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Sample records for experimental functional neurosurgery

  1. Experimental and clinical standards, and evolution of lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Devaux, B C; Roux, F X

    1996-01-01

    From initial experiments of ruby, argon and CO2 lasers on the nervous system so far, dramatic progress was made in delivery systems technology as well as in knowledge of laser-tissue interaction effects and hazards through various animal experiments and clinical experience. Most surgical effects of laser light on neural tissue and the central nervous system (CNS) are thermal lesions. Haemostasis, cutting and vaporization depend on laser emission parameters--wavelength, fluence and mode--and on the exposed tissues optical and thermal properties--water and haemoglobin content, thermal conductivity and specific heat. CO2 and Nd-YAG lasers have today a large place in the neurosurgical armamentarium, while new laser sources such as high power diode lasers will have one in the near future. Current applications of these lasers derive from their respective characteristics, and include CNS tumour and vascular malformation surgery, and stereotactic neurosurgery. Intracranial, spinal cord and intra-orbital meningiomas are the best lesions for laser use for haemostasis, dissection and tissue vaporization. Resection of acoustic neuromas, pituitary tumours, spinal cord neuromas, intracerebral gliomas and metastases may also benefit from lasers as accurate, haemostatic, non-contact instruments which reduce surgical trauma to the brain and eloquent structures such as brain stem and cranial nerves. Coagulative lasers (1.06 microns and 1.32 microns Nd-YAG, argon, or diode laser) will find an application for arteriovenous malformations and cavernomas. Any fiberoptic-guided laser will find a use during stereotactic neurosurgical procedures, including image-guided resection of tumours and vascular malformations and endoscopic tumour resection and cysts or entry into a ventricle. Besides these routine applications of lasers, laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) of brain tumours are still in the experimental stage. The choice of a laser in a

  2. Experimental new automatic tools for robotic stereotactic neurosurgery: towards "no hands" procedure of leads implantation into a brain target.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, P; Arena, P; Cantelli, L; Spampinato, G; Sposato, S; Cozzolino, S; Demarinis, P; Muscato, G

    2016-07-01

    The use of robotics in neurosurgery and, particularly, in stereotactic neurosurgery, is becoming more and more adopted because of the great advantages that it offers. Robotic manipulators easily allow to achieve great precision, reliability, and rapidity in the positioning of surgical instruments or devices in the brain. The aim of this work was to experimentally verify a fully automatic "no hands" surgical procedure. The integration of neuroimaging to data for planning the surgery, followed by application of new specific surgical tools, permitted the realization of a fully automated robotic implantation of leads in brain targets. An anthropomorphic commercial manipulator was utilized. In a preliminary phase, a software to plan surgery was developed, and the surgical tools were tested first during a simulation and then on a skull mock-up. In such a way, several tools were developed and tested, and the basis for an innovative surgical procedure arose. The final experimentation was carried out on anesthetized "large white" pigs. The determination of stereotactic parameters for the correct planning to reach the intended target was performed with the same technique currently employed in human stereotactic neurosurgery, and the robotic system revealed to be reliable and precise in reaching the target. The results of this work strengthen the possibility that a neurosurgeon may be substituted by a machine, and may represent the beginning of a new approach in the current clinical practice. Moreover, this possibility may have a great impact not only on stereotactic functional procedures but also on the entire domain of neurosurgery. PMID:27194228

  3. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods was developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13 % lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13 % smaller in the anterior–posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior–superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  4. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-04-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods were developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13% lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13% smaller in the anterior-posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior-superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  5. Numerical simulations of clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Werner, Beat; Martin, Ernst; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-04-01

    A computational model utilizing grid and finite difference methods were developed to simulate focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery interventions. The model couples the propagation of ultrasound in fluids (soft tissues) and solids (skull) with acoustic and visco-elastic wave equations. The computational model was applied to simulate clinical focused ultrasound functional neurosurgery treatments performed in patients suffering from therapy resistant chronic neuropathic pain. Datasets of five patients were used to derive the treatment geometry. Eight sonications performed in the treatments were then simulated with the developed model. Computations were performed by driving the simulated phased array ultrasound transducer with the acoustic parameters used in the treatments. Resulting focal temperatures and size of the thermal foci were compared quantitatively, in addition to qualitative inspection of the simulated pressure and temperature fields. This study found that the computational model and the simulation parameters predicted an average of 24 ± 13% lower focal temperature elevations than observed in the treatments. The size of the simulated thermal focus was found to be 40 ± 13% smaller in the anterior-posterior direction and 22 ± 14% smaller in the inferior-superior direction than in the treatments. The location of the simulated thermal focus was off from the prescribed target by 0.3 ± 0.1 mm, while the peak focal temperature elevation observed in the measurements was off by 1.6 ± 0.6 mm. Although the results of the simulations suggest that there could be some inaccuracies in either the tissue parameters used, or in the simulation methods, the simulations were able to predict the focal spot locations and temperature elevations adequately for initial treatment planning performed to assess, for example, the feasibility of sonication. The accuracy of the simulations could be improved if more precise ultrasound tissue properties (especially of the

  6. Transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound for Non-Invasive Functional Neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Beat; Morel, Anne; Zadicario, Eyal; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Martin, Ernst

    2010-03-01

    While the development of transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound has been driven mainly by applications for tumor ablation this new intervention method is also very attractive for functional neurosurgery due to its non-invasiveness, the absence of ionizing radiation and the closed-loop intervention control by MRI. Here we provide preliminary data to demonstrate the clinical feasibility, safety and precision of non-invasive functional neurosurgery by transcranial MR-guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound.

  7. Executive Function Deficits in Patients after Cerebellar Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Mak, Monika; Tyburski, Ernest; Madany, Łukasz; Sokołowski, Andrzej; Samochowiec, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    The cerebellum has long been perceived as a structure responsible for the human motor function. According to the contemporary approach, however, it plays a significant role in complex behavior regulatory processes. The aim of this study was to describe executive functions in patients after cerebellar surgery. The study involved 30 patients with cerebellar pathology. The control group comprised 30 neurologically and mentally healthy individuals, matched for sex, age, and number of years of education. Executive functions were measured by the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT), Trail Making Test (TMT), and working memory by the Digit Span. Compared to healthy controls, patients made more Errors and Perseverative errors in the WCST, gave more Perseverative responses, and had a lower Number of categories completed. The patients exhibited higher response times in all three parts of the SCWT and TMT A and B. No significant differences between the two groups were reported in their performance of the SCWT and TMT with regard to the measures of absolute or relative interference. The patients had lower score on the backward Digit Span. Patients with cerebellar pathology may exhibit some impairment within problem solving and working memory. Their worse performance on the SCWT and TMT could, in turn, stem from their poor motor-somatosensory control, and not necessarily executive deficits. Our results thus support the hypothesis of the cerebellum's mediating role in the regulation of the activity of the superordinate cognitive control network in the brain. (JINS, 2016, 22, 47-57). PMID:26626541

  8. From Structure to Circuits: The Contribution of MEG Connectivity Studies to Functional Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Pang, Elizabeth W; Snead Iii, O C

    2016-01-01

    New advances in structural neuroimaging have revealed the intricate and extensive connections within the brain, data which have informed a number of ambitious projects such as the mapping of the human connectome. Elucidation of the structural connections of the brain, at both the macro and micro levels, promises new perspectives on brain structure and function that could translate into improved outcomes in functional neurosurgery. The understanding of neuronal structural connectivity afforded by these data now offers a vista on the brain, in both healthy and diseased states, that could not be seen with traditional neuroimaging. Concurrent with these developments in structural imaging, a complementary modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been garnering great attention because it too holds promise for being able to shed light on the intricacies of functional brain connectivity. MEG is based upon the elemental principle of physics that an electrical current generates a magnetic field. Hence, MEG uses highly sensitive biomagnetometers to measure extracranial magnetic fields produced by intracellular neuronal currents. Put simply then, MEG is a measure of neurophysiological activity, which captures the magnetic fields generated by synchronized intraneuronal electrical activity. As such, MEG recordings offer exquisite resolution in the time and oscillatory domain and, as well, when co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), offer excellent resolution in the spatial domain. Recent advances in MEG computational and graph theoretical methods have led to studies of connectivity in the time-frequency domain. As such, MEG can elucidate a neurophysiological-based functional circuitry that may enhance what is seen with MRI connectivity studies. In particular, MEG may offer additional insight not possible by MRI when used to study complex eloquent function, where the precise timing and coordination of brain areas is critical. This article will review the

  9. From Structure to Circuits: The Contribution of MEG Connectivity Studies to Functional Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Elizabeth W.; Snead III, O. C.

    2016-01-01

    New advances in structural neuroimaging have revealed the intricate and extensive connections within the brain, data which have informed a number of ambitious projects such as the mapping of the human connectome. Elucidation of the structural connections of the brain, at both the macro and micro levels, promises new perspectives on brain structure and function that could translate into improved outcomes in functional neurosurgery. The understanding of neuronal structural connectivity afforded by these data now offers a vista on the brain, in both healthy and diseased states, that could not be seen with traditional neuroimaging. Concurrent with these developments in structural imaging, a complementary modality called magnetoencephalography (MEG) has been garnering great attention because it too holds promise for being able to shed light on the intricacies of functional brain connectivity. MEG is based upon the elemental principle of physics that an electrical current generates a magnetic field. Hence, MEG uses highly sensitive biomagnetometers to measure extracranial magnetic fields produced by intracellular neuronal currents. Put simply then, MEG is a measure of neurophysiological activity, which captures the magnetic fields generated by synchronized intraneuronal electrical activity. As such, MEG recordings offer exquisite resolution in the time and oscillatory domain and, as well, when co-registered with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), offer excellent resolution in the spatial domain. Recent advances in MEG computational and graph theoretical methods have led to studies of connectivity in the time-frequency domain. As such, MEG can elucidate a neurophysiological-based functional circuitry that may enhance what is seen with MRI connectivity studies. In particular, MEG may offer additional insight not possible by MRI when used to study complex eloquent function, where the precise timing and coordination of brain areas is critical. This article will review the

  10. Development of computer-aided functions in clinical neurosurgery with PACS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Minoru; Aoki, Makoto; Satoh, Minoru; Kowada, Masayoshi; Kikuchi, K.

    1991-07-01

    The introduction of the "Picture Archiving and Communications System (known as PACS)," provides many benefits, including the application of C.A.D., (Computer Aided Diagnosis). Clinically, this allows for the measurement and design of an operation to be easily completed with the CRT monitors of PACS rather than with film, as has been customary in the past. Under the leadership of the Department of Neurosurgery, Akita University School of Medicine, and Southern Tohoku Research Institute for Neuroscience, Koriyama, new computer aided functions with EFPACS (Fuji Electric's PACS) have been developed for use in clinical neurosurgery. This image processing is composed of three parts as follows: (1) Automatic mapping of small lesions depicted on Magnetic Resonance (or MR) images on the brain atlas. (2) Superimposition of two angiographic films onto a single synthesized image. (3) Automatic mapping of the lesion's position (as shown on the. CT images) on the processing image referred to in the foregoing clause 2. The processing in the clause (1) provides a reference for anatomical estimation. The processing in the clause (2) is used for general analysis of the condition of a disease. The processing in the clause (3) is used to design the operation. This image processing is currently being used with good results.

  11. Human pallidothalamic and cerebellothalamic tracts: anatomical basis for functional stereotactic neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Marc N.; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Liu, Jian

    2008-01-01

    Anatomical knowledge of the structures to be targeted and of the circuitry involved is crucial in stereotactic functional neurosurgery. The present study was undertaken in the context of surgical treatment of motor disorders such as essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson’s disease (PD) to precisely determine the course and three-dimensional stereotactic localisation of the cerebellothalamic and pallidothalamic tracts in the human brain. The course of the fibre tracts to the thalamus was traced in the subthalamic region using multiple staining procedures and their entrance into the thalamus determined according to our atlas of the human thalamus and basal ganglia [Morel (2007) Stereotactic atlas of the human thalamus and basal ganglia. Informa Healthcare Inc., New York]. Stereotactic three-dimensional coordinates were determined by sectioning thalamic and basal ganglia blocks parallel to stereotactic planes and, in two cases, by correlation with magnetic resonance images (MRI) from the same brains prior to sectioning. The major contributions of this study are to provide: (1) evidence that the bulks of the cerebellothalamic and pallidothalamic tracts are clearly separated up to their thalamic entrance, (2) stereotactic maps of the two tracts in the subthalamic region, (3) the possibility to discriminate between different subthalamic fibre tracts on the basis of immunohistochemical stainings, (4) correlations of histologically identified fibre tracts with high-resolution MRI, and (5) evaluation of the interindividual variability of the fibre systems in the subthalamic region. This study should provide an important basis for accurate stereotactic neurosurgical targeting of the subthalamic region in motor disorders such as PD and ET. PMID:18193279

  12. Actualities and Perspectives in Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Iencean, SM; Brehar, FM

    2008-01-01

    In the field of neurosurgery, like in other surgical specialties, the last decades have brought major achievements. The series of revolutionary discoveries has started during the last century in the fifties, with stereotactic radiosurgery, then continued with the implementation of operative microscope (during the seventies), the endovascular embolisation in the nineties and finally with the major improvement in robotic neurosurgery and molecular neurosurgery at the beginning of this century. The major innovation has been brought not only in the field of therapeutical measures but also in the field of neuro– imaging. Thus, the modern MRI with more than 3 Tesla, can reveal to the neurosurgeon the most intimate structures of the nervous system. Several important areas in neurosurgery like: vascular neurosurgery, functional neurosurgery and brain tumors pathology, benefit from the modern technology and from the latest discoveries from genetic and molecular biology. In conclusion, summarizing the discoveries of the last decade, we emphasize that the related areas like genetics, molecular biology, computer technology become more and more important in the future progress of the neurosurgery. PMID:20108475

  13. [In the 100 birth anniversary of the pioneer of stereotactic brain surgery in Poland professor Oskar Liszka. Functional neurosurgery in Poland and in Krakow].

    PubMed

    Stachura, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    This article is the report from the meeting of the Medical Society of Cracow, that has been devoted to the 100 birth anniversary of Oskar Liszka, Assoc. Prof., MD. In the course of the meeting Professor Oskar Liszka's figure has been reminded and his work as a pioneer of stereotactic surgery in Poland has been discussed. In the next two sections, the development of functional neurosurgery in Poland and achievements in this field in the Department of Neurosurgery and Neurotraumatology of Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum in Krakow have been presented. PMID:27197434

  14. Photolasertherapy for the treatment of infections in neurosurgery: experimental and clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, Gian F.

    1996-12-01

    At the first time, the CO2 laser was utilised in infective neurosurgical pathology as a surgical cutting instrument to remove inflammatory pseudomembranes in chronic osteomyelitis, and as a vaporising instmment on the dura mater surface. Successively, the instrument, defocused and at a low power, was used for prolonged and diffuse photo coagulation ofthe surgical cavity, particularly, ofthe dural surface and ofthe osteomyelitic bone edges, with the aim to sterilise tissues. So, we saw a shortening of the average time of wound healing and a lack of recurrence of the septic pathology. Then, we have treated, with CO2 laser, intracranial infective pathology: i.e. primary abscesses, capsulated or not, circumscribed purulent encephalitis, secondary abscesses in surgical cavities (patients operated for intracranial hematomas and tumors). In these cases we have obtained a lack of septic recurrences and an improvement ofneurological post-operative course. Thank to these results, we have continued to use laser in infective pathology; for giving an experimental support to these results we have carried on researches in vivo (on the experimental animal) to see the interaction between the laser and inflammatory tissue, and in vitro (on bacterial culture: in solid and liquid media) to see the laser effect on the bacterial cell. The bacterial cell has been also sensibiized to the photo dynamic effect of the laser (Argon, He-Ne), with hematoporphyrin. The goal of these experiments is to understand the role of thermal, photochemical, and mechanic resonance laser effects in the interaction between laser radiation and bacterial cell.

  15. Neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Gian Franco; Colicchio, Gabriella; Di Rocco, Concezio; Maira, Giulio; Meglio, Mario; Scerrati, Massimo

    2002-06-01

    Neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome was initiated by Gian Franco Rossi in 1969 and has gradually expanded since then. From the beginning, research has been regarded as an essential part of training and daily activities in the university's neurosurgery programs. The professional and research education of all faculty members includes at least 1 year abroad in a reputable neurosurgical center. Subspecialization is encouraged. Today, the faculty is composed of 3 full professors, 4 associate professors, and 16 assistant professors. The university's neurosurgery programs include the Institute of Neurosurgery, the residency program, and the following clinical units: a Division of General Neurosurgery; three subspecialty sections comprising Neurotraumatology, Pediatric Neurosurgery, and Functional and Spine Surgery; a day hospital; and dedicated laboratories. More than 1700 surgical patients are treated annually. Epilepsy, pain management, parkinsonism, spinal cord and vertebral pathologies, clinical and basic neuro-oncology, cerebrospinal fluid and intracranial pressure dynamics, cerebrovascular disease, neurotrauma, developmental malformations, and peripheral and central nervous system neuroregeneration are the main fields of clinical and research activities. The results of the research performed thus far at the Catholic University in Rome have been reported in more than 900 publications, most of which have appeared in prominent journals and books. Members of the faculty are involved in relevant editorial activities and serve as officers of national and international scientific and professional societies. In 1999, Giulio Maira succeeded Dr. Rossi in directing the Institute of Neurosurgery and the Division of General Neurosurgery. In addition to the history of neurosurgery at the Catholic University in Rome, this article describes present challenges and plans for the future in neurosurgery at the university. PMID:12015854

  16. Functional Neurosurgery in the Human Thalamus by Transcranial Magnetic Resonance Guided Focused Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Beat; Morel, Anne; Jeanmonod, Daniel; Martin, Ernst

    2009-04-01

    Potential applications of Transcranial Magnetic Resonance guided Focused Ultrasound (TcMRgFUS) include treatment of functional brain disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, dystonia and tremor, neurogenic pain and tinnitus, neuropsychiatric disorders and epilepsy. In this study we demonstrate the feasibility of non-invasive TcMRgFUS ablation of clinically well established targets in the human thalamus that are currently accessed stereotactically by interventional strategies based on the concept of the thalamocortical dysrhythmia (TCD). Thermal hotspots suitable for clinical intervention were created successfully in anatomical preparations of human ex-vivo heads under pseudo clinical conditions. The hotspots could be positioned at the target locations as needed and local energy deposition was sufficient to create tissue ablation. Numerical simulations based on these experimental data predict that the acoustic energy needed to create ablative lesions in-vivo will be within limits that can safely applied.

  17. Laser applications in neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerullo, Leonard J.

    1985-09-01

    The "false start" of the laser in neurosurgery should not be misconstrued as a denial of the inherent advantages of precision and gentleness in dealing with neural tissue. Rather, early investigators were frustrated by unrealistic expectations, cumbersome equipment, and a general ignorance of microtechnique. By the early 70s, microneurosurgery was well established, surgical laser equipment for free hand and microlinked application had been developed, and a more realistic view of the limitations of the laser had been established. Consequently, the late 70s really heralded the renaissance of the laser in neurosurgery. Since then, there has been an overwhelming acceptance of the tool in a variety of clinical situations, broadly categorized in five groups. 1)|Perhaps the most generally accepted area is in the removal of extra-axial tumors of the brain and spinal cord. These tumors, benign by histology but treacherous by location, do not present until a significant amount of neurological compensation has already occurred. The application of additional trauma to the neural tissue, whether by further tumor growth or surgical manipulation, frequently results in irreversible damage. Here, the ability of the laser to vaporize tissue, in a fairly hemostatic fashion, without mechanical or thermal damage to sensitive surrounding tissues, is essential. 2)|The ability to incise delicate neural tissue with minimal spread of thermal destruction to adjacent functioning tissue makes the laser the ideal instrument when tumors deep under the surface are encountered in the brain or spinal cord. Thus, the second group of applications is in the transgression of normal neural structures to arrive at deeper pathological tissue. 3)|The third area of benefit for the laser in neurosurgery has been in the performance of neuroablative procedures, calling for deliberate destruction of functioning neural tissue in a controlled fashion. Again, the precision and shape confinement of the destructive

  18. Sarcopenia and Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aging process can be characterized as a spontaneous decrease of function in various organs with age. Muscle, as a big organ of human body, undergoes aging process presenting with loss of muscle mass, "sarcopenia". Recently, several working groups have tried to make consensus about sarcopenia for definition and diagnosis. Muscle mass is known to be closely related with bone, brain, fat, cardiovascular and metabolic systems. With increased understanding, clinical and basic researches about sarcopenia have been also increased rapidly from various areas of health science and technology. In this paper, the history and recent concepts of sarcopenia were reviewed and brief discussion of its prospect in the field of neurosurgery was done. PMID:25328642

  19. Computers and neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Shaikhouni, Ammar; Elder, J Bradley

    2012-11-01

    At the turn of the twentieth century, the only computational device used in neurosurgical procedures was the brain of the surgeon. Today, most neurosurgical procedures rely at least in part on the use of a computer to help perform surgeries accurately and safely. The techniques that revolutionized neurosurgery were mostly developed after the 1950s. Just before that era, the transistor was invented in the late 1940s, and the integrated circuit was invented in the late 1950s. During this time, the first automated, programmable computational machines were introduced. The rapid progress in the field of neurosurgery not only occurred hand in hand with the development of modern computers, but one also can state that modern neurosurgery would not exist without computers. The focus of this article is the impact modern computers have had on the practice of neurosurgery. Neuroimaging, neuronavigation, and neuromodulation are examples of tools in the armamentarium of the modern neurosurgeon that owe each step in their evolution to progress made in computer technology. Advances in computer technology central to innovations in these fields are highlighted, with particular attention to neuroimaging. Developments over the last 10 years in areas of sensors and robotics that promise to transform the practice of neurosurgery further are discussed. Potential impacts of advances in computers related to neurosurgery in developing countries and underserved regions are also discussed. As this article illustrates, the computer, with its underlying and related technologies, is central to advances in neurosurgery over the last half century. PMID:22985531

  20. History of Korean Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung-nam

    2015-08-01

    The year 2012 was the 50th anniversary of the Korean Neurosurgical Society, and in 2013, the 15th World Congress of Neurosurgery took place in Seoul, Korea. Thus, it is an appropriate occasion to introduce the world to the history of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and the foundation, development, and growth of Korean neurosurgery. Historical materials and pictures were collected and reviewed from the history book and photo albums of the Korean Neurosurgical Society. During the last 50 years, the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery have developed and grown enormously not only in quantity but also in quality. In every aspect, the turning point from the old to the new era of the Korean Neurosurgical Society and Korean neurosurgery was the year 1980. PMID:25064423

  1. Feasibility of Diffusion Tractography for the Reconstruction of Intra-Thalamic and Cerebello-Thalamic Targets for Functional Neurosurgery: A Multi-Vendor Pilot Study in Four Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Jakab, András; Werner, Beat; Piccirelli, Marco; Kovács, Kázmér; Martin, Ernst; Thornton, John S.; Yousry, Tarek; Szekely, Gabor; O‘Gorman Tuura, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Functional stereotactic neurosurgery by means of deep brain stimulation or ablation provides an effective treatment for movement disorders, but the outcome of surgical interventions depends on the accuracy by which the target structures are reached. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) based probabilistic tractography of deep brain structures that are commonly used for pre- and perioperative targeting for functional neurosurgery. Three targets were reconstructed based on their significance as intervention sites or as a no-go area to avoid adverse side effects: the connections propagating from the thalamus to (1) primary and supplementary motor areas, (2) to somatosensory areas and the cerebello-thalamic tract (CTT). We evaluated the overlap of the reconstructed connectivity based targets with corresponding atlas based data, and tested the inter-subject and inter-scanner variability by acquiring repeated DTI from four volunteers, and on three MRI scanners with similar sequence parameters. Compared to a 3D histological atlas of the human thalamus, moderate overlaps of 35-50% were measured between connectivity- and atlas based volumes, while the minimal distance between the centerpoints of atlas and connectivity targets was 2.5 mm. The variability caused by the MRI scanner was similar to the inter-subject variability, except for connections with the postcentral gyrus where it was higher. While CTT resolved the anatomically correct trajectory of the tract individually, high volumetric variability was found across subjects and between scanners. DTI can be applied in the clinical, preoperative setting to reconstruct the CTT and to localize subdivisions within the lateral thalamus. In our pilot study, such subdivisions moderately matched the borders of the ventrolateral-posteroventral (VLpv) nucleus and the ventral-posterolateral (VPL) nucleus. Limitations of the currently used standard DTI protocols were

  2. Chronic Pain in Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Grodofsky, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    This review includes a summary of contemporary theories of pain processing and advocates a multimodal analgesia approach for providing perioperative care. A summary of various medication classes and anesthetic techniques is provided that highlights evidence emerging from neurosurgical literature. This summary covers opioid management, acetaminophen, nonsteroidal antiinflammatories, ketamine, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine, corticosteroids, gabapentin, and regional anesthesia for neurosurgery. At present, there is not enough investigation into these areas to describe best practices for treating or preventing chronic pain in neurosurgery; but providers can identify a wider range of options available to personalize perioperative care strategies. PMID:27521193

  3. Nanotechnology and vascular neurosurgery: an in vivo experimental study on microvessels repair using laser photoactivation of a nanostructured hyaluronan solder.

    PubMed

    Esposito, G; Rossi, F; Matteini, P; Ratto, F; Sabatino, G; Puca, A; Albanese, A; Rossi, G; Marchese, E; Maira, G; Pini, R

    2012-01-01

    Sealing tissues by laser in neurosurgical procedures may overcome problems related to the use of conventional suturing methods which can be associated with various degrees of vascular wall damage. Despite the significant experimental and clinical achievements of the past, a standardized clinical application of laser-welding technology has not yet been implemented. The main problem is related to the use of common organic chromophores. A substantial breakthrough in the laser welding of biological tissues may come from the advent of nanotechnologies. In this paper we describe an experimental study, to confirm the feasibility of an innovative laser-assisted vascular repair (LAVR) technique based on diode laser irradiation and subsequent photoactivation of a hyaluronan solder embedded with near infrared (NIR) absorbing gold nanorods (GNRs), and to analyze the induced closuring effect in a follow-up study performed in animal model. Twenty New Zealand rabbits underwent closure of a 3-mm longitudinal incision performed on the common carotid artery (CCA) by means of 810 nm diode laser irradiation, in conjunction with the topical application of an optimized GNR composite. Effective closure of the arterial wound was accomplished by using very low laser intensity (30 W/cm2). The average CCA occlusion time was as low as 50 sec. Animals underwent different follow-up periods (2, 8, 30 days). After follow-up, they were re-anesthetized, the patency of the treated vessels was tested (Doppler analysis) and then the irradiated vessels were excised and subjected to histological evaluations. Morphological examinations of the samples documented the integrity of the vascular wall. No host reaction to nanoparticles occurred. Collagen and elastic fibers returned to their normal architecture 30 days after treatment. A Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examination and immuno-histochemical analysis demonstrated a full re-endothelization of the vessel walls. We thus confirmed that a laser

  4. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  5. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations. In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT (Computational Tomography) or MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled 'Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification' is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  6. Neurosurgery in Siberia.

    PubMed

    Krivoshapkin, Alexey L; Zelman, Vladimir L

    2012-02-01

    There is archaeological evidence that the first neurosurgical procedure in what is now known as Siberia was performed in 8005 ± 100 B.C. According to signs of bone growth, perhaps more than half of the individuals who received the ancient trepanations survived. In Siberia, the first operations on the human brain and spinal cord were performed in 1909 at Tomsk University Hospital by the outstanding Russian surgeon and professor Vladimir M. Mysh. Professor Mysh initially moved from Saint Petersburg to Tomsk and later to Novosibirsk. Nicolay N. Burdenko, the founder of Russian neurosurgery and the Moscow Neurosurgical Institution, began his medical education at the Tomsk Imperial University. In the 1950s, Professor Ksenia I. Kharitonova exerted her great influence upon the development of neurosurgery in Siberia. Since 1955, and for 30 years thereafter, Professor Kharitonova was recognized as a principal leader of Siberian neurosurgery. She applied every effort to spread neurosurgical knowledge, and she popularized best practices around Siberia and the Far East. Perestroika deconstructed and ultimately eliminated the orderly system of neurosurgical service in the Soviet Union. From another perspective, the process opened the window to the world. Fully equipped centers and clinics with state-of-the-art techniques for neuro-oncology, cerebrovascular diseases, neurotrauma, and spinal pathology management in Novosibirsk, Barnaul, Kemerovo, and Irkutsk were enabled. PMID:22387212

  7. [Prophylactic antibiotics in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Iacob, G; Iacob, Simona; Cojocaru, Inimioara

    2007-01-01

    Because of a low risk of infection (around 2-3%), prophylactic use of antibiotics in neurosurgery is a controversial issue. Some neurosurgeons consider that there are strong arguments against the use of antimicrobials (promotion of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, superinfection and adverse drug reactions) and meticulous aseptic techniques could be more usefully than prophylactic antibiotics. On the other hand, despite of being rare, the consequences of a neurosurgical infection can be dramatic and may result in a rapid death, caused by meningitis, cerebritis, abscess formation or sepsis. Clinical studies emphasized that the most important factors influencing the choice of antibiotic prophylaxis in neurosurgery is the patient's immune status, virulence of the pathogens and the type of surgery ("clean contaminated"--procedure that crosses the cranial sinuses, "clean non-implant"--procedure that does not cross the cranial sinuses, CSF shunt surgery, skull fracture). Prophylaxis has become the standard of care for contaminated and clean-contaminated surgery, also for surgery involving insertion of artificial devices. The antibiotic (first/second generation of cephalosporins or vancomycin in allergic patients) should recover only the cutaneous possibly contaminating flora (S. aureus, S. epidermidis) and should be administrated 30' before the surgical incision, intravenously in a single dose. Most studies pointed that identification of the risk factors for infections, correct asepsis and minimal prophylactic antibiotic regimen, help neurosurgeons to improve patient care and to decrease mortality without selecting resistant bacteria. PMID:18293694

  8. Application of lasers in neurosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cerullo, L.J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the titles are: Laser Safety; Photoradiation Therapy of Malignant Brian Tumors; Photochemotherapy: Anesthesiologic Considerations; Power; From Instrument to Tissue; and Theoretical Neurosurgery.

  9. Single Case Study: Neuropsychological Functioning in a Patient Diagnosed with Intermittent Explosive Disorder Pre and Post Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Alonso, María José; Morales-Muñoz, Isabel; Castaño-León, Ana María; Lagares, Alfonso; Rubio, Gabriel; Jurado-Barba, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent explosive disorder (IED) is characterized by a difficulty to resist the urge to carry out a recognized harmful behavior. The central symptom is aggressiveness, expressed in isolated episodes. Executive function impairments are habitually found in impulse control disorders. Neuropsychology of impulsivity is related to dysfunctions in the orbito-frontal cortex, dorsolateral cortex and anterior-cingulated regions, being consequently involved in cognitive mechanisms of inhibition. Lesions in those areas are common in IED. In the most severe cases of IED, surgical procedures are required for treatment. In this study, we examined JML; a patient suffering from a severe case of IED. He experienced frequent episodes of auto and heteroaggression and multiple psychiatric admissions, and thus stereotactic surgery was the recommended treatment. The procedure consisted of an electrode situated lateral to the lateral ventricle, targeting the projections between frontal and subcortical affected regions. We aimed to study the neuropsychological functioning of JML, before and after electrode implantation. Our results suggested that surgery in IED improves cognitive performance at some levels. JML significantly improved his cognitive flexibility, measured with WCST, and alternate attention assessed with CPT and TMT-B tests, after electrode implantation. Cognitive flexibility deficits may be also related to increased aggressiveness. Therefore, improvements at this level may involve a reduction of impulsivity and aggressive behavior. PMID:27161981

  10. Mythology and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ökten, Ali İhsan

    2016-06-01

    Myths are the keystone of mythology. They are interpretations of events that have been told as stories and legends for thousands of years, inherited from generation to generation, and have reached the present day. Although most myths are considered figments of the imagination or fictitious legends, all of them contain references to facts from the time they occurred. Mythology, which is a collection of figments of imagination concerning nature and human beings, is a product of human effort to perceive, explain, and interpret the universe and the world, much like science. The interaction between mythology and science dates back to the early days of civilization. Mythology, a reflection of human creativity, is extensively used in modern science, particularly in a terminological context. This article aims to reveal the texture of mythology in neurosurgery, by analyzing the birth of medicine in mythology; heroes such as Apollo and Asklepios, the gods of healing and medicine, as well as Hygieia, the goddess of health and hygiene; and mythological terms and phrases such as Achilles tendon, atlas vertebra, gigantism, priapism syndrome, hippocampus, lethargy, syrinx, and arachnoid. Through the use of symbols, mythology has attempted to explain several subjects, such as human nature, disease, birth, and death. In this respect, mythology and medicine dance arm in arm, and this dance has been going on for centuries. As a result, mythology has manifested itself in many fields within medicine, either anatomically or by giving names to various diseases. PMID:26970479

  11. History of Neurosurgery in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    RAFFIQ, Azman; ABDULLAH, Jafri Malin; HASPANI, Saffari; ADNAN, Johari Siregar

    2015-01-01

    The development of neurosurgical services and training in Malaysia began in 1963, with the first centre established in its capital city at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, aimed to provide much needed neurosurgical services and training in the field of neurology and neurosurgery. This center subsequently expanded in 1975 with the establishment of the Tunku Abdul Rahman Neuroscience Institute (IKTAR); which integrated the three allied interdependent disciplines of neurosurgery, neurology and psychiatry. The establishment of this institute catalysed the rapid expansion of neurosurgical services in Malaysia and paved the way for development of comprehensive training for doctors, nurses, and paramedics. This culminated in the establishments of a local comprehensive neurosurgery training program for doctors in 2001; followed by a training program for nurses and paramedics in 2006. To date, there are more than 60 neurosurgeons providing expert care in 11 centers across Malaysia, along with trained personnel in the field of neurosciences. PMID:27006632

  12. [New simulation technologies in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Byvaltsev, V A; Belykh, E G; Konovalov, N A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents a literature review on the current state of simulation technologies in neurosurgery, a brief description of the basic technology and the classification of simulation models, and examples of simulation models and skills simulators used in neurosurgery. Basic models for the development of physical skills, the spectrum of available computer virtual simulators, and their main characteristics are described. It would be instructive to include microneurosurgical training and a cadaver course of neurosurgical approaches in neurosurgery training programs and to extend the use of three-dimensional imaging. Technologies for producing three-dimensional anatomical models and patient-specific computer simulators as well as improvement of tactile feedback systems and display quality of virtual models are promising areas. Continued professional education necessitates further research for assessing the validity and practical use of simulators and physical models. PMID:27331235

  13. Progress of women in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Spetzler, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in issues related to gender equity, barriers to recruiting and retaining women in neurosurgery continue to exist. At the same time, the overall projected shortage of neurosurgeons suggests that women will be vital to the long-term success of the field. Attracting women to neurosurgery can capitalize on strategies, such as mentoring, teaching leadership and negotiating skills, and job sharing or dual training tracks to name a few, that would benefit both men and women passionate about pursuing neurosurgery. Ultimately, personal and institutional accountability must be evaluated to ensure that the best and brightest candidates, regardless of gender, are recruited to neurosurgical programs to promote the health of our challenging but most satisfying profession. PMID:22059098

  14. Artificial neural networks in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Azimi, Parisa; Mohammadi, Hasan Reza; Benzel, Edward C; Shahzadi, Sohrab; Azhari, Shirzad; Montazeri, Ali

    2015-03-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) effectively analyze non-linear data sets. The aimed was A review of the relevant published articles that focused on the application of ANNs as a tool for assisting clinical decision-making in neurosurgery. A literature review of all full publications in English biomedical journals (1993-2013) was undertaken. The strategy included a combination of key words 'artificial neural networks', 'prognostic', 'brain', 'tumor tracking', 'head', 'tumor', 'spine', 'classification' and 'back pain' in the title and abstract of the manuscripts using the PubMed search engine. The major findings are summarized, with a focus on the application of ANNs for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Finally, the future of ANNs in neurosurgery is explored. A total of 1093 citations were identified and screened. In all, 57 citations were found to be relevant. Of these, 50 articles were eligible for inclusion in this review. The synthesis of the data showed several applications of ANN in neurosurgery, including: (1) diagnosis and assessment of disease progression in low back pain, brain tumours and primary epilepsy; (2) enhancing clinically relevant information extraction from radiographic images, intracranial pressure processing, low back pain and real-time tumour tracking; (3) outcome prediction in epilepsy, brain metastases, lumbar spinal stenosis, lumbar disc herniation, childhood hydrocephalus, trauma mortality, and the occurrence of symptomatic cerebral vasospasm in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage; (4) the use in the biomechanical assessments of spinal disease. ANNs can be effectively employed for diagnosis, prognosis and outcome prediction in neurosurgery. PMID:24987050

  15. Computer-aided navigation in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Grunert, P; Darabi, K; Espinosa, J; Filippi, R

    2003-05-01

    The article comprises three main parts: a historical review on navigation, the mathematical basics for calculation and the clinical applications of navigation devices. Main historical steps are described from the first idea till the realisation of the frame-based and frameless navigation devices including robots. In particular the idea of robots can be traced back to the Iliad of Homer, the first testimony of European literature over 2500 years ago. In the second part the mathematical calculation of the mapping between the navigation and the image space is demonstrated, including different registration modalities and error estimations. The error of the navigation has to be divided into the technical error of the device calculating its own position in space, the registration error due to inaccuracies in the calculation of the transformation matrix between the navigation and the image space, and the application error caused additionally by anatomical shift of the brain structures during operation. In the third part the main clinical fields of application in modern neurosurgery are demonstrated, such as localisation of small intracranial lesions, skull-base surgery, intracerebral biopsies, intracranial endoscopy, functional neurosurgery and spinal navigation. At the end of the article some possible objections to navigation-aided surgery are discussed. PMID:12962294

  16. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dyster, Timothy G; Mikell, Charles B; Sheth, Sameer A

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field's history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  17. The Co-evolution of Neuroimaging and Psychiatric Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Dyster, Timothy G.; Mikell, Charles B.; Sheth, Sameer A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of neuroimaging in psychiatric neurosurgery has evolved significantly throughout the field’s history. Psychiatric neurosurgery initially developed without the benefit of information provided by modern imaging modalities, and thus lesion targets were selected based on contemporary theories of frontal lobe dysfunction in psychiatric disease. However, by the end of the 20th century, the availability of structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allowed for the development of mechanistic theories attempting to explain the anatamofunctional basis of these disorders, as well as the efficacy of stereotactic neuromodulatory treatments. Neuroimaging now plays a central and ever-expanding role in the neurosurgical management of psychiatric disorders, by influencing the determination of surgical candidates, allowing individualized surgical targeting and planning, and identifying network-level changes in the brain following surgery. In this review, we aim to describe the coevolution of psychiatric neurosurgery and neuroimaging, including ways in which neuroimaging has proved useful in elucidating the therapeutic mechanisms of neuromodulatory procedures. We focus on ablative over stimulation-based procedures given their historical precedence and the greater opportunity they afford for post-operative re-imaging, but also discuss important contributions from the deep brain stimulation (DBS) literature. We conclude with a discussion of how neuroimaging will transition the field of psychiatric neurosurgery into the era of precision medicine. PMID:27445706

  18. [A short history of endoscopic neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Song, Zhi-Bin; Gao, Jian-Wei; Li, Xu-Guangl

    2013-11-01

    Since 1910, rigid cystoscopy was first applied in the lateral ventricular choroid plexus cauterization for the treatment of congenital hydrocephalus, thus, opening up a new window in the endoscopic neurosurgery, but poor surgical outcome and high mortality made the application of endoscopic neurosurgery in question. Latterly, because of the appearance of new microscope and optical fiber endoscope, neuroendoscopy has been applied adequately in neurosurgery, with the increase of its clinical indications. Along with it, the concept of neuroendoscopy in surgery has changed, as well as the expansion of clinical indications. At present, neuroendoscopy technology has become a significant branch of modern neurosurgery. PMID:24524639

  19. Virtual neurosurgery, training for the future.

    PubMed

    Vloeberghs, M; Glover, A; Benford, S; Jones, A; Wang, P; Becker, Adib

    2007-06-01

    Virtual reality (VR) simulators have been created for various surgical specialties. The common theme is extensive use of graphics, confined spaces, limited functionality and limited tactile feedback. A development team at the University of Nottingham, UK, consisting of computer scientists, mechanical engineers, graphic designers and a neurosurgeon, set out to develop a haptic, e.g. tactile simulator for neurosurgery making use of boundary elements (BE). The relative homogeneity of the brain, allows boundary elements, e.g. 'surface only' rendering, to simulate the brain structure. A boundary element simplifies the computing equations saves computing time, by assuming the properties of the surface equal the properties of the body. A limited audit was done by neurosurgical users confirming the potential of the simulator as a training tool. This paper focuses on the application of the computational method and refers to the underlying mathematical structure. Full references are included regarding the mathematical methodology. PMID:17612915

  20. Father of neurosurgery in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tze-Ching

    2004-04-01

    Neurosurgery in Hong Kong had its origins as a division of General Surgery and became a subspecialty only 46 years ago with the arrival of Hsiang-Lai Wen. For well over a decade, Wen would be the only neurosurgeon in the colony. His contributions to neurosurgery included the ventriculosuperior sagittal sinus shunt and the application of acupuncture in anesthesia, pain ablation, and drug detoxification. A pilot with the China National Aviation Corporation during World War II, he played an active part in the Allied war effort. As a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, Wen sought to improve the standard of neurosurgery in Hong Kong and southern China with the establishment of the Hong Kong Neurosurgical Society in 1981 and the Research Institute of Neurosciences in Guangzhou in 1988. Wen was acknowledged as Hong Kong's "father of neurosurgery," and his work paved the way for the development of modern neurosurgery in the region. PMID:15046667

  1. Anaesthesia for elective neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, J

    2007-07-01

    Neuroanaesthesia continues to develop and expand. It is a speciality where the knowledge and expertise of the anaesthetist can directly influence patient outcome. Evolution of neurosurgical practice is accompanied by new challenges for the anaesthetist. Increasingly, we must think not only as an anaesthetist but also as a neurosurgeon and neurologist. With the focus on functional and minimally invasive procedures, there is an increased emphasis on the provision of optimal operative conditions, preservation of neurocognitive function, minimizing interference with electrophysiological monitoring, and a rapid, high-quality recovery. Small craniotomies, intraoperative imaging, stereotactic interventions, and endoscopic procedures increase surgical precision and minimize trauma to normal tissues. The result should be quicker recovery, minimal perioperative morbidity, and reduced hospital stay. One of the peculiarities of neuroanaesthesia has always been that as much importance is attached to wakening the patient as sending them to sleep. With the increasing popularity of awake craniotomies, there is even more emphasis on this skill. However, despite high-quality anaesthetic research and advances in drugs and monitoring modalities, many controversies remain regarding best clinical practice. This review will discuss some of the current controversies in elective neurosurgical practice, future perspectives, and the place of awake craniotomies in the armamentarium of the neuroanaesthetist. PMID:17573395

  2. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery in evolution: the endovascular paradigm.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Grant C; Dumont, Travis M; Eller, Jorge L; Mokin, Maxim; Snyder, Kenneth V; Levy, Elad I; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Hopkins, L Nelson

    2014-02-01

    Endovascular technique represents an important, minimally invasive approach to treating cerebrovascular disease. In this article, we discuss the origins of endovascular neurosurgery as a discipline in the context of important technical milestones, evidence-based medicine, and future cerebrovascular neurosurgical training. Cerebrovascular neurosurgery has seen a steady, convergent evolution toward the surgeon capable of seamless incorporation of open and endovascular approaches to any complex vascular disease affecting the central nervous system. Neurosurgery must assume the leadership role in the multidisciplinary neurovascular team. PMID:24402487

  3. Student-selected components in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Clark, David J; Kolias, Angelos G; Garnett, Matthew R; Trivedi, Rikin A; Price, Stephen J; Hutchinson, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    Student-selected components (SSCs) are protected periods of time in the undergraduate medical curriculum which allow students to explore an area of medicine they are interested in. They are particularly valuable in exposing students to smaller specialties like neurosurgery, which are often sparsely covered in the rest of the undergraduate curriculum. Moreover, they provide opportunities for students interested in pursuing a career in neurosurgery to increase their likelihood of being successful in specialty training applications. In this article, we summarise our department's experience of hosting SSCs. Furthermore, we have set out to establish a series of achievable objectives over the course of a typical SSC in neurosurgery. This includes the possibility of participation in research and audit, which, if well planned, can be rewarding for both the student and the host unit. SSCs are an effective means of exposing medical students to neurosurgery and provide a multitude of opportunities for enhancing clinical competencies and career development. PMID:26610147

  4. Neurosurgery at Fujita Health University, Japan.

    PubMed

    Kanno, T; Kato, Y; Sano, H; Shoda, M; Nonomura, K; Imai, F; Kawase, T; Kanaoka, N; Bannur, U

    2000-06-01

    Neurosurgery at the Fujita Health University began in 1972 with Dr. Tetsuo Kanno. In 1973, he was joined by Dr. Kazuhiro Katada and in the year 1976, an independent neurosurgery department was established with Dr. Kanno as the Chief of Neurosurgery. Under his guidance the department continued to grow and by 1978, a neurosurgical residency program recognised by the Japanese Board of Neurosurgery was established. Integration of laboratory research and clinical experience is the hallmark of this program. The current philosophy is directed towards subspecialization and academic training. This article provides a brief overview of the rapid development of a Neurosurgical Centre to reach international acclaim under the guidance of Prof. Tetsuo Kanno. PMID:10943990

  5. [Changing the teaching of neurosurgery with information technology].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Jean-Jacques; Caire, François; Kalamarides, Michel; Mireau, Etienne; Dauger, Frédéric; Coignac, Marie-Jo; Charlin, Bernard

    2009-10-01

    A digital campus is a distance learning site that uses the potential of information and communication technologies to disseminate and improve educational services. This website, with open and free access, is built from free software with Web 2.0 technology. It is hosted at the University of Limoges. It functions as a digital library, containing scanned books, slide shows, more than 200 hours of recorded courses and round tables accessible by streaming video. The site is indexed according to the users' needs, by level of knowledge, specialty, keywords, and supplementary MeSH terms. The campus is organized as the College of Neurosurgery (http://college.neurochirurgie.fr). The durability of this type of training (in existence for 9 years now) is made possible by a powerful and committed consortium: the French Society of Neurosurgery, which has created high-quality intellectual and scientific resources, the University of Limoges, the Dupuytren University Hospital Center in Limoges, the region of Limousin, and the French-language Virtual Medical University, which have provided logistic and financial support. To target appropriate levels at various users, we distinguished four groups: medical students, neurosurgery students, neurosurgeons (continuing medical education), and students in allied health fields. All areas of neurosurgery are concerned. All the courses, including tests for self-evaluation and scientific meetings (organized with information and communication technologies) are digitally recorded for the site. The principles that make it possible for a medical discipline to organize around an online project are: a pedagogical conception of projects built in the form of models reusable by other health specialties; a stronghold within professional societies of the relevant specialties able to create high-quality intellectual and scientific resources; an organization by educational levels that can be extended transversally to other health disciplines; and free

  6. Renaissance Neurosurgery: Italy's Iconic Contributions.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Khan, Imad Saeed; Apuzzo, Michael L

    2016-03-01

    Various changes in the sociopolitical milieu of Italy led to the increasing tolerance of the study of cadavers in the late Middle Ages. The efforts of Mondino de Liuzzi (1276-1326) and Guido da Vigevano (1280-1349) led to an explosion of cadaver-centric studies in centers such as Bologna, Florence, and Padua during the Renaissance period. Legendary scientists from this era, including Leonardo Da Vinci, Andreas Vesalius, Bartolomeo Eustachio, and Costanzo Varolio, furthered the study of neuroanatomy. The various texts produced during this period not only helped increase the understanding of neuroanatomy and neurophysiology but also led to the formalization of medical education. With increased understanding came new techniques to address various neurosurgical problems from skull fractures to severed peripheral nerves. The present study aims to review the major developments in Italy during the vibrant Renaissance period that led to major progress in the field of neurosurgery. PMID:26585723

  7. Intraoperative Image Guidance in Neurosurgery: Development, Current Indications, and Future Trends

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Chris; Waldeck, Stephan; Mauer, Uwe Max

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. As minimally invasive surgery becomes the standard of care in neurosurgery, it is imperative that surgeons become skilled in the use of image-guided techniques. The development of image-guided neurosurgery represents a substantial improvement in the microsurgical treatment of tumors, vascular malformations, and other intracranial lesions. Objective. There have been numerous advances in neurosurgery which have aided the neurosurgeon to achieve accurate removal of pathological tissue with minimal disruption of surrounding healthy neuronal matter including the development of microsurgical, endoscopic, and endovascular techniques. Neuronavigation systems and intraoperative imaging should improve success in cranial neurosurgery. Additional functional imaging modalities such as PET, SPECT, DTI (for fiber tracking), and fMRI can now be used in order to reduce neurological deficits resulting from surgery; however the positive long-term effect remains questionable for many indications. Method. PubMed database search using the search term “image guided neurosurgery.” More than 1400 articles were published during the last 25 years. The abstracts were scanned for prospective comparative trials. Results and Conclusion. 14 comparative trials are published. To date significant data amount show advantages in intraoperative accuracy influencing the perioperative morbidity and long-term outcome only for cerebral glioma surgery. PMID:22655196

  8. Global Neurosurgery: The Unmet Need.

    PubMed

    Park, Kee B; Johnson, Walter D; Dempsey, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    Globally, the lack of access to basic surgical care causes 3 times as much deaths as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria combined. The magnitude of this unmet need has been described recently, and the numbers are startling. Major shifts in global health agenda have highlighted access to essential and emergency surgery as a high priority. A broad examination of the current global neurosurgical efforts to improve access has revealed some strengths, particularly in the realm of training; however, the demand grossly outstrips the supply; most people in low-income countries do not have access to basic surgical care, either due to lack of availability or affordability. Projects that help create a robust and resilient health system within low- and middle-income countries require urgent implementation. In this context, concurrent scale-up of human resources, investments in capacity building, local data collection, and analysis for accurate assessment are essential. In addition, through process of collaboration and consensus building within the neurosurgical community, a unified voice of neurosurgery is necessary to effectively advocate for all those who need neurosurgical care wherever, whenever. PMID:26732963

  9. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Bohm, Parker E.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. Methods: We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. Results: A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. Conclusion: The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education. PMID:25745588

  10. Comprehensive review on rhino-neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hosemann, Werner; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2015-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, an innovative and active field of surgical collaboration has been evolved and established combining the expertise of neurosurgery and rhinosurgery in the endonasal treatment of different lesions affecting the anterior skull base together with the adjacent intranasal and intradural areas. Important prerequisites for this development were improvements of technical devices, definitions of transnasal surgical corridors, and approvements in endonasal reconstructions, e.g. by use of pedicled nasal mucosal flaps. Due to these improvements, the rate of perioperative infectious complications remained acceptable. Interdisciplinary surgical teams (4-hands-2-minds) have been established constituting specialized centers of "rhino-neurosurgery". With growing expertise of these groups, it could be shown that oncological results and perioperative complications were comparable to traditional surgery while at the same time the patients' morbidity could be reduced. The present review encompasses the recent literature focusing on the development, technical details, results, and complications of "rhino-neurosurgery". PMID:26770276

  11. Landmark papers in cerebrovascular neurosurgery 2015.

    PubMed

    Moore, Justin M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Gupta, Raghav; Adeeb, Nimer; Patel, Apar S; Ogilvy, Christopher S; Thomas, Ajith J

    2016-09-01

    The management of cerebrovascular disease has advanced considerably in 2015. Five randomized control trials have firmly established the role of endovascular thrombectomy for ischemic strokes due to large vessel occlusion. The randomized trial of intraarterial treatment for acute ischemic stroke (MR CLEAN) (Berkhemer et al. NEJM 2015;372:11-20) was the first of a series on the topic. There was a total of 5 randomized controlled trials published showing benefit in terms of functional outcomes at 90days for mechanical thrombectomy including the Endovascular Therapy for Ischemic stroke with perfusion-imaging selection (EXTEND IA) (Campbell et al. NEJM 2015;372:1009-18), the Randomized assessment of rapid endovascular treatment of ischemic stroke (ESCAPE) (Goyal et al. NEJM 2015;372:1019-30) trials, the stent-retriever thrombectomy after IV t-PA is t-PA alone in stroke (SWIFT-PRIME) (Saver et al. NEJM 2015;372:2285-95), and the thrombectomy within 8h after symptom onset in Ischemic stroke (REVASCAT) trial (Jovin et al. NEJM 2015; 372:2296-306). Six-year results from randomized controlled Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) found no significant difference in functional outcomes in patients ruptured aneurysms treated surgically clippings versus endovascular treatment (Spetzler et al. JNS 2015;123:609-17. The 10-year results of the International Subarachnoid Aneurysm trial (ISAT) reported similar mortality rates and good functional outcomes between clipped and coiled patients (Molyneux et al. Lancet 2015;385:691-7). We also discuss the impact of genome wide sequencing studies in familial aneurysms, the largest publication on stent assisted coiling and flow diverter for aneurysms and noteworthy papers relevant to Moyamoya and cavernous malformations (Yang et al. Neurosurgery 2015;77:241-7). PMID:27366977

  12. Reflections on a career in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Heimburger, Robert F.; Heimburger, Douglas C.

    2013-01-01

    Robert Heimburger recounts his career in neurosurgery, including some of the early years of modern neurosurgery and some of the contributions he made, particularly in the areas of early repair of myelomeningocele and spinal cord tethering, high-intensity focused ultrasound for the brain, stereotactic surgery, washing hair and scalps instead of shaving for cranial surgery, and neurosurgical consultation in Asian countries. Now aged 96, he continues to have a keen mind and thorough commitment to the profession that offered him a lifetime of inspiration and service. PMID:23956932

  13. Experimental measurement of the Melnikov function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Patrice; Huck, Peter; Nobili, Clément; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-07-01

    We study the transport properties of a genuine two-dimensional flow with a large mean velocity perturbed periodically in time by means of an original experimental technique. The flow generated by the co-rotation of two cylinders is both stratified with a linear density gradient using salted water and viscous in order to prevent Ekman pumping and centrifugal instabilities. Thus, the mean flow contains a hyperbolic point with a homoclinic streamline, which we perturb periodically by an extra oscillation. A blob of scalar injected close to the stagnation point contracts on the stable manifold and stretches in the unstable direction. The distance between the stable and the unstable manifolds is measured as the distance between the maximum and the minimum of the dye undulating pattern and is recorded as a function of the perturbation frequency. This distance, also called the Melnikov function, presents a maximum when the residence time of a fluid particle in the mean flow is about half a perturbation period. This resonance criterion is recovered with good quantitative agreement by the theoretical prediction of the Melnikov function computed for this flow.

  14. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN NEUROSURGERY: A QUANTITATIVE STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Hani J; Hughes-Hallett, Archie; Kwasnicki, Richard M; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Nandi, Dipankar

    2015-01-01

    Object Technological innovation within healthcare may be defined as the introduction of a new technology that initiates a change in clinical practice. Neurosurgery is a particularly technologically intensive surgical discipline, and new technologies have preceded many of the major advances in operative neurosurgical technique. The aim of the present study was to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery using patents and peer-reviewed publications as metrics of technology development and clinical translation respectively. Methods A patent database was searched between 1960 and 2010 using the search terms “neurosurgeon” OR “neurosurgical” OR “neurosurgery”. The top 50 performing patent codes were then grouped into technology clusters. Patent and publication growth curves were then generated for these technology clusters. A top performing technology cluster was then selected as an exemplar for more detailed analysis of individual patents. Results In all, 11,672 patents and 208,203 publications relating to neurosurgery were identified. The top performing technology clusters over the 50 years were: image guidance devices, clinical neurophysiology devices, neuromodulation devices, operating microscopes and endoscopes. Image guidance and neuromodulation devices demonstrated a highly correlated rapid rise in patents and publications, suggesting they are areas of technology expansion. In-depth analysis of neuromodulation patents revealed that the majority of high performing patents were related to Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS). Conclusions Patent and publication data may be used to quantitatively evaluate technological innovation in neurosurgery. PMID:25699414

  15. Neurosurgery, "neurospine," and neuroscience: a vital synergy?

    PubMed

    Nowitzke, Adrian

    2008-10-01

    A fundamental dilemma that faces both neurosurgery in general and the subspecialty field of spine surgery is the question of whether those who trained in the former and now work in the latter should maintain their links with their origins and remain under the broader umbrella of neurosurgery, or whether they should develop their own organizational structure and identity separate from organized neurosurgery. This challenge raises many questions with respect to future potential for growth and development, professional identity, and collegiality. This paper is an edited version of an invited speech to the 2007 Annual Meeting of the Joint Section on Disorders of the Spine and Peripheral Nerves. It uses the concept of synergy to review relevant history and explore possible future options for neurosurgery, neurospine, and neuroscience. An example from medical politics is used to illustrate the importance of perspective in approaching these questions, and examples of current therapeutic cutting-edge endeavors highlight the need for team-based behavior that takes a broad view. The premise of the paper is that while individual and specialty aspirations need to be acknowledged, considered, and managed, the results from truly working together will be greater than the sum of the individual efforts-synergy. PMID:18939916

  16. Susceptibility artefact correction using dynamic graph cuts: application to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Daga, Pankaj; Pendse, Tejas; Modat, Marc; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Winston, Gavin P; McEvoy, Andrew W; Thornton, John; Yousry, Tarek; Drobnjak, Ivana; Duncan, John S; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Echo Planar Imaging (EPI) is routinely used in diffusion and functional MR imaging due to its rapid acquisition time. However, the long readout period makes it prone to susceptibility artefacts which results in geometric and intensity distortions of the acquired image. The use of these distorted images for neuronavigation hampers the effectiveness of image-guided surgery systems as critical white matter tracts and functionally eloquent brain areas cannot be accurately localised. In this paper, we present a novel method for correction of distortions arising from susceptibility artefacts in EPI images. The proposed method combines fieldmap and image registration based correction techniques in a unified framework. A phase unwrapping algorithm is presented that can efficiently compute the B0 magnetic field inhomogeneity map as well as the uncertainty associated with the estimated solution through the use of dynamic graph cuts. This information is fed to a subsequent image registration step to further refine the results in areas with high uncertainty. This work has been integrated into the surgical workflow at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery and its effectiveness in correcting for geometric distortions due to susceptibility artefacts is demonstrated on EPI images acquired with an interventional MRI scanner during neurosurgery. PMID:25047865

  17. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  18. The history of neurosurgery in Bolivia and pediatric neurosurgery in Santa Cruz de la Sierra

    PubMed Central

    Dabdoub, Carlos F.; Dabdoub, Carlos B.

    2013-01-01

    The practice of neurosurgery in Bolivia began thousands of years ago with skull trepanation. This procedure dates from the earliest period of the Tiwanaku culture, a preInca civilization. Neurosurgical development in Bolivia has its origins in the late 19th century and can be divided in two stages. At the beginning, before the advent of neurosurgery as a discipline, some general surgeons performed procedures on the skull and brain. Formal neurosurgery in Bolivia was developed with the arrival of neurosurgeons trained in the United States and some countries of South America. The Bolivian Neurosurgical Society was created in 1975. Nowadays, our national society has 74 members. It is affiliated with the World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies and the Latin American Federation of Neurosurgical Societies. Presently, neurosurgery in Bolivia is similar to that seen in developed countries. In this sense, government programs should dedicate more financial support to establish specialized healthcare centers where the management of complex central nervous system lesions could be offered. In contrast, we believe that encouraging the local training of young neurosurgeons is one of the most important factors in the development of neurosurgery in Bolivia or any other country. PMID:24232440

  19. Advances in neurosurgery: The Fujita Health University experience

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ashish

    2011-01-01

    In a world with rapidly changing technologies in the field of neurosurgery, Japan leads the world in many subspecialities like vascular neurosurgery. Apart from this, neuro-oncology and spinal surgeries are also among the premium quality operations performed in the region. I would like to share my experience of spending 3 months at the Fujita Health University, Nagoya, Japan, and the rich expertise and technologies encountered during the period, which made me understand Neurosurgery in a better way. PMID:22059102

  20. Laser Nano-Neurosurgery from Gentle Manipulation to Nano-Incision of Neuronal Cells and Scaffolds: An Advanced Neurotechnology Tool.

    PubMed

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Palazzolo, Gemma; Tsushima, Hanako; Chieregatti, Evelina; Vassalli, Massimo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Current optical approaches are progressing far beyond the scope of monitoring the structure and function of living matter, and they are becoming widely recognized as extremely precise, minimally-invasive, contact-free handling tools. Laser manipulation of living tissues, single cells, or even single-molecules is becoming a well-established methodology, thus founding the onset of new experimental paradigms and research fields. Indeed, a tightly focused pulsed laser source permits complex tasks such as developing engineered bioscaffolds, applying calibrated forces, transfecting, stimulating, or even ablating single cells with subcellular precision, and operating intracellular surgical protocols at the level of single organelles. In the present review, we report the state of the art of laser manipulation in neuroscience, to inspire future applications of light-assisted tools in nano-neurosurgery. PMID:27013962

  1. Laser Nano-Neurosurgery from Gentle Manipulation to Nano-Incision of Neuronal Cells and Scaffolds: An Advanced Neurotechnology Tool

    PubMed Central

    Soloperto, Alessandro; Palazzolo, Gemma; Tsushima, Hanako; Chieregatti, Evelina; Vassalli, Massimo; Difato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Current optical approaches are progressing far beyond the scope of monitoring the structure and function of living matter, and they are becoming widely recognized as extremely precise, minimally-invasive, contact-free handling tools. Laser manipulation of living tissues, single cells, or even single-molecules is becoming a well-established methodology, thus founding the onset of new experimental paradigms and research fields. Indeed, a tightly focused pulsed laser source permits complex tasks such as developing engineered bioscaffolds, applying calibrated forces, transfecting, stimulating, or even ablating single cells with subcellular precision, and operating intracellular surgical protocols at the level of single organelles. In the present review, we report the state of the art of laser manipulation in neuroscience, to inspire future applications of light-assisted tools in nano-neurosurgery. PMID:27013962

  2. Walter E. Dandy's contributions to vascular neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Kretzer, Ryan M; Coon, Alexander L; Tamargo, Rafael J

    2010-06-01

    Although Walter E. Dandy (1886-1946) is appropriately credited with the first surgical clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 1937--a procedure that established the modern field of vascular neurosurgery--his numerous other contributions to this specialty are not as well known. Dandy can be credited with the first detailed description of the vein of Galen malformation, the first description of x-ray visualization of an intracranial aneurysm, the first characterization of basilar artery dolichoectasia, and the publication of the first comprehensive operative case series of arteriovenous malformations, cavernous malformations, and developmental venous anomalies. In addition, Dandy performed the first surgical trapping of a cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm by clipping the supraclinoid ICA and ligating the cervical ICA, and he also executed the first intracranial surgical clipping of the ICA to treat a carotid-cavernous fistula. In this article the authors describe Dandy's contributions to the field of vascular neurosurgery. PMID:20515365

  3. [The origins of the French neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Brunon, J

    2016-06-01

    Modern French neurosurgery starts at the beginning of the XXth century under the motivation of Joseph Babinski. He submitted his patients to Thierry de Martel who had learned this new specialized area of medicine with H. Cushing in the États-Unis and V. Horsey in Great Britain. His first successfully treated case of an intracranial tumor was published in 1909. But the true founding father was Clovis Vincent, initially a neurologist and collaborator of de Martel, who became the first chairman in 1933 of the neurosurgical department at the Pitié hospital of Paris and the first professor of neurosurgery in 1938. After the Second World War, many departments were created outside of Paris. Neurosurgery was definitively recognized as a specialized area in medicine in 1948. Currently, more than 400 neurosurgeons work in France. Because I had the very great privilege to be present at the birth of this society in 1970 and to still be in contact with some of the second and third generation of French neurosurgeons who led it to its high international recognition, the Chairman of the French Neurosurgical Society asked me to write this short historical vignette. PMID:27234912

  4. Photodynamic application in neurosurgery: present and future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostron, Herwig

    2009-06-01

    Photodynamic techniques such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD), fluorescence guided tumor resection (FGR) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) are currently undergoing intensive clinical investigations as adjunctive treatment for malignant brain tumours. This review provides an overview on the current clinical data and trials as well as on photosensitisers, technical developments and indications for photodynamic application in Neurosurgery. Furthermore new developments and clinical significance of FGR for neurosurgery will be discussed. Over 1000 patients were enrolled in various clinical phase I/II trials for PDT for malignant brain tumours. Despite various treatment protocols, variation of photosensitisers and light dose there is a clear trend towards prolonging median survival after one single PDT as compared to conventional therapeutic modalities. The median survival after PDT for primary glioblastoma multiforme WHO IV was 19 months and for recurrent GBM 9 months as compared to standard convential treatment which is 15 months and 3 months, respectively. FGR in combination with adjunctive radiation was significantly superior to standard surgical resection followed by radiation. The combination of FGR/PDD and intraoperative PDT increased significantly survival in recurrent glioblastoma patients. The combination of PDD/ FGR and PDT offers an exciting approach to the treatment of malignant brain tumours "to see and to treat." PDT was generally well tolerated and side effects consisted of occasionally increased intracranial pressure and prolonged skin sensitivity against direct sunlight. This review covers the current available data and draws the future potential of PDD and PDT for its application in neurosurgery.

  5. Neurosurgery: A profession or a technical trade?

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Clark

    2014-01-01

    The American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), 11 years ago converted its Internal Revenue Code (IRC) tax status from a 501 (c) (3) to a 501 (c) (6) entity. By doing so, the professional medical association, now a trade association, was able to more aggressively lobby, support political campaigns, and pursue business opportunities for its members. In the following decade, major changes were seen in the practice of neurosurgery, especially as it relates to spine surgery. With the majority of neurosurgeons limiting themselves to a spine practice, an increased number of spinal procedures, most noted in the Medicare population, was recorded. For example, a 15-fold increase in complex spinal fusions for spinal stenosis was seen between 2002 and 2007. While the basis for this increase was not readily apparent, it was associated with a reduction in reimbursement per case of about 50%, fueling the belief that the increase in complexity of surgery permitted recovery of fees in complex cases to off-set the loss of reimbursement for simpler cases. Considering the growth of spinal surgery within neurosurgery, and decrease funding for spine surgery, in the future there may be too many surgeons chasing too few dollars. There appears to be within neurosurgery a crisis developing where future manpower projections do not realistically match future anticipated specialty funding. PMID:25558426

  6. Graph theory analysis of complex brain networks: new concepts in brain mapping applied to neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Hart, Michael G; Ypma, Rolf J F; Romero-Garcia, Rafael; Price, Stephen J; Suckling, John

    2016-06-01

    Neuroanatomy has entered a new era, culminating in the search for the connectome, otherwise known as the brain's wiring diagram. While this approach has led to landmark discoveries in neuroscience, potential neurosurgical applications and collaborations have been lagging. In this article, the authors describe the ideas and concepts behind the connectome and its analysis with graph theory. Following this they then describe how to form a connectome using resting state functional MRI data as an example. Next they highlight selected insights into healthy brain function that have been derived from connectome analysis and illustrate how studies into normal development, cognitive function, and the effects of synthetic lesioning can be relevant to neurosurgery. Finally, they provide a précis of early applications of the connectome and related techniques to traumatic brain injury, functional neurosurgery, and neurooncology. PMID:26544769

  7. Application of Predictive Nursing Reduces Psychiatric Complications in ICU Patients after Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Qiong; ZHU, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to investigate the effects of clinical application of perioperative predictive nursing on reducing psychiatric complications in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients after neurosurgery. Methods: A total of 129 patients who underwent neurosurgery and received intensive care were enrolled in our study from February 2013 to February 2014. These patients were divided into two groups: the experimental group (n=68) receiving predictive nursing before and after operation, and the control group (n=61) with general nursing. Clinical data including length of ICU stay, duration of the patients’ psychiatric symptoms, form and incidence of adverse events, and patient satisfaction ratings were recorded, and their differences between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The duration of psychiatric symptoms and the length of ICU stay for patients in the experimental group were significantly shorter than those in the control group (P<0.05). The incidence of adverse events and psychiatric symptoms, such as sensory and intuition disturbance, thought disturbance, emotional disorder, and consciousness disorder, in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Patient satisfaction ratings were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of predictive nursing on ICU patients who undergo neurosurgery could effectively reduce the incidence of psychiatric symptoms as well as other adverse events. Our study provided clinical evidences to encourage predictive nursing in routine settings for patients in critical conditions. PMID:27252916

  8. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b)...

  9. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b)...

  10. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b)...

  11. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b)...

  12. 21 CFR 882.4800 - Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. 882...-retaining retractor for neurosurgery. (a) Identification. A self-retaining retractor for neurosurgery is a self-locking device used to hold the edges of a wound open during neurosurgery. (b)...

  13. Smartphone use in neurosurgery? APP-solutely!

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Michael; Drazin, Doniel

    2014-01-01

    Background: A number of smartphone medical apps have recently emerged that may be helpful for the neurosurgical patient, practitioner, and trainee. This study aims to review the current neurosurgery-focused apps available for the iPhone, iPad, and Android platforms as of December 2013. Methods: Two of the most popular smartphone app stores (Apple Store and Android Google Play Store) were surveyed for neurosurgery-focused apps in December 2013. Search results were categorized based on their description page. Data were collected on price, rating, app release date, target audience, and medical professional involvement in app design. A review of the top apps in each category was performed. Results: The search resulted in 111 unique apps, divided into these 7 categories: 16 (14%) clinical tools, 17 (15%) conference adjunct, 27 (24%) education, 18 (16%) literature, 15 (14%) marketing, 10 (9%) patient information, and 8 (7%) reference. The average cost of paid apps was $23.06 (range: $0.99-89.99). Out of the 111 apps, 71 (64%) were free, 48 (43%) had reviews, and 14 (13%) had more than 10 reviews. Seventy-three (66%) apps showed evidence of medical professional involvement. The number of apps being released every year has been increasing since 2009. Conclusions: There are a number of neurosurgery-themed apps available to all audiences. There was a lack of patient information apps for nonspinal procedures. Most apps did not have enough reviews to evaluate their quality. There was also a lack of oversight to validate the accuracy of medical information provided in these apps. PMID:25101208

  14. Development and Evaluation of a Registration Methodology for Information-Guided Precision Robotic Laser Neurosurgery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Ryoichi; Hara, Mikiko; Omori, Shigeru; Uematsu, Miyuki; Umezu, Mitsuo; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi

    To establish safe, precise, and minimally invasive surgery, Computer Aided Surgery (CAS) systems, such as intra-operative imaging and navigation system to detect the location of the target of therapy, and surgical robot system, are very powerful tools. There is strong need to combine these CAS systems for fusion of advanced diagnosis and treatment technologies. In this paper, we introduce our new method to register the intraoperative imaging information, robotic surgery system, and patient using surgical navigation system. Using our Open-MRI navigation system and laser surgery system for neurosurgery, we can make registration between these system and patient precisely. The experimental result shows that the error on the registration between image data and the laser surgery system is low enough to fulfill the requirement of laser surgery system in the use of high-resolution image data. This system realizes the safe, precise and minimally invasive neurosurgery by the combination of intra-operative diagnosis and advanced therapeutic device.

  15. The functions of language: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Redhead, Gina; Dunbar, R I M

    2013-01-01

    We test between four separate hypotheses (social gossip, social contracts, mate advertising and factual information exchange) for the function(s) of language using a recall paradigm. Subjects recalled the social content of stories (irrespective of whether this concerned social behavior, defection or romantic events) significantly better than they did ecological information. Recall rates were no better on ecological stories if they involved flamboyant language, suggesting that, if true, Miller's "Scheherazade effect" may not be independent of content. One interpretation of these results might be that language evolved as an all-purpose social tool, and perhaps acquired specialist functions (sexual advertising, contract formation, information exchange) at a later date through conventional evolutionary windows of opportunity. PMID:23945312

  16. Mythological and Prehistorical Origins of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Anil; Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush

    2016-05-01

    Mythology has a cultural appeal, and the description of some neurosurgical procedures in the Hindu, Greek, Egyptian, and Chinese mythology has a bearing to the origins of our professions. The traces to some of our modern-day practices also can be linked back to the ancient prehistoric eras of the Siberian, Persian, and the Andean region. In this historical perspective, we briefly dwell into individual accounts through the prism of different cultures to highlight the development of neurosurgery in mythology and prehistoric era. PMID:26947728

  17. Neurosurgery for mental disorders: a review.

    PubMed

    Heeramun-Aubeeluck, A; Lu, Z

    2013-05-01

    Neurosurgical interventions date back to ancient civilization, 5100 BC through a practice known as trephination. Due to past abuse and ethical considerations, neurosurgical interventions in psychiatry remain a controversial issue. This article aims to review the different surgical techniques and their current application in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. The U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA) gave its approval for vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) for the management of treatment-resistant depression in 2005 and deep brain stimulation (DBS) for refractory obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) in 2009. These invasive but non destructive techniques represent the future of neurosurgery for mental disorder. PMID:23739819

  18. Cost-effectiveness research in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Zygourakis, Corinna C; Kahn, James G

    2015-04-01

    Cost and value are increasingly important components of health care discussions. Despite a plethora of cost and cost-effectiveness analyses in many areas of medicine, there has been little of this type of research for neurosurgical procedures. This scarcity is vexing because this specialty represents one of the most expensive areas in medicine. This article discusses the general principles of cost-effectiveness analyses and reviews the cost- and cost-effectiveness-related research to date in neurosurgical subspecialties. The need for standardization of cost and cost-effectiveness measurement and reporting within neurosurgery is highlighted and a set of metrics for this purpose is defined. PMID:25771274

  19. First experimental measurement of the Melnikov function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meunier, Patrice; Huck, Peter; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2014-11-01

    The problem of scalar mixing in a 2D flow has been extensively studied numerically by following Lagrangian tracers or theoretically using the tools of dynamical systems (KAM tori, quasi-periodic orbits, chaotic attractors...). However, in all these modelisations, the diffusion of the scalar is usually neglected for the purposes of the numerical/theoretical tools. We present here an experiment with an exactly 2D flow, which allows to study properly the diffusive and mixing problem at very large Peclet number. To avoid any 3D flow, the fluid is stratified with a linear density gradient using salted water. Moreover, the viscosity of the water is decreased of an order of magnitude by adding 10% ucon oil in the water. The flow under study is created by the co-rotation of two vertical cylinders, leading to a homoclinc point at the center. This base flow is perturbed periodically by a third oscillating cylinder. The dye injected at the center settles on the stable manifold of the homoclinic point. The distance between the stable and the unstable manifold is measured as half the distance between the maximum and the minimum of the dye's undulation. The results are in good quantitative agreement with the theoretical prediction of the Melnikov function for this flow.

  20. The 2015 AANS Presidential Address: Neurosurgery's founding principles.

    PubMed

    Harbaugh, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    These are turbulent times for American neurosurgery. It is important to look ahead and prepare for the future but it is also important to look back-for it is memory and tradition that prevent the tyranny of the present. It is impossible to know where we are going if we don't remember where we were. In this paper I want to discuss the founding principles of neurosurgery-the principles that have allowed neurosurgery to prosper in its first century-and to stress the importance of adhering to these principles in times of change. I also want to talk to you about how the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) is helping neurosurgeons honor our founding principles, while preparing neurosurgery for its second century. PMID:26620322

  1. Recent Trends in Conducting School-Based Experimental Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.

    2009-01-01

    Demonstrations of school-based experimental functional analyses have received limited attention within the literature. School settings present unique practical and ethical concerns related to the implementation of experimental analyses which were originally developed within clinical settings. Recent examples have made definite contributions toward…

  2. Aura of technology and the cutting edge: a history of lasers in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Robert W; Spetzler, Robert F; Preul, Mark C

    2009-09-01

    In this historical review the authors examine the important developments that have led to the availability of laser energy to neurosurgeons as a unique and sometimes invaluable tool. They review the physical science behind the function of lasers, as well as how and when various lasers based on different lasing mediums were discovered. They also follow the close association between advances in laser technology and their application in biomedicine, from early laboratory experiments to the first clinical experiences. Because opinions on the appropriate role of lasers in neurosurgery vary widely, the historical basis for some of these views is explored. Initial enthusiasm for a technology that appears to have innate advantages for safe resections has often given way to the strict limitations and demands of the neurosurgical operating theater. However, numerous creative solutions to improve laser delivery, power, safety, and ergonomics demonstrate the important role that technological advances in related scientific fields continue to offer neurosurgery. Benefiting from the most recent developments in materials science, current CO(2) laser delivery systems provide a useful addition to the neurosurgical armamentarium when applied in the correct circumstances and reflect the important historical advances that come about from the interplay between neurosurgery and technology. PMID:19722821

  3. Bulgarian military neurosurgery: from Warsaw Pact to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor; Eftimov, Tihomir

    2010-05-01

    After 45 years as a closest ally of the Soviet Union in the Warsaw Pact, founded mainly against the US and the Western Europe countries, and 15 years of democratic changes, since 2004 Bulgaria has been a full member of NATO and an equal and trusted partner of its former enemies. The unprecedented transformation has affected all aspects of the Bulgarian society. As a function of the Bulgarian Armed Forces, Bulgarian military medicine and in particular Bulgarian military neurosurgery is indivisibly connected with their development. The history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery is the history of the transition from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics military system and military medicine to NATO standards in every aspect. The career of the military neurosurgeon in Bulgaria is in many ways similar to that of the civilian neurosurgeon, but there are also many peculiarities. The purpose of this study was to outline the background and the history of Bulgarian military neurosurgery as well as its future trends in the conditions of world globalization. PMID:20568931

  4. Comprehensive review on rhino-neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Hosemann, Werner; Schroeder, Henry W.S.

    2015-01-01

    In the past 2 decades, an innovative and active field of surgical collaboration has been evolved and established combining the expertise of neurosurgery and rhinosurgery in the endonasal treatment of different lesions affecting the anterior skull base together with the adjacent intranasal and intradural areas. Important prerequisites for this development were improvements of technical devices, definitions of transnasal surgical corridors, and approvements in endonasal reconstructions, e.g. by use of pedicled nasal mucosal flaps. Due to these improvements, the rate of perioperative infectious complications remained acceptable. Interdisciplinary surgical teams (4-hands-2-minds) have been established constituting specialized centers of “rhino-neurosurgery”. With growing expertise of these groups, it could be shown that oncological results and perioperative complications were comparable to traditional surgery while at the same time the patients’ morbidity could be reduced. The present review encompasses the recent literature focusing on the development, technical details, results, and complications of “rhino-neurosurgery”. PMID:26770276

  5. Options for perioperative pain management in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Vadivelu, Nalini; Kai, Alice M; Tran, Daniel; Kodumudi, Gopal; Legler, Aron; Ayrian, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-to-severe pain following neurosurgery is common but often does not get attention and is therefore underdiagnosed and undertreated. Compounding this problem is the traditional belief that neurosurgical pain is inconsequential and even dangerous to treat. Concerns about problematic effects associated with opioid analgesics such as nausea, vomiting, oversedation, and increased intracranial pressure secondary to elevated carbon dioxide tension from respiratory depression have often led to suboptimal postoperative analgesic strategies in caring for neurosurgical patients. Neurosurgical patients may have difficulty or be incapable of communicating their need for analgesics due to neurologic deficits, which poses an additional challenge. Postoperative pain control should be a priority, because pain adversely affects recovery and patient outcomes. Inconsistent practices and the quality of current analgesic strategies for neurosurgical patients still leave room for improvement. Given the complexity of postoperative pain management for these patients, multimodal strategies are often required to optimize pain control and at the same time limit undesired side effects. PMID:26929661

  6. Simulation in neurosurgery: Past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ashish; Patra, Devi Prasad; Meena, Rajesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most technically demanding medical professions that warrants a high level of expertise. In the present context of competitive medical practice, high societal expectations regarding quality of patient care and medicolegal and financial constraints, there are fewer opportunities for a trainee to achieve competency in standard neurosurgical, microsurgical, and operative techniques. Practice on simulation models like cadavers has been a trend since antiquity; however, recent development of newer models with their strategic modifications has given simulation education a new dimension. It has allowed trainees to acquire and improve surgical skills and knowledge in specifically fabricated and controlled settings with no risk to real patients. Simulation also offers the opportunity for deliberate practice and repetition unlimited number of times so that psychomotor skills can be automated. There is ever-growing evidence showing the positive impact of simulation on resident training in various areas of health care. Advances in computer technology and imaging, development of sophisticated virtual reality simulators with haptic feedback and the recent addition of three-dimensional printing technology, have opened a wide arena for the development of high-fidelity patient-specific models to complement current neurosurgical training. Simulation training in neurosurgery in India is still elementary since its inception at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. A structured modular training program has been developed which is yet to be implemented at a multi-institutional level. Stringent efforts are needed to establish a uniform resident training curriculum where simulators can be used to complement current neurosurgical training. PMID:27147144

  7. The 2012 AANS Presidential Address. We are neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Paul C

    2012-12-01

    The theme of the 80th Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons and the title of this presidential address, "We are neurosurgery," is a simple 3-word affirmation of who neurosurgeons are, what they have achieved, and how much there is yet to accomplish. Recent advances in neurobiology and the clinical neurosciences have brought an unprecedented understanding of the human nervous system in both health and disease. As a specialty, neurosurgery has translated knowledge, expanded techniques, and incorporated technology to exponentially expand the science and scope of neurosurgical practice. However, the rapidly advancing, divergently evolving growth of neurosurgery has had profound effects on all aspects of neurosurgery. In this address, the author examines the contemporary meaning of the annual meeting's theme as it relates to the science, practice, specialty, and profession of neurosurgery, as well as the neurosurgeon. In doing so, the author reveals his interpretation of "We are neurosurgery," which he hopes will have an effect on others. PMID:23198859

  8. The genesis of neurosurgery and the evolution of the neurosurgical operative environment: part I-prehistory to 2003.

    PubMed

    Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2003-01-01

    Despite its singular importance, little attention has been given to the neurosurgical operative environment in the scientific and medical literature. This article focuses attention on the development of neurosurgery and the parallel emergence of its operative setting. The operative environment has, to a large extent, defined the "state of the art and science" of neurosurgery, which is now undergoing rapid reinvention. During the course of its initial invention, major milestones in the development of neurosurgery have included the definition of anatomy, consolidation of a scientific basis, and incorporation of the practicalities of anesthesia and antisepsis and later operative technical adjuvants for further refinement of action and minimalism. The progress, previously long and laborious in emergence, is currently undergoing rapid evolution. Throughout its evolution, the discipline has assimilated the most effective tools of modernity into the operative environment, leading eventually to the entity known as the operating room. In the decades leading to the present, progressive minimalization of manipulation and the emergence of more refined operative definition with increasing precision are evident, with concurrent miniaturization of attendant computerized support systems, sensors, robotic interfaces, and imaging devices. These developments over time have led to the invention of neurosurgery and the establishment of the current state-of-the-art neurosurgical operating room as we understand it, and indeed, to a broader definition of the entity itself. To remain current, each neurosurgeon should periodically reconsider his or her personal operative environment and its functional design with reference to modernity of practice as currently defined. PMID:12493097

  9. Nonlinear optical imaging: toward chemical imaging during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Tobias; Dietzek, Benjamin; Krafft, Christoph; Romeike, Bernd F. M.; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Popp, Jürgen

    2011-03-01

    Tumor recognition and precise tumor margin detection presents a central challenge during neurosurgery. In this contribution we present our recent all-optical approach to tackle this problem. We introduce various nonlinear optical techniques, such as coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), second-harmonic generation (SHG) and two-photon fluorescence (TPEF), to study the morphology and chemical composition of (ex vivo) brain tissue. As the experimental techniques presented are contact-free all-optical techniques, which do not rely on the administration of external (fluorescence) labels, we anticipate that their implementation into surgical microscopes will provide significant advantages of intraoperative tumor diagnosis. In this contribution an introduction to the different optical spectroscopic methods will be presented and their implementation into a multimodal microscopic setup will be discussed. Furthermore, we will exemplify their application to brain tissue, i.e. both pig brain as a model for healthy brain tissue and human brain samples taken from surgical procedures. The data to be discussed show the capability of a joint CARS/SHG/TPEF multimodal imaging approach in highlighting various aspects of tissue morphochemistry. The consequences of this microspectroscopic potential, when combined with the existing technology of surgical microscopes, will be discussed.

  10. History of neurosurgery and neurosurgical applications in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sait; Erbengi, Aykut

    2005-01-01

    Although there is evidence of applications of cranial surgery in ancient times, it is commonly accepted that modern surgery started in the late 19th century. The advancements in anesthesiology and aseptic techniques were the main factors contributing to this process. Surgery of the nervous system, however, has a relatively shorter history than surgery of other systems. The process of surgical development in Turkey did not differ from most Western countries. Modern surgery started in 1890 in Turkey. In the beginning, neurosurgical applications were performed by general surgeons. Most of these applications included procedures for craniocerebral traumas and infections and procedures for pain relief. The first neurosurgeon, Dr. Tuner, started working in 1923, operating in some spinal cord and brain tumor and trigeminal neuralgia cases. Other neurosurgeons, Dr. Dilek, Dr. Baydur, and Dr. Kankat, were trained in France and started to work in the mid 1930s. The first neurosurgery department was established in Istanbul in 1923, and the first neurosurgery training program started in the late 1940s. Today, there are more than 50 neurosurgery training centers and more than 500 neurosurgeons in Turkey. There is an increasing number of publications by Turkish neurosurgeons, contributing to the total body of literature in neurosurgery. The current state of neurosurgery in Turkey is parallel to that of the advanced Western countries. PMID:16256833

  11. Role of computer technology in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, M G; Cavalcanti, D D; Preul, M C

    2010-08-01

    In the clinical office, during surgical planning, or in the operating room, neurosurgeons have been surrounded by the digital world either recreating old tools or introducing new ones. Technological refinements, chiefly based on the use of computer systems, have altered the modus operandi for neurosurgery. In the emergency room or in the office, patient data are entered, digitally dictated, or gathered from electronic medical records. Images from every modality can be examined on a Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) or can be seen remotely on cell phones. Surgical planning is based on high-resolution reconstructions, and microsurgical or radiosurgical approaches can be assessed precisely using stereotaxy. Tumor resection, abscess or hematoma evacuation, or the management of vascular lesions can be assisted intraoperatively by new imaging resources integrated into the surgical microscope. Mathematical models can dictate how a lesion may recur as well as how often a particular patient should be followed. Finally, virtual reality is being developed as a training tool for residents and surgeons by preoperatively simulating complex surgical scenarios. Altogether, computerization at each level of patient care has been affected by digital technology to help enhance the safety of procedures and thereby improve outcomes of patients undergoing neurosurgical procedures. PMID:20802430

  12. [Application of frameless neuronavigation in urgent neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Burov, S A; Dash'ian, V G; Shaklunov, A A

    2008-01-01

    Application of a novel technique is analyzed. Frameless CT-based navigation was applied for planning of surgical approach in 92 patients aged 14 to 69 with acute intracranial hemorrhage of different etiology (43 cases of hypertensive hemorrhages, 10 cases of traumatic intracranial hematomas and 16 cases of secondary non-traumatic intracerebral hematomas). Comparative analysis of radioopaque markers and natural anatomical landmarks for registration of patients showed that anatomical landmarks are sufficient for surgical planning without significant distortion of approach trajectory (mean error was 2.2 +/- 1 mm) in supratentorial haemorrhage. This discovery simplified the application of neuronavigation in emergency cases. In posterior fossa hematomas additional radioopaque markers are essential due to absence of constant anatomical landmarks in occipital region. Applicatyion of frameless neuronavigation in surgical treatment of acute intracranial hemorrhages may diminish intraoperative damage to the brain tissue and decrease invasiveness of the operation because of high accuracy of planning of surgical approach. This technique has good perspectives in emergency neurosurgery. PMID:19062589

  13. EXProt: a database for proteins with an experimentally verified function.

    PubMed

    Ursing, Björn M; van Enckevort, Frank H J; Leunissen, Jack A M; Siezen, Roland J

    2002-01-01

    EXProt is a non-redundant protein database containing a selection of entries from genome annotation projects and public databases, aimed at including only proteins with an experimentally verified function. In EXProt release 2.0 we have collected entries from the Pseudomonas aeruginosa community annotation project (PseudoCAP), the Escherichia coli genome and proteome database (GenProtEC) and the translated coding sequences from the Prokaryotes division of EMBL nucleotide sequence database, which are described as having an experimentally verified function. Each entry in EXProt has a unique ID number and contains information about the species, amino acid sequence, functional annotation and, in most cases, links to references in MEDLINE/PubMed and to the entry in the original database. EXProt is indexed in SRS at CMBI (http://www.cmbi.kun.nl/srs/) and can be searched with BLAST and FASTA through the EXProt web page (http://www.cmbi.kun.nl/EXProt/). PMID:11752251

  14. African neurosurgery, the 21st-century challenge.

    PubMed

    El-Fiki, Mohamed

    2010-04-01

    Two major challenges facing African neurosurgery include quality and quantity, in both recourses and personnel. Discrepancy is noted between the two poles, namely, the north and south of the continent and the sub-Saharan area. Although reasonably advanced in the north and south, neurosurgery remains poorly distributed and has multiple deficiencies. The sub-Saharan region, where the demand is high and services are scarce, suffers from a similar lack of both qualified personnel and well-equipped neurosurgical facilities. Insufficient state funding and research facilities aggravate the situation and discourage the few well-trained African neurosurgeons to practice in their homeland. For those who do return home, cultural, social, economical, and political issues hinder their performance and hence the quality of neurosurgery delivered in Africa. Strategies for rectification of these handicaps are presented, including the need for high-standard local training and support from international organizations. PMID:20849772

  15. Simulation in Neurosurgery-A Brief Review and Commentary.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Mary In-Ping Huang; Taekman, Jeffrey M; Zomorodi, Ali R; Gonzalez, L Fernando; Turner, Dennis A

    2016-05-01

    Neurosurgery is one of the most technically demanding and liable of all medical professionals. More than 75% of neurosurgical errors are deemed as preventable and technical in nature. Yet in a specialty that requires such high level of technical expertise, with large consequences for error, there are even fewer opportunities for residents in training to practice on the most complicated cases. Although there is no replacement for actual experiences in the operating room, interpersonal mentorship, coaching, and training, there is room to supplement residency education through simulation. Here we review the evidence to support surgical simulation, describe the strengths and weaknesses of existing technologies in direct neurosurgery specific and indirect simulation applications, and advocate for the development of more neurosurgery-specific applications using emerging kinetic technologies. PMID:26704209

  16. MINOP: development of a miniaturized endoscopic operation system for neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guber, Andreas E.; Wieneke, Paul

    1996-04-01

    Within the framework of R&D activities in the field of microsystems technology, the Institute for Microstructure Technology of Karlsruhe Research Center among others has started to improve the functionality of existing medicotechnical instruments by increased integration of microtechnical components. On the basis of microsystems fabrication techniques, completely novel medical endoscope systems have become feasible. In cooperation with clinical, technical and industrial partners, a novel endoscopic operation system based on microsystems technology is being developed by the Institute for Microstructure Technology and the Aesculap AG company, Tuttlingen within the framework of the MINOP joint project. This new system shall be applied above all in the field of neurosurgery. This newly conceived endosystem is characterized by a multitude of novelties. It can perform a number of both sensor and actor functions. Due to its extremely small outer diameter, it can be applied through minute openings. As a result of the integrated microfluidic control system, the flexible endoscope can be moved to the actual site of operation on a previously specified path. This will allow future bi- and triportal neuro-endoscopic interventions for critical operations in the brain area. The different lumina of the flexible endoscope fulfill various functions. Via the optical fibers, laser radiation may be led to the distal end of the endoscope. Using microtechnical fabrication methods, special plastic microlenses have been produced. The working channel can be applied for rinsing and removal. Furthermore, the cleaning of the optics or the taking of tissue samples are possible. If required, another laser fiber can be driven forward through the working channel for selective therapy. For the first time, high-performance microinstruments have been developed on the basis of novel materials. These instruments can be applied either through the working channel or through an additional trocar.

  17. [Clinical studies of cefoperazone in neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Kitamura, K; Shimizu, T; Abe, H; Suzuki, J; Tanaka, R; Nagai, H; Yamamoto, S; Handa, H; Nishimoto, A; Matsuoka, K

    1986-01-01

    A multicenter trial consisting of 164 institutions through out Japan, has been conducted to study the transfer of cefoperazone (CPZ) into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and the clinical effectiveness of CPZ as a therapeutic or prophylactic agent in neurosurgery. The levels of CPZ in serum and CSF were determined in 96 patients. After initial dose of 2 g CPZ (intravenous drip infusion for 30 minutes), the serum level of CPZ after 1 hour was 124.5 +/- 6.6 micrograms/ml (Mean +/- S.E.), and even after 6 hours, it maintained as high as 47.8 +/- 16.6 micrograms/ml. The peak CPZ levels in CSF in patients with normal or minimal impairment in blood-CSF-barrier (BCB) (group I) and in those of localized impairment in BCB (group II) were 1.0 +/- 0.5 micrograms/ml at 2 hours and 3.0 +/- 1.8 micrograms/ml at 3 hours, respectively. The highest CSF level was seen in patients with meningitis (group III) and showed 5.0 +/- 2.4 micrograms/ml at 6 hours. After multiple dose of 2 g CPZ (intravenous drip infusion for 30 minutes), the serum kinetics of CPZ were not significantly different from those obtained after initial dose. However, the CPZ levels in CSF were higher than those observed after initial dose in all 3 groups and were higher than MIC75 against relevant pathogens for meningitis such as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus. Moreover, in group III peak level of CPZ in CSF exceeded the MIC75 against Pseudomonas aeruginosa which is also frequently isolated from patients with meningitis in neurosurgery. As a therapeutic agent CPZ administered as sole agent was effective in 42 out of 55 cases (76.4%) in meningitis, in 78 out of 116 cases (67.2%) in pneumonia and in 36 out of 47 cases (76.6%) in urinary tract infection (UTI). Its efficacy rate against all infections treated was 72.2% (184/255). Regarding CPZ's prophylactic use, 39 out of 514 cases (7.6%) were judged as having or possibly having infections as follows; meningitis (13/514, 2

  18. What can functional neuroimaging tell the experimental psychologist?

    PubMed

    Henson, Richard

    2005-02-01

    I argue here that functional neuroimaging data--which I restrict to the haemodynamic techniques of fMRI and PET--can inform psychological theorizing, provided one assumes a "systematic" function-structure mapping in the brain. In this case, imaging data simply comprise another dependent variable, along with behavioural data, that can be used to test competing theories. In particular, I distinguish two types of inference: function-to-structure deduction and structure-to-function induction. With the former inference, a qualitatively different pattern of activity over the brain under two experimental conditions implies at least one different function associated with changes in the independent variable. With the second type of inference, activity of the same brain region(s) under two conditions implies a common function, possibly not predicted a priori. I illustrate these inferences with imaging studies of recognition memory, short-term memory, and repetition priming. I then consider in greater detail what is meant by a "systematic" function-structure mapping and argue that, particularly for structure-to-function induction, this entails a one-to-one mapping between functional and structural units, although the structural unit may be a network of interacting regions and care must be taken over the appropriate level of functional/structural abstraction. Nonetheless, the assumption of a systematic function-structure mapping is a "working hypothesis" that, in common with other scientific fields, cannot be proved on independent grounds and is probably best evaluated by the success of the enterprise as a whole. I also consider statistical issues such as the definition of a qualitative difference and methodological issues such as the relationship between imaging and behavioural data. I finish by reviewing various objections to neuroimaging, including neophrenology, functionalism, and equipotentiality, and by observing some criticisms of current practice in the imaging

  19. Spinal neurosurgery with the head-mounted "Varioscope" microscope.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, J; Simons, P

    2009-05-01

    We present a preliminary report on the intra-operative use of a head-mounted microscope ("Varioscope" Leica HM500) in spinal neurosurgery. The Varioscope is a dynamic microscope mounted on a head-set. It weights 297 g and measures 73 x 120 x 63 mm (length x width x height). It offers an infinitely variable range of magnification from 3.6x to 7.2x. The working distance ranges from 300 to 600 mm. The field of view varies between 30-144 mm, depending on the selected enlargement factor and the working distance. In addition to the zoom function, the device offers a focus function (automatic or on demand). The optical elements for focus and zoom are located in two separate tubes which are mounted on a middle section containing the mechanical components as well as the receiver unit for the focussing elements. The lenses are adjusted by means of motor-driven push/pull cables. The autofocus works well in larger operative fields and a working distance between 30 and 60 cm. Nevertheless, when used in today's "keyhole" approaches, the autofocus is not helpful when operating in deep structures. Based on the satisfactory results achieved in our series, we can recommend the Varioscope, especially when no stationary microscope is available. The portable device can be packed in a suitcase and can travel with the consultant microsurgeon to different hospitals and distant units. The built-in video camera is ideal for patients, staff, assistant surgeons, and student education with real-time video monitoring of procedures from the microsurgeon's perspective. For daily microsurgery, we felt more comfortable with fixed, stationary operating microscopes. PMID:19711265

  20. Optimizing experimental design for comparing models of brain function.

    PubMed

    Daunizeau, Jean; Preuschoff, Kerstin; Friston, Karl; Stephan, Klaas

    2011-11-01

    This article presents the first attempt to formalize the optimization of experimental design with the aim of comparing models of brain function based on neuroimaging data. We demonstrate our approach in the context of Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM), which relates experimental manipulations to observed network dynamics (via hidden neuronal states) and provides an inference framework for selecting among candidate models. Here, we show how to optimize the sensitivity of model selection by choosing among experimental designs according to their respective model selection accuracy. Using Bayesian decision theory, we (i) derive the Laplace-Chernoff risk for model selection, (ii) disclose its relationship with classical design optimality criteria and (iii) assess its sensitivity to basic modelling assumptions. We then evaluate the approach when identifying brain networks using DCM. Monte-Carlo simulations and empirical analyses of fMRI data from a simple bimanual motor task in humans serve to demonstrate the relationship between network identification and the optimal experimental design. For example, we show that deciding whether there is a feedback connection requires shorter epoch durations, relative to asking whether there is experimentally induced change in a connection that is known to be present. Finally, we discuss limitations and potential extensions of this work. PMID:22125485

  1. In touch with robotics: neurosurgery for the future.

    PubMed

    Nathoo, Narendra; Cavuşoğlu, M Cenk; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Barnett, Gene H

    2005-03-01

    The introduction of multiple front-end technologies during the past quarter century has generated an emerging futurism for the discipline of neurological surgery. Driven primarily by synergistic developments in science and engineering, neurosurgery has always managed to harness the potential of the latest technical developments. Robotics represents one such technology. Progress in development of this technology has resulted in new uses for robotic devices in our discipline, which are accompanied by new potential dangers and inherent risks. The recent surge in robot-assisted interventions in other disciplines suggests that this technology may be considered one of a spectrum of frontier technologies poised to fuel the development of neurosurgery and consolidate the era of minimalism. On a more practical level, if the introduction of robotics in neurosurgery proves beneficial, neurosurgeons will need to become facile with this technology and learn to harness its potential so that the best surgical results may be achieved in the least invasive manner. This article reviews the role of robotic technology in the context of neurosurgery. PMID:15730567

  2. Experimental assessment of presumed filtered density function models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetsyuk, V.; Soulopoulos, N.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.

    2015-06-01

    Measured filtered density functions (FDFs) as well as assumed beta distribution model of mixture fraction and "subgrid" scale (SGS) scalar variance z '' 2 ¯ , used typically in large eddy simulations, were studied by analysing experimental data, obtained from two-dimensional planar, laser induced fluorescence measurements in isothermal swirling turbulent flows at a constant Reynolds number of 29 000 for different swirl numbers (0.3, 0.58, and 1.07). Two-dimensional spatial filtering, by using a box filter, was performed in order to obtain the filtered variables, namely, resolved mean and "subgrid" scale scalar variance. These were used as inputs for assumed beta distribution of mixture fraction and top-hat FDF shape estimates. The presumed beta distribution model, top-hat FDF, and the measured filtered density functions were used to integrate a laminar flamelet solution in order to calculate the corresponding resolved temperature. The experimentally measured FDFs varied with the flow swirl number and both axial and radial positions in the flow. The FDFs were unimodal at flow regions with low SGS scalar variance, z '' 2 ¯ < 0.01, and bimodal at regions with high SGS variance, z '' 2 ¯ > 0.02. Bimodal FDF could be observed for a filter size of approximately 1.5-2 times the Batchelor scale. Unimodal FDF could be observed for a filter size as large as four times the Batchelor scale under well-mixed conditions. In addition, two common computational models (a gradient assumption and a scale similarity model) for the SGS scalar variance were used with the aim to evaluate their validity through comparison with the experimental data. It was found that the gradient assumption model performed generally better than the scale similarity one.

  3. Inosine improves functional recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Dachir, Shlomit; Shabashov, Dalia; Trembovler, Victoria; Alexandrovich, Alexander G; Benowitz, Larry I; Shohami, Esther

    2014-03-25

    Despite years of research, no effective therapy is yet available for the treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The most prevalent and debilitating features in survivors of TBI are cognitive deficits and motor dysfunction. A potential therapeutic method for improving the function of patients following TBI would be to restore, at least in part, plasticity to the CNS in a controlled way that would allow for the formation of compensatory circuits. Inosine, a naturally occurring purine nucleoside, has been shown to promote axon collateral growth in the corticospinal tract (CST) following stroke and focal TBI. In the present study, we investigated the effects of inosine on motor and cognitive deficits, CST sprouting, and expression of synaptic proteins in an experimental model of closed head injury (CHI). Treatment with inosine (100 mg/kg i.p. at 1, 24 and 48 h following CHI) improved outcome after TBI, significantly decreasing the neurological severity score (NSS, p<0.04 vs. saline), an aggregate measure of performance on several tasks. It improved non-spatial cognitive performance (object recognition, p<0.016 vs. saline) but had little effect on sensorimotor coordination (rotarod) and spatial cognitive functions (Y-maze). Inosine did not affect CST sprouting in the lumbar spinal cord but did restore levels of the growth-associated protein GAP-43 in the hippocampus, though not in the cerebral cortex. Our results suggest that inosine may improve functional outcome after TBI. PMID:24502983

  4. Mining experimental evidence of molecular function claims from the literature

    PubMed Central

    Crangle, Colleen E.; Cherry, J. Michael; Hong, Eurie L.; Zbyslaw, Alex; Wong, Limsoon

    2011-01-01

    Motivation The rate at which gene-related findings appear in the scientific literature makes it difficult if not impossible for biomedical scientists to keep fully informed and up to date. The importance of these findings argues for the development of automated methods that can find, extract and summarize this information. This article reports on methods for determining the molecular function claims that are being made in a scientific article, specifically those that are backed by experimental evidence. Results The most significant result is that for molecular function claims based on direct assays, our methods achieved recall of 70.7% and precision of 65.7%. Furthermore, our methods correctly identified in the text 44.6% of the specific molecular function claims backed up by direct assays, but with a precision of only 0.92%, a disappointing outcome that led to an examination of the different kinds of errors. These results were based on an analysis of 1823 articles from the literature of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast). Availability The annotation files for S.cerevisiae are available from ftp://genome-ftp.stanford.edu/pub/yeast/data_download/literature_curation/gene_association.sgd.gz. The draft protocol vocabulary is available by request from the first author. Contact crangle@converspeech.com PMID:17942445

  5. Hugh Cairns and the origin of British neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Tailor, J; Handa, A

    2007-04-01

    Sir Hugh Cairns, the first Nuffield Professor of Surgery in Oxford and consultant neurosurgeon to the Royal Army Medical Corps during World War II, was a leader in helping to establish neurosurgery as a speciality in Britain. After learning the craft from Dr Harvey Cushing in Boston, Cairns fought against the general surgical orthodoxy in London to establish the first specialised neurosurgical unit in a teaching hospital. We review his early life, training with Cushing, his inspiring character and administrative prowess which not only helped to win the battle for neurosurgery in London but also helped to establish the Oxford Clinical School and to save thousands of lives during the Second World War. PMID:17453787

  6. Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging of brain tumor specimens during neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello Enrico; Schiariti, Marco P.; Grana, Chiara M.; Ferrari, Mahila; Cremonesi, Marta; Boschi, Federico

    2016-05-01

    We presented the first example of Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI) of human tumor specimens. A patient with a brain meningioma localized in the left parietal region was injected with 166 MBq of Y90-DOTATOC the day before neurosurgery. The specimens of the tumor removed during surgery were imaged using both CLI and RLI using an optical imager prototype developed in our laboratory. The system is based on a cooled electron multiplied charge coupled device coupled with an f/0.95 17-mm C-mount lens. We showed for the first time the possibility of obtaining CLI and RLI images of fresh human brain tumor specimens removed during neurosurgery.

  7. Experimental moments of the nucleon structure function F2

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhail Osipenko; W. Melnitchouk; Silvano Simula; Sergey Kulagin; Giovanni Ricco

    2007-12-01

    Experimental data on the F2 structure functions of the proton and deuteron, including recent results from CLAS at Jefferson Lab, have been used to construct their n<=12 moments. A comprehensive analysis of the moments in terms of the operator product expansion has been performed to separate the moments into leading and higher twist contributions. Particular attention was paid to the issue of nuclear corrections in the deuteron, when extracting the neutron moments from data. The difference between the proton and neutron moments was compared directly with lattice QCD simulations. Combining leading twist moments of the neutron and proton we found the d/u ratio at x->1 approaching 0, although the precision of the data did not allow to exclude the 1/5 value. The higher twist components of the proton and neutron moments suggest that multi-parton correlations are isospin independent.

  8. Experimental investigations of the functional morphology of dragonfly wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, H.; Darvizeh, A.

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, the importance of identifying the flight mechanisms of the dragonfly, as an inspiration for designing flapping wing vehicles, is well known. An experimental approach to understanding the complexities of insect wings as organs of flight could provide significant outcomes for design purposes. In this paper, a comprehensive investigation is carried out on the morphological and microstructural features of dragonfly wings. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and tensile testing are used to experimentally verify the functional roles of different parts of the wings. A number of SEM images of the elements of the wings, such as the nodus, leading edge, trailing edge, and vein sections, which play dominant roles in strengthening the whole structure, are presented. The results from the tensile tests indicate that the nodus might be the critical region of the wing that is subjected to high tensile stresses. Considering the patterns of the longitudinal corrugations of the wings obtained in this paper, it can be supposed that they increase the load-bearing capacity, giving the wings an ability to tolerate dynamic loading conditions. In addition, it is suggested that the longitudinal veins, along with the leading and trailing edges, are structural mechanisms that further improve fatigue resistance by providing higher fracture toughness, preventing crack propagation, and allowing the wings to sustain a significant amount of damage without loss of strength.

  9. Application of the Chick Embryo Chorioallantoic Membrane in Neurosurgery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Yong-Jie; Xu, Kan; Wu, Wei; Luo, Qi; Yu, Jin-Lu

    2014-01-01

    The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) is a highly vascularized extraembryonic membrane. Because of its ease of accessibility, extensive vascularization and immunodeficient environment, the CAM has been broadly used in the oncology, biology, pharmacy, and tissue regeneration research. The present review summarizes the application of the CAM in neurosurgery disease research. We focused on the use of the CAM as an assay for the research of glioma, vascular anomalies, Moyamoya Disease, and the blood-brain barrier. PMID:25419173

  10. Multitrophic functional diversity predicts ecosystem functioning in experimental assemblages of estuarine consumers.

    PubMed

    Lefcheck, Jonathan S; Duffy, J Emmett

    2015-11-01

    The use of functional traits to explain how biodiversity affects ecosystem functioning has attracted intense interest, yet few studies have a priori altered functional diversity, especially in multitrophic communities. Here, we manipulated multivariate functional diversity of estuarine grazers and predators within multiple levels of species richness to test how species richness and functional diversity predicted ecosystem functioning in a multitrophic food web. Community functional diversity was a better predictor than species richness for the majority of ecosystem properties, based on generalized linear mixed-effects models. Combining inferences from eight traits into a single multivariate index increased prediction accuracy of these models relative to any individual trait. Structural equation modeling revealed that functional diversity of both grazers and predators was important in driving final biomass within trophic levels, with stronger effects observed for predators. We also show that different species drove different ecosystem responses, with evidence for both sampling effects and complementarity. Our study extends experimental investigations of functional trait diversity to a multilevel food web, and demonstrates that functional diversity can be more accurate and effective than species richness in predicting community biomass in a food web context. PMID:27070016

  11. Improving on-time start for iMRI neurosurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Ghadiali, Natascha Fherzinah Rustom; Koh, Darren; Chia, Kuok Wei; Quek, Shin Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Singapore General Hospital, intraoperative MRI (iMRI) neurosurgery is a multi-disciplinary process that involves staff from multiple departments. However, a baseline analysis showed that only 10.5% of iMRI neurosurgeries start on time, resulting in unnecessary waste of resources. The project aimed to improve the percentage of on-time start iMRI neurosurgeries to 100% within nine months. Materials and Methods: Clinical Practice Improvement methodology was used. The project involves four phases: Diagnostic, in which a baseline analysis is conducted; Intervention, in which problem areas are identified; Implementation, in which potential solutions are implemented; and sustaining, in which strategies to sustain gains are discussed. Results: The percentage of on-time start cases gradually increased to 100% in eight months, and was sustained above 85% in the following five months. Conclusion: This project serves as a successful demonstration of how quality improvement can be effected in a complex, multidisciplinary workflow, which is the norm for many hospital procedures. PMID:23741256

  12. Experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis compromises ureagenesis, an essential hepatic metabolic function.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Karen Louise; Grønbæk, Henning; Glavind, Emilie; Hebbard, Lionel; Jessen, Niels; Clouston, Andrew; George, Jacob; Vilstrup, Hendrik

    2014-08-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is increasing in prevalence, yet its consequences for liver function are unknown. We studied ureagenesis, an essential metabolic liver function of importance for whole body nitrogen homeostasis, in a rodent model of diet-induced NASH. Rats were fed a high-fat, high-cholesterol diet for 4 and 16 wk, resulting in early and advanced experimental NASH, respectively. We examined the urea cycle enzyme mRNAs in liver tissue, the hepatocyte urea cycle enzyme proteins, and the in vivo capacity of urea-nitrogen synthesis (CUNS). Early NASH decreased all of the urea cycle mRNAs to an average of 60% and the ornithine transcarbamylase protein to 10%, whereas the CUNS remained unchanged. Advanced NASH further decreased the carbamoyl phosphate synthetase protein to 63% and, in addition, decreased the CUNS by 20% [from 5.65 ± 0.23 to 4.58 ± 0.30 μmol × (min × 100 g)(-1); P = 0.01]. Early NASH compromised the genes and enzyme proteins involved in ureagenesis, whereas advanced NASH resulted in a functional reduction in the capacity for ureagenesis. The pattern of urea cycle perturbations suggests a prevailing mitochondrial impairment by NASH. The decrease in CUNS has consequences for the ability of the body to adjust to changes in the requirements for nitrogen homeostasis e.g., at stressful events. NASH, thus, in terms of metabolic consequences, is not an innocuous lesion, and the manifestations of the damage seem to be a continuum with increasing disease severity. PMID:24924745

  13. Network inference from functional experimental data (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desrosiers, Patrick; Labrecque, Simon; Tremblay, Maxime; Bélanger, Mathieu; De Dorlodot, Bertrand; Côté, Daniel C.

    2016-03-01

    Functional connectivity maps of neuronal networks are critical tools to understand how neurons form circuits, how information is encoded and processed by neurons, how memory is shaped, and how these basic processes are altered under pathological conditions. Current light microscopy allows to observe calcium or electrical activity of thousands of neurons simultaneously, yet assessing comprehensive connectivity maps directly from such data remains a non-trivial analytical task. There exist simple statistical methods, such as cross-correlation and Granger causality, but they only detect linear interactions between neurons. Other more involved inference methods inspired by information theory, such as mutual information and transfer entropy, identify more accurately connections between neurons but also require more computational resources. We carried out a comparative study of common connectivity inference methods. The relative accuracy and computational cost of each method was determined via simulated fluorescence traces generated with realistic computational models of interacting neurons in networks of different topologies (clustered or non-clustered) and sizes (10-1000 neurons). To bridge the computational and experimental works, we observed the intracellular calcium activity of live hippocampal neuronal cultures infected with the fluorescent calcium marker GCaMP6f. The spontaneous activity of the networks, consisting of 50-100 neurons per field of view, was recorded from 20 to 50 Hz on a microscope controlled by a homemade software. We implemented all connectivity inference methods in the software, which rapidly loads calcium fluorescence movies, segments the images, extracts the fluorescence traces, and assesses the functional connections (with strengths and directions) between each pair of neurons. We used this software to assess, in real time, the functional connectivity from real calcium imaging data in basal conditions, under plasticity protocols, and epileptic

  14. Platelet Function During Hypothermia in Experimental Mock Circulation.

    PubMed

    Van Poucke, Sven; Stevens, Kris; Kicken, Cécile; Simons, Antoine; Marcus, Abraham; Lancé, Marcus

    2016-03-01

    for platelet stimulation using COL, this trend continues during temperature drop from 37°C to 32°C. LTA values using AA and TRAP demonstrate a considerable decline in platelet function throughout the experiment that was most pronounced after 24 h of circulation at 32°C. LTA values using ADP and COL further decline after rewarming. MEA ADP, ASPI, and COL identify platelet dysfunction patterns analogous with LTA, between the start of the mock circulation and the start of cooling. Except for MEA TRAP, this trend continues during temperature drop from 37°C to 32°C. MEA ASPI and ADP demonstrate a considerable decline in platelet function throughout the experiment, which was most pronounced after 24 h of circulation at 32°C. For MEA COL and TRAP, further decline in platelet function is observed after rewarming. This study quantitatively assessed the effect of temperature changes on platelet function during experimental mock circulation demonstrating a considerable decline in platelet function during hypothermia without uniform recovery of platelet function observed after rewarming. PMID:26411987

  15. Critical Zone Experimental Design to Assess Soil Processes and Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banwart, Steve

    2010-05-01

    experimental design studies soil processes across the temporal evolution of the soil profile, from its formation on bare bedrock, through managed use as productive land to its degradation under longstanding pressures from intensive land use. To understand this conceptual life cycle of soil, we have selected 4 European field sites as Critical Zone Observatories. These are to provide data sets of soil parameters, processes and functions which will be incorporated into the mathematical models. The field sites are 1) the BigLink field station which is located in the chronosequence of the Damma Glacier forefield in alpine Switzerland and is established to study the initial stages of soil development on bedrock; 2) the Lysina Catchment in the Czech Republic which is representative of productive soils managed for intensive forestry, 3) the Fuchsenbigl Field Station in Austria which is an agricultural research site that is representative of productive soils managed as arable land and 4) the Koiliaris Catchment in Crete, Greece which represents degraded Mediterranean region soils, heavily impacted by centuries of intensive grazing and farming, under severe risk of desertification.

  16. Functional genomic hypothesis generation and experimentation by a robot scientist.

    PubMed

    King, Ross D; Whelan, Kenneth E; Jones, Ffion M; Reiser, Philip G K; Bryant, Christopher H; Muggleton, Stephen H; Kell, Douglas B; Oliver, Stephen G

    2004-01-15

    The question of whether it is possible to automate the scientific process is of both great theoretical interest and increasing practical importance because, in many scientific areas, data are being generated much faster than they can be effectively analysed. We describe a physically implemented robotic system that applies techniques from artificial intelligence to carry out cycles of scientific experimentation. The system automatically originates hypotheses to explain observations, devises experiments to test these hypotheses, physically runs the experiments using a laboratory robot, interprets the results to falsify hypotheses inconsistent with the data, and then repeats the cycle. Here we apply the system to the determination of gene function using deletion mutants of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and auxotrophic growth experiments. We built and tested a detailed logical model (involving genes, proteins and metabolites) of the aromatic amino acid synthesis pathway. In biological experiments that automatically reconstruct parts of this model, we show that an intelligent experiment selection strategy is competitive with human performance and significantly outperforms, with a cost decrease of 3-fold and 100-fold (respectively), both cheapest and random-experiment selection. PMID:14724639

  17. Experimental Study of Functionally Graded Beam with Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajaj, K.; Shrivastava, Y.; Dhoke, P.

    2013-11-01

    Generally, concrete used in the field suffers from lack of durability and homogeneity. As cement is the only binding material in concrete and due to hike in its price, researchers have been looking for apt substitutes. For the sake of economy, strength and anti-corrosion functionally graded beam (FGB) has developed having one layer of normal concrete and another of high volume fly-ash concrete (HVFAC). The flexural behavior FGB has analyzed experimentally in this work with variation in interface as 0, 25, 50, 75 and 100 from bottom. In this study, HVFAC has prepared with replacement of cement by 20, 35 and 55 % with fly ash for M20 and M30 grade of concrete. It has seemed that there is 12.86 and 3.56 % increase in compressive and flexural strength of FGB. The bond strength FGM cube is optimum at 50 mm depth. As FGM is economical, having more durability and strength, so its adoption enables more sustainability in concrete industry.

  18. Naval aviation and neurosurgery: traditions, commonalities, and lessons learned. The 2007 presidential address.

    PubMed

    Quest, Donald O

    2007-12-01

    In his presidential address to the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, the author recounts lessons he learned while training to be a Naval Aviator and later a neurosurgeon. He describes his life as an aviator and neurosurgeon, compares naval aviation and neurosurgery, and points out lessons that neurosurgery can learn from naval aviation. PMID:18077941

  19. Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991): Creator of Pediatric Neurosurgery in Romania.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dumitru; Moisa, Horatiu Alexandru; Nica, Dan Aurel; Ciurea, Alexandru Vlad

    2016-04-01

    The development of neurosurgery as an independent specialty took place with great difficulty in Romania. In this respect, the most revered personalities are those of Professor Alexandru Moruzzi (1900-1957) (in Iasi) and Professor Dimitrie Bagdasar (1893-1946) (in Bucharest), who are the fathers of modern neurosurgery in Romania. Professor Bagdasar was schooled in Professor Harvey Cushing's clinic in Boston and is credited with creating the first completely independent neurosurgical unit in Romania. His legacy was carried on with honor by Professor Constantin Arseni (1912-1994), who, in 1975, tasked Dr. Lenke Horvath (1917-1991) with creating the first autonomous pediatric neurosurgery unit in Bucharest. This article is a small tribute to the founder of pediatric neurosurgery in Romania and one of the female pioneer neurosurgeons, who, by personal example of dedication and hard work, radically changed medical thinking and neurosurgery in Romania. PMID:26211853

  20. Robot-assisted microscope for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, C; Eisenberg, H; Costi, G; Gallo, E; Garibotto, G; Casolino, D S

    1995-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a robotic arm connected to a neurosurgical operative microscope. A force feedback sensor drives the motors of the arm in response to the positioning of the microscope by the surgeon. Computer graphic techniques allow tracking of the current position of the microscope within the volumetric reconstruction of the brain. The integration of the prototype into the neurosurgical operating room is currently being evaluated. Preliminary comments on this experimental phase are offered. PMID:9079441

  1. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-01-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons’ self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  2. Checklists in Neurosurgery to Decrease Preventable Medical Errors: A Review.

    PubMed

    Enchev, Yavor

    2015-10-01

    Neurosurgery represents a zero tolerance environment for medical errors, especially preventable ones like all types of wrong site surgery, complications due to the incorrect positioning of patients for neurosurgical interventions and complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure. Following the excellent and encouraging results of the safety checklists in intensive care medicine and in other surgical areas, the checklist was naturally introduced in neurosurgery. To date, the reported world experience with neurosurgical checklists is limited to 15 series with fewer than 20,000 cases in various neurosurgical areas. The purpose of this review was to study the reported neurosurgical checklists according to the following parameters: year of publication; country of origin; area of neurosurgery; type of neurosurgical procedure-elective or emergency; person in charge of the checklist completion; participants involved in completion; whether they prevented incorrect site surgery; whether they prevented complications due to incorrect positioning of the patients for neurosurgical interventions; whether they prevented complications due to failure of the devices required for the specific procedure; their specific aims; educational preparation and training; the time needed for checklist completion; study duration and phases; number of cases included; barriers to implementation; efforts to implementation; team appreciation; and safety outcomes. Based on this analysis, it could be concluded that neurosurgical checklists represent an efficient, reliable, cost-effective and time-saving tool for increasing patient safety and elevating the neurosurgeons' self-confidence. Every neurosurgical department must develop its own neurosurgical checklist or adopt and modify an existing one according to its specific features and needs in an attempt to establish or develop its safety culture. The world, continental, regional and national neurosurgical societies

  3. Highly cited publications in pediatric neurosurgery: part 2

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nickalus R.; Auschwitz, Tyler; McAbee, Joseph H.; Boop, Frederick A.; Klimo, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Citation counting can be used to evaluate the impact an article has made on its discipline. This study characterizes the most cited articles related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery as of July 2013. Methods A list of search terms was computed using Thomson Reuters Web of Science® (WOS) to capture the 100 most cited articles in the overall literature and the top 50 articles from 2002 to 2012 related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery from non-dedicated pediatric neurosurgical journals. The following information was recorded for each article: number of authors, country of origin, citation count adjusted for number of years in print, topic, and level of evidence. Results The 100 most cited articles appeared in 44 journals. Publication dates ranged from 1986 to 2008; two were class 1 evidence, nine class 2, 26 class 3, and 52 class 4. Citations ranged from 90 to 321 (mean=131); average time-adjusted citation count was 10. The 50 most cited articles from 2002 to 2012 appeared in 31 journals; four were class 2 evidence, 15 class 3, and 21 class 4. Citations ranged from 68 to 245 (mean=103); average time-adjusted citation count was 13. Conclusion Overall, papers from non-pediatric neurosurgical journals had higher citation counts and improved level of evidence grades compared to articles from pediatric neurosurgical periodicals. An original paper related to clinical pediatric neurosurgery in a non-pediatric neurosurgical journal having a total citation count of 100–150 or more and an average citation count of 10–15 per year or more can be considered a high-impact publication. PMID:24113776

  4. Publication misrepresentation among neurosurgery residency applicants: an increasing problem.

    PubMed

    Kistka, Heather M; Nayeri, Arash; Wang, Li; Dow, Jamie; Chandrasekhar, Rameela; Chambless, Lola B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT Misrepresentation of scholarly achievements is a recognized phenomenon, well documented in numerous fields, yet the accuracy of reporting remains dependent on the honor principle. Therefore, honest self-reporting is of paramount importance to maintain scientific integrity in neurosurgery. The authors had observed a trend toward increasing numbers of publications among applicants for neurosurgery residency at Vanderbilt University and undertook this study to determine whether this change was a result of increased academic productivity, inflated reporting, or both. They also aimed to identify application variables associated with inaccurate citations. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed the residency applications submitted to their neurosurgery department in 2006 (n = 148) and 2012 (n = 194). The applications from 2006 were made via SF Match and those from 2012 were made using the Electronic Residency Application Service. Publications reported as "accepted" or "in press" were verified via online search of Google Scholar, PubMed, journal websites, and direct journal contact. Works were considered misrepresented if they did not exist, incorrectly listed the applicant as first author, or were incorrectly listed as peer reviewed or published in a printed journal rather than an online only or non-peer-reviewed publication. Demographic data were collected, including applicant sex, medical school ranking and country, advanced degrees, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, and USMLE Step 1 score. Zero-inflated negative binomial regression was used to identify predictors of misrepresentation. RESULTS Using univariate analysis, between 2006 and 2012 the percentage of applicants reporting published works increased significantly (47% vs 97%, p < 0.001). However, the percentage of applicants with misrepresentations (33% vs 45%) also increased. In 2012, applicants with a greater total of reported works (p < 0.001) and applicants from unranked US medical schools (those not

  5. Intraoperative neurosonography revisited: effective neuronavigation in pediatric neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Intraoperative ultrasonography (IOUS) is a widely used noninvasive method to evaluate the morphology, vasculature, and pathologies of the brain. The advantages of IOUS include realtime depiction of neuroanatomy, accurate localization and characterization of a lesion, reduced surgical exploration and surgical time, and presumably decreased patient morbidity. IOUS is useful in the intraoperative monitoring of lesion resection as well as intraoperative localization and characterization of focal parenchymal lesions. This review aims to provide an overview of the clinical application of IOUS in pediatric intracranial neurosurgery. PMID:25672771

  6. Construction of spline functions in spreadsheets to smooth experimental data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A previous manuscript detailed how spreadsheet software can be programmed to smooth experimental data via cubic splines. This addendum corrects a few errors in the previous manuscript and provides additional necessary programming steps. ...

  7. Neurosurgery Education and Development program to treat hydrocephalus and to develop neurosurgery in Africa using mobile neuroendoscopic training.

    PubMed

    Piquer, José; Qureshi, Mubashir Mahmood; Young, Paul H; Dempsey, Robert J

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT A shortage of neurosurgeons and a lack of knowledge of neuroendoscopic management of hydrocephalus limits modern care in sub-Saharan Africa. Hence, a mobile teaching project for endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) procedures and a subsequent program to develop neurosurgery as a permanent specialty in Kenya and Zanzibar were created and sponsored by the Neurosurgery Education and Development (NED) Foundation and the Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery. The objective of this work was to evaluate the results of surgical training and medical care in both projects from 2006 to 2013. METHODS Two portable neuroendoscopy systems were purchased and a total of 38 ETV workshops were organized in 21 hospitals in 7 different countries. Additionally, 49 medical expeditions were dispatched to the Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, and to the Mnazi Moja Hospital in Zanzibar. RESULTS From the first project, a total of 376 infants with hydrocephalus received surgery. Six-month follow-up was achieved in 22%. In those who received follow-up, ETV efficacy was 51%. The best success rates were achieved with patients 1 year of age or older with aqueductal stenosis (73%). The main causes of hydrocephalus were infection (56%) and spina bifida (23%). The mobile education program interacted with 72 local surgeons and 122 nurses who were trained in ETV procedures. The second project involved 49 volunteer neurosurgeons who performed a total of 360 nonhydrocephalus neurosurgical operations since 2009. Furthermore, an agreement with the local government was signed to create the Mnazi Mmoja NED Institute in Zanzibar. CONCLUSIONS Mobile endoscopic treatment of hydrocephalus in East Africa results in reasonable success rates and has also led to major developments in medicine, particularly in the development of neurosurgery specialty care sites. PMID:25745948

  8. A critical analysis of the current state of neurosurgery training in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, M. Shahzad; Tahir, M. Zubair; Godil, Saniya Siraj; Kumar, Rajesh; Siddiqui, Arshad Ali

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To observe interdepartmental variation in the availability of resources and academic activities within the various neurosurgery programs of Pakistan. Methods: This was a proforma-based survey of neurosurgery trainees and young neurosurgeons of Pakistan, looking at the academic infrastructure and output of their programs. The proforma was filled by 36 respondents from 11 neurosurgery centers of the country. All these centers were accredited for neurosurgery training in Pakistan. Results: Out of the 36 respondents, 30 were completing a Fellowship training (FCPS) and six were enrolled for a Master in Surgery (MS) program. About 80% of the participants used the Youman's Textbook of Neurosurgery as a reference book. Only 40% of the candidates had access to more than one indexed neurosurgery journal. Structured academic sessions (e.g., journal clubs and neuropathology meetings) were lacking in a majority of the training institutes, 95% of the trainees had no microsurgical laboratory experience, and modern neurosurgical tools (frameless neuronavigation system, neuroendoscopy) were in use at a few centers only. Conclusion: Neurosurgery training in Pakistan is not uniform and wide variations exist between the programs at the centers evaluated. We recommend exchange programs between centers at national and international levels, to allow trainees to gain first-hand exposure to training components not available in their own center. PMID:22276237

  9. Virtual reality simulation in neurosurgery: technologies and evolution.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sonny; Conti, François; Salisbury, Kenneth; Blevins, Nikolas H

    2013-01-01

    Neurosurgeons are faced with the challenge of learning, planning, and performing increasingly complex surgical procedures in which there is little room for error. With improvements in computational power and advances in visual and haptic display technologies, virtual surgical environments can now offer potential benefits for surgical training, planning, and rehearsal in a safe, simulated setting. This article introduces the various classes of surgical simulators and their respective purposes through a brief survey of representative simulation systems in the context of neurosurgery. Many technical challenges currently limit the application of virtual surgical environments. Although we cannot yet expect a digital patient to be indistinguishable from reality, new developments in computational methods and related technology bring us closer every day. We recognize that the design and implementation of an immersive virtual reality surgical simulator require expert knowledge from many disciplines. This article highlights a selection of recent developments in research areas related to virtual reality simulation, including anatomic modeling, computer graphics and visualization, haptics, and physics simulation, and discusses their implication for the simulation of neurosurgery. PMID:23254804

  10. Bradford's law: identification of the core journals for neurosurgery and its subspecialties.

    PubMed

    Venable, Garrett T; Shepherd, Brandon A; Loftis, Christopher M; McClatchy, S Gray; Roberts, Mallory L; Fillinger, Meghan E; Tansey, James B; Klimo, Paul

    2016-02-01

    OBJECT Bradford's law describes the scatter of citations for a given subject or field. It can be used to identify the most highly cited journals for a field or subject. The objective of this study was to use currently accepted formulations of Bradford's law to identify core journals of neurosurgery and neurosurgical subspecialties. METHODS All original research publications from 2009 to 2013 were analyzed for the top 25 North American academic neurosurgeons from each subspecialty. The top 25 were chosen from a ranked career h-index list identified from previous studies. Egghe's formulation and the verbal formulation of Bradford's law were applied to create specific citation density zones and identify the core journals for each subspecialty. The databases were then combined to identify the core journals for all of academic neurosurgery. RESULTS Using Bradford's verbal law with 4 zone models, the authors were able to identify the core journals of neurosurgery and its subspecialties. The journals found in the most highly cited first zone are presented here as the core journals. For neurosurgery as a whole, the core included the following journals: Journal of Neurosurgery, Neurosurgery, Spine, Stroke, Neurology, American Journal of Neuroradiology, International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, and New England Journal of Medicine. The core journals for each subspecialty are presented in the manuscript. CONCLUSIONS Bradford's law can be used to identify the core journals of neurosurgery and its subspecialties. The core journals vary for each neurosurgical subspecialty, but Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery are among the core journals for each neurosurgical subspecialty. PMID:26339849

  11. Animal Structures and Functions, Science (Experimental): 5314.13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Barbara A.

    This unit of instruction was designed to introduce the student to the relationship between structure and function in the animal kingdom, with emphasis given to: (1) the evolution of physiological systems in the major animal phyla, (2) the complementarity of structure and function, and (3) the concept of homeostasis. The booklet lists the relevant…

  12. The Motivational Function of Private Speech: An Experimental Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Dios, M. J.; Montero, I.

    Recently, some works have been published exploring the role of private speech as a tool for motivation, reaching beyond the classical research on its regulatory function for cognitive processes such as attention or executive function. In fact, the authors' own previous research has shown that a moderate account of spontaneous private speech of…

  13. Alzheimer's disease: The role for neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Julio Leonardo Barbosa; Downes, Angela; Gorgulho, Alessandra; Patel, Vishal; Malkasian, Dennis; De Salles, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Dementia, most commonly caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), affects approximately 35 million people worldwide, with the incidence expected to increase as the population ages. After decades of investigation, AD is now understood to be a complex disease that affects behavior and cognition through several mechanisms: Disrupted neuronal communication, abnormal regional tissue metabolism, and impaired cellular repair. Existing therapies have demonstrated limited efficacy, which has spurred the search for specific disease markers and predictors as well as innovative therapeutic options. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the memory circuits is one such option, with early studies suggesting that modulation of neural activity in these networks may improve cognitive function. Encapsulated cell biodelivery (ECB) is a device that delivers nerve growth factor to the cholinergic basal forebrain to potentially improve cognitive decline in AD patients. This review discusses the pathogenesis of AD, novel neuroimaging and biochemical markers, and the emerging role for neurosurgical applications such as DBS and ECB. PMID:25289167

  14. Experimental Economics for Teaching the Functioning of Electricity Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guevara-Cedeno, J. Y.; Palma-Behnke, R.; Uribe, R.

    2012-01-01

    In the field of electricity markets, the development of training tools for engineers has been extremely useful. A novel experimental economics approach based on a computational Web platform of an electricity market is proposed here for the practical teaching of electrical engineering students. The approach is designed to diminish the gap that…

  15. The development of neurosurgery at the University of Utah, 1955-2009.

    PubMed

    House, Paul A; Heilbrun, M Peter; Apfelbaum, Ronald I; Kraus, Kristin L; Couldwell, William T

    2010-09-01

    Located in the geographic Intermountain West, the Department of Neurosurgery at the University of Utah has undergone remarkable growth and transformation since the appointment of the first full-time clinical faculty member in 1955. The Department has provided broad neurosurgical services to an expanding community while fulfilling its academic mission of pushing the frontiers within neurosurgical subspecialties. The history of neurosurgery in the Salt Lake Valley and the achievements of the Department of Neurosurgery, including the seminal development of early cranial stereotactic devices, are reviewed in this article. PMID:20651622

  16. The g2 Structure Function: An Experimental Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Slifer, Karl

    2009-08-01

    We will discuss recent results for the spin structure functions, with an emphasis on g2 . High precision g2 data allows for tests of the Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule, and is needed to consistently evaluate higher twist effects.

  17. Influence of experimental hypokinesia on gastric secretory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markova, O. O.; Vavryshchuk, V. I.; Rozvodovskyy, V. I.; Proshcheruk, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gastric secretory function of rats was studied in 4, 8, 16 and 30 day hypokinesia. Inhibition of both the gastric juice secretory and acid producing functions was found. The greatest inhibition was observed on day 8 of limited mobility. By days 16 and 30 of the experiment, a tendency of the gastric secretory activity to return to normal was observed, although it remained reduced.

  18. Threats to academic neurosurgery in the United Kingdom: a personal view.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, J D

    1993-01-01

    Money, or lack of it, is but one, albeit very important, threat to academic neurosurgery. This review has rambled over some of the other minefields and self-inflicted hurdles. The path of academic progress is long and tortuous. Time has to be found in neurosurgery to examine critically the opportunities and threats posed by a changing world to our goals of establishing standards of patient care, research, and the flexible training of the next generation. Images PMID:8229023

  19. [Intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure: Applications in vascular neurosurgery].

    PubMed

    Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Torne, Ramon; Chocron, Ivette; Rodriguez-Tesouro, Ana; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic lesions related to surgical procedures are a major cause of postoperative morbidity in patients with cerebral vascular disease. There are different systems of neuromonitoring to detect intraoperative ischemic events, including intraoperative monitoring of oxygen tissue pressure (PtiO2). The aim of this article was to describe, through the discussion of 4 cases, the usefulness of intraoperative PtiO2 monitoring during vascular neurosurgery. In presenting these cases, we demonstrate that monitoring PtiO2 is a reliable way to detect early ischemic events during surgical procedures. Continuous monitoring of PtiO2 in an area at risk allows the surgeon to resolve the cause of the ischemic event before it evolves to an established cerebral infarction. PMID:24934513

  20. New laser technologies in the clinic of neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stupak, V. V.; Fomichev, N. G.; Tsvetovsky, S. B.; Dmitriev, A. B.; Kobosev, V. V.; Bagaev, S. N.; Mayorov, A. P.; Struts, S. G.

    2005-08-01

    In report summarized more then 10 experience of authors in Novosibirsk Traumatology and orthopedics research institute Neurosurgery clinic on usage of laser technologies in treatment of central nervous system tumors. On the basis of ND-YAG laser application original technologies have been developed and used in surgical treatment of patients with various neurosurgical pathology and protected by 8 Patents of the Russian Federation. 427 patients were operated on with the use of YAG:Nd3+ laser. Out of them 152 patients had extracerebral tumors of various volume and localization, 135 patients - spinal cord tumors, 74 patients - a pathology of cerebrospinal transition (Amold-Chiari syndrome of 1-2 types), and 66 patients - intramedullary tumors of deep localization. Results showed good results of laser technologies usage for central nervous system tumors removal.

  1. High functional diversity stimulates diversification in experimental microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Jousset, Alexandre; Eisenhauer, Nico; Merker, Monika; Mouquet, Nicolas; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing awareness that biodiversity not only drives ecosystem services but also affects evolutionary dynamics. However, different theories predict contrasting outcomes on when do evolutionary processes occur within a context of competition. We tested whether functional diversity can explain diversification patterns. We tracked the survival and diversification of a focal bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) growing in bacterial communities of variable diversity and composition. We found that high functional diversity reduced the fitness of the focal species and, at the same time, fostered its diversification. This pattern was linked to resource competition: High diversity increased competition on a portion of the resources while leaving most underexploited. The evolved phenotypes of the focal species showed a better use of underexploited resources, albeit at a cost of lower overall growth rates. As a result, diversification alleviated the impact of competition on the fitness of the focal species. We conclude that biodiversity can stimulate evolutionary diversification, provided that sufficient alternative niches are available. PMID:27386573

  2. High functional diversity stimulates diversification in experimental microbial communities

    PubMed Central

    Jousset, Alexandre; Eisenhauer, Nico; Merker, Monika; Mouquet, Nicolas; Scheu, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing awareness that biodiversity not only drives ecosystem services but also affects evolutionary dynamics. However, different theories predict contrasting outcomes on when do evolutionary processes occur within a context of competition. We tested whether functional diversity can explain diversification patterns. We tracked the survival and diversification of a focal bacterial species (Pseudomonas fluorescens) growing in bacterial communities of variable diversity and composition. We found that high functional diversity reduced the fitness of the focal species and, at the same time, fostered its diversification. This pattern was linked to resource competition: High diversity increased competition on a portion of the resources while leaving most underexploited. The evolved phenotypes of the focal species showed a better use of underexploited resources, albeit at a cost of lower overall growth rates. As a result, diversification alleviated the impact of competition on the fitness of the focal species. We conclude that biodiversity can stimulate evolutionary diversification, provided that sufficient alternative niches are available. PMID:27386573

  3. In vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Regelsberger, Jan; Eicker, Sven; Siasios, Ioannis; Hänggi, Daniel; Kirsch, Matthias; Horn, Peter; Winkler, Peter; Signoretti, Stefano; Fountas, Kostas; Dufour, Henry; Barcia, Juan A; Sakowitz, Oliver; Westermaier, Thomas; Sabel, Michael; Heese, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Supplemental education is desirable for neurosurgical training, and the use of human cadaver specimen and virtual reality models is routine. An in vivo porcine training model for cranial neurosurgery was introduced in 2005, and our recent experience with this unique model is outlined here. For the first time, porcine anatomy is illustrated with particular respect to neurosurgical procedures. The pros and cons of this model are described. The aim of the course was to set up a laboratory scenery imitating an almost realistic operating room in which anatomy of the brain and neurosurgical techniques in a mentored environment free from time constraints could be trained. Learning objectives of the course were to learn about the microsurgical techniques in cranial neurosurgery and the management of complications. Participants were asked to evaluate the quality and utility of the programme via standardized questionnaires by a grading scale from A (best) to E (worst). In total, 154 residents have been trained on the porcine model to date. None of the participants regarded his own residency programme as structured. The bleeding and complication management (97%), the realistic laboratory set-up (89%) and the working environment (94%) were favoured by the vast majority of trainees and confirmed our previous findings. After finishing the course, the participants graded that their skills in bone drilling, dissecting the brain and preserving cerebral vessels under microscopic magnification had improved to level A and B. In vivo hands-on courses, fully equipped with microsurgical instruments, offer an outstanding training opportunity in which bleeding management on a pulsating, vital brain represents a unique training approach. Our results have shown that education programmes still lack practical training facilities in which in vivo models may act as a complementary approach in surgical training. PMID:25240530

  4. [FRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY: A GAME CHANGER FOR NEUROSURGERY].

    PubMed

    Nissim, Ouzi; Spiegelmann, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The article by Dr. Cohen-Inbar published in this issue of Harefuah is a timely review that brings to the general medical community the recent important developments in the field of radiosurgery--the evolution of multi-session radiosurgery [or "FSR", standing for Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation]. Radiosurgery and FSR continue to have a tremendous impact on modern neurosurgery. Sharing sub-millimetric accuracy in radiation delivery made possible by real-time-imaging positioning, frameless single and multisession radiosurgery have become two faces of a therapeutic technique with wide application in the field of intracranial pathology. Blending dose fractionation with delivery precision, FSR is a hybrid tool that can be implemented safely and effectively for practically any intra-cranial pathology without restrictions of volume or location. Dr. Cohen Inbar reviews the available data regarding doses, fractionation schemes, and results for the different pathologies in which FSR is being increasingly applied. FSR, as single-dose radiosurgery since the late 1980s, has changed the practice of neurosurgery. Radical microsorgical tumor removal at any cost in demanding intracranial locations has been replaced by upfront conservative volume-reduction surgery, leaving the more complicated part of those tumors to safer elimination by precise irradiation in single or multiple sessions. In Israel, further to the first unit operative since 1993 at the Sheba Medical Center, 3 new active LINAC based treatment sites have been added in recent years, with facilities either planned or under construction in the remaining major medical centers with neurosurgical and radiotherapy resources. They are evidence of the central role this modality has captured in the management of intracranial pathology. PMID:27526561

  5. Experimental studies on islets isolation, purification and function in rats.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinlu; Xue, Wujun; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Teng, Yan; Ding, Xiaoming; Pan, Xiaoming; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a simple and effective method of islet isolation and purification in rats. Collagenase P was injected into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath to digest the pancreas and isolate islet, then discontinuous gravity gradient purification was used to purify the islet. The purified islets were identified by dithizone staining. The viability of islets was assessed by fluorescence staining of acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI). The function of purified islets was determined by glucose-stimulated insulin release test and transplantation of rat with streptozocin-induced diabetes. 738±193 islets were recovered after purification. The average purity was 77±13%, the viability of islets was more than 95%. When inspected by glucose stimulation, the secreted insulin concentration was 24.31±5.47 mIU/L when stimulated by low concentration glucose and 37.62±4.29 mIU/L by high concentration glucose. There was significant difference between the two phases (P<0.05). The blood sugar concentration recovered to normal level after two days in the animals with islet transplantation. In conclusion, islets can be procured with good function and shape by using the method of injecting collagenase into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath and purification using discontinuous gravity gradient. PMID:26885021

  6. Experimental studies on islets isolation, purification and function in rats

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xinlu; Xue, Wujun; Feng, Xinshun; Tian, Xiaohui; Teng, Yan; Ding, Xiaoming; Pan, Xiaoming; Guo, Qi; He, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    To develop a simple and effective method of islet isolation and purification in rats. Collagenase P was injected into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath to digest the pancreas and isolate islet, then discontinuous gravity gradient purification was used to purify the islet. The purified islets were identified by dithizone staining. The viability of islets was assessed by fluorescence staining of acridine orange (AO) and propidium iodide (PI). The function of purified islets was determined by glucose-stimulated insulin release test and transplantation of rat with streptozocin-induced diabetes. 738±193 islets were recovered after purification. The average purity was 77±13%, the viability of islets was more than 95%. When inspected by glucose stimulation, the secreted insulin concentration was 24.31±5.47 mIU/L when stimulated by low concentration glucose and 37.62±4.29 mIU/L by high concentration glucose. There was significant difference between the two phases (P<0.05). The blood sugar concentration recovered to normal level after two days in the animals with islet transplantation. In conclusion, islets can be procured with good function and shape by using the method of injecting collagenase into pancreatic duct followed by incubation in water bath and purification using discontinuous gravity gradient. PMID:26885021

  7. Experimental characterization of high speed centrifugal compressor aerodynamic forcing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallier, Kirk

    The most common and costly unexpected post-development gas turbine engine reliability issue is blade failure due to High Cycle Fatigue (HCF). HCF in centrifugal compressors is a coupled nonlinear fluid-structure problem for which understanding of the phenomenological root causes is incomplete. The complex physics of this problem provides significant challenges for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. Furthermore, the available literature fails to address the flow field associated with the diffuser potential field, a primary cause of forced impeller vibration. Because of the serious nature of HCF, the inadequacy of current design approaches to predict HCF, and the fundamental lack of benchmark experiments to advance the design practices, there exists a need to build a database of information specific to the nature of the diffuser generated forcing function as a foundation for understanding flow induced blade vibratory failure. The specific aim of this research is to address the fundamental nature of the unsteady aerodynamic interaction phenomena inherent in high-speed centrifugal compressors wherein the impeller exit flow field is dynamically modulated by the vaned diffuser potential field or shock structure. The understanding of this unsteady aerodynamic interaction is fundamental to characterizing the impeller forcing function. Unsteady static pressure measurement at several radial and circumferential locations in the vaneless space offer a depiction of pressure field radial decay, circumferential variation and temporal fluctuation. These pressure measurements are coupled with high density, full field measurement of the velocity field within the diffuser vaneless space at multiple spanwise positions. The velocity field and unsteady pressure field are shown to be intimately linked. A strong momentum gradient exiting the impeller is shown to extend well across the vaneless space and interact with the diffuser vane leading edge. The deterministic unsteady

  8. Experimental and first-principles characterization of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Antipas, Georgios S E; Statharas, Eleftherios; Tserotas, Philippos; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Hristoforou, E

    2013-06-24

    Magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles synthesized by coprecipitation and thermal decomposition yield largely monodisperse size distributions. The diameters of the coprecipitated particles measured by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy are between approximately 9 and 15 nm, whereas the diameters of thermally decomposed particles are in the range of 8 to 10 nm. Coprecipitated particles are indexed as magnetite-rich and thermally decomposed particles as maghemite-rich; however, both methods produce a mixture of magnetite and maghemite. Fourier transform IR spectra reveal that the nanoparticles are coated with at least two layers of oleic acid (OA) surfactant. The inner layer is postulated to be chemically adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface whereas the rest of the OA is physically adsorbed, as indicated by carboxyl O-H stretching modes above 3400 cm(-1). Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results indicate a double-stepped weight loss process, the lower-temperature step of which is assigned to condensation due to physically adsorbed or low-energy bonded OA moieties. Density functional calculations of Fe-O clusters, the inverse spinel cell, and isolated OA, as well as OA in bidentate linkage with ferrous and ferric atoms, suggest that the higher-temperature DTA stage could be further broken down into two regions: one in which condensation is due ferrous/ferrous- and/or ferrous/ferric-OA and the other due to condensation from ferrous/ferric- and ferric/ferric-OA complexes. The latter appear to form bonds with the OA carbonyl group of energy up to fivefold that of the bond formed by the ferrous/ferrous pairs. Molecular orbital populations indicate that such increased stability of the ferric/ferric pair is due to the contribution of the low-lying Fe(3+) t(2g) states into four bonding orbitals between -0.623 and -0.410 a.u. PMID:23649714

  9. Uterine glands: development, function and experimental model systems.

    PubMed

    Cooke, Paul S; Spencer, Thomas E; Bartol, Frank F; Hayashi, Kanako

    2013-09-01

    Development of uterine glands (adenogenesis) in mammals typically begins during the early post-natal period and involves budding of nascent glands from the luminal epithelium and extensive cell proliferation in these structures as they grow into the surrounding stroma, elongate and mature. Uterine glands are essential for pregnancy, as demonstrated by the infertility that results from inhibiting the development of these glands through gene mutation or epigenetic strategies. Several genes, including forkhead box A2, beta-catenin and members of the Wnt and Hox gene families, are implicated in uterine gland development. Progestins inhibit uterine epithelial proliferation, and this has been employed as a strategy to develop a model in which progestin treatment of ewes for 8 weeks from birth produces infertile adults lacking uterine glands. More recently, mouse models have been developed in which neonatal progestin treatment was used to permanently inhibit adenogenesis and adult fertility. These studies revealed a narrow and well-defined window in which progestin treatments induced permanent infertility by impairing neonatal gland development and establishing endometrial changes that result in implantation defects. These model systems are being utilized to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine adenogenesis and endometrial function. The ability of neonatal progestin treatment in sheep and mice to produce infertility suggests that an approach of this kind may provide a contraceptive strategy with application in other species. Recent studies have defined the temporal patterns of adenogenesis in uteri of neonatal and juvenile dogs and work is underway to determine whether neonatal progestin or other steroid hormone treatments might be a viable contraceptive approach in this species. PMID:23619340

  10. Uterine glands: development, function and experimental model systems

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, Paul S.; Spencer, Thomas E.; Bartol, Frank F.; Hayashi, Kanako

    2013-01-01

    Development of uterine glands (adenogenesis) in mammals typically begins during the early post-natal period and involves budding of nascent glands from the luminal epithelium and extensive cell proliferation in these structures as they grow into the surrounding stroma, elongate and mature. Uterine glands are essential for pregnancy, as demonstrated by the infertility that results from inhibiting the development of these glands through gene mutation or epigenetic strategies. Several genes, including forkhead box A2, beta-catenin and members of the Wnt and Hox gene families, are implicated in uterine gland development. Progestins inhibit uterine epithelial proliferation, and this has been employed as a strategy to develop a model in which progestin treatment of ewes for 8 weeks from birth produces infertile adults lacking uterine glands. More recently, mouse models have been developed in which neonatal progestin treatment was used to permanently inhibit adenogenesis and adult fertility. These studies revealed a narrow and well-defined window in which progestin treatments induced permanent infertility by impairing neonatal gland development and establishing endometrial changes that result in implantation defects. These model systems are being utilized to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying uterine adenogenesis and endometrial function. The ability of neonatal progestin treatment in sheep and mice to produce infertility suggests that an approach of this kind may provide a contraceptive strategy with application in other species. Recent studies have defined the temporal patterns of adenogenesis in uteri of neonatal and juvenile dogs and work is underway to determine whether neonatal progestin or other steroid hormone treatments might be a viable contraceptive approach in this species. PMID:23619340

  11. Biases in the Experimental Annotations of Protein Function and Their Effect on Our Understanding of Protein Function Space

    PubMed Central

    Schnoes, Alexandra M.; Ream, David C.; Thorman, Alexander W.; Babbitt, Patricia C.; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-01-01

    The ongoing functional annotation of proteins relies upon the work of curators to capture experimental findings from scientific literature and apply them to protein sequence and structure data. However, with the increasing use of high-throughput experimental assays, a small number of experimental studies dominate the functional protein annotations collected in databases. Here, we investigate just how prevalent is the “few articles - many proteins” phenomenon. We examine the experimentally validated annotation of proteins provided by several groups in the GO Consortium, and show that the distribution of proteins per published study is exponential, with 0.14% of articles providing the source of annotations for 25% of the proteins in the UniProt-GOA compilation. Since each of the dominant articles describes the use of an assay that can find only one function or a small group of functions, this leads to substantial biases in what we know about the function of many proteins. Mass-spectrometry, microscopy and RNAi experiments dominate high throughput experiments. Consequently, the functional information derived from these experiments is mostly of the subcellular location of proteins, and of the participation of proteins in embryonic developmental pathways. For some organisms, the information provided by different studies overlap by a large amount. We also show that the information provided by high throughput experiments is less specific than those provided by low throughput experiments. Given the experimental techniques available, certain biases in protein function annotation due to high-throughput experiments are unavoidable. Knowing that these biases exist and understanding their characteristics and extent is important for database curators, developers of function annotation programs, and anyone who uses protein function annotation data to plan experiments. PMID:23737737

  12. History and current state of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Vibhor; Rauf, Yasmeen; Patel, Sunil; Glazier, Steve; Perot, Phanor; Ellegala, Dilantha B

    2011-07-01

    We review the development of neurosurgery at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the emergence of MUSC as a leading academic neurosurgical center in South Carolina. Historical records from the Waring Historical Library were studied, former and current faculty members were interviewed, and the personal records of Dr Phanor J Perot were examined. Dr Frederick E Kredel was the first to perform cerebral revascularization in stroke patients using omental flaps and the first to culture glioma cells in artificial media. The MUSC Neurosurgery residency program was established in 1964 by its first formally trained neurosurgeon, Julian Youmans, MD. The first graduate of the program, Dr Russell Travis, went on to become the President of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons. In 1968, the longest serving chairman, Dr Perot, joined the department and conducted significant research in spinal cord injury, receiving a continuous, 20-year award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. A major change in the neurosurgery program occurred in 2004 when Dr Sunil Patel accepted the chairmanship. He integrated neurosurgery, neurology, and basic neuroscience departments into a comprehensive Department of Neurosciences to provide integrated clinical care. This department now ranks second in the country in National Institutes of Health research funding. Recently, the Center for Global Health and Global Neurosurgery was established with a vision of caring for patients beyond national borders. Neurosurgery at MUSC has been influenced by Drs Kredel and Perot and the current leadership is moving forward with a uniquely integrated department with novel areas such as global neurosurgery. PMID:21368698

  13. FUNCTIONAL ASPECTS OF DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY OF POLYHALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS AND HUMAN INFANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A scientific evaluation was made of functional aspects of developmental toxicity of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and dibenzofurans (PCDFs) in experimental animals and in human infants. ersistent neurobehavioral, reproductive, and endocrine alteration...

  14. Neurosurgery value and quality in the context of the Affordable Care Act: a policy perspective.

    PubMed

    Menger, Richard P; Guthikonda, Bharat; Storey, Christopher M; Nanda, Anil; McGirt, Matthew; Asher, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Neurosurgeons provide direct individualized care to patients. However, the majority of regulations affecting the relative value of patient-related care are drafted by policy experts whose focus is typically system- and population-based. A central, prospectively gathered, national outcomes-related database serves as neurosurgery's best opportunity to bring patient-centered outcomes to the policy arena. In this study the authors analyze the impact of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) on the determination of quality and value in neurosurgery care through the scope, language, and terminology of policy experts. The methods by which the ACA came into law and the subsequent quality implications this legislation has for neurosurgery will be discussed. The necessity of neurosurgical patient-oriented clinical registries will be discussed in the context of imminent and dramatic reforms related to medical cost containment. In the policy debate moving forward, the strength of neurosurgery's argument will rest on data, unity, and proactiveness. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) allows neurosurgeons to generate objective data on specialty-specific value and quality determinations; it allows neurosurgeons to bring the patient-physician interaction to the policy debate. PMID:26621419

  15. Robotics in neurosurgery: state of the art and future technological challenges.

    PubMed

    Zamorano, L; Li, Q; Jain, S; Kaur, G

    2004-06-01

    The use of robotic technologies to assist surgeons was conceptually described almost thirty years ago but has only recently become feasible. In Neurosurgery, medical robots have been applied to neurosurgery for over 19 years. Nevertheless this field remains unknown to most neurosurgeons. The intrinsic characteristics of robots, such as high precision, repeatability and endurance make them ideal surgeon's assistants. Unfortunately, limitations in the current available systems make its use limited to very few centers in the world. During the last decade, important efforts have been made between academic and industry partnerships to develop robots suitable for use in the operating room environment. Although some applications have been successful in areas of laparoscopic surgery and orthopaedics, Neurosurgery has presented a major challenge due to the eloquence of the surrounding anatomy. This review focuses on the application of medical robotics in neurosurgery. The paper begins with an overview of the development of the medical robotics, followed by the current clinical applications in neurosurgery and an analysis of current limitations. We discuss robotic applications based in our own experience in the field. Next, we discuss the technological challenges and research areas to overcome those limitations, including some of our current research approaches for future progress in the field. PMID:17520593

  16. Experimental evidence for strong stabilizing forces at high functional diversity of aquatic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Francesco; Giometto, Andrea; Seymour, Mathew; Rinaldo, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Unveiling the mechanisms that promote coexistence in biological communities is a fundamental problem in ecology. Stable coexistence of many species is commonly observed in natural communities. Most of these natural communities, however, are composed of species from multiple trophic and functional groups, while theory and experiments on coexistence have been focusing on functionally similar species. Here, we investigated how functional diversity affects the stability of species coexistence and productivity in multispecies communities by characterizing experimentally all pairwise species interactions in a pool of 11 species of eukaryotes (10 protists and one rotifer) belonging to three different functional groups. Species within the same functional group showed stronger competitive interactions compared to among-functional group interactions. This often led to competitive exclusion between species that had higher functional relatedness, but only at low levels of species richness. Communities with higher functional diversity resulted in increased species coexistence and community biomass production. Our experimental findings and the results of a stochastic model tailored to the experimental interaction matrix suggest the emergence of strong stabilizing forces when species from different functional groups interact in a homogeneous environment. By combining theoretical analysis with experiments we could also disentangle the relationship between species richness and functional diversity, showing that functional diversity per se is a crucial driver of productivity and stability in multispecies community. PMID:26236847

  17. Evaluation of a synergistically controlled semiautomatic trepanation system for neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Follmann, Axel; Korff, Alexander; Furtjes, Tobias; Lauer, Wolfgang; Kunze, Sandra C; Schmieder, Kirsten; Radermacher, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    One of the most common procedures in neurosurgery is the trepanation of the skull. In this paper, a synergistically controlled handheld tool for trepanation is introduced. This instrument is envisioned to reduce problems of dural tears and wide cutting gaps by combining a soft tissue preserving saw with an automatic regulation of the cutting depth. Since usability and safety of the semi-automatic handheld device are of utmost importance, the complex interaction between the user and the system has been analyzed extensively. Based on prospective usability evaluation the user interaction design and the corresponding user-interface were developed. The compliance with the relevant factors effectiveness, efficiency, error tolerance, learnability and user satisfaction was measured in user-centered experiments to evaluate the usability of the semiautomatic trepanation system. The results confirm the user interaction design of the semiautomatic trepanation system and the corresponding safety strategy. The system seems to integrate itself smoothly into the existing workflow and keeps the surgeon aware of the process. PMID:21096797

  18. Investigating the Scope of Resident Patient Care Handoffs within Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Maya A.; Nahed, Brian V.; Heary, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Handoffs are defined as verbal and written communications during patient care transitions. With the passage of recent ACMGE work hour rules further limiting the hours interns can spend in the hospital, many fear that more handoffs will occur, putting patient safety at risk. The issue of handoffs has not been studied in the neurosurgical literature. Methods A validated, 20-question online-survey was sent to neurosurgical residents in all 98 accredited U.S. neurosurgery programs. Survey results were analyzed using tabulations. Results 449 surveys were completed yielding a 56% response rate. 63% of neurosurgical residents surveyed had not received formal instruction in what constitutes an effective handoff; 24% believe there is high to moderate variability among their co-residents in terms of the quality of the handoff provided; 55% experience three or more interruptions during handoffs on average. 90% of neurosurgical residents surveyed say that handoff most often occurs in a quiet, private area and 56% report a high level of comfort for knowing the potential acute, critical issues affecting a patient when receiving a handoff. Conclusions There needs to be more focused education devoted to learning effective patient-care handoffs in neurosurgical training programs. Increasingly, handing off a patient adequately and safely is becoming a required skill of residency. PMID:22848615

  19. Using Electronic Noses to Detect Tumors During Neurosurgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie L.; Ryan, Margaret A.; Lara, Liana M.; Kateb, Babak; Chen, Mike

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to develop special-purpose electronic noses and algorithms for processing the digitized outputs of the electronic noses for determining whether tissue exposed during neurosurgery is cancerous. At present, visual inspection by a surgeon is the only available intraoperative technique for detecting cancerous tissue. Implementation of the proposal would help to satisfy a desire, expressed by some neurosurgeons, for an intraoperative technique for determining whether all of a brain tumor has been removed. The electronic-nose technique could complement multimodal imaging techniques, which have also been proposed as means of detecting cancerous tissue. There are also other potential applications of the electronic-nose technique in general diagnosis of abnormal tissue. In preliminary experiments performed to assess the viability of the proposal, the problem of distinguishing between different types of cultured cells was substituted for the problem of distinguishing between normal and abnormal specimens of the same type of tissue. The figure presents data from one experiment, illustrating differences between patterns that could be used to distinguish between two types of cultured cancer cells. Further development can be expected to include studies directed toward answering questions concerning not only the possibility of distinguishing among various types of normal and abnormal tissue but also distinguishing between tissues of interest and other odorous substances that may be present in medical settings.

  20. Examining the Function of Problem Behavior in Fragile X Syndrome: Preliminary Experimental Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langthorne, Paul; McGill, Peter; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Lang, Russell; Machalicek, Wendy; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Rispoli, Mandy

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common inherited cause of intellectual and developmental disability. The influence of environmental variables on behaviors associated with the syndrome has received only scant attention. The current study explored the function served by problem behavior in fragile X syndrome by using experimental functional analysis…

  1. Effects of Physical Activity on Children's Executive Function: Contributions of Experimental Research on Aerobic Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Best, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Executive function refers to the cognitive processes necessary for goal-directed cognition and behavior, which develop across childhood and adolescence. Recent experimental research indicates that both acute and chronic aerobic exercise promote children's executive function. Furthermore, there is tentative evidence that not all forms of aerobic…

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  3. Practical guidelines for setting up neurosurgery skills training cadaver laboratory in India.

    PubMed

    Suri, Ashish; Roy, Tara Sankar; Lalwani, Sanjeev; Deo, Rama Chandra; Tripathi, Manjul; Dhingra, Renu; Bhardwaj, Daya Nand; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Though the necessity of cadaver dissection is felt by the medical fraternity, and described as early as 600 BC, in India, there are no practical guidelines available in the world literature for setting up a basic cadaver dissection laboratory for neurosurgery skills training. Hands-on dissection practice on microscopic and endoscopic procedures is essential in technologically demanding modern neurosurgery training where ethical issues, cost constraints, medico-legal pitfalls, and resident duty time restrictions have resulted in lesser opportunities to learn. Collaboration of anatomy, forensic medicine, and neurosurgery is essential for development of a workflow of cadaver procurement, preservation, storage, dissection, and disposal along with setting up the guidelines for ethical and legal concerns. PMID:25033845

  4. [Recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Hyodo, A; Harakuni, T; Shingaki, T; Tsurushima, H; Saito, A; Yoshii, Y

    2000-12-01

    With the recent advances in the devices and techniques in intravascular neurosurgery such as microcatheters or a digital subtraction angiography, intravascular neurosurgery plays an important role for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. We describe here, a recent progress in intravascular neurosurgery for the treatment of cerebrovascular disease. As a treatment of cerebrovascular disease, we discuss the treatment of cerebral aneurysm using Guglielmi detachable coils (GDC), and the treatment of ischemic cerebrovascular disease such as the thrombolytic therapy for the acute embolic occlusion of the cerebral artery, and a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) or a stenting for the stenotic lesion of the cerebral arteries. Embolization of the cerebral aneurysm using GDC is less invasive method compare to the standard neurosurgical clipping of aneurysm. So, recently it becomes one of standard methods of the treatment of cerebral aneurysm. Thrombolytic therapy, PTA and stenting also become an important treatment for the ischemic cerebrovascular disease. PMID:11464467

  5. Robotic System for MRI-Guided Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Cole, Gregory A.; Shang, Weijian; Harrington, Kevin; Camilo, Alex; Pilitsis, Julie G.; Fischer, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    Stereotaxy is a neurosurgical technique that can take several hours to reach a specific target, typically utilizing a mechanical frame and guided by preoperative imaging. An error in any one of the numerous steps or deviations of the target anatomy from the preoperative plan such as brain shift (up to 20 mm), may affect the targeting accuracy and thus the treatment effectiveness. Moreover, because the procedure is typically performed through a small burr hole opening in the skull that prevents tissue visualization, the intervention is basically “blind” for the operator with limited means of intraoperative confirmation that may result in reduced accuracy and safety. The presented system is intended to address the clinical needs for enhanced efficiency, accuracy, and safety of image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery for Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) lead placement. The work describes a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided, robotically actuated stereotactic neural intervention system for deep brain stimulation procedure, which offers the potential of reducing procedure duration while improving targeting accuracy and enhancing safety. This is achieved through simultaneous robotic manipulation of the instrument and interactively updated in situ MRI guidance that enables visualization of the anatomy and interventional instrument. During simultaneous actuation and imaging, the system has demonstrated less than 15% signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) variation and less than 0.20% geometric distortion artifact without affecting the imaging usability to visualize and guide the procedure. Optical tracking and MRI phantom experiments streamline the clinical workflow of the prototype system, corroborating targeting accuracy with 3-axis root mean square error 1.38 ± 0.45 mm in tip position and 2.03 ± 0.58° in insertion angle. PMID:25376035

  6. Consensus on guidelines for stereotactic neurosurgery for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nuttin, Bart; Wu, Hemmings; Mayberg, Helen; Hariz, Marwan; Gabriëls, Loes; Galert, Thorsten; Merkel, Reinhard; Kubu, Cynthia; Vilela-Filho, Osvaldo; Matthews, Keith; Taira, Takaomi; Lozano, Andres M; Schechtmann, Gastón; Doshi, Paresh; Broggi, Giovanni; Régis, Jean; Alkhani, Ahmed; Sun, Bomin; Eljamel, Sam; Schulder, Michael; Kaplitt, Michael; Eskandar, Emad; Rezai, Ali; Krauss, Joachim K; Hilven, Paulien; Schuurman, Rick; Ruiz, Pedro; Chang, Jin Woo; Cosyns, Paul; Lipsman, Nir; Voges, Juergen; Cosgrove, Rees; Li, Yongjie; Schlaepfer, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Background For patients with psychiatric illnesses remaining refractory to ‘standard’ therapies, neurosurgical procedures may be considered. Guidelines for safe and ethical conduct of such procedures have previously and independently been proposed by various local and regional expert groups. Methods To expand on these earlier documents, representative members of continental and international psychiatric and neurosurgical societies, joined efforts to further elaborate and adopt a pragmatic worldwide set of guidelines. These are intended to address a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders, brain targets and neurosurgical techniques, taking into account cultural and social heterogeneities of healthcare environments. Findings The proposed consensus document highlights that, while stereotactic ablative procedures such as cingulotomy and capsulotomy for depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder are considered ‘established’ in some countries, they still lack level I evidence. Further, it is noted that deep brain stimulation in any brain target hitherto tried, and for any psychiatric or behavioural disorder, still remains at an investigational stage. Researchers are encouraged to design randomised controlled trials, based on scientific and data-driven rationales for disease and brain target selection. Experienced multidisciplinary teams are a mandatory requirement for the safe and ethical conduct of any psychiatric neurosurgery, ensuring documented refractoriness of patients, proper consent procedures that respect patient's capacity and autonomy, multifaceted preoperative as well as postoperative long-term follow-up evaluation, and reporting of effects and side effects for all patients. Interpretation This consensus document on ethical and scientific conduct of psychiatric surgery worldwide is designed to enhance patient safety. PMID:24444853

  7. Simulation of brain tumor resection in image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaoyao; Ji, Songbai; Fontaine, Kathryn; Hartov, Alex; Roberts, David; Paulsen, Keith

    2011-03-01

    Preoperative magnetic resonance images are typically used for neuronavigation in image-guided neurosurgery. However, intraoperative brain deformation (e.g., as a result of gravitation, loss of cerebrospinal fluid, retraction, resection, etc.) significantly degrades the accuracy in image guidance, and must be compensated for in order to maintain sufficient accuracy for navigation. Biomechanical finite element models are effective techniques that assimilate intraoperative data and compute whole-brain deformation from which to generate model-updated MR images (uMR) to improve accuracy in intraoperative guidance. To date, most studies have focused on early surgical stages (i.e., after craniotomy and durotomy), whereas simulation of more complex events at later surgical stages has remained to be a challenge using biomechanical models. We have developed a method to simulate partial or complete tumor resection that incorporates intraoperative volumetric ultrasound (US) and stereovision (SV), and the resulting whole-brain deformation was used to generate uMR. The 3D ultrasound and stereovision systems are complimentary to each other because they capture features deeper in the brain beneath the craniotomy and at the exposed cortical surface, respectively. In this paper, we illustrate the application of the proposed method to simulate brain tumor resection at three temporally distinct surgical stages throughout a clinical surgery case using sparse displacement data obtained from both the US and SV systems. We demonstrate that our technique is feasible to produce uMR that agrees well with intraoperative US and SV images after dural opening, after partial tumor resection, and after complete tumor resection. Currently, the computational cost to simulate tumor resection can be up to 30 min because of the need for re-meshing and the trial-and-error approach to refine the amount of tissue resection. However, this approach introduces minimal interruption to the surgical workflow

  8. Smartphones in remote medicine and daily neurosurgery: The Sabah update

    PubMed Central

    Perumall, Vinodh Vayara; Sellamuthu, Pulivendhan; Harun, Rahmat; Zenian, Mohd Sofan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Healthcare costs continue to rise every day as the demand outgrows the supply of surgeons. The application of telephone consultation for immediate management is needed as most neurosurgeons are technology orientated. This enables a specialist at a remote mobile site to receive the necessary information and reduce transmission time, from the second the patient is seen till the management is obtained. Materials and Methods: We conducted a survey on smartphone ownership among doctors and gathered cases that needed neurosurgical input from 1st November 2012 till 30th April 2013 from all 24 district hospitals in Sabah, Malaysia. Results: The percentage of smartphone ownership among doctors surveyed and usage of it for remote and daily medicine at various departments at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Kota Kinabalu, which shows at least 90% smartphone ownership and proves 100% ownership of cross-platform instant messaging applications and its usage for remote and daily medicine. It also proves to be a more popular mode of referral compared to “teleconsultation” (TC). Discussion: In Sabah, the TC service is used for remote medical consultation and only available at four hospitals. The sender needs direct access to a computer with the TC software, and it causes delay whereas doctors using smartphones will just need to discuss the case on the spot and obtain the appropriate management within minutes. Smartphone usage is also important in daily neurosurgery especially at the department level to promote efficient communication, organization, and interaction between all the staff. As for the department's administrative sector, it is useful to notify if anyone is on leave, attending courses or even meetings as the shortage can be avoided, and redistribution easily done. It also allows us to transfer simple intra-departmental data at any time, and any place whenever required. Conclusion: With all the given fact, it is clear that a day without utilizing this service

  9. Sensors management in robotic neurosurgery: the ROBOCAST project.

    PubMed

    Vaccarella, Alberto; Comparetti, Mirko Daniele; Enquobahrie, Andinet; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; De Momi, Elena

    2011-01-01

    Robot and computer-aided surgery platforms bring a variety of sensors into the operating room. These sensors generate information to be synchronized and merged for improving the accuracy and the safety of the surgical procedure for both patients and operators. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a sensor management architecture that is used is to gather and fuse data from localization systems, such as optical and electromagnetic trackers and ultrasound imaging devices. The architecture follows a modular client-server approach and was implemented within the EU-funded project ROBOCAST (FP7 ICT 215190). Furthermore it is based on very well-maintained open-source libraries such as OpenCV and Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK), which are supported from a worldwide community of developers and allow a significant reduction of software costs. We conducted experiments to evaluate the performance of the sensor manager module. We computed the response time needed for a client to receive tracking data or video images, and the time lag between synchronous acquisition with an optical tracker and ultrasound machine. Results showed a median delay of 1.9 ms for a client request of tracking data and about 40 ms for US images; these values are compatible with the data generation rate (20-30 Hz for tracking system and 25 fps for PAL video). Simultaneous acquisitions have been performed with an optical tracking system and US imaging device: data was aligned according to the timestamp associated with each sample and the delay was estimated with a cross-correlation study. A median value of 230 ms delay was calculated showing that realtime 3D reconstruction is not feasible (an offline temporal calibration is needed), although a slow exploration is possible. In conclusion, as far as asleep patient neurosurgery is concerned, the proposed setup is indeed useful for registration error correction because the brain shift occurs with a time constant of few tens of minutes

  10. Experimental Study of Level Density and {gamma}-strength Functions from Compound Nuclear Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Voinov, A. V.; Grimes, S. M.; Brune, C. R.; Massey, T. N.; Schiller, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Siem, S.

    2008-04-17

    The current status of experimental study of level density and {gamma}-strength functions is reviewed. Three experimental techniques are used. These are measurements of particle evaporation spectra from compound nuclear reactions, the measurements of particle-{gamma} coincidences from inelastic scattering and pick-up reactions and the method of two-step {gamma}-cascades following neutron/proton radiative capture. Recent experimental data on level densities from neutron evaporation spectra are shown. The first results on the cascade {gamma}-spectrum from the {sup 59}Co(p,2{gamma}){sup 60}Ni reaction are presented.

  11. Versatile utilization of real-time intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound in cranial neurosurgery: technical note and retrospective case series.

    PubMed

    Lekht, Ilya; Brauner, Noah; Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Chang, Ki-Eun; Gulati, Mittul; Shiroishi, Mark S; Grant, Edward G; Christian, Eisha; Zada, Gabriel

    2016-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Intraoperative contrast-enhanced ultrasound (iCEUS) offers dynamic imaging and provides functional data in real time. However, no standardized protocols or validated quantitative data exist to guide its routine use in neurosurgery. The authors aimed to provide further clinical data on the versatile application of iCEUS through a technical note and illustrative case series. METHODS Five patients undergoing craniotomies for suspected tumors were included. iCEUS was performed using a contrast agent composed of lipid shell microspheres enclosing perflutren (octafluoropropane) gas. Perfusion data were acquired through a time-intensity curve analysis protocol obtained using iCEUS prior to biopsy and/or resection of all lesions. RESULTS Three primary tumors (gemistocytic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, and meningioma), 1 metastatic lesion (melanoma), and 1 tumefactive demyelinating lesion (multiple sclerosis) were assessed using real-time iCEUS. No intraoperative complications occurred following multiple administrations of contrast agent in all cases. In all neoplastic cases, iCEUS replicated enhancement patterns observed on preoperative Gd-enhanced MRI, facilitated safe tumor debulking by differentiating neoplastic tissue from normal brain parenchyma, and helped identify arterial feeders and draining veins in and around the surgical cavity. Intraoperative CEUS was also useful in guiding a successful intraoperative needle biopsy of a cerebellar tumefactive demyelinating lesion obtained during real-time perfusion analysis. CONCLUSIONS Intraoperative CEUS has potential for safe, real-time, dynamic contrast-based imaging for routine use in neurooncological surgery and image-guided biopsy. Intraoperative CEUS eliminates the effect of anatomical distortions associated with standard neuronavigation and provides quantitative perfusion data in real time, which may hold major implications for intraoperative diagnosis, tissue differentiation, and quantification of

  12. Reconstruction of the unknown optimization cost functions from experimental recordings during static multi-finger prehension.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xun; Terekhov, Alexander V; Latash, Mark L; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M

    2012-04-01

    The goal of the research is to reconstruct the unknown cost (objective) function(s) presumably used by the neural controller for sharing the total force among individual fingers in multifinger prehension. The cost function was determined from experimental data by applying the recently developed Analytical Inverse Optimization (ANIO) method (Terekhov et al. 2010). The core of the ANIO method is the Theorem of Uniqueness that specifies conditions for unique (with some restrictions) estimation of the objective functions. In the experiment, subjects (n = 8) grasped an instrumented handle and maintained it at rest in the air with various external torques, loads, and target grasping forces applied to the object. The experimental data recorded from 80 trials showed a tendency to lie on a 2-dimensional hyperplane in the 4-dimensional finger-force space. Because the constraints in each trial were different, such a propensity is a manifestation of a neural mechanism (not the task mechanics). In agreement with the Lagrange principle for the inverse optimization, the plane of experimental observations was close to the plane resulting from the direct optimization. The latter plane was determined using the ANIO method. The unknown cost function was reconstructed successfully for each performer, as well as for the group data. The cost functions were found to be quadratic with nonzero linear terms. The cost functions obtained with the ANIO method yielded more accurate results than other optimization methods. The ANIO method has an evident potential for addressing the problem of optimization in motor control. PMID:22104742

  13. The rewards of pediatric neurosurgery: presidential address: twenty-ninth annual meeting of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery, October 18, 2011, Goa, India.

    PubMed

    Steinbok, Paul

    2012-09-01

    The author relates how he ended up somewhat unexpectedly as a pediatric neurosurgeon and how fortunate he feels to have become a pediatric neurosurgeon. He reflects on his life and on the importance of trying to do one's best. He comments about the importance of listening, empathizing, and being compassionate as characteristics of the pediatric neurosurgeon and notes that by trying one's best to be a good pediatric neurosurgeon one adopts more of these characteristics by learning from patients and their parents. He discusses the many ways in which the practice of pediatric neurosurgery and his involvement in the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery have created meaning in his life, which has led to a feeling of happiness and fulfillment. PMID:22872238

  14. Experimental investigations of the scanning functions of galvanometer-based scanners with applications in OCT.

    PubMed

    Duma, Virgil-Florin; Lee, Kye-sung; Meemon, Panomsak; Rolland, Jannick P

    2011-10-10

    We analyze the three most common profiles of scanning functions for galvanometer-based scanners (GSs): the sawtooth, triangular and sinusoidal functions. They are determined experimentally with regard to the scan parameters of the input signal (i.e., frequency and amplitude). We study the differences of the output function of the GS measured as the positional error of the oscillatory mirror from the ideal function given by the input signal of the device. The limits in achieving the different types of scanning functions in terms of duty cycle and linearity are determined experimentally for the possible range of scan parameters. Of particular importance are the preservation of an imposed duty cycle and profile for the sawtooth function, the quantification of the linearity for the sinusoidal function, and the effective duty cycle for the triangular, as well as for the other functions. The range of scan amplitudes for which the stability of the oscillatory regime of the galvo mirror is stable for different frequencies is also highlighted. While the use of the device in certain scanning regimes is studied, certain rules of thumb are deduced to make the best out of the galvoscanner. Finally, the three types of scanning functions are tested with a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD OCT) setup and the conclusions of the study are demonstrated in an imaging application by correlating the determined limits of the scanning regimes with the requirements of OCT. PMID:22015369

  15. Fedor Krause: the first systematic use of X-rays in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Elhadi, Ali M; Kalb, Samuel; Martirosyan, Nikolay L; Agrawal, Abhishek; Preul, Mark C

    2012-08-01

    Within a few months of Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen's discovery of x-rays in 1895, Fedor Krause acquired an x-ray apparatus and began to use it in his daily interactions with patients and for diagnosis. He was the first neurosurgeon to use x-rays methodically and systematically. In 1908 Krause published the first volume of text on neurosurgery, Chirurgie des Gehirns und Rückenmarks (Surgery of the Brain and Spinal Cord), which was translated into English in 1909. The second volume followed in 1911. This was the first published multivolume text totally devoted to neurosurgery. Although Krause excelled in and promoted neurosurgery, he believed that surgeons should excel at general surgery. Importantly, Krause was inclined to adopt technology that he believed could be helpful in surgery. His 1908 text was the first neurosurgical text to contain a specific chapter on x-rays ("Radiographie") that showed roentgenograms of neurosurgical procedures and pathology. After the revolutionary discovery of x-rays by Röntgen, many prominent neurosurgeons seemed pessimistic about the use of x-rays for anything more than trauma or fractures. Krause immediately seized on its use to guide and monitor ventricular drainage and especially for the diagnosis of tumors of the skull base. The x-ray images contained in Krause's "Radiographie" chapter provide a seminal view into the adoption of new technology and the development of neurosurgical technique and are part of neurosurgery's heritage. PMID:22853835

  16. The Mathematics of Three N-Localizers Used Together for Stereotactic Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The N-localizer enjoys widespread use in image-guided stereotactic neurosurgery and radiosurgery. This article derives the mathematical equations that are used with three N-localizers and provides analogies, explanations, and appendices in order to promote a deeper understanding of the mathematical principles that govern the N-localizer. PMID:26594605

  17. The contributions of W.D. Stevenson to the development of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada.

    PubMed

    Mukhida, K; Mendez, I

    1999-08-01

    The establishment of a neurosurgical department in Halifax in January 1948 marked the beginnings of the first dedicated neurosurgical service in Atlantic Canada. The development of neurosurgery in Halifax occurred in a receptive place and time. The Victoria General Hospital, the region's largest tertiary care centre, and the Dalhousie University Faculty of Medicine were in a period of growth associated with medical specialization and departmentalization, changes inspired in part by the Flexner Report of 1910. Atlantic Canadians during this period were increasingly looking to specialists for their medical care. Although this social environment encouraged the establishment of surgical specialty services, the development of neurosurgery in Halifax, as in other parts of Canada, was closely associated with the efforts of individual neurosurgeons, such as William D. Stevenson. After training with Kenneth G. McKenzie in Toronto, Stevenson was recruited to Halifax and established the first neurosurgical department in Atlantic Canada. From the outset and over his twenty-six years as Department Head at the Victoria General Hospital and Dalhousie University, Stevenson worked to maintain the department's commitment to clinical practice, medical education, and research. Although Stevenson single-handedly ran the service for several years after its inception, by the time of his retirement in 1974 the neurosurgery department had grown to include five attending staff surgeons who performed over two thousand procedures each year. This paper highlights the importance of Stevenson's contributions to the development of neurosurgery in Atlantic Canada within the context of the social and medical environment of the region. PMID:10451747

  18. Experimental characterization of the transfer function for a Silver-dielectric superlens.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J

    2012-03-12

    We describe a technique for experimentally determining the spatial-frequency modulation transfer function for near-field super-resolution imaging systems and present such a modulation transfer function for a 20|40|20 nm poly(vinyl alcohol)~(PVA)|Silver|PVA superlens exposed to 365 nm wavelength (i-line) radiation through a 50-nm thick tungsten mask. An extensive spectral characterization is achieved from only two exposures, with transmission coefficients determined for spatial frequencies as high as 13 µm-1, corresponding to λ / 4.75. The resulting transfer function is in good agreement with analytical models that incorporate the effects of mask-superlens interactions. PMID:22418523

  19. The sitting position in neurosurgery: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Porter, J M; Pidgeon, C; Cunningham, A J

    1999-01-01

    The potential for serious complications after venous air embolism and successful malpractice liability claims are the principle reasons for the dramatic decline in the use of the sitting position in neurosurgical practice. Although there have been several studies substantiating the relative safety compared with the prone or park bench positions, its use will continue to decline as neurosurgeons abandon its application and trainees in neurosurgery are not exposed to its relative merits. How can individual surgeons continue to use this position? Will individual, difficult surgical access cases be denied the obvious technical advantages of the sitting position? Limited use of the sitting position should remain in the neurosurgeon's armamentarium. However, several caveats must be emphasized. Assessment of the relative risk-benefit, based on the individual patient's physical status and surgical implications for the particular intracranial pathology, is of paramount importance. The patient should be informed of the specific risks of venous air embolism, quadriparesis and peripheral nerve palsies. Appropriate charting of patient information provided and special consent issues are essential. An anaesthetic input into the decision to use the sitting position is a sine qua non. The presence of a patient foramen ovale is an absolute contraindication. Preoperative contrast echocardiography should be used as a screening technique to detect the population at risk of paradoxical air embolism caused by the presence of a patent foramen ovale. The technique involves i.v. injection of saline agitated with air and a Valsalva manoeuvre is applied and released. Use of this position necessitates supplementary monitoring to promptly detect and treat venous air embolism. Doppler ultrasonography is the most sensitive of the generally available monitors to detect intracardiac air. The use of a central venous catheter is recommended, with the tip positioned close to the superior vena cava

  20. New technologies in neurosurgery: Effects on the conventional techniques and anaesthesiological considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasano, V. A.; Lombard, G. F.; Urciuoli, R.; Benech, F.; Ponzio, R. M.

    1985-09-01

    New technologies have been recently introduced into neurosurgery: laser sources, ultrasonic aspiration, intraoperative echotomography and intraoperative Doppler flowmeter. The aim of this work, showing the use of these instruments in different neurosurgical operations, is to discuss the effective improvements of the surgical techniques when comparing new and traditional technologies. The laser is able to concentrate high energies in restricted areas allowing a maximum selectivity. Having a superficial destructive effect with associated hemostasis, CO 2 and argon are suitable in dissection maneuvers. Nd:YAG produces a high thermal diffusion, consenting a deeper and extended tissue removal and a considerable reduction of intraoperative blood loss also in vascularized tumors. A promising field of application of the laser is the treatment of cerebral vascular malformations. In arterio-venous malformations the irradiation of the nidus with Nd:YAG produces a rapid obliteration of the pathologic vessels. This technique avoids the isolation of the feeding arteries and reduces the manipulation of the surrounding tissue. In small saccular aneurysms an argon laser is used to produce a shrinkage of the dilatation with consequent occlusion of the malformation. The ultrasonic aspirator is used in the tumoral surgery to obtain a more rapid demolition of the mass by fragmentation and suction. Intraoperative echotomography consents a sharp topographic localization of the lesion, particularly in deeper cerebral areas, providing data on the nature of solid tumors. The intraoperative Doppler flowmeter is useful for identification of the feeding arteries and the shunt of the small deep-seated arterio-venous malformations consenting a dynamic evaluation of the operation. General anaesthesia in neurosurgical procedures is favourably influenced by laser use. Conventional anaesthetic techniques, however, must be modified to avoid the harmful effect of the laser, depending on the movements

  1. Integration of patient specific modeling and advanced image processing techniques for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archip, Neculai; Fedorov, Andriy; Lloyd, Bryn; Chrisochoides, Nikos; Golby, Alexandra; Black, Peter M.; Warfield, Simon K.

    2006-03-01

    A major challenge in neurosurgery oncology is to achieve maximal tumor removal while avoiding postoperative neurological deficits. Therefore, estimation of the brain deformation during the image guided tumor resection process is necessary. While anatomic MRI is highly sensitive for intracranial pathology, its specificity is limited. Different pathologies may have a very similar appearance on anatomic MRI. Moreover, since fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging are not currently available during the surgery, non-rigid registration of preoperative MR with intra-operative MR is necessary. This article presents a translational research effort that aims to integrate a number of state-of-the-art technologies for MRI-guided neurosurgery at the Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH). Our ultimate goal is to routinely provide the neurosurgeons with accurate information about brain deformation during the surgery. The current system is tested during the weekly neurosurgeries in the open magnet at the BWH. The preoperative data is processed, prior to the surgery, while both rigid and non-rigid registration algorithms are run in the vicinity of the operating room. The system is tested on 9 image datasets from 3 neurosurgery cases. A method based on edge detection is used to quantitatively validate the results. 95% Hausdorff distance between points of the edges is used to estimate the accuracy of the registration. Overall, the minimum error is 1.4 mm, the mean error 2.23 mm, and the maximum error 3.1 mm. The mean ratio between brain deformation estimation and rigid alignment is 2.07. It demonstrates that our results can be 2.07 times more precise then the current technology. The major contribution of the presented work is the rigid and non-rigid alignment of the pre-operative fMRI with intra-operative 0.5T MRI achieved during the neurosurgery.

  2. A value-based, no-cost-to-patient health model in the developing world: Critical appraisal of a unique patient-centric neurosurgery unit

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Sumit; Dadlani, Ravi; Sivaraju, Laxminadh; Aryan, Saritha; Mohan, Dilip; Sai Kiran, Narayanam Anantha; Rajarathnam, Ravikiran; Shyam, Maya; Sadanand, Venkatraman; Hegde, Alangar S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: It is well-accepted that the current healthcare scenario worldwide is due for a radical change, given that it is fraught with mounting costs and varying quality. Various modifications in health policies have been instituted toward this end. An alternative model, the low-cost, value-based health model, focuses on maximizing value for patients by moving away from a physician-centered, supply-driven system to a patient-centered system. Methods: The authors discuss the successful inception, functioning, sustainability, and replicability of a novel health model in neurosurgery built and sustained by inspired humanitarianism and that provides all treatment at no cost to the patients irrespective of their socioeconomic strata, color or creed. Results: The Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Medical Sciences (SSSIHMS) at Whitefield, Bengaluru, India, a private charitable hospital established in 2001, functions on the ideals of providing free state-of-the-art healthcare to all in a compassionate and holistic manner. With modern equipment and respectable outcome benchmarks, its neurosurgery unit has operated on around 18,000 patients since its inception, and as such, has contributed INR 5310 million (USD 88.5 million) to society from an economic standpoint. Conclusions: The inception and sustainability of the SSSIHMS model are based on self-perpetuating philanthropy, a cost-conscious culture and the dissemination of human values. Replicated worldwide, at least in the developing nations, this unique healthcare model may well change the face of healthcare economics. PMID:26322241

  3. Reproducibility and Variability of the Cost Functions Reconstructed from Experimental Recordings in Multi-Finger Prehension

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xun; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of the study is to examine whether the cost (objective) functions reconstructed from experimental recordings in multi-finger prehension tasks are reproducible over time, i.e., whether the functions reflect stable preferences of the subjects and can be considered personal characteristics of motor coordination. Young, healthy participants grasped an instrumented handle with varied values of external torque, load and target grasping force and repeated the trials on three days: Day 1, Day 2, and Day 7. By following Analytical Inverse Optimization (ANIO) computation procedures, the cost functions for individual subjects were reconstructed from the experimental recordings (individual finger forces) for each day. The cost functions represented second-order polynomials of finger forces with non-zero linear terms. To check whether the obtained cost functions were reproducible over time a cross-validation was performed: a cost function obtained on Day i was applied to experimental data observed on Day j (i≠j). In spite of the observed day-to-day variability of the performance and the cost functions, the ANIO reconstructed cost functions were found to be reproducible over time: application of a cost function Ci to the data of Day j (i≠j) resulted in smaller deviations from the experimental observations than using other commonly used cost functions. Other findings are: (a) The 2nd order coefficients Ki of the cost function showed negative linear relations with finger force magnitudes. This fact may be interpreted as encouraging involvement of stronger fingers in tasks requiring higher total force magnitude production. (b) The finger forces were distributed on a 2-dimensional plane in the 4-dimensional finger force space, which has been confirmed for all subjects and all testing sessions. (c) The discovered principal components in the principal component analysis of the finger forces agreed well with the principle of superposition, i.e. the complex action of

  4. Experimental approaches for addressing fundamental biological questions in living, functioning cells with single molecule precision

    PubMed Central

    Lenn, Tchern; Leake, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule experimentation has allowed researchers to observe biological processes at the sensitivity level of single molecules in actual functioning, living cells, thereby allowing us to observe the molecular basis of the key mechanistic processes in question in a very direct way, rather than inferring these from ensemble average data gained from traditional molecular and biochemical techniques. In this short review, we demonstrate the impact that the application of single molecule bioscience experimentation has had on our understanding of various cellular systems and processes, and the potential that this approach has for the future to really address very challenging and fundamental questions in the life sciences. PMID:22773951

  5. Reconstruction of the unknown optimization cost functions from experimental recordings during static multi-finger prehension

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xun; Terekhov, Alexander V.; Latash, Mark L.; Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the research is to reconstruct the unknown cost (objective) function(s) presumably used by the neural controller for sharing the total force among individual fingers in multi-finger prehension. The cost function was determined from experimental data by applying the recently developed Analytical Inverse Optimization (ANIO) method (Terekhov et al 2010). The core of the ANIO method is the Theorem of Uniqueness that specifies conditions for unique (with some restrictions) estimation of the objective functions. In the experiment, subjects (n=8) grasped an instrumented handle and maintained it at rest in the air with various external torques, loads, and target grasping forces applied to the object. The experimental data recorded from 80 trials showed a tendency to lie on a 2-dimensional hyperplane in the 4-dimensional finger-force space. Because the constraints in each trial were different, such a propensity is a manifestation of a neural mechanism (not the task mechanics). In agreement with the Lagrange principle for the inverse optimization, the plane of experimental observations was close to the plane resulting from the direct optimization. The latter plane was determined using the ANIO method. The unknown cost function was reconstructed successfully for each performer, as well as for the group data. The cost functions were found to be quadratic with non-zero linear terms. The cost functions obtained with the ANIO method yielded more accurate results than other optimization methods. The ANIO method has an evident potential for addressing the problem of optimization in motor control. PMID:22104742

  6. Recent developments in optimal experimental designs for functional magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Ming-Hung; Temkit, M'hamed; Wong, Weng Kee

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the leading brain mapping technologies for studying brain activity in response to mental stimuli. For neuroimaging studies utilizing this pioneering technology, there is a great demand of high-quality experimental designs that help to collect informative data to make precise and valid inference about brain functions. This paper provides a survey on recent developments in experimental designs for fMRI studies. We briefly introduce some analytical and computational tools for obtaining good designs based on a specified design selection criterion. Research results about some commonly considered designs such as blocked designs, and m-sequences are also discussed. Moreover, we present a recently proposed new type of fMRI designs that can be constructed using a certain type of Hadamard matrices. Under certain assumptions, these designs can be shown to be statistically optimal. Some future research directions in design of fMRI experiments are also discussed. PMID:25071884

  7. Experimental triplet and quadruplet fluctuation densities and spatial distribution function integrals for liquid mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Paul E.

    2015-03-07

    Kirkwood-Buff or Fluctuation Solution Theory can be used to provide experimental pair fluctuations, and/or integrals over the pair distribution functions, from experimental thermodynamic data on liquid mixtures. Here, this type of approach is used to provide triplet and quadruplet fluctuations, and the corresponding integrals over the triplet and quadruplet distribution functions, in a purely thermodynamic manner that avoids the use of structure factors. The approach is then applied to binary mixtures of water + methanol and benzene + methanol over the full composition range under ambient conditions. The observed correlations between the different species vary significantly with composition. The magnitude of the fluctuations and integrals appears to increase as the number of the most polar molecule involved in the fluctuation or integral also increases. A simple physical picture of the fluctuations is provided to help rationalize some of these variations.

  8. Validation of MCDS by comparison of predicted with experimental velocity distribution functions in rarefied normal shocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham-Van-diep, Gerald C.; Erwin, Daniel A.

    1989-01-01

    Velocity distribution functions in normal shock waves in argon and helium are calculated using Monte Carlo direct simulation. These are compared with experimental results for argon at M = 7.18 and for helium at M = 1.59 and 20. For both argon and helium, the variable-hard-sphere (VHS) model is used for the elastic scattering cross section, with the velocity dependence derived from a viscosity-temperature power-law relationship in the way normally used by Bird (1976).

  9. Electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation: a review of density functional theory approach combined with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison Escaño, Mary Clare; Lacdao Arevalo, Ryan; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    The electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation is a complex, up-to-eight-electron transfer process, which is essential for development of efficient direct borohydride fuel cells. Here we review the progress achieved by density functional theory (DFT) calculations in explaining the adsorption of BH4- on various catalyst surfaces, with implications for electrocatalyst screening and selection. Wherever possible, we correlate the theoretical predictions with experimental findings, in order to validate the proposed models and to identify potential directions for further advancements.

  10. Localization and socialization: Experimental insights into the functional architecture of IP3 receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diambra, Luis; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2009-09-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-evoked Ca2+ signals display great spatiotemporal malleability. This malleability depends on diversity in both the cellular organization and in situ functionality of IP3 receptors (IP3Rs) that regulate Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recent experimental data imply that these considerations are not independent, such that—as with other ion channels—the local organization of IP3Rs impacts their functionality, and reciprocally IP3R activity impacts their organization within native ER membranes. Here, we (i) review experimental data that lead to our understanding of the "functional architecture" of IP3Rs within the ER, (ii) propose an updated terminology to span the organizational hierarchy of IP3Rs observed in intact cells, and (iii) speculate on the physiological significance of IP3R socialization in Ca2+ dynamics, and consequently the emerging need for modeling studies to move beyond gridded, planar, and static simulations of IP3R clustering even over short experimental timescales.

  11. A Comparison of Experimental Functional Analysis and the Questions about Behavioral Function (QABF) in the Assessment of Challenging Behavior of Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Olive; Brett, Denise; Leader, Geraldine

    2013-01-01

    We compared two functional behavioral assessment methods: the Questions About Behavioral Function (QABF; a standardized test) and experimental functional analysis (EFA) to identify behavioral functions of aggressive/destructive behavior, self-injurious behavior and stereotypy in 32 people diagnosed with autism. Both assessments found that self…

  12. Downregulation of FoxC2 Increased Susceptibility to Experimental Colitis: Influence of Lymphatic Drainage Function?

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Felix; Potepalov, Sergey; Shehzahdi, Romana; Bernas, Michael; Witte, Marlys; Abreo, Fleurette; Traylor, James; Orr, Wayne A.; Tsunoda, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although inflammation-induced expansion of the intestinal lymphatic vasculature (lymphangiogenesis) is known to be a crucial event in limiting inflammatory processes, through clearance of interstitial fluid and immune cells, considerably less is known about the impact of an impaired lymphatic clearance function (as seen in inflammatory bowel diseases) on this cascade. We aimed to investigate whether the impaired intestinal lymphatic drainage function observed in FoxC2(+/−) mice would influence the course of disease in a model of experimental colitis. Methods: Acute dextran sodium sulfate colitis was induced in wild-type and haploinsufficient FoxC2(+/−) mice, and survival, disease activity, colonic histopathological injury, neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration were evaluated. Functional and structural changes in the intestinal lymphatic vessel network were analyzed, including submucosal edema, vessel morphology, and lymphatic vessel density. Results: We found that FoxC2 downregulation in FoxC2(+/−) mice significantly increased the severity and susceptibility to experimental colitis, as displayed by lower survival rates, increased disease activity, greater histopathological injury, and elevated colonic neutrophil, T-cell, and macrophage infiltration. These findings were accompanied by structural (dilated torturous lymphatic vessels) and functional (greater submucosal edema, higher immune cell burden) changes in the intestinal lymphatic vasculature. Conclusions: These results indicate that sufficient lymphatic clearance plays a crucial role in limiting the initiation and perpetuation of experimental colitis and those disturbances in the integrity of the intestinal lymphatic vessel network could intensify intestinal inflammation. Future therapies might be able to exploit these processes to restore and maintain adequate lymphatic clearance function in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25822012

  13. An abrupt reduction in end-tidal carbon-dioxide during neurosurgery is not always due to venous air embolism: a capnograph artefact.

    PubMed

    Vinay, Byrappa; Sriganesh, Kamath; Gopala Krishna, Kadarapura Nanjundaiah

    2014-04-01

    Venous air embolism (VAE) is a well recognized complication during neurosurgery. Pre-cordial doppler and trans-esophageal echocardiography are sensitive monitors for the detection of VAE. A sudden, abrupt reduction in the end-tidal carbondioxide (ETCO2) pressure with associated hypotension during neurosurgery might suggest VAE, when more sensitive monitors are not available. We describe an unusual cause for sudden reduction in ETCO2 during neurosurgery and discuss the mechanism for such presentation. PMID:23996497

  14. Alfvénic oscillations of the electron distribution function: Linear theory and experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J. W. R. Skiff, F.; Howes, G. G.; Kletzing, C. A.; Carter, T. A.; Dorfman, S.

    2015-12-10

    Wave propagation can be an accurate method for determining material properties. High frequency whistler mode waves (0.7 < ω/|Ω{sub ce}| < 1) in an overdense plasma (ω{sub pe} > |Ω{sub ce}|) are damped primarily by Doppler-shifted electron cyclotron resonance. A kinetic description of whistler mode propagation parallel to the background magnetic field shows that damping is proportional to the parallel electron distribution function. This property enables an experimental determination of the parallel electron distribution function using a measurement of whistler mode wave absorption. The whistler mode wave absorption diagnostic uses this technique on UCLA’s Large Plasma Device (LaPD) to measure the distribution of high energy electrons (5 − 10v{sub te}) with 0.1% precision. The accuracy is limited by systematic effects that need to be considered carefully. Ongoing research uses this diagnostic to investigate the effect of inertial Alfvén waves on the electron distribution function. Results presented here verify experimentally the linear effects of inertial Alfvén waves on the reduced electron distribution function, a necessary step before nonlinear physics can be tested. Ongoing experiments with the whistler mode wave absorption diagnostic are making progress toward the first direct detection of electrons nonlinearly accelerated by inertial Alfvén waves, a process believed to play an important role in auroral generation.

  15. Numerical and experimental studies of enhanced electron emission from functionalized carbon nanotube emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Feng; Little, Scott; Alzubi, Feras

    2007-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. The CNTs were further functionalized by coating their surface with a thin layer of low work function oxide emissive materials. The electron emission capability of the coated CNT emitters was greatly improved with the low work function emissive layer, particularly at high temperature. Thermionic emission current three orders magnitude higher was observed. The emission properties of the oxide coated CNTs were measured and characterized over a wide temperature and field ranges. It was found that neither the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission nor the Richardson theory for thermionic emission were adequate to describe the electron emission characteristics of these emitters in certain range of temperature and field. However, by adopting a general electron emission formulism developed by Murphy and Good, we were able to simulate the electron emission from the coated CNTs over the whole temperature and field range and fit the experimental data.

  16. Preliminary Results on the Experimental Investigation of the Structure Functions of Bound Nucleons

    SciTech Connect

    Bodek, Arie

    2015-09-01

    We present preliminary results on an experimental study of the nuclear modification of the longitudinal (σL) and transverse (σT) structure functions of nucleons bound in nuclear targets. The origin of these modifications (commonly referred as as the EMC effect) is not fully understood. Our measurements of R= σLT for nuclei (RA) and for deuterium (RD) indicate that nuclear modifications of the structure functions of bound nucleons are different for the longitudinal and transverse structure functions, and that contrary to expectation from several theoretical models, RA < RD.

  17. The Richard C. Schneider Lecture. New dimensions of neurosurgery in the realm of high technology: possibilities, practicalities, realities.

    PubMed

    Apuzzo, M L

    1996-04-01

    Fueled by a buoyant economy, popular attitudes and demands, and parallel progress in transferable technical and biological areas, neurosurgery has enjoyed a remarkable quarter of a century of progress. Developmental trends in the discipline have included the following: 1) a refinement of preoperative definition of the structural substrate, 2) miniaturization of operative corridors, 3) reduction of operative trauma, 4) increased effectiveness at the target site, and 5) incorporation of improved technical adjuvants and physical operative tools into treatment protocols. In particular, the computer has become a formidable ally in diagnostic and surgical events. Trends in technical development indicate that we are entering an exciting era of advanced surgery of the human cerebrum, which is heralded by the following: 1) current developments in areas of imaging, sensors, and visualization; 2) new devices for localization and navigation; 3) new capabilities for action at the target point; and 4) innovative concepts related to advanced operative venues. Imaging has provided structurally based surgical maps, which now are being given the new dimension of function in complex and integrated formats for preoperative planning and intraoperative tactical direction. Cerebral localization and navigation based on these advances promise to provide further refinement to the field of stereotactic neurosurgery, as linked systems are superseded by more flexible nonlinked methodologies in functionally defined volume-oriented navigational databases. Target point action now includes not only ablative capabilities through micro-operative methods and the use of stereotactically directed high-energy forms but also the emergence of restorative capabilities through applications of principles of genetic engineering in the areas of molecular and cellular neurosurgery. Complex, dedicated, and self-contained operative venues will be required to optimize the emergence and development of these

  18. Stereotactic neurosurgery in the United Kingdom: the hundred years from Horsley to Hariz.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Erlick A C; Green, Alexander L; Nandi, Dipankar; Aziz, Tipu Z

    2008-09-01

    The history of stereotactic neurosurgery in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is reviewed. Horsley and Clarke's primate stereotaxy at the turn of the 20th century and events surrounding it are described, including Mussen's development of a human version of the apparatus. Stereotactic surgery after the Second World War is reviewed, with an emphasis on the pioneering work of Gillingham, Hitchcock, Knight, and Watkins and the contributions from Bennett, Gleave, Hughes, Johnson, McKissock, McCaul, and Dutton after the influences of Dott, Cairns, and Jefferson. Forster's introduction of gamma knife radiosurgery is summarized, as is the application of computed tomography by Hounsfield and Ambrose. Contemporary contributions to the present day from Bartlett, Richardson, Miles, Thomas, Gill, Aziz, Hariz, and others are summarized. The current status of British stereotactic neurosurgery is discussed. PMID:18812971

  19. Impact of 20th Century Wars on the Development of Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Dowdy, Justin; Pait, T Glenn

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of neurosurgical casualties suffered during the wars of the 20th century had a significant impact on the formation and early growth of neurosurgery as a specialty. This chapter explores how the evolution of military tactics and weaponry along with the circumstances surrounding the wars themselves profoundly influenced the field. From the crystallization of intracranial projectile wound management and the formal recognition of the specialty itself arising from World War I experiences to the radical progress made in the outcomes of spinal-cord-injured soldiers in World War II or the fact that the neurosurgical training courses commissioned for these wars proved to be the precursors to modern neurosurgical training programs, the impact of the 20th century wars on the development of the field of neurosurgery is considerable. PMID:27035828

  20. 100 Years of British military neurosurgery: on the shoulders of giants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, S A G

    2015-01-01

    Death from head injuries has been a feature of conflicts throughout the world for centuries. The burden of mortality has been variously affected by the evolution in weaponry from war-hammers to explosive ordnance, the influence of armour on survivability and the changing likelihood of infection as a complicating factor. Surgery evolved from haphazard trephination to valiant, yet disjointed, neurosurgery by a variety of great historical surgeons until the Crimean War of 1853-1856. However, it was events initiated by the Great War of 1914-1918 that not only marked the development of modern neurosurgical techniques, but our approach to military surgery as a whole. Here the author describes how 100 years of conflict and the input and intertwining relationships between the 20th century's great neurosurgeons established neurosurgery in the United Kingdom and beyond. PMID:26292388

  1. Propionibacterium Acnes Brain Abscess in an Immunocompetent Man in the Absence of Prior Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Odunukan, Olufunso W; Masannat, Fares; Baka, J Jeff

    2016-02-01

    Propionibacterium acnes is a rare, but established, cause of intracranial abscesses. We describe a case of P. acnes brain abscess in an immunocompetent man without prior neurosurgery. A 49-year old man with mild psoriasis presented with a two-week history of gait changes, generalized weakness and a two-day history of headaches, aphasia and confusion. Imaging revealed a left thalamic mass and surgical biopsy suggested a pyogenic abscess. Cultures of biopsy samples of the abscess grew P. acnes alone. MRI and serial neurological exam showed marked clinical improvement with intravenous antibiotics. The significant reduction in the abscess was sustained on MRI obtained at six weeks after completion of antibiotic therapy. In conclusion, P. acnes must be considered as a differential diagnosis in individuals presenting with features suggestive of a brain abscess even in the absence of immunosuppression or previous neurosurgery. PMID:26999913

  2. Experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gütlich, Philipp; Bill, Eckhard; Trautwein, Alfred X.

    In this chapter, we present the principles of conventional Mössbauer spectrometers with radioactive isotopes as the light source; Mössbauer experiments with synchrotron radiation are discussed in Chap. 9 including technical principles. Since complete spectrometers, suitable for virtually all the common isotopes, have been commercially available for many years, we refrain from presenting technical details like electronic circuits. We are concerned here with the functional components of a spectrometer, their interaction and synchronization, the different operation modes and proper tuning of the instrument. We discuss the properties of radioactive γ-sources to understand the requirements of an efficient γ-counting system, and finally we deal with sample preparation and the optimization of Mössbauer absorbers. For further reading on spectrometers and their technical details, we refer to the review articles [1-3].

  3. The present and future of quality measures and public reporting in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Bekelis, Kimon; McGirt, Matthew J; Parker, Scott L; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Quality measurement and public reporting are intended to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. However, regulatory implementation has created a complex network of reporting requirements for physicians and medical practices. These include Medicare's Physician Quality Reporting System, Electronic Health Records Meaningful Use, and Value-Based Payment Modifier programs. The common denominator of all these initiatives is that to avoid penalties, physicians must meet "generic" quality standards that, in the case of neurosurgery and many other specialties, are not pertinent to everyday clinical practice and hold specialists accountable for care decisions outside of their direct control. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has recently authorized alternative quality reporting mechanisms for the Physician Quality Reporting System, which allow registries to become subspecialty-reporting mechanisms under the Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) program. These programs further give subspecialties latitude to develop measures of health care quality that are relevant to the care provided. As such, these programs amplify the power of clinical registries by allowing more accurate assessment of practice patterns, patient experiences, and overall health care value. Neurosurgery has been at the forefront of these developments, leveraging the experience of the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database to create one of the first specialty-specific QCDRs. Recent legislative reform has continued to change this landscape and has fueled optimism that registries (including QCDRs) and other specialty-driven quality measures will be a prominent feature of federal and private sector quality improvement initiatives. These physician- and patient-driven methods will allow neurosurgery to underscore the value of interventions, contribute to the development of sustainable health care

  4. Virtual reality training in neurosurgery: Review of current status and future applications

    PubMed Central

    Alaraj, Ali; Lemole, Michael G.; Finkle, Joshua H.; Yudkowsky, Rachel; Wallace, Adam; Luciano, Cristian; Banerjee, P. Pat; Rizzi, Silvio H.; Charbel, Fady T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Over years, surgical training is changing and years of tradition are being challenged by legal and ethical concerns for patient safety, work hour restrictions, and the cost of operating room time. Surgical simulation and skill training offer an opportunity to teach and practice advanced techniques before attempting them on patients. Simulation training can be as straightforward as using real instruments and video equipment to manipulate simulated “tissue” in a box trainer. More advanced virtual reality (VR) simulators are now available and ready for widespread use. Early systems have demonstrated their effectiveness and discriminative ability. Newer systems enable the development of comprehensive curricula and full procedural simulations. Methods: A PubMed review of the literature was performed for the MESH words “Virtual reality, “Augmented Reality”, “Simulation”, “Training”, and “Neurosurgery”. Relevant articles were retrieved and reviewed. A review of the literature was performed for the history, current status of VR simulation in neurosurgery. Results: Surgical organizations are calling for methods to ensure the maintenance of skills, advance surgical training, and credential surgeons as technically competent. The number of published literature discussing the application of VR simulation in neurosurgery training has evolved over the last decade from data visualization, including stereoscopic evaluation to more complex augmented reality models. With the revolution of computational analysis abilities, fully immersive VR models are currently available in neurosurgery training. Ventriculostomy catheters insertion, endoscopic and endovascular simulations are used in neurosurgical residency training centers across the world. Recent studies have shown the coloration of proficiency with those simulators and levels of experience in the real world. Conclusion: Fully immersive technology is starting to be applied to the practice of

  5. Diabetes insipidus following neurosurgery at a university hospital in Western Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Faiza A.; AbuDaood, Elaff A.; Nasser, Tariq A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To review the incidence, spectrum of clinical manifestation, course, risk factors, as well as treatment of diabetes insipidus (DI) following neurosurgery of the pituitary gland. Methods: The files of 24 patients that underwent neurosurgery for sellar lesions, or tumor near the hypothalamus or pituitary gland at the Department of Neurosurgery, King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were retrospectively reviewed between January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 24 patients were studied, and were divided into 2 groups namely; DI and non-DI. Patient characteristics were studied using descriptive statistics. The differences in proportion between the 2 groups were found out using Z-test for proportion in 2 populations. The mean differences in the hormonal abnormalities for the 2 groups were assessed using independent t-test. All statistics are considered statistically significant when p<0.05. Results: During hospitalization, 13 (54.2%) out of 24 patient that underwent neurosurgery had manifestations of DI, which was transient in 5 (38.8%) and permanent in 8 (61.2%). The DI subgroup contained higher prevalence of prolactinoma, craniopharyngioma, pre-operative panhypopituitarism, and macroadenoma in MRI imaging and transphenoidal surgery. Furthermore, urine osmolality was significantly lower in the DI group post-operatively with a significant p=0.023. It was recognized that the permanent DI documented more significant numbers than other studies. Conclusion: In our study group, it was recognized that permanent DI meant that our patients needed desmopressin for more than 3 months, which documented a more significant number than other studies. PMID:26837398

  6. Structure of amorphous Ag/Ge/S alloys: experimentally constrained density functional study.

    PubMed

    Akola, J; Beuneu, B; Jones, R O; Jóvári, P; Kaban, I; Kolář, J; Voleská, I; Wágner, T

    2015-12-01

    Density functional/molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to determine structural and other properties of amorphous Ag/Ge/S and Ge/S alloys. In the former, the calculations have been combined with experimental data (x-ray and neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure). Ag/Ge/As alloys have high ionic conductivity and are among the most promising candidates for future memristor technology. We find excellent agreement between the experimental results and large-scale (500 atoms) simulations in Ag/Ge/S, and we compare and contrast the structures of Ge/S and Ag/Ge/S. The calculated electronic structures, vibrational densities of states, ionic mobilities, and cavity distributions of the amorphous materials are discussed and compared with data on crystalline phases where available. The high mobility of Ag in solid state electrolyte applications is related to the presence of cavities and can occur via jumps to a neighbouring vacant site. PMID:26569035

  7. Structure of amorphous Ag/Ge/S alloys: experimentally constrained density functional study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akola, J.; Beuneu, B.; Jones, R. O.; Jóvári, P.; Kaban, I.; Kolář, J.; Voleská, I.; Wágner, T.

    2015-12-01

    Density functional/molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to determine structural and other properties of amorphous Ag/Ge/S and Ge/S alloys. In the former, the calculations have been combined with experimental data (x-ray and neutron diffraction, extended x-ray absorption fine structure). Ag/Ge/As alloys have high ionic conductivity and are among the most promising candidates for future memristor technology. We find excellent agreement between the experimental results and large-scale (500 atoms) simulations in Ag/Ge/S, and we compare and contrast the structures of Ge/S and Ag/Ge/S. The calculated electronic structures, vibrational densities of states, ionic mobilities, and cavity distributions of the amorphous materials are discussed and compared with data on crystalline phases where available. The high mobility of Ag in solid state electrolyte applications is related to the presence of cavities and can occur via jumps to a neighbouring vacant site.

  8. Laser speckle contrast imaging of cerebral blood flow in humans during neurosurgery: a pilot clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parthasarathy, Ashwin B.; Weber, Erica L.; Richards, Lisa M.; Fox, Douglas J.; Dunn, Andrew K.

    2010-11-01

    Monitoring cerebral blood flow (CBF) during neurosurgery can provide important physiological information for a variety of surgical procedures. CBF measurements are important for assessing whether blood flow has returned to presurgical baseline levels and for assessing postsurgical tissue viability. Existing techniques for intraoperative monitoring of CBF based on magnetic resonance imaging are expensive and often impractical, while techniques such as indocyanine green angiography cannot produce quantitative measures of blood flow. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an optical technique that has been widely used to quantitatively image relative CBF in animal models in vivo. In a pilot clinical study, we adapted an existing neurosurgical operating microscope to obtain LSCI images in humans in real time during neurosurgery under baseline conditions and after bipolar cautery. Simultaneously recorded ECG waveforms from the patient were used to develop a filter that helped reduce measurement variabilities due to motion artifacts. Results from this study demonstrate the feasibility of using LSCI to obtain blood flow images during neurosurgeries and its capability to produce full field CBF image maps with excellent spatial resolution in real-time with minimal disruption to the surgical procedure.

  9. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database Qualified Clinical Data Registry: 2015 measure specifications and rationale.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; McGirt, Matthew J; Bekelis, Kimon; Holland, Christopher M; Davies, Jason; Devin, Clinton J; Atkins, Tyler; Knightly, Jack; Groman, Rachel; Zyung, Irene; Asher, Anthony L

    2015-12-01

    Meaningful quality measurement and public reporting have the potential to facilitate targeted outcome improvement, practice-based learning, shared decision making, and effective resource utilization. Recent developments in national quality reporting programs, such as the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Qualified Clinical Data Registry (QCDR) reporting option, have enhanced the ability of specialty groups to develop relevant quality measures of the care they deliver. QCDRs will complete the collection and submission of Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) quality measures data on behalf of individual eligible professionals. The National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) offers 21 non-PQRS measures, initially focused on spine procedures, which are the first specialty-specific measures for neurosurgery. Securing QCDR status for N(2)QOD is a tremendously important accomplishment for our specialty. This program will ensure that data collected through our registries and used for PQRS is meaningful for neurosurgeons, related spine care practitioners, their patients, and other stakeholders. The 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR is further evidence of neurosurgery's commitment to substantively advancing the health care quality paradigm. The following manuscript outlines the measures now approved for use in the 2015 N(2)QOD QCDR. Measure specifications (measure type and descriptions, related measures, if any, as well as relevant National Quality Strategy domain[s]) along with rationale are provided for each measure. PMID:26621418

  10. Atrial natriuretic factor: is it responsible for hyponatremia and natriuresis in neurosurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Gasparotto, Ana Paula Devite Cardoso; Falcão, Antonio Luis Eiras; Kosour, Carolina; Araújo, Sebastião; Cintra, Eliane Araújo; de Oliveira, Rosmari Aparecida Rosa Almeida; Martins, Luiz Claudio; Dragosavac, Desanka

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the presence of hyponatremia and natriuresis and their association with atrial natriuretic factor in neurosurgery patients. Methods The study included 30 patients who had been submitted to intracranial tumor resection and cerebral aneurism clipping. Both plasma and urinary sodium and plasma atrial natriuretic factor were measured during the preoperative and postoperative time periods. Results Hyponatremia was present in 63.33% of the patients, particularly on the first postoperative day. Natriuresis was present in 93.33% of the patients, particularly on the second postoperative day. Plasma atrial natriuretic factor was increased in 92.60% of the patients in at least one of the postoperative days; however, there was no statistically significant association between the atrial natriuretic factor and plasma sodium and between the atrial natriuretic factor and urinary sodium. Conclusion Hyponatremia and natriuresis were present in most patients after neurosurgery; however, the atrial natriuretic factor cannot be considered to be directly responsible for these alterations in neurosurgery patients. Other natriuretic factors are likely to be involved. PMID:27410411

  11. Neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences, a center of excellence: A success story.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manmohan; Sawarkar, Dattaraj; Sharma, Bhawani S

    2015-01-01

    The department of neurosurgery at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS) started its humble beginning in 1965. With the untiring and selfless hard work of Prof. P N Tandon and Prof. A K Banerji, the department progressed over time to become a center of excellence in the subcontinent. To establish a neurosciences center at AIIMS was an uphill task, which was accomplished with great efforts. The department has established itself as one of the highest centers of learning in the country with its vast infrastructure and diversity in all fields of neurosurgery. AIIMS, New Delhi was established by an act of the parliament in 1956. It was started with a grant from the Government of New Zealand under the "Colombo Plan." It was the vision of Rajkumari Amrita Kaur, the first Health Minister of India, that led to the establishment of a medical institute of international repute in India. AIIMS, New Delhi is an autonomous institute and is governed by the AIIMS Act, 1956. The department of neurosurgery at AIIMS was started in March 1965 with Prof. P.N. Tandon as the Head of the Department. Prof. A.K. Banerji joined him a few months later. The Department celebrated its golden jubilee in the year 2015, and has tremendously grown in stature from its humble beginnings to being a center of excellence with world-wide recognition. PMID:26238896

  12. The Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Kim, D G; Kim, H J

    2001-04-01

    The Department of Neurosurgery at Seoul National University College of Medicine is one of the oldest neurosurgical departments in Korea, and it is a center of academic leadership in neurosurgery. In September 1957, the department was established by Bo Sung Sim, and it has produced many leaders of neurosurgery in Korea. Chairmen Bo Sung Sim, Kil Soo Choi, Dae Hee Han, and Byung-Kyu Cho each brought special skills and talents to the development of the department. The current and fifth chair, Hyun Jib Kim, assumed the chairmanship in July 2000. The department comprises 11 full-time faculty members, 5 fellows, and 14 residents. More than 1,700 neurosurgical procedures are performed annually in four operating theaters. A gamma knife was installed in 1997, and approximately 200 gamma knife procedures are performed each year. In addition to clinical activities, research and education for graduate and postgraduate students are also particular strengths of the department. This article traces the clinical, academic, and scientific development of the department, its present activities, and its future direction. PMID:11322453

  13. DIANA-miRPath v3.0: deciphering microRNA function with experimental support.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Ioannis S; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Georgakilas, Georgios; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2015-07-01

    The functional characterization of miRNAs is still an open challenge. Here, we present DIANA-miRPath v3.0 (http://www.microrna.gr/miRPathv3) an online software suite dedicated to the assessment of miRNA regulatory roles and the identification of controlled pathways. The new miRPath web server renders possible the functional annotation of one or more miRNAs using standard (hypergeometric distributions), unbiased empirical distributions and/or meta-analysis statistics. DIANA-miRPath v3.0 database and functionality have been significantly extended to support all analyses for KEGG molecular pathways, as well as multiple slices of Gene Ontology (GO) in seven species (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Gallus gallus and Danio rerio). Importantly, more than 600 000 experimentally supported miRNA targets from DIANA-TarBase v7.0 have been incorporated into the new schema. Users of DIANA-miRPath v3.0 can harness this wealth of information and substitute or combine the available in silico predicted targets from DIANA-microT-CDS and/or TargetScan v6.2 with high quality experimentally supported interactions. A unique feature of DIANA-miRPath v3.0 is its redesigned Reverse Search module, which enables users to identify and visualize miRNAs significantly controlling selected pathways or belonging to specific GO categories based on in silico or experimental data. DIANA-miRPath v3.0 is freely available to all users without any login requirement. PMID:25977294

  14. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Golubev, S. V.; Izotov, I. V.; Mansfeld, D. A.; Semenov, V. E.

    2012-02-15

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy.

  15. Experimental electron energy distribution function investigation at initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance discharge.

    PubMed

    Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Mansfeld, D A; Semenov, V E

    2012-02-01

    Experimental investigation is undertaken to study formation of electron energy distribution function (EEDF) at the initial stage of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside magnetic mirror trap. In experiment, where discharge was initiated by high power radiation of gyrotron operated in the mm-wavelength range, electrons were revealed to leave the trap having EEDF be quite different from Maxwellian one. Specifically, the EEDF was found to decrease slowly with energy up to 400-500 keV and drops abruptly further. The possible physical mechanisms are discussed to explain losses of high energy electrons from the trap and a limitation of their energy. PMID:22380303

  16. Comparison between skin-mounted fiducials and bone-implanted fiducials for image-guided neurosurgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rost, Jennifer; Harris, Steven S.; Stefansic, James D.; Sillay, Karl; Galloway, Robert L., Jr.

    2004-05-01

    Point-based registration for image-guided neurosurgery has become the industry standard. While the use of intrinsic points is appealing because of its retrospective nature, affixing extrinsic objects to the head prior to scanning has been demonstrated to provide much more accurate registrations. Points of reference between image space and physical space are called fiducials. The extrinsic objects which generate those points are fiducial markers. The markers can be broken down into two classifications: skin-mounted and bone-implanted. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages. Skin-mounted fiducials require simply sticking them on the patient in locations suggested by the manufacturer, however, they can move with tractions placed on the skin, fall off and perhaps the most dangerous problem, they can be replaced by the patient. Bone implanted markers being rigidly affixed to the skull do not present such problems. However, a minor surgical intervention (analogous to dental work) must be performed to implant the markers prior to surgery. Therefore marker type and use has become a decision point for image-guided surgery. We have performed a series of experiments in an attempt to better quantify aspects of the two types of markers so that better informed decisions can be made. We have created a phantom composed of a full-size plastic skull [Wards Scientific Supply] with a 500 ml bag of saline placed in the brain cavity. The skull was then sealed. A skin mimicking material, DragonSkinTM [SmoothOn Company] was painted onto the surface and allowed to dry. Skin mounted fiducials [Medtronic-SNT] and bone-implanted markers [Z-Kat]were placed on the phantom. In addition, three additional bone-implanted markers were placed (two on the base of the skull and one in the eye socket for use as targets). The markers were imaged in CT and 4 MRI sequences (T1-weighted, T2 weighted, SPGR, and a functional series.) The markers were also located in physical space using an Optotrak

  17. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Kilina, Svetlana; Tretiak, Sergei; Sykora, Milan; Albert, Victor; Badaeva, Ekaterina; Koposov, Alexey

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to play an

  18. Imaging samples in silica aerogel using an experimental point spread function.

    PubMed

    White, Amanda J; Ebel, Denton S

    2015-02-01

    Light microscopy is a powerful tool that allows for many types of samples to be examined in a rapid, easy, and nondestructive manner. Subsequent image analysis, however, is compromised by distortion of signal by instrument optics. Deconvolution of images prior to analysis allows for the recovery of lost information by procedures that utilize either a theoretically or experimentally calculated point spread function (PSF). Using a laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM), we have imaged whole impact tracks of comet particles captured in silica aerogel, a low density, porous SiO2 solid, by the NASA Stardust mission. In order to understand the dynamical interactions between the particles and the aerogel, precise grain location and track volume measurement are required. We report a method for measuring an experimental PSF suitable for three-dimensional deconvolution of imaged particles in aerogel. Using fluorescent beads manufactured into Stardust flight-grade aerogel, we have applied a deconvolution technique standard in the biological sciences to confocal images of whole Stardust tracks. The incorporation of an experimentally measured PSF allows for better quantitative measurements of the size and location of single grains in aerogel and more accurate measurements of track morphology. PMID:25517515

  19. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M.L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-24

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  20. Comparison between Theoretical Calculation and Experimental Results of Excitation Functions for Production of Relevant Biomedical Radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menapace, E.; Birattari, C.; Bonardi, M. L.; Groppi, F.; Morzenti, S.; Zona, C.

    2005-05-01

    The radionuclide production for biomedical applications has been brought up in the years, as a special nuclear application, at INFN LASA Laboratory, particularly in co-operation with the JRC-Ispra of EC. Mainly scientific aspects concerning radiation detection and the relevant instruments, the measurements of excitation functions of the involved nuclear reactions, the requested radiochemistry studies and further applications have been investigated. On the side of the nuclear data evaluations, based on nuclear model calculations and critically selected experimental data, the appropriate competence has been developed at ENEA Division for Advanced Physics Technologies. A series of high specific activity accelerator-produced radionuclides in no-carrier-added (NCA) form, for uses in metabolic radiotherapy and for PET radiodiagnostics, are investigated. In this work, last revised measurements and model calculations are reviewed for excitation functions of natZn(d,X)64Cu, 66Ga reactions, referring to irradiation experiments at K=38 variable energy Cyclotron of JRC-Ispra. Concerning the reaction data for producing 186gRe and 211At/211gPo (including significant emission spectra) and 210At, most recent and critically selected experimental results are considered and discussed in comparison with model calculations paying special care to pre-equilibrium effects estimate and to the appropriate overall parameterization. Model calculations are presented for 226Ra(p,2n)225Ac reaction, according to the working program of the ongoing IAEA CRP on the matter.

  1. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution: a combined experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A; Nugent, Joseph W; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S

    2015-02-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pK(a) values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pK(a) values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopic titrations to measure the pK(a) values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime, and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pK(a) values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance, with a root-mean-square deviation of 0.46 pK(a) units and 0.45 pK(a) units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pK(a) values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands, which provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents. PMID:25621618

  2. Experimental Measurements and Density Functional Theory Calculations of Continuum Lowering in Strongly Coupled Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam

    2014-10-01

    An accurate description of the ionization potential depression (IPD) of ions in plasmas due to their interaction with the environment is a fundamental problem in plasma physics, playing a key role in determining the ionization balance, charge state distribution, opacity and plasma equation of state. Here I present the first experimental investigation of the IPD as a function of ionic charge state in a range of dense Mg, Al and Si plasmas, using the Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray free-electron laser. The measurements show significantly larger IPDs than are predicted by the most commonly used models, such as that of Stewart-Pyatt, or the ion-sphere model of Zimmerman-More. Instead, plasma simulations using finite-temperature density functional theory with excited-state projector augmented-wave potentials show excellent agreement with the experimental results and explain the stronger-than-expected continuum lowering through the electronic structure of the valence states in these strong-coupling conditions, which retain much of their atomic characteristics close to the ion core regions. These results have a profound impact on the understanding and modelling of plasmas over a wide range of warm- and hot-dense matter conditions.

  3. A photoemission model for low work function coated metal surfaces and its experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Feldman, Donald W.; Moody, Nathan A.; O'Shea, Patrick G.

    2006-06-01

    Photocathodes are a critical component many linear accelerator based light sources. The development of a custom-engineered photocathode based on low work function coatings requires an experimentally validated photoemission model that accounts the complexity of the emission process. We have developed a time-dependent model accounting for the effects of laser heating and thermal propagation on photoemission. It accounts for surface conditions (coating, field enhancement, and reflectivity), laser parameters (duration, intensity, and wavelength), and material characteristics (reflectivity, laser penetration depth, and scattering rates) to predict current distribution and quantum efficiency (QE) as a function of wavelength. The model is validated by (i) experimental measurements of the QE of cesiated surfaces, (ii) the QE and performance of commercial dispenser cathodes (B, M, and scandate), and (iii) comparison to QE values reported in the literature for bare metals and B-type dispenser cathodes, all for various wavelengths. Of particular note is that the highest QE for a commercial (M-type) dispenser cathode found here was measured to be 0.22% at 266 nm, and is projected to be 3.5 times larger for a 5 ps pulse delivering 0.6 mJ/cm2 under a 50 MV/m field.

  4. Urban artificial light emission function determined experimentally using night sky images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio; Kocifaj, Miroslav

    2016-09-01

    To date, diverse approximations have been developed to interpret the radiance of a night sky due to light emissions from ground-based light sources. The radiant intensity distribution as a function of zenith angle is one of the most unknown properties because of the collective effects of all artificial, private and public lights. The emission function (EF) is, however, a key property in modeling the skyglow under arbitrary conditions, and thus it is equally required by modelers, light pollution researchers, and also experimentalists who are using specialized devices to study the diffuse light of a night sky. In this paper, we present the second generation of a dedicated measuring system intended for routine monitoring of a night sky in any region. The experimental technology we have developed is used to interpret clear sky radiance data recorded at a set of discrete distances from a town (or city) with the aim to infer the fraction of upwardly emitted light (F), that is a parameter scaling the bulk EF. The retrieval of the direct upward emissions has been improved by introducing a weighting factor that is used to eliminate imperfections of experimental data and thus to make the computation of F more stable when processing the radiance data taken at two adjacent measuring points. The field experiments made in three Mexican cities are analyzed and the differences found are discussed.

  5. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  6. Sparing of muscle mass and function by passive loading in an experimental intensive care unit model.

    PubMed

    Renaud, Guillaume; Llano-Diez, Monica; Ravara, Barbara; Gorza, Luisa; Feng, Han-Zhong; Jin, Jian-Ping; Cacciani, Nicola; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ochala, Julien; Corpeno, Rebeca; Li, Meishan; Hedström, Yvette; Ford, G Charles; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Larsson, Lars

    2013-03-01

    The response to mechanical stimuli, i.e., tensegrity, plays an important role in regulating cell physiological and pathophysiological function, and the mechanical silencing observed in intensive care unit (ICU) patients leads to a severe and specific muscle wasting condition. This study aims to unravel the underlying mechanisms and the effects of passive mechanical loading on skeletal muscle mass and function at the gene, protein and cellular levels. A unique experimental rat ICU model has been used allowing long-term (weeks) time-resolved analyses of the effects of standardized unilateral passive mechanical loading on skeletal muscle size and function and underlying mechanisms. Results show that passive mechanical loading alleviated the muscle wasting and the loss of force-generation associated with the ICU intervention, resulting in a doubling of the functional capacity of the loaded versus the unloaded muscles after a 2-week ICU intervention. We demonstrate that the improved maintenance of muscle mass and function is probably a consequence of a reduced oxidative stress revealed by lower levels of carbonylated proteins, and a reduced loss of the molecular motor protein myosin. A complex temporal gene expression pattern, delineated by microarray analysis, was observed with loading-induced changes in transcript levels of sarcomeric proteins, muscle developmental processes, stress response, extracellular matrix/cell adhesion proteins and metabolism. Thus, the results from this study show that passive mechanical loading alleviates the severe negative consequences on muscle size and function associated with the mechanical silencing in ICU patients, strongly supporting early and intense physical therapy in immobilized ICU patients. PMID:23266938

  7. Effects of experimental cardiac volume loading on left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Osuga, Tatsuyuki; Nakamura, Kensuke; Morita, Tomoya; Nisa, Khoirun; Yokoyama, Nozomu; Sasaki, Noboru; Morishita, Keitaro; Ohta, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To elucidate the relationship between acute volume overload and left atrial phasic function in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were anesthetized. A Swan-Ganz catheter was placed to measure mean pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP). Cardiac preload was increased by IV infusion with lactated Ringer solution at 150 mL/kg/h for 90 minutes. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed before (baseline) and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 75, and 90 minutes after volume loading began. At each echocardiographic assessment point, apical 4-chamber images were recorded and analyzed to derive time-left atrial area curves. Left atrial total (for reservoir function), passive (for conduit function), and active (for booster-pump function) fractional area changes were calculated from the curves. RESULTS Volume overload resulted in a significant increase from baseline in PCWP from 15 to 90 minutes after volume loading began. All fractional area changes at 15 to 90 minutes were significantly increased from baseline. In multiple regression analysis, quadratic regression models were better fitted to the relationships between PCWP and each of the total and active fractional area changes than were linear regression models. A linear regression model was better fitted to the relationship between PCWP and passive fractional area change. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that left atrial phasic function assessed on the basis of left atrial phasic areas was enhanced during experimental cardiac volume loading in healthy dogs. The effect of volume load should be considered when evaluating left atrial phasic function by indices derived from left atrial phasic sizes. PMID:27580106

  8. Anatomic and Functional Connectivity Relationship in Autistic Children During Three Different Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Machado, Calixto; Rodríguez, Rafael; Estévez, Mario; Leisman, Gerry; Melillo, Robert; Chinchilla, Mauricio; Portela, Liana

    2015-10-01

    A group of 21 autistic children were studied for determining the relationship between the anatomic (AC) versus functional (FC) connectivity, considering short-range and long-range brain networks. AC was assessed by the DW-MRI technique and FC by EEG coherence calculation, in three experimental conditions: basal, watching a popular cartoon with audio (V-A), and with muted audio track (VwA). For short-range connections, basal records, statistical significant correlations were found for all EEG bands in the left hemisphere, but no significant correlations were found for fast EEG frequencies in the right hemisphere. For the V-A condition, significant correlations were mainly diminished for the left hemisphere; for the right hemisphere, no significant correlations were found for the fast EEG frequency bands. For the VwA condition, significant correlations for the rapid EEG frequencies mainly disappeared for the right hemisphere. For long-range connections, basal records showed similar correlations for both hemispheres. For the right hemisphere, significant correlations incremented to all EEG bands for the V-A condition, but these significant correlations disappeared for the fast EEG frequencies in the VwA condition. It appears that in a resting-state condition, AC is better associated with functional connectivity for short-range connections in the left hemisphere. The V-A experimental condition enriches the AC and FC association for long-range connections in the right hemisphere. This might be related to an effective connectivity improvement due to full video stimulation (visual and auditory). An impaired audiovisual interaction in the right hemisphere might explain why significant correlations disappeared for the fast EEG frequencies in the VwA experimental condition. PMID:26050707

  9. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Rats with Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Reveals Brain Cortex Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Tambalo, Stefano; Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Rigolio, Roberta; Fiorini, Silvia; Bontempi, Pietro; Mallucci, Giulia; Balzarotti, Beatrice; Marmiroli, Paola; Sbarbati, Andrea; Cavaletti, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Cortical reorganization occurring in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients is thought to play a key role in limiting the effect of structural tissue damage. Conversely, its exhaustion may contribute to the irreversible disability that accumulates with disease progression. Several aspects of MS-related cortical reorganization, including the overall functional effect and likely modulation by therapies, still remain to be elucidated. The aim of this work was to assess the extent of functional cortical reorganization and its brain structural/pathological correlates in Dark Agouti rats with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a widely accepted preclinical model of chronic MS. Morphological and functional MRI (fMRI) were performed before disease induction and during the relapsing and chronic phases of EAE. During somatosensory stimulation of the right forepaw, fMRI demonstrated that cortical reorganization occurs in both relapsing and chronic phases of EAE with increased activated volume and decreased laterality index versus baseline values. Voxel-based morphometry demonstrated gray matter (GM) atrophy in the cerebral cortex, and both GM and white matter atrophy were assessed by ex vivo pathology of the sensorimotor cortex and corpus callosum. Neuroinflammation persisted in the relapsing and chronic phases, with dendritic spine density in the layer IV sensory neurons inversely correlating with the number of cluster of differentiation 45-positive inflammatory lesions. Our work provides an innovative experimental platform that may be pivotal for the comprehension of key mechanisms responsible for the accumulation of irreversible brain damage and for the development of innovative therapies to reduce disability in EAE/MS. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Since the early 2000s, functional MRI (fMRI) has demonstrated profound modifications in the recruitment of cortical areas during motor, cognitive, and sensory tasks in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Experimental autoimmune

  10. Undergraduate teaching of neurosurgery - what is the current practice in the UK and is there a need for improvement?

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Kathrin J; Moore, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    There has been concern that the move towards generalism means that specialties, such as neurosurgery, are being pushed out of the undergraduate syllabus. Surveys were created, along with the Society of British Neurological Surgeons, and sent to medical school representatives (MSRs) and neurosurgery programme directors (NPDs) in the United Kingdom (UK). 60% of MSRs and 71% of NPDs responded. Neurosurgical topics were taught by a variety of specialties, and in one medical school, a MSR said that neurosurgery was not taught at all. 83% of MSRs and 80% of NPDs said that neurosurgeons should be more involved in undergraduate education, with 70% of NPDs saying that their unit would be willing to have increased involvement. All NPDs, but only 72% of MSRs, said that neurosurgery should be taught in medical school. Those MSRs who disagreed opined that it was a postgraduate subject, and could be difficult to engage all students. The majority of MSRs and NPDs thought that neurosurgery guidelines would be useful. The most popular forms of guidance were in the forms of curriculum/guidelines, website and powerpoint presentations. It is therefore recommended that neurosurgeons, under the umbrella of the Society of British Neurological Surgeons, create national guidelines for the teaching of undergraduate students; to aid their educational colleagues and ensure that accurate, standardised teaching occurs. Care must be taken not to be over-prescriptive in these endeavours. PMID:26083138

  11. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution. A combined experimental and computational study

    SciTech Connect

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A.; Nugent, Joseph W.; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-01-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. It has been demonstrated repeatedly in the literature that the success of these materials is due to the amidoxime functional group. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pKa values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group in the literature. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pKa values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopic titrations to measure the pKa values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pKa values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance with a mean absolute error of 0.33 pKa units and 0.35 pKa units, respectively, and a root mean square deviation of 0.46 pKa units and 0.45 pKa units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pKa values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands. Hence, our study provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents used to mine uranium from seawater.

  12. Acidity of the amidoxime functional group in aqueous solution. A combined experimental and computational study

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mehio, Nada; Lashely, Mark A.; Nugent, Joseph W.; Tucker, Lyndsay; Correia, Bruna; Do-Thanh, Chi-Linh; Dai, Sheng; Hancock, Robert D.; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S.

    2015-01-26

    Poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents are often invoked in discussions of mining uranium from seawater. It has been demonstrated repeatedly in the literature that the success of these materials is due to the amidoxime functional group. While the amidoxime-uranyl chelation mode has been established, a number of essential binding constants remain unclear. This is largely due to the wide range of conflicting pKa values that have been reported for the amidoxime functional group in the literature. To resolve this existing controversy we investigated the pKa values of the amidoxime functional group using a combination of experimental and computational methods. Experimentally, we used spectroscopicmore » titrations to measure the pKa values of representative amidoximes, acetamidoxime and benzamidoxime. Computationally, we report on the performance of several protocols for predicting the pKa values of aqueous oxoacids. Calculations carried out at the MP2 or M06-2X levels of theory combined with solvent effects calculated using the SMD model provide the best overall performance with a mean absolute error of 0.33 pKa units and 0.35 pKa units, respectively, and a root mean square deviation of 0.46 pKa units and 0.45 pKa units, respectively. Finally, we employ our two best methods to predict the pKa values of promising, uncharacterized amidoxime ligands. Hence, our study provides a convenient means for screening suitable amidoxime monomers for future generations of poly(acrylamidoxime) adsorbents used to mine uranium from seawater.« less

  13. Investment in constitutive immune function by North American elk experimentally maintained at two different population densities.

    PubMed

    Downs, Cynthia J; Stewart, Kelley M; Dick, Brian L

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection favors individuals that respond with effective and appropriate immune responses to macro or microparasites. Animals living in populations close to ecological carrying capacity experience increased intraspecific competition, and as a result are often in poor nutritional condition. Nutritional condition, in turn, affects the amount of endogenous resources that are available for investment in immune function. Our objective was to understand the relationship between immune function and density dependence mediated by trade-offs between immune function, nutritional condition, and reproduction. To determine how immune function relates to density-dependent processes, we quantified bacteria killing ability, hemolytic-complement activity, and nutritional condition of North American elk (Cervus elaphus) from populations maintained at experimentally high- and low-population densities. When compared with elk from the low-density population, those from the high-density population had higher bacteria killing ability and hemolytic-complement activity despite their lower nutritional condition. Similarly, when compared with adults, yearlings had higher bacteria killing ability, higher hemolytic-complement activity, and lower nutritional condition. Pregnancy status and lactational status did not change either measure of constitutive immunity. Density-dependent processes affected both nutritional condition and investment in constitutive immune function. Although the mechanism for how density affects immunity is ambiguous, we hypothesize two possibilities: (i) individuals in higher population densities and in poorer nutritional condition invested more into constitutive immune defenses, or (ii) had higher parasite loads causing higher induced immune responses. Those explanations are not mutually exclusive, and might be synergistic, but overall our results provide stronger support for the hypothesis that animals in poorer nutritional condition invest more in

  14. Investment in Constitutive Immune Function by North American Elk Experimentally Maintained at Two Different Population Densities

    PubMed Central

    Downs, Cynthia J.; Stewart, Kelley M.; Dick, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    Natural selection favors individuals that respond with effective and appropriate immune responses to macro or microparasites. Animals living in populations close to ecological carrying capacity experience increased intraspecific competition, and as a result are often in poor nutritional condition. Nutritional condition, in turn, affects the amount of endogenous resources that are available for investment in immune function. Our objective was to understand the relationship between immune function and density dependence mediated by trade-offs between immune function, nutritional condition, and reproduction. To determine how immune function relates to density-dependent processes, we quantified bacteria killing ability, hemolytic-complement activity, and nutritional condition of North American elk (Cervus elaphus) from populations maintained at experimentally high- and low-population densities. When compared with elk from the low-density population, those from the high-density population had higher bacteria killing ability and hemolytic-complement activity despite their lower nutritional condition. Similarly, when compared with adults, yearlings had higher bacteria killing ability, higher hemolytic-complement activity, and lower nutritional condition. Pregnancy status and lactational status did not change either measure of constitutive immunity. Density-dependent processes affected both nutritional condition and investment in constitutive immune function. Although the mechanism for how density affects immunity is ambiguous, we hypothesize two possibilities: (i) individuals in higher population densities and in poorer nutritional condition invested more into constitutive immune defenses, or (ii) had higher parasite loads causing higher induced immune responses. Those explanations are not mutually exclusive, and might be synergistic, but overall our results provide stronger support for the hypothesis that animals in poorer nutritional condition invest more in

  15. An experimental investigation of the functional hypothesis and evolutionary advantage of stone-tipped spears.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jayne; Schoville, Benjamin J; Brown, Kyle S

    2014-01-01

    Stone-tipped weapons were a significant innovation for Middle Pleistocene hominins. Hafted hunting technology represents the development of new cognitive and social learning mechanisms within the genus Homo, and may have provided a foraging advantage over simpler forms of hunting technology, such as a sharpened wooden spear. However, the nature of this foraging advantage has not been confirmed. Experimental studies and ethnographic reports provide conflicting results regarding the relative importance of the functional, economic, and social roles of hafted hunting technology. The controlled experiment reported here was designed to test the functional hypothesis for stone-tipped weapons using spears and ballistics gelatin. It differs from previous investigations of this type because it includes a quantitative analysis of wound track profiles and focuses specifically on hand-delivered spear technology. Our results do not support the hypothesis that tipped spears penetrate deeper than untipped spears. However, tipped spears create a significantly larger inner wound cavity that widens distally. This inner wound cavity is analogous to the permanent wound cavity in ballistics research, which is considered the key variable affecting the relative 'stopping power' or 'killing power' of a penetrating weapon. Tipped spears conferred a functional advantage to Middle Pleistocene hominins, potentially affecting the frequency and regularity of hunting success with important implications for human adaptation and life history. PMID:25162397

  16. An Experimental Investigation of the Functional Hypothesis and Evolutionary Advantage of Stone-Tipped Spears

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Jayne; Schoville, Benjamin J.; Brown, Kyle S.

    2014-01-01

    Stone-tipped weapons were a significant innovation for Middle Pleistocene hominins. Hafted hunting technology represents the development of new cognitive and social learning mechanisms within the genus Homo, and may have provided a foraging advantage over simpler forms of hunting technology, such as a sharpened wooden spear. However, the nature of this foraging advantage has not been confirmed. Experimental studies and ethnographic reports provide conflicting results regarding the relative importance of the functional, economic, and social roles of hafted hunting technology. The controlled experiment reported here was designed to test the functional hypothesis for stone-tipped weapons using spears and ballistics gelatin. It differs from previous investigations of this type because it includes a quantitative analysis of wound track profiles and focuses specifically on hand-delivered spear technology. Our results do not support the hypothesis that tipped spears penetrate deeper than untipped spears. However, tipped spears create a significantly larger inner wound cavity that widens distally. This inner wound cavity is analogous to the permanent wound cavity in ballistics research, which is considered the key variable affecting the relative ‘stopping power’ or ‘killing power’ of a penetrating weapon. Tipped spears conferred a functional advantage to Middle Pleistocene hominins, potentially affecting the frequency and regularity of hunting success with important implications for human adaptation and life history. PMID:25162397

  17. An experimental study of the accuracy in measurement of modulation transfer function using an edge method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ye-seul; Park, Hye-Suk; Lee, Young-Jin; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-03-01

    Image evaluation is necessary in digital radiography (DR) which is widely used in medical imaging. Among parameters of image evaluation, modulation transfer function (MTF) is the important factor in the field of medical imaging and necessary to obtain detective quantum efficiency (DQE) which represents overall performance of the detector signal-to-noise ratio. However, the accurate measurement of MTF is still not easy because of geometric effect, electric noise, quantum noise, and truncation error. Therefore, in order to improve accuracy of MTF, four experimental methods were tested in this study such as changing the tube current, applying smoothing method in edge spread function (ESF), adjusting line spread function (LSF) range, and changing tube angle. Our results showed that MTF's fluctuation was decreased by high tube current and smoothing method. However, tube current should not exceed detector saturation and smoothing in ESF causes a distortion in ESF and MTF. In addition, decreasing LSF range diminished fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF and high tube angle generates degradation in MTF. Based on these results, excessively low tube current and the smoothing method should be avoided. Also, optimal range of LSF considering reduction of fluctuation and the number of sampling in MTF was necessary and precise tube angle is essential to obtain an accurate MTF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that accurate MTF can be acquired.

  18. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Ryan C.; Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-01

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  19. Liquid contact resonance atomic force microscopy via experimental reconstruction of the hydrodynamic function

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, Ryan C. Killgore, Jason P.; Hurley, Donna C.

    2014-06-14

    We present a method to correct for surface-coupled inertial and viscous fluid loading forces in contact resonance (CR) atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments performed in liquid. Based on analytical hydrodynamic theory, the method relies on experimental measurements of the AFM cantilever's free resonance peaks near the sample surface. The free resonance frequencies and quality factors in both air and liquid allow reconstruction of a continuous hydrodynamic function that can be used to adjust the CR data in liquid. Validation experiments utilizing thermally excited free and in-contact spectra were performed to assess the accuracy of our approach. Results show that the method recovers the air frequency values within approximately 6%. Knowledge of fluid loading forces allows current CR analysis techniques formulated for use in air and vacuum environments to be applied to liquid environments. Our technique greatly extends the range of measurement environments available to CR-AFM.

  20. An experimental approach to study the function of mitochondria in cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Youn Wook; Kang, Seok-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an inherited or acquired disease of the myocardium, which can result in severe ventricular dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathological process of cardiomyopathy. Many dysfunctions in cardiac mitochondria are consequences of mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA followed by alterations in transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial protein function, and mitochondrial dynamics and energetics, presenting with associated multisystem mitochondrial disorders. To ensure correct diagnosis and optimal management of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyopathy caused by multiple pathogenesis, multidisciplinary approaches are required, and to integrate between clinical and basic sciences, ideal translational models are needed. In this review, we will focus on experimental models to provide insights into basic mitochondrial physiology and detailed underlying mechanisms of cardiomyopathy and current mitochondria-targeted therapies for cardiomyopathy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(10): 541-548] PMID:26198095

  1. Experimental Energy Levels and Partition Function of the 12C2 Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Szabó, István; Császár, Attila G.; Bernath, Peter F.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    The carbon dimer, the 12C2 molecule, is ubiquitous in astronomical environments. Experimental-quality rovibronic energy levels are reported for 12C2, based on rovibronic transitions measured for and among its singlet, triplet, and quintet electronic states, reported in 42 publications. The determination utilizes the Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels (MARVEL) technique. The 23,343 transitions measured experimentally and validated within this study determine 5699 rovibronic energy levels, 1325, 4309, and 65 levels for the singlet, triplet, and quintet states investigated, respectively. The MARVEL analysis provides rovibronic energies for six singlet, six triplet, and two quintet electronic states. For example, the lowest measurable energy level of the {{a}}{}3{{{\\Pi }}}{{u}} state, corresponding to the J = 2 total angular momentum quantum number and the F 1 spin-multiplet component, is 603.817(5) cm‑1. This well-determined energy difference should facilitate observations of singlet–triplet intercombination lines, which are thought to occur in the interstellar medium and comets. The large number of highly accurate and clearly labeled transitions that can be derived by combining MARVEL energy levels with computed temperature-dependent intensities should help a number of astrophysical observations as well as corresponding laboratory measurements. The experimental rovibronic energy levels, augmented, where needed, with ab initio variational ones based on empirically adjusted and spin–orbit coupled potential energy curves obtained using the Duo code, are used to obtain a highly accurate partition function, and related thermodynamic data, for 12C2 up to 4000 K.

  2. Functional changes in regulatory T cells during an experimental infection with sparganum (plerocercofid of Spirometra mansoni).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung-Ran; Lee, Su-Min; Won, Jong-Wha; Lim, Woosung; Moon, Byung-In; Yang, Hyun-Jong; Seoh, Ju-Young

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells are important in the regulation of immune response, but the exact regulation of Treg-cell function in vivo is still not well known. In the present study, we investigated the functional activity of CD4(+) CD25(+) Treg cells as well as the frequency and number of CD4(+) CD25(+) FoxP3(+) Treg cells in the spleens of experimentally infected mice with a tissue-migrating parasite, sparganum (plerocercoid of Spirometra mansoni) for 3 weeks. The results demonstrated fluctuations in the Treg-cell function during the parasite infection, being up-regulated at day 3, down-regulated until day 14, and thereafter up-regulated again at day 21. We also investigated the cytokine-producing capability of the splenocytes to study the pattern of immune response of the mice to the parasite. The results showed decreased capabilities of interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and IL-17α production, whereas IL-4-producing and IL-10-producing capabilities were increased along with the parasitic infection. Meanwhile, IL-6-producing capability was increased to reach a peak at week 2, and thereafter was decreased to the baseline level. As a regulatory mechanism, we found that Treg-cell function was attenuated in the presence of the crude extracts of sparganum, but was enhanced in the presence of the excretory-secretory products, suggesting that sparganum products were involved in the triggering and regulation of immune response in the acute and chronic phases, respectively. Results show that Treg cells are central in the immune homeostasis in vivo that is maintained by host-parasite interactions during the parasitic infection. PMID:23078673

  3. Kinetic energies to analyze the experimental auger electron spectra by density functional theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Kazunaka

    2016-02-01

    In the Auger electron spectra (AES) simulations, we define theoretical modified kinetic energies of AES in the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The modified kinetic energies correspond to two final-state holes at the ground state and at the transition-state in DFT calculations, respectively. This method is applied to simulate Auger electron spectra (AES) of 2nd periodic atom (Li, Be, B, C, N, O, F)-involving substances (LiF, beryllium, boron, graphite, GaN, SiO2, PTFE) by deMon DFT calculations using the model molecules of the unit cell. Experimental KVV (valence band electrons can fill K-shell core holes or be emitted during KVV-type transitions) AES of the (Li, O) atoms in the substances agree considerably well with simulation of AES obtained with the maximum kinetic energies of the atoms, while, for AES of LiF, and PTFE substance, the experimental F KVV AES is almost in accordance with the spectra from the transitionstate kinetic energy calculations.

  4. Experimental Determination of the Electric Dipole Moment Function of the X Pi-2 Hydroxyl Radical

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.; Goorvitch, D.; Abrams, M. C.; Davis, S. P.; Benidar, A.; Farrenq, R.; Guelachvili, G.; Strawa, Anthony W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory infrared emission spectra of X 2piOH obtained with the Solar McMath FTS and the U. Paris (Orsay) FTS are used in an inversion procedure to experimentally determine the electric dipole moment function (EDMF) of the hydroxyl radical. The spectra produced at Kitt Peak show vibrational levels up to v = 10 and rotational lines in the range, -25.5 less than or equal to m less than or equal to 12.5. The following vibrational quantum number ranges were observed: for DELTA v = -1, v prime = 1 - 9, for DELTA v = -2, v prime = 2 - 10, and for DELTA v = - 3, v prime = 6 - 10. The spectra produced at Orsay show DELTA v = -1, with v prime = 1 - 4 and -22.5 less than or equal to m less than or equal to 9.5 as well as DELTA v = 0, with v prime= 1 - 3, and 9.5 less than or equal to m less than or equal to 25.5. The OH rovibrational wavefunctions used in the inversion procedure were calculated using a procedure which reproduces observed rotational constants with a high level of accuracy. Comparisons of our EDMF are made with previous experimental and theoretical work.

  5. Tiny giants of gene regulation: experimental strategies for microRNA functional studies

    PubMed Central

    Steinkraus, Bruno R.; Toegel, Markus

    2016-01-01

    The discovery over two decades ago of short regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) has led to the inception of a vast biomedical research field dedicated to understanding these powerful orchestrators of gene expression. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the methods and techniques underpinning the experimental pipeline employed for exploratory miRNA studies in animals. Some of the greatest challenges in this field have been uncovering the identity of miRNA–target interactions and deciphering their significance with regard to particular physiological or pathological processes. These endeavors relied almost exclusively on the development of powerful research tools encompassing novel bioinformatics pipelines, high‐throughput target identification platforms, and functional target validation methodologies. Thus, in an unparalleled manner, the biomedical technology revolution unceasingly enhanced and refined our ability to dissect miRNA regulatory networks and understand their roles in vivo in the context of cells and organisms. Recurring motifs of target recognition have led to the creation of a large number of multifactorial bioinformatics analysis platforms, which have proved instrumental in guiding experimental miRNA studies. Subsequently, the need for discovery of miRNA–target binding events in vivo drove the emergence of a slew of high‐throughput multiplex strategies, which now provide a viable prospect for elucidating genome‐wide miRNA–target binding maps in a variety of cell types and tissues. Finally, deciphering the functional relevance of miRNA post‐transcriptional gene silencing under physiological conditions, prompted the evolution of a host of technologies enabling systemic manipulation of miRNA homeostasis as well as high‐precision interference with their direct, endogenous targets. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:311–362. doi: 10.1002/wdev.223 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26950183

  6. Tiny giants of gene regulation: experimental strategies for microRNA functional studies.

    PubMed

    Steinkraus, Bruno R; Toegel, Markus; Fulga, Tudor A

    2016-01-01

    The discovery over two decades ago of short regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) has led to the inception of a vast biomedical research field dedicated to understanding these powerful orchestrators of gene expression. Here we aim to provide a comprehensive overview of the methods and techniques underpinning the experimental pipeline employed for exploratory miRNA studies in animals. Some of the greatest challenges in this field have been uncovering the identity of miRNA-target interactions and deciphering their significance with regard to particular physiological or pathological processes. These endeavors relied almost exclusively on the development of powerful research tools encompassing novel bioinformatics pipelines, high-throughput target identification platforms, and functional target validation methodologies. Thus, in an unparalleled manner, the biomedical technology revolution unceasingly enhanced and refined our ability to dissect miRNA regulatory networks and understand their roles in vivo in the context of cells and organisms. Recurring motifs of target recognition have led to the creation of a large number of multifactorial bioinformatics analysis platforms, which have proved instrumental in guiding experimental miRNA studies. Subsequently, the need for discovery of miRNA-target binding events in vivo drove the emergence of a slew of high-throughput multiplex strategies, which now provide a viable prospect for elucidating genome-wide miRNA-target binding maps in a variety of cell types and tissues. Finally, deciphering the functional relevance of miRNA post-transcriptional gene silencing under physiological conditions, prompted the evolution of a host of technologies enabling systemic manipulation of miRNA homeostasis as well as high-precision interference with their direct, endogenous targets. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26950183

  7. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  8. Current Applications and Future Perspectives of the Use of 3D Printing in Anatomical Training and Neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Vivek; Štrkalj, Goran; Štrkalj, Mirjana; Di Ieva, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    3D printing is a form of rapid prototyping technology, which has led to innovative new applications in biomedicine. It facilitates the production of highly accurate three dimensional objects from substrate materials. The inherent accuracy and other properties of 3D printing have allowed it to have exciting applications in anatomy education and surgery, with the specialty of neurosurgery having benefited particularly well. This article presents the findings of a literature review of the Pubmed and Web of Science databases investigating the applications of 3D printing in anatomy and surgical education, and neurosurgery. A number of applications within these fields were found, with many significantly improving the quality of anatomy and surgical education, and the practice of neurosurgery. They also offered advantages over existing approaches and practices. It is envisaged that the number of useful applications will rise in the coming years, particularly as the costs of this technology decrease and its uptake rises. PMID:27445707

  9. The Head Injury Transportation Straight to Neurosurgery (HITS-NS) randomised trial: a feasibility study.

    PubMed Central

    Lecky, Fiona; Russell, Wanda; Fuller, Gordon; McClelland, Graham; Pennington, Elspeth; Goodacre, Steve; Han, Kyee; Curran, Andrew; Holliman, Damien; Freeman, Jennifer; Chapman, Nathan; Stevenson, Matt; Byers, Sonia; Mason, Suzanne; Potter, Hugh; Coats, Tim; Mackway-Jones, Kevin; Peters, Mary; Shewan, Jane; Strong, Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Reconfiguration of trauma services, with direct transport of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients to neuroscience centres (NCs), bypassing non-specialist acute hospitals (NSAHs), could potentially improve outcomes. However, delays in stabilisation of airway, breathing and circulation (ABC) and the difficulties in reliably identifying TBI at scene may make this practice deleterious compared with selective secondary transfer from nearest NSAH to NC. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence guidance and systematic reviews suggested equipoise and poor-quality evidence - with regard to 'early neurosurgery' in this cohort - which we sought to address. METHODS Pilot cluster randomised controlled trial of bypass to NC conducted in two ambulance services with the ambulance station (n = 74) as unit of cluster [Lancashire/Cumbria in the North West Ambulance Service (NWAS) and the North East Ambulance Service (NEAS)]. Adult patients with signs of isolated TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of < 13 in NWAS, GCS score of < 14 in NEAS] and stable ABC, injured nearest to a NSAH were transported either to that hospital (control clusters) or bypassed to the nearest NC (intervention clusters). PRIMARY OUTCOMES recruitment rate, protocol compliance, selection bias as a result of non-compliance, accuracy of paramedic TBI identification (overtriage of study inclusion criteria) and pathway acceptability to patients, families and staff. 'Open-label' secondary outcomes: 30-day mortality, 6-month Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) and European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions. RESULTS Overall, 56 clusters recruited 293 (169 intervention, 124 control) patients in 12 months, demonstrating cluster randomised pre-hospital trials as viable for heath service evaluations. Overall compliance was 62%, but 90% was achieved in the control arm and when face-to-face paramedic training was possible. Non-compliance appeared to be driven by proximity of the nearest hospital

  10. Neural convergence and divergence in the mammalian cerebral cortex: from experimental neuroanatomy to functional neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Man, Kingson; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Hanna; Damasio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A development essential for understanding the neural basis of complex behavior and cognition is the description, during the last quarter of the twentieth century, of detailed patterns of neuronal circuitry in the mammalian cerebral cortex. This effort established that sensory pathways exhibit successive levels of convergence, from the early sensory cortices to sensory-specific association cortices and to multisensory association cortices, culminating in maximally integrative regions; and that this convergence is reciprocated by successive levels of divergence, from the maximally integrative areas all the way back to the early sensory cortices. This article first provides a brief historical review of these neuroanatomical findings, which were relevant to the study of brain and mind-behavior relationships using a variety of approaches and to the proposal of heuristic anatomo-functional frameworks. In a second part, the article reviews new evidence that has accumulated from studies of functional neuroimaging, employing both univariate and multivariate analyses, as well as electrophysiology, in humans and other mammals, that the integration of information across the auditory, visual, and somatosensory-motor modalities proceeds in a content-rich manner. Behaviorally and cognitively relevant information is extracted from and conserved across the different modalities, both in higher-order association cortices and in early sensory cortices. Such stimulus-specific information is plausibly relayed along the neuroanatomical pathways alluded to above. The evidence reviewed here suggests the need for further in-depth exploration of the intricate connectivity of the mammalian cerebral cortex in experimental neuroanatomical studies. PMID:23840023