions near a Longitudinally-Slotted Wind-Tunnel Wall. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel Lee

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical examination of the slotted-wall flow field is conducted to determine the appropriate wall pressure drop (or boundary condition) equation. This analysis improves the understanding of the fluid physics of these types of flow fields and helps in evaluating the uncertainties and limitations existing in previous mathematical developments. It is shown that the resulting slotted-wall boundary condition contains contributions from the airfoil-induced streamline curvature and the non-linear, quadratic, slot crossflow in addition to an often neglected linear term which results from viscous shearing in the slot. Existing and newly acquired experimental data are examined in the light of this formulation and theoretical developments.

  9. Numerical modeling and experimental study of motion-induced remote field current effect and its applications to online inspection and quality examination of rolling metallic strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yushi; Udpa, Satish S.; Lord, William; Udpa, Lalita; Ouyang, Tianhe

    2000-06-01

    Currently, rolled metallic strips and sheets are inspected off-line, which is costly, time consuming and not ideal for quality control. A well designed online diagnostic and control system for metal rolling process may largely reduce cost, improve quality, and hence enhance competitiveness of the product. The overall objective of this paper is to study a new nondestructive measurement system for on-line diagnostics and control of metallic rolling process using motion-induced remote-field eddy-current (MIRFEC) effect. The system can be used to monitor in real time the rolled metallic strips/sheets for possible anomalies, inclusions, voids, bubbles, lamination, as well as measuring variations of its properties. The potential advantages of the MIRFEC system include simplicity, robustness, low cost, high reliability, quick and accurate signal classification and characterization that can used for real-time process control, or off-line data analysis. The technique also allows operation at high temperature, large lift-off and vibration, and high rolling speed. Results of finite element modeling of the MIRFEC effect and experimental measurement data obtained from a prototype system are presented.

  10. Transient rheological behavior of natural polysaccharide xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields: An experimental study using a strain-controlled rheometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Seok; Kim, Yong-Seok; Song, Ki-Won

    2015-08-01

    The objective of the present study is to experimentally investigate the transient rheological behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions in start-up shear flow fields. Using a strain-controlled rheometer, a number of constant shear rates were suddenly imposed to aqueous xanthan gum solutions with different concentrations and the resultant shear stress responses were measured with time. The main findings obtained from this study can be summarized as follows: (1) For all shear rates imposed, however low it may be, the shear stress is rapidly increased with time (stress overshoot) upon inception of steady shear flow before passing through the maximum stress value and then gradually decreased with time (stress decay) until reaching a steady state flow. (2) As the imposed shear rate is increased, a more pronounced stress overshoot takes place and the maximum stress value becomes larger, whereas both times at which the maximum stress is observed and needed to reach a steady state flow are shortened. (3) The maximum shear stress is linearly increased with shear rate in a double logarithmic scale and becomes larger with increasing concentration at equal shear rates. In addition, the time at which the maximum stress occurs exhibits a linear relationship with the inverse of shear rate in a double logarithmic scale for all xanthan gum solutions, regardless of their concentrations. (4) The shear stress is sharply increased with an increase in strain until reaching the maximum stress at small range of deformations. The maximum stress is observed at similar strain values, irrespective of the imposed shear rates lower than 10 1/s. (5) The Bird-Leider model can be successfully used with regard to quantitatively predicting the transient behavior of concentrated xanthan gum solutions. However, this model has a fatal weakness in terms of describing a decrease in shear stress (stress decay).

  11. Experimental Study on Improving Unclamped Inductive Switching Characteristics of the New Power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Employing Deep Body Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, In‑Hwan; Choi, Young‑Hwan; Kim, Soo‑Seong; Choi, Yearn‑Ik; Han, Min‑Koo

    2006-04-01

    A new power metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) with deep body contact (DBC), which improves the avalanche energy capability, is proposed and verified by experimental results. For the experiment, a 60 V, 1 A power MOSFET employing DBC has been fabricated using a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) compatible deep Si trench process. Previous simulations show that DBC alters the direction of the current flow from the edge to the bottom of the p-body under unclamped inductive switching (UIS) conditions. DBC also suppresses the activation of the parasitic bipolar transistor due to the reduction of the current density beneath the n+ source. Experimental results show that the ruggedness of the proposed power MOSFET is improved without sacrificing any other electrical characteristics and increasing device area.

  12. Experimental Studies on Biosensing by SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun; Shiokawa, Showko; Matsui, Yosikazu

    1989-09-01

    Biosensing using surface plasmon resonance is experimentally studied. The results obtained by detecting the bioresponse of the α-Feto protein system and cyclic experiments show that this technique has potential application in the field of biosensing. The effects of an organic layer on detecting sensitivity and restoration of sensors are also discussed.

  13. Profiling of energy deposition fields in a modular HTHR with annular core: Computational/experimental studies at the ASTRA critical facility

    SciTech Connect

    Boyarinov, V. F.; Garin, V. P.; Glushkov, E. S.; Zimin, A. A.; Kompaniets, G. V.; Nevinitsa, V. A.; Polyakov, D. N.; Ponomarev, A. S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Smirnov, O. N.; Fomichenko, P. A.; Chunyaev, E. I.; Marova, E. V.; Sukharev, Yu. P.

    2010-12-15

    The paper presents the results obtained from the computational/experimental studies of the spatial distribution of the {sup 235}U fission reaction rate in a critical assembly with an annular core and poison profiling elements inserted into the inner graphite reflector. The computational analysis was carried out with the codes intended for design computation of an HTHR-type reactor.

  14. Towards experimental quantum-field tomography with ultracold atoms

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, A.; Friesdorf, M.; Langen, T.; Rauer, B.; Schweigler, T.; Hübener, R.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Riofrío, C.A.; Eisert, J.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental realization of large-scale many-body systems in atomic-optical architectures has seen immense progress in recent years, rendering full tomography tools for state identification inefficient, especially for continuous systems. To work with these emerging physical platforms, new technologies for state identification are required. Here we present first steps towards efficient experimental quantum-field tomography. Our procedure is based on the continuous analogues of matrix-product states, ubiquitous in condensed-matter theory. These states naturally incorporate the locality present in realistic physical settings and are thus prime candidates for describing the physics of locally interacting quantum fields. To experimentally demonstrate the power of our procedure, we quench a one-dimensional Bose gas by a transversal split and use our method for a partial quantum-field reconstruction of the far-from-equilibrium states of this system. We expect our technique to play an important role in future studies of continuous quantum many-body systems. PMID:26138511

  15. Experimental Infrasound Studies in Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrin, E. T.; Negraru, P. T.; Golden, P.; Williams, A.

    2009-12-01

    An experimental propagation study was carried out in Nevada in June 2009 on Julian days 173-177. During this field experiment we deployed 16 single channel digital infrasound recorders to monitor the munitions disposal activities near Hawthorne, NV. The sensors were deployed in a single line and placed approximately 12 km apart at distances ranging from 2 to 177 km. A four element semi-permanent infrasound array named FNIAR was installed approximately 154 km north of the detonation site in line with the individual temporary recorders. Tropospheric arrivals were observed during all days of the experiment, but during day 176 the observed arrivals had very large amplitudes. A large signal was observed at 58 km from the detonation site with amplitude as large as 4 Pascals, while at 94 km no signal was observed. At FNIAR the amplitude of the tropospheric arrival was 1 Pascal. During this day meteorological data acquired in the propagation path showed a strong jet stream to the north. On day 177 we were not able to identify tropospheric arrivals beyond 34 km, but at stations beyond 152 km we observed stratospheric arrivals. Continuous monitoring of these signals at FNIAR shows that stratospheric arrivals are the most numerous. In a two month period, from 06/15/2009 to 08/15/2009 there were 35 operational days at the Hawthorne disposal facility resulting in 212 explosions with known origin times. Based on the celerity values there were 115 explosions that have only stratospheric arrivals (celerities of 300-275 m/s), 72 explosions with both tropospheric (celerities above 330 m/s) and stratospheric arrivals, 20 explosions that were not detected and five explosions that have only tropospheric arrivals.

  16. Unraveling The Origin of Enhanced Field Emission from Irradiated FeCo-SiO2 Nanocomposites: A Combined Experimental and First-Principles Based Study.

    PubMed

    Sarker, Debalaya; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Rodriguez, Raul D; Sheremet, Evgeniya; Kabiraj, D; Avasthi, D K; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Schmidt, H; Srivastava, P; Ghosh, S

    2016-02-01

    This work is driven by the vision of engineering planar field emitters with ferromagnetic metal-insulator nanocomposite thin films, using swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation method. FeCo nanoparticles inside SiO2 matrix, when subjected to SHI get elongated. Using this, we demonstrate here a planar field emitter with maximum current density of 550 μA/cm(2) at an applied field of 15 V/μm. The film, irradiated with 5 × 10(13) ions/cm(2) fluence (5e13) of 120 MeV Au(9+) ions, shows very high electron emitting quantum efficiency in comparison to its unirradiated counterpart. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy analysis of unirradiated and 5e13 films further confirms that the field emission (FE) enhancement is not only due to surface protrusions but also depends on the properties of entire matrix. We find experimental evidence of enhanced valence band density of states (VB DOS) for 5e13 film from XPS, which is verified in the electronic structure of a model FeCo cluster from first-principles based calculations combining density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD temperature is selected from the lattice temperature profile inside nanoparticles as deduced from thermal spike model. Increasing the irradiation fluence beyond 5e13, results in reduced VB DOS and melting of surface protrusions, thus causing reduction of FE current density. We finally conclude from theoretical analysis that change in fluence alters the co-ordination chemistry followed by the charge distribution and spin alignment, which influence the VB DOS and concurrent FE as evident from our experiment. PMID:26812580

  17. Experimental Studies in Ice Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Timothy Peter

    Ice nuclei play a critical role in the formation of precipitation in mixed phase clouds. Modification of IN concentrations can lead to changes in cloud lifetimes and precipitation size. Presented in this study are experimental investigations into ice nuclei in an ongoing effort to reduce the uncertainties that ice nuclei have on cloud processes and climate. This research presents a new version of the cold stage drop freezing assay to investigate the time-dependence of heterogeneous nucleation. The temperature range for the instrument spans from the melting point of water to the homogeneous freezing limit of ˜-38 deg C. Temperature stability for the instrument allowed for experimental operation for up to four days while interrogating the same sample. Up to a one hundred fold increase in the number of analyzed drops was accomplished through an in-house written automated drop freezing detection software package. Combined instrument design improvements allow for the analysis of IN concentrations down to ˜10-8 ice nuclei per picoliter of sample water. A new variant of the multiple-component stochastic model for heterogeneous ice nucleation was used to investigate the time dependence of heterogeneous freezing processes. This was accomplished by analyzing how the changes in the cooling rate can impact the observed nucleation rate. The model employed four material-dependent parameters to accurately capture the observed freezing of water drops containing Arizona Test Dust. The parameters were then used to accurately predict the freezing behavior of the drops in time dependent experiments. The time dependence freezing of a wide range of materials was then investigated. These materials included the minerals montmorillonite and kaolinite, the biological proxy ice nuclei contained within the product Icemax, and flame soot generated from the incomplete combustion of ethylene gas. The time dependence for ice nuclei collected from rainwater samples was also investigated. The

  18. About soil cover heterogeneity of agricultural research stations' experimental fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rannik, Kaire; Kõlli, Raimo; Kukk, Liia

    2013-04-01

    Depending on local pedo-ecological conditions (topography, (geo) diversity of soil parent material, meteorological conditions) the patterns of soil cover and plant cover determined by soils are very diverse. Formed in the course of soil-plant mutual relationship, the natural ecosystems are always influenced to certain extent by the other local soil forming conditions or they are site specific. The agricultural land use or the formation of agro-ecosystems depends foremost on the suitability of soils for the cultivation of feed and food crops. As a rule, the most fertile or the best soils of the area, which do not present any or present as little as possible constraints for agricultural land use, are selected for this purpose. Compared with conventional field soils, the requirements for the experimental fields' soil cover quality are much higher. Experimental area soils and soil cover composition should correspond to local pedo-ecological conditions and, in addition to that, represent the soil types dominating in the region, whereas the fields should be as homogeneous as possible. The soil cover heterogeneity of seven arable land blocks of three research stations (Jõgeva, Kuusiku and Olustvere) was studied 1) by examining the large scale (1:10 000) digital soil map (available via the internet), and 2) by field researches using the transect method. The stages of soils litho-genetic and moisture heterogeneities were estimated by using the Estonian normal soils matrix, however, the heterogeneity of top- and subsoil texture by using the soil texture matrix. The quality and variability of experimental fields' soils humus status, was studied more thoroughly from the aspect of humus concentration (g kg-1), humus cover thickness (cm) and humus stocks (Mg ha-1). The soil cover of Jõgeva experimental area, which presents an accumulative drumlin landscape (formed during the last glacial period), consist from loamy Luvisols and associated to this Cambisols. In Kuusiku area

  19. Acquisition of chemical remanent magnetization during experimental ferrihydrite-hematite conversion in Earth-like magnetic field-implications for paleomagnetic studies of red beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaoxia; Liu, Qingsong; Dekkers, Mark J.; Tauxe, Lisa; Qin, Huafeng; Barrón, Vidal; Torrent, José

    2015-10-01

    Hematite-bearing red beds are renowned for their chemical remanent magnetization (CRM). If the CRM was acquired substantially later than the sediment was formed, this severely compromises paleomagnetic records. To improve our interpretation of the natural remanent magnetization, the intricacies of the CRM acquisition process must be understood. Here, we contribute to this issue by synthesizing hematite under controlled 'Earth-like' field conditions (≲ 100 μ T). CRM was imparted in 90 oriented samples with varying inclinations. The final synthesis product appeared to be dominated by hematite with traces of ferrimagnetic iron oxides. When the magnetic field intensity is ≳ 40 μ T, the CRM records the field direction faithfully. However, for field intensities ≲ 40 μ T, the CRM direction may deviate considerably from that of the applied field during synthesis. The CRM intensity normalized by the isothermal remanent magnetization (CRM/IRM@2.5 T) increases linearly with the intensity of growth field, implying that CRM could potentially be useful for relative paleointensity studies if hematite particles of chemical origins have consistent properties. CRM in hematite has a distributed unblocking temperature spectrum from ˜200 to ˜650 °C, while hematite with a depositional remanent magnetization (DRM) has a more confined spectrum from ˜ 600to 680 °C because it is usually coarser-grained and more stoichiometric. Therefore, the thermal decay curves of CRM with their concave shape are notably different from their DRM counterparts which are convex. These differences together are suggested to be a potential discriminator of CRM from DRM carried by hematite in natural red beds, and of significance for the interpretation of paleomagnetic studies on red beds.

  20. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  1. Field Experimental Research on Human Crowding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiello, John R.; And Others

    Overcrowded residence halls at Rutgers University form the basis for this research study on the effects of overcrowding. Subjects were the occupants of 31 rooms (7 triple male rooms, 7 triple female rooms, 7 double male rooms, and 10 double female rooms). Two sets of measures were used to determine whether crowding caused arousal and stress. The…

  2. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  3. An experimental study of the structure and acoustic field of a jet in a cross stream. [Ames 7-ft by 10-ft wind tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Camelier, I.; Karamcheti, K.

    1976-01-01

    The plane of symmetry of a high speed circular jet was surveyed to measure the mean and turbulent velocity fields by using constant temperature hot wire anemometry. The intensity of the noise radiated from the jet was determined in the tunnel test section by utilizing the cross-correlation at a particular time delay between the signals of two microphones suitably located along a given direction. Experimental results indicate that the turbulent intensity inside the crossflow jet increases by a factor of (1 + 1/2) as compared to the turbulent intensity of the same jet under free conditions, with r indicating the ratio of the jet velocity by the cross stream velocity. The peak observed in the turbulence spectra obtained inside the potential core of the jet has a frequency that increases by the same factor with respect to the corresponding frequency measured in the case of the free jet. The noise radiated by the jet becomes more intense as the crossflow velocity increases. The measured acoustic intensity of the crossflow jet is higher than the value which would be expected from the increase of the turbulent intensity only.

  4. Dynamics and kinetics of molecular high Rydberg states in the presence of an electrical field: An experimental and classical computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabani, Eran; Levine, R. D.; Mühlpfordt, Annette; Even, U.

    1995-01-01

    by either a gain or a loss of enough energy. Either process occurs in a diffusive like fashion of many smaller steps, except for a fraction of trajectories where prompt ionization occurs. The results for ensembles of trajectories are examined in terms of the decay kinetics. It is found that after a short induction period, which can be identified with the sampling time of the available phase space, the kinetics of the decay depend only on the initial energy of the electron and on the magnitude of the field, but not on the other details of the excitation process. The computed kinetics of the up and down channels are shown to represent competing decay modes. A possible intramolecular mechanism for long time stability based on the sojourn in intermediate Rydberg states is discussed. The available experimental evidence does not suffice to rule out nor to substantiate this mechanism, and additional tests are proposed. The theoretical expectations are discussed in relation to observed time resolved decay kinetics of high Rydberg states of BBC (bisbenzenechromium) and of DABCO (1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane). The experimental setup allows for the imposition of a weak (0.1-1.5 V/cm) electrical field in the excitation region. The role of the amplitude of the time delayed field, used to detect the surviving Rydberg states by ionization, is also examined. The observed decay kinetics are as previously reported for cold aromatic molecules: Most of the decay is on the sub-μs time scale with a minor (˜10%) longer time component. The decay rate of the faster component increases with the magnitude of the field. Many features in such an experiment, including the absolute time scales, are similar to those found in the classical trajectory computations, suggesting that the Hamiltonian used correctly describes the physics of the faster decay kinetics of the high Rydberg states.

  5. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  6. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  7. Experimental studies of glass refining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subramanian, R. S.; Cole, R.; Kondos, P.

    1984-01-01

    The basic components of the experimental apparatus were selected and acquired. Techniques were developed for the fabrication of the special crucibles necessary for the experiments. Arrangements were made for the analysis of glass and gas bubble samples for composition information. Donations of major equipment were received for this project from Owens, Illinois where a similar study had been conducted a few year ago. Decisions were made regarding the actual glass composition to be used, the gas to be used in the first experiments, and the temperatures at which the experiments should be conducted. A microcomputer was acquired, and work was begun on interfacing the video analyzer to it.

  8. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  9. The linear model and experimentally observed resonant field amplification in tokamaks and reversed field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2011-01-15

    A review is given of the experimentally observed effects related to the resonant field amplification (RFA) and the Resistive Wall Mode (RWM) instability in tokamaks and reversed field pinches (RFPs). This includes the feedback rotation of RWM in RFX-mod RFP, dependence of the RWM growth rate on the plasma-wall separation observed in JT-60U, appearance of the slowly growing RWM precursors in JT-60U and similar phenomena in other devices. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions based on the model comprising the Maxwell equations, Ohm's law for the conducting wall, the boundary conditions and assumption of linear plasma response to the external magnetic perturbations. The model describes the plasma reaction to the error field as essentially depending on two factors: the plasma proximity to the RWM stability threshold and the natural rotation frequency of the plasma mode. The linear response means that these characteristics are determined by the plasma equilibrium parameters only. It is shown that the mentioned effects in different devices under different conditions can be described on a common basis with only assumption that the plasma behaves as a linear system. To extend the range of the model validation, some predictions are derived with proposals for experimental studies of the RFA dynamics.

  10. Experimental studies with palygorskite dusts.

    PubMed

    Wagner, J C; Griffiths, D M; Munday, D E

    1987-11-01

    As the preliminary results of experimental studies on dust from the palygorskite group have led to some confusion a detailed description of the completed investigation is given for clarification. As in other experiments the biological effects have been shown to be associated with the physical characteristics of the fibres in these specimens. Samples of sepiolite and attapulgite from Spain and a single sample of palygorskite from the United Kingdom have been studied. Serious abnormalities were produced only by the palygorskite and one of the attapulgite dusts. The palygorskite is of no commercial interest and the attapulgite was from one small deposit and was used only in the preparation of drilling mud in the exploration of oil deposits. PMID:2961365

  11. Grouping of Experimental Conditions as an Approach to Evaluate Effects of Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields on Oxidative Response in in vitro Studies

    PubMed Central

    Mattsson, Mats-Olof; Simkó, Myrtill

    2014-01-01

    A large body of literature deals with biological effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF MFs) studied in vitro. Despite the multitude of studies, no coherent picture has evolved regarding the plausibility of effects at low-flux densities or regarding the interaction mechanisms. Here, we propose that ELF MF exposure in vitro causes changes in oxidative status as an early response. We tested this hypothesis by scrutinizing the literature and applying a grouping approach for analyzing relevant biological properties and exposure conditions. A total of 41 scientific original publications were analyzed for this purpose. The conclusion from the work is that ELF MF (modulated or unmodulated) consistently can influence the oxidative status, at or above 1 mT, in a broad range of cell types and independent of exposure duration. A response at lower flux densities is seen in certain studies, although not consistently. Further studies with stringent protocols for sham exposure, blinding, and statistical analysis as well as appropriate positive controls are needed to establish if true dose-relationships for effects on oxidative status exist. PMID:25229055

  12. Simulation and Experimental Studies on Substrate Temperature and Gas Density Field in Hfcvd Diamond Films Growth on WC-Co Drill Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Xinchang; Shen, Bin; Sun, Fanghong

    2013-04-01

    Uniform temperature and gas density field inside the reactor play an important role on synthesis of high-quality diamond films using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) method. In the present study, the finite volume method (FVM) is adopted to simulate the temperature and gas density distribution during the deposition process. Temperature-measuring experiments are conducted to verify the correctness of the simulation results. Thereafter, the deposition parameters are optimized using this model as D (filament separation) = 35 mm, H (filament-substrate distance) = -10 mm and N (number of gas inlet) = 3. Finally, experiments of depositing diamond films on WC-Co drill tools are carried out with the optimal deposition parameters. The results of the characterization by SEM and Raman spectrum exhibit that as-fabricated diamond-coated tools present a layer of high-quality diamond films with homogeneous surface and uniform thickness, further validating the accuracy of the parameter optimization using the simulation method.

  13. An experimental study of the flow of gas along synthetic faults of varying orientation to the stress field: Implications for performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuss, Robert J.; Harrington, Jon F.; Noy, David J.; Sathar, Shanvas; Norris, Simon

    2015-05-01

    Critical stress theory states that fault transmissivity is strongly dependent upon orientation with respect to the stress tensor. This paper describes an experimental study aimed at verifying critical stress theory using a bespoke angled shear rig designed to examine the relationship between gas flows along a kaolinite-filled synthetic fault as a function of fault dip. A total of 22 gas injection experiments were conducted on faults oriented 0°, 15°, 30°, and 45° to horizontal; both with and without active shear. Gas flow was seen to be complex; repeat gas injection testing showed a consistent gas entry pressure but considerably different, nonrepeatable, gas peak or breakthrough pressure. Gas flow occurred along discrete, dilatant pathways. The physics governing the pressure at which these features formed was repeatable; however, permeability was dependent on the number, distribution, and geometry of the resultant pathways. The nonrepeatable gas response suggests that the number of pathways was dependent on very subtle variations in gouge properties. No fault orientations were seen to exhibit nonflow characteristics, although critical stress theory predicted that two of the investigated fault angles should be effective seals. However, a small variation in gas entry pressure was seen with fault angle as a result of varying normal and shear stress acting on the gouge material. Shear was seen to enhance gas movement by reducing gas entry pressure and increased permeability once gas became mobile. Therefore, in kaolinite gouge-filled faults, shear is not an effective self-sealing mechanism to gas flow.

  14. Experimental Validation of Simulations Using Full-field Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hack, Erwin

    2010-05-28

    The calibration by reference materials of dynamic full-field measurement systems is discussed together with their use to validate numerical simulations of structural mechanics. The discussion addresses three challenges that are faced in these processes, i.e. how to calibrate a measuring instrument that (i) provides full-field data, and (ii) is dynamic; (iii) how to compare data from simulation and experimentation.

  15. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  16. Prospective risk analysis prior to retrospective incident reporting and analysis as a means to enhance incident reporting behaviour: a quasi-experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Kessels-Habraken, Marieke; De Jonge, Jan; Van der Schaaf, Tjerk; Rutte, Christel

    2010-05-01

    Hospitals can apply prospective and retrospective methods to reduce the large number of medical errors. Retrospective methods are used to identify errors after they occur and to facilitate learning. Prospective methods aim to determine, assess and minimise risks before incidents happen. This paper questions whether the order of implementation of those two methods influences the resultant impact on incident reporting behaviour. From November 2007 until June 2008, twelve wards of two Dutch general hospitals participated in a quasi-experimental reversed-treatment non-equivalent control group design. The six units of Hospital 1 first conducted a prospective analysis, after which a sophisticated incident reporting and analysis system was implemented. On the six units of Hospital 2 the two methods were implemented in reverse order. Data from the incident reporting and analysis system and from a questionnaire were used to assess between-hospital differences regarding the number of reported incidents, the spectrum of reported incident types, and the profession of reporters. The results show that carrying out a prospective analysis first can improve incident reporting behaviour in terms of a wider spectrum of reported incident types and a larger proportion of incidents reported by doctors. However, the proposed order does not necessarily yield a larger number of reported incidents. This study fills an important gap in safety management research regarding the order of the implementation of prospective and retrospective methods, and contributes to literature on incident reporting. This research also builds on the network theory of social contagion. The results might indicate that health care employees can disseminate their risk perceptions through communication with their direct colleagues. PMID:20202731

  17. Genesis of Dune Fields Under Unidirectional Wind with Sand Input Flux Control: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Courrech du Pont, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Valance, A.; Narteau, C.; Gao, X.; Lucas, A.

    2015-05-01

    Our experimental studies with control of wind and sediment source will characterize more precisely the different modes of dune formation and long-term evolution, and constrain the physics behind the morphogenesis and dynamics of dunes fields.

  18. Numerical and Experimental Study of Levee Breach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elalfy, E. Y.; LaRocque, L.; Riahi-Nezhad, C. K.; Chaudhry, H.

    2014-12-01

    Levees are constructed along rivers and channels for flood protection. Failure of these levees can cause loss of life and property damage. A better understanding of the flow field from a levee breach allows the decision maker to assess risks and to prepare emergency plans. For this purpose, a two-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the levee breach. The model solves the shallow-water equations using the MacCormack explicit, finite- difference two-step, predictor-corrector scheme. The scheme is second-order accurate in time and space. The artificial viscosity technique is used to smooth the high-frequency oscillations in the computed results. The numerical results compare satisfactorily with the experimental results. A parametric study is carried-out to investigate the effect of main channel width, breach width on the computed flow field.

  19. Experimental investigation of the critical magnetic fields of transition metal superconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcevoy, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The isothermal magnetic transitions of a type 2 superconductor have been studied by AC susceptibility techniques as a function of the amplitude and frequency of the exciting field. The field variation of the complex susceptibility was used to determine the critical fields. The research was planned to clarify the determination (both experimentally and theoretically) of the maximum field at which the superconductive phase spontaneously nucleates in the bulk and on the surface of the metal.

  20. Horse Manure and Other Fun Projects. Field Studies and Laboratory Experiences in Environmental Biology - A Book of Experimental Ideas for Secondary School Biology Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Robert T., Ed.; Clark, Barbara G., Ed.

    This guide contains a collection of laboratory and field inquiries designed to promote ecological awareness, sensitivity, and understanding. The activities compiled by 28 teachers are for use in teaching biology at the secondary level. They are presented in a "recipe" form to make it possible for teachers without prior experience or training to…

  1. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; Higashi, Yasuo; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  2. Experimental studies of transonic flow field near a longitudinally slotted wind tunnel wall. Ph.D. Thesis - George Washington Univ., 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, Joel L.; Bobbitt, Percy J.

    1994-01-01

    The results of detailed parametric experiments are presented for the near-wall flow field of a longitudinally slotted transonic wind tunnel. Existing data are reevaluated and new data obtained in the Langley 6- by 19-inch Transonic Wind Tunnel are presented and analyzed. In the experiments, researchers systematically investigate many pertinent wall-geometry variables such as the wall openness and the number of slots along with the free stream Mach number and model angle of attack. Flow field surveys on the plane passing through the centerline of the slot were conducted and are presented. The effects of viscosity on the slot flow are considered in the analysis. The present experiments, combined with those of previous investigations, give a more complete physical characterization of the flow near and through the slotted wall of a transonic wind tunnel.

  3. The three youngest Plinian eruptions of Mt Pelée, Martinique (P1, P2 and P3): Constraining the eruptive conditions from field and experimental studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kueppers, Ulrich; Uhlig, Joan; Carazzo, Guillaume; Kaminski, Edouard; Perugini, Diego; Tait, Steve; Clouard, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Mt Pelée on Martinique, French Lesser Indies, is infamous for the last big Pelean (i.e., dome forming) eruption in 1902 AD that destroyed agricultural land and the city of Saint Pierre by pyroclastic density currents. Beside such mostly valley-confined deposits, the geological record shows thick fall deposits of at least three Plinian eruptions during the past 2000 years. In an attempt to describe and understand systematic eruptive behaviours as well as the associated variability of eruptive scenarios of Plinian eruptions in Martinique, we have investigated approx. 50 outcrops belonging to the P1 (1315 AD), P2 (345 AD) and P3 (4 AD) eruptions (Traineau et al., JVGR 1989) and collected bulk samples as well as >100 mm pumiceous clasts. All samples are andesitic, contain plagioclase and pyroxene in a glassy matrix and range in porosity between 55 and 69 vol.% with individual bubbles rarely larger than 1 mm. Our approach was two-fold: 1) Loose bulk samples have been subject to dry mechanical sieving in order to quantively describe the grain-size distribution and the fractal dimension. 2) From large clasts, 60*25 mm cylinders have been drilled for fragmentation experiments following the sudden decompression of gas in the sample's pore space. The used experimental set-up allowed for precisely controllable and repeatable conditions (5, 10 and 15 MPa, 25 °C) and the complete sampling of the generated pyroclasts. These experimentally generated clasts were analysed for their grain-size distribution and fractal dimension. For both natural samples and experimental populations, we find we find that the grain-size distribution follows a power-law, with an exponent between 2,5 and 3,7. Deciphering eruption conditions from deposits alone is challenging because of the complex interplay of dynamic volcanic processes and transport-related sorting. We use the quantified values of fractal dimension for a comparison of the power law exponents among the three eruptions and the

  4. Precision improvement in dark-field microscopy imaging by using gold nanoparticles as an internal reference: a combined theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Yue; Gao, Peng Fei; Zou, Hong Yan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-04-28

    Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). PMID:27065307

  5. Precision improvement in dark-field microscopy imaging by using gold nanoparticles as an internal reference: a combined theoretical and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jun; Liu, Yue; Gao, Peng Fei; Zou, Hong Yan; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA).Low accuracy is a big obstacle in the dark-field microscopy imaging (iDFM) technique in practical applications. In order to reduce the deviations and fluctuations in the observed or snapped scattered light in the iDFM technique caused by unavoidable measurement errors, bare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were introduced as an internal reference (IR). The feasibility of using AuNPs as the IR in iDFM in theory was verified. The function of the IR in improving the precision of the acquired data through post data analysis was identified by three kinds of experiments: monitoring the oxidation process of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at room temperature, quantifying the level of glucose with AgNPs used as probes and quantifying the change in the light intensity of AuNPs after the plasmon resonance energy transfer (PRET) between AuNPs and tetramethylrhodamine (TAMRA). Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08837b

  6. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  7. Michelson wide-field stellar interferometry: principles and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Montilla, I; Pereira, S F; Braat, J J M

    2005-01-20

    A new interferometric technique for Michelson wide-field interferometry is presented that consists of a Michelson pupil-plane combination scheme in which a wide field of view can be achieved in one shot. This technique uses a stair-shaped mirror in the intermediate image plane of each telescope in the array, allowing for simultaneous correction of the differential delay for the on-axis and off-axis image positions. Experimental results in a laboratory setup show that it is possible to recover the fringes of on-axis and off-axis stars with an angular separation of 1 arc min simultaneously and with a similar contrast. This new technique represents a considerable extension of the field of view of an interferometer without the need for extra observation time. PMID:15717821

  8. Experimental studies of the mechanisms of seismo-geochemical precursors

    SciTech Connect

    Fong-liang, J.; Gui-ru, L.

    1981-05-01

    The following aspects of modeling experiments on seismo-geochemical precursors are described: (1) gas emission during laboratory stress loading and rupture of rocks, (2) field measurements with explosion sources, (3) aquifer mixing tests in the field, (4) experimental studies of physico-chemical processes caused by stress events.

  9. A Field Experimental Approach to the Study of Relevance Assessments in Relation to Document Searching. Final Report to the National Science Foundation. Volume II, Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rees, Alan M.; Schultz, Douglas G.

    This volume consists of appendices to the final report on a study of the nature and variability of relevance judgments connected with document searching. Included in these appendices are: (1) all test materials and forms used in the experiments with medical librarians, medical experts, medical scientists, and medical students who were asked to…

  10. Experimental rotor-stator cavity ingress study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.; Glezer, B.

    1999-07-01

    An experimental facility has been constructed in order to study the problems of hot gas ingress and heat transfer in an engine-realistic rotor-stator cavity. This paper describes the facility, and presents detailed baseline measurements of gas ingress on the stator using a carbon-dioxide tracer method. Tests were conducted with and without a rim seal, with two axial rotor-stator spacings, and for two methods of injecting the disk cavity buffer air: axially through a central hole in the stator and through rim impingement. A cross section of the facility is shown. The data show the importance, for ingress prevention, of the detailed geometry in the region of the disk rim, as well as provides qualitative data which can be used as a guideline by the engine designer. The current data are compared, finally, to those of other researchers in the field.

  11. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  12. Theoretical and experimental studies on the foundation theoretical and experimental studies on the foundation of mesomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudnovsky, A.; Wu, S.

    1992-06-01

    The report summarizes a closely coupled experimental and theoretical investigation of various stages of Fracture Process: (1) accumulation of 'damage' on submicroscopical and microscopical scales leading to crack initiation; (2) slow (subcritical) crack growth and an evolution of the damage zone; (3) transition to dynamic crack growth and the catastrophic failure. The experimental part of the program is focused on the observation and quantitative characterization of damage preceding and accompanying crack initiation and growth. A special experimental setup for studying the fracture process under variable stress field is reported in Chapter 2. A leading role of crack-damage interaction in fracture process is well documented. A new formalism for solution of crack-microcrack array interaction problem and its successful implementation in the evaluation of crack layer driving forces is presented in Chapter 3. A new model of the process zone, which generalizes the well-known Dagdale-Barenblatt model is presented in Chapter 4. A new measure for material toughness and the prediction of R-curve behavior illustrate the practical application of our model. Experimental examinations of our model under various test conditions are reported in Chapters 4, 5 and 6. The development of the constitutive equations for Crack Layer evolution and their experimental examinations under stress relaxation, fatigue and creep conditions are reported in Chapters 5 and 6. An accelerated test procedure and the formulation of crack layer instability criteria as a substitution for the conventional fracture toughness parameters are also discussed in Chapter 6.

  13. Experimental violation of Tsirelson's bound by Maxwell fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandeau, N.; Akhouayri, H.; Matzkin, A.; Durt, T.

    2016-05-01

    In analogy with quantum optics it is possible to impose nonseparability between different degrees of freedom of an optical beam. The resulting correlations between these degrees of freedom can be investigated with correlations functions traditionally employed in quantum mechanics, such as the well-known Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) correlation function. In this paper we present results achieving a maximal violation of Tsirelson's bound on CHSH correlations between spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of classical (Maxwell) fields. We describe the theoretical method, based on the realization of a nonunitary gate, and then proceed to its experimental implementation carried out with classical optical techniques. Our approach relies on the realization at the level of classical Maxwell fields of a so-called POVM (positive operator valued measure) which is traditionally discussed in the realm of quantum physics.

  14. The impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists (the field--medicine) on research productivity: a quasi-experimental study and a brief systematic review.

    PubMed

    Saygitov, Ruslan T

    2014-01-01

    The impact of grants on research productivity has been investigated by a number of retrospective studies. The results of these studies vary considerably. The objective of my study was to investigate the impact of funding through the RF President's grants for young scientists on the research productivity of awarded applicants. The study compared the number of total articles and citations for awarded and rejected applicants who in 2007 took part in competitions for young candidates of science (CoS's) and doctors of science (DoS's) in the scientific field of medicine. The bibliometric analysis was conducted for the period from 2003 to 2012 (five years before and after the competition). The source of bibliometric data is the eLIBRARY.RU database. The impact of grants on the research productivity of Russian young scientists was assessed using the meta-analytical approach based on data from quasi-experimental studies conducted in other countries. The competition featured 149 CoS's and 41 DoS's, out of which 24 (16%) and 22 (54%) applicants, respectively, obtained funding. No difference in the number of total articles and citations at baseline, as well as in 2008-2012, for awarded and rejected applicants was found. The combination of data from the Russian study and other quasi-experimental studies (6 studies, 10 competitions) revealed a small treatment effect--an increase in the total number of publications over a 4-5-year period after the competition by 1.23 (95% CI 0.48-1.97). However, the relationship between the number of total publications published by applicants before and after the competition revealed that this treatment effect is an effect of the "maturation" of scientists with a high baseline publication activity--not of grant funding. PMID:24475203

  15. Adaptive wave field synthesis for active sound field reproduction: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Philippe-Aubert; Berry, Alain

    2008-04-01

    Sound field reproduction has applications in music reproduction, spatial audio, sound environment reproduction, and experimental acoustics. Sound field reproduction can be used to artificially reproduce the spatial character of natural hearing. The objective is then to reproduce a sound field in a real reproduction environment. Wave field synthesis (WFS) is a known open-loop technology which assumes that the reproduction environment is anechoic. The room response thus reduces the quality of the physical sound field reproduction by WFS. In recent research papers, adaptive wave field synthesis (AWFS) was defined as a potential solution to compensate for these quality reductions from which WFS objective performance suffers. In this paper, AWFS is experimentally investigated as an active sound field reproduction system with a limited number of reproduction error sensors to compensate for the response of the listening environment. Two digital signal processing algorithms for AWFS are used for comparison purposes, one of which is based on independent radiation mode control. AWFS performed propagating sound field reproduction better than WFS in three tested reproduction spaces (hemianechoic chamber, standard laboratory space, and reverberation chamber). PMID:18397007

  16. Experimental evaluation of radiosity for room sound-field prediction.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Murray; Nosal, Eva-Marie

    2006-08-01

    An acoustical radiosity model was evaluated for how it performs in predicting real room sound fields. This was done by comparing radiosity predictions with experimental results for three existing rooms--a squash court, a classroom, and an office. Radiosity predictions were also compared with those by ray tracing--a "reference" prediction model--for both specular and diffuse surface reflection. Comparisons were made for detailed and discretized echograms, sound-decay curves, sound-propagation curves, and the variations with frequency of four room-acoustical parameters--EDT, RT, D50, and C80. In general, radiosity and diffuse ray tracing gave very similar predictions. Predictions by specular ray tracing were often very different. Radiosity agreed well with experiment in some cases, less well in others. Definitive conclusions regarding the accuracy with which the rooms were modeled, or the accuracy of the radiosity approach, were difficult to draw. The results suggest that radiosity predicts room sound fields with some accuracy, at least as well as diffuse ray tracing and, in general, better than specular ray tracing. The predictions of detailed echograms are less accurate, those of derived room-acoustical parameters more accurate. The results underline the need to develop experimental methods for accurately characterizing the absorptive and reflective characteristics of room surfaces, possible including phase. PMID:16938969

  17. WATER TEMPERATURE DYNAMICS IN EXPERIMENTAL FIELD CHANNELS: ANALYSIS AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is on water temperature dynamics in the shallow field channels of the USEPA Monticello Ecological Research Station (MERS). The hydraulic and temperature environment in the MERS channels was measured and simulated to provide some background for several biological studie...

  18. Experimental study and evaluation of radioprotective drugs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, D. E.; Thomson, J. F.

    1968-01-01

    Experimental study evaluates radioprotective drugs administered before exposure either orally or intravenously. Specifically studied are the sources of radiation, choice of radiation dose, choice of animals, administration of drugs, the toxicity of protective agents and types of protective drug.

  19. Experimental Study of Olivine-rich Troctolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, S.; Faul, U.

    2014-12-01

    This experimental study is designed to complement field observations of olivine-rich troctolites in ophiolites and from mid-ocean ridges. The olivine-rich troctolites are characterized by high volume proportion of olivine with interstitial plagioclase and clinopyroxene. Typically the clinopyroxene occurs in the form of few large, poikilitic grains. The primary purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of cooling process on the geometry of the interstitial phases (clinopyroxene and plagioclase). Experiments are conducted in a piston cylinder apparatus by first annealing olivine plus a basaltic melt with a composition designed to be in equilibrium with four phases at ~ 1 GPa and 1250ºC. Initially, we anneal the olivine-basalt aggregates at 1350 °C and 0.7 GPa for one week to produce a steady state microstructure. At this temperature only olivine and minor opx are present as crystalline phases. We then cool the samples over two weeks below their solidus temperature, following different protocols. The post-run samples are sectioned, polished, and imaged at high resolution and analyzed by using a field emission SEM. Initial observations show that under certain conditions clinopyroxene nucleates distributed throughout the aggregate at many sites, forming relatively small, rounded to near euhedral grains. Under certain conditions few cpx grains nucleate and grow with a poikilitic shape, partially or fully enclosing olivine grains, as is observed in natural samples. As for partially molten aggregates quenched form the annealing temperature, the microstructure will be characterized by tracing phase boundaries on screen by using ImageJ software. The geometry of the interstitial phases will be quantified by determining the grain boundary wetness, in this case the ratio of the length of polyphase to single phase (olivine-olivine) boundaries. Compositional data will also be used to study the change in major element compositions before and after the cooling process.

  20. Experimental and theoretical studies in nonlinear aeroelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, Peter Joseph

    Experimental and theoretical studies are conducted in the field of nonlinear aeroelasticity. Specifically two aeroelastic configurations, a flapping flag and a delta wing, are investigated and correlations between theory and experiment are presented. Two nonlinear structural theories are used to describe the structural behavior of the two models which are studied. The delta wing structural behavior is modeled using the nonlinear plate theory of von Karman. The nonlinearity in this model is due to the coupling between the out-of-plane and in-plane deflections and the model allows for moderately large out-of-plane plate deflections. The flapping flag structural model is a nonlinear beam theory which includes nonlinearities due to both large curvature and inertia. The axial deflection in this model is related to the out-of-plane deflection using an axially inextensible theory. The aerodynamic theory used is potential flow theory, which is applicable to low speed flows. The equation which describes potential flow is the Laplace equation, which is a linear partial differential equation. The Laplace equation is solved using a vortex lattice method. Aeroelastic solutions are found using both the classic small disturbance linearized fluid-structure interface boundary condition and the exact nonlinear boundary condition. The aeroelastic model which includes the nonlinear boundary conditions also includes a free wake solution. Several reduced order methods are explored. Normal mode solutions, both for the structural and aerodynamic models, are studied along with a proper orthogonal decomposition model for the aerodynamic flow. A brief description of a parallel implementation of the aeroelastic simulation code is also given and the parallel speedup is shown to be nearly linear for a certain class of problems. Correlation between theory and experiment is presented for both the delta wing and flapping flag model. Several steady angle of attack cases were investigated for the

  1. Synchronization in coupled Ikeda delay systems. Experimental observations using Field Programmable Gate Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valli, D.; Muthuswamy, B.; Banerjee, S.; Ariffin, M. R. K.; Wahab, A. W. A.; Ganesan, K.; Subramaniam, C. K.; Kurths, J.

    2014-06-01

    In this work, we demonstrate the use of a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as a physical platform for realizing chaotic delay differential equations (DDE). Moreover, using our platform, we also experimentally study the synchronization between two time delayed systems. We illustrate two different experimental approaches - one is hardware co-simulation (using a Digilent Atlys with a Xilinx Spartan-6 FPGA) and the other is analog output (using a Terasic DE2-115 with an Altera Cyclone IV E FPGA).

  2. Experimental Study of Lift-Generated Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossow, Vernon J.; Nixon, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The flow fields of vortices, whether bouyancy-driven or lift-generated, are fascinating fluid-dynamic phenomena which often possess intense swirl velocities and complex time-dependent behavior. As part of the on-going study of vortex behavior, this paper presents a historical overview of the research conducted on the structure and modification of the vortices generated by the lifting surfaces of subsonic transport aircraft. It is pointed out that the characteristics of lift-generated vortices are related to the aerodynamic shapes that produce them and that various arrangements of surfaces can be used to produce different vortex structures. The primary purpose of the research to be described is to find a way to reduce the hazard potential of lift-generated vortices shed by subsonic transport aircraft in the vicinity of airports during landing and takeoff operations. It is stressed that lift-generated vortex wakes are so complex that progress towards a solution requires application of a combined theoretical and experimental research program because either alone often leads to incorrect conclusions. It is concluded that a satisfactory aerodynamic solution to the wake-vortex problem at airports has not yet been found but a reduction in the impact of the wake-vortex hazard on airport capacity may become available in the foreseeable future through wake-vortex avoidance concepts currently under study. The material to be presented in this overview is drawn from aerospace journals that are available publicly.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND INSTRUMENTATION FOR A FIELD EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report concerns the design of a field experiment for a military setting in which the effects of carbon monoxide on neurobehavioral variables are to be studied. ield experiment is distinguished from a survey by the fact that independent variables are manipulated, just as in t...

  4. A far-field radio-frequency experimental exposure system with unrestrained mice.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jared W; Asif, Sajid; Singelmann, Lauren; Khan, Muhammad Saeed; Ghosh, Sumit; Gustad, Tom; Doetkott, Curt; Braaten, Benjamin D; Ewert, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have been performed on exploring the effects of radio-frequency (RF) energy on biological function in vivo. In particular, gene expression results have been inconclusive due, in part, to a lack of a standardized experimental procedure. This research describes a new far field RF exposure system for unrestrained murine models that reduces experimental error. The experimental procedure includes the materials used, the creation of a patch antenna, the uncertainty analysis of the equipment, characterization of the test room, experimental equipment used and setup, power density and specific absorption rate experiment, and discussion. The result of this research is an experimental exposure system to be applied to future biological studies. PMID:26558172

  5. Experimental and simulation studies of alignment marks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Alfred K. K.; Doi, Takeshi; Dunn, Diana D.; Neureuther, Andrew R.

    1991-07-01

    The roles of alignment mark structure, geometry, film materials and scanned illumination image on dark-field alignment signal quality are investigated through simulation interpreted experiments. The illumination of the alignment system consists of a low numerical aperture 1.0 micrometers image of a slit at 488.0 and 514.5 nm which is scanned across the alignment mark. The light scattered into a dark-band protected cone is collected. The structures consist of 0.5 to 1.2 micrometers wide features including trenches in silicon coated with 1.34 micrometers of photoresist, and trenches in nitride coated silicon with 1.00 micrometers of photoresist. For simulation, the illumination image is calculated using SAMPLE and input to a massively parallel finite-difference time-domain scattering analysis program called TEMPEST at various lateral shifts to simulate scanning. The diffracted orders output from TEMPEST are used to calculate total diffracted energy in various angular bands and to view dark field instantaneous images. Studied of depth, width, thin-film stack and coating thickness are used to identify key phenomena such as the role of interference between reflection from the alignment mark and substrate surfaces. Simulations are used to interpret the experimental observations and provide guidelines for topography control, and illumination and collection optics. The alignment signal is shown to be a strong function of trench depth, and only a weak function of trench width. An order of magnitude signal strength reduction occurs when the effective optical depth of the trench is a multiple of (lambda) resist/2 compared to the surrounding area.

  6. Experimental Modeling of Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy. An Experimental Morphological Study.

    PubMed

    Khoroshilova-Maslova, I P; Leparskaya, N L; Nabieva, M M; Andreeva, L D

    2015-05-01

    A model of proliferative vitreoretinopathy induced by simultaneous intravitreal injection of recombinant IL-1β and platelet concentrate is created and its main morphological manifestations are studied on Chinchilla rabbits. The model reflects pathogenesis of proliferative vitreoretinopathy: epiretinal membrane with the formation of retinal plication, traction detachment of the retina; moderate inflammatory reaction in the uveal tract, in the optic nerve infundibulum, in the vitreous body; intact structural elements of the retina, dissociation of the retinal pigmented epithelium cells with their subsequent migration. The model is adequate to the clinical picture of proliferative vitreoretinopathy in humans, which recommends it for experimental studies of the efficiency of drug therapy and prevention of this disease. PMID:26033599

  7. Experimental analysis of a new retarding field energy analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yu-Xiang; Liu, Shu-Qing; Li, Xian-Xia; Shen, Hong-Li; Huang, Ming-Guang; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a new compact retarding field energy analyzer (RFEA) is designed for diagnosing electron beams of a K-band space travelling-wave tube (TWT). This analyzer has an aperture plate to sample electron beams and a cylindrical electrode to overcome the defocusing effects. The front end of the analyzer constructed as a multistage depression collector (MDC) structure is intended to shape the field to prevent electrons from being accelerated to escape. The direct-current (DC) beams of the K-band space TWTs with the removing MDC can be investigated on the beam measurement system. The current density distribution of DC beams is determined by the analyzer, while the anode voltage and helix voltage of the TWTs are 7000 V and 6850 V, respectively. The current curve's slope effect due to the reflection of secondary electrons on the copper collector of the analyzer is discussed. The experimental analysis shows this RFEA has a good energy resolution to satisfy the requirement of beam measurement.

  8. Experimental studies of gravity with slow neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Ichikawa, Go; Hirota, Katsuya; Shimizu, Hirohiko; Sumi, Naoyuki; Matsumoto, Satoru; Yoshioka, Tamaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Mishima, Kenji; Ino, Takashi; Seki, Yoshichika

    2014-09-01

    Neutron is a chargeless massive particle with the lifetime in the macroscopic range, which is suitable for precision measurement of the small influence of new physics including gravity. We have started the experimental studies of the gravity with slow neutrons in order to search non-Newtonian effect at the short range which is lead by the existence of extra-dimension of the space. Combination of the pulsed neutrons provided by J-PARC and the advanced optical devices enables us to perform new types of high precision measurements. Neutron scattering with noble gas target enables us to measure the interaction at the range of the order of 1 nm. The apparatus was installed into beamline NOP and commissioning has been started. Neutron interferometer has the advantage to measure the gravitational potential precisely. We are developing the large-scale interferometer using long-wavelength neutrons, which is realized by using multilayer mirrors. Ultra-cold neutrons in a small cavity can be bound to the discrete energy eigenstates by Earth's gravitational field. We are discussing the direct measurement of the spatial localization of the neutrons with high resolution detectors, for example, CCD and nuclear emulation.

  9. Experimental study and modeling of a novel magnetorheological elastomer isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jian; Du, Haiping; Li, Weihua; Li, Yancheng; Li, Jianchun; Sun, Shuaishuai; Deng, H. X.

    2013-11-01

    This paper reports an experimental setup aiming at evaluating the performance of a newly designed magnetorheological elastomer (MRE) seismic isolator. As a further effort to explore the field-dependent stiffness/damping properties of the MRE isolator, a series of experimental testing were conducted. Based upon the analysis of the experimental responses and the characteristics of the MRE isolator, a new model that is capable of reproducing the unique MRE isolator dynamics behaviors is proposed. The validation results verify the model’s effectiveness to portray the MRE isolator. A study on the field-dependent parameters is then provided to make the model valid with fluctuating magnetic fields. To fully explore the mechanism of the proposed model, an investigation relating the dependence of the proposed model on every parameter is carried out.

  10. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.

    2000-01-01

    The research carried out in the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the Johns Hopkins University was motivated by previous studies indicating that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 when compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. Imposing an external electric field holds the promise to improve pool boiling heat transfer in low gravity, since a phase separation force other than gravity is introduced. The influence of electric fields on bubble formation has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically.

  11. Experimental Investigation on Sandstone Rock Permeability of Pakistan Gas Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Arshad; Bing, Chua Han; Nagarajan, Ramasamy; Hamid, Mohamed Ali

    2015-04-01

    Permeability is the ability of formation to produce hydrocarbon which is affected by compaction, pore size, sorting, cementation, layering and clay swelling. The effect of texture on permeability in term of grain size, sorting, sphericity, degree of cementing has been reported in literature. Also, the effect of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, displacement pressure and pore geometry constant has been studied separately. This preliminary study presents the experimental results of eight samples to understand the effect of similar factors of texture on permeability. With the knowledge of the results, it can be said that the effect of grain size, cementation, texture material, sphericity, and porosity can't be observed on permeability except sorting when less than ten samples are considered from different depositional environment. The results also show the impact of permeability on capillary pressure, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure and pore geometry index as similar as published in the literature.

  12. Experimental design of a waste glass study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Redgate, P.E.; Hrma, P.

    1995-04-01

    A Composition Variation Study (CVS) is being performed to support a future high-level waste glass plant at Hanford. A total of 147 glasses, covering a broad region of compositions melting at approximately 1150{degrees}C, were tested in five statistically designed experimental phases. This paper focuses on the goals, strategies, and techniques used in designing the five phases. The overall strategy was to investigate glass compositions on the boundary and interior of an experimental region defined by single- component, multiple-component, and property constraints. Statistical optimal experimental design techniques were used to cover various subregions of the experimental region in each phase. Empirical mixture models for glass properties (as functions of glass composition) from previous phases wee used in designing subsequent CVS phases.

  13. [Experimental and clinical studies of flomoxef in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Representative Committee Members of the Research Team for Infections in the Field of Obstetrics and Gynecology].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, S; Okada, H; Ninomiya, K; Shimizu, T; Noda, K; Deguchi, K

    1988-12-01

    Flomoxef (FMOX) has a broad antibacterial spectrum against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; especially its potent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus is a significant advantage that may not be found with other cephem compounds. In our determination of its antibacterial potency against various clinical isolates obtained from clinical materials (amniotic fluid, intrauterine secretions, exudates of the pelvic dead space) of patients with various infections, we obtained results representing specific features of this drug. From the results, the drug may be expected to produce an excellent effect in the treatment of various infections. Our study on drug concentrations in body fluids and genital tissues demonstrated a good transfer of this drug into various tissues; in every tissue examined, the drug administered by the usual method in the usual dose yielded a concentration exceeding MIC for principal pathogens, thus promising a good clinical response. Indeed a high clinical efficacy rate of 90.1% (good to very good responses) was obtained in a clinical trial involving 222 cases. Administration of the drug in 2 g quantity daily produced a high response rate of 92.8%. It was especially noteworthy that a good response was obtained in 30 of 32 cases (93.8%) in which other cephem compounds had failed. In evaluation of the bacteriological effect, furthermore, the drug showed an excellent rate of bacterial elimination. In conclusion, this drug is expected to be greatly useful in the light of its good transfer into genital tissues and its strong antibacterial activities against Gram-positive cocci, Gram-negative bacteria and anaerobes as well as against multiple bacterial infections predominating among women with genital infections. PMID:3074181

  14. (Studies in quantum field theory)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the period 4/1/89--3/31/90 the theoretical physics group supported by Department of Energy Contract No. AC02-78ER04915.A015 and consisting of Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Senior Research Associate Visser has made progress in many areas of theoretical and mathematical physics. Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Research Associate Visser are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including OCD; studies of the early universe and inflation, and quantum gravity.

  15. Field experimental observations of highly graded sediment plumes.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jacob Hjelmager; Saremi, Sina; Jimenez, Carlos; Hadjioannou, Louis

    2015-06-15

    A field experiment in the waters off the south-eastern coast of Cyprus was carried out to study near-field formation of sediment plumes from dumping. Different loads of sediment were poured into calm and limpid waters one at the time from just above the sea surface. The associated plumes, gravitating towards the seafloor, were filmed simultaneously by four divers situated at different depths in the water column, and facing the plume at different angles. The processes were captured using GoPro-Hero-series cameras. The high-quality underwater footage from near-surface, mid-depth and near-bed positions gives unique insight into the dynamics of the descending plume and near-field dispersion processes, and enables good understanding of flow and sediment transport processes involved from-release-to-deposition of the load in a non-scaled environment. The high resolution images and footages are available through the link provided herein. Observations support the development of a detailed multi-fractional sediment plume model. PMID:25935811

  16. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, John

    1999-01-01

    This termination report covers the latter part of a single research effort spanning several grant cycles. During this time there was a single title, "Experimental and Modeling Studies of Massif Anorthosites", but there were several contract numbers as the mode and location of NASA contract administration changed. Initially, the project was funded as an increment to the PI's other grant, "Early Differentiation of the Moon: Experimental and Modeling Studies", but subsequently it became an independent grant. Table 1 contains a brief summary of the dates and contract numbers.

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies of elementary physics

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, A.; Ferbel, T.; Melissinos, A.C.; Olsen, S.; Slattery, P.; Tipton, P.; Das, A.; Hagen, C.R.; Rajeev, S.G.; Okubo, S.

    1992-04-30

    The experimental high energy physics program is directed toward the execution of experiments that probe the basic constituents of matter and the forces between them. These experiments are carried out at national and international accelerator facilities. At the current time, we are primarily concentrating on the following projects: Direct photon production in hadronic reactions (Fermilab E706); Production of hybrid mesons in the nuclear Coulomb field; The D-Zero experiment at the Tevatron collider; Deep inelastic neutrino- and electron-nucleon scattering at FNAL and SLAC; Nonlinear QED at critical field strengths at SLAC; The Experiments at KEK (AMY, 17keV neutrino); The CDF experiment at the Tevatron collider; and SSC-related detector R D on scintillating tile- and diamond-based calorimetry and microstrip tracking detectors.

  18. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  19. Experimental and computational study of thaumasite structure

    SciTech Connect

    Scholtzová, Eva; Kucková, Lenka; Kožíšek, Jozef; Pálková, Helena; Tunega, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    The structure of thaumasite has been studied experimentally by means of a single crystal X-ray diffraction and FTIR methods, and theoretically using density functional theory (DFT) method. Very good agreement was achieved between calculated and experimental structural parameters. In addition, calculations offered the refinement of the positions of the hydrogen atoms. The detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds existing in the thaumasite structure has been performed. Several types of hydrogen bonds have been classified. The water molecules coordinating Ca{sup 2+} cation act as proton donors in moderate O-H···O hydrogen bonds formed with CO₃⁻²and SO₄⁻² anions. The multiple O-H···O hydrogen bonds exist among water molecules themselves. Finally, relatively weak hydrogen bonds form water molecules with the OH groups from the coordination sphere of the Si(OH)₆⁻² anion. Further, calculated vibrational spectrum allowed complete assignment of all vibrational modes which are not available from the experimental spectrum that has a complex structure with overlapped bands, especially below 1500 cm⁻¹. Highlights: • The thaumasite structure was studied experimentally and using DFT method. • We used DFT method for the refinement of the positions of hydrogen atoms. • A detailed analysis of the hydrogen bonds was done. • A complete assignment of all bands to particular types of vibrations was done.

  20. Experimental Visualization of Bubble Formation from an Orifice In Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, C.; Iacona, E.; Foldes, I. B.; Suner, G.; Milburn, C.

    2002-01-01

    The formation of air bubbles injected into a stagnant, isothermal liquid in microgravity through an orifice was studied. The bubbles grew very large in microgravity. They attained a nearly spherical shape and showed pronounced affinity towards coalescence in the absence of electric fields and other perturbations. Under the influence of electric fields, periodic detachment was observed, with bubble sizes larger than in terrestrial conditions. The bubble shape was elongated. After detachment, the bubbles moved away from the electrode at which they formed without coalescing with other bubbles. Experimental data on bubble shape and size at detachment showed good agreement with models.

  1. Experimental Investigation of Effectiveness of Magnetic Field on Food Freezing Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toru; Takeuchi, Yuri; Masuda, Kazunori; Watanabe, Manabu; Shirakashi, Ryo; Fukuda, Yutaka; Tsuruta, Takaharu; Yamamoto, Kazutaka; Koga, Nobumitsu; Hiruma, Naoya; Ichioka, Jun; Takai, Kiyoshi

    Recently, several food refrigeration equipments that utilize magnetic field have attracted much attention from food production companies, consumers and mass media. However, the effectiveness of the freezers is not scientifically examined. Therefore, the effectiveness should be clarified by experiments or theoretical considerations. In this study, the effect of weak magnetic field (about 0.0005 T) on freezing process of several kinds of foods was investigated by using a specially designed freezer facilitated with magnetic field generator. The investigation included the comparison of freezing curves, drip amount, physicochemical evaluations on color and texture, observation of microstructure, and sensory evaluation. From the results of the control experiments, it can be concluded that weak magnetic field around 0.0005 T provided no significant difference on temperature history during freezing and on the qualities of frozen foods, within our experimental conditions.

  2. The importance of accurate experimental data to marginal field development

    SciTech Connect

    Overa, S.J.; Lingelem, M.N.

    1997-12-31

    Since exploration started in the Norwegian North Sea in 1965 a total of 196 fields have been discovered. Less than one-third of these fields have been developed. The marginal fields can not be developed economically with current technology even though some of those fields have significant reserves. The total cost to develop one of those large installations is estimated to be 2--5 billion US dollars. Therefore new technology is needed to lower the designed and installed costs of each unit. The need for new physical property data is shown. The value of valid operating data from present units is also pointed out.

  3. A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study of Doped Polypyrrole.

    PubMed

    Fonner, John M; Schmidt, Christine E; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-10-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a biocompatible, electrically conductive polymer that has great potential for battery, sensor, and neural implant applications. Its amorphous structure and insolubility, however, limit the experimental techniques available to study its structure and properties at the atomic level. Previous theoretical studies of PPy in bulk are also scarce. Using ab initio calculations, we have constructed a molecular mechanics force field of chloride-doped PPy (PPyCl) and undoped PPy. This model has been designed to integrate into the OPLS force field, and parameters are available for the Gromacs and TINKER software packages. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of bulk PPy and PPyCl have been performed using this force field, and the effects of chain packing and electrostatic scaling on the bulk polymer density have been investigated. The density of flotation of PPyCl films has been measured experimentally. Amorphous X-ray diffraction of PPyCl was obtained and correlated with atomic structures sampled from MD simulations. The force field reported here is foundational for bridging the gap between experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for PPy based materials. PMID:21052521

  4. A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Experimental Study of Doped Polypyrrole

    PubMed Central

    Fonner, John M.; Schmidt, Christine E.; Ren, Pengyu

    2010-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) is a biocompatible, electrically conductive polymer that has great potential for battery, sensor, and neural implant applications. Its amorphous structure and insolubility, however, limit the experimental techniques available to study its structure and properties at the atomic level. Previous theoretical studies of PPy in bulk are also scarce. Using ab initio calculations, we have constructed a molecular mechanics force field of chloride-doped PPy (PPyCl) and undoped PPy. This model has been designed to integrate into the OPLS force field, and parameters are available for the Gromacs and TINKER software packages. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of bulk PPy and PPyCl have been performed using this force field, and the effects of chain packing and electrostatic scaling on the bulk polymer density have been investigated. The density of flotation of PPyCl films has been measured experimentally. Amorphous X-ray diffraction of PPyCl was obtained and correlated with atomic structures sampled from MD simulations. The force field reported here is foundational for bridging the gap between experimental measurements and theoretical calculations for PPy based materials. PMID:21052521

  5. Experimental evidence for seismoelectric observations at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzhauer, Julia; Yaramanci, Ugur

    2010-05-01

    In the past decades, seismoelectric has concentrated a growing interest as a promising tool for hydrogeophysical studies. Resulting from an electrokinetic coupling in porous saturated media traversed by an acoustic wave, this method could ultimately offer a direct access to various hydraulic parameters ranging from porosity to permeability or fluids conductivity. In some other aspects it also occasionally showed some ability to thin-layer resolution. Within the development of the new test-site Schillerslage with typical north-German geology, consisting of two shallow quaternary aquifers separated by a till layer over cretaceous marl, we tested the observability of the seismoelectric signal along with various conventional (seismic, georadar, geoelectric) and unconventional (magnetic resonance sounding -MRS, spectral induced polarisation -SIP) geophysical methods as well as boreholes analysis. The special focus was on the converted seismoelectric signal, an electromagnetic wave acting as a vertical dipole which should theoretically display on the seismoelectrogram as a horizontal arrival. This converted wave appears when the incident acoustic wave meets a hydraulic discontinuity affecting the pore space in any geometrical or chemical manner. This electromagnetic signal fades out rapidly, due to its dipole nature and its weakness, so that its relevance is restricted to the near surface characterisation. In the given setting, such a wave could either initiate at the water table or originate from an abrupt transition from sand to till. Decision was made to record both seismic and seismoelectric signal concomitantly. To allow the detection of the later signal, the field layout was gradually adjusted. Considering the source, hammer-seismic was chosen for its precision in near surface application and automatic trigger-techniques producing major disturbances in the first 10 ms of the seismoelectrogram were abandoned in favour of manual triggering. To avoid any further noise

  6. An experimental study of the glottal jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasikova, Darina; Sidlof, Petr; Kotek, Michal; Kopecky, Vaclav

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of the flow field analysis in a static scaled model of human larynx. Here we are focused on the effect of the nozzle gap parameter and the incoming flow velocity. The study is performed in the aerodynamic channel using the PIV technique.

  7. [Experimental study of pinostrobine oxime biotransformation].

    PubMed

    Sariev, A K; Abaimov, D A; Tankevich, M V; Prokhorov, D I; Adekenov, S M; Arystan, L I; Seĭfulla, R D

    2014-01-01

    We have experimentally studied pathways of elimination of an oximized derivative of phytoflavonoid pinostrobine by HPLC/mass spectrometry. Four potential metabolites of pinostrobine oxime have been found and there was an attempt to determine their molecular structures on the basis of their fragmentation under positive electrospray ionization conditions. It is established that pinostrobine oxime is removed from the organism mainly unchanged and also in the form of glucuronated derivative. PMID:25335390

  8. Real versus Simulated Mobile Phone Exposures in Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J.; Johansson, Olle; Carlo, George L.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether exposures to mobile phone radiation in biological/clinical experiments should be performed with real-life Electromagnetic Fields (EMFs) emitted by commercially available mobile phone handsets, instead of simulated EMFs emitted by generators or test phones. Real mobile phone emissions are constantly and unpredictably varying and thus are very different from simulated emissions which employ fixed parameters and no variability. This variability is an important parameter that makes real emissions more bioactive. Living organisms seem to have decreased defense against environmental stressors of high variability. While experimental studies employing simulated EMF-emissions present a strong inconsistency among their results with less than 50% of them reporting effects, studies employing real mobile phone exposures demonstrate an almost 100% consistency in showing adverse effects. This consistency is in agreement with studies showing association with brain tumors, symptoms of unwellness, and declines in animal populations. Average dosimetry in studies with real emissions can be reliable with increased number of field measurements, and variation in experimental outcomes due to exposure variability becomes less significant with increased number of experimental replications. We conclude that, in order for experimental findings to reflect reality, it is crucially important that exposures be performed by commercially available mobile phone handsets. PMID:26346766

  9. Experimental Evaluation of Field Trips on Instruction in Vocational Agriculture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaslin, Norval L.

    To determine the effect of field trips on student achievement in each of four subject matter areas in vocational agriculture, 12 schools offering approved programs were randomly selected and divided into a treatment group and a control group. Uniform teaching outlines and reference materials were provided to each group. While no field trips were…

  10. Feasibility study of the AOSTA experimental campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carta, M.; Blaise, P.; Bethaz, C.; Boccia, F.; Fabrizio, V.; Geslot, B.; Grossi, A.; Gruel, A.

    2016-03-01

    The reduction of the nuclear waste is one of the most important nuclear issues. The high radiotoxicity of the spent fuel is due to plutonium and some minor actinides (MAs) such as neptunium, americium and curium, above all. One way to reduce their hazard is to destroy by fission MAs in appropriate nuclear reactors. To allow the MAs destruction an important effort have been done on the nuclear data due to the poor knowledge in this field. In the framework of one of the NEA Expert Group on Integral Experiments for Minor Actinide Management an analysis of the feasibility of MAs irradiation campaign in the TAPIRO fast research reactor is carried out. This paper provides preliminary results obtained by calculations modelling the irradiation, in different TAPIRO irradiation channels, of some CEA samples coming from the French experimental campaign OSMOSE, loaded with different contents of MAs, in order to access, through particular peak spectrometry, to their capture cross section. On the basis of neutron transport calculation results, obtained by both deterministic and Monte Carlo methods, an estimate of the irradiated samples counting levels from the AOSTA (Activation of OSMOSE Samples in TAPIRO) experimental campaign is provided.

  11. Theoretical and experimental studies of reentry plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. G.; Kang, S.

    1973-01-01

    A viscous shock-layer analysis was developed and used to calculate nonequilibrium-flow species distributions in the plasma layer of the RAM vehicle. The theoretical electron-density results obtained are in good agreement with those measured in flight. A circular-aperture flush-mounted antenna was used to obtain a comparison between theoretical and experimental antenna admittance in the presence of ionized boundary layers of low collision frequency. The electron-temperature and electron-density distributions in the boundary layer were independently measured. The antenna admittance was measured using a four-probe microwave reflectometer and these measured values were found to be in good agreement with those predicted. Measurements were also performed with another type of circular-aperture antenna and good agreement was obtained between the calculations and the experimental results. A theoretical analysis has been completed which permits calculation of the nonequilibrium, viscous shock-layer flow field for a sphere-cone body. Results are presented for two different bodies at several different altitudes illustrating the influences of bluntness and chemical nonequilibrium on several gas dynamic parameters of interest. Plane-wave transmission coefficients were calculated for an approximate space-shuttle body using a typical trajectory.

  12. Field emission study of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin

    Recently, carbon nanosheets (CNS), a novel nanostructure, were developed in our laboratory as a field emission source for high emission current. To characterize, understand and improve the field emission properties of CNS, a ultra-high vacuum surface analysis system was customized to conduct relevant experimental research in four distinct areas. The system includes Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), field emission energy spectroscopy (FEES), field emission I-V testing, and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Firstly, commercial Mo single tips were studied to calibrate the customized system. AES and FEES experiments indicate that a pyramidal nanotip of Ca and O elements formed on the Mo tip surface by field induced surface diffusion. Secondly, field emission I-V testing on CNS indicates that the field emission properties of pristine nanosheets are impacted by adsorbates. For instance, in pristine samples, field emission sources can be built up instantaneously and be characterized by prominent noise levels and significant current variations. However, when CNS are processed via conditioning (run at high current), their emission properties are greatly improved and stabilized. Furthermore, only H2 desorbed from the conditioned CNS, which indicates that only H adsorbates affect emission. Thirdly, the TDS study on nanosheets revealed that the predominant locations of H residing in CNS are sp2 hybridized C on surface and bulk. Fourthly, a fabricating process was developed to coat low work function ZrC on nanosheets for field emission enhancement. The carbide triple-peak in the AES spectra indicated that Zr carbide formed, but oxygen was not completely removed. The Zr(CxOy) coating was dispersed as nanobeads on the CNS surface. Although the work function was reduced, the coated CNS emission properties were not improved due to an increased beta factor. Further analysis suggest that for low emission current (<1 uA), the H adsorbates affect emission by altering the work

  13. Plant Taxonomy as a Field Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalby, D. H.

    1970-01-01

    Suggests methods of teaching plant identification and taxonomic theory using keys, statistical analyses, and biometrics. Population variation, genotype- environment interaction and experimental taxonomy are used in laboratory and field. (AL)

  14. Experimental study of the chaotic waterwheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutherford, George; Erxleben, Amy; Rosa, Epaminondas, Jr.

    2007-03-01

    The chaotic waterwheel is often given as an example of a mechanical system that can exhibit chaotic behavior. Its early demonstration by Malkus and the realization that it can be modeled by the Lorenz equations has secured it a prominent place in almost every general presentation of chaos. It seems quite surprising, then, that no experimental investigations of this textbook system have ever been published. To fill this historic gap, and to initiate an experimental study of this incredibly rich dynamic system, our lab has constructed a research-grade waterwheel consisting of a vacuum-formed polycarbonate frame in which 36 cylindrical cells are mounted on an 18 inch diameter. The wheel and its axis can be tilted, and water is fed into the top of the wheel and drains out through thin tubes at the bottom of each cell. An aluminum skirt at the wheel's periphery passes through a variable gap magnet to provide magnetic braking. Angular time series data are collected with an absolute rotary encoder. The data are smoothed and angular velocity and acceleration are calculated via fast fourier transforms. The data show quasi-uniform rotation as well as periodic and chaotic motion and agree fairly well with computer simulations of the idealized wheel equations. We will discuss differences between the experimental data and the simulation predictions as well as plans for future studies.

  15. Experimental realization of a silicon spin field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Biqin; Monsma, Douwe J.; Appelbaum, Ian

    2007-08-01

    A longitudinal electric field is used to control the transit time (through an undoped silicon vertical channel) of spin-polarized electrons precessing in a perpendicular magnetic field. Since an applied voltage determines the final spin direction at the spin detector and hence the output collector current, this comprises a spin field-effect transistor. An improved hot-electron spin injector providing ≈115% magnetocurrent, corresponding to at least ≈37% electron current spin polarization after transport through 10μm undoped single-crystal silicon, is used for maximum current modulation.

  16. Experimental Study of Athermal Elastic Network Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Jonathan; Yunker, Peter

    Recently, significant theoretical effort has been directed towards understanding the mechanics of networks. Elastic networks are of inherent fundamental interest and serve as useful analogs for describing other physical systems. Recent applications include modeling of collagen and descriptions of jamming in granular media and glass formation. I propose to discuss ongoing experimental efforts to study mechanical properties of elastic networks, such as Young's modulus and ultimate strength, in the athermal limit. I will begin with the simple case of regular, isostatic crystalline lattices and proceed to studies of random, connected elastic networks of varying bond number for a given number of lattice sites, including both isostatic and sub-isostatic networks.

  17. Experimental study of curved guide tubes for pellet injection

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, S.K.; Baylor, L.R.; Foust, C.R.; Gouge, M.J.; Jernigan, T.C.; Milora, S.L.

    1997-12-01

    The use of curved guide tubes for transporting frozen hydrogen pellets offers great flexibility for pellet injection into plasma devices. While this technique has been previously employed, an increased interest in its applicability has been generated with the recent ASDEX Upgrade experimental data for magnetic high-field side (HFS) pellet injection. In these innovative experiments, the pellet penetration appeared to be significantly deeper than for the standard magnetic low-field side injection scheme, along with corresponding greater fueling efficiencies. Thus, some of the major experimental fusion devices are planning experiments with HFS pellet injection. Because of the complex geometries of experimental fusion devices, installations with multiple curved guide tube sections will be required for HFS pellet injection. To more thoroughly understand and document the capability of curved guide tubes, an experimental study is under way at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In particular, configurations and pellet parameters applicable for the DIII-D tokamak and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) were simulated in laboratory experiments. Initial test results with nominal 2.7- and 10-mm-diam deuterium pellets are presented and discussed.

  18. Determining Pressure and Velocity Fields from Experimental Schlieren Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Frank M.; Allshouse, Michael R.; Morrison, P. J.; Swinney, Harry L.

    2015-11-01

    Internal gravity waves generated by tidal flow over bottom topography in the ocean are important because they contribute significantly to the energy composition of the ocean. Determination of the instantaneous internal wave energy flux requires knowledge of the pressure and velocity fields, each of which is difficult to measure in the ocean or the laboratory. However, the density perturbation field can be measured using a laboratory technique known as ``synthetic schlieren.'' We present an analytical method for deducing both the pressure and velocity fields from the density perturbation field. This yields the instantaneous energy flux of linear internal waves. Our method is verified in tests with data from a Navier-Stokes direct numerical simulation. The method is then applied to laboratory schlieren data obtained for the conditions in the numerical simulations. MRA and HLS were supported by ONR. FML and PJM supported by DOE contract DE-FG02-04ER-54742.

  19. Experimental and computational investigation of the patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm pressure field.

    PubMed

    Antón, R; Chen, C-Y; Hung, M-Y; Finol, E A; Pekkan, K

    2015-07-01

    The objective of the present manuscript is three-fold: (i) to study the detailed pressure field inside a patient-specific abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) model experimentally and numerically and discuss its clinical relevance, (ii) to validate a number of possible numerical model options and their ability to predict the experimental pressure field and (iii) to compare the spatial pressure drop in the AAA before and after the formation of intraluminal thrombus (ILT) for a late disease development timeline. A finite volume method was used to solve the governing equations of fluid flow to simulate the flow dynamics in a numerical model of the AAA. Following our patient-specific anatomical rapid prototyping technique, physical models of the aneurysm were created with seven ports for pressure measurement along the blood flow path. A flow loop operating with a blood analogue fluid was used to replicate the patient-specific flow conditions, acquired with phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging, and measure pressure in the flow model. The Navier-Stokes equations and two turbulent models were implemented numerically to compare the pressure estimations with experimental measurements. The relative pressure difference from experiments obtained with the best performing model (unsteady laminar simulation) was ∼1.1% for the AAA model without ILT and ∼15.4% for the AAA model with ILT (using Reynolds Stress Model). Future investigations should include validation of the 3D velocity field and wall shear stresses within the AAA sac predicted by the three numerical models. PMID:24460046

  20. Continuous game dynamics: an experimental study.

    SciTech Connect

    Patelli, P.; Sato, Yuzuru

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study an experiment with human agents strategically interacting in a game characterized by continuous time and continuous strategy space. The research is focused in studying the agents interaction dynamic under different experimental settings. The agents play a two person game that is an extension of the classic Cournot duopoly. Having agents making decision continuously allows us to track the temporal structure of strategy evolution very precisely. We can follow the agents continuous behavior evolution avoiding the data under-sampling. To our knowledge this is the first attempt to approach experimentally the continuous time decision making. We also emphasize that the focus of our work is not the Cournot model but rather the more general problem of studying the agents strategic interaction dynamic in continuous space time. Flaming the problem as the well studied Cournot Duopoly would be a good starting point. In economics dynamics studies the oligopoly model literature in both discrete and continuous time is one of the richest. There is also a vast literature in experimental economics about repeated games in general and more specifically in duopoly/oligopoly models. Cox and Walker studied whether subjects can learn to play the Cournot Duopoly strategies comparing the experimental results with the theoretical prediction of learning models. The Cox Walker experiment differs from our settings because it is in discrete time and is an evolutionary dynamics framework through a random matching mechanism of the experimental subjects. From the theoretical perspective many works have been focused in studying the Cournot model in a dynamical settings. Okuguchi and Szidarovsky formulated a continuous time version of the Cournot Oligopoly with multiproduct firms. They analyzed the stability of the equilibrium and proved that it is stable, under certain conditions, independently from the value of the adjustments. Chiarella and Khomin extended this analysis to

  1. Experimental study of low frequency drift instability

    SciTech Connect

    Ioffe, M.S.; Kanaev, B.I.; Pastukhov, V.P.

    1994-05-01

    Experimental studies of nondissipative low frequency drift instability are reported; the plasma of a long mirror trap with edge casp anchors was investigated. The instability growth was found to take place only in a limited number of operation modes even in the case of all the growth requirements being satisfied. Furthermore, the instability development is rather moderate, and the associated anomalous losses appear to be small compared to the classical Coulomb losses. Possible factors accounting for the {open_quotes}soft{close_quotes} instability evolution are discussed. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  2. The experimental study on heat rejection equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Toshihiko; Atsumi, Masahiro; Tokue, Rinzo

    1992-07-01

    This paper describes the concept study and the experimental work for development of the advanced style expendable heat rejection device. Emphasis is laid on minimizing the hardware weight and using innocuous coolant. Empirical heat transfer characteristics of water spray cooling were obtained and applied to the mathematical model to evaluate the performance. Besides the development of spray nozzle, prototype model of 4 kW class evaporator was fabricated and tested. Heat rejection rate of 3.2-4.5 kW was attained at both (high/low altitude) modes of operation, and feasibility of this heat rejection device was assured.

  3. Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jian-Ping Chen

    2012-03-01

    Overview of Experimental Study of Nucleon Structure and QCD, with focus on the spin structure. Nucleon (spin) Structure provides valuable information on QCD dynamics. A decade of experiments from JLab yields these exciting results: (1) valence spin structure, duality; (2) spin sum rules and polarizabilities; (3) precision measurements of g{sub 2} - high-twist; and (4) first neutron transverse spin results - Collins/Sivers/A{sub LT}. There is a bright future as the 12 GeV Upgrade will greatly enhance our capability: (1) Precision determination of the valence quark spin structure flavor separation; and (2) Precision extraction of transversity/tensor charge/TMDs.

  4. Experimental Studying of Dust Particles Charging by Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gavrikov, A. V.; Fortov, V. E.; Petrov, O. F.; Vorona, N. A.; Vasiliev, M. N.

    2008-09-07

    The studying of the dusty plasma properties under electron beam action are of great interest because it gives the unique opportunities for experimental investigation of strongly coupled systems as well as for developing the new dusty plasma technologies of creating the new composite materials. Highly charged dust particle generates electrostatic field that can accelerate positive ions to high power. It gives the unique possibilities of using these macroparticles (for deeply ions implantation, as catalysts for increasing rate of reactions with the high energy barrier, in the new ionic engines etc.). Presented work deals with the experimental investigation of dust particles charging under direct influence of electron beam. On the basis of experimental data the average velocities of dust particles were obtained and the charge of macroparticle was estimated.

  5. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  6. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  7. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new

  8. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Mansour, Mohy; Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  9. An experimental Lagrangian study of inhomgeneous turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzenmuller, Nickolas; Mordant, Nicolas

    2015-11-01

    We investigate experimentally the Lagrangian properties of inhomogeneous turbulence in the general scope of dispersion studies in natural and industrial flows. Lagrangian studies of homogeneous turbulence are becoming common, but very little Lagrangian experimental data exists for inhomogeneous turbulence despite the vast range of applications. Particle tracking velocimetry using a very high speed camera in a fully developed turbulent channel flow in water is achieved at ReH = 33 , 000 . This technique provides Lagrangian velocity and acceleration statistics fully resolved at the smallest turbulent scales near the wall. These statistics, conditioned by the distance to the wall, allow the the investigation of the inhomogeneity of the statistical properties of this flow. Autocorrelations of velocity and acceleration show increasing Lagrangian turbulent scales as distance from the wall increases, as well as decreasing anisotropy. PDF's and moments of Lagrangian quantities are presented by showing the evolution of structure functions across the boundary layer. These results are compared to direct numerical simulation results from a similar flow, and their implications for stochastic models of inhomogeneous flows are discussed.

  10. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Itoh, K; Ido, T; Kamiya, K; Itoh, S-I; Miura, Y; Nagashima, Y; Fujisawa, A; Inagaki, S; Ida, K; Hoshino, K

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt "radial" electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson's equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude. PMID:27489128

  11. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Kamiya, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Miura, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2016-01-01

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt “radial” electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson’s equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude. PMID:27489128

  12. Experimental Identification of Electric Field Excitation Mechanisms in a Structural Transition of Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, T.; Itoh, K.; Ido, T.; Kamiya, K.; Itoh, S.-I.; Miura, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Fujisawa, A.; Inagaki, S.; Ida, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2016-08-01

    Self-regulation between structure and turbulence, which is a fundamental process in the complex system, has been widely regarded as one of the central issues in modern physics. A typical example of that in magnetically confined plasmas is the Low confinement mode to High confinement mode (L-H) transition, which is intensely studied for more than thirty years since it provides a confinement improvement necessary for the realization of the fusion reactor. An essential issue in the L-H transition physics is the mechanism of the abrupt “radial” electric field generation in toroidal plasmas. To date, several models for the L-H transition have been proposed but the systematic experimental validation is still challenging. Here we report the systematic and quantitative model validations of the radial electric field excitation mechanism for the first time, using a data set of the turbulence and the radial electric field having a high spatiotemporal resolution. Examining time derivative of Poisson’s equation, the sum of the loss-cone loss current and the neoclassical bulk viscosity current is found to behave as the experimentally observed radial current that excites the radial electric field within a few factors of magnitude.

  13. Numerical and Experimental Determination of the Geometric Far Field for Round Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle; Bridges, James; Brown, Cliff; Khavaran, Abbas

    2003-01-01

    To reduce ambiguity in the reporting of far field jet noise, three round jets operating at subsonic conditions have recently been studied at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The goal of the investigation was to determine the location of the geometric far field both numerically and experimentally. The combination of the WIND Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes solver and the MGBK jet noise prediction code was used for the computations, and the experimental data was collected in the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory. While noise sources are distributed throughout the jet plume, at great distances from the nozzle the noise will appear to be emanating from a point source and the assumption of linear propagation is valid. Closer to the jet, nonlinear propagation may be a problem, along with the known geometric issues. By comparing sound spectra at different distances from the jet, both from computational methods that assume linear propagation, and from experiments, the contributions of geometry and nonlinearity can be separately ascertained and the required measurement distance for valid experiments can be established. It is found that while the shortest arc considered here (approx. 8D) was already in the geometric far field for the high frequency sound (St greater than 2.0), the low frequency noise due to its extended source distribution reached the geometric far field at or about 50D. It is also found that sound spectra at far downstream angles does not strictly scale on Strouhal number, an observation that current modeling does not capture.

  14. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31

    Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated

  15. Improved field experimental designs and quantitative evaluation of aquatic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie, D.H.; Thomas, J.M.

    1984-05-01

    The paired-station concept and a log transformed analysis of variance were used as methods to evaluate zooplankton density data collected during five years at an electrical generation station on Lake Michigan. To discuss the example and the field design necessary for a valid statistical analysis, considerable background is provided on the questions of selecting (1) sampling station pairs, (2) experimentwise error rates for multi-species analyses, (3) levels of Type I and II error rates, (4) procedures for conducting the field monitoring program, and (5) a discussion of the consequences of violating statistical assumptions. Details for estimating sample sizes necessary to detect changes of a specified magnitude are included. Both statistical and biological problems with monitoring programs (as now conducted) are addressed; serial correlation of successive observations in the time series obtained was identified as one principal statistical difficulty. The procedure reduces this problem to a level where statistical methods can be used confidently. 27 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  16. Wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope: experimental results.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, R L; Aubrun, Jean-Noel; Bell, Ray; Benson, Robert; Benson, Larry; Brace, David; Breakwell, John; Burriesci, Larry; Byler, Eric; Camp, John; Cross, Gene; Cuneo, Peter; Dean, Peter; Digumerthi, Ramji; Duncan, Alan; Farley, John; Green, Andy; Hamilton, Howard H; Herman, Bruce; Lauraitis, Kris; de Leon, Erich; Lorell, Kenneth; Martin, Rob; Matosian, Ken; Muench, Tom; Ni, Mel; Palmer, Alice; Roseman, Dennis; Russell, Sheldon; Schweiger, Paul; Sigler, Rob; Smith, John; Stone, Richard; Stubbs, David; Swietek, Gregg; Thatcher, John; Tischhauser, C; Wong, Harvey; Zarifis, Vassilis; Gleichman, Kurt; Paxman, Rick

    2006-06-20

    A nine-aperture, wide-field Fizeau imaging telescope has been built at the Lockheed-Martin Advanced Technology Center. The telescope consists of nine, 125 mm diameter collector telescopes coherently phased and combined to form a diffraction-limited image with a resolution that is consistent with the 610 mm diameter of the telescope. The phased field of view of the array is 1 murad. The measured rms wavefront error is 0.08 waves rms at 635 nm. The telescope is actively controlled to correct for tilt and phasing errors. The control sensing technique is the method known as phase diversity, which extracts wavefront information from a pair of focused and defocused images. The optical design of the telescope and typical performance results are described. PMID:16778931

  17. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  18. Experimental studies on coaxial vortex loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariani, R.; Kontis, K.

    2010-12-01

    An experimental study has been conducted on the formation and propagation of coaxial vortex loops using a shock tube facility. The study aimed at evaluating the flow characteristics of pairs of corotating vortex rings that generate the leapfrogging phenomenon. The driver and driven gas of the shock tube were air. Three driver pressures were used (4, 8, and 12 bars) with the driven gas being at ambient conditions. The Mach numbers of the shock wave generated inside the shock tube were 1.34, 1.54, and 1.66, respectively. The sudden expansion present at the diaphragm location effectively decreased the Mach number value of the traveling shock wave. Results showed that a pair of vortex rings staggered with respect to time and with the same direction rotation lead to leapfrogging. Results also indicated that the number of leapfrogging occurrences is related to the Reynolds number of the vortex ring pairs with a decrease in leapfrogs at higher Reynolds numbers.

  19. Studies in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polmar, S. K.

    The theoretical physics group at Washington University has been devoted to the solution of problems in theoretical and mathematical physics. All of the personnel on this task have a similar approach to their research in that they apply sophisticated analytical and numerical techniques to problems primarily in quantum field theory. Specifically, this group has worked on quantum chromodynamics, classical Yang-Mills fields, chiral symmetry breaking condensates, lattice field theory, strong-coupling approximations, perturbation theory in large order, nonlinear waves, 1/N expansions, quantum solitons, phase transitions, nuclear potentials, and early universe calculations.

  20. Field enhancement factor dependence on electric field and implications on microscale gas breakdown: Theory and experimental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alejandro Buendia, Jose; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy

    2015-12-01

    In this letter, we obtain a better understanding of effective field enhancement factors (β eff) in the context of microscale gas breakdown with specific emphasis on its dependence on applied electric field. The theoretical dependence of β eff on electric field for various hemi-ellipsoidal asperities indicates that the value of β eff decreases with increasing electric field. The interpretation of experimental data using a typical one-dimensional modified Paschen law indicates a qualitatively similar electric field dependence even though the data could not be completely explained using a single effective asperity size. The values of β eff extracted from seven independent experimental datasets for microscale breakdown of argon and air are shown to be consistent and an empirical dependence on electric field is determined.

  1. Insights into Arbovirus Evolution and Adaptation from Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ciota, Alexander T.; Kramer, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses) are maintained in nature by cycling between vertebrate hosts and haematophagous invertebrate vectors. These viruses are responsible for causing a significant public health burden throughout the world, with over 100 species having the capacity to cause human disease. Arbovirus outbreaks in previously naïve environments demonstrate the potential of these pathogens for expansion and emergence, possibly exacerbated more recently by changing climates. These recent outbreaks, together with the continued devastation caused by endemic viruses, such as Dengue virus which persists in many areas, demonstrate the need to better understand the selective pressures that shape arbovirus evolution. Specifically, a comprehensive understanding of host-virus interactions and how they shape both host-specific and virus-specific evolutionary pressures is needed to fully evaluate the factors that govern the potential for host shifts and geographic expansions. One approach to advance our understanding of the factors influencing arbovirus evolution in nature is the use of experimental studies in the laboratory. Here, we review the contributions that laboratory passage and experimental infection studies have made to the field of arbovirus adaptation and evolution, and how these studies contribute to the overall field of arbovirus evolution. In particular, this review focuses on the areas of evolutionary constraints and mutant swarm dynamics; how experimental results compare to theoretical predictions; the importance of arbovirus ecology in shaping viral swarms; and how current knowledge should guide future questions relevant to understanding arbovirus evolution. PMID:21994633

  2. Planned waveguide electric field breakdown studies

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Faya; Li Zenghai

    2012-12-21

    This paper presents an experimental setup for X-band rf breakdown studies. The setup is composed of a section of WR90 waveguide with a tapered pin located at the middle of the waveguide E-plane. Another pin is used to rf match the waveguide so it operates in a travelling wave mode. By adjusting the penetration depth of the tapered pin, different surface electric field enhancements can be obtained. The setup will be used to study the rf breakdown rate dependence on power flow in the waveguide for a constant maximum surface electric field on the pin. Two groups of pins have been designed. The Q of one group is different and very low. The other has a similar Q. With the test of the two groups of pins, we should be able to discern how the net power flow and Q affect the breakdown. Furthermore, we will apply an electron beam treatment to the pins to study its effect on breakdown. Overall, these experiments should be very helpful in understanding rf breakdown phenomena and could significantly benefit the design of high gradient accelerator structures.

  3. Experimental approaches to studying cumulative cultural evolution

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, Christine A.; Atkinson, Mark; Renner, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    In humans, cultural traditions often change in ways which increase efficiency and functionality. This process, widely referred to as cumulative cultural evolution, sees beneficial traits preferentially retained, and it is so pervasive that we may be inclined to take it for granted. However, directional change of this kind appears to distinguish human cultural traditions from behavioural traditions that have been documented in other animals. Cumulative culture is therefore attracting an increasing amount of attention within psychology, and researchers have begun to develop methods of studying this phenomenon under controlled conditions. These studies have now addressed a number of different questions, including which learning mechanisms may be implicated, and how the resulting behaviours may be influenced by factors such as population structure. The current article provides a synopsis of some of these studies, and highlights some of the unresolved issues in this field. PMID:27397972

  4. Experimental studies of auroral arc generators

    SciTech Connect

    Suszcynsky, D.M.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). An all-sky video camera system was deployed in Eagle, Alaska at the foot of the magnetic field line that threads geosynchronous satellite 1989-046 as part of a campaign to study correlations of ground-based auroral activity with satellite-based plasma and energetic particle measurements. The overall intent of the project was to study magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling as it relates to the aurora, and, in particular, to look for signatures that may help to identify various auroral generator mechanism(s). During this study, our efforts were primarily directed towards identifying the generator mechanism(s) for pulsating aurora. Our data, though not conclusive, are found to support theories that propose a cyclotron resonance mechanism for the generation of auroral pulsations.

  5. Experimental study of fracture processes in rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, A. K.; Wang, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    The Fracture process zone in compact tension specimens of Indiana limestone was investigated to study its effect on the fracture mechanics parameters in such materials. Specimens were tested up to the peak load, and propagation of the crack from a preexisting notch was monitored. Experiments were designed to study the two features of the fracture process zone in rocks: ligament connections and microcracking. To observe this zone with high sensitivity and accuracy, laser interferometry methods were adopted. Holographic Interferometry was used to observe initial crack propagation. To obtain more quantitative measurements of the displacement field, in realtime, the recently developed technique of electronic speckle pattern interferometry was applied. This technique can provide continuous video recording of the interferometric fringe pattern, depict the evolution of the fracture process, and measure profiles of crack opening displacements. The macroscopic observations of full-field displacement by the laser techniques were supplemented by post mortem observation of the fracture region under a scanning electron microscope. Regions around the crack were studied after the test for possible presence of microcracks. An interactive finite element code was used to compute the stress intensity factors of the propagating crack-tip and displacements. Finite element computations were used to evaluate the effect of the process zone on crack propagation.

  6. Experimental and modeling study on char combustion

    SciTech Connect

    J. Yu; M.C. Zhang

    2009-05-15

    In this study, on the basis of experimental verifications with an FTIR online measurement system, theoretical calculations by using the strict continuous-film model were first compared with those by the simple single-film model that is still widely used in mathematical modeling of pulverized coal flames. The results indicated that the single-film model has some significant errors in its predictions of the ignition temperature and the combustion following ignition and hence should have some restrictions on its application. Then an improved char combustion model has been presented, taking into consideration the influence of the finite-rate heterogeneous reduction and oxidation reactions. This model gives the explicit algebraic expressions for the overall rate of combustion, the surface temperature of the particle, and the gas temperature at the flame sheet. Compared with the single-film model, predictions by the present model were in much better agreement with those predicted by the continuous-film model and the experimental data. The novel model is also much easier to be integrated into the comprehensive computing codes for industrial pulverized coal flame than the continuous-film model. 21 refs., 14 figs.

  7. [Chemoprophylaxis of secondary peritoneal hydatidosis. Experimental study].

    PubMed

    Errasti Alustiza, J; Arévalo Alonso, J M; Ortiz Tudanca, J; Rebollar Saenz, J; Martínez Blázquez, C; Vítores López, J M

    1993-09-01

    We have studied the effectiveness of pharmacologic prophylaxis of experimental peritoneal hydatidosis. Mice (n = 140, divided in ten groups) suffered intraperitoneal contamination with protoscoleces of E. granulosus from sheep. Each group received different treatment (mebendazole, praziquantel, or both), in three different schedules (during 3 days before contamination, during 7 days after contamination, or both before and after Mebendazole 150 mg/kg-day), praziquantel (25 mg/kg-day) were given in three daily doses. Mice were sacrificed six months later and the number and type of existing peritoneal cysts was recorded. Prophylaxis prior to contamination was shown ineffective. Early treatment greatly decreased the severity of the peritoneal hydatidosis. The administration of the drug before and after contamination, did not improve the results obtained when the drug was given after contamination. Both mebendazole and praziquantel were effective, though the former obtained better results. The association of both drugs does not improve the results obtained with mebendazole alone. These experimental results recommend the early use of mebendazol or praziquantel after open surgery for hydatidosis, in order to prevent the occurrence of secondary peritoneal hydatidosis. PMID:8217380

  8. Experimental research in aerodynamic control with electric and electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, E. M.; Lu, F. K.; Wilson, D. R.

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years ago, publications began to discuss the possibilities of electromagnetic flow control (EMFC) to improve aerodynamic performance. This led to an era of research that focused on coupling the fundamentals of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) with propulsion, control, and power generation systems. Unfortunately, very few designs made it past an exploratory phase as, among other issues, power consumption was unreasonably high. Recent proposed advancements in technology like the MARIAH hypersonic wind tunnel and the AJAX scramjet engine concepts have led to a new phase of MHD research in the aerospace industry, with many interdisciplinary applications. Compared with propulsion systems and channel flow accelerators, EMFC concepts applied to control surface aerodynamics have not seen the same level of advancement that may eventually produce a device that can be integrated with an aircraft or missile. The purpose of this paper is to review the overall feasibility of the different electric and EMFC concepts. Emphasis is placed on EMFC with high voltage ionization sources and experimental work.

  9. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-11-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science.

  10. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  11. Experimental Demonstration of Anomalous Field Enhancement in All-Dielectric Transition Magnetic Metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Xiaoming; Zhou, Ji; Kudyshev, Zhaxylyk; Litchinitser, Natalia M

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous field enhancement accompanied by resonant absorption phenomenon was originally discussed in the context of plasma physics and in applications related to radio-communications between the ground and spacecraft returning to Earth. Indeed, there is a critical period of time when all communications are lost due to the reflection/absorption of electromagnetic waves by the sheath of plasma created by a high speed vehicle re-entering the atmosphere. While detailed experimental studies of these phenomena in space are challenging, the emergence of electromagnetic metamaterials enables researchers exceptional flexibility to study them in the laboratory environment. Here, we experimentally demonstrated the strong localized field enhancement of magnetic field for an electromagnetic wave propagating in Mie-resonance-based inhomogeneous metamaterials with magnetic permeability gradually changing from positive to negative values. Although these experiments were performed in the microwave frequency range, the proposed all-dielectric approach to transition metamaterials can be extended to terahertz, infrared, and visible frequencies. We anticipate that these results, besides most basic science aspects, hold the potential for numerous applications, including low-intensity nonlinear transformation optics, topological photonics, and the broader area of surface and interface science. PMID:26531855

  12. On the proper study design applicable to experimental balneology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Csaba

    2015-11-01

    The simple message of this paper is that it is the high time to reevaluate the strategies and optimize the efforts for investigation of thermal (spa) waters. Several articles trying to clear mode of action of medicinal waters have been published up to now. Almost all studies apply the unproven hypothesis, namely the inorganic ingredients are in close connection with healing effects of bathing. Change of paradigm would be highly necessary in this field taking into consideration the presence of several biologically active organic substances in these waters. A successful design for experimental mechanistic studies is approved.

  13. On the proper study design applicable to experimental balneology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varga, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    The simple message of this paper is that it is the high time to reevaluate the strategies and optimize the efforts for investigation of thermal (spa) waters. Several articles trying to clear mode of action of medicinal waters have been published up to now. Almost all studies apply the unproven hypothesis, namely the inorganic ingredients are in close connection with healing effects of bathing. Change of paradigm would be highly necessary in this field taking into consideration the presence of several biologically active organic substances in these waters. A successful design for experimental mechanistic studies is approved.

  14. On the proper study design applicable to experimental balneology.

    PubMed

    Varga, Csaba

    2016-08-01

    The simple message of this paper is that it is the high time to reevaluate the strategies and optimize the efforts for investigation of thermal (spa) waters. Several articles trying to clear mode of action of medicinal waters have been published up to now. Almost all studies apply the unproven hypothesis, namely the inorganic ingredients are in close connection with healing effects of bathing. Change of paradigm would be highly necessary in this field taking into consideration the presence of several biologically active organic substances in these waters. A successful design for experimental mechanistic studies is approved. PMID:26597677

  15. Molecular simulations and experimental studies of zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moloy, Eric C.

    Zeolites are microporous aluminosilicate tetrahedral framework materials that have symmetric cages and channels with open-diameters between 0.2 and 2.0 nm. Zeolites are used extensively in the petrochemical industries for both their microporosity and their catalytic properties. The role of water is paramount to the formation, structure, and stability of these materials. Zeolites frequently have extra-framework cations, and as a result, are important ion-exchange materials. Zeolites also play important roles as molecular sieves and catalysts. For all that is known about zeolites, much remains a mystery. How, for example, can the well established metastability of these structures be explained? What is the role of water with respect to the formation, stabilization, and dynamical properties? This dissertation addresses these questions mainly from a modeling perspective, but also with some experimental work as well. The first discussion addresses a special class of zeolites: pure-silica zeolites. Experimental enthalpy of formation data are combined with molecular modeling to address zeolitic metastability. Molecular modeling is used to calculate internal surface areas, and a linear relationship between formation enthalpy and internal surface areas is clearly established, producing an internal surface energy of approximately 93 mJ/m2. Nitrate bearing sodalite and cancrinite have formed under the caustic chemical conditions of some nuclear waste processing centers in the United States. These phases have fouled expensive process equipment, and are the primary constituents of the resilient heels in the bottom of storage tanks. Molecular modeling, including molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, and density functional theory, is used to simulate these materials with respect to structure and dynamical properties. Some new, very interesting results are extracted from the simulation of anhydrous Na6[Si6Al 6O24] sodalite---most importantly, the identification of two distinct

  16. Free will and consciousness: experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Joshua

    2012-06-01

    What are the folk-conceptual connections between free will and consciousness? In this paper I present results which indicate that consciousness plays central roles in folk conceptions of free will. When conscious states cause behavior, people tend to judge that the agent acted freely. And when unconscious states cause behavior, people tend to judge that the agent did not act freely. Further, these studies contribute to recent experimental work on folk philosophical affiliation, which analyzes folk responses to determine whether folk views are consistent with the view that free will and determinism are incompatible (incompatibilism) or with the opposite view (compatibilism). Conscious causation of behavior tends to elicit pro-free will judgments, even when the causation takes place deterministically. Thus, when controlling for consciousness, many folk seem to be compatibilists. However, participants who disagree with the deterministic or cognitive scientific descriptions given of human behavior tend to give incompatibilist responses. PMID:22480780

  17. [Brackets and friction in orthodontics: experimental study].

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb Jdir, Saloua; Tobji, Samir; Turki, Wiem; Dallel, Ines; Khedher, Nedra; Ben Amor, Adel

    2015-09-01

    Many authors have been involved in developing brackets in order to improve the quality, stability, speed and efficiency of orthodontic treatment. In order to reduce friction between bracket and archwire, new therapeutic approaches have been devised based on novel technologies. Among these innovative techniques, self-ligating brackets are increasingly popular. SLBs can be classified into several categories according to their mode of action and their materials. We performed an experimental study to compare the friction forces generated during the sliding of orthodontic archwires made from various alloys through conventional and self-ligating brackets. Results show the favorable influence of SLBs, compared to conventional systems using elastomeric or metal ligatures, on the level of friction, particularly when shape-memory Ni-Ti archwires are used. PMID:26370596

  18. Experimental Studies in Helicopter Vertical Climb Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    Data and analysis from an experimental program to measure vertical climb performance on an eight-foot model rotor are presented. The rotor testing was performed using a unique moving-model facility capable of accurately simulating the flow conditions during axial flight, and was conducted from July 9, 1992 to July 16, 1992 at the Dynamic Model Track, or 'Long Track,' just prior to its demolition in August of 1992. Data collected during this brief test program included force and moment time histories from a sting-mounted strain gauge balance, support carriage velocity, and rotor rpm pulses. In addition, limited video footage (of marginal use) was recorded from smoke flow studies for both simulated vertical climb and descent trajectories. Analytical comparisons with these data include a series of progressively more detailed calculations ranging from simple momentum theory, a prescribed wake method, and a free-wake prediction.

  19. Experimental study of crossing angle collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Rice, D.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Tigner, M.

    1993-05-01

    The non-linear coupling due to the beam-beam interaction with crossing angle has been studied. The major effect of a small ({approximately}12mrad) crossing angle is to excite 5Q{sub x}{plus_minus}Q{sub s}=integer coupling resonance family on large amplitude particles, which results in bad lifetime. On the CESR, a small crossing angle ({approximately}2.4mr) was created at the IP and a reasonable beam-beam tune-shift was achieved. The decay rate of the beam is measured as a function of horizontal tune with and without crossing angle. The theoretical analysis, simulation and experimental measurements have a good agreement. The resonance strength as a function of crossing angle is also measured.

  20. Experimental study of solar simulator mirror cryocontamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galjaev, V. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Afanassiev, N. A.

    1994-01-01

    The background and tasks formulation of the study of Solar Simulator collimation mirror cryocontamination in Large Thermal Vacuum Facility are outlined, research methods and experiment procedures are described, experimental relationships obtained are analyzed and practical recommendations are given. The accepted procedure of thermal vacuum tests as a rule defines the sequence of operations for verifying the spacecraft under test without taking into account measures for preventing Solar Simulator collimation mirror contamination and degradation. On the other hand, evacuation procedures is defined for conditions of achieving the required vacuum in the shortest possible time with using the available evacuation equipment at a regime close to the optimum one. Similarly, cryopanel cooling down cyclogram and test object preparation process are not analyzed from the viewpoint of ways of reducing environmental detrimental effects on thermal vacuum facility contamination-sensitive systems. Solar Simulator mirror contamination and its reflective characteristics change results in degradation of solar flux parameters and reduction of simulator continuous operation time. Methods of consideration of optical effects due to mirror surface contamination are actually missing. The effects themselves are not quite understood and data cited in literature as a rule, were obtained under conditions different from real thermal vacuum facility and therefore should be subjected to additional experimental verification. Only in the last few years contamination effect on optical surfaces degradation has been considered with using empirical relations. Mirror reflective properties degradation leads to the increase of Solar Simulator errors. This ultimately has an adverse effect on S/C ground development, schedule and cost of thermal vacuum tests. Besides, the mirror maintenance in operable state becomes more expensive. The present paper is dedicated to the study of Solar Simulator collimation

  1. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense. PMID:12002842

  2. Experimental Investigation on Liquid Metal Flow Distribution in Insulating Manifold under Uniform Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masato; Ueki, Yoshitaka; Yokomine, Takehiko; Kunugi, Tomoaki

    2012-11-01

    Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) problem which is caused by interaction between electrical conducting fluid flow and the magnetic field is one of the biggest problem in the liquid metal blanket of the fusion reactor. In the liquid metal blanket concept, it is necessary to distribute liquid metal flows uniformly in the manifold because imbalance of flow rates should affect the heat transfer performance directly, which leads to safety problem. While the manifold is insulated electrically as well as the flow duct, the 3D-MHD effect on the flowing liquid metal in the manifold is more apparent than that in straight duct. With reference to the flow distribution in this concept, the liquid metal flow in the electrical insulating manifold under the uniform transverse magnetic field is investigated experimentally. In this study, GaInSn is selected as working fluid. The experimental system includes the electrical magnet and the manifold test section which is made of acrylic resin for perfectly electrical insulation. The liquid metal flows in a non-symmetric 180°-turn with manifold, which consists of one upward channel and two downward channels. The flow rates in each channel are measured by electromagnetic flow meters for several combinations Reynolds number and Hartman number. The effects of magnetic field on the uniformity of flow distribution are cleared.

  3. Effects of Fipronil Insecticide Application on Sympetrum sp. Larvae and Adults in Experimental Rice Paddy Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinguji, Hiroshi; Ueda, Tetsuyuki; Tsunoda, Manami; Aihara, Shoko; Saito, Mitsuo

    The effect of on sowing and before transplanting application of the phenyl pyrazole insecticide, fipronil, on the survivorship Sympetrum spp. was investigated in plots of an experimental rice paddy field. In addition, the effect of two pesticide applications on rice weevils was investigated. A total of nine paddy plots were used in this study: three were treated with fipronil at the before transplanting application , three at the on sowing application, and the three remaining plots were left untreated for use as controls. Fipronil concentrations in paddy water at the time of application in before transplanting and on sowing treatments reached 1.45 and 1.20 μg/L, respectively. A comparison of experimental and control plots revealed a marked absence of Sympetrum frequens larvae, exuviae and adults from fipronil-treated fields. Adult density of Sympetrum sp. and members of Lestidae in paddy fields before transplanting application were considerably lower than in control plots. Our results show that before transplanting application is more effective than on sowing application for treating rice weevils, but that on sowing application may still be harm against dragonflies.

  4. Experimental Study of Alluvial Fan Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delorme, P.; Devauchelle, O.; Barrier, L.; Métivier, F.

    2015-12-01

    At the outlet of mountain ranges, rivers flow onto flatter lowlands. The associated change of slope causes sediment deposition. As the river is free to move laterally, it builds conical sedimentary structures called alluvial fans. Their location at the interface between erosional and depositional areas makes them valuable sedimentary archives. To decipher these sedimentary records, we need to understand the dynamics of their growth. Most natural fans are built by braided streams. However, to avoid the complexity of braided rivers, we develop a small-scale experiment in which an alluvial fan is formed by a single channel. We use a mixture of water and glycerol to produce a laminar river. The fluid is mixed with corindon sand (~ 300 μm) in a tilted channel and left free to form a fan around its outlet. The sediment and water discharges are constant during an experimental run. We record the fan progradation and the channel morphology with top-view pictures. We also generate an elevation map with an optical method based on the deformation of a moiré pattern. We observe that, to leading order, the fan remains self-affine as it grows, with a constant slope. We compare two recent studies about the formation of one-dimensionnal fan [Guerit et al. 2014] and threshold rivers [Seizilles et al. 2013] to our experimental findings. In particular, we propose a theory witch relates the fan morphology to the control parameters ( fluid and sediment discharges, grain size). Our observation accord with the predictions, suggesting that the fan is built near the threshold of sediment motion. Finally, we intend to expand our interpretation to alluvial fans build by single-thread channels ( Okavango, Bostwana; Taquari and Paraguay, Brasil; Pastaza, Peru).

  5. Millimeter wave near-field study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, Neill

    1990-01-01

    The possibility is evaluated of current technology measuring large aperture millimeter wave antennas. Included are a mathematical modeling of system errors, experimental data supporting error model, predictions of system accuracy at millimeter wavelengths, advantage of near-field measurements, and a cost estimate for a facility upgrade. The use is emphasized of software compensation and other inexpensive alternatives to develop a near optimum solution to near-field measurement problems at millimeter wavelengths.

  6. Experimental study of ocean-atmosphere exchanges

    SciTech Connect

    Eymard, L.; Weill, A.; Planton, S.

    1994-12-31

    The SOFIA/ASTEX and SEMAPHORE campaigns were performed over open ocean, near the Azores, to study the ocean-atmosphere exchanges at the local and meso-scales, with a particular insight to the spatial variability of fluxes and related processes. In both cases, the experimental strategy involved two research aircraft and an oceanographic vessel, as well as surface buoys. SOFIA/ASTEX was more particularly devoted to the study of boundary layer and cloud properties, including microphysical and radiative aspects, in the framework of the international campaign ASTEX. SEMAPHORE was aimed at the analysis of surface fluxes and interactions with the upper ocean at the mesoscale. It included an important network of ocean circulation and thermal properties, from ships, current meter moorings, current drifters, and drifting buoys. The thermal front associated with the Azores current is an important feature of the ocean circulation and was particularly investigated. The analysis of data from meteorological satellites is also an important aspect of the two campaigns.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Radiative Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Vinci, T.; Boireau, L.; Koenig, M.; Bouquet, S.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Osaki, N.; Herpe, G.; Falize, E.; Loupias, B.; Atzeni, S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the radiative shock from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It is based on the whole experimental results obtained at Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI, École Polytechnique). Radiative shocks are high-Mach number shocks with a strong coupling between radiation and hydrodynamics which leads to a structure governed by a radiative precursor. These shocks are involved in various astrophysical systems: stellar accretion shocks, pulsating stars, interaction between supernovae and the interstellar medium. In laboratory, these radiative shocks are generated using high power lasers. New diagnostics have been implemented to study the geometrical shape of the shock and the front shock density. Data were obtained varying initial conditions for different laser intensities and temperature. The modeling of these phenomena is mainly performed through numerical simulations (1D and 2D) and analytical studies. We exhibit results obtained from several radiative hydrodynamics codes. As a result, it is possible to discuss about the influence of the geometry and physical parameters introduced in the 1D and 2D models.

  8. Experimental concept for examination of biological effects of magnetic field concealed by gravity.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, M; Tomita-Yokotani, K; Hashimoto, H; Takai, M; Tsushima, M; Nakamura, T

    2004-01-01

    Space is not only a place to study biological effects of gravity, but also provides unique opportunities to examine other environmental factors, where the biological actions are masked by gravity on the ground. Even the earth's magnetic field is steadily acting on living systems, and is known to influence many biological processes. A systematic survey and assessment of its action are difficult to conduct in the presence of dominant factors, such as gravity. Investigation of responses of biological systems against the combined environment of zero-gravity and zero-magnetic field might establish the baseline for the analysis of biological effects of magnetic factors. We propose, in this paper, an experimental concept in this context, together with a practical approach of the experiments, both in orbit and on the ground, with a thin magnetic shielding film. Plant epicotyl growth was taken as an exemplar index to evaluate technical and scientific feasibility of the proposed system concept. PMID:15880894

  9. Design of organic scintillators for non-standard radiation field dosimetry: experimental setup.

    PubMed

    Norman H, Machado R; Maximiliano, Trujillo T; Javier E, García G; Diana C, Narvaez G; Paula A, Marín M; Róbinson A, Torres V

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup designed for sensing the luminescent light coming from an organic plastic scintillator stimulated with ionizing radiation. This device is intended to be a part of a complete dosimeter system for characterization of small radiation fields which is the project of the doctoral thesis of the medical physicist at the Radiation Oncology facility of Hospital San Vicente Fundación in conjunction with the Universidad de Antioquia of Medellín Colombia. Some preliminary results predict a good performance of the unit, but further studies must be conducted in order to have a completed evaluation of the system. This is the first step in the development of an accuracy tool for measurement of non-standard fields in the Radiotherapy or Radiosurgery processes. PMID:24110369

  10. A numerical and experimental study of confined swirling jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikjooy, M.; Mongia, H. C.; Samuelsen, G. S.; Mcdonell, V. G.

    1989-01-01

    A numerical and experimental study of a confined strong swirling flow is presented. Detailed velocity measurements are made using a two-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) technique. Computations are performed using a differential second-moment (DSM) closure. The effect of inlet dissipation rate on calculated mean and turbulence fields is investigated. Various model constants are employed in the pressure-strain model to demonstrate their influences on the predicted results. Finally, comparison of the DSM calculations with the algebraic second-monent (ASM) closure results shows that the DSM is better suited for complex swirling flow analysis.

  11. Experimental Study of Gas Hydrate Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fandino, O.; Ruffine, L.

    2011-12-01

    Important quantities of methane and other gases are trapped below the seafloor and in the permafrost by an ice-like solid, called gas hydrates or clathrate hydrates. The latter is formed when water is mixing with different gases at high pressures and low temperatures. Due to a their possible use as a source of energy [1] or the problematic related to flow assurance failure in pipelines [2] the understanding of their processes of formation/destabilisation of these structures becomes a goal for many laboratories research as well as industries. In this work we present an experimental study on the stochastic behaviour of hydrate formation from a bulk phase. The method used here for the experiments was to repeat several time the same hydrate formation procedure and to notice the different from one experiment to another. A variable-volume type high-pressure apparatus with two sapphire windows was used. This device, already presented by Ruffine et al.[3], allows us to perform both kinetics and phase equilibrium measurements. Three initial pressure conditions were considered here, 5.0 MPa, 7.5 MPa and 10.0 MPa. Hydrates have been formed, then allowed to dissociate by stepwise heating. The memory effect has also been investigated after complete dissociation. It turned out that, although the thermodynamics conditions of formation and/or destabilization were reproducible. An attempt to determine the influence of pressure on the nucleation induction time will be discussed. References 1. Sum, A. K.; Koh, C. A.; Sloan, E. D., Clathrate Hydrates: From Laboratory Science to Engineering Practice. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research 2009, 48, 7457-7465. 2. Sloan, E. D., A changing hydrate paradigm-from apprehension to avoidance to risk management. Fluid Phase Equilibria 2005, 228, 67-74. 3. Ruffine, L.; Donval, J. P.; Charlou, J. L.; Cremière, A.; Zehnder, B. H., Experimental study of gas hydrate formation and destabilisation using a novel high-pressure apparatus. Marine

  12. Experimental and Computational Investigation of a Plasma Ion Accelerator with Multiple Magnetic Field Cusps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Christopher; Cappelli, Mark

    2011-10-01

    A cusped-field discharge produces efficient ionization by trapping electrons from an external cathode through magnetic mirroring between adjacent magnetic cusps. These discharges have applications in space propulsion, particularly at low power (under 200W). However, the underlying physics driving electron transport and ionization in these devices is still poorly understood. In the current study, the plasma potential of a 40-250 W cylindrical cusped-field discharge is characterized using a floating emissive probe. The potential exhibits a spatial structure that mimics visible light emission; elevated potential is observed in a surrounding conical region downstream of the discharge channel, concomitant with ion emission. The experimentally measured plasma potential is used in single-electron particle simulations to investigate transport processes associated with electron migration from the external cathode to the anode at the base of the discharge channel. A cusped-field discharge produces efficient ionization by trapping electrons from an external cathode through magnetic mirroring between adjacent magnetic cusps. These discharges have applications in space propulsion, particularly at low power (under 200W). However, the underlying physics driving electron transport and ionization in these devices is still poorly understood. In the current study, the plasma potential of a 40-250 W cylindrical cusped-field discharge is characterized using a floating emissive probe. The potential exhibits a spatial structure that mimics visible light emission; elevated potential is observed in a surrounding conical region downstream of the discharge channel, concomitant with ion emission. The experimentally measured plasma potential is used in single-electron particle simulations to investigate transport processes associated with electron migration from the external cathode to the anode at the base of the discharge channel. The authors acknowledge support from the Air Force Office of

  13. Theoretical & Experimental Studies of Elementary Particles

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, Kevin

    2012-10-04

    Abstract High energy physics has been one of the signature research programs at the University of Rochester for over 60 years. The group has made leading contributions to experimental discoveries at accelerators and in cosmic rays and has played major roles in developing the theoretical framework that gives us our ``standard model'' of fundamental interactions today. This award from the Department of Energy funded a major portion of that research for more than 20 years. During this time, highlights of the supported work included the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron, the completion of a broad program of physics measurements that verified the electroweak unified theory, the measurement of three generations of neutrino flavor oscillations, and the first observation of a ``Higgs like'' boson at the Large Hadron Collider. The work has resulted in more than 2000 publications over the period of the grant. The principal investigators supported on this grant have been recognized as leaders in the field of elementary particle physics by their peers through numerous awards and leadership positions. Most notable among them is the APS W.K.H. Panofsky Prize awarded to Arie Bodek in 2004, the J.J. Sakurai Prizes awarded to Susumu Okubo and C. Richard Hagen in 2005 and 2010, respectively, the Wigner medal awarded to Susumu Okubo in 2006, and five principal investigators (Das, Demina, McFarland, Orr, Tipton) who received Department of Energy Outstanding Junior Investigator awards during the period of this grant. The University of Rochester Department of Physics and Astronomy, which houses the research group, provides primary salary support for the faculty and has waived most tuition costs for graduate students during the period of this grant. The group also benefits significantly from technical support and infrastructure available at the University which supports the work. The research work of the group has provided educational opportunities for graduate students

  14. A Computational and Experimental Study of Slit Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Ju, H.; Jones, M. G.; Watson, W. R.; Parrott, T. L.

    2003-01-01

    Computational and experimental studies are carried out to offer validation of the results obtained from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of the flow and acoustic fields of slit resonators. The test cases include slits with 90-degree corners and slits with 45-degree bevel angle housed inside an acoustic impedance tube. Three slit widths are used. Six frequencies from 0.5 to 3.0 kHz are chosen. Good agreement is found between computed and measured reflection factors. In addition, incident sound waves having white noise spectrum and a prescribed pseudo-random noise spectrum are used in subsequent series of tests. The computed broadband results are again found to agree well with experimental data. It is believed the present results provide strong support that DNS can eventually be a useful and accurate prediction tool for liner aeroacoustics. The usage of DNS as a design tool is discussed and illustrated by a simple example.

  15. An Experimental Study of Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, Jeffrey W.; Niederhaus, Charles E.

    1996-01-01

    Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability occurs when a planar interface separating two fluids of different density is impulsively accelerated In the direction of its normal. It is one of the most fundamental of fluid instabilities and is of importance in fields ranging from astrophysics to materials processing. Because RM instability experiments are normally carried out in shock tubes, where the generation of a sharp well controlled interface between gases is difficult, there is a scarcity of good experimental results. The experiments presented here utilize a novel technique which circumvents many of the experimental difficulties that have previously limited the study of RM instability. In this system, the instability is generated by bouncing a thin rectangular tank containing two liquids off of a fixed spring. Results obtained from these experiments yield particularly well visualized images of the nonlinear development of the instability. However, because the run time in these experiments is limited, new experiments capable of achieving longer run times are planned.

  16. Experimental studies of rock fracture behavior related to hydraulic fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zifeng

    The objective of this experimental investigation stems from the uncontrollable of the hydraulic fracture shape in the oil and gas production field. A small-scale laboratory investigation of crack propagation in sandstone was first performed with the objective to simulate the field fracture growth. Test results showed that the fracture resistance increased with crack extension, assuming that there was an interaction between crack faces (bridging, interlocking, and friction). An acoustic emission test was conducted to examine the existence of the interaction by locating AE events and analyzing waveform. Furthermore, the effects of confining stress, loading rate, stress field, and strength heterogeneous on the tortuosity of the fracture surface were experimentally investigated in the study. Finally, a test was designed and conducted to investigate the crack propagation in a stratified media with permeability contrast. Crack was observed to arrested in an interface. The phenomenon of delamination along an interface between layers with permeability contrast was observed. The delamination was proposed to be the cause of crack arrest and crack jump in the saturated stratified materials under confinement test.

  17. The experimental studies of thermoacoustic cooler.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Shin-ichi; Watanabe, Yoshiaki

    2004-04-01

    The experimental studies of thermoacoustic cooler consisting of acoustic loop-tube were carried out. The loop-tube was filled with the mixture of air and helium gas or air at atmospheric pressure. The dimensions of the loop-tube were 3.3 m of length, 44 mm of inner diameter and 4 mm of thickness. A pair of stacks (stack 1 and stack 2) which were sandwiched between two heat exchangers was placed symmetrically in the loop-tube. Stack 1 was employed as a prime mover and stack 2 as a heat pump. The self-sustained sound generated by the thermoacoustic effect and the cooling phenomena at the stack 2 were observed. The distribution of the sound pressures and the waveforms in the loop-tube were measured, and the frequency component of the self-sustained sound was investigated at the starting phase. The fundamental frequency component was confirmed and it was developing as the sound pressure increasing. The higher harmonics frequency components were generated and they were also developing. PMID:15047261

  18. Phosphatic fertiliser poisoning of sheep: experimental studies.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, P J; McCausland, I P; Coup, M R

    1982-11-01

    The toxicity of serpentine phosphate and superphosphate for non-pregnant dry ewes, pregnant ewes and lactating ewes was investigated by oral dosing. An attempt was made to reproduce a natural episode of poisoning by exposing pregnant and lactating ewes to topdressed pasture. A total dose in the range of 1200 to 1800 g of serpentine phosphate was required to kill two ewes and it was concluded that natural episodes of poisoning with this material are unlikely. The toxic process was similar to that caused by superphosphate. The LD50 of superphosphate was estimated to be in the range of 5 to 6 g/kg and a dose in the range of 200 to 300 g was sufficient to kill most sheep. The apparently greater susceptibility of pregnant and lactating sheep to poisoning suggested by the study of natural outbreaks was not demonstrated in these experiments, but the numbers of experimental animals may have been too small to detect differing susceptibility. The clinical disease resembled that seen in natural episodes; anorexia, diarrhoea, progressive depression and death in a period of 5 to 8 days after the start of dosing. Sublethal doses produced a transient diarrhoea and, in two sheep, a severe wool-break. The principal biochemical changes were hyperphosphataemia and evidence of renal failure (oliguria, uraemia, azotaemia). Gross lesions were not consistently present but included abomasal ulceration and renal cortical swelling and pallor. The histopathological evidence of renal tubular obstruction by flocculant eosinophilic casts was characteristic. PMID:16030836

  19. Fractional calculus in viscoelasticity: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meral, F. C.; Royston, T. J.; Magin, R.

    2010-04-01

    Viscoelastic properties of soft biological tissues provide information that may be useful in medical diagnosis. Noninvasive elasticity imaging techniques, such as Magnetic Resonance Elastography (MRE), reconstruct viscoelastic material properties from dynamic displacement images. The reconstruction algorithms employed in these techniques assume a certain viscoelastic material model and the results are sensitive to the model chosen. Developing a better model for the viscoelasticity of soft tissue-like materials could improve the diagnostic capability of MRE. The well known "integer derivative" viscoelastic models of Voigt and Kelvin, and variations of them, cannot represent the more complicated rate dependency of material behavior of biological tissues over a broad spectral range. Recently the "fractional derivative" models have been investigated by a number of researchers. Fractional order models approximate the viscoelastic material behavior of materials through the corresponding fractional differential equations. This paper focuses on the tissue mimicking materials CF-11 and gelatin, and compares fractional and integer order models to describe their behavior under harmonic mechanical loading. Specifically, Rayleigh (surface) waves on CF-11 and gelatin phantoms are studied, experimentally and theoretically, in order to develop an independent test bed for assessing viscoelastic material models that will ultimately be used in MRE reconstruction algorithms.

  20. Experimental Study on Revetec Engine Cam Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohyeldin Gasim, Maisara; Giok Chui, Lee; Anwar, Khirul Azhar bin

    2012-09-01

    In Revetec engine (three-lobed) cam replaces the crankshaft to convert the reciprocating motion of the engine piston, to a rotating motion in the drive line. Since the cam controls the piston movement, the cam profile has a great effect on engine performance. In this paper an experimental study was done to a (three- lobed) cam with Cycloidal motion profile but with different ratios between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower. DEWESoft was used to find the displacement and the vibration of the piston, and compare the actual results from the test with the theoretical results from the cam profile equation. The results showed that there is a periods of miss contact between the follower and the cam when the ratio between the base circle radius of the cam and the radius of the roller follower is less than a certain value, and also increasing of vibration. The suggested ratio between the cam and follower radius is to be more than 2:1.

  1. Experimental study of finite Larmor radius effects

    SciTech Connect

    Struve, K.W.

    1980-08-01

    Linear Z-pinches in Ar, Kr, Xe, N/sub 2/, and He are experimentally studied in regimes where strong finite Larmor radius effects could provide a significant stabilizing effect. Scaling arguments show that for deuterium such a pinch has an electron line density of order 2 x 10/sup 15//cm. For higher Z plasmas a higher line density is allowed, the exact value of which depends on the average ion charge. The pinch is formed by puffing gas axially through the cathode towards the anode of an evacuated pinch chamber. When the gas reaches the anode, the pinch bank is fired. The pinch current rises in 2 to 3 ..mu..sec to a maximum of 100 to 200 kA. The pinch bank capacitance is 900 ..mu..F, and the external inductance is 100 nH. Additionally, the bank is fused to increase dI/dt. The primary diagnostics are a framing camera, a spatially resolved Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and X-ray absorption.

  2. Traditional use of mosquito-repellent plants in western Kenya and their evaluation in semi-field experimental huts against Anopheles gambiae: ethnobotanical studies and application by thermal expulsion and direct burning.

    PubMed

    Seyoum, A; Pålsson, K; Kung'a, S; Kabiru, E W; Lwande, W; Killeen, G F; Hassanali, A; Knols, B G J

    2002-01-01

    Ethnobotanical survey in 2 communities in western Kenya revealed that the most commonly known repellent plants were Ocimum americanum L. (64.1%), Lantana camara L. (17.9%), Tagetes minuta L. (11.3%) and Azadirachta indica A. Juss (8.7%) on Rusinga Island, and Hyptis suaveolens Poit. (49.2%), L. camara (30.9%) and O. basilicum L. (30.4%) in Rambira. Direct burning of plants is the most common method of application for O. americanum (68.8%), L. camara (100%) and O. basilicum (58.8%). Placing branches or whole plants inside houses is most common for H. suaveolens (33.3 and 57.8% for the respective locations), A. indica (66.7 and 100%), and T. minuta (54.8 and 56.0%). The repellency of plants suggested by the ethnobotanical survey and other empirical information was evaluated against the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae s.s. Giles in experimental huts within a screenwalled greenhouse. Thermal expulsion and direct burning were tested as alternative application methods for the selected plants O. americanum, O. kilimandscharicum Guerke, O. suave Willd., L. camara, A. indica, H. suaveolens, Lippia uckambensis Spreng and Corymbia citriodora Hook. When thermally expelled, only H. suaveolens failed to repel mosquitoes, whereas the leaves of C. citriodora (74.5%, P < 0.0001), leaves and seeds of O. suave (53.1%, P < 0.0001) and O. kilimandscharicum (52.0%, P < 0.0001) were the most effective. Leaves of C. citriodora also exhibited the highest repellency (51.3%, P < 0.0001) by direct burning, followed by leaves of L. uckambensis (33.4%, P = 0.0004) and leaves and seeds of O. suave (28.0%, P = 0.0255). The combination of O. kilimandscharicum with L. uckambensis repelled 54.8% of mosquitoes (P < 0.0001) by thermal expulsion. No combination of plants increased repellency by either method. The semi-field system described appears a promising alternative to full-field trials for screening large numbers of candidate repellents without risk of malaria exposure. PMID:12174767

  3. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  4. Experimental study of the dynamics of a spherical flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oppenheim, A. K.; Kamel, M. M.; Varvatsoulis, C.

    1973-01-01

    Preliminary results of an experimental study conducted to investigate the dynamic behavior of flames in explosive gases are presented. The medium was an equimolar acetylene-oxygen mixture maintained initially at a pressure of 110 torr. and room temperature in an experimental vessel 9 cm in internal diameter. Ignition was performed by means of a neodymium laser beam focused on a 0.3 mm diameter steel wire. Experimental observations were performed by the use of a stroboscopic laser-schlieren system yielding a set of photographic records of wave phenomena at a frequency of 200,000 per second. The records reveal the existence of a number of shocks which by a thorough analysis of the blast wave generated by the ignition process, are shown to be due entirely to the flame generated flow field. The capability of a flame to form blast waves in an expanding spherical geometry is thus established, providing an experimental demonstration of the significance the dynamic effects of combustion can achieve.

  5. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    1998-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the role of volatiles in magmatic processes and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. The work on the lunar volcanic glasses has resulted in some exciting new discoveries over the years of this grant. We discovered small metal blebs initially in the Al5 green glass, and determined the significant importance of this metal in fixing the oxidation state of the parent magma (Fogel and Rutherford, 1995). More recently, we discovered a variety of metal blebs in the Al7 orange glass. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs were in the glass; others were in olivine phenocrysts. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption (Weitz et al., 1997) They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas which drove the lunar fire-fountaining. One of the more exciting and controversial findings in our research over the past year has been the possible fractionation of H from D during shock (experimental) of hornblende bearing samples (Minitti et al., 1997). This research is directed at explaining some of the low H2O and high D/H observed in hydrous phases in the SNC meteorites.

  6. Experimental and computational studies of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajjha, Ravikanth S.

    The goals of this dissertation were (i) to experimentally investigate the fluid dynamic and heat transfer performance of nanofluids in a circular tube, (ii) to study the influence of temperature and particle volumetric concentration of nanofluids on thermophysical properties, heat transfer and pumping power, (iii) to measure the rheological properties of various nanofluids and (iv) to investigate using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique the performance of nanofluids in the flat tube of a radiator. Nanofluids are a new class of fluids prepared by dispersing nanoparticles with average sizes of less than 100 nm in traditional heat transfer fluids such as water, oil, ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. In cold regions of the world, the choice of base fluid for heat transfer applications is an ethylene glycol or propylene glycol mixed with water in different proportions. In the present research, a 60% ethylene glycol (EG) or propylene glycol (PG) and 40% water (W) by mass fluid mixture (60:40 EG/W or 60:40 PG/W) was used as a base fluid, which provides freeze protection to a very low level of temperature. Experiments were conducted to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss of nanofluids flowing in a circular tube in the fully developed turbulent regime. The experimental measurements were carried out for aluminum oxide (Al2O3), copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles dispersed in 60:40 EG/W base fluid. Experiments revealed that the heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids showed an increase with the particle volumetric concentration. Pressure loss was also observed to increase with the nanoparticle volumetric concentration. New correlations for the Nusselt number and the friction factor were developed. The effects of temperature and particle volumetric concentration on different thermophysical properties (e.g. viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and subsequently on the Prandtl number

  7. Experimental study of periodic flow effects on spanwise vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Molina, Cruz Daniel; Lopez Sanchez, Erick Javier; Ruiz Chavarria, Gerardo; Medina Ovando, Abraham

    2014-11-01

    We present an experimental study about the spanwise vortex produced in a flow going out of a channel in shallow waters. This vortex travels in front of the dipole. The velocity field measurement was done using the PIV technique, and DPIVsoft (https://www.irphe.fr/ ~meunier/) was used for data processing. In this case the flow has a periodic forcing to simulate ocean tides. The experiment was conducted in a channel with variable width and the measurements were made using three different values of the aspect ratio width-depth. We present results of the position, circulation of this spanwise vortex and the flow inversion effect. The change of flow direction modify the intensity of the vortex, but it does not destroy it. The vertical components of the velocity field contributes particle transport. G. Ruiz Chavarria, E. J. Lopez Sanchez and C. D. Garcia Molina acknowledge DGAPA-UNAM by support under project IN 116312 (Vorticidad y ondas no lineales en fluidos).

  8. Evapotranspiration studies for protective barriers: Experimental plans

    SciTech Connect

    Link, S.O.; Waugh, W.J.

    1989-11-01

    This document describes a general theory and experimental plans for predicting evapotranspiration in support of the Protective Barrier Program. Evapotranspiration is the combined loss of water from plants and soil surfaces to the atmosphere. 45 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. An experimental study on microwave electron gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Wu, J.; Wang, Y.

    1995-12-31

    We report both the simulation and experimental results of using a ring cathode instead of the solid cathode to reduce the back bombardment effect of a thermionic cathode microwave electron gun. The result shows that the back bombardment power is decreased about 2/3 without changing the beam quality apparently which allows operation at higher repetition rate. Experimental results are compared with the simulation with good agreement.

  10. Experimental investigation of electron transport across a magnetic field barrier in electropositive and electronegative plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. B.; Rafalskyi, D.; Lafleur, T.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we experimentally investigate the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons in low temperature plasmas containing a magnetic field barrier; a plasma configuration commonly used in gridded negative ion sources. A planar Langmuir probe array is developed to quantify the \\mathbf{E}× \\mathbf{B} drift of electrons over the cross-section of the ion-extraction region of an ion–ion plasma source. The drift is studied as a function of pressure using both electropositive plasmas (Ar), as well electronegative plasmas (Ar and SF6 mixtures), and is demonstrated to result from an interaction of the applied magnetic field and the electric fields in the sheath and pre-sheath near the transverse boundaries. The drift enhances electron transport across the magnetic field by more than two orders of magnitude compared with simple collisional transport, and is found to be strongly dependant on pressure. The lowest pressure resulted in the highest influence of the drift across the extraction area and is found to be 30%.

  11. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields.

    PubMed

    Azcona, Juan Diego; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac's head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  12. Experimental pencil beam kernels derivation for 3D dose calculation in flattening filter free modulated fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diego Azcona, Juan; Barbés, Benigno; Wang, Lilie; Burguete, Javier

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to obtain the pencil-beam kernels that characterize a megavoltage photon beam generated in a flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerator (linac) by deconvolution from experimental measurements at different depths. The formalism is applied to perform independent dose calculations in modulated fields. In our previous work a formalism was developed for ideal flat fluences exiting the linac’s head. That framework could not deal with spatially varying energy fluences, so any deviation from the ideal flat fluence was treated as a perturbation. The present work addresses the necessity of implementing an exact analysis where any spatially varying fluence can be used such as those encountered in FFF beams. A major improvement introduced here is to handle the actual fluence in the deconvolution procedure. We studied the uncertainties associated to the kernel derivation with this method. Several Kodak EDR2 radiographic films were irradiated with a 10 MV FFF photon beam from two linacs from different vendors, at the depths of 5, 10, 15, and 20cm in polystyrene (RW3 water-equivalent phantom, PTW Freiburg, Germany). The irradiation field was a 50mm diameter circular field, collimated with a lead block. The 3D kernel for a FFF beam was obtained by deconvolution using the Hankel transform. A correction on the low dose part of the kernel was performed to reproduce accurately the experimental output factors. Error uncertainty in the kernel derivation procedure was estimated to be within 0.2%. Eighteen modulated fields used clinically in different treatment localizations were irradiated at four measurement depths (total of fifty-four film measurements). Comparison through the gamma-index to their corresponding calculated absolute dose distributions showed a number of passing points (3%, 3mm) mostly above 99%. This new procedure is more reliable and robust than the previous one. Its ability to perform accurate independent dose calculations was

  13. Experimental studies in non-equilibrium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cressman, John Robert, Jr.

    This work is a collection of three experiments aimed at studying different facets of non-equilibrium dynamics. Chapter I concerns strongly compressible turbulence, which turns out to be very different from incompressible turbulence. The focus is on the dispersion of contaminants in such a flow. This type of turbulence can be studied, at very low mach number, by measuring the velocity fields of particles that float on a turbulently stirred body of water. It turns out that in the absence of incompressibility, the turbulence causes particles to cluster rather than to disperse. The implications of the observations are far reaching and include the transport of pollutants on the oceans surface, phytoplankton growth, as well as industrial applications. Chapter II deals with the effects of polymer additives on drag reduction and turbulent suppression, a well-known phenomenon that is not yet understood. In an attempt to simplify the problem, the effects of a polymer additive were investigated in a vortex street formed in a flowing soap film. Measurements suggest that an increase in elongational viscosity is responsible for a substantial reduction in periodic velocity fluctuations. This study also helps to illuminate the mechanism responsible for vortex separation in the wake of a bluff body. Chapter III describes an experiment designed to test a theoretical approach aimed at generalizing the classical fluctuation dissipation theorem (FDT). This theorem applies to systems driven only slightly away from thermal equilibrium, whereas ours, a liquid crystal under-going electroconvection, is so strongly driven, that the FDT does not apply. Both theory and experiment focus on the flux in global power fluctuations. Physical limitations did not permit a direct test of the theory, however it was possible to establish several interesting characteristics of the system: the source of the fluctuations is the transient defect structures that are generated when the system is driven hard

  14. Experimental and computational studies of nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vajjha, Ravikanth S.

    The goals of this dissertation were (i) to experimentally investigate the fluid dynamic and heat transfer performance of nanofluids in a circular tube, (ii) to study the influence of temperature and particle volumetric concentration of nanofluids on thermophysical properties, heat transfer and pumping power, (iii) to measure the rheological properties of various nanofluids and (iv) to investigate using a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) technique the performance of nanofluids in the flat tube of a radiator. Nanofluids are a new class of fluids prepared by dispersing nanoparticles with average sizes of less than 100 nm in traditional heat transfer fluids such as water, oil, ethylene glycol and propylene glycol. In cold regions of the world, the choice of base fluid for heat transfer applications is an ethylene glycol or propylene glycol mixed with water in different proportions. In the present research, a 60% ethylene glycol (EG) or propylene glycol (PG) and 40% water (W) by mass fluid mixture (60:40 EG/W or 60:40 PG/W) was used as a base fluid, which provides freeze protection to a very low level of temperature. Experiments were conducted to measure the convective heat transfer coefficient and pressure loss of nanofluids flowing in a circular tube in the fully developed turbulent regime. The experimental measurements were carried out for aluminum oxide (Al2O3), copper oxide (CuO) and silicon dioxide (SiO2) nanoparticles dispersed in 60:40 EG/W base fluid. Experiments revealed that the heat transfer coefficient of nanofluids showed an increase with the particle volumetric concentration. Pressure loss was also observed to increase with the nanoparticle volumetric concentration. New correlations for the Nusselt number and the friction factor were developed. The effects of temperature and particle volumetric concentration on different thermophysical properties (e.g. viscosity, thermal conductivity, specific heat and density) and subsequently on the Prandtl number

  15. Mentoring Field Directors: A National Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Martha L.; Raskin, Miriam S.

    2014-01-01

    In social work field education, mentoring is underused and lacks research data. There is a paucity of research that examines the effect mentoring has on social work field directors who administer field programs at the undergraduate and/or graduate level. This exploratory study fills this void by examining the mentoring opportunities and…

  16. Recent biophysical studies in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maret, Georg

    1990-06-01

    A brief overview of biophysical effects of steady magnetic fields is given. The need of high field strength is illustrated by several recent diamagnetic orientation experiments. They include rod-like viruses, purple membranes and chromosomes. Results of various studies on bees, quails, rats and pigeons exposed to fields above 7 T are also resumed.

  17. Experimental Studies on Magnetorheological Model Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendler, Alexandra-Maria; Böse, Holger

    Magnetorheological model suspensions with different contents of iron particles have been investigated. The results show an increase of the shear stress by increasing the magnetic field and the solid content, which was mathematically modelled. The influence of the solid content is approximately exponential without magnetic field and linear in strong magnetic fields. The effect of the temperature and of the base oil viscosity on the shear stress is negligible in the field but decisive without field. The sedimentation behavior also strongly depends on the iron particle content, where MR fluids with a higher concentration settle with a lower intensity due to the higher sediment height. The response time of the magnetorheological model suspensions could not be clearly determined, but it is less than 10 milliseconds.

  18. Industrial Noise and Tooth Wear - Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Cavacas, Maria Alzira; Tavares, Vitor; Borrecho, Gonçalo; Oliveira, Maria João; Oliveira, Pedro; Brito, José; Águas, Artur; dos Santos, José Martins

    2015-01-01

    Tooth wear is a complex multifactorial process that involves the loss of hard dental tissue. Parafunctional habits have been mentioned as a self-destructive process caused by stress, which results in hyperactivity of masticatory muscles. Stress manifests itself through teeth grinding, leading to progressive teeth wear. The effects of continuous exposure to industrial noise, a “stressor” agent, cannot be ignored and its effects on the teeth must be evaluated. Aims: The aim of this study was to ascertain the effects of industrial noise on dental wear over time, by identifying and quantifying crown area loss. Material and Methods: 39 Wistar rats were used. Thirty rats were divided in 3 experimental groups of 10 animals each. Animals were exposed to industrial noise, rich in LFN components, for 1, 4 and 7 months, with an average weekly exposure of 40 hours (8h/day, 5 days/week with the weekends in silence). The remaining 9 animals were kept in silence. The areas of the three main cusps of the molars were measured under light microscopy. Statistical analysis used: A two-way ANOVA model was applied at significance level of 5%. Results: The average area of the molar cusps was significantly different between exposed and non-exposed animals. The most remarkable differences occurred between month 1 and 4. The total crown loss from month 1 to month 7 was 17.3% in the control group, and 46.5% in the exposed group, and the differences between these variations were significant (p<0.001). Conclusions: Our data suggest that industrial noise is an important factor in the pathogenesis of tooth wear. PMID:25798052

  19. Advances in electric field and atomic surface derived properties from experimental electron densities.

    PubMed

    Bouhmaida, Nouzha; Ghermani, Nour Eddine

    2008-07-14

    The present study is devoted to a general use of the Gauss law. This is applied to the atomic surfaces derived from the topological analysis of the electron density. The method proposed here is entirely numerical, robust and does not necessitate any specific parametrization of the atomic surfaces. We focus on two fundamental properties: the atomic charges and the electrostatic forces acting on atoms in molecules. Application is made on experimental electron densities modelized by the Hansen-Coppens model from which the electric field is derived for a heterogenic set of compounds: water molecule, NO(3) anion, bis-triazine molecule and MgO cluster. Charges and electrostatic forces are estimated by the atomic surface flux of the electric field and the Maxwell stress tensor, respectively. The charges obtained from the present method are in good agreement with those issued from the conventional volume integration. Both Feynman and Ehrenfest forces as well as the electrostatic potential at the nuclei (EPN) are here estimated from the experimental electron densities. The values found for the molecular compounds are presented and discussed in the scope of the mechanics of atomic interactions. PMID:18688393

  20. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  1. Electric field driven fractal growth in polymer electrolyte composites: Experimental evidence of theoretical simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawar, Anit; Chandra, Amita

    2012-11-01

    The influence of electric field on the diffusion limited aggregation has been observed experimentally. The observation provides experimental confirmation of the theoretical model proposed by Zhi-Jie Tan et al. [Phys. Lett. A 268 (2000) 112]. Most strikingly, a transition from a disordered ramified pattern to an ordered pattern (chain-like growth) has been observed. The growth is governed by diffusion, convection and migration in an electric field which give rise to the different patterns. This Letter can also be considered as an experimental evidence of computer simulated fractal growth given by Huang and Hibbert [Physica A 233 (1996) 888].

  2. Evolution of an experimental population of Phytophthora capsici in the field

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Populations of the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici are often highly diverse, with limited gene flow between fields. To investigate the structure of a newly established, experimental population, an uninfested research field was inoculated with two single zoospore isolates of P. capsici in Sep...

  3. A field study of wind over a simulated block building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, W.; Shahabi, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    A full-scale field study of the wind over a simulated two-dimensional building is reported. The study develops an experiment to investigate the structure and magnitude of the wind fields. A description of the experimental arrangement, the type and expected accuracy of the data, and the range of the data are given. The data are expected to provide a fundamental understanding of mean wind and turbulence structure of the wind field around the bluff body. Preliminary analysis of the data demonstrates the reliability and completeness of the data in this regard.

  4. Biomass thermochemical gasification: Experimental studies and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    The overall goals of this research were to study the biomass thermochemical gasification using experimental and modeling techniques, and to evaluate the cost of industrial gas production and combined heat and power generation. This dissertation includes an extensive review of progresses in biomass thermochemical gasification. Product gases from biomass gasification can be converted to biopower, biofuels and chemicals. However, for its viable commercial applications, the study summarizes the technical challenges in the gasification and downstream processing of product gas. Corn stover and dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS), a non-fermentable byproduct of ethanol production, were used as the biomass feedstocks. One of the objectives was to determine selected physical and chemical properties of corn stover related to thermochemical conversion. The parameters of the reaction kinetics for weight loss were obtained. The next objective was to investigate the effects of temperature, steam to biomass ratio and equivalence ratio on gas composition and efficiencies. DDGS gasification was performed on a lab-scale fluidized-bed gasifier with steam and air as fluidizing and oxidizing agents. Increasing the temperature resulted in increases in hydrogen and methane contents and efficiencies. A model was developed to simulate the performance of a lab-scale gasifier using Aspen Plus(TM) software. Mass balance, energy balance and minimization of Gibbs free energy were applied for the gasification to determine the product gas composition. The final objective was to optimize the process by maximizing the net energy efficiency, and to estimate the cost of industrial gas, and combined heat and power (CHP) at a biomass feedrate of 2000 kg/h. The selling price of gas was estimated to be 11.49/GJ for corn stover, and 13.08/GJ for DDGS. For CHP generation, the electrical and net efficiencies were 37 and 86%, respectively for corn stover, and 34 and 78%, respectively for DDGS. For

  5. Retrievable IVC Square Stent Filter: Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Pavcnik, Dusan; Uchida, Barry T.; Keller, Frederick S.; Corless, Christopher L.; Roesch, Josef

    1999-05-15

    experimental and eventual clinical studies with a commercially manufactured SSF.

  6. Experimental study of uncentralized squeeze film dampers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, R. D.

    1983-01-01

    The vibration response of a rotor system supported by a squeeze film damper (SFD) was experimentally investigated in order to provide experimental data in support of the Rotor/Stator Interactive Finite Element theoretical development. Part of the investigation required the designing and building of a rotor/SFD system that could operate with or without end seals in order to accommodate different SFD lengths. SFD variables investigated included clearance, eccentricity mass, fluid pressure, and viscosity and temperature. The results show inlet pressure, viscosity and clearance have significant influence on the damper performance and accompanying rotor response.

  7. Computatonal and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, M.D.; Long, M.B.

    1993-12-01

    This research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in counterflow, cylindrical and coflowing axisymmetric configurations. The authors have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the one and two-dimensional nonlinear boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. In particular, spontaneous Raman scattering and laser induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles.

  8. Vibrio viscosus in farmed Atlantic salmon Salmo salar in Scotland: field and experimental observations.

    PubMed

    Bruno, D W; Griffiths, J; Petrie, J; Hastings, T S

    1998-11-30

    Winter mortality occurred in market-sized (2 to 3 kg) Atlantic salmon Salmo salar reared in sea cages in Scottish waters. Many of the fish had skin ulcers. Internally prominent dark-brown petechiae or ecchymotic haemorrhage was observed. Splenomegaly was associated with congestion and widespread necrosis. A Vibrio sp. was isolated from internal organs. Biochemically isolates of the bacterium were similar to a previously described bacterium, Vibrio viscosus, recorded in a phenotypic study from farmed salmon in Norway. This work examines the occurrence of V. viscosus in marine-reared Atlantic salmon for the first time in Scottish waters. An experimental study reproduced the field observations and Koch's postulates were fulfilled. The histopathology associated with natural infection was compared with that in laboratory-infected fish. PMID:9891731

  9. Experimental characterization of Fabry-Perot resonances of magnetostatic volume waves in near-field metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chabalko, Matthew J.; Ricketts, David S.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we report on the experimental demonstration of magnetoquasistatic volume wave resonances in a 2-dimensional near field metamaterial (MM). Previous works have described only theoretically the magnetostatic waves in near field MMs and have reported peaks and valleys in the mutual coupling of MM enhanced wireless power transfer that they have attributed to Fabry-Perot resonances, however, neither has been experimentally measured nor characterized. We report on the direct magnetic field measurement of magnetostatic volume waves in a 2D near-field MM and show that the periodic peaks and valleys in mutual coupling observed previously are indeed due to a Fabry-Perot oscillation. In addition, we show that these resonances can be predicted from experimentally extracted permeability and the dimensions of the system.

  10. Experimental manipulation of floral scent bouquets restructures flower-visitor interactions in the field.

    PubMed

    Larue, Anne-Amélie C; Raguso, Robert A; Junker, Robert R

    2016-03-01

    A common structural feature of natural communities is the non-random distribution of pairwise interactions between organisms of different trophic levels. For plant-animal interactions, it is predicted that both stochastic processes and functional plant traits that facilitate or prevent interactions are responsible for these patterns. However, unbiased manipulative field experiments that rigorously test the effects of individual traits on community structure are lacking. We address this gap by manipulating floral scent bouquets in the field. Manipulation of floral scent bouquets led to quantitative as well as qualitative restructuring of flower-visitor networks, making them more generalized. Olfactometer trials confirmed both positive and negative responses to scent bouquets. Our results clearly show that the distribution of insect visitors to the two abundant study plant species reflects the insects' species-specific preferences for floral scents, rather than for visual or morphological floral traits. Thus, floral scents may be of major importance in partitioning flower-visitor interactions. Integrating experimental manipulations of plant traits with field observations of interaction patterns thus represents a promising approach for revealing the processes that structure species assemblages in natural communities. PMID:26428739

  11. Experimental study of cadaver head transmittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lychagov, Vladislav V.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Vilensky, Maxim A.; Savchenko, Eugeny P.; Efimov, Alexander A.; Lakodina, Nina A.; De Taboada, Luis; Reznik, Boris N.

    2005-06-01

    The results of measurements of transmittance of high power laser irradiation through skull bones and scalp are presented. Dependences of transmittance on sample thickness were received. Character of transmittance was investigated and characteristics of heterogeneity of the scattering structure of the skull bones are proposed. Besides that, variation of temperature of skull and scalp surfaces under exposure of high power laser irradiation during experiments was controlled. Experimental results were verified by Monte-Carlo simulations.

  12. Experimental Study of Sterilizing Molds by Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Jin-lian; Niu, Yong

    1998-02-01

    An ultrasound method of sterilizing aspergillus flavus and fusarium is proposed and demonstrated. The dependence of sterilizing effect on ultrasonic intensity, frequency, and treatment time is experimentally investigated. The density of surviving spores decreases first with increasing ultrasonic frequency and then increases with the further increase of the frequency, that is to say, there exists the optimum frequency 26 kHz at which the killing rate is near 100%. The killing rate seems proportional to the intensity and the time.

  13. Extremes of the nuclear landscape: experimental studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Henning, W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly more intense beams of radioactive isotopes allow moving into unknown areas of the nuclear chart and exploring the limits in nuclear binding and proton-to-neutron ratio. New aspects of nuclear structure and important results for nuclear astrophysics are obtained. The paper provides some overview of experimental developments, facilities and research results; and is intended to set the stage for the many exciting examples of research presented in these proceedings.

  14. ELF electric and magnetic fields: Pacific Northwest Laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E.

    1992-06-01

    Studies have been conducted at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to examine extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields for possible biological effects in animals. Three areas of investigation are reported here: (1) studies on the nervous system, including behavior and neuroendocrine function, (2) experiments on cancer development in animals, and (3) measurements of currents and electric fields induced in animal models by exposure to external magnetic fields. In behavioral experiments, rats have been shown to be responsive to ELF electric field exposure. Furthermore, experimental data indicate that short-term memory may be affected in albino rats exposed to combined ELF and static magnetic fields. Neuroendocrine studies have been conducted to demonstrate an apparent stress-related response in rats exposed to 60-Hz electric fields. Nighttime pineal melatonin levels have been shown to be significantly depressed in animals exposed to either electric or magnetic fields. A number of animal tumor models are currently under investigation to examine possible relationships between ELF exposure and carcinogenesis. Finally, theoretical and experimental measurements have been performed which form the basis for animals and human exposure comparisons.

  15. Experimental optimization of cooling-tower-fan control based on field data. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, D.L.

    1991-04-01

    Energy costs continue to play an important role in the decision-making process for building design and operation. Since the chiller, cooling tower fans, and associated pumps consume the largest fraction of energy in a heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, the control of these components is of major importance in determining building energy use. A significant control parameter for the chilled water system is the minimum entering condenser water set point temperature at which the cooling tower fans are cycled on and off, several studies have attempted to determine the optimum value for this minimum set point temperature, but direct measurements are not available to validate these studies. The purpose of this study was to experimentally determine the optimum minimum entering condenser water set point temperature from field data based on minimum energy consumption and to validate a chilled water system analytical model previously developed in earlier work. The total chiller system electrical consumption (chiller and cooling tower fan energy) was measured for four entering condensor water set point temperatures (70, 75, 80, and 85 deg F). The field results were compared to results obtained using an analytical model previously developed in a thesis entitled Optimized Design of a Commercial Building Chiller/Cooling Tower System, written by Joyce.

  16. Age, Women, and Hiring: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahey, Joanna N.

    2008-01-01

    As baby boomers reach retirement age, demographic pressures on public programs may cause policy makers to cut benefits and encourage employment at later ages. But how much demand exists for older workers? This paper reports on a field experiment to determine hiring conditions for older women in entry-level jobs in two cities. A younger worker is…

  17. Experimental studies of rotating exchange flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, B.; Smeed, D. A.; Dalziel, S. B.; Lane-Serff, G. F.

    2007-02-01

    Ocean basins are connected by straits and passages, geometrically limiting important heat and salt exchanges which in turn influence the global thermohaline circulation and climate. Such exchange can be modeled in an idealized way by taking into consideration the density-driven two-layer flow along a strait under the influence of rotation. We use a laboratory model of a lock exchange between two reservoirs of different density through a flat-bottom channel with a horizontal narrows, set up on two different platforms: a 1 m diameter turntable, where density interface position was measured by dye attenuation, and the 14 m diameter turntable at Coriolis/LEGI (Grenoble, France), where correlation imaging velocimetry, a particle imaging technique, allowed us to obtain for the first time detailed measurements of the velocity fields in these flows. The influence of rotation is studied by varying a parameter, Bu, a type of Burger number given by the ratio of the Rossby radius to the channel width at the narrows. In addition, a two-layer version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Model (MICOM) is used, to study the cases with low Burger number. Results from experiments by Dalziel [1988. Two-layer hydraulics: maximal exchange flows. Ph.D. Thesis, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, see also ] are also included for comparison. Time-mean exchange fluxes for any Bu are in close agreement with the inviscid zero-potential vorticity theory of Dalziel [1990. Rotating two-layer sill flows. In: Pratt, L.J. (Ed.), The Physical Oceanography of Sea Straits. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht, pp. 343-371] and Whitehead et al. [1974. Rotating hydraulics of strait and sill flows. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 6, 101-125], who found that fluxes for Bu>1 mainly vary with channel width, similar to non-rotating flow, but for Bu<1 are only limited by the Rossby radius. We also show

  18. Microwave field pattern measurement for EMC study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagi, Tasuku

    The author has developed a robotic system for automatic measurement of a microwave field. An antenna (sensor) scans a field space to be measured. The data of each point in the scanned space is stored in memories and processed to display or print out as a field pattern. All systems are controlled by a microcomputer. Scattering field by an object to be studied can be obtained without use of a special measuring site by obtaining a difference between the field intensity without the object and that with the object. Several measuring examples are presented, such as a field pattern in a living space, diffraction pattern around the living body, pattern measurement of an effect of aprons for protection from the microwave field, and so on.

  19. Validity of archaeomagnetic field recording: an experimental pottery kiln at Coppengrave, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman; Korte, Monika; Klett-Drechsel, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic data obtained from archaeological materials are used for reconstructions of the Earth's magnetic field of the past millennia. While many studies tested the reliability of this recorder for palaeointensity only a few studies did this for direction. The study presents an archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation applied to an experimental pottery kiln, which was operated in 2003 to produce stone ware. This kind of high-quality pottery needs a temperature of at least 1160 °C. Shortly before heating of the kiln direct absolute measurements of the absolute geomagnetic field vector have been carried out close to it. After cooling of the kiln 24 oriented palaeomagnetic samples have been taken. Although Curie temperatures are about 580 °C, that is the typical temperature for magnetite, thermal as well as alternating field demagnetisations reveal also a considerable amount of hematite as magnetic carrier. This mixture of magnetite and hematite is dominated by pseudo-single domain grains. Demagnetisation removed in some cases weak secondary components, but in most cases the specimens carried a single component thermoremanent magnetisation. The mean characteristic remanent magnetisation direction agrees on 95 per cent confidence level with the directly measured field direction. Archaeointensity was obtained from five specimens with the Thellier-Coe method and with the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method. Six of these specimens also provided a result of the Dekkers-Böhnel method, which overestimated the archaeointensity by about 9 per cent compared to the direct value, while after correction for fraction the value agrees very well. For the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method only fractions between 25 and 75 per cent have been used and specimens showing alteration have been excluded. Above 450 °C many specimens showed alteration of the magnetic grains. Because median destructive temperatures were

  20. Validity of archaeomagnetic field recording: an experimental pottery kiln at Coppengrave, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman; Korte, Monika; Klett-Drechsel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic data obtained from archaeological materials are used for reconstructions of the Earth's magnetic field of the past millennia. While many studies tested the reliability of this recorder for palaeointensity only a few studies did this for direction. The study presents an archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation applied to an experimental pottery kiln, which was operated in 2003 to produce stone ware. This kind of high-quality pottery needs a temperature of at least 1160 °C. Shortly before heating of the kiln direct absolute measurements of the absolute geomagnetic field vector have been carried out close to it. After cooling of the kiln 24 oriented palaeomagnetic samples have been taken. Although Curie temperatures are about 580 °C, that is the typical temperature for magnetite, thermal as well as alternating field demagnetisations reveal also a considerable amount of hematite as magnetic carrier. This mixture of magnetite and hematite is dominated by pseudo-single domain grains. Demagnetisation removed in some cases weak secondary components, but in most cases the specimens carried a single component thermoremanent magnetisation. The mean characteristic remanent magnetisation direction agrees on 95 per cent confidence level with the directly measured field direction. Archaeointensity was obtained from five specimens with the Thellier–Coe method and with the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method. Six of these specimens also provided a result of the Dekkers–Böhnel method, which overestimated the archaeointensity by about 9 per cent compared to the direct value, while after correction for fraction the value agrees very well. For the multiple-specimen palaeointensity domain-state corrected method only fractions between 25 and 75 per cent have been used and specimens showing alteration have been excluded. Above 450 °C many specimens showed alteration of the magnetic grains. Because median destructive

  1. Validity of archaeomagnetic field recording: an experimental pottery kiln at Coppengrave, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnepp, Elisabeth; Leonhardt, Roman; Korte, Monika; Klett-Drechsel, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Palaeomagnetic data obtained from archaeological materials are used for reconstructions of the Earth's magnetic field of the past millennia. While many studies tested the reliability of this recorder for palaeointensity only a few studies did this for direction. The study presents an archaeomagnetic and rock magnetic investigation applied to an experimental pottery kiln, which was operated in 2003 to produce stone ware. This kind of high-quality pottery needs a temperature of at least 1160°C. Shortly before heating of the kiln direct absolute measurements of the absolute geomagnetic field vector have been carried out close to it. After cooling of the kiln 24 oriented paleomagnetic samples have been taken. Although Curie temperatures are about 580°C, i.e. the typical temperature for magnetite, thermal as well as alternating field demagnetisations reveal also a considerable amount of hematite as magnetic carrier. This mixture of magnetite and hematite is dominated by pseudo-single domain grains. Demagnetisation removed in some cases weak secondary components, but in most cases the specimens carried a single component thermoremanent magnetisation. The mean characteristic remanent magnetisation direction agrees on 95% confidence level with the directly measured field direction. Archaeointensity was obtained from five specimens with the Thellier-Coe method and with the multiple-specimen paleointensity domain-state corrected method. Six of these specimens also provided a result of the Dekkers-Böhnel method, which over-estimated the archaeointensity by about 9 per cent compared to the direct value, while after correction for fraction the value agrees very well. For the multiple-specimen paleointensity domain-state corrected method only fractions between 25 and 75 per cent have been used and specimens showing alteration have been excluded. Above 450°C many specimens showed alteration of the magnetic grains. Because median destructive temperatures were often above this

  2. Experimental study on behavior of GFRP stiffened panels under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankeri, Pradeep; Ganesh Mahidhar, P. K.; Prakash, S. Suriya; Ramji, M.

    2015-03-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) materials are extensively used in the aerospace and marine industries because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Stiffened panels are commonly used in aircraft wing and fuselage parts. The present study focuses on the behavior of composite stiffened panels under compressive loading. With the introduction of stiffeners to unstiffened composite plates, the structural stiffness of the panel increases resulting in higher strength and stiffness. Studies in the past have shown that the critical structural failure mode under compressive loading of a stiffened composite panel is by local buckling. The present study attempts to evaluate the mechanical behavior of composite stiffened panels under compression using blade stiffener configuration and in particular on the behavior of the skin- stiffener interface through experimental testing. A novel test fixture is developed for experimental testing of GFRP stiffened panels. A non-contact whole field strain analysis technique called digital image correlation (DIC) is used for capturing the strain and damage mechanisms. Blade stiffeners increased the strength, stiffness and reduced the out-of plane displacement at failure. The failure of both the unstiffened and stiffened panels was through local buckling rather than through material failure. DIC was able to capture the strain localization and buckling failure modes.

  3. Experimental measurements of topological singularity screening in random paraxial scalar and vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Egorov, Roman I; Soskin, Marat S; Kessler, David A; Freund, Isaac

    2008-03-14

    There exists a substantial body of theory that predicts mutual screening of signed topological singularities (topological charges) in random optical fields (speckle patterns). Such screening appears to be rather mysterious because there are neither energetic nor entropic reasons for its existence. We present the first experimental confirmation of mutual screening by the stationary points of the intensity, the canonical optical scalar field, and of mutual screening by C points in elliptically polarized light, the generic optical vector field. We also elucidate specific aspects of the geometry and topology of these fields that we argue give rise to screening. PMID:18352186

  4. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1996-01-01

    Boiling is an effective mode of heat transfer since high heat flux levels are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences. The high heat transfer coefficients associated with boiling have made the use of these processes increasingly attractive to aerospace engineering. Applications of this type include compact evaporators in the thermal control of aircraft avionics and spacecraft environments, heat pipes, and use of boiling to cool electronic equipment. In spite of its efficiency, cooling based on liquid-vapor phase change processes has not yet found wide application in aerospace engineering due to specific problems associated with the low gravity environment. After a heated surface has reached the superheat required for the initiation of nucleate boiling, bubbles will start forming at nucleation sites along the solid interface by evaporation of the liquid. Bubbles in contact with the wall will continue growing by this mechanism until they detach. In terrestrial conditions, bubble detachment is determined by the competition between body forces (e.g. buoyancy) and surface tension forces that act to anchor the bubble along the three phase contact line. For a given body force potential and a balance of tensions along the three phase contact line, bubbles must reach a critical size before the body force can cause them to detach from the wall. In a low gravity environment the critical bubble size for detachment is much larger than under terrestrial conditions, since buoyancy is a less effective means of bubble removal. Active techniques of heat transfer enhancement in single phase and phase change processes by utilizing electric fields have been the subject of intensive research during recent years. The field of electrohydrodynamics (EHD) deals with the interactions between electric fields, flow fields and temperature fields. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50 as

  5. Experimental studies of Generalized Parton Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) are nowadays the object of an intense effort of research, in the perspective of understanding nucleon structure. They describe the correlations between the longitudinal momentum and the transverse spatial position of the partons inside the nucleon and they can give access to the contribution of the orbital momentum of the quarks to the nucleon spin. Deeply Virtual Compton scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction on the nucleon, at the quark level, of a real photon, is the process more directly interpretable in terms of GPDs of the nucleon. Depending on the target nucleon (proton or neutron) and on the DVCS observable extracted (cross-sections, target- or beam-spin asymmetries, etc.), different sensitivity to the various GPDs for each quark flavor can be exploited. This article is focused on recent promising results, obtained at Jefferson Lab, on cross-sections and asymmetries for DVCS, and their link to GPDs. These data open the way to a “tomographic” representation of the structure of the nucleon, allowing the extraction of transverse-space densities of the quarks at fixed longitudinal momentum. The extensive experimental program to measure GPDs at Jefferson Lab with the 12 GeV-upgraded electron accelerator and the complementary detectors that will be housed in three experimental Halls (A, B and C), will also be presented.

  6. Microwave magnetoelectric fields: An analytical study of topological characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joffe, R.; Shavit, R.; Kamenetskii, E. O.

    2015-10-01

    The near fields originated from a small quasi-two-dimensional ferrite disk with magnetic-dipolar-mode (MDM) oscillations are the fields with broken dual (electric-magnetic) symmetry. Numerical studies show that such fields - called the magnetoelectric (ME) fields - are distinguished by the power-flow vortices and helicity parameters (E.O. Kamenetskii, R. Joffe, R. Shavit, Phys. Rev. E 87 (2013) 023201). These numerical studies can well explain recent experimental results with MDM ferrite disks. In the present paper, we obtain analytically topological characteristics of the ME-field modes. For this purpose, we used a method of successive approximations. In the second approximation we take into account the influence of the edge regions of an open ferrite disk, which are excluded in the first-approximation solving of the magnetostatic (MS) spectral problem. Based on the analytical method, we obtain a "pure" structure of the electric and magnetic fields outside the MDM ferrite disk. The analytical studies can display some fundamental features that are non-observable in the numerical results. While in numerical investigations, one cannot separate the ME fields from the external electromagnetic (EM) radiation, the present theoretical analysis allows clearly distinguish the eigen topological structure of the ME fields. Importantly, this ME-field structure gives evidence for certain phenomena that can be related to the Tellegen and bianisotropic coupling effects. We discuss the question whether the MDM ferrite disk can exhibit properties of the cross magnetoelectric polarizabilities.

  7. Systematic study of bubble nuclei in relativistic mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Åberg, S.; Bajpeyi, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have theoretically studied potential bubble nuclei (20,22O, 34,36Si, and 46Ar), which are experimentally accessible and have attracted several studies in the recent past. Relativistic mean field is employed in conjunction with the NL-SH parameter set. Our results show that among the possible candidates, 22Oand 34Si may be the most prominent candidates, showing significant depletion of density at the center, which could be verified experimentally in the near future with some of the experiments underway.

  8. Experimental and theoretical studies of implant assisted magnetic drug targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aviles, Misael O.

    One way to achieve drug targeting in the body is to incorporate magnetic nanoparticles into drug carriers and then retain them at the site using an externally applied magnetic field. This process is referred to as magnetic drug targeting (MDT). However, the main limitation of MDT is that an externally applied magnetic field alone may not be able to retain a sufficient number of magnetic drug carrier particles (MDCPs) to justify its use. Such a limitation might not exist when high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) principles are applied to assist MDT by means of ferromagnetic implants. It was hypothesized that an Implant Assisted -- MDT (IA-MDT) system would increase the retention of the MDCPs at a target site where an implant had been previously located, since the magnetic forces are produced internally. With this in mind, the overall objective of this work was to demonstrate the feasibility of an IA-MDT system through mathematical modeling and in vitro experimentation. The mathematical models were developed and used to demonstrate the behavior and limitations of IA-MDT, and the in vitro experiments were designed and used to validate the models and to further elucidate the important parameters that affect the performance of the system. IA-MDT was studied with three plausible implants, ferromagnetic stents, seed particles, and wires. All implants were studied theoretically and experimentally using flow through systems with polymer particles containing magnetite nanoparticles as MDCPs. In the stent studies, a wire coil or mesh was simply placed in a flow field and the capture of the MDCPs was studied. In the other cases, a porous polymer matrix was used as a surrogate capillary tissue scaffold to study the capture of the MDCPs using wires or particle seeds as the implant, with the seeds either fixed within the polymer matrix or captured prior to capturing the MDCPs. An in vitro heart tissue perfusion model was also used to study the use of stents. In general, all

  9. Experimental study of external fuel vaporization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szetela, E. J.; Tevelde, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    The fuel properties used in the design of a flash vaporization system for aircraft gas turbine engines were evaluated in experiments using a flowing system to determine critical temperature and pressure, boiling points, dew points, heat transfer coefficients, deposit formation rates, and deposit removal. Three fuels were included in the experiments: Jet-A, an experimental referree broad specification fuel, and a premium No. 2 diesel fuel. Engine conditions representing a NASA Energy Efficient Engine at sea-level take-off, cruise, and idle were simulated in the vaporization system and it was found that single phase flow was maintained in the heat exchanger and downstream of the throttle. Deposits encountered in the heat exchanger represented a thermal resistance as high as 1300 sq M K/watt and a deposit formation rate over 1000 gC/sq cm hr.

  10. Experimental Study of Torsional Column Failure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nile, Alfred S

    1939-01-01

    Thirty-three 24ST aluminum-alloy 2- by 2- by 0.10-inch channels, with lengths ranging from 10 to 90 inches were tested at Stanford University in compression to obtain an experimental verification of the theoretical formulas for torsional failure developed by Eugene E. Lundquist of the N.A.C.A. The observed critical loads and twist-axis locations were sufficiently close to the values obtained from the formulas to establish the substantial validity of the latter. The differences between observed and computed results were small enough to be accounted for by small and mostly unavoidable differences between actual test conditions and those assumed in deriving the formulas. Some data were obtained from the shorter specimens regarding the growth of the buckles that resulted in local buckling failure.

  11. Experimental studies of collision and fragmentation phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartmann, William K.; Davis, D. R.; Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    The reduction and publication of an extensive data set collected in experiments over several years at Ames and PSI is briefly examined. Hartmann has been assembling data sets from his experiments on catastrophic fragmentation of various materials, including basalt, other igneous rock, ice, and weak dirt clods. Weidenschilling and Davis have continued to gather and reduce data on oblique impacts. The data indicate a power law distribution of ejecta mass vs. velocity, with a slope that is independent of azimuth, and does not vary with impact angle from normal impacts to at least 75 deg from vertical. In order to improve models of coagulation of dust aggregates in the solar nebula, SJW developed an apparatus for drop tests of fragile projectiles. Davis and Weidenschilling continued to collect and analyze experimental data on collisional catastrophic disruption at the Ames Vertical Gun Range.

  12. Experimental and theoretical study of ornidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Gunasekaran, S.; Gnanasambandan, T.; Seshadri, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and the Fourier transform Raman (FT-Raman) spectra of the title molecule in solid phase were recorded in the region 4000-400 cm- 1 and 4000-100 cm- 1 respectively. The geometrical parameters and energies were investigated with the help of Density Functional Theory (DFT) employing B3LYP method and 6-31G (d, p) basis set. The analysis was supported by electrostatic potential maps and calculation of HOMO-LUMO. UV, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of ornidazole were calculated and compared with experimental results. Thermodynamic properties like entropy, heat capacity, have been calculated for the molecule. The predicted first hyperpolarizability also shows that the molecule might have a reasonably good non-linear optical (NLO) behavior. The intramolecular contacts have been interpreted using natural bond orbital (NBO) and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) analysis.

  13. Experimental land observing data system feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. L.; Kraiman, H.

    1982-01-01

    An end-to-end data system to support a Shuttle-based Multispectral Linear Array (MLA) mission in the mid-1980's was defined. The experimental Land Observing System (ELOS) is discussed. A ground system that exploits extensive assets from the LANDSAT-D Program to effectively meet the objectives of the ELOS Mission was defined. The goal of 10 meter pixel precision, the variety of data acquisition capabilities, and the use of Shuttle are key to the mission requirements, Ground mission management functions are met through the use of GSFC's Multi-Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC). The MLA Image Generation Facility (MIGF) combines major hardware elements from the Applications Development Data System (ADDS) facility and LANDSAT Assessment System (LAS) with a special purpose MLA interface unit. LANDSAT-D image processing techniques, adapted to MLA characteristics, form the basis for the use of existing software and the definition of new software required.

  14. Computational and experimental study of laminar flames

    SciTech Connect

    Smooke, Mitchell

    2015-05-29

    During the past three years, our research has centered on an investigation of the effects of complex chemistry and detailed transport on the structure and extinction of hydrocarbon flames in coflowing axisymmetric configurations. We have pursued both computational and experimental aspects of the research in parallel on both steady-state and time-dependent systems. The computational work has focused on the application of accurate and efficient numerical methods for the solution of the steady-state and time-dependent boundary value problems describing the various reacting systems. Detailed experimental measurements were performed on axisymmetric coflow flames using two-dimensional imaging techniques. Previously, spontaneous Raman scattering, chemiluminescence, and laser-induced fluorescence were used to measure the temperature, major and minor species profiles. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) has been used to investigate velocity distributions and for calibration of time-varying flames. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) with an extinction calibration was used to determine soot volume fractions, while soot surface temperatures were measured with three-color optical pyrometry using a color digital camera. A blackbody calibration of the camera allows for determination of soot volume fraction as well, which can be compared with the LII measurements. More recently, we have concentrated on a detailed characterization of soot using a variety of techniques including time-resolved LII (TiRe-LII) for soot primary particles sizes, multi-angle light scattering (MALS) for soot radius of gyration, and spectrally-resolved line of sight attenuation (spec-LOSA). Combining the information from all of these soot measurements can be used to determine the soot optical properties, which are observed to vary significantly depending on spatial location and fuel dilution. Our goal has been to obtain a more fundamental understanding of the important fluid dynamic and chemical interactions in

  15. Experimental investigation of heating phenomena in linac mechanical interfaces due to RF field penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Fazio, M.V.; Reid, D.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    In a high duty-factor, high-current, drift-tube linear accelerator, a critical interface exists between the drift-tube stem and the tank wall. This interface must provide vacuum integrity and RF continuity, while simultaneously allowing alignment flexibility. Because of past difficulties with RF heating of vacuum bellows and RF joints encountered by others, a paucity of available information, and the high reliability requirement for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator, a program was initiated to study the problem. Because RF heating is the common failure mode, an attempt was made to find a correlation between the drift-tube-stem/linac-tank interface geometry and RF field penetration from the tank into the interface region. Experiments were performed at 80 MHz on an RF structure designed to simulate the conditions to which a drift-tube stem and vacuum bellows are exposed in a drift-tube linac. Additional testing was performed on a 367-MHz model of the FMIT prototype drift-tube linac. Experimental results, and a method to predict excessive RF heating, is presented. An experimentally tested solution to the problem is discussed.

  16. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.; Pearson, J.

    2006-11-01

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O(α,p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  17. Experimental Study of Stellar Reactions at CNS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubono, S.; Yamaguchi, H.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Amadio, G.; Hayakawa, S.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Teranishi, T.; Nishimura, S.; Fukunishi, N.; Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, K.; Kato, S.; Tanaka, M. H.; Fuchi, Y.; Moon, J. Y.; Kwon, K.; Lee, C. S.; Khiem, Le Hong; Chen, A.

    2006-11-02

    After a brief review on low-energy RI beam production technology, nuclear astrophysics programs at CNS are presented including a scope of the field in the Wako campus. The CRIB project involves a total development of the whole facility to maximize the low-energy RI beam intensities, including the ion source, the AVF cyclotron and the low-energy RI beam separator CRIB, Some recent nuclear astrophysics experiments performed with the RI beams were discussed, including the measurement of the 14O({alpha},p)17F reaction, the key stellar reaction for the onset of the high-temperature rp-process. The first experiment performed with a newly installed high-resolution magnetic spectrograph PA of CNS was also presented. Collaboration possibilities for nuclear astrophysics in the RIKEN campus are also touched.

  18. Experimental study of asymmetric heart valve prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukicevic, M.; Fortini, S.; Querzoli, G.; Cenedese, A.; Pedrizzetti, G.

    2011-11-01

    The mechanical heart valves (MHVs) are extremely important medical devices, commonly used for diseased heart valves replacement. Despite the long term of use and constant design refinement, the MHVs are very far from ideal and their performance is very diverse from that of the native ones. It has been approved that small variations in geometry of valvular leaflets influence the significant change in the intraventricular vortical flow, known as one of the most important factors for the overall functionality of the heart. We have experimentally examined the home-made heart valve prototypes, exclusively modeled for the mitral valve replacement. The performance and energetic properties of the prototypes have been compared with those in the presence of standard MHVs. The analysis was based on the testing of intraventricular fluid dynamics, usually missing criteria for the quality of the valve performance. It has been shown that the asymmetric prototype, with unequal leaflets and D-shaped orifice produces flow patterns and energetic properties close to those found in the healthy subjects. Thus, the break of symmetry in the standard bi-leaflet MHV prosthesis, at least from the fluid dynamics point of view, is worthwhile to be considered for the design of MHVs for the mitral valve replacement.

  19. Experimental study of low Reynolds number nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisnik, Stanley P.; Smith, Tamara A.; Saltz, Larry E.

    1987-01-01

    High-performance electrothermal thrusters operate in a low nozzle-throat Reynolds number regime. Under these conditions, the flow boundary layer occupies a large volume inside the nozzle, contributing to large viscous losses. Four nozzles (conical, bell, trumpet, and modified trumpet) and a sharp-edged orifice were evaluated over a Reynolds number range of 500 to 9000 with unheated nitrogen and hydrogen. The nozzles showed significant decreases in specific impulse efficiency with decreasing Reynolds number. At Reynolds numbers less than 1000, all four nozzles were probably filled with a large boundary layer. The discharge coefficient decreased with Reynolds number in the same manner as the specific impulse efficiency. The bell and modified trumpet nozzles had discharge coefficients 4 to 8 percent higher than those of the cone or trumpet nozzles. The Two-Dimensional Kinetics (TDK) nozzle analysis computer program was used to predict nozzle performance. The results were then compared to the experimental results in order to determine the accuracy of the program within this flow regime.

  20. Experimental and analytical studies in fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goglia, Gene L.; Ibrahim, Adel

    1984-01-01

    The first objective was to analyze and design a true airspeed sensor which will replace the conventional pitot-static pressure transducer for small commercial aircraft. The second objective was to obtain a numerical solution and predict the frequency response which is generated by the vortex whistle at a certain airspeed. It was concluded flow rate measurements indicate that the vortex tube sound frequency is linearly proportional to the frequency response. The vortex tube whistle frequency is dependent upon geometrical parameters to such an extent that: an increase in vortex tube length produces a decrease in frequency response and that an increase in the exhaust nozzle length produces an increase in the frequency precession. An increase in the vortex tube diameter produces a decrease in frequency precession. An increase in swirler diameter produces a decrease in frequency. An increase in the location distance of the microphone pickup signal point from the inside edge of the exit nozzle produces an increase in frequency response. The experimental results indicate that those parameters most significantly effecting frequency are in descending order of importance microphone location, vortex tube diameter, exit nozzle length, vortex tube length, and swirler diameter.

  1. Computational and Experimental Flow Field Analyses of Separate Flow Chevron Nozzles and Pylon Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massey, Steven J.; Thomas, Russell H.; AbdolHamid, Khaled S.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.

    2003-01-01

    A computational and experimental flow field analyses of separate flow chevron nozzles is presented. The goal of this study is to identify important flow physics and modeling issues required to provide highly accurate flow field data which will later serve as input to the Jet3D acoustic prediction code. Four configurations are considered: a baseline round nozzle with and without a pylon, and a chevron core nozzle with and without a pylon. The flow is simulated by solving the asymptotically steady, compressible, Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations using an implicit, up-wind, flux-difference splitting finite volume scheme and standard two-equation kappa-epsilon turbulence model with a linear stress representation and the addition of a eddy viscosity dependence on total temperature gradient normalized by local turbulence length scale. The current CFD results are seen to be in excellent agreement with Jet Noise Lab data and show great improvement over previous computations which did not compensate for enhanced mixing due to high temperature gradients.

  2. A Computational and Experimental Investigation of a Three-Dimensional Hypersonic Scramjet Inlet Flow Field. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Scott Douglas

    1991-01-01

    A combined computational and experimental parametric study of the internal aerodynamics of a generic three dimensional sidewall compression scramjet inlet configuration was performed. The study was designed to demonstrate the utility of computational fluid dynamics as a design tool in hypersonic inlet flow fields, to provide a detailed account of the nature and structure of the internal flow interactions, and to provide a comprehensive surface property and flow field database to determine the effects of contraction ratio, cowl position, and Reynolds number on the performance of a hypersonic scramjet inlet configuration.

  3. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies.

    PubMed

    Acquadro, Michaël A S; Congedo, Marco; De Riddeer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally social and tend to create emergent organizations when interacting with each other; from dyads to families, small groups, large groups, societies, and civilizations. The study of the neuronal substrate of human social behavior is currently gaining momentum in the young field of social neuroscience. Hyperscanning is a neuroimaging technique by which we can study two or more brains simultaneously while participants interact with each other. The aim of this article is to discuss several factors that we deem important in designing hyperscanning experiments. We first review hyperscanning studies performed by means of electroencephalography (EEG) that have been relying on a continuous interaction paradigm. Then, we provide arguments for favoring ecological paradigms, for studying the emotional component of social interactions and for performing longitudinal studies, the last two aspects being largely neglected so far in the hyperscanning literature despite their paramount importance in social sciences. Based on these premises, we argue that music performance is a suitable experimental setting for hyperscanning and that for such studies EEG is an appropriate choice as neuroimaging modality. PMID:27252641

  4. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acquadro, Michaël A. S.; Congedo, Marco; De Riddeer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally social and tend to create emergent organizations when interacting with each other; from dyads to families, small groups, large groups, societies, and civilizations. The study of the neuronal substrate of human social behavior is currently gaining momentum in the young field of social neuroscience. Hyperscanning is a neuroimaging technique by which we can study two or more brains simultaneously while participants interact with each other. The aim of this article is to discuss several factors that we deem important in designing hyperscanning experiments. We first review hyperscanning studies performed by means of electroencephalography (EEG) that have been relying on a continuous interaction paradigm. Then, we provide arguments for favoring ecological paradigms, for studying the emotional component of social interactions and for performing longitudinal studies, the last two aspects being largely neglected so far in the hyperscanning literature despite their paramount importance in social sciences. Based on these premises, we argue that music performance is a suitable experimental setting for hyperscanning and that for such studies EEG is an appropriate choice as neuroimaging modality. PMID:27252641

  5. Experimental and DFT study on pyrrole tosylhydrazones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam; Verma, Divya; Bharti, Shailendra Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Two pyrrole tosylhydrazones, 1H-pyrrole-2-tosylhydrazone (PT) and ethyl 3,5-dimethyl-4-(1-(2-tosylhydrazono)ethyl)-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylate (EDTEPC) have been synthesized and characterized by various spectroscopic techniques. All calculations have been performed using B3LYP functional and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The result of hydrogen bonding is obvious in 1H NMR and FT-IR due to down field chemical shift and vibrational red shift to pyrrole Nsbnd H proton, respectively. The red shift in both the proton donor (pyrrole Nsbnd H) and proton acceptor (Sdbnd O) group designates presence of intermolecular classical hydrogen bonding Nsbnd H⋯O. The binding energy of dimer formation is calculated as 13.12, 14.12 kcal/mol, after correction in basis set superposition error (BSSE). Topological parameters indicate the weaker interactions presents in the molecules. The global electrophilicity index (ω = 2.54, 2.28 eV) shows that PT and EDTEPC molecules are strong electrophile. The local reactivity descriptors analyses are performed to determine the reactive sites within the PT and EDTEPC. Computed first hyperpolarizability (β0 = 6.50/8.38 × 10-30 esu) of PT and EDTEPC indicates non-linear optical (NLO) response of the molecules.

  6. Experimental results of cusptron microwave tube study

    SciTech Connect

    Namkung, W.; Choe, J.Y.

    1985-10-01

    A cusptron microwave tube generates microwave radiation at high harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency. This device utilizes the negative mass instability for the resonant interaction of an axis rotating electron beam and the modes in a conducting boundary with a multivane structure. A 17 kv, 3 ..mu..sec and 60 pps electron beam passed through a cusped magnetic field, produces radiation at the sixth and twelfth harmonic frequencies with the six and twelve vane structures, respectively. In the sixth harmonic case, the grazing condition is obtained at B = 250 G and approximately 500 W radiation is produced at 4.36 GHz. In the twelfth harmonic case, however, it is operated in a continuously tunable frequency range of 7.4 - 8.2 GHz in B = 210 - 220 G. The radiation power level is substantially reduced to few watts without the grazing condition satisfied. Since it is operated at high harmonic frequencies it holds promise as an efficient, compact, and tunable microwave tube suitable for many practical applications.

  7. An experimental study of recirculating flow through fluid sediment interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalili, A.; Basu, A. J.; Pietrzyk, U.; Raffel, M.

    1999-03-01

    We report here visualizations and quantitative measurements of scalar transport, under the influence of rotation, through permeable sediments with an overlying fluid layer. The experimental set-up considered here is a stationary cylinder containing a fluid-saturated porous medium up to its midheight, with supernatant water on top. A rotating lid generates, in the upper fluid region, a flow that partially percolates into the porous layer below. The velocity field in the fluid layer is obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). Further, dye transport from the sediment is studied using two different techniques. The first one is positron emission tomography (PET), a non-invasive method which allowed us to ‘see’ through the opaque solid matrix, and to obtain full three-dimensional pictures of dye transport through the sediment. The second one is digital photographic visualization from outside, and subsequent image processing in order to obtain the near-wall dye-washout depth. The experimental data suggest that the temporal evolution of washout depth for different sediments follows near-logarithmic behaviour. This finding is of importance for the a priori estimation of the transport of fluid and other solute substances in sandy aquatic sediments.

  8. An experimental study of flow past a rotationally oscillating cylinder.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Lopez, Carlos; Probst, Oliver; Askari, Davood; Yang, Yingchen

    2012-11-01

    Flow past a circular cylinder executing sinusoidal rotary oscillations about its own axis is studied experimentally. The experiments are carried out at Re = 185, oscillation amplitudes varying from π/8 to π, and forcing frequency ratios varying from 0 to 5. It is found that the phenomenon of lock-on occurs in a forcing frequency range which depends not only on the oscillation amplitude but also the downstream location from the cylinder. The experimentally measured lock-on diagram in the forcing amplitude and frequency plane is presented at various downstream locations ranging from 2 to 23 diameters. The upper limit of the lock-on forcing frequency band depends strongly on the downstream location whereas the lower limit is fairly insensitive. The far field wake decouples, after the lock-on at higher forcing frequencies and behaves more like a regular Karman vortex street from a stationary cylinder with a vortex shedding frequency mostly lower than the one from a stationary cylinder. The dependence of circulation values of shed vortices on the forcing frequency revealed a universal decay curve independent of forcing amplitude beyond forcing frequency of ~ 1.0.

  9. Experimental Vertical Stability Studies for ITER Performance and Design Guidance

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, D A; Casper, T A; Eidietis, N; Ferrera, M; Gates, D A; Hutchinson, I H; Jackson, G L; Kolemen, E; Leuer, J A; Lister, J; LoDestro, L L; Meyer, W H; Pearlstein, L D; Sartori, F; Walker, M L; Welander, A S; Wolfe, S M

    2008-10-13

    Operating experimental devices have provided key inputs to the design process for ITER axisymmetric control. In particular, experiments have quantified controllability and robustness requirements in the presence of realistic noise and disturbance environments, which are difficult or impossible to characterize with modeling and simulation alone. This kind of information is particularly critical for ITER vertical control, which poses some of the highest demands on poloidal field system performance, since the consequences of loss of vertical control can be very severe. The present work describes results of multi-machine studies performed under a joint ITPA experiment on fundamental vertical control performance and controllability limits. We present experimental results from Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, NSTX, TCV, and JET, along with analysis of these data to provide vertical control performance guidance to ITER. Useful metrics to quantify this control performance include the stability margin and maximum controllable vertical displacement. Theoretical analysis of the maximum controllable vertical displacement suggests effective approaches to improving performance in terms of this metric, with implications for ITER design modifications. Typical levels of noise in the vertical position measurement which can challenge the vertical control loop are assessed and analyzed.

  10. The GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) Theory of Field Unification: Experimental Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, J. E.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental progress on the GEM (Gravity-Electro-Magnetism) unification theory is summarized as applied to human flight and dynamically modified gravity fields and waves. A VBE (``Vacuum Bernoulli Equation'') is derived. This shows Gravitational energy density to be equated to an EM dynamic pressure that is quadratic in the local Poynting Flux: g2/(2π G) + S2/(c2 L)= Constant, where g and S are the local gravity and Poynting vector magnitudes, respectively, and where L is the Lagrangian density of the vacuum EM field. The VBE can be used to understand anomalous weight loss reported in gyroscope experiments and to understand possible gravity modification for human flight. The GEM gravity modification theory is extended to predict a VHE (Vacuum Hall Effect). Methods for creating dynamic gravity fields via VHE for production and detection of high frequency gravity fields involve electric quadrapole fields normal to static magnetic fields. Earlier experiments at 400Hz had seen lifting effects, however, only when a certain field threshold was crossed. An experiment was performed using 60Hz three phase rotating fields but no effects were seen in low frequency fields thus it appears threshold effects in field intensity and frequency may have been seen.

  11. Apprenticeships, Collaboration and Scientific Discovery in Academic Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Derek Scott; Grayson, Diane J.; Madden, Erinn H.; Milewski, Antoni V.; Snyder, Cathy Ann

    2012-11-01

    Teachers may use apprenticeships and collaboration as instructional strategies that help students to make authentic scientific discoveries as they work as amateur researchers in academic field studies. This concept was examined with 643 students, ages 14-72, who became proficient at field research through cognitive apprenticeships with the Smithsonian Institute, School for Field Studies and Earthwatch. Control student teams worked from single research goals and sets of methods, while experimental teams varied goals, methods, and collaborative activities in Kenya, Costa Rica, Panama, and Ecuador. Results from studies indicate that students who conducted local pilot studies, collaborative symposia, and ongoing, long-term fieldwork generated significantly more data than did control groups. Research reports of the experimental groups were ranked highest by experts, and contributed the most data to international science journals. Data and anecdotal information in this report indicate that structured collaboration in local long-term studies using apprenticeships may increase the potential for students' academic field studies contribution of new information to science.

  12. A Numerical/Experimental Study of Nitinol Actuator Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auricchio, Ferdinando; Scalet, Giulia; Urbano, Marco

    2014-07-01

    This study deals with the numerical modeling, simulation and experimental analysis of shape-memory alloy (SMA) helicoidal springs. An experimental campaign is conducted on both SMA straight wires and helicoidal springs that experienced the same annealing process. Then, we use such experimental results to investigate three phenomenological constitutive models able to represent SMA macroscopic behavior. In particular, after the identification of all the material parameters from experimental results on SMA wires, we inspect the thermo-mechanical behavior of SMA helicoidal springs by comparing numerical predictions to experimental data. Finally, we discuss models capabilities and some aspects characterizing SMA material behavior.

  13. Phase-field modeling and experimental observation of the irregular interface morphology during directional solidification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Taiming

    Evolution of the complex solid-liquid interface morphology during a solidification process is an important issue in solidification theory since the morphology eventually dictates the final microstructure of the solidified material and therefore the material properties. Significant progress have been made in recent years in the study of the formation and development of regular dendritic growth, while only limited understanding is achieved for the irregular interface patterns observed in many industry processes. This dissertation focuses on the physical mechanisms of the development and transition of various irregular interface patterns, including the tilted dendritic, the seaweed, and the degenerate patterns. Both experimental observations and numerical simulation using the phase field modeling are performed. A special effort is devoted on the effects of the capillary anisotropy and the kinetic anisotropy in the evolution of the interface morphology during solidification. Experimentally, a directional solidification system is constructed to observe in situ the interface morphology by using the transparent organic material succinonitrile. With such a system, both the regular interface patterns (cellular and dendritic) and the irregular interface patterns (seaweed, degenerate and tilted dendritic) are observed. The effects of the temperature gradient and the interface velocity on the development and transition of the irregular interface patterns are investigated. It is found that the interface morphology transits from the seaweed to the tilted dendritic pattern as the interface velocity increases, while the tilted dendritic pattern may transit to the degenerate seaweed pattern as the temperature gradient increases. Under certain conditions, dendrites and seaweed coexist within the same grain. The dynamic transitions among various patterns and the effect of the solidification conditions are examined in detail. Numerically, a 2-D phase field model is developed to

  14. Experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT using digital beam attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Szczykutowicz, TP; Mistretta, CA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tailoring CT scan acquisition parameters to individual patients is a topic of much research in the CT imaging community. It is now common place to find automatically adjusted tube current options for modern CT scanners. In addition, the use of beam shaping filters, commonly called bowtie filters, is available on most CT systems and allows for different body regions to receive different incident x-ray fluence distributions. However, no method currently exists which allows for the form of the incident x-ray fluence distribution to change as a function of view angle. This study represents the first experimental realization of fluence field modulated CT (FFMCT) for a c-arm geometry CT scan. Methods: X-ray fluence modulation is accomplished using a digital beam attenuator (DBA). The device is composed of 10 iron wedge pairs that modulate the thickness of iron x-rays must traverse before reaching a patient. Using this device, experimental data was taken using a Siemens Zeego c-arm scanner. Scans were performed on a cylindrical polyethylene phantom and on two different sections of an anthropomorphic phantom. The DBA was used to equalize the x-ray fluence striking the detector for each scan. Non DBA, or “flat field” scans were also acquired of the same phantom objects for comparison. In addition, a scan was performed in which the DBA was used to enable volume of interest (VOI) imaging. In VOI, only a small sub-volume within a patient receives full dose and the rest of the patient receives a much lower dose. Data corrections unique to using a piece-wise constant modulator were also developed. Results The feasibility of FFMCT implemented using a DBA device has been demonstrated. Initial results suggest dose reductions of up to 3.6 times relative to “flat field” CT. In addition to dose reduction, the DBA enables a large improvement in image noise uniformity and the ability to provide regionally enhanced signal to noise using VOI imaging techniques. Conclusions

  15. Combined Experimental and Numerical Diagnostics for Near-field Flow around a Supersonic Flight Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Atsushi; Shimizu, Katsuya; Suzuki, Kakuei; Sasoh, Akihiro; Murakami, Keiichi; Aoyama, Takashi

    A system for evaluating the near-field pressure distribution around a supersonic flight model by combining experimental and numerical diagnostics has been developed. Experimental measurement is conducted using a ballistic range with four kinds of axi-symmetric flight models. Schlieren flow visualization is recorded using a high-speed framing camera and near-field pressure histories are measured using piezoelectric pressure transducers flush-mounted on the surface of flat plates in the test section. The numerical diagnostics is done using FaSTAR, a numerical simulation tool developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The experimental and numerical data are compared to each other, and the numerical results well validated. Based on the numerical results, it becomes possible to estimate the accuracy of experimental conditions including the flight path and angle of attack, which cannot readily be determined only from experimental data, and to discuss the relationship between peak overpressure and aerodynamic performance. Satisfactory agreement between the experimental and numerical results at a flight Mach number of 1.66±0.02 and important insights related to rear boom strength are obtained.

  16. Experimental studies of ITER demonstration discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sips, A. C. C.; Casper, T. A.; Doyle, E. J.; Giruzzi, G.; Gribov, Y.; Hobirk, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Horton, L. D.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I.; Ide, S.; Isayama, A.; Imbeaux, F.; Jackson, G. L.; Kamada, Y.; Kessel, C.; Kochl, F.; Lomas, P.; Litaudon, X.; Luce, T. C.; Marmar, E.; Mattei, M.; Nunes, I.; Oyama, N.; Parail, V.; Portone, A.; Saibene, G.; Sartori, R.; Stober, J. K.; Suzuki, T.; Wolfe, S. M.; C-Mod Team; ASDEX Upgrade Team; DIII-D Team; JET EFDA Contributors

    2009-08-01

    Key parts of the ITER scenarios are determined by the capability of the proposed poloidal field (PF) coil set. They include the plasma breakdown at low loop voltage, the current rise phase, the performance during the flat top (FT) phase and a ramp down of the plasma. The ITER discharge evolution has been verified in dedicated experiments. New data are obtained from C-Mod, ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JT-60U and JET. Results show that breakdown for Eaxis < 0.23-0.33 V m-1 is possible unassisted (ohmic) for large devices like JET and attainable in devices with a capability of using ECRH assist. For the current ramp up, good control of the plasma inductance is obtained using a full bore plasma shape with early X-point formation. This allows optimization of the flux usage from the PF set. Additional heating keeps li(3) < 0.85 during the ramp up to q95 = 3. A rise phase with an H-mode transition is capable of achieving li(3) < 0.7 at the start of the FT. Operation of the H-mode reference scenario at q95 ~ 3 and the hybrid scenario at q95 = 4-4.5 during the FT phase is documented, providing data for the li (3) evolution after the H-mode transition and the li (3) evolution after a back-transition to L-mode. During the ITER ramp down it is important to remain diverted and to reduce the elongation. The inductance could be kept <=1.2 during the first half of the current decay, using a slow Ip ramp down, but still consuming flux from the transformer. Alternatively, the discharges can be kept in H-mode during most of the ramp down, requiring significant amounts of additional heating.

  17. Impact of field-induced quantum confinement on the onset of tunneling field-effect transistors: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin Verreck, Devin; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Martens, Koen; Lin, Han Chung; Kazzi, Salim El; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-17

    The Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor (TFET) is a promising device for future low-power logic. Its performance is often predicted using semiclassical simulations, but there is usually a large discrepancy with experimental results. An important reason is that Field-Induced Quantum Confinement (FIQC) is neglected. Quantum mechanical simulations show FIQC delays the onset of Band-To-Band Tunneling (BTBT) with hundreds of millivolts in the promising line-TFET configuration. In this letter, we provide experimental verification of this delayed onset. We accomplish this by developing a method where line-TFET are modeled using highly doped MOS capacitors (MOS-CAP). Using capacitance-voltage measurements, we demonstrate AC inversion by BTBT, which was so far unobserved in MOS-CAP. Good agreement is shown between the experimentally obtained BTBT onset and quantum mechanical predictions, proving the need to include FIQC in all TFET simulations. Finally, we show that highly doped MOS-CAP is promising for characterization of traps deep into the conduction band.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of thermovibrational convection in microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhkov, Ilya; Mialdun, Alexander; Melnikov, Denis; Shevtsova, Valentina

    Thermovibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a non-uniformly heated fluid is subjected to external vibration. The relative motion results from different inertia of cold and hot parts of the fluid, which have different density. A pure thermovibrational convective mechanism can be observed only in the absence of other external forces. In terrestrial conditions, the static gravity provides an additional driving force for convection and may suppress the flows caused by vibration. There have been extensive theoretical studies of thermovibrational convection in weightlessness and ground conditions. However, the experiments addressing this phenomenon (especially in reduced gravity) are very limited. This work is focused on the experimental study of thermovibrational convection in microgravity and complementary theoretical analysis. The experiments were performed in parabolic flights during 46th Campaign organized by the European Space Agency. The study is aimed at observing thermo-vibrational flows in reduced gravity and verifying existing theoretical results. In the experiment, a cubic cell with differentially heated walls was filled with isopropanol and subjected to the harmonic oscillations produced by a linear motor. The flows were monitored by observing the evolution of temperature field with a help of optical digital interferometry. A comprehensive theoretical analysis has been performed in the course of experiment preparation. The strategy of choosing control parameters (such as the frequency, amplitude, applied temperature difference, etc.) for successful observation of thermovibrational phenomena was developed. In the experiment, it was shown that mean vibrational flows can cause strong heat transport in the fluid. This transport becomes more intensive with increasing the vibrational impact. The observed flow structures confirm previous theoretical results. Numerical simulations of thermovibrational convection in parabolic flight

  19. An experimental study of subaqueous slipface deposition.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunter, R.E.; Kocurek, G.

    1986-01-01

    A flume study indicates that grainflow on slipfaces accounts for most cross-strata formed in unidirectional, shallow-water flows. The slipfaces studied were on small megaripples and delta-like steps (0.06-0.28 m high). During intermittent avalanching, at relatively low flow velocities, periods between avalanches were marked by grainfall onto the slipface, the intensity of which was greatest near the brink of the slipface and increased with current velocity. The lee eddy proved very significant in slipface processes by redistributing grainfall sediments and both promoting and impeding grainflow. -from Authors

  20. Experimental studies of actinides in molten salts

    SciTech Connect

    Reavis, J.G.

    1985-06-01

    This review stresses techniques used in studies of molten salts containing multigram amounts of actinides exhibiting intense alpha activity but little or no penetrating gamma radiation. The preponderance of studies have used halides because oxygen-containing actinide compounds (other than oxides) are generally unstable at high temperatures. Topics discussed here include special enclosures, materials problems, preparation and purification of actinide elements and compounds, and measurements of various properties of the molten volts. Property measurements discussed are phase relationships, vapor pressure, density, viscosity, absorption spectra, electromotive force, and conductance. 188 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  1. Cardiovascular alterations in Macaca monkeys exposed to stationary magnetic fields: experimental observations and theoretical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Tenforde, T.S.; Gaffey, C.T.; Moyer, B.R.; Budinger, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements were made of the electrocardiogram (ECG) and the intraarterial blood pressure of adult male Macaca monkeys during acute exposure to homogeneous stationary magnetic fields ranging in strength up to 1.5 tesla. An instantaneous, field strength-dependent increase in the ECG signal amplitude at the locus of the T wave was observed in fields greater than 0.1 tesla. The temporal sequence of this signal in the ECG record and its reversibility following termination of the magnetic field exposure are consistent with an earlier suggestion that it arises from a magnetically induced aortic blood flow potential superimposed on the native T-wave signal. No measurable alterations in blood pressure resulted from exposure to fields up to 1.5 tesla. This experimental finding is in agreement with theoretical calculations of the magnetohydrodynamic effect on blood flow in the major arteries of the cardiovascular system. 27 references, 1 figure, 1 table.

  2. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, M. D.; Chriss, R. M.; Wood, J. R.; Strazisar, A. J.

    1992-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Low-Speed Centrifugal Compressor (LSCC) flow field has been conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' 3D viscous code. The experimental configuration consists of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational analysis, and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the rotor as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provide independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique.

  3. Experimental and computational studies of polar solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Many articles and papers were published; a few are still in preparation or will be published. The solvation dynamics studies will be extended to ionic solutions. Computer simulations were also performed. A new line of research was begun on excited-state proton-transfer reactions catalyzed by alcohol solvents. (DLC)

  4. Experimental study of photonic crystal triangular lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Ruhu; Qin, Bo; Jin, Chongjun

    1999-06-01

    Triangular lattice photonic crystal behaving in the electromagnetic zones constructed from fused silica cylinders in styrofoam is fabricated. The transmission spectra of the photonic crystal with and without defects are measured. On this basis, the defect modes of photonic crystal were studied, and the potential applications of the photonic crystal are discussed.

  5. New experimental techniques for studying root herbivores

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relatively less is known about belowground ground herbivores than their aboveground counterparts . This is largely because root-feeding herbivores live in the soil, an opaque, tri-phasic medium, which makes them harder to study and perhaps less perceptible as key components of many terrestrial ecosy...

  6. Dorm 8: An Experimental Social Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ontario Dept. of Education, Toronto. School Planning and Building Research Section.

    A study of the social environment in special schools for the deaf is reported in this publication. The problem was to deinstitutionalize the dormitory environment, and to stimulate an involvement in the surroundings and a sense of personal pride in the children. Research was carried out at the Ontario School for the Deaf, Belleville, with a group…

  7. Theoretical and experimental studies of baroclinic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Tim; Leslie, Fred W.; Chou, Shih-Hung; Reynolds, Nathaniel; Lu, H.-I.; Butler, Karen

    1990-01-01

    The geophysical fluid flow simulation code, GEOSIM, is being used to study the phenomenon of vacillation in the baroclinic annulus. Having verified that the code predicts vacillation for the same points as the experiments, the work is aiming toward explaining the mechanics of vacillation and pointing out some of the sensitivities of the results to the numerical method. Researchers are finding that there is a structural change associated with amplitude vacillation, where the structural changes are in the vertical. The results disagree with the premise of Lindzen et al, that the vacillation is due to constructive and destructive interference of neutral modes with different phase speeds. The researchers are continuing to study the Spacelab 3 Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell (GFFC) results with horizontal temperature gradients and heating from below. GEOSIM has been used to compute a wide range of cases, and these are being compared with the observations. The computations and observations compare well, and the model is being used to extend the results beyond cases studied in the experiments and to study the mechanics and predictability of the flows. The study of fully nonlinear baroclinic instability using the GFFC apparatus is proceeding with the numerical code. While the first instability that occurs is of planetary scale, secondary instabilities consisting of small-scale, penetrative convection occurs where cold fluid flows over a warm surface. The simultaneous modeling of the planetary scale and the convective scale is possible because of the nonhydrostatic formulation of the model. Some of these results have been animated on the Stardent computer, which shows the explosive nature of the small-scale convection.

  8. Can We Study Intelligence Using the Experimental Method?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eysenck, Hans J.

    1995-01-01

    It is argued that the study of one important aspect of intelligence, creativity, can be furthered by the introduction of causal theories and their experimental study. Purely correlational investigations are a useful beginning, but psychology can only acquire true scientific stature by combining correlational and experimental approaches. (SLD)

  9. Experimental Study of Flow in a Bifurcation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fresconi, Frank; Prasad, Ajay

    2003-11-01

    An instability known as the Dean vortex occurs in curved pipes with a longitudinal pressure gradient. A similar effect is manifest in the flow in a converging or diverging bifurcation, such as those found in the human respiratory airways. The goal of this study is to characterize secondary flows in a bifurcation. Particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) experiments were performed in a clear, plastic model. Results show the strength and migration of secondary vortices. Primary velocity features are also presented along with dispersion patterns from dye visualization. Unsteadiness, associated with a hairpin vortex, was also found at higher Re. This work can be used to assess the dispersion of particles in the lung. Medical delivery systems and pollution effect studies would profit from such an understanding.

  10. Experimental study of highly viscous impinging jets

    SciTech Connect

    Gomon, M.

    1998-12-01

    The objective of this research is to study the behavior of highly viscous gravity-driven jets filling a container. Matters of interest are the formation of voids in the fluid pool during the filling process and the unstable behavior of the fluid in the landing region which manifests itself as an oscillating motion. The working fluids used in this research are intended to simulate the flow behavior of molten glass. Qualitative and quantitative results are obtained in a parametric study. The fraction of voids present in the fluid pool after the filling of the container is measured for different parameter values of viscosity and mass flow rate. Likewise, frequencies of the oscillating jet are measured. Results are inconclusive with regard to a correlation between parameter settings and void fractions. As for frequencies, power law correlations are established.

  11. Experimental setup for laser spectroscopy of molecules in a high magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takazawa, Yasuyuki Kimura; Ken

    2011-01-01

    An experimental setup to measure the effects of a high magnetic field on the structure and decay dynamics of molecules is designed and constructed. A vacuum chamber is mounted in the bore of a superconducting magnet. A molecular beam passes in the chamber. Pulsed laser light excites the molecules in the field. The parent or fragment ions are extracted by an electric field parallel to the magnetic field. They are detected by a microchannel plate. Their mass and charge are determined by the time-of-flight method. The performance of the setup was examined using resonance-enhanced two-photon ionization through the X2 Pi- A2Σ + transition of nitric oxide (NO) molecules. The ions were detected with sufficient mass resolution to discriminate the species in a field of up to 10 T. This is the first experiment to succeed in the mass-selective detection of ions by the time-of-flight method in a high magnetic field. By measuring NO+ ion current as a function of the laser frequency, the X2Pi- A2 Σ + rotational transition lines, separated clearly from the background noise, were observed in fields of up to 10 T. From the relative strengths of the transition lines, the ion detection efficiency was determined as a function of the magnetic field strength. This setup was shown to be applicable in a field higher than 10 T. The Landau levels of molecules were successfully observed to demonstrate the setup.

  12. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati, G. Myneni, F. Stevie, P. Maheshwari, D. Griffis

    2010-02-01

    The performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low-temperature (100–140°C, 12–48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high-temperature heat treatments, while secondary ion mass spectroscopy surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  13. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimedmore » at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.« less

  14. High field Q slope and the baking effect: Review of recent experimental results and new data on Nb heat treatments

    SciTech Connect

    G. Ciovati; Myneni, G.; Stevie, F.; Maheshwari, P.; Griffis, D.

    2010-02-22

    Here, the performance of superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing rf losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48 h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated in a vacuum furnace at high temperature without subsequent chemical etching. These studies are aimed at understanding the role of hydrogen on the high-field Q-slope and at the passivation of the Nb surface during heat treatment. Improvement of the cavity performances, particularly of the cavities’ quality factor, have been obtained following the high temperature heat-treatments, while SIMS surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  15. Study of the electric field inside microchannel plate multipliers

    SciTech Connect

    Gatti, E.; Oba, K.; Rehak, P.

    1982-01-01

    Electric field inside high gain microchannel plate multipliers was studied. The calculations were based directly on the solution of the Maxwell equations applied to the microchannel plate (MCP) rather than on the conventional lumped RC model. The results are important to explain the performance of MCP's, (1) under a pulsed bias tension and, (2) at high rate conditions. The results were tested experimentally and a new method of MCP operation free from the positive ion feedback was demonstrated.

  16. Experimental Studies on High Speed Air Intakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panigrahy, Amit Kumar; Muruganandam, T. M.

    All high speed air breathing engines require an inlet to decelerate air from free stream velocity to a lower velocity conducive to combustion. The inlet is designed to capture and deliver the required mass flow to combustion chamber with minimum pressure loss, along with minimum flow distortion. Inlet buzz can occur due to several reasons, such as large internal area contraction ratio, serious shock-boundary layer interactions, and high back pressure. Inlet buzz is detrimental to thrust and can even cause structural damage. Thus a detailed back pressure and over contraction based study of inlet behavior is needed.

  17. Experimental study of a solar still

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassoun, Z. Sari; Aliane, K.; Berrezoug, H. I.

    2016-07-01

    This work concerns the study of a solar distiller. Particular attention is paid to the different operating characteristics such as: temperature, global and internal efficiency, performance and the performance factor during the distillation process. We have also established the overall heat balance in transition. A series of tests was carried out during the summer under the sea water to see the evolution of different parameters of the distiller. The daily output of solar still is 1.8litre / day. All the dissolved solids (TDS), conductivity and pH of the water were measured.

  18. Experimental study of isovector spin sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandre Deur; Peter Bosted; Volker Burkert; Donald Crabb; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Gail Dodge; Tony Forest; Keith Griffioen; Sebastian Kuhn; Ralph Minehart; Yelena Prok

    2008-02-04

    We present the Bjorken integral extracted from Jefferson Lab experiment EG1b for $0.05<2.92$ GeV$^2$. The integral is fit to extract the twist-4 element $f_{2}^{p-n}$ which is large and negative. Systematic studies of this higher twist analysis establish its legitimacy at $Q^{2}$ around 1 GeV$^{2}$. We also extracted the isovector part of the generalized forward spin polarizability $\\gamma_{0}$. Although this quantity provides a robust test of Chiral Perturbation Theory, our data disagree with the calculations.

  19. A Computational and Experimental Study of Resonators in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, C. K. W.; Ju, H.; Jones, Michael G.; Watson, Willie R.; Parrott, Tony L.

    2009-01-01

    In a previous work by the present authors, a computational and experimental investigation of the acoustic properties of two-dimensional slit resonators was carried out. The present paper reports the results of a study extending the previous work to three dimensions. This investigation has two basic objectives. The first is to validate the computed results from direct numerical simulations of the flow and acoustic fields of slit resonators in three dimensions by comparing with experimental measurements in a normal incidence impedance tube. The second objective is to study the flow physics of resonant liners responsible for sound wave dissipation. Extensive comparisons are provided between computed and measured acoustic liner properties with both discrete frequency and broadband sound sources. Good agreements are found over a wide range of frequencies and sound pressure levels. Direct numerical simulation confirms the previous finding in two dimensions that vortex shedding is the dominant dissipation mechanism at high sound pressure intensity. However, it is observed that the behavior of the shed vortices in three dimensions is quite different from those of two dimensions. In three dimensions, the shed vortices tend to evolve into ring (circular in plan form) vortices, even though the slit resonator opening from which the vortices are shed has an aspect ratio of 2.5. Under the excitation of discrete frequency sound, the shed vortices align themselves into two regularly spaced vortex trains moving away from the resonator opening in opposite directions. This is different from the chaotic shedding of vortices found in two-dimensional simulations. The effect of slit aspect ratio at a fixed porosity is briefly studied. For the range of liners considered in this investigation, it is found that the absorption coefficient of a liner increases when the open area of the single slit is subdivided into multiple, smaller slits.

  20. Experimental study on artificially triggered lightning using high power lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, S.; Shimada, Y.; Yasuda, H.; Yamanaka, C.; Fujita, H.; Izawa, Y.; Yamanaka, T.; Wang, D.; Kawasaki, Z.; Matsu-ura, K.; Ishikubo, Y.; Adachi, M.

    1996-05-01

    A series of laboratory experiments has been conducted to investigate the initiating effects of laser plasma channel on electrical discharge. It was confirmed that the plasma channels reduce the required electrical field strength for electrical discharges to occur by a factor of 6. A field experimental site targeting natural lightning is being prepared. The thunderstorm monitoring system and the laser and optical systems have been developed and tested against various weather conditions. The results from the laboratory experiments and field experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Three dimensional finite element stress analysis of different designs of superconducting toroidal field coils for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Borovkov, A.I.; Ilyin, P.; L'vov, V. ); Krivchenkov, Y.; Korol'kov, M.; Spirchenko, Y. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that during conceptual design phase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor a series of finite element stress analyses of different variants of the toroidal field coils (TFC) have been performed. The three dimensional stress state requires the three dimensional stress analysis, the complex microheterogenous structure of the TFC required a special algorithm for analysis. On the basis of study of four variants of the TFC the latest one was designed and analyzed.

  2. An experimental study of dense aerosol aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhaubhadel, Rajan

    We demonstrated that an aerosol can gel. This gelation was then used for a one-step method to produce an ultralow density porous carbon or silica material. This material was named an aerosol gel because it was made via gelation of particles in the aerosol phase. The carbon and silica aerosol gels had high specific surface area (200--350 sq m2/g for carbon and 300--500 sq m2/g for silica) and an extremely low density (2.5--6.0 mg/cm3), properties similar to conventional aerogels. Key aspects to form a gel from an aerosol are large volume fraction, ca. 10-4 or greater, and small primary particle size, 50 nm or smaller, so that the gel time is fast compared to other characteristic times. Next we report the results of a study of the cluster morphology and kinetics of a dense aggregating aerosol system using the small angle light scattering technique. The soot particles started as individual monomers, ca. 38 nm radius, grew to bigger clusters with time and finally stopped evolving after spanning a network across the whole system volume. This spanning is aerosol gelation. The gelled system showed a hybrid morphology with a lower fractal dimension at length scales of a micron or smaller and a higher fractal dimension at length scales greater than a micron. The study of the kinetics of the aggregating system showed that when the system gelled, the aggregation kernel homogeneity lambda attained a value 0.4 or higher. The magnitude of the aggregation kernel showed an increase with increasing volume fraction. We also used image analysis technique to study the cluster morphology. From the digitized pictures of soot clusters the cluster morphology was determined by two different methods: structure factor and perimeter analysis. We find a hybrid, superaggregate morphology characterized by a fractal dimension of Df ≈ to 1.8 between the monomer size, ca. 50 nm, and 1 mum micron and Df ≈ to 2.6 at larger length scales up to ˜ 10 mum. The superaggregate morphology is a

  3. Experimental Studies of Dynamics at Solid Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Thomas Avery

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of thermal and photoinduced processes on metal surfaces point to the importance of transient intermediate species in the understanding of dynamics. Experiments were performed using photoinduced desorption (PID), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), high-resolution and time -resolved electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS and TREELS), and femtosecond multiphoton photoemission spectroscopy. The thermal and photoinduced reactions of Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on Rh(100) were studied to better understand energy transfer between a photoexcited molecule and a metal surface. The Mo(CO)_6 partially dissociated upon adsorption, allowing a comparison to be made between Mo(CO)_6 adsorbed on the fragment-covered surface and a more ordered CO-covered surface. The energy transfer rate was found to be larger on the fragment-covered surface. The thermal reaction of hydrogen gas with oxygen adsorbed on Pt(111) was studied with TREELS between 130 and 160 K, observing the modes associated with hydroxyl adsorbed on the surface as a function of time while the sample, preadsorbed with atomic oxygen, was exposed to hydrogen gas. In coordination between Monte Carlo calculations and kinetic simulations, a model was developed whereby the reaction to form hydroxyl occurred between a molecular hydrogen precursor and oxygen at island boundaries. The photoinduced reaction of adsorbed atomic hydrogen and molecular oxygen to form hydroxyl and water on Pt(111) was studied in order to understand the reactivity of the hot oxygen atoms produced by photodissociation of molecular oxygen. The final products of the two oxygen -hydrogen reactions were the same. A measurement was made of the cross section for NO photodesorption from Pt(111) at 90 K. All of these experiments pointed to a need to make transient measurements on the ultrashort time scale in order to develop a more microscopic understanding of the dynamical processes that are occurring. As a result, a novel time-of-flight analyzer was

  4. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2000-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the role of volatiles in magmatic processes and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. The work on the lunar volcanic glasses has resulted in some exciting new discoveries over the years of this grant. During the tenure of the present grant, we discovered a variety of metal blebs in the A17 orange glass. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs occur in the glass; others were found in olivine phenocrysts which we find make up about 2 vol % of the orange glass magma. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption. They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas which drove the lunar fire-fountaining. In an Undergraduate senior thesis project, Nora Klein discovered a melt inclusion that remained in a glassy state in one of the olivine phenocrysts. Analyses of this inclusion gave additional information on the CO2, CO and S contents of the orange glass magma prior to its reaching the lunar surface. The composition of lunar volcanic gases has long been one of the puzzles of lunar magmatic processes. One of the more exciting findings in our research over the past year has been the study of magmatic processes linking the SNC meteorite source magma composition with the andesitic composition rocks found at the Pathfinder site. In this project, graduate student Michelle Minitti showed that there was a clear petrologic link between these two magma types via fractional removal of crystals from the SNC parent melt, but the process only worked if there was at least 1 wt

  5. Experimental Investigation of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer Enhancement in Microgravity in the Presence of Electric Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, Cila

    1999-01-01

    In boiling high heat fluxes are possible driven by relatively small temperature differences, which make its use increasingly attractive in aerospace applications. The objective of the research is to develop ways to overcome specific problems associated with boiling in the low gravity environment by substituting the buoyancy force with the electric force to enhance bubble removal from the heated surface. Previous studies indicate that in terrestrial applications nucleate boiling heat transfer can be increased by a factor of 50, as compared to values obtained for the same system without electric fields. The goal of our research is to experimentally explore the mechanisms responsible for EHD heat transfer enhancement in boiling in low gravity conditions, by visualizing the temperature distributions in the vicinity of the heated surface and around the bubble during boiling using real-time holographic interferometry (HI) combined with high-speed cinematography. In the first phase of the project the influence of the electric field on a single bubble is investigated. Pool boiling is simulated by injecting a single bubble through a nozzle into the subcooled liquid or into the thermal boundary layer developed along the flat heater surface. Since the exact location of bubble formation is known, the optical equipment can be aligned and focused accurately, which is an essential requirement for precision measurements of bubble shape, size and deformation, as well as the visualization of temperature fields by HI. The size of the bubble and the frequency of bubble departure can be controlled by suitable selection of nozzle diameter and mass flow rate of vapor. In this approach effects due to the presence of the electric field can be separated from effects caused by the temperature gradients in the thermal boundary layer. The influence of the thermal boundary layer can be investigated after activating the heater at a later stage of the research. For the visualization experiments a

  6. Fulminant liver failure: clinical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Slapak, M

    1975-11-01

    Clinical experience of some newer methods of hepatic support is described. The results are unpredictable and far from satisfactory. The need for an animal model in which potential therapeutic methods can be studied is emphasized. Such a model based on carefully imposed ischaemic insult to the liver in the absence of portacaval shunting is described. It is suggested that bacterial presence in the bowel together with a depression of the liver reticuloendothelial function plays an important part in the early and rapid mortality of acute liver failure. Temporary auxiliary liver transplantation using an allograft or a closely related primate heterograft seem to be the 2 best available methods of hepatic support for potentially reversible acute liver failure. PMID:812415

  7. Experimental Study of Lunar and SNC Magmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.

    2004-01-01

    The research described in this progress report involved the study of petrological, geochemical, and volcanic processes that occur on the Moon and the SNC meteorite parent body, generally accepted to be Mars. The link between these studies is that they focus on two terrestrial-type parent bodies somewhat smaller than earth, and the fact that they focus on the types of magmas (magma compositions) present, the role of volatiles in magmatic processes, and on processes of magma evolution on these planets. We are also interested in how these processes and magma types varied over time.In earlier work on the A15 green and A17 orange lunar glasses, we discovered a variety of metal blebs. Some of these Fe-Ni metal blebs occur in the glass; others (in A17) were found in olivine phenocrysts that we find make up about 2 vol 96 of the orange glass magma. The importance of these metal spheres is that they fix the oxidation state of the parent magma during the eruption, and also indicate changes during the eruption . They also yield important information about the composition of the gas phase present, the gas that drove the lunar fire-fountaining. During the tenure of this grant, we have continued to work on the remaining questions regarding the origin and evolution of the gas phase in lunar basaltic magmas, what they indicate about the lunar interior, and how the gas affects volcanic eruptions. Work on Martian magmas petrogenesis questions during the tenure of this grant has resulted in advances in our methods of evaluating magmatic oxidation state variations in Mars and some new insights into the compositional variations that existed in the SNC magmas over time . Additionally, Minitti has continued to work on the problem of possible shock effects on the abundance and distribution of water in Mars minerals.

  8. Effects of pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercise on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Unsal, Cengiz; Uner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Cömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  9. Effects of Pulsed Electromagnetic Field and Swimming Exercise on Rats with Experimental Sciatic Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kavlak, Erdoğan; Belge, Ferda; Ünsal, Cengiz; Üner, Aykut Göktürk; Cavlak, Uğur; Çömlekçi, Selçuk

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The current study aimed to reveal the therapeutic effects of a pulsed electromagnetic field and swimming exercises on rats with experimental sciatic nerve injury, which was induced with crush-type neuropathy model damage, using electrophysiological methods. [Subjects] In the current study, the sample consisted of 28 adult male Wistar albino rats. [Methods] The rats were randomized into four groups (n=7). Swimming exercise and PEMF (2 Hz and 0.3 MT) were applied one hour a day, five days a week, for four weeks. Electroneuromyographic (ENMG) measurements were taken on day 7. [Results] When the data were evaluated, it was found that the 4 weeks of PEMF and swimming exercises led to an increase in motor conduction rates and a decrease in latency values, but the changes were not significant in comparison with the control and injury groups. The compound muscle action potential (CMAP) values of the left leg were lower in weeks 2, 3, and 4 in the swimming exercise group in comparison with the control group, although for the PEMF group, the CMAP values of the left leg reached the level observed in the control group beginning in week 3. [Conclusion] PEMF and swimming exercise made positive contributions to nerve regeneration after week 1, and regeneration was enhanced. PMID:25276015

  10. Experimental and Numerical Studies of Oceanic Overflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Thomas; Hohman, Fred; Morrison, Theresa; Reckinger, Shanon; Reckinger, Scott

    2014-11-01

    Oceanic overflows occur when dense water flows down a continental slope into less dense ambient water. The resulting density driven plumes occur naturally in various regions of the global ocean and affect the large-scale circulation. General circulation models currently rely on parameterizations for representing dense overflows due to resolution restrictions. The work presented here involves a direct qualitative and quantitative comparison between physical laboratory experiments and lab-scale numerical simulations. Laboratory experiments are conducted using a rotating square tank customized for idealized overflow and a high-resolution camera mounted on the table in the rotating reference frame for data collection. Corresponding numerical simulations are performed using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm) run in the non-hydrostatic configuration. Resolution and numerical parameter studies are presented to ensure accuracy of the simulation. Laboratory and computational experiments are compared across a wide range of physical parameters, including Coriolis parameter, inflow density anomaly, and dense inflow volumetric flow rate. The results are analyzed using various calculated metrics, such as the plume velocity. Funding for this project is provided by the National Science Foundation.

  11. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  12. Hypertonicity: Pathophysiologic Concept and Experimental Studies

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Raj, Dominic S; Malhotra, Deepak; Agaba, Emmanuel I; Rohrscheib, Mark; Khitan, Zeid; Murata, Glen H; Shapiro, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances in tonicity (effective osmolarity) are the major clinical disorders affecting cell volume. Cell shrinking secondary to hypertonicity causes severe clinical manifestations and even death. Quantitative management of hypertonic disorders is based on formulas computing the volume of hypotonic fluids required to correct a given level of hypertonicity. These formulas have limitations. The major limitation of the predictive formulas is that they represent closed system calculations and have been tested in anuric animals. Consequently, the formulas do not account for ongoing fluid losses during development or treatment of the hypertonic disorders. In addition, early comparisons of serum osmolality changes predicted by these formulas and observed in animals infused with hypertonic solutions clearly demonstrated that hypertonicity creates new intracellular solutes causing rises in serum osmolality higher than those predicted by the formulas. The mechanisms and types of intracellular solutes generated by hypertonicity and the effects of the solutes have been studied extensively in recent times. The solutes accumulated intracellularly in hypertonic states have potentially major adverse effects on the outcomes of treatment of these states. When hypertonicity was produced by the infusion of hypertonic sodium chloride solutions, the predicted and observed changes in serum sodium concentration were equal. This finding justifies the use of the predictive formulas in the management of hypernatremic states. PMID:27382523

  13. Experimental and Analytical Studies on Pyroelectric Waste Heat Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Felix

    This study is concerned with direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy by subjecting pyroelectric materials to the Olsen cycle. The Olsen cycle consists of two isoelectric field and two isothermal process on the electric displacement versus electric field diagram. The energy and power generation capabilities of copolymer poly(vinylidene fluoridetrifluorethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] films and lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramics were evaluated by executing the Olsen cycle via so-called "stamping experiments" and "dipping experiments". The stamping experiments consisted of alternatively pressing a pyroelectric material in thermal contact with hot and cold aluminum blocks under specified electric fields. It was performed to assess the pyroelectric energy conversion performance using heat conduction. The largest energy density generated in the stamping experiments was 155 J/L/cycle with 60/40 P(VDF-TrFE) thin film at 0.066 Hz between 25 and 110°C and electric fields cycled between 20 and 35 MV/m. This energy density exceeded the 130 J/L/cycle achieved by our previous prototypical device using oscillatory laminar convective heat transfer. However, the performance was limited by poor thermal contact between the aluminum blocks and pyroelectric material and also by excessive leakage current inherent to P(VDF-TrFE) at high temperatures and/or large electric fields. On the other hand, dipping experiments consisted of successively immersing a pyroelectric material into isothermal hot and cold thermal reservoirs at different temperatures while simultaneously cycling the electric fields. It was performed on relaxor ferroelectric x/65/35 PLZT ceramics with x between 5 and 10 mol.%. The operating temperature, applied electric field, sample thickness, cycle frequency, and electrode material were systematically varied to explore their respective effects on the energy and power densities produced. A maximum energy density

  14. Theoretical and experimental study of fiber-optic fluorescence immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, He

    This dissertation investigates the optical detection of antigens (in this case, food pathogens such as Salmonella) with fiber-optic immunosensors. The major techniques used for this optical detection include: (1)Linking the antigens to some physical tracers that can be optically detected; (2)Collecting and transmitting the optical signal to an optical detector. From an optical point of view, the problem is a nonimaging-optics problem to collect a fluorescent signal from an extended Lambertian source and deliver it to an optical detection system with maximum energy transfer and distinct wavelength separation. A raytrace model of the optical detection system was used for numerical simulations to analyze and optimize the optical design. The result leads to an improvement of the optical detection. Related physical problems such as magnetic focusing effect, fluorescence detection, and wavelength separation have also been studied in detail. With the adoption of a single-step immunomagnetic assay, experimental studies have been conducted for the detection of Salmonella, with a dual- fiber optical probe and tapered tubular waveguide probes. The test results have shown that the detection system gives detection limit of approximately 106 CFU/ml with dual-fiber optical probes, and 105 CFU/ml with improved tubular waveguide probes. The system developed for this research project is designed as a cost-effective portable instrument that may be used for field-testing. Rapid and on-site detection, low cost instrumentation and a reusable optical probe have been emphasized throughout the study.

  15. Experimental and theoretical study of combustion jet ignition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, D. Y.; Ghoniem, A. F.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion jet ignition system was developed to generate turbulent jets of combustion products containing free radicals and to discharge them as ignition sources into a combustible medium. In order to understand the ignition and the inflammation processes caused by combustion jets, the studies of the fluid mechanical properties of turbulent jets with and without combustion were conducted theoretically and experimentally. Experiments using a specially designed igniter, with a prechamber to build up and control the stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice, were conducted to investigate the formation processes of turbulent jets of combustion products. The penetration speed of combustion jets has been found to be constant initially and then decreases monotonically as turbulent jets of combustion products travel closer to the wall. This initial penetration speed to combustion jets is proportional to the initial stagnation pressure upstream of the orifice for the same stoichiometric mixture. Computer simulations by Chorin's Random Vortex Method implemented with the flame propagation algorithm for the theoretical model of turbulent jets with and without combustion were performed to study the turbulent jet flow field. In the formation processes of the turbulent jets, the large-scale eddy structure of turbulence, the so-called coherent structure, dominates the entrainment and mixing processes. The large-scale eddy structure of turbulent jets in this study is constructed by a series of vortex pairs, which are organized in the form of a staggered array of vortex clouds generating local recirculation flow patterns.

  16. Experimental study of infrared filaments under different initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirell, Daniel Joseph

    In 1964, four years after the first working laser was constructed, long skinny damage tracks and fluorescence trails were seen inside of certain transparent media that were excited by intense light pulses [1]. What was so remarkable about these features was the narrowness of the spatial profile and their long propagation length in the beam in concert with the very high intensity of the light that would be necessary to produce them. A purely linear model of light propagation through such media was insufficient to explain the results of these experiments and hence a new area of nonlinear optics, latex coined filamentation (to describe the length, slimness, and intensity of the light field), was born. Filament studies begin with a medium that has a nonlinear index of refraction, n¯2, that interacts with an intense beam of light so as to cause it to self-focus. The n¯2 of liquid and solid transparent media is much higher than the n¯ 2 of gases and therefore a much higher intensity of laser source would need to be invented to begin the study of filaments in air. With the advent of the Ti-Sapphire Kerr-lens modelocked laser [2], working in combination with the development of the chirped pulse amplifier system in the mid-1990's, light intensities sufficient to produce filaments in air was realized. Since that time much experimental and theoretical work has been done to better understand some of the additional complexities that arise specifically in the filamentation of light in air using several different wavelengths (UV to IR) and pulsewidths (femto- to pico-seconds). Many theoretical models exist each with a different emphasis on the various physical mechanisms that may produce the features experimentally observed in filaments. The experimental work has sought to give the theoretician better data on some of the properties of filaments such as the: (a) spatial and temporal structure of the beam and of the produced plasma (that arises due to the high intensity light

  17. Markets and morals: an experimental survey study.

    PubMed

    Elias, Julio J; Lacetera, Nicola; Macis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most societies prohibit some market transactions based on moral concerns, even when the exchanges would benefit the parties involved and would not create negative externalities. A prominent example is given by payments for human organs for transplantation, banned virtually everywhere despite long waiting lists and many deaths of patients who cannot find a donor. Recent research, however, has shown that individuals significantly increase their stated support for a regulated market for human organs when provided with information about the organ shortage and the potential beneficial effects a price mechanism. In this study we focused on payments for human organs and on another "repugnant" transaction, indoor prostitution, to address two questions: (A) Does providing general information on the welfare properties of prices and markets modify attitudes toward repugnant trades? (B) Does additional knowledge on the benefits of a price mechanism in a specific context affect attitudes toward price-based transactions in another context? By answering these questions, we can assess whether eliciting a market-oriented approach may lead to a relaxation of moral opposition to markets, and whether there is a cross-effect of information, in particular for morally controversial activities that, although different, share a reference to the "commercialization" of the human body. Relying on an online survey experiment with 5,324 U.S. residents, we found no effect of general information about market efficiency, consistent with morally controversial markets being accepted only when they are seen as a solution to a specific problem. We also found some cross-effects of information about a transaction on the acceptance of the other; however, the responses were mediated by the gender and (to a lesser extent) religiosity of the respondent--in particular, women exposed to information about legalizing prostitution reduced their stated support for regulated organ payments. We relate these

  18. Medical waste to energy: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    ARCURI, C.; LUCIANI, F.; PIVA, P.; BARTULI, F.N.; OTTRIA, L.; MECHERI, B.; LICOCCIA, S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective. Although waste is traditionally assessed as a pollutant which needs to be reduced or lessened, its management is certainly necessary. Nowadays, biological fuel cells, through the direct conversion of organic matter to electricity using biocatalysts, represent a technology able to produce sustainable energy by means of waste treatment. This study aims to propose a mean to generate energy from blood and saliva, that are common risk-infectious medical waste. Materials and methods. Material employed (purchased by Sigma-Aldrich) were: Glucose oxidase (GOx), Nafion perfluorinated resin solution at 5% in a mixture of lower aliphatic alcohols and water, Polyethylene oxide. Stock solutions of D (+) glucose were prepared in a 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution and stored at 4 °C for at least 24 h before use. Carbon cloth electrode ELAT HT 140 E-W with a platinum loading of 5 gm-2 was purchased by E-Tek. Electrospun Nafion fibers were obtained as follows. Scanning electron microscopy was used to characterize the electrode morphologies. Results. In order to develop an effective immobilization strategy of GOx on the electrode surface, Nafion fibers (a fully fluorinated ion conducting polymer used as a membrane material in enzymatic fuel cells - EFC) were selected as immobilizing polymer matrix. In this work, exploiting the nafion fibers capability of being able to cathalize Gox activity, we have tried to produce an enzymatic fuel cell which could produce energy from the blood and the saliva within medical-dental waste. Conclusions. Medical waste refers to all those materials produced by the interaction among doctor and patient, such as blood and saliva. During our research we will try to complete an EFC prototype able to produce energy from blood and saliva inside the risk-infectious medical waste in order to contribute to the energy requirements of a consulting room. PMID:24971161

  19. Markets and Morals: An Experimental Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Julio J.; Lacetera, Nicola; Macis, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Most societies prohibit some market transactions based on moral concerns, even when the exchanges would benefit the parties involved and would not create negative externalities. A prominent example is given by payments for human organs for transplantation, banned virtually everywhere despite long waiting lists and many deaths of patients who cannot find a donor. Recent research, however, has shown that individuals significantly increase their stated support for a regulated market for human organs when provided with information about the organ shortage and the potential beneficial effects a price mechanism. In this study we focused on payments for human organs and on another “repugnant” transaction, indoor prostitution, to address two questions: (A) Does providing general information on the welfare properties of prices and markets modify attitudes toward repugnant trades? (B) Does additional knowledge on the benefits of a price mechanism in a specific context affect attitudes toward price-based transactions in another context? By answering these questions, we can assess whether eliciting a market-oriented approach may lead to a relaxation of moral opposition to markets, and whether there is a cross-effect of information, in particular for morally controversial activities that, although different, share a reference to the “commercialization” of the human body. Relying on an online survey experiment with 5,324 U.S. residents, we found no effect of general information about market efficiency, consistent with morally controversial markets being accepted only when they are seen as a solution to a specific problem. We also found some cross-effects of information about a transaction on the acceptance of the other; however, the responses were mediated by the gender and (to a lesser extent) religiosity of the respondent—in particular, women exposed to information about legalizing prostitution reduced their stated support for regulated organ payments. We relate

  20. Interaction Between Flames and Electric Fields Studied

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Hegde, Uday

    2003-01-01

    The interaction between flames and electric fields has long been an interesting research subject that has theoretical importance as well as practical significance. Many of the reactions in a flame follow an ionic pathway: that is, positive and negative ions are formed during the intermediate steps of the reaction. When an external electric field is applied, the ions move according to the electric force (the Coulomb force) exerted on them. The motion of the ions modifies the chemistry because the reacting species are altered, it changes the velocity field of the flame, and it alters the electric field distribution. As a result, the flame will change its shape and location to meet all thermal, chemical, and electrical constraints. In normal gravity, the strong buoyant effect often makes the flame multidimensional and, thus, hinders the detailed study of the problem.

  1. An experimental study on pump clogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, M.; Nohmi, M.; Uchida, H.; Kawai, M.; Kudo, H.; Kawahara, T.; Miyagawa, K.; Saito, S.

    2014-03-01

    For sewage pump that various foreign substance is flowed into, anti-clogging performance is a factor as important as pump efficiency in order to avoid clogging trouble by foreign substance. Many investigations about pump inner flow and pump efficiency estimation have been carried out conventionally in order to realize coexistence with anti-clogging performance and pump performance. And these results have been reflected in construction of the running water section design method. As a index of anti-clogging performance, "impeller passage diameter" which is diameter of spherical solid that can pass through the pump is used widely. And there are various type of the sewage pump which have large impeller passage diameter. However real cause of clog is not a solid, and it is fibrous material such as towel and clothes, vinyl and paper diaper. In most case these material accumulate in the pump, so that clog is occurred. In this study, for the purpose of quantification of anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials, the factor that affect to clogging of pump was investigated by pump model test using a string. The test is done based on Taguchi method. In this test, type of the pump model, diameter of the string, material of the string, length of the string and flow rate are selected for the factor, and the effect that they have on the clogging of the pump was investigated. As a result of this test, it was made clear that length of the string has a strong influence on the clogging of the pump. And from the result of this test, evaluation method of anti-clogging performance of the pump against fibrous material by using string was considered. According to the result of above test based on Taguchi method, it was assumed that quantification of anti-clogging performance against fibrous materials is possible by flowing plural strings into the pump and calculating the probability of passing. Plurality sewage pumps of different types were evaluated based on this assumption

  2. Uremic pruritus. Clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Ståhle-Bäckdahl, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate clinical aspects of pruritus in maintenance hemodialysis patients and to evaluate factors of putative pathogenic importance. 60-65% of the patients in a maintenance hemodialysis program during a two-year period suffered from itching. Patients with pruritus tended to have been on dialysis treatment longer than those without pruritus (p = 0.05), otherwise there was no difference in clinical data or routine laboratory tests. Measurement of itch intensity continuously over one week in 28 patients using a computerized method showed that itching peaked at night after two days without dialysis, was relatively high during treatment and lowest during the day following dialysis. Our results suggest that the accumulation of pruritogens between dialysis sessions influences the intensity of itching. Most patients had "dry" skin. Recording of the stratum corneum water content by measurement of electrical capacitance, in 31 patients (19 with pruritus) and 12 controls, disclosed no significant difference between dialysis patients and controls, but a tendency that pruritic patients had a lower water content than the other subjects. In different body areas, there was a positive correlation in all groups between the clinical estimation of xerosis and hydration. Serum concentrations of parathyroid hormone (PTH) were significantly higher in dialysis patients with pruritus than in those without, but there was no correlation between the degree of symptoms and the PTH level. Indirect immunohistochemistry revealed no immunoreactivity for different parts of the PTH molecule in skin biopsies from uremic patients. Intradermal injections of PTH fragments did not evoke itching or other cutaneous reactions in patients or controls. Our results do not support PTH as a peripheral mediator of uremic itching. Flare reactions induced by intradermal histamine injections were significantly smaller in 26 dialysis patients (18 with pruritus) than in 9 healthy

  3. Field studies on pesticides and birds: Unexpected and unique relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blus, L.J.; Henny, Charles J.

    1997-01-01

    We review the advantages and disadvantages of experimental and field studies for determining effects of pesticides on birds. Important problems or principles initially discovered in the field include effects of DDT (through its metabolite DDE) on eggshell thickness, reproductive success, and population stability; trophic-level bioaccumulation of the lipid-soluble organochlorine pesticides; indirect effects on productivity and survival through reductions in the food supply and cover by herbicides and insecticides; unexpected toxic effects and routes of exposure of organophosphorus compounds such as famphur and dimethoate; effects related to simultaneous application at full strength of several pesticides of different classes; and others. Also, potentially serious bird problems with dicofol, based on laboratory studies, later proved negligible in the field. In refining field tests of pesticides, the selection of a species or group of species to study is important, because exposure routes may vary greatly, and 10-fold interspecific differences in sensitivity to pesticides are relatively common. Although there are limitations with field investigations, particularly uncontrollable variables that must be addressed, the value of a well-designed field study far outweighs its shortcomings.

  4. Experimental analysis of crack tip fields in rubber materials under large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Song, Hai-Peng; Kang, Yi-Lan; Li, Xiao-Lei; Tan, Xiao-Hua; Tan, Hao-Yun

    2012-04-01

    A three-nested-deformation model is proposed to describe crack-tip fields in rubber-like materials with large deformation. The model is inspired by the distribution of the measured in-plane and out-of-plane deformation. The inplane displacement of crack-tip fields under both Mode I and mixed-mode (Mode I-II) fracture conditions is measured by using the digital Moiré method. The deformation characteristics and experimental sector division mode are investigated by comparing the measured displacement fields under different fracture modes. The out-of-plane displacement field near the crack tip is measured using the three-dimensional digital speckle correlation method.

  5. Stressing biological samples with pulsed magnetic fields: physical aspects and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delle Side, D.; Specchia, V.; D'Attis, S.; Giuffreda, E.; Quarta, G.; Calcagnile, L.; Bozzetti, M. P.; Nassisi, V.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic field effects are diffused among living organisms. They are mainly studied with static or extremely low frequency fields, while scarce information is available for pulsed fields. This work is devoted to the study of the interaction between Drosophila melanogaster, both adults and larvae, and pulsed magnetic fields. We exposed the organisms to a peak field of 0.4 T, lasting for about 2 μ s, within an ad hoc designed copper coil. Adult individuals didn't present any deregulation of repetitive sequences in the germ line of Drosophila. Instead, we noticed a marked magnetic field effect in larvae. Polytene chromosomes coming from treated individuals showed the presence of heat shock puffs; the same organisms revealed also an upregulation of the genes encoding for the Hsp70 protein. These observations suggest that the larvae underwent an oxidative stress caused by the modulation of free radicals' yield induced by the magnetic field through a radical pair mechanism.

  6. Experimental implementation of a strong two-color asymmetric laser field in the mid-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaziannis, S.; Danakas, S.; Kotsina, N.; Kosmidis, C.

    2016-05-01

    We report the experimental implementation of a strong two-color (ω/2ω) asymmetric laser field in the mid-infrared regime (MIR) consisting of a fs pulse centered at 1400 nm and its second harmonic (700 nm). Control of the temporal delay between the two pulses with sub-cycle accuracy and, therefore, the two-color field phase is based on the use of a birefringent calcite plate. The experimental methodology is described in detail for the 1400/700 nm case, while its applicability is discussed for a broader wavelength range, nowadays accessible by optical parametric amplifiers. The validity of the proposed methodology is further supported by the application of the asymmetric 1400/700 nm field on the dissociative ionization of carbon monoxide, which is considered to be a benchmark target in the field of coherent control of strong laser‑matter interaction. It is demonstrated that efficient control on the directional emission of the CO ionic fragments is achieved by varying the relative phase of the 1400 and 700 nm field components.

  7. Experimental evidence of transport of pesticides through field soils - a review

    SciTech Connect

    Flury, M.

    1996-01-01

    Much information is available in the literature about pesticide transport through soils at the field scale. The purpose of this study is to review the literature with a focus on pesticide leaching to groundwater. The literature was compiled and discussed with respect to different factors that influence pesticide leaching. Pesticide leaching below the root zone has been demonstrated in sandy as well as in loamy soils. Particularly in loamy soils, there is evidence that even strongly adsorbing chemicals can move along preferential flow pathways and that the travel times of pesticides are comparable to those of conservative solutes. The amounts of pesticides leached below the root zone by worst case rainfall events depend on the chemical properties and can reach up to 5% of the applied mass. When there is no heavy rainfall shortly following application of chemicals, the mass annually leached below the root zone is in the range of <0.1 to 1%, occasionally it can reach up to 4%. Although a direct comparison cannot be made, the mass lost by leaching seems generally to be smaller than that lost by runoff, depending of course on the slope of the fields. Several factors that affect pesticide leaching, such as surface preparation, soil structure, soil water content, type of irrigation, pesticide formulation, time of application and rainfall events, are discussed with support of experimental evidence. While some factors showed inconsistent effects, others show promise in controlling leaching mechanisms. These latter factors include initial water content, surface preparation, and time of pesticide application. Based on the reviewed literature recommendations were made for future research activities. 172 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  8. Species-specific photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to open-field experimental warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, S.; Yoon, S. J.; Yoon, T. K.; Han, S. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, D.; Kim, S.; Hwang, J.; Cho, M.; Son, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature increase under climate change is expected to affect photosynthesis of tree species. Biochemical models generally suggest that the elevated temperature increases the photosynthetic carbon fixation, however, many opposing results were reported as well. We aimed to examine the photosynthetic responses of four coniferous seedlings to projected future temperature increase, by conducting an open-field warming experiment. Experimental warming set-up using infra-red heater was built in 2011 and the temperature in warming plots has been regulated to be consistently 3oC higher than that of control plots. The seeds of Abies holophylla (AH), A. koreana (AK), Pinus densiflora (PD), and P. koraiensis (PK) were planted in each 1 m × 1 m plot (n=3) in April, 2012. Monthly net photosynthetic rates (Pn; μmol CO2 m-2 s-1) of 1-year-old seedlings (n=9) from June to November, 2013 were measured using CIRAS-2 (PP-Systems, UK) and photosynthetic parameters (the apparent quantum yield; ф; µmol CO2 mol-1, the dark respiration rate; Rd; µmol CO2 mol-1, and the light compensation point; LCP; µmol mol-1 s-1) were also calculated from the light-response curve of photosynthesis in August, 2013. Chlorophyll contents were measured using DMSO extraction method. Monthly Pn was generally higher for PD and decreased for AK in warmed plots than in control plots (Fig. 1). Pn of AK and PK did not show any significant difference, however, Pn of PK in October and November increased by experimental warming. Pn of PD also showed the highest increase in November and this distinct increase of Pn in autumn might be caused by delayed cessation of photosynthesis by temperature elevation. ф and Rd in warmed plots were higher for PD and lower for AK, while LCP did not significantly differ by treatments for all species. Because ф is considered to be related to the efficiency of harvesting and using light, the change in ф might have caused the response of Pn to warming in this study. Decreases

  9. A phase-field model for ductile fracture at finite strains and its experimental verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambati, Marreddy; Kruse, Roland; De Lorenzis, Laura

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a phase-field model for ductile fracture previously proposed in the kinematically linear regime is extended to the three-dimensional finite strain setting, and its predictions are qualitatively and quantitatively compared with several experimental results, both from ad-hoc tests carried out by the authors and from the available literature. The proposed model is based on the physical assumption that fracture occurs when a scalar measure of the accumulated plastic strain reaches a critical value, and such assumption is introduced through the dependency of the phase-field degradation function on this scalar measure. The proposed model is able to capture the experimentally observed sequence of elasto-plastic deformation, necking and fracture phenomena in flat specimens; the occurrence of cup-and-cone fracture patterns in axisymmetric specimens; the role played by notches and by their size on the measured displacement at fracture; and the sequence of distinct cracking events observed in more complex specimens.

  10. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Bimetal-Pipe Hydroforming.

    PubMed

    Dezhi, Zeng; Kuanhai, Deng; Taihe, Shi; Yuanhua, Lin; Hongjun, Zhu; Tianlei, Li; Yongxing, Sun

    2014-12-01

    The corrosion of oil country tubular goods (OCTG) gets more and more serious especially in the acidic environment. So, it is very important to develop a perfect anticorrosion technology for exploring sour oil and gas fields economically and safely. Analysis indicates that the bimetal-pipe (BP) which consists of the base layer of low carbon steel and a corrosion resistant alloy (CRA) cladding layer is an economic and reliable anticorrosion technology and has broad application prospects in the transportation of acid medium. However, theoretical study of hydraulic expansion mechanism for BP is not enough. In this paper, the deformation compatibility condition of BP was obtained by studying the deformation rule of the (CRA) liner and the outer pipe of carbon steel in the forming process; the mechanical model which can compute the hydroforming pressure of BP has been established based on the nonlinear kinematic hardening characteristics of material; furthermore, based on the stress strain curve of inner pipe simultaneously, the calculation method of the plastic hardening stress has been proposed. Thus, the accurate method for computing the forming pressure was obtained. The experimental data show that results are consistent with results of the proposed model. It indicates that the model can be used to provide theoretical guidance for the design and production as well as use of BP. PMID:25349461

  11. Experimental study of phase separation in dividing two phase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Qian Yong; Yang Zhilin; Xu Jijun

    1996-12-31

    Experimental study of phase separation of air-water two phase bubbly, slug flow in the horizontal T-junction is carried out. The influences of the inlet mass quality X1, mass extraction rate G3/G1, and fraction of extracted liquid QL3/QL1 on phase separation characteristics are analyzed. For the first time, the authors have found and defined pulsating run effect by the visual experiments, which show that under certain conditions, the down stream flow of the T-junction has strangely affected the phase redistribution of the junction, and firstly point out that the downstream geometric condition is very important to the study of phase separation phenomenon of two-phase flow in a T-junction. This kind of phenomenon has many applications in the field of energy, power, petroleum and chemical industries, such as the loss of coolant accident (LOCA) caused by a small break in a horizontal coolant pipe in nuclear reactor, and the flip-flop effect in the natural gas transportation pipeline system, etc.

  12. Effects of small-scale chemical reactions between supercritical CO2 and arkosic sandstone on large-scale permeability fields: An experimental study with implications for geologic carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, A. J.; Ding, K.; Saar, M. O.; Seyfried, W. E.

    2011-12-01

    During geologic carbon sequestration, small, pore-scale changes in mineralogy due to dissolution and precipitation reactions can modify bulk porosity. Porosity/permeability relationships are then typically used to infer large-scale permeability field changes. However, these relationships have limited use because they do not account for changes in pore geometry. Therefore, in connection with a DOE sponsored program, involving CO2 sequestration with geothermal energy usage, we constructed a novel hydrothermal flow system that allows simultaneous determination of changes in fluid chemistry and associated changes in permeability at elevated temperatures and high CO2 pressure. Initial experiments were conducted with an arkosic sandstone core of the Eau Claire Formation from southeastern Minnesota. The core was disaggregated and then wet sieved to yield a grain size distribution of 90-120 μm that was used to fill the Teflon sleeve held within the stainless steel pressure vessel. Initial water chemistry consisted of CO2 dissolved in deionized water. Outlet pressure was set to 11 MPa, and confinement pressure was 20 MPa. Flow rates produced inlet pressures between these two extremes, allowing CO2 solubility up to 1.1 mol/kg water. Rates of fluid flow ranged from 0.04 to 1.5 mL/min at a temperature of 21°C over the course of 33 days. Based on these data, the in-situ permeability of ~1E-14 to 9E-14 m2 for the arkosic sandstone was calculated. The reaction cell temperature was then increased to 50°C, and eventually 100°C. Each temperature step was associated with a sharp decrease in permeability, such that at 100°C the permeability had decreased by approximately three orders of magnitude from the starting condition. Fluid samples indicate release of dissolved Na, Ca, Mg, K, Al, SiO2, and Cl from minerals in the core, suggesting dissolution of primary mineral components. Charge balance constraints indicate a pH of approximately 4.2 at the highest temperature run condition

  13. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu; William E. Seyfried

    2005-01-01

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between lab and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the first year of the project, we have successfully developed a sample preparation method and completed three batch feldspar dissolution experiments at 200 C and 300 bars. The changes of solution chemistry as dissolution experiments progressed were monitored with on-line sampling of the aqueous phase at the constant temperature and pressure

  14. Methodology to estimate the relative pressure field from noisy experimental velocity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolin, C. D.; Raguin, L. G.

    2008-11-01

    The determination of intravascular pressure fields is important to the characterization of cardiovascular pathology. We present a two-stage method that solves the inverse problem of estimating the relative pressure field from noisy velocity fields measured by phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (PC-MRI) on an irregular domain with limited spatial resolution, and includes a filter for the experimental noise. For the pressure calculation, the Poisson pressure equation is solved by embedding the irregular flow domain into a regular domain. To lessen the propagation of the noise inherent to the velocity measurements, three filters - a median filter and two physics-based filters - are evaluated using a 2-D Couette flow. The two physics-based filters outperform the median filter for the estimation of the relative pressure field for realistic signal-to-noise ratios (SNR = 5 to 30). The most accurate pressure field results from a filter that applies in a least-squares sense three constraints simultaneously: consistency between measured and filtered velocity fields, divergence-free and additional smoothness conditions. This filter leads to a 5-fold gain in accuracy for the estimated relative pressure field compared to without noise filtering, in conditions consistent with PC-MRI of the carotid artery: SNR = 5, 20 x 20 discretized flow domain (25 X 25 computational domain).

  15. Outdoor Education, Junior Biology Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikman, John H.; And Others

    Field studies for grade nine and ten biology students are developed in this teacher and student guide for outdoor education. A small section is devoted to teacher pre-planning and final sections are concerned with equipment, audio-visual resources, and a large booklist. Twenty-three investigations related to earth science and biology topics are…

  16. "Idols" - A Game for Field Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connally, James T.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a game for field studies titled "Idols." Idols is a struggle of intellect and reason against instinct and superstition. The game involves two "tribes" which are protecting a superstitious legacy while trying to replace it with other forms of wealth and understanding. (Author/DS)

  17. Marine and Environmental Studies Field Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cranston School Dept., RI.

    This laboratory manual was developed for a field-oriented high school oceanology program. The organization of the units includes a selection of supplementary activities to allow students to explore ocean studies in more depth. Included are 19 units. The units include biological oceanography, physical oceanography, and some social science topics. A…

  18. Jupiter Environmental Research & Field Studies Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttemeyer, Bob

    1996-01-01

    Describes the development and workings of the Jupiter Environmental Research and Field Studies Academy that focuses on enabling both teachers and students to participate in real-life learning experiences. Discusses qualifications for admittance, curriculum, location, ongoing projects, students, academics, preparation for life, problem solving, and…

  19. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  20. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  1. Experimental studies of low-voltage, grating TWT amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Joe, J.; Basten, M.A.; Scharer, J.E.; Booske, J.H.; Wagner, K.

    1995-12-31

    Recent results are presented from experimental studies of spontaneous emission and linear gain in a low-voltage, sheet-beam-compatible, grating TWT amplifier. A round probe beam from a 10 kV, 0.25 A Pierce gun electron source is utilized for 14 GHz amplifier experiments. From the spontaneous emission measurements the authors obtain the following valuable information: (a) measurements of the grating-induced spontaneous emission spectrum which can be correlated with the theoretically predicted linear gain curves, (b) measurements of broad-band noise emission which are critical for amplifier sensitivity characterization, and (c) measurements of spontaneous emission in the backward-wave regime to correlate with start oscillation predictions. The noise emission spectra have been correlated with the most dominant experimental factors including guide magnetic field intensity and body currents. Measurements of linear gain are also compared with the theoretical prediction in both forward and backward-wave regimes. The slow-wave structure consists of a uniform grating that adiabatically tapers to a smooth wall at both ends for impedance matching between the conventional TE{sub 10} rectangular guide mode and the TE{sub x10} hybrid slow-wave mode of the grating circuit. Small loop antennas are inserted at each end in smooth-walled rectangular guide sections for input and output signal coupling with the TE{sub 10} mode. Broadband, high-vacuum-compatible, SiC waveguide attenuator fins provide excellent suppression of unwanted end reflections and prevent the system from self-oscillation in the forward-wave regime.

  2. Validating lipid force fields against experimental data: Progress, challenges and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Poger, David; Caron, Bertrand; Mark, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    Biological membranes display a great diversity in lipid composition and lateral structure that is crucial in a variety of cellular functions. Simulations of membranes have contributed significantly to the understanding of the properties, functions and behaviour of membranes and membrane-protein assemblies. This success relies on the ability of the force field used to describe lipid-lipid and lipid-environment interactions accurately, reproducibly and realistically. In this review, we present some recent progress in lipid force-field development and validation strategies. In particular, we highlight how a range of properties obtained from various experimental techniques on lipid bilayers and membranes, can be used to assess the quality of a force field. We discuss the limitations and assumptions that are inherent to both computational and experimental approaches and how these can influence the comparison between simulations and experimental data. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane Proteins edited by J.C. Gumbart and Sergei Noskov. PMID:26850737

  3. Schmallenberg virus infection in South American camelids: Field and experimental investigations.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Claudia; Beer, Martin; Hoffmann, Bernd

    2015-11-18

    During the first epizootic wave of the novel, teratogenic Schmallenberg virus (SBV, Orthobunyavirus) in ruminants in Northern Europe, serological evidence of a previous SBV-infection demonstrated that South American camelids (SAC) are also susceptible to SBV. However, their potential role in SBV spread remains unknown. To investigate the prevalence and course of SBV-infection in SAC, a German field study and an animal trial with three llamas and three alpacas were conducted. From September 2012 to December 2013, 313 of 502 SAC (62.35%) were found SBV seropositive, but negative for SBV-RNA. The estimated between-district (94.23% of 52) and median within-district (71.43%) and herd (73.13%) SBV seroprevalence in German SAC was similar to the seroprevalence reported in cattle herds and sheep flocks at the time. An age of >1 year was found a statistically significant risk factor for SBV-infection, which could be explained by the spatio-temporal spread of SBV in Germany during the study period. No clinical signs or an increase of abortion and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection in SAC were reported by the study participants. Similar to SBV-infected ruminants, SBV-RNAemia in experimentally SBV-infected SAC was detected for a short time between days 3 and 7 after infection (dpi), and seroconversion occurred between 9 and 21 dpi. Despite the similar virological and serological results, the lack of clinical signs and congenital malformation associated with SBV-infection suggests that SBV causes subclinical infection in SAC. However, their role as reservoirs in the spread of SBV has to be further investigated. PMID:26361966

  4. Experimental Observation of a Metal-insulator Transition in 2D at Zero Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchenko, S. V.

    1996-03-01

    The scaling theory of Abrahams et al. ^1 has had considerable success in describing many features of metal-insulator transitions. Within this theory, which was developed for non-interacting electrons, no such transition is possible in two-dimensional electron systems (2DES) in the absence of a magnetic field. However, we show experimentally that an ultra-high-mobility 2DES on the surface of silicon does exhibit the signature of a true metal-insulator phase transition at zero magnetic field at a critical electron density n_c ~10^11 cm-2. The energy of electron-electron interactions, ignored in the scaling theory,^1 is the dominant parameter in this 2DES. The resistivity, ρ, is empirically found to scale near the critical point both with temperature T and electric field E so that it can be represented by the form ρ(T,n_s)=ρ(T/T_0(n_s)) as Earrow0 or ρ(E,n_s)=ρ(E/E_0(n_s)) as Tarrow0. At the transition, the resistivity is close to 3h/e^2. Both scaling parameters, T0 and E_0, show power law behavior at the critical point. This is characteristic of a true phase transition and strongly resembles, in particular, the superconductor-insulator transition in disordered thin films,^2 as well as the transition between quantum Hall liquid and insulator.^3 Many high-mobility samples from two different sources (Institute for Metrological Service, Russia, and Siemens AG, Germany) with different oxide thicknesses and gate materials have been studied and similar results were found. Work done in collaboration with J. E. Furneaux, Whitney Mason, V. M. Pudalov, and M. D'Iorio, supported by NSF. ^1 E. Abrahams, P. W. Anderson, D. C. Licciardello, and T. V. Ramakrishnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 673 (1979). ^2 Y. Liu, K. A. McGreer, B. Nease, D. B. Haviland, G. Martinez, J. W. Halley, and A. M. Goldman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 67, 2068 (1991). ^3 T. Wang, K. P. Clark, G. F. Spencer, A. M. Mack, and W. P. Kirk, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72, 709 (1994).

  5. Water erosion monitoring and experimentation for global change studies

    SciTech Connect

    Poesen, J.W.; Boardman, J.; Wilcox, B.

    1996-09-01

    This report describes the need for monitoring the effects of climatic change on soil erosion. The importance of monitoring not only runoff, but monitoring and experimental studies at the larger scale of hillslope and catchments is stressed.

  6. Experimental study on heat transfer of the magnetorheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Gokhan; Genc, Seval

    2013-08-01

    Thermal conductivity of magnetorheological suspensions synthesized with iron powder and silicone oil is experimentally investigated for varying particle volume fractions (5, 20, and 40 vol%) of two different grades of iron (Fe) and magnetic field strengths. In order to determine the temperature range at which the thermal conductivity of MR fluids is more effective for different heat transfer applications, the experiments are done for three different temperature intervals in three different temperature ranges: from -20 to 0  ° C, from 0 to 50  ° C, and from 50 to 100 ° C. In this study, ISO 8301 ‘Thermal insulation—determination of steady state thermal resistance and related properties—heat flow meter apparatus’ is used. The thermal conductivity of the MR fluids shows an increase with increasing magnetic field and volume fraction in the temperature intervals from 0 to 50 ° C and from 50 to 100 ° C. In particular, there is a substantial enhancement in the thermal conductivity for the 50-100 ° C temperature interval (enhancement ratio by almost 134% for 40SM at H = 150 G). However, the thermal conductivity shows a decrease in the lower temperature interval from -20 to 0 ° C (a decrease by 42% for 40SM at 150 G), which could be due the effect of the thermal conductivity of silicone oil at lower temperatures. Although the heat transfer coefficient is higher for higher particle concentrations, the percentage increase is more pronounced for lower particle concentrations, especially in the 0 to 50 ° C temperature interval (for the 40SM sample at 150 G 18% an enhancement for a 20 K temperature difference is observed, whereas for the 20% MR fluid sample, the enhancement is 34%).

  7. Experimental and theoretical studies of cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Artem; Raitses, Yegeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2007-05-15

    The Hall thruster is a mature electric propulsion device that holds considerable promise in terms of the propellant saving potential. The annular design of the conventional Hall thruster, however, does not naturally scale to low power. The efficiency tends to be lower and the lifetime issues are more aggravated. Cylindrical geometry Hall thrusters have lower surface-to-volume ratio than conventional thrusters and, thus, seem to be more promising for scaling down. The cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) is fundamentally different from the conventional design in the way the electrons are confined and the ion space charge is neutralized. The performances of both the large (9-cm channel diameter, 600-1000 W) and miniaturized (2.6-cm channel diameter, 50-300 W) CHTs are comparable with those of the state-of-the-art conventional (annular) design Hall thrusters of similar sizes. A comprehensive experimental and theoretical study of the CHT physics has been conducted, addressing the questions of electron cross-field transport, propellant ionization, plasma-wall interaction, and formation of the electron distribution function. Probe measurements in the harsh plasma environment of the microthruster were performed. Several interesting effects, such as the unusually high ionization efficiency and enhanced electron transport, were observed. Kinetic simulations suggest the existence of the strong fluctuation-enhanced electron diffusion and predict the non-Maxwellian shape of the electron distribution function. Through the acquired understanding of the new physics, ways for further optimization of this means for low-power space propulsion are suggested. Substantial flexibility in the magnetic field configuration of the CHT is the key tool in achieving the high-efficiency operation.

  8. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu

    2006-08-31

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between laboratory and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO2 injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the second year of the project, we completed CO{sub 2}-Navajo sandstone interaction batch and flow-through experiments and a Navajo sandstone dissolution experiment without the presence of CO{sub 2} at 200 C and 250-300 bars, and initiated dawsonite dissolution and solubility experiments. We also performed additional 5-day experiments at the

  9. Field Study and Numerical Simulation of Sub Slab Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnefous, Y.C.; Gadgil, A.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Prill, R.J.; Nematollahi, A.R.

    1992-05-01

    The effectiveness of the technique of subslab ventilation (SSV) for limiting radon entry into basements was investigated through complementary experimentation and numerical modeling. Subslab pressure fields resulting from SSV were measured in six well-characterized basements, each with a different combination of soil and aggregate permeability. The relationship between air velocity and pressure gradient was measured in the laboratory for the three types of aggregate installed beneath the basement slabs. A new numerical model of SSV was developed and verified with the field data. This model simulates non-Darcy flow in the aggregate. We demonstrate that non-Darcy effects significantly impact SSV performance. Field data and numerical simulations indicate that increasing the aggregate permeability within the investigated range of 2 x 10{sup -8} m{sup 2} to 3 x 10{sup -7} m{sup 2} substantially improves the extension of the subslab pressure field due to SSV operation. Sealing of cracks in the slab and excavation of a small pit where the SSV pipe penetrates the slab also dramatically improve this pressure field extension. Our findings are consistent with the results of prior field studies; however, the studies reported here have improved our understanding of factors affecting SSV performance. The dependence of SSV performance on the relevant parameters are currently under investigation with the model.

  10. AC Electrostatic Field Study : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Lebby, Gary L.

    1990-08-28

    The phenomenon of fast transients propagating to the outer sheath of a gas insulated substation (GIS) during switching and disconnect operations as well as the distortion of the electric field gradient around an electric transmission line in the presence of field measuring equipment are examples of electrostatic and electromagnetic field problems that are very much on the minds of both power engineers and maintenance personnel alike. Maintenance personnel working on high voltage equipment want to know the areas that have the highest electric field strength gradients and they want to reduce the risk of being shocked when touching a conventionally 60 Hz grounded GIS enclosure due to fast transients initiated by faults and switching operations. In studying these phenomena during the performance period of this grant, tower configurations for the electric field strength gradient measurements were tested with the ESURF3D program acquired from BPA and gas insulated substation test pole (GISTP) models were tested using the Alternative Transients Program (ATP) version Electromagnets Transients Program (EMTP). The results of these two modeling paradigms are presented in this report not as the last word on these subjects, but as a couple of the many ways one can approach two classical electromagnetic waves problems. 19 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Experimental Structural Studies of Solutes in Aqueous Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Ingmar

    2007-11-29

    The principles of experimental methods to study the structure and the hydrogen bonding of hydrated solutes in aqueous solution are presented, and whether theoretical simulations can produce comparable information as the experimental ones is discussed. Two structure methods, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and large angle X-ray scattering (LAXS), and one method to study the hydrogen bonding in hydrated species in aqueous solution, double difference infrared spectroscopy of HDO, are presented.

  12. Experimental examination of strain field within GP zone in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, P. C.; Liu, F.; Hou, X. H.; Zhao, C. W.; Xing, Y. M.

    2012-11-01

    The strain field of GP zone plays a very important role in strengthening of the precipitation-hardened aluminum alloys by prohibiting movement of dislocations; however, quantitative analysis about the strain field of the GP zone in the aluminum alloys has been seldom reported elsewhere. In this paper, the microstructure of GP zone in an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy was explored by using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and the displacement field of lattice planes within the GP zone was experimentally measured by geometric phase analysis (GPA) technique; then, the quantitative results about strains of the distorted lattice planes within the GP zone were also obtained. It is found that the GP zone core is convergence region of the strains, and the maximum value of the compressive strains within the GP zone is about 7.6%.

  13. Numerical and experimental analysis of e-field scattering from the ground for base station antennae.

    PubMed

    Bistoni, S; Cristoforetti, L; Pontalti, R; Vaccari, A; Malacarne, C; Anglesio, L; D'Amore, G

    2001-01-01

    Based on the numerical determination of the complete irradiation volume of a commercial RBS antenna--performed using the FDTD method and the Kirchhoff integral formula for near to far field transformation--open site estimations of the electric field are made and compared with experimentally measured values. To describe the actual behaviour of the radiation field, the inherently complex phasic nature of plane waves is taken into account, together with their two independent states of polarisation. This information is contained in the radiation pattern previously deduced. Moreover, a reflected contribution from flat ground is introduced, along with the line-of-sight ray. Amplitude and phase of the reflected wave are calculated using Fresnel formulae for stratified ground and two polarisation states, i.e. normal and parallel to the plane of incidence. Good agreement with measured values is achieved only by using such assumptions. PMID:11878429

  14. Numerical Simulations and Accompanying Experimental Investigations of Magnetoplasmadynamic Thrusters with Coaxial Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Daniel; Auweter-Kurtz, Monika; Fertig, Markus; Herdrich, Georg

    An overview is given on a numerical simulation program for applied field magnetoplasmadynamic (AF-MPD) thrusters, which is currently under development at the Institute of Space Systems (IRS). The program allows the simulation of argon plasma flows in thermal and chemical non-equilibrium. The code is based on an axisymmetric finite volume method on unstructured, adaptive meshes. An externally applied magnetic field can be taken into account employing the vector potential formulation. Azimuthal velocity and magnetic field are handled by a quasi three-dimensional approach with vanishing azimuthal derivatives. Additionally, a laboratory AF-MPD thruster for the power range of 10-20 kW has been built up at IRS. The goal of the experimental investigations is the characterization of the operation and performance parameters of the thruster.

  15. Experimental correlation of electric fields and Raman signals in SERS and TERS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Wang, Hao; Kwasnieski, Daniel T.; Marr, James M.

    2015-08-01

    Enhanced Raman scattering from plasmonic nanostructures associated with surface enhanced (SERS) and tip enhanced (TERS) is seeing a dramatic increase in applications from bioimaging to chemical catalysis. The importance of gapmodes for high sensitivity indicates plasmon coupling between nanostructures plays an important role. However, the observed Raman scattering can change with different geometric arrangements of nanoparticles, excitation wavelengths, and chemical environments; suggesting differences in the local electric field. Our results indicate that molecules adsorbed to the nanostructures are selectively enhanced in the presence of competing molecules. This selective enhancement arises from controlled interactions between nanostructures, such as an isolated nanoparticle and a TERS tip. Complementary experiments suggest that shifts in the vibrational frequency of reporter molecules can be correlated to the electric field. Here we present a strategy that utilizes the controlled formation of coupled plasmonic structures to experimentally measure both the magnitude of the electric fields and the observed Raman scattering.

  16. Experimental correlation of electric fields and Raman signals in SERS and TERS

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Zachary D.; Wang, Hao; Kwasnieski, Daniel T.; Marr, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced Raman scattering from plasmonic nanostructures associated with surface enhanced (SERS) and tip enhanced (TERS) is seeing a dramatic increase in applications from bioimaging to chemical catalysis. The importance of gap-modes for high sensitivity indicates plasmon coupling between nanostructures plays an important role. However, the observed Raman scattering can change with different geometric arrangements of nanoparticles, excitation wavelengths, and chemical environments; suggesting differences in the local electric field. Our results indicate that molecules adsorbed to the nanostructures are selectively enhanced in the presence of competing molecules. This selective enhancement arises from controlled interactions between nanostructures, such as an isolated nanoparticle and a TERS tip. Complementary experiments suggest that shifts in the vibrational frequency of reporter molecules can be correlated to the electric field. Here we present a strategy that utilizes the controlled formation of coupled plasmonic structures to experimentally measure both the magnitude of the electric fields and the observed Raman scattering. PMID:26412927

  17. Experimental investigation of the interference structure in a shallow-water vector acoustic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wangsheng; Liang, Guolong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Yilin

    2012-11-01

    The waveguide invariant concept describes the interference striations in the acoustic pressure spectrograms produced with an underwater broadband source. In this paper, the existence of interference structure in the vector acoustic field is examined using sea trial data, and the waveguide invariant is exploited to interpret fringes of the vector field. The experimental data, which recorded a merchant vessel passing on a straight path, were collected by a 2-dimensional vector sensor during an experiment in the South China Sea. The intensity and phase spectra of the energy flux density vector in the acoustic field radiated by the moving vessel are obtained from the magnitude and phase angle of the product of the pressure and the horizontal particle velocity's complex conjugate. Distinct interference patterns appear in the vector intensity and phase spectra. The characteristics of these have been analyzed by comparison with the scaled acoustic field. The equation describing the striations associated with the ship's trajectory is derived from waveguide invariant theory. The Hough transform method is used to extract the waveguide invariant from the data. To improve the quality of the patterns derived from the vector field, a better value of waveguide invariant can be estimated. Good agreement between reconstructed trajectories and real patterns suggests that it is feasible to use the interference structure in an acoustic vector field to determine the waveguide characteristics.

  18. Particle-In-Cell Simulation and Experimental Characterization of a Cylindrical Cusped Field Plasma Thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucca Fabris, Andrea; Young, Christopher; Manente, Marco; Pavarin, Daniele; Cappelli, Mark

    2014-10-01

    This work aims to provide new insight into the physical mechanisms occurring in the discharge channel and acceleration region of a cusped field plasma thruster through a combined experimental and computational approach. Simulations are performed using the 3D particle-in-cell code F3MPIC, comprised of a PIC core coupled with a finite element electrostatic field solver over an unstructured mesh of tetrahedra. The cusped field structure is also included to resolve magnetized particle dynamics. We perform simulations with two ionization schemes: one where constant particle source rates are assigned to certain regions, and a more rigorous approach based on Monte Carlo collision events. The simulation results reveal correlations between the particle density distributions, electrostatic potential, and magnetic field topology inside the thruster discharge channel that are confirmed through experiments. Laser induced fluorescence measurements have resolved xenon ion velocities at several points near the thruster exit plane. Faraday and floating emissive probe measurements indicate this velocity field is correlated with the measured ion beam current profile and electrostatic potential field. This work sponsored by the U.S.A.F. Office of Scientific Research, with Dr. Mitat Birkan as program manager. F3MPIC developed under the European Union FP7 HPH.com project. C.V.Y. acknowledges the DOE NNSA SSGF fellowship under Contract DE-FC52-08NA28752.

  19. Experimental Studies of Nanobubbles at Solid-Water Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuehua

    2013-11-01

    When a hydrophobic substrate is in contact with water, gas bubbles thinner than 100 nm can form at the interface and stay for long time under ambient conditions. These nanobubbles have significant influence on a range of interfacial processes. For example, they give rise to hydrodynamic slip on the boundary, initiate the rupture of thin liquid films, facilitate the long-ranged interactions between hydrophobic surfaces, and enhance the attachment of a macroscopic bubble to the substrate. Experimentally, it is nontrivial to characterize such small fragile bubbles and unravel their fundamental physical properties. Based on our established procedure for the nanobubble formation, we have systematically studied the formation, stability and response of nanobubbles to external fields (e.g. sonication, pressure drop and temperature rise). By following the bubble morphology by atomic force microscopy, we show that the loss or gain of the nanobubble volume is achieved mainly by the change in the bubble height. The pinning on the three-phase boundary has significant implication on the properties of nanobubbles under various conditions. This talk will cover the effects of the substrate structures on the nanobubble formation, and the response of nanobubbles to the gas dissolution, the temperature increase, the extended gentle ultrasound or the substantial pressure drop in the environment. We acknowledge the support from Australian Research Council (FFT120100473).

  20. Analysis of experimental studies on gully erosion: a global review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Carlos; Gómez, Jose A.

    2015-04-01

    Research on gully erosion has increased significantly in the last decades. Despite the growing interest on the topic, relevant knowledge gaps still remain a challenge for gully erosion researchers (Poesen, 2011). Moreover, many of these studies are mainly descriptive, with little quantitative data allowing a comparison of the severity of the processes among different environments and conditions. The aim of this communication is to analyse the available experimental data in gully erosion literature involving quantitative information from the Web of Science datasets. Our objective is to investigate relevant trends of this type of erosion on the world scale. We have evaluated the role of gully erosion in the overall soil losses as well as the magnitude of the morphological variables. Also, we analysed the characteristics of image-based and field surveys regarding the technique employed, duration and data collection frequency. In this communication, we intend to provide insights on the evolution of gully erosion research up to the present moment in order to gain perspectives on the design of future efforts in the topic. References Poesen, J. 2011. Challenges in gully erosion research. Landform Analysis, Vol. 17: 5-9.

  1. Experimental study of drop impacts on soap films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yawar, Ali; Basu, Saikat; Concha, Andres; Bandi, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    Impinging drops on flowing and static soap films demonstrate at least three distinct types of impact regimes: (a) the drop bounces off the film surface, (b) it coalesces with the downstream flow for a moving film and for static films it gets assimilated within the film, and (c) it pierces through the film. The interaction presents a unique opportunity to explore the impact of a quasi one-dimensional object on a two-dimensional fluid, much like a comet impacting on a thin atmosphere. We present a detailed experimental study of droplet impacts on soap film flow, for a number of film inclination angles and falling heights of the drop. Imaging techniques employed include sodium lamp interferometry to measure film thickness fluctuations and particle tracking velocimetry to measure the velocity field. Film thickness measures approximately 10 microns and the drop diameter is 1 mm. We mostly observe the bouncing-off regime for smaller inclination angles. However, at higher impact angles, puncturing of the film becomes a more common occurrence. We show that when the drop bounces off the film, there is a momentum transfer leading to vortex dipole shedding, along with the generation of capillary waves; an impulsive regime that may share correspondence with the locomotion of water striders.

  2. Experimental Study of Functionally Graded Beam with Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, K.; Shrivastava, Y.; Dhoke, P.

    2013-11-01

    Generally, concrete used in the field suffers from lack of durability and homogeneity. As cement is the only binding material in concrete and due to hike in its price, researchers have been looking for apt substitutes. For the sake of economy, strength and anti-corrosion functionally graded beam (FGB) has developed having one layer of normal concrete and another of high volume fly-ash concrete (HVFAC). The flexural behavior FGB has analyzed experimentally in this work with variation in interface as 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 from bottom. In this study, HVFAC has prepared with replacement of cement by 20, 35 and 55 % with fly ash for M20 and M30 grade of concrete. It has seemed that there is 12.86 and 3.56 % increase in compressive and flexural strength of FGB. The bond strength FGM cube is optimum at 50 mm depth. As FGM is economical, having more durability and strength, so its adoption enables more sustainability in concrete industry.

  3. The study of piezoelectric lateral-electric-field-excited resonator.

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, Boris; Kuznetsova, Iren; Shikhabudinov, Alexander; Teplykh, Andrey; Borodina, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The piezoelectric lateral-electric-field-excited resonator based on an X-cut lithium niobate plate has been investigated. Two rectangular electrodes were applied on one side of the plate so that the lateral electric field components were parallel to the crystallographic Y-axis and excited the longitudinal wave in the gap between the electrodes. The region around the electrodes was covered with a special absorbing varnish to suppress the spurious oscillations. The effect of the absorbing coating width on the resonant frequency and Q-factor of the lateral field-excited resonator was studied in detail with the series and parallel resonances for different width of the gap between the electrodes. As a result, we found experimentally the parameter regions of pure resonances and the boundaries of value variation for resonance frequency, Q-factor, and effective electromechanical coupling coefficient. PMID:24402903

  4. Folding kinetics of WW domains with the united residue force field for bridging microscopic motions and experimental measurements

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Maisuradze, Gia G.; Suñol, David; Todorovski, Toni; Macias, Maria J.; Xiao, Yi; Scheraga, Harold A.; Czaplewski, Cezary; Liwo, Adam

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate the utility of the coarse-grained united-residue (UNRES) force field to compare experimental and computed kinetic data for folding proteins, we have performed long-time millisecond-timescale canonical Langevin molecular dynamics simulations of the triple β-strand from the Formin binding protein 28 WW domain and six nonnatural variants, using UNRES. The results have been compared with available experimental data in both a qualitative and a quantitative manner. Complexities of the folding pathways, which cannot be determined experimentally, were revealed. The folding mechanisms obtained from the simulated folding kinetics are in agreement with experimental results, with a few discrepancies for which we have accounted. The origins of single- and double-exponential kinetics and their correlations with two- and three-state folding scenarios are shown to be related to the relative barrier heights between the various states. The rate constants obtained from time profiles of the fractions of the native, intermediate, and unfolded structures, and the kinetic equations fitted to them, correlate with the experimental values; however, they are about three orders of magnitude larger than the experimental ones for most of the systems. These differences are in agreement with the timescale extension derived by scaling down the friction of water and averaging out the fast degrees of freedom when passing from all-atom to a coarse-grained representation. Our results indicate that the UNRES force field can provide accurate predictions of folding kinetics of these WW domains, often used as models for the study of the mechanisms of proein folding. PMID:25489078

  5. Efficiency of experimental rice (Oryza sativa L.) fields in mitigating diazinon runoff toxicity to Hyalella azteca

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study assessed the viability of using planted, mature rice fields in mitigating diazinon (an organophosphate insecticide) runoff toxicity using aqueous 48 h Hyalella azteca whole effluent toxicity bioassays. Rice fields decreased diazinon concentrations 80.1-99.9% compared with 10.8% in the unv...

  6. Experimental design based on field spectrometry for characterization of fire-affected soils.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosero, Olga; Vlassova, Lidia; Montorio Llovería, Raquel; Pérez-Cabello, Fernando

    2014-05-01

    Wildfires can modify physical and chemical properties of soils (Mataix-Solera et al., 2011; Badía et al., 2014). These disturbances involve changes in soil spectral properties, which can be analyzed by using field spectrometry (VIS-SWIR) (Montorio et al., 2008; Guerrero et al., 2010). The aim of this study is to present an experimental design for hyperspectral characterization of fire affected soils in laboratory conditions. We analyzed soil samples from Montes de Zuera area (Aragón, Spain) repeatedly affected by wildfires in the period of 1979-2008. Fourteen samples, seven from the burned zones and the corresponding control samples were collected in spring of 2013. Spectral analysis was performed on subsamples of around 130 g (fine fraction, particle size < 2 mm), previously dried in a stove at 105°C during 36 hours, and placed in crystal petri dishes (90 mm x 15 mm). The spectra were obtained using spectroradiometer ASD FieldSpec® 4 (spectral range from 350 nm to 2500 nm) combined with a Contact Probe ensuring homogeneity of observation and illumination conditions. Spectralon reference panel Labsphere® was used for conversion to reflectance values. The resulting reflectance is an average of the measurements corresponding to five random points of the subsample, each of them representing a mean value of 10 spectra. The averaging of spectra improves the signal to noise ratio and, at the same time, it minimizes the variations caused by the samples surface roughness. Statistically significant differences have been detected between burned and control soils. Reflectance increase of 12% (average for the whole spectrum) was observed in 70% of the samples: 16%, 15% and 10% increase in visible, NIR and SWIR respectively. Therefore regardless of the wildfire date, an increase of reflectance is observed in burned soils due to changes on soil properties. A detailed analysis of physical, chemical and biological properties of soils will be used in further research to

  7. Analytical and experimental investigation of flow fields of annular jets with and without swirling flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonson, M. R.; Smith, E. G.; Uhl, W. R.

    1974-01-01

    Analytical and experimental studies were performed to define the flowfield of annular jets, with and, without swirling flow. The analytical model treated configurations with variations of flow angularities, radius ratio, and swirl distributions. Swirl distributions characteristic of stator vanes and rotor blade rows, where the total pressure and swirl distributions are related were incorporated in the mathematical model. The experimental studies included tests of eleven nozzle models, both with and, without swirling exhaust flow. Flowfield surveys were obtained and used for comparison with the analytical model. This comparison of experimental and analytical studies served as the basis for evaluation of several empirical constants as required for application of the analysis to the general flow configuration. The analytical model developed during these studies is applicable to the evaluation of the flowfield and overall performance of the exhaust of statorless lift fan systems that contain various levels of exhaust swirl.

  8. Microbial field pilot study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  9. Experimental determination of field factors ([Formula: see text]) for small radiotherapy beams using the daisy chain correction method.

    PubMed

    Lárraga-Gutiérrez, José Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Recently, Alfonso et al proposed a new formalism for the dosimetry of small and non-standard fields. The proposed new formalism is strongly based on the calculation of detector-specific beam correction factors by Monte Carlo simulation methods, which accounts for the difference in the response of the detector between the small and the machine specific reference field. The correct calculation of the detector-specific beam correction factors demands an accurate knowledge of the linear accelerator, detector geometry and composition materials. The present work shows that the field factors in water may be determined experimentally using the daisy chain correction method down to a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm for a specific set of detectors. The detectors studied were: three mini-ionization chambers (PTW-31014, PTW-31006, IBA-CC01), three silicon-based diodes (PTW-60018, IBA-SFD and IBA-PFD) and one synthetic diamond detector (PTW-60019). Monte Carlo simulations and experimental measurements were performed for a 6 MV photon beam at 10 cm depth in water with a source-to-axis distance of 100 cm. The results show that the differences between the experimental and Monte Carlo calculated field factors are less than 0.5%-with the exception of the IBA-PFD-for field sizes between 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm and 5 cm × 5 cm. For the 1 cm × 1 cm field size, the differences are within 2%. By using the daisy chain correction method, it is possible to determine measured field factors in water. The results suggest that the daisy chain correction method is not suitable for measurements performed with the IBA-PFD detector. The latter is due to the presence of tungsten powder in the detector encapsulation material. The use of Monte Carlo calculated [Formula: see text] is encouraged for field sizes less than or equal to 1 cm × 1 cm for the dosimeters used in this work. PMID:26161448

  10. Theoretical and experimental studies relevant to interpretation of auroral emissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keffer, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    The accomplishments achieved over the past year are detailed with emphasis on the interpretation or auroral emissions and studies of potential spacecraft-induced contamination effects. Accordingly, the research was divided into two tasks. The first task is designed to add to the understanding of space vehicle induced external contamination. An experimental facility for simulation of the external environment for a spacecraft in low earth orbit was developed. The facility was used to make laboratory measurements of important phenomena required for improving the understanding of the space vehicle induced external environment and its effect on measurement of auroral emissions from space-based platforms. A workshop was sponsored to provide a forum for presentation of the latest research by nationally recognized experts on space vehicle contamination and to discuss the impact of this research on future missions involving space-based platforms. The second task is to add an ab initio auroral calculation to the extant ionospheric/thermospheric global modeling capabilities. Once the addition of the code was complete, the combined model was to be used to compare the relative intensities and behavior of various emission sources (dayglow, aurora, etc.). Such studies are essential to an understanding of the types of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) auroral images which are expected to be available within two years with the successful deployment of the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on the ISTP POLAR spacecraft. In anticipation of this, the second task includes support for meetings of the science working group for the UVI to discuss operational and data analysis needs. Taken together, the proposed tasks outline a course of study designed to make significant contributions to the field of space-based auroral imaging.

  11. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Low-Solubility Radionuclides: A Field, Experimental, and Modeling Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Kersting, A B; Reimus, P W; Abdel-Fattah, A; Allen, P G; Anghel, I; Benedict, F C; Esser, B K; Lu, N; Kung, K S; Nelson, J; Neu, M P; Reilly, S D; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Ware, S D; Warren, RG; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2003-02-01

    rate of Pu transport. Currently, the role of colloids in facilitating the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is not understood well enough to effectively model contaminant transport. A fundamental understanding of the role that colloids may or may not play in the transport of low-solubility radionuclides is needed in order to predict contaminant transport, design remediation strategies and provide risk assessments. Ryan and Elimelech (1996) have argued that in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport radionuclides, several criteria must be met: (1) colloids must exist and be stable, (2) radionuclides must have a high sorption affinity for the colloids, and (3) colloids must be transported. Only then can we understand the conditions where colloids can and will facilitate transport of radionuclides. In this report we compile the results from a series of field, laboratory and modeling studies funded by the UGTA program in order to evaluate the potential for colloids to transport low-solubility radionuclides at the NTS. The studies presented in this report fall under three general areas of investigation: Characterization of natural colloids in groundwater at NTS, Pu sorption/desorption experiments on colloid minerals identified in NTS groundwater, and Transport of Pu-doped colloids through fractured rock core. Chapter 1 is a background review of our current understanding of colloids and their role in facilitating contaminant transport. Chapters 2, and 3 are field studies that focused on characterizing natural colloids at different hydrologic environments at the NTS and address Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) first criteria regarding the existence and stability of colloids. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 are laboratory experimental studies that investigate the sorption/desorption behavior of Pu and other low-solubility radionuclides on colloid minerals observed in NTS groundwater. These studies evaluate Ryan and Elimelech's (1996) second criteria that the affinity

  12. Studies of turbulent round jets through experimentation, simulation, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keedy, Ryan

    This thesis studies the physics of the turbulent round jet. In particular, it focuses on three different problems that have the turbulent round jet as their base flow. The first part of this thesis examines a compressible turbulent round jet at its sonic condition. We investigate the shearing effect such a jet has when impinging on a solid surface that is perpendicular to the flow direction. We report on experiments to evaluate the jet's ability to remove different types of explosive particles from a glass surface. Theoretical analysis revealed trends and enabled modeling to improve the predictability of particle removal for various jet conditions. The second part of thesis aims at developing a non-intrusive measurement technique for free-shear turbulent flows in nature. Most turbulent jet investigations in the literature, both in the laboratory and in the field, required specialized intrusive instrumentation and/or complex optical setups. There are many situations in naturally-occurring flows where the environment may prove too hostile or remote for existing instrumentation. We have developed a methodology for analyzing video of the exterior of a naturally-occurring flow and calculating the flow velocity. We found that the presence of viscosity gradients affects the velocity analysis. While these effects produce consistent, predictable changes, we became interested in the mechanism by which the viscosity gradients affect the mixing and development of the turbulent round jet. We conducted a stability analysis of the axisymmetric jet when a viscosity gradient is present. Finally, the third problem addressed in this thesis is the growth of liquid droplets by condensation in a turbulent round jet. A vapor-saturated turbulent jet issues into a cold, dry environment. The resulting mixing produces highly inhomogeneous regions of supersaturation, where droplets grow and evaporate. Non-linear interactions between the droplet growth rate and the supersaturation field make

  13. Deposition of laminated shale: A field and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Daniel L.; Roy, David C.

    1985-03-01

    Intermittently laminated shale of the Jemtland Formation in Maine is characterized by thin lenticular silt segregations interlaced with argillaceous and organic material (including graptolites). This shale is thinly interbedded with nonlaminated shale, siltstone, and thicker turbidite graywacke beds. Experiments suggest that the intermittently laminated shale was deposited by silt/clay-laden currents and may have been part of an upward turbidite progression from parallel-laminated silt (>60% silt), through intermittently laminated mud (40 to 60% silt), to nonlaminated mud (20 to 40% silt). Intermittently laminated mud may be produced from silt/clay flows that are: decelerating at a constant silt content, losing silt at constant velocity; or both decelerating and losing silt.

  14. Treatment of tunnel phobia: an experimental field study.

    PubMed

    Gotestam, K Gunnar; Svebak, Sven

    2009-01-01

    The opening of the deepest undersea tunnel in the world (264 m below sea level, 5600 m in length) replaced the ferry from the island of Hitra to the mainland in Norway. This event provoked phobic anxiety for traveling through the undersea tunnel in a number of individuals in the area. A treatment program for tunnel phobia was designed to test whether such a phobia could be mitigated by procedures previously proven effective in the treatment of other phobias. The program was presented to 18 persons with a specific phobia for tunnels and included a general discussion on the construction of undersea tunnels, given by an engineer from the tunnel construction company, and on phobic anxiety. It further consisted of gradual exposure to the tunnel in situ. Treatment effects were strong. All patients were able to travel on their own by car through the tunnel after the treatment. Their somatic complaints and phobic thoughts related to the tunnel were substantially reduced, and their mastery of tunnel driving was convincingly increased compared with the wait-list reference group. PMID:19440895

  15. Strain localization in carbonate rocks experimentally deformed in the ductile field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. F. G.; Dresen, G.

    2012-04-01

    The deformation of rocks in the Earth's crust is often localized, varying from brittle fault gauges in shallow environments to mylonites in ductile shear zones at greater depth. A number of theoretical, experimental, and field studies focused on the evolution and extend of brittle fault zones, but little is known so far about initiation of ductile shear zones. Strain localization in rocks deforming at high temperature and pressure may be induced by several physical, chemical, or structurally-related mechanisms. We performed simple and pure shear deformation experiments on carbonate rocks containing structural inhomogenities in the ductile deformation regime. The results may help to gain insight into the evolution of high temperature shear zones. As starting material we used cylindrical samples of coarse-grained Carrara marble containing one or two 1 mm thin artificially prepared sheets of fine-grained Solnhofen limestone, which act as soft inclusions under the applied experimental conditions. Length and diameter of the investigated solid and hollow cylinders were 10-20 mm and 10-15 mm, respectively. Samples were deformed in a Paterson-type gas deformation apparatus at 900° C temperature and confining pressures of 300 and 400 MPa. Three samples were deformed in axial compression at a bulk strain rate of 8x10-5 s-1to axial strains between 0.02 and 0.21 and 15 samples were twisted in torsion at a bulk shear strain rate of 2x10-4 s-1 to shear strains between 0.01 and 3.74. At low strain, specimens deformed axially and in torsion show minor strain hardening that is replaced by strain weakening at shear strains in excess of about 0.2. Peak shear stress at the imposed condition is about 20 MPa. Strain localized strongly within the weak inclusions as indicated by inhomogeneous bending of initially straight strain markers on sample jackets. Maximum strain concentration within inclusions with respect to the adjacent matrix was between 4 and 40, depending on total strain and

  16. An advanced field experimental design to assess plant tolerance to heavy metal pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łopata, Barbara; Szarek-Łukaszewska, Grażyna; Babst-Kostecka, Alicja

    2016-04-01

    Only a limited number of vascular plant species can survive and reproduce in toxic metalliferous environments. Among these species, pseudometallophytes are particularly interesting, as their metallicolous (M) populations on metalliferous soils and non-metallicolous (NM) populations on non-metalliferous soils show very pronounced ecological differences. Pseudometallophytes thus provide excellent opportunities for multidisciplinary research to improve phytoremediation and phytomining. Numerous methods have been developed to investigate plant adaptation to metal pollution, the majority of which has been conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. Although these efforts have significantly advanced our understanding of mechanisms underlying metal tolerance in plants, populations must be reciprocally transplanted to clearly identify natural selection. Only then is it possible to test, whether the fitness of native plants is higher than that of nonnative populations and thereby prove local adaptation. Here, we present an enhanced field experimental design aimed at verification of local adaptation to habitats with different levels of heavy metal soil contamination. At two M and two NM sites, we established a total of 12 plots (4 sites x 3 plots each), removed the existing local vegetation, and collected soil samples for chemical analyses (5 samples per plot). Plant collection (N= 480) from all four selected populations was established under laboratory conditions prior to the transplant experiment. Genotypes were randomly distributed within each plot (240 x 270 cm) and planted along a regulary spaced grid (30x30cm cell size) in spring 2015. Measurements will start in spring 2016, by which time plants are expected to have acclimatized to the local conditions. For the two subsiquent years, growth, survival, fitness, life cycle and herbivory consumption will be monitored for each transplant. On a weekly basis, we will record: 1) pictures of each transplant to determine

  17. A theoretical and experimental study of coplanar waveguide shunt stubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dib, Nihad I.; Ponchak, George E.; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1993-01-01

    A comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of straight and bent coplanar waveguide (CPW) shunt stubs is presented. In the theoretical analysis, the CPW is assumed to be inside a cavity while, the experiments are performed on open structures. For the analysis of CPW discontinuities with air-bridges, a hybrid technique was developed which was validated through extensive theoretical and experimental comparisons. The effect of the cavity resonances on the behavior of the stubs with and without air-bridges is investigated. In addition, the encountered radiation loss due to the discontinuities is evaluated experimentally.

  18. Numerical and experimental study of shock-driven cavity collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betney, M. R.; Anderson, P. A.; Doyle, H.; Tully, B.; Hawker, N. A.; Ventikos, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A study is presented of the interaction of a shock wave with gas cavities cast in a hydrogel. Simulations are conducted using a front-tracking approach, whereby Lagrangian hypersurfaces are used to model the interface between materials. These ‘fronts’ are overlaid on an Eulerian grid which is used to model the bulk flow. Results are compared to an experimental investigation, in which a light gas gun is used to create ∼600 MPa shock waves in hydrogel blocks, within which air cavities have been cast. Experimental results are presented, including temporally resolved measurements of light emission. Comparison between experimental and simulated results shows good agreement.

  19. Comparison of experimental and theoretical reaction rail currents, rail voltages, and airgap fields for the linear induction motor research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of reaction rail currents, reaction rail voltages, and airgap magnetic fields in tests of the Linear Induction Motor Research Vehicle (LIMRV) were compared with theoretical calculations from the mesh/matrix theory. It was found that the rail currents and magnetic fields predicted by the theory are within 20 percent of the measured currents and fields at most motor locations in most of the runs, but differ by as much as a factor of two in some cases. The most consistent difference is a higher experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the entrance of the motor and a lower experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the exit. The observed differences between the theoretical and experimental magnetic fields and currents do not account for the differences of as much as 26 percent between the theoretical and experimental thrusts.

  20. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns.

    PubMed

    Jawla, Sudheer K; Nanni, Emilio A; Shapiro, Michael A; Woskov, Paul P; Temkin, Richard J

    2012-06-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  1. Mode Content Determination of Terahertz Corrugated Waveguides Using Experimentally Measured Radiated Field Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Jawla, Sudheer K.; Nanni, Emilio A.; Shapiro, Michael A.; Woskov, Paul P.; Temkin, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    This work focuses on the accuracy of the mode content measurements in an overmoded corrugated waveguide using measured radiated field patterns. Experimental results were obtained at 250 GHz using a vector network analyzer with over 70 dB of dynamic range. The intensity and phase profiles of the fields radiated from the end of the 19 mm diameter helically tapped brass waveguide were measured on planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm from the waveguide end. The measured fields were back propagated to the waveguide aperture to provide three independent estimates of the field at the waveguide exit aperture. Projecting that field onto the modes of the guide determined the waveguide mode content. The three independent mode content estimates were found to agree with one another to an accuracy of better than ±0.3%. These direct determinations of the mode content were compared with indirect measurements using the experimentally measured amplitude in three planes, with the phase determined by a phase retrieval algorithm. The phase retrieval technique using the planes at 7, 10, and 13 cm yielded a mode content estimate in excellent agreement, within 0.3%, of the direct measurements. Phase retrieval results using planes at 10, 20, and 30 cm were less accurate due to truncation of the measurement in the transverse plane. The reported measurements benefited greatly from a precise mechanical alignment of the scanner with respect to the waveguide axis. These results will help to understand the accuracy of mode content measurements made directly in cold test and indirectly in hot test using the phase retrieval technique. PMID:25264391

  2. Experimental Investigation of Porous-floor Effects on Cavity Flow Fields at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Floyd J., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a passive-venting system to modify the flow field characteristics of a rectangular-box cavity at supersonic speeds. The passive-venting system consists of a porous floor with a vent chamber beneath the floor. For certain cavity length-to-height ratios, this configuration allowed high-pressure air at the rear of the cavity to vent to the forward part of the cavity, thereby modifying the cavity flow field. The wind-tunnel model consisted of a flat plate that housed a cavity mounted on a balance such that only the cavity drag was measured. The cavity height remained constant, and the length varied with rectangular-block inserts. Both solid-and porous-floor cavities were tested for comparison at Mach numbers of 1.60, 1.90, 2.16, and 2.86. These results showed that the passive-venting system did modify the cavity flow field. In order to determine the type flow field which existed for the porous-floor configuration, pressures were measured inside the cavity at the same conditions and for the same configurations as those used in the drag tests. Pressure data were also obtained with stores mounted in the cavity. These results, along with Schlieren photographs and the tabulated data, are presented to document the porous-floor cavity flow field.

  3. Evolution of an Experimental Population of Phytophthora capsici in the Field.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Amara R; Bruening, Stephen R; Grünwald, Niklaus J; Smart, Christine D

    2014-10-01

    Populations of the vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici are often highly diverse, with limited gene flow between fields. To investigate the structure of a newly established, experimental population, an uninfested research field was inoculated with two single-zoospore isolates of P. capsici in September 2008. From 2009 through 2012, ≈50 isolates of P. capsici were collected from the field each year and genotyped using five microsatellite loci. The same two isolates were also crossed in the lab. High levels of diversity were detected in the research field, with 26 to 37 unique multilocus genotypes detected each year. Through 2012, genotypic diversity did not decline and no evidence of genetic drift was observed. However, during the 2011 and 2012 growing seasons, four new alleles not present in either parental isolate were observed in the field. Selfing (but not apomixis) was observed at low frequency among in vitro progeny. In addition, evidence for loss of heterozygosity was observed in half of the in vitro progeny. These results suggest that recombination, mutation, and loss of heterozygosity can affect the genetic structure observed in P. capsici populations. PMID:24702666

  4. Experimental and computational investigation of the NASA low-speed centrifugal compressor flow field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hathaway, Michael D.; Chriss, Randall M.; Wood, Jerry R.; Strazisar, Anthony J.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental and computational investigation of the NASA Lewis Research Center's low-speed centrifugal compressor (LSCC) flow field was conducted using laser anemometry and Dawes' three-dimensional viscous code. The experimental configuration consisted of a backswept impeller followed by a vaneless diffuser. Measurements of the three-dimensional velocity field were acquired at several measurement planes through the compressor. The measurements describe both the throughflow and secondary velocity field along each measurement plane. In several cases the measurements provide details of the flow within the blade boundary layers. Insight into the complex flow physics within centrifugal compressors is provided by the computational fluid dynamics analysis (CFD), and assessment of the CFD predictions is provided by comparison with the measurements. Five-hole probe and hot-wire surveys at the inlet and exit to the impeller as well as surface flow visualization along the impeller blade surfaces provided independent confirmation of the laser measurement technique. The results clearly document the development of the throughflow velocity wake that is characteristic of unshrouded centrifugal compressors.

  5. Experimental investigation of relationship between nonlinear field energy and emittance growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, D.; McCready, S. S.; McHarg, M. G.; Brasure, L. D.

    1989-11-01

    Understanding the phenomena of emittance growth in space-charge-dominated particle beams is important to any application that requires a small final emittance. Many researchers have looked at the process of emittance growth under these conditions. Wangler, et al., uses the idea of nonlinear field energy to describe emittance growth. In brief, a beam with a nonuniform radial intensity distribution has a potential energy associated with this distribution. As the beam propagates through a solenoidal magnetic field, this potential energy is turned into transverse kinetic energy and manifests itself as emittance growth. The experimental results shows that there is a relationship between the initial intensity profile and the tune ratio to the emittance of charged particle beams in solenoidal focusing fields. The results also agree with the predicted beam intensity profile changes under focusing for peaked and flat beams. This experiment shows that an experiment to verify this theory by using two different beam intensity profiles is feasible. More experimentation in this area is recommended.

  6. Experimental study of burnout in channels with twisted fuel rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol'Shakov, V. V.; Bashkirtsev, S. M.; Kobzar', L. L.; Morozov, A. G.

    2007-05-01

    The results of experimental studies of pressure drop and critical heat flux in the models of fuel assemblies (FAs) with fuel rod simulators twisted relative to the longitudinal axis and a three-ray cross section are considered. The experimental data are compared to the results obtained with the use of techniques adopted for design calculations with fuel rod bundles of type-VVER reactors.

  7. THE SALEM ROAD STUDY: RESTORATION OF DEGRADED LAND WITH PASTURE-EXPERIMENTAL LAYOUT AND ANIMAL RESPONSES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The general goal of the following study was to identify sustainable cattle production systems that are highly productive, that minimize negative environmental impacts, and that improve soil quality in degraded landscapes. The experimental site was a 15-ha upland field near Farmington, GA that had p...

  8. Investigating microbial transformations of soil organic matter: synthesizing knowledge from disparate fields to guide new experimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S. A.; Tiemann, L. K.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Lehmeier, C. A.; Min, K.

    2015-04-01

    Discerning why some soil organic matter (SOM) leaves soil profiles relatively quickly while other compounds, especially at depth, can be retained for decades to millennia is challenging for a multitude of reasons. Simultaneous with soil-specific advances, multiple other disciplines have enhanced their knowledge bases in ways potentially useful for future investigations of SOM decay. In this article, we highlight observations highly relevant for those investigating SOM decay and retention but often emanating from disparate fields and residing in literature seldom cited in SOM research. We focus on recent work in two key areas. First, we turn to experimental approaches using natural and artificial aquatic environments to investigate patterns of microbially mediated OM transformations as environmental conditions change, and highlight how aquatic microbial responses to environmental change can reveal processes likely important to OM decay and retention in soils. Second, we emphasize the importance of establishing intrinsic patterns of decay kinetics for purified substrates commonly found in soils to develop baseline rates. These decay kinetics - which represent the upper limit of the reaction rates - can then be compared to substrate decay kinetics observed in natural samples, which integrate intrinsic decay reaction rates and edaphic factors essential to the site under study but absent in purified systems. That comparison permits the site-specific factors to be parsed from the fundamental decay kinetics, an important advance in our understanding of SOM decay (and thus persistence) in natural systems. We then suggest ways in which empirical observations from aquatic systems and purified substrate-enzyme reaction kinetics can be used to advance recent theoretical efforts in SOM-focused research. Finally, we suggest how the observations in aquatic and purified substrate-enzyme systems could be used to help unravel the puzzles presented by oft-observed patterns of SOM

  9. Magnetic Field Enhancement and Hydromagnetic Dynamics in an Experimental Model of the Earth's Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, D.; Liu, Q.; Zimmerman, D. S.; Triana, S. A.; Nataf, H. C.; Lathrop, D. P.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic field amplification and hydromagnetic dynamics relevant to the earth's outer core are studied in the University of Maryland Three Meter Geodynamo, a rapidly rotating spherical Couette experiment that is geometrically similar to the earth's core and filled with liquid sodium. Turbulent flow is driven in the sodium by differential rotation of the inner and outer spherical shells, while an external coil applies a magnetic field in order to study hydromagnetic effects such as dynamo action. An array of 31 external Hall sensors measures the Gauss coefficients of the resulting field. The flow state is strongly dependent on Rossby number Ro = (ΩI - ΩO)/ΩO, where ΩI and ΩO are the inner and outer sphere rotation frequencies. The flow state is inferred from the torque required to drive the inner sphere. The generation of internal toroidal magnetic field through the Omega effect is measured by a Hall probe inserted into the sodium. A self-sustaining dynamo has not yet been observed at rotation speeds up to about half of the design maximum. However, continuous dipole amplification up to ~12% of a small applied field has been observed at Ro = -17.7 while bursts of dipole field have been observed up to 15% of a large external applied field at Ro = +6.0 and up to ~20% of a small applied field at Ro = +2.15.

  10. Inverse field-based approach for simultaneous B₁ mapping at high fields - a phantom based study.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jin; Liu, Feng; Zuo, Zhentao; Xue, Rong; Li, Mingyan; Li, Yu; Weber, Ewald; Crozier, Stuart

    2012-04-01

    Based on computational electromagnetics and multi-level optimization, an inverse approach of attaining accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity of radiofrequency coils is presented. This paper extends our previous study of inverse methods of receptivity mapping at low fields, to allow accurate mapping of RF magnetic fields (B(1)) for high-field applications. Accurate receive sensitivity mapping is essential to image domain parallel imaging methods, such as sensitivity encoding (SENSE), to reconstruct high quality images. Accurate transmit sensitivity mapping will facilitate RF-shimming and parallel transmission techniques that directly address the RF inhomogeneity issue, arguably the most challenging issue of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The inverse field-based approach proposed herein is based on computational electromagnetics and iterative optimization. It fits an experimental image to the numerically calculated signal intensity by iteratively optimizing the coil-subject geometry to better resemble the experiments. Accurate transmit and receive sensitivities are derived as intermediate results of the optimization process. The method is validated by imaging studies using homogeneous saline phantom at 7T. A simulation study at 300MHz demonstrates that the proposed method is able to obtain receptivity mapping with errors an order of magnitude less than that of the conventional method. The more accurate receptivity mapping and simultaneously obtained transmit sensitivity mapping could enable artefact-reduced and intensity-corrected image reconstructions. It is hoped that by providing an approach to the accurate mapping of both transmit and receive sensitivity, the proposed method will facilitate a range of applications in high-field MRI and parallel imaging. PMID:22391489

  11. Towards a sterile insect technique field release of Anopheles arabiensis mosquitoes in Sudan: Irradiation, transportation, and field cage experimentation

    PubMed Central

    Helinski, Michelle EH; Hassan, Mo'awia M; El-Motasim, Waleed M; Malcolm, Colin A; Knols, Bart GJ; El-Sayed, Badria

    2008-01-01

    Background The work described in this article forms part of a study to suppress a population of the malaria vector Anopheles arabiensis in Northern State, Sudan, with the Sterile Insect Technique. No data have previously been collected on the irradiation and transportation of anopheline mosquitoes in Africa, and the first series of attempts to do this in Sudan are reported here. In addition, experiments in a large field cage under near-natural conditions are described. Methods Mosquitoes were irradiated in Khartoum and transported as adults by air to the field site earmarked for future releases (400 km from the laboratory). The field cage was prepared for experiments by creating resting sites with favourable conditions. The mating and survival of (irradiated) laboratory males and field-collected males was studied in the field cage, and two small-scale competition experiments were performed. Results Minor problems were experienced with the irradiation of insects, mostly associated with the absence of a rearing facility in close proximity to the irradiation source. The small-scale transportation of adult mosquitoes to the release site resulted in minimal mortality (< 6%). Experiments in the field cage showed that mating occurred in high frequencies (i.e. an average of 60% insemination of females after one or two nights of mating), and laboratory reared males (i.e. sixty generations) were able to inseminate wild females at rates comparable to wild males. Based on wing length data, there was no size preference of males for mates. Survival of mosquitoes from the cage, based on recapture after mating, was satisfactory and approximately 60% of the insects were recaptured after one night. Only limited information on male competitiveness was obtained due to problems associated with individual egg laying of small numbers of wild females. Conclusion It is concluded that although conditions are challenging, there are no major obstacles associated with the small

  12. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, J. F.; Sale, K.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J. H.; Preston, C. C.

    1991-06-01

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry.

  13. Benchmark field study of deep neutron penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, J.F.; Sale, K. ); Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.; Preston, C.C. )

    1991-06-10

    A unique benchmark neutron field has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to study deep penetration neutron transport. At LLNL, a tandem accelerator is used to generate a monoenergetic neutron source that permits investigation of deep neutron penetration under conditions that are virtually ideal to model, namely the transport of mono-energetic neutrons through a single material in a simple geometry. General features of the Lawrence Tandem (LATAN) benchmark field are described with emphasis on neutron source characteristics and room return background. The single material chosen for the first benchmark, LATAN-1, is a steel representative of Light Water Reactor (LWR) Pressure Vessels (PV). Also included is a brief description of the Little Boy replica, a critical reactor assembly designed to mimic the radiation doses from the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima, and its us in neutron spectrometry. 18 refs.

  14. An experimental study into the bilinear oscillator close to grazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ing, J.; Pavlovskaia, E.; Wiercigroch, M.

    2008-02-01

    A linear oscillator undergoing impact with a secondary support is studied experimentally. Smooth as well as nonsmooth bifurcations are observed. The bifurcations are explained with help from simulations based on mapping solutions between locally smooth subspaces. Experimental stability studies are also presented, justifying the normal form maps used to show the response close to grazing for systems with and without prestress of the secondary spring. The high degree of correspondence lends support to the modelling approach, and the highly complicated response justifies continued study of this system.

  15. Experimental investigations of the role of laser field fluctuations in non-linear optical absorption processes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    In the experimental program described, we deliberately broaden a well-stabilized single mode laser beam by introducing fluctuations to the laser frequency, in order to synthesize laser power spectra for which the fluctuations are well-characterized to all orders in a statistical sense. With this technique we are able to produce single mode laser fields which have nearly Lorentzian power spectra at one limit, essentially Gaussian power spectra at the other limit, and which may be varied continuously between these two limits. 16 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Experimental and Calculated Flow Fields Produced by Airplanes Flying at Supersonic Speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Harriet J.

    1960-01-01

    Results are presented of a flight investigation conducted to survey the flow field generated by airplanes flying a t supersonic speeds. The pressure signatures of an F-100, an F-104, and a B-58 airplane, representing widely varying configurations, a t distances from 120 t o 425 f e e from the generating aircraft and at Mach numbers from 1.2 t o 1.8 are shown. Calculations were made by using Whitham's method and were compared with the experimental results.

  17. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  18. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation.

  19. Behavioural evidence of magnetoreception in dolphins: detection of experimental magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Kremers, Dorothee; López Marulanda, Juliana; Hausberger, Martine; Lemasson, Alban

    2014-11-01

    Magnetoreception, meaning the perception of magnetic fields, is supposed to play an important role for orientation/navigation in some terrestrial and aquatic species. Although some spatial observations of free-ranging cetaceans' migration routes and stranding sites led to the assumption that cetaceans may be sensitive to the geomagnetic field, experimental evidence is lacking. Here, we tested the spontaneous response of six captive bottlenose dolphins to the presentation of two magnetized and demagnetized controlled devices while they were swimming freely. Dolphins approached the device with shorter latency when it contained a strongly magnetized neodymium block compared to a control demagnetized block that was identical in form and density and therefore undistinguishable with echolocation. We conclude that dolphins are able to discriminate the two stimuli on the basis of their magnetic properties, a prerequisite for magnetoreception-based navigation. PMID:25267469

  20. Experimental investigation of the temperature field in the gas-liquid two-layer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatapova, E. Ya.; Filipenko, R. A.; Lyulin, Yu. V.; Graur, I. A.; Marchuk, I. V.; Kabov, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the temperature field across the liquid-gas two-layer system are presented. The liquid layer is locally heated from the bottom substrate, and the intensive liquid evaporation is observed. A technique for measuring the temperature profile across the liquid and gas layers (including their interface) is developed. To do these measurements, the microthermocouple is moved across the layers with the help of precision micropositioner with a step of 1 μm. The temperature jump at the liquid-gas interface is measured, and its value increases with the temperature increase. Detailed information on the temperature field near the interface is obtained by using the precise thermocouple displacement with a small step.

  1. New experimental method of visualizing the electric field due to surface charges on circuit elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Rebecca; de Salazar, Alex; Nassar, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    Although static surface charges on circuit elements are of enormous interest, recent papers and textbooks have only discussed the problem theoretically using analytical or numerical approaches. The only well-known experimental method to visualize the structure of electric fields around circuit elements was reported by Jefimenko almost half a century ago. In our paper, we report on a simple method to visualize the electric field produced by static surface charges on current-carrying circuit elements. Our method uses a mixture of PTFE (Teflon) sealant and mineral oil, a copper wire placed in the mixture's container, and two 6 kV power supplies. We believe that our new method can be used directly in the classroom.

  2. An experimental study of scalar mixing in curved shear layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1990-01-01

    This report describes the work being undertaken to study the scalar mixing in curved shear layers. First, the motivation for this work and its objectives are described. Second, a description of the experimental rig that has been built is given. Third, some preliminary results (flow visualizations) are discussed, and finally, future steps that will be taken to complete the study are outlined.

  3. A Small Scale Experimental Study: Using Animations to Learn Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayaoglu, M. Naci; Dag Akbas, Raside; Ozturk, Zeynep

    2011-01-01

    This study attempts to investigate whether a difference exists between learning vocabulary via animation and via traditional paper-based method. This small scale study was conducted at Karadeniz Technical University in academic year 2009-2010. Two pre-intermediate classes were randomly selected as the experimental group (n = 17), and control group…

  4. Computational and Experimental Studies On The Hydrolysis of Bryostatin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bryostatin is a marine natural product studied in over 30 clinical cancer therapy trials. Its large bryophan ring is held together by an ester bond. This study was conducted in three phases. The first phase is a compilation of experimental data obtained with TLC-MALDI-TOF-MS, FT-ICR and LC-MS techni...

  5. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics based on the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruprecht Yonkofski, C. M.; Horner, J.; White, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after a thorough quality check. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This study uses numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the CH4/CO2/N2 guest molecule exchange process that occurred at Ignik Sikumi #1. Simulations were further informed by experimental observations. The goal of the scoping experiments was to understand kinetic exchange rates and develop parameters for use in Iġnik Sikumi history match simulations. The experimental procedure involves two main stages: 1) the formation of CH4 hydrate in a consolidated sand column at 750 psi and 2°C and 2) flow-through of a 77.5/22.5 N2/CO2 molar ratio gas mixture across the column. Experiments were run both above and below the hydrate stability zone in order to observe exchange behavior across varying conditions. The numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was then used to match experimental results, specifically fitting kinetic behavior. Once this behavior is understood, it can be applied to field scale models based on Ignik Sikumi #1.

  6. Biological and Agricultural Studies on Application of Discharge Plasma and Electromagnetic Fields 5. Effects of High Electric Fields on Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaka, Katsuo

    The biological effects of extremely low frequency electric fields on animals are reviewed with emphasis on studies of the nervous system, behavior, endocrinology, and blood chemistry. First, this paper provides a histrical overview of studies on the electric field effects initiated in Russia and the United States mainly regarding electric utility workers in high voltage substations and transmission lines. Then, the possible mechanisms of electric field effects are explained using the functions of surface electric fields and induced currents in biological objects. The real mechanisms have not yet been identified. The thresholds of electric field perception levels for rats, baboons, and humans are introduced and compared. The experimental results concerning the depression of melatonin secretion in rats exposed to electric fields are described.

  7. Extremely low frequency fields and cancer: laboratory studies

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Larry E.)

    1998-10-01

    There is now convincing evidence from a large number of laboratories, that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric fields produces biological responses in animals. However, no animal studies clearly demonstrate deleterious effects of ELF fields, although several are suggestive of potential health impacts. A major current emphasis in laboratory research is to determine whether or not the reported epidemiological studies that suggest an association between EMF exposure and risk of cancer are supported in studies using animal models. Several approaches are outlined in the experimental approach to this question. With specific reference to the radiofrequencies (RF) associated with wireless technology, even less research has been carried out than with ELF. Particularly, in regard to research on carcinogenesis and RF exposure in animals, little is known This section addresses laboratory studies in animals exposed to extremely low-power-frequency EMF, the relevance of which, to RF, is unknown. However, the approaches used with ELF may be useful in guiding laboratory research on the issue of RF exposure and cancer. From the perspective of laboratory animal studies, this paper will discuss studies investigating the potential relationship between ELF magnetic and/or electric field exposure and the risk of cancer.

  8. Program Plan: field radionuclide migration studies in Climax granite

    SciTech Connect

    Isherwood, D.; Raber, E.; Coles, D.; Stone, R.

    1980-11-01

    This Program Plan describes the field radionuclide migration studies we plan to conduct in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. Laboratory support studies are included to help us understand the geochemical and hydrologic processes involved in the field. The Program Plan begins with background information (Section 1) on how this program fits into the National Waste Terminal Storage Program Plan and discusses the needs for field studies of this type. The objectives stated in Section 2 are in direct response to these needs, particularly the need to determine whether laboratory studies accurately reflect actual field conditions and the need for field testing to provide a data base for verification of hydrologic and mass transport models. The technical scope (Section 3) provides a work breakdown structure that integrates the various activities and establishes a base for the technical approach described in Section 4. Our approach combines an interactive system of field and laboratory migration experiments with the use of hydrologic models for pre-test predictions and data interpretation. Section 5 on program interfaces identifies how information will be transferred to other related DOE projects. A schedule of activities and major milestones (Section 6) and the budget necessary to meet the project objectives (Section 7) are included in the Program Plan. Sections 8 and 9 contain brief descriptions of how the technical and program controls will be established and maintained and an outline of our quality assurance program. This program plan is an initial planning document and provides a general description of activities. An Engineering Test Plan containing detailed experimental test plans, an instrumentation plan and equipment design drawings will be published as a separate document.

  9. Experimental investigation of the flow in the near-field of a cross-shaped orifice jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Hassan, Mouhammad; Meslem, Amina; Abed-Meraim, Kamel

    2011-04-01

    The flow in the near-field of a cross-shaped orifice jet is investigated experimentally in the present study. The three components of the velocity field are obtained at different longitudinal locations using time-resolved stereoscopic particle-image velocimetry measurements. The mean and the instantaneous entrainment rates are calculated to study the entrainment mechanism. The distribution of momentum thicknesses is also inspected in the region of the axis switching. It is found that both the instantaneous entrainment rate and the net volume flux are strongly dependent on the vortical structures present in the flow and particularly at different parts of the Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex ring. Hence, different phases of the flow are investigated in the region of the axis switching. The contribution of the turbulent normal and shear stresses to the streamwise vorticity generation is also studied in the near-field of the cross jet. The momentum flux and its streamwise evolution are obtained from the mean velocity field. The contribution of different turbulent intensities to the momentum flux is given. The proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) is then applied to show the streamwise evolution of energy content of the most energetic POD modes.

  10. Field study plan for alternate barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, H.D.; Gee, G.W.; Relyea, J.F.

    1989-05-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is providing technical assistance in selecting, designing, evaluating, and demonstrating protective barriers. As part of this technical assistance effort, asphalt, clay, and chemical grout will be evaluated for use as alternate barriers. The purpose of the subsurface layer is to reduce the likelihood that extreme events (i.e., 100-year maximum storms, etc.) will cause significant drainage through the barrier. The tests on alternate barriers will include laboratory and field analysis of the subsurface layer performance. This field test plan outlines the activities required to test and design subsurface moisture barriers. The test plan covers activities completed in FY 1988 and planned through FY 1992 and includes a field-scale test of one or more of the alternate barriers to demonstrate full-scale application techniques and to provide performance data on a larger scale. Tests on asphalt, clay, and chemical grout were initiated in FY 1988 in small (30.5 cm diameter) tube-layer lysimeters. The parameters used for testing the materials were different for each one. The tests had to take into account the differences in material characteristics and response to change in conditions, as well as information provided by previous studies. 33 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Field Trip Book: Study Travel Experiences in Social Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Ronald V.

    2010-01-01

    Looking for social studies adventures to help students find connections to democratic citizenship? Look no further! This book provides just the answer teachers need for engaging students in field trips as researching learners with emphasis on interdisciplinary social studies plus skills in collecting and reporting data gathered from field…

  12. Analysis and experimental study of the spherical joint clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Peng; Hu, Penghao; Bao, Xinxin; Li, Shuaipeng

    2013-10-01

    The spherical joint clearance is a key error factor, which influenced and restricted the application of parallel mechanism in high precision field. This paper discusses the regularity of the spherical joint clearance in the parallel mechanism and its influence on the accuracy of the parallel mechanism in both theoretical and experimental aspects. A spherical joint clearance measuring instrument is introduced and used to measure the joint clearance. And the relationship between the clearance and its work pose is revealed. Based on the theoretical and experimental analysis, it is concluded that the clearance of the spherical joint is near-linear proportional to the applied load as well as the clearances in different poses obey the Rayleigh distribution approximately under the same load.

  13. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Iceland and Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. These studies, conducted in Iceland and in Antarctica, investigated physical and chemical weathering mechanisms and rates, eolitan processes, mudflow phenomena, drainage development, and catastrophic fluvial and volcanic phenomena. Continuing investigations in Iceland fall in three main catagories: (1) catastrophic floods of the Jokulsa a Fjollum, (2) lahars associated with explosive volcanic eruptions of Askja caldera, and (3) rates of eolian abrasion in cold, volcanic deserts. The ice-free valleys of Antarctica, in particular those in South Victoria Land, have much is common with the surface of Mars. In addition to providing independent support for the application of the Iceland findings to consideration of the martian erosional system, the Antarctic observations also provide analogies to other martian phenomena. For example, a family of sand dunes in Victoria Valley are stabilized by the incorporation of snow as beds.

  14. Planetary geomorphology field studies: Washington and Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Field studies of terrestrial landforms and the processes that shape them provide new directions to the study of planetary features. Investigations discussed address principally mudflow phenomena and drainage development. At the Valley of 10,000 Smokes (Katmai, AK) and Mount St. Helens, WA, studies of the development of erosional landforms (in particular, drainage) on fresh, new surfaces permitted analysis of the result of competition between geomorphic processes. Of specific interest is the development of stream pattern as a function of the competition between perennial seepage overland flow (from glacial or groundwater sources), ephemeral overland flow (from pluvial or seasonal melt sources), and ephemeral/perennial groundwater sapping, as a function of time since initial resurfacing, material properties, and seasonal/annual environmental conditions.

  15. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S.; King, W.C.; Ursic, J.R.

    1992-07-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  16. Field studies in geophysical diffraction tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Witten, A.J.; Stevens, S.S. ); King, W.C. . Dept. of Geography and Environmental Engineering); Ursic, J.R. . Region V)

    1992-01-01

    Geophysical diffraction tomography (GDT) is a quantitative, high- resolution technique for subsurface imaging. This method has been used in a number of shallow applications to image buried waste, trenches, soil strata, tunnels, synthetic magma chambers, and the buried skeletal remains of seismosaurus, the longest dinosaur ever discovered. The theory associated with the GDT inversion and implementing software have been developed for acoustic and scalar electromagnetic waves for bistatic and monostatic measurements in cross-borehole, offset vertical seismic profiling and reflection geometries. This paper presents an overview of some signal processing algorithms, a description of the instrumentation used in field studies, and selected imaging results.

  17. Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Andy L.; Conrad, Mark E.; Daily, William D.; Fink, James B.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Gee, Glendon W.; Hoversten, Gary M.; Keller, Jason M.; Majer, Ernest L.; Murray, Christopher J.; White, Mark D.; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2006-07-31

    From FY 2000 through FY 2003, a series of vadose zone transport field experiments were conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Project, now known as the Remediation and Closure Science Project, and managed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The series of experiments included two major field campaigns, one at a 299-E24-11 injection test site near PUREX and a second at a clastic dike site off Army Loop Road. The goals of these experiments were to improve our understanding of vadose zone transport processes; to develop data sets to validate and calibrate vadose zone flow and transport models; and to identify advanced monitoring techniques useful for evaluating flow-and-transport mechanisms and delineating contaminant plumes in the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. This report summarizes the key findings from the field studies and demonstrates how data collected from these studies are being used to improve conceptual models and develop numerical models of flow and transport in Hanford’s vadose zone. Results of these tests have led to a better understanding of the vadose zone. Fine-scale geologic heterogeneities, including grain fabric and lamination, were observed to have a strong effect on the large-scale behavior of contaminant plumes, primarily through increased lateral spreading resulting from anisotropy. Conceptual models have been updated to include lateral spreading and numerical models of unsaturated flow and transport have revised accordingly. A new robust model based on the concept of a connectivity tensor was developed to describe saturation-dependent anisotropy in strongly heterogeneous soils and has been incorporated into PNNL’s Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) simulator. Application to field-scale transport problems have led to a better understanding plume behavior at a number of sites where lateral spreading may have dominated waste

  18. Atmospheric Pressure Ion Source Development: Experimental Validation of Simulated Ion Trajectories within Complex Flow and Electrical Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissdorf, Walter; Lorenz, Matthias; Pöhler, Thorsten; Hönen, Herwart; Benter, Thorsten

    2013-10-01

    Three-dimensionally (3D) resolved ion trajectory calculations within the complex viscous flow field of an atmospheric pressure ion source are presented. The model calculations are validated with spatially resolved measurements of the relative sensitivity distribution within the source enclosure, referred to as the distribution of ion acceptance (DIA) of the mass analyzer. In previous work, we have shown that the DIA shapes as well as the maximum signal strengths strongly depend on ion source operational parameters such as gas flows and temperatures, as well as electrical field gradients established by various source electrode potentials (e.g., capillary inlet port potential and spray shield potential). In all cases studied, distinct, reproducible, and, to some extent, surprising DIA patterns were observed. We have thus attempted to model selected experimental operational source modes (called operational points) using a validated computational flow dynamics derived 3D-velocity field as an input parameter set for SIMION/SDS, along with a suite of custom software for data analysis and parameter set processing. Despite the complexity of the system, the modeling results reproduce the experimentally derived DIA unexpectedly well. It is concluded that SIMION/SDS in combination with accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) input data and adequate analysis software is capable of successfully modeling operational points of an atmospheric pressure ion (API) source. This approach should be very useful in the computer-aided design of future API sources.

  19. Experimental observations and modeling of ponding and overland flow in flat, permeable soil fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appels, Willemijn; Bogaart, Patrick; van der Zee, Sjoerd

    2015-04-01

    In flat well-drained agricultural terrain, overland flow is a relatively rare phenomenon, yet still a potentially important driver of sediment and nutrient transport. Under these conditions, periods of intense rainfall, shallow groundwater dynamics and local combinations of meso- and microtopography control whether water in ponds will become connected to streams and ditches. Combining overland flow measurements at agricultural fields with a new modeling approach, we explored: (i) what rainfall conditions relate to overland flow and (ii) how does flow route connectivity develop for various types of runoff generation and meso/microtopography? For this purpose, we assessed overland flow at two field sites in flat, lowland catchments in the sandy part of the Netherlands and developed a dynamic model (FAST-runoff) to simulate redistribution of water over a heterogeneous surface with infiltration and soil water storage. Experimentally, it appeared that most overland flow occurred as saturation excess runoff during long wet periods, though infiltration excess runoff generation may have played a role during snowmelt periods that generated small amounts of runoff. For both fields, the contributing area during the saturation excess events was large and flow paths long, irrespective of the profoundly different microtopographies. We explored this behaviour with our FAST-Runoff model and found that under saturation excess conditions, mesotopographic features, such as natural depressions or those caused by tillage, gain importance at the expense of the spatial organization of microtopography. The surface topographies of our experimental fields were equal in terms of standard topographic analytical measures such as Curvature, Convergence Index, and Topographic Wetness Index. However, the fields could be distinguished when analysed with a quantitative indicator of flow for hydrological connectivity. Also, the fields had different dynamics related to the runoff generating mechanism

  20. SQUIDs vs. Faraday coils for ultlra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance: experimental and simulation comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Sayukov, Igor M; Schultz, Larry J; Urbaitis, Algis V; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging or MRI. Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in ultra-low field (ULF) regime that requires measurement field strengths only of the order of 1 Gauss. These techniques exploit the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group at LANL has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airports security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR/MRI technique. We describe an experimental and computer simulation comparison of the world's first multichannel SQUID based and Faraday coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquids identification.

  1. Experimental comparison of Wide Field AO control schemes using the Homer AO bench.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisot, Amélie; Petit, Cyril; Fusco, Thierry

    2011-09-01

    Wide Field Adaptive Optics (WFAO) concepts, such as Laser Tomography AO (LTAO) or Multi-Conjugate AO (MCAO) have been developed in order to overcome the anisoplanatism limit of classical AO. Most of the future AO-assisted instruments of ELTs rely on such concepts which have raised critical challenges such as tomographic estimation and from laser and natural guide star combined with efficient DM(s) control. In that context, the experimental validation of the various clever control solutions proposed by several teams in the past years is now essential to reach a level of maturity compatible with their implementation in future WFAO developments for ELT. The ONERA wide field AO facility (HOMER bench) has been developed for these very issues. Gathering a 3D turbulence generator, laser and natural guide stars, two deformable mirrors with variable altitude positions and a PC-based flexible and user-friendly RTC , HOMER allows the implementation and comparison of control schemes from the simplest least-square to the optimal Linear Quadratic Gaussian solutions including Virtual DM and Pseudo-closed loop approaches. After a description of the bench internal calibrations and ultimate performance, all the control schemes are compared experimentally. Their evolutions as a function of wavefront sensors SNR as well as their robustness to calibration / model errors are particularly emphasised. Finally, we derive from the previous works some specific calibrations and identifications procedures ensuring both robustness and efficiency of WFAO systems and we extrapolate their applications to the future ELT AO systems.

  2. Experimental confirmation of temperature dependent negative capacitance in ferroelectric field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvatore, Giovanni A.; Rusu, Alexandru; Ionescu, Adrian M.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, we report the basic design conditions and the experimental confirmation of a temperature dependent negative capacitance (NC) effect in a ferroelectric field-effect-transistor (Fe-FET). We find that the internal voltage amplification peaks of a metal-ferroelectric-metal-insulator-semiconductor (MFMIS) structure are correlated with the S-shape of the polarization versus electrical field characteristics. The internal voltage amplification is responsible for the subthreshold swing reduction in a Fe-FET; this effect cancels out when the temperature is increased close to the Curie temperature because of the narrowing of the NC region and because of the saturation of the amplification. A counter-clockwise rotation of the P-V loops with an associated increase of the dP/dV slope with the temperature is reported, which corresponds to an increase of the overall ferroelectric capacitance with the temperature. Finally, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that an optimum temperature exists at which the amplification gets its maximum.

  3. Developments in the field of allergy in 2009 through the eyes of Clinical and Experimental Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Chu, H. W.; Lloyd, C. M.; Karmaus, W.; Maestrelli, P.; Mason, P.; Salcedo, G.; Thaikoottathil, J.; Wardlaw, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary In 2009 the journal published in the region of 200 papers including reviews, editorials, opinion pieces and original papers that ran the full gamut of allergic disease. It is instructive to take stock of this output to determine patterns of interest and where the cutting edge lies. We have surveyed the field of allergic disease as seen through the pages of Clinical and Experimental Allergy (CEA) highlighting trends, emphasizing notable observations and placing discoveries in the context of other key papers published during the year. The review is divided into similar sections as the journal. In the field of Asthma and Rhinitis CEA has contributed significantly to the debate about asthma phenotypes and expressed opinions about the cause of intrinsic asthma. It has also added its halfpennyworth to the hunt for meaningful biomarkers. In Mechanisms the considerable interest in T cell subsets including Th17 and T regulatory cells continues apace and the discipline of Epidemiology continues to invoke a steady stream of papers on risk factors for asthma with investigators still trying to explain the post-second world war epidemic of allergic disease. Experimental Models continue to make important contributions to our understanding of pathogenesis of allergic disease and in the Clinical Allergy section various angles on immunotherapy are explored. New allergens continue to be described in the allergens section to make those allergen chips even more complicated. A rich and vibrant year helpfully summarized by some of our associate editors. PMID:21039970

  4. Benthic Foraminifera as Proxies of Organic Flux: Experimental and Field Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zwaan, G. J.; Duijnstee, I. A. P.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Ernst, S. R.

    2003-04-01

    Food is one of the most important parameters in the marine realm, structuring faunal communities. Therefore, changing food flux from the mixed layer to the sea bottom is expected to be of great importance to the benthic community. In this poster we present data from 5 years of experimental work in which shallow and deeper water benthic foraminiferal associations were subjected to variable food fluxes, and even to artificial marine snow events. The experiments took place under well-controlled or well-monitored oxygen conditions. At the same time field research in the Adriatic Sea and the Levantine Basin suggests that variation in the input of nutrients greatly affects the benthic foraminiferal communities indeed, but mostly by variation of the oxygen content at the sea floor. This is confirmed by experiments. Deeper water assemblages, however, appear to be rather sensitive to changing food fluxes. In experiments with material from the Bay of Biscay high doses of organic matter result in significant response of the meiofauna: many microhabitat patterns shift to shallower depth. Some species, notably Epistominella exigua, respond after some weeks with increasing abundances; this suggests that they are good markers of eutrophic conditions. The main conclusion of experimental and field research is that short-term changes in associations are governed by the oxygen regime. Although on short time scales food does not have much effect in our experiments, it seems that on longer time scales food is of profound importance for structuring the foraminiferal community.

  5. SQUIDs vs. Induction Coils for Ultra-Low Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance: Experimental and Simulation Comparison.

    PubMed

    Matlashov, Andrei N; Schultz, Larry J; Espy, Michelle A; Kraus, Robert H; Savukov, Igor M; Volegov, Petr L; Wurden, Caroline J

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. One application area is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently it has become possible to perform NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime requiring measurement field strengths of the order of only 1 Gauss. This technique exploits the advantages offered by superconducting quantum interference devices or SQUIDs. Our group has built SQUID based MRI systems for brain imaging and for liquid explosives detection at airport security checkpoints. The requirement for liquid helium cooling limits potential applications of ULF MRI for liquid identification and security purposes. Our experimental comparative investigation shows that room temperature inductive magnetometers may provide enough sensitivity in the 3-10 kHz range and can be used for fast liquid explosives detection based on ULF NMR technique. We describe experimental and computer-simulation results comparing multichannel SQUID based and induction coils based instruments that are capable of performing ULF MRI for liquid identification. PMID:21747638

  6. Experimental Mapping and Benchmarking of Magnetic Field Codes on the LHD Ion Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Chitarin, G.; Agostinetti, P.; Gallo, A.; Marconato, N.; Serianni, G.; Nakano, H.; Takeiri, Y.; Tsumori, K.

    2011-09-26

    For the validation of the numerical models used for the design of the Neutral Beam Test Facility for ITER in Padua [1], an experimental benchmark against a full-size device has been sought. The LHD BL2 injector [2] has been chosen as a first benchmark, because the BL2 Negative Ion Source and Beam Accelerator are geometrically similar to SPIDER, even though BL2 does not include current bars and ferromagnetic materials. A comprehensive 3D magnetic field model of the LHD BL2 device has been developed based on the same assumptions used for SPIDER. In parallel, a detailed experimental magnetic map of the BL2 device has been obtained using a suitably designed 3D adjustable structure for the fine positioning of the magnetic sensors inside 27 of the 770 beamlet apertures. The calculated values have been compared to the experimental data. The work has confirmed the quality of the numerical model, and has also provided useful information on the magnetic non-uniformities due to the edge effects and to the tolerance on permanent magnet remanence.

  7. Colour vision experimental studies in teaching of optometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozolinsh, Maris; Ikaunieks, Gatis; Fomins, Sergejs

    2005-10-01

    Following aspects related to human colour vision are included in experimental lessons for optometry students of University of Latvia. Characteristics of coloured stimuli (emitting and reflective), determination their coordinates in different colour spaces. Objective characteristics of transmitting of colour stimuli through the optical system of eye together with various types of appliances (lenses, prisms, Fresnel prisms). Psychophysical determination of mono- and polychromatic stimuli perception taking into account physiology of eye, retinal colour photoreceptor topography and spectral sensitivity, spatial and temporal characteristics of retinal receptive fields. Ergonomics of visual perception, influence of illumination and glare effects, testing of colour vision deficiencies.

  8. Satellite to study earth's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Satellite (Magsat) designed to measure the near earth magnetic field and crustal anomalies is briefly described. A scalar magnetometer to measure the magnitude of the earth's crustal magnetic field and a vector magnetometer to measure magnetic field direction as well as magnitude are included. The mission and its objectives are summarized along with the data collection and processing system.

  9. Studies of the Martian Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    This report covers two awards: the first NAGW-2573 was awarded to enable participation in the Mars 94 mission that slipped to become the Mars 96 mission. Upon the unfortunate failure of Mars 96 to achieve its intended trajectory, the second grant was awarded to closeout the Mars 96 activities. Our initial efforts concentrated on assisting our colleagues: W. Riedler, K. Schwingenschuh, K. Gringanz, M. Verigin and Ye. Yeroshenko with advice on the development of the magnetic field portion of the investigation and to help them with test activities. We also worked with them to properly analyze the Phobos magnetic field and plasma data in order to optimize the return from the Mars 94/96 mission. This activity resulted in 18 papers on Mars scientific topics, and two on the instrumentation. One of these latter two papers was the last of the papers written, and speaks to the value of the closeout award. These 20 papers are listed in the attached bibliography. Because we had previously studied Venus and Titan and since it was becoming evident that the magnetic field was very weak, we compared the various properties of the Martian interaction with those of the analogous interactions at Venus and Titan while other papers simply analyzed the properties of the interaction as Phobos 2 observed them. One very interesting observation was the identification of ions picked up in the solar wind, originating in Mars neutral atmosphere. These had been predicted by our earlier observation of cyclotron waves at the proton gyrofrequency in the region upstream from Mars in the solar wind. Of course, the key question we addressed was that of the intrinsic or induced nature of the Martian magnetic field. We found little evidence for the former and much for the latter point of view. We also discussed the instrumentation planned for the Mars balloon and the instrumentation on the orbiter. In all these studies were very rewarding despite the short span of the Phobos data. Although they did not

  10. Experimental realization of strong effective magnetic fields in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    Aidelsburger, M; Atala, M; Nascimbène, S; Trotzky, S; Chen, Y-A; Bloch, I

    2011-12-16

    We use Raman-assisted tunneling in an optical superlattice to generate large tunable effective magnetic fields for ultracold atoms. When hopping in the lattice, the accumulated phase shift by an atom is equivalent to the Aharonov-Bohm phase of a charged particle exposed to a staggered magnetic field of large magnitude, on the order of 1 flux quantum per plaquette. We study the ground state of this system and observe that the frustration induced by the magnetic field can lead to a degenerate ground state for noninteracting particles. We provide a measurement of the local phase acquired from Raman-induced tunneling, demonstrating time-reversal symmetry breaking of the underlying Hamiltonian. Furthermore, the quantum cyclotron orbit of single atoms in the lattice exposed to the magnetic field is directly revealed. PMID:22243087

  11. An experimental investigation of the flow field of a rectangular wall jet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, C.; Karamcheti, K.

    1979-01-01

    The structure of a laminar, rectangular wall jet developing from an initially parabolic velocity profile was investigated with measurements of the mean and fluctuating velocity field, and with Schlieren flow visualization. The effects on mean and fluctuating velocity fields of changes in the jet Reynolds number over the range of from 0 to 4800, and of various wall lengths ranging from 0 to 312 jet widths were studied. For a given wall length and Reynolds number, disturbances in the flow field were regular and periodic, and of a constant frequency in a large region of the flow field. Small, self-excited disturbances at the nozzle exit were observed to grow exponentially with downstream distance, and roll up to form a convecting array of discrete vortices. For certain values of wall length and jet speed, discrete audible tones were detected, and appeared to be associated with an enhancement of the regularity and stability of the vortex array.

  12. Parameterization of a process-based soil erosion model by means of experimental field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butzen, Verena; Seeger, Manuel; Scherer, Ulrike; Casper, Markus; Ries, Johannes B.

    2010-05-01

    The physically-based hydrological and soil erosion model CATFLOW-SED has been developed with data from a loess area in Germany (Maurer, 1997; Scherer, 2008) and covers the principal processes detachment, transport and deposition. The catchment is divided into slopes on the basis of topography as well as soil and land-use maps. The slopes are further divided into slope segments and the flow-routing is abstractly modeled as slope cross sections connected by a drainage network. In many process-based soil erosion models, soil erosion is calculated by an interaction of the forces of flowing water and rainfall. In CATFLOW-SED the detachment process is divided into the pulse current of precipitation and the sheer stress of flowing water. The most important parameter concerning detachment is the erosion resistance parameter fcrit. The described model is parameterized for a small catchment in the Central Spanish Pyrenees with experimental field data from this study area. The mean annual precipitation amount of 1120 mm is rather high but as it is typical of a Mediterranean climate the summer months show a deficit in water balance. Accordingly, a seasonal variation in dominating overland flow generation and soil erosion processes, can be observed particularly for wetland areas that regularly dry out in summer. The spatial and temporal pattern of overland-flow generation and erosion processes and their intensity in the study area is assessed by means of small plot-scale rainfall experiments in the field. The gained data are the amounts of overland flow and eroded material for intervals of five minutes duration. The gained results are used for the parameterization of the soil specific parameter fcrit in CATFLOW-SED. In order to cover the seasonal variation in dominating runoff processes, rainfall simulations that were carried out under dry soil moisture conditions in September as well as measurements that were done under moist conditions in March are used for parameterization

  13. Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W.

    1996-10-01

    The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

  14. MOOSES: Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapp, Jon; Wehby, Joseph

    The Multiple Option Observation System for Experimental Studies (MOOSES) is a flexible data collection and analysis package for applied behavioral research that addresses the needs of researchers interested in live coding of observational data. MOOSES allows the researcher to design a coding system for a particular research question. General types…

  15. Experimental and numerical study of pulsating transversal jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfeld, M. A.; Fedorova, N. N.; Fedorchenko, I. A.; Pozdnyakov, G. A.; Timofeev, K. Yu.; Zhakharova, Yu. V.

    2015-06-01

    Paper presents results of joint experimental and numerical investigation of pulsating jet penetration into still air and supersonic flow. Goal of the study is to investigate two-dimensional (2D) Hartmann generator (HG) properties and clear up its possibilities in providing better mixing between air and secondary (injected) gases.

  16. Can Facebook Make Students Remember? An Experimental Study from Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acar, Adam

    2014-01-01

    This study experimentally manipulated the way students submit their assignments and tested the number of new words that are learned in each condition. The results showed that students who submitted their assignments through Facebook learned as much as those who submitted their assignment in a traditional way. In the light of these findings, we can…

  17. It Pays to Compare: An Experimental Study on Computational Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Jon R.; Rittle-Johnson, Bethany

    2009-01-01

    Comparing and contrasting examples is a core cognitive process that supports learning in children and adults across a variety of topics. In this experimental study, we evaluated the benefits of supporting comparison in a classroom context for children learning about computational estimation. Fifth- and sixth-grade students (N = 157) learned about…

  18. Experimental study of the longitudinal instability for beam transport

    SciTech Connect

    Reiser, M.; Wang, J.G.; Guo, W.M.; Wang, D.X.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical model for beam longitudinal instability in a transport pipe with general wall impedance is considered. The result shows that a capacitive wall tends to stabilize the beam. The experimental study of the instability for a pure resistive-wall is presented, including the design parameters, setup and components for the experiment. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Electronic Texts or Learning through Textbooks: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartes-Enriquez, Ninette; Rodriguez, M. I. Solar; Letelier, R. Quintana

    2004-01-01

    This is an experimental study in the area of Didactics applied to the learning of English as a foreign language and complemented by CALL. The main objective of this work is to know the degree of incidence existing between two groups of students: one, based on conference-style classes where students, guided by the teacher, have to search for…

  20. High School Algebra Readiness Program: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birnbohm, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study measured the effectiveness of a locally created summer Algebra readiness program in a large suburban high school district in New Jersey. Incoming ninth grade students who were not ready for high school algebra were invited to participate in the summer program. The program was designed to provide access to more…