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Sample records for explicit solvation effects

  1. DFT solvation studies of carbohydrates: implicit and explicit solvation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play a role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a more realistic comparison with experimental data. A possible way to include solvation effects is to use implicit solvation models such as COSMO and PCM. Another avenu...

  2. Modeling aqueous solvation with semi-explicit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Christopher J.; Kehoe, Charles W.; Dill, Ken A.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a computational solvation model called semi-explicit assembly (SEA). SEA water captures much of the physics of explicit-solvent models but with computational speeds approaching those of implicit-solvent models. We use an explicit-water model to precompute properties of water solvation shells around simple spheres, then assemble a solute’s solvation shell by combining the shells of these spheres. SEA improves upon implicit-solvent models of solvation free energies by accounting for local solute curvature, accounting for near-neighbor nonadditivities, and treating water’s dipole as being asymmetrical with respect to positive or negative solute charges. SEA does not involve parameter fitting, because parameters come from the given underlying explicit-solvation model. SEA is about as accurate as explicit simulations as shown by comparisons against four different homologous alkyl series, a set of 504 varied solutes, solutes taken retrospectively from two solvation-prediction events, and a hypothetical polar-solute series, and SEA is about 100-fold faster than Poisson–Boltzmann calculations. PMID:21300905

  3. An explicitly solvated full atomistic model of the cardiac thin filament and application on the calcium binding affinity effects from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy linked mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Michael; Schwartz, Steven

    2015-03-01

    The previous version of our cardiac thin filament (CTF) model consisted of the troponin complex (cTn), two coiled-coil dimers of tropomyosin (Tm), and 29 actin units. We now present the newest revision of the model to include explicit solvation. The model was developed to continue our study of genetic mutations in the CTF proteins which are linked to familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathies. Binding of calcium to the cTnC subunit causes subtle conformational changes to propagate through the cTnC to the cTnI subunit which then detaches from actin. Conformational changes propagate through to the cTnT subunit, which allows Tm to move into the open position along actin, leading to muscle contraction. Calcium disassociation allows for the reverse to occur, which results in muscle relaxation. The inclusion of explicit TIP3 water solvation allows for the model to get better individual local solvent to protein interactions; which are important when observing the N-lobe calcium binding pocket of the cTnC. We are able to compare in silica and in vitro experimental results to better understand the physiological effects from mutants, such as the R92L/W and F110V/I of the cTnT, on the calcium binding affinity compared to the wild type.

  4. Minimalist explicit solvation models for surface loops in proteins.

    PubMed

    White, Ronald P; Meirovitch, Hagai

    2006-01-01

    We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of protein surface loops solvated by explicit water, where a prime focus of the study is the small numbers (e.g., ~100) of explicit water molecules employed. The models include only part of the protein (typically 500 - 1000 atoms), and the water molecules are restricted to a region surrounding the loop. In this study, the number of water molecules (N(w)) is systematically varied, and convergence with large N(w) is monitored to reveal N(w)(min), the minimum number required for the loop to exhibit realistic (fully hydrated) behavior. We have also studied protein surface coverage, as well as diffusion and residence times for water molecules as a function of N(w). A number of other modeling parameters are also tested. These include the number of environmental protein atoms explicitly considered in the model, as well as two ways to constrain the water molecules to the vicinity of the loop (where we find one of these methods to perform better when N(w) is small). The results (for RMSD and its fluctuations for four loops) are further compared to much larger, fully solvated systems (using ~10,000 water molecules under periodic boundary conditions and Ewald electrostatics), and to results for the GBSA implicit solvation model. We find that the loop backbone can stabilize with a surprisingly small number of water molecules (as low as 5 molecules per amino acid residue). The side chains of the loop require somewhat larger N(w), where the atomic fluctuations become too small if N(w) is further reduced. Thus, in general, we find adequate hydration to occur at roughly 12 water molecules per residue. This is an important result, because at this hydration level, computational times are comparable to those required for GBSA. Therefore these "minimalist explicit models" can provide a viable and potentially more accurate alternative. The importance of protein loop modeling is discussed in the context of these, and other, loop models

  5. Conformation of a flexible polymer in explicit solvent: Accurate solvation potentials for Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Ye, Yuting; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2015-11-28

    The conformation of a polymer chain in solution is coupled to the local structure of the surrounding solvent and can undergo large changes in response to variations in solvent density and temperature. The many-body effects of solvent on the structure of an n-mer polymer chain can be formally mapped to an exact n-body solvation potential. Here, we use a pair decomposition of this n-body potential to construct a set of two-body potentials for a Lennard-Jones (LJ) polymer chain in explicit LJ solvent. The solvation potentials are built from numerically exact results for 5-mer chains in solvent combined with an approximate asymptotic expression for the solvation potential between sites that are distant along the chain backbone. These potentials map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem and can be used to study a chain of arbitrary length, thereby dramatically reducing the computational complexity of the polymer chain-in-solvent problem. We have constructed solvation potentials at a large number of state points across the LJ solvent phase diagram including the vapor, liquid, and super-critical regions. We use these solvation potentials in single-chain Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with n ≤ 800 to determine the size, intramolecular structure, and scaling behavior of chains in solvent. To assess our results, we have carried out full chain-in-solvent MC simulations (with n ≤ 100) and find that our solvation potential approach is quantitatively accurate for a wide range of solvent conditions for these chain lengths. PMID:26627969

  6. Simulation of peptide folding with explicit water--a mean solvation method.

    PubMed

    Wu, X W; Sung, S S

    1999-02-15

    A new approach to efficiently calculate solvent effect in computer simulation of macromolecular systems has been developed. Explicit solvent molecules are included in the simulation to provide a mean solvation force for the solute conformational search. Simulations of an alanine dipeptide in aqueous solution showed that the new approach is significantly more efficient than conventional molecular dynamics method in conformational search, mainly because the mean solvation force reduced the solvent damping effect. This approach allows the solute and solvent to be simulated separately with different methods. For the macromolecule, the rigid fragment constraint dynamics method we developed previously allows large time-steps. For the solvent, a combination of a modified force-bias Monte Carlo method and a preferential sampling can efficiently sample the conformational space. A folding simulation of a 16-residue peptide in water showed high efficiency of the new approach. PMID:10024017

  7. Are mixed explicit/implicit solvation models reliable for studying phosphate hydrolysis? A comparative study of continuum, explicit and mixed solvation models.

    SciTech Connect

    Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Haranczyk, Maciej; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-05-01

    Phosphate hydrolysis is ubiquitous in biology. However, despite intensive research on this class of reactions, the precise nature of the reaction mechanism remains controversial. In this work, we have examined the hydrolysis of three homologous phosphate diesters. The solvation free energy was simulated by means of either an implicit solvation model (COSMO), hybrid quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical free energy perturbation (QM/MM-FEP) or a mixed solvation model in which N water molecules were explicitly included in the ab initio description of the reacting system (where N=1-3), with the remainder of the solvent being implicitly modelled as a continuum. Here, both COSMO and QM/MM-FEP reproduce Delta Gobs within an error of about 2kcal/mol. However, we demonstrate that in order to obtain any form of reliable results from a mixed model, it is essential to carefully select the explicit water molecules from short QM/MM runs that act as a model for the true infinite system. Additionally, the mixed models tend to be increasingly inaccurate the more explicit water molecules are placed into the system. Thus, our analysis indicates that this approach provides an unreliable way for modelling phosphate hydrolysis in solution.

  8. Infrared and vibrational CD spectra of partially solvated alpha-helices: DFT-based simulations with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Turner, David R; Kubelka, Jan

    2007-02-22

    Theoretical simulations are used to investigate the effects of aqueous solvent on the vibrational spectra of model alpha-helices, which are only partly exposed to solvent to mimic alpha-helices in proteins. Infrared absorption (IR) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) amide I' spectra for 15-amide alanine alpha-helices are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations combined with the property transfer method. The solvent is modeled by explicit water molecules hydrogen bonded to the solvated amide groups. Simulated spectra for two partially solvated model alpha-helices, one corresponding to a more exposed and the other to a more buried structure, are compared to the fully solvated and unsolvated (gas phase) simulations. The dependence of the amide I spectra on the orientation of the partially solvated helix with respect to the solvent and effects of solvation on the amide I' of 13C isotopically substituted alpha-helices are also investigated. The partial exposure to solvent causes significant broadening of the amide I' bands due to differences in the vibrational frequencies of the explicitly solvated and unsolvated amide groups. The different degree of partial solvation is reflected primarily in the frequency shifts of the unsolvated (buried) amide group vibrations. Depending on which side of the alpha-helix is exposed to solvent, the simulated IR band-shapes exhibit significant changes, from broad and relatively featureless to distinctly split into two maxima. The simulated amide I' VCD band-shapes for the partially solvated alpha-helices parallel the broadening of the IR and exhibit more sign variation, but generally preserve the sign pattern characteristic of the alpha-helical structures and are much less dependent on the alpha-helix orientation with respect to the solvent. The simulated amide I' IR spectra for the model peptides with explicitly hydrogen-bonded water are consistent with the experimental data for small alpha-helical proteins

  9. Computing solvent-induced forces in the solvation approach called Semi Explicit Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brini, Emiliano; Hummel, Michelle H.; Coutsias, Evangelos A.; Fennell, Christopher J.; Dill, Ken A.

    2014-03-01

    Many biologically relevant processes (e.g. protein folding) are often too big and slow to be simulated by computer methods that model atomically detailed water. Faster physical models of water are needed. We have developed an approach called Semi Explicit Assembly (SEA) [C.J. Fennell, C.W. Kehoe, K.A. Dill, PNAS, 108, 3234 (2011)]. It is physical because it uses pre-simulations of explicit-solvent models, and it is fast because at runtime, we just combine the pre-simulated results in rapid computations. SEA has also now been proven physically accurate in two blind tests called SAMPL. Here, we describe the computation of solvation forces in SEA, so that this solvation procedure can be incorporated into standard molecular dynamics codes. We describe experimental tests.

  10. Ab initio joint density-functional theory of solvated electrodes, with model and explicit solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, Tomas

    2015-03-01

    the electrochemical context and how it is needed for realistic description of solvated electrode systems [], and how simple ``implicit'' polarized continuum methods fail radically in this context. Finally, we shall present a series of results relevant to battery, supercapacitor, and solar-fuel systems, one of which has led to a recent invention disclosure for improving battery cycle lifetimes. Supported as a part of the Energy Materials Center at Cornell, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by DOE/BES (award de-sc0001086) and by the New York State Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR, award 60923).

  11. Solvation!

    SciTech Connect

    Ivana Adamovic

    2004-12-19

    This dissertation consists of two closely related parts: theory development and coding of correlation effects in a model potential for solvation, and study of solvent effects on chemical reactions and processes. The effective fragment potential (EFP) method has been re-parameterized, using density functional theory (DFT), more specifically, the B3LYP functional. The DFT based EFP method includes short-range correlation effects; hence it is a first step in incorporating the treatment of correlation in the EFP solvation model. In addition, the gradient of the charge penetration term in the EFP model was derived and coded. The new method has been implemented in the electronic structure code GAMESS and is in use. Formulas for the dynamic dipole polarizability, C{sub 6} dispersion coefficient and dispersion energy were derived and coded as a part of a treatment of the dispersion interactions in the general solvation model, EFP2. Preliminary results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical data. The DFT based EFP (EFP1/DFT) method was used in the study of microsolvation effects on the S{sub N}2 substitution reaction, between chloride and methyl bromide. Changes in the central barrier, for several lowest lying isomers of the systems with one, two, three and four waters, were studied using second order perturbation theory (MP2), DFT and mixed quantum mechanics (QM)/(EFP1/DFT) methods. EFP1/DFT is found to reproduce QM results with high accuracy, at just a fraction of the cost. Molecular structures and potential energy surfaces for IHI{sup -} {center_dot} Ar{sub n} (n=1-7) were studied using the MP2 method. Experimentally observed trends in the structural arrangement of the Ar atoms were explained through the analysis of the geometrical parameters and three-dimensional MP2 molecular electrostatic potentials.

  12. Testing the semi-explicit assembly model of aqueous solvation in the SAMPL4 challenge.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Dill, Ken A; Fennell, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    Here, we test a method, called semi-explicit assembly (SEA), that computes the solvation free energies of molecules in water in the SAMPL4 blind test challenge. SEA was developed with the intention of being as accurate as explicit-solvent models, but much faster to compute. It is accurate because it uses pre-simulations of simple spheres in explicit solvent to obtain structural and thermodynamic quantities, and it is fast because it parses solute free energies into regionally additive quantities. SAMPL4 provided us the opportunity to make new tests of SEA. Our tests here lead us to the following conclusions: (1) The newest version, called Field-SEA, which gives improved predictions for highly charged ions, is shown here to perform as well as the earlier versions (dipolar and quadrupolar SEA) on this broad blind SAMPL4 test set. (2) We find that both the past and present SEA models give solvation free energies that are as accurate as TIP3P. (3) Using a new approach for force field parameter optimization, we developed improved hydroxyl parameters that ensure consistency with neat-solvent dielectric constants, and found that they led to improved solvation free energies for hydroxyl-containing compounds in SAMPL4. We also learned that these hydroxyl parameters are not just fixing solvent exposed oxygens in a general sense, and therefore do not improve predictions for carbonyl or carboxylic-acid groups. Other such functional groups will need their own independent optimizations for potential improvements. Overall, these tests in SAMPL4 indicate that SEA is an accurate, general and fast new approach to computing solvation free energies. PMID:24474161

  13. Computations of absolute solvation free energies of small molecules using explicit and implicit solvent model.

    SciTech Connect

    Shivakumar, D.; Deng, Y.; Roux, B.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Chicago

    2009-01-01

    Accurate determination of absolute solvation free energy plays a critical role in numerous areas of biomolecular modeling and drug discovery. A quantitative representation of ligand and receptor desolvation, in particular, is an essential component of current docking and scoring methods. Furthermore, the partitioning of a drug between aqueous and nonpolar solvents is one of the important factors considered in pharmacokinetics. In this study, the absolute hydration free energy for a set of 239 neutral ligands spanning diverse chemical functional groups commonly found in drugs and drug-like candidates is calculated using the molecular dynamics free energy perturbation method (FEP/MD) with explicit water molecules, and compared to experimental data as well as its counterparts obtained using implicit solvent models. The hydration free energies are calculated from explicit solvent simulations using a staged FEP procedure permitting a separation of the total free energy into polar and nonpolar contributions. The nonpolar component is further decomposed into attractive (dispersive) and repulsive (cavity) components using the Weeks-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) separation scheme. To increase the computational efficiency, all of the FEP/MD simulations are generated using a mixed explicit/implicit solvent scheme with a relatively small number of explicit TIP3P water molecules, in which the influence of the remaining bulk is incorporated via the spherical solvent boundary potential (SSBP). The performances of two fixed-charge force fields designed for small organic molecules, the General Amber force field (GAFF), and the all-atom CHARMm-MSI, are compared. Because of the crucial role of electrostatics in solvation free energy, the results from various commonly used charge generation models based on the semiempirical (AM1-BCC) and QM calculations [charge fitting using ChelpG and RESP] are compared. In addition, the solvation free energies of the test set are also calculated using

  14. Efficient Simulation of Explicitly Solvated Proteins in the Well-Tempered Ensemble.

    PubMed

    Deighan, Michael; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Pfaendtner, Jim

    2012-07-10

    Herein, we report significant reduction in the cost of combined parallel tempering and metadynamics simulations (PTMetaD). The efficiency boost is achieved using the recently proposed well-tempered ensemble (WTE) algorithm. We studied the convergence of PTMetaD-WTE conformational sampling and free energy reconstruction of an explicitly solvated 20-residue tryptophan-cage protein (trp-cage). A set of PTMetaD-WTE simulations was compared to a corresponding standard PTMetaD simulation. The properties of PTMetaD-WTE and the convergence of the calculations were compared. The roles of the number of replicas, total simulation time, and adjustable WTE parameter γ were studied. PMID:26588950

  15. DFT Solvation Studies of Carbohydrates: Solvation effects in alpha-linked carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the current paper we address the effect of solvation on the landscape of alpha-linked glucose residues. The solvent is introduced via the implicit solvation models COSMO and PCM. Geometry optimizations, at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory with and without implicit solvation were carried out...

  16. DFT molecular simulations of solvated glucose dimers: explicit vs. implicit water

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The behavior of Glucose dimers in solution is investigated at the DFT level of theory via optimization and constant energy DFT molecular dynamics. The effect of the solvent on the dimer is treated two different ways: using the implicit solvation method COSMO alone to treat the bulk water behavior an...

  17. Multiple time step molecular dynamics in the optimized isokinetic ensemble steered with the molecular theory of solvation: Accelerating with advanced extrapolation of effective solvation forces

    SciTech Connect

    Omelyan, Igor E-mail: omelyan@icmp.lviv.ua; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2013-12-28

    steered by effective solvation forces allows huge outer time steps up to tens of picoseconds without affecting the equilibrium and conformational properties, and thus provides a 100- to 500-fold effective speedup in comparison to conventional MD with explicit solvent. With the statistical-mechanical 3D-RISM-KH account for effective solvation forces, the method provides efficient sampling of biomolecular processes with slow and/or rare solvation events such as conformational transitions of hydrated alanine dipeptide with the mean life times ranging from 30 ps up to 10 ns for “flip-flop” conformations, and is particularly beneficial for biomolecular systems with exchange and localization of solvent and ions, ligand binding, and molecular recognition.

  18. DFT studies of carbohydrate solvation: II. MD-DFTr of a super-molecule complex of glucose, explicit waters, and an implicit solvent (COSMO)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    MD-DFTr studies are carried out on the super-molecule solvated complexes of glucose described in paper I. Included were ten explicit water molecules and an implicit solvation model, COSMO, superimposed upon the complex. Starting configurations were taken from DFTr optimized complexes resulting from ...

  19. Solvent effects on the electronic absorption spectrum of camphor using continuum, discrete or explicit approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongsted, Jacob; Mennucci, Benedetta; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2010-01-01

    We address the effect of solvation on the lowest electronic excitation energy of camphor. The solvents considered represent a large variation in-solvent polarity. We consider three conceptually different ways of accounting for the solvent using either an implicit, a discrete or an explicit solvation model. The solvatochromic shifts in polar solvents are found to be in good agreement with the experimental data for all three solvent models. However, both the implicit and discrete solvation models are less successful in predicting solvatochromic shifts for solvents of low polarity. The results presented suggest the importance of using explicit solvent molecules in the case of nonpolar solvents.

  20. Accurate calculation of conformational free energy differences in explicit water: the confinement-solvation free energy approach.

    PubMed

    Esque, Jeremy; Cecchini, Marco

    2015-04-23

    The calculation of the free energy of conformation is key to understanding the function of biomolecules and has attracted significant interest in recent years. Here, we present an improvement of the confinement method that was designed for use in the context of explicit solvent MD simulations. The development involves an additional step in which the solvation free energy of the harmonically restrained conformers is accurately determined by multistage free energy perturbation simulations. As a test-case application, the newly introduced confinement/solvation free energy (CSF) approach was used to compute differences in free energy between conformers of the alanine dipeptide in explicit water. The results are in excellent agreement with reference calculations based on both converged molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling. To illustrate the general applicability of the method, conformational equilibria of met-enkephalin (5 aa) and deca-alanine (10 aa) in solution were also analyzed. In both cases, smoothly converged free-energy results were obtained in agreement with equilibrium sampling or literature calculations. These results demonstrate that the CSF method may provide conformational free-energy differences of biomolecules with small statistical errors (below 0.5 kcal/mol) and at a moderate computational cost even with a full representation of the solvent. PMID:25807150

  1. Conformation of a flexible chain in explicit solvent: exact solvation potentials for short Lennard-Jones chains.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark P; Adhikari, Shishir R

    2011-07-28

    The average conformation of a flexible chain molecule in solution is coupled to the local solvent structure. In a dense solvent, local chain structure often mirrors the pure solvent structure, whereas, in a dilute solvent, the chain can strongly perturb the solvent structure which, in turn, can lead to either chain expansion or compression. Here we use Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to study such solvent effects for a short Lennard-Lones (LJ) chain in monomeric LJ solvent. For an n-site chain molecule in solution these many-body solvent effects can be formally mapped to an n-body solvation potential. We have previously shown that for hard-sphere and square-well chain-in-solvent systems this n-body potential can be decomposed into a set of two-body potentials. Here, we show that this decomposition is also valid for the LJ system. Starting from high precision MC results for the n = 5 LJ chain-in-solvent system, we use a Boltzmann inversion technique to compute numerically exact sets of two-body solvation potentials which map the many-body chain-in-solvent problem to a few-body single-chain problem. We have carried out this mapping across the full solvent phase diagram including the dilute vapor, dense liquid, and supercritical regions and find that these sets of solvation potentials are able to encode the complete range of solvent effects found in the LJ chain-in-solvent system. We also show that these two-site solvation potentials can be used to obtain accurate multi-site intramolecular distribution functions and we discuss the application of these exact short chain potentials to the study of longer chains in solvent. PMID:21806157

  2. Surface Protonation at the Rutile (110) Interface: Explicit Incorporation of Solvation Structure within the Refined MUSIC Model Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Machesky, Michael L.; Predota, M.; Wesolowski, David J

    2008-11-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile ({alpha}-TiO{sub 2}) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 {angstrom} of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4 {+-} 0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pH{sub znpc} values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pH{sub znpc} value of the rutile (110) surface at 25 C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8 {+-} 0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic

  3. Surface protonation at the rutile (110) interface: explicit incorporation of solvation structure within the refined MUSIC model framework.

    PubMed

    Machesky, Michael L; Predota, Milan; Wesolowski, David J; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T; Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Ridley, Moira K; Kubicki, James D; Bandura, Andrei V; Kumar, Nitin; Sofo, Jorge O

    2008-11-01

    The detailed solvation structure at the (110) surface of rutile (alpha-TiO2) in contact with bulk liquid water has been obtained primarily from experimentally verified classical molecular dynamics (CMD) simulations of the ab initio-optimized surface in contact with SPC/E water. The results are used to explicitly quantify H-bonding interactions, which are then used within the refined MUSIC model framework to predict surface oxygen protonation constants. Quantum mechanical molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations in the presence of freely dissociable water molecules produced H-bond distributions around deprotonated surface oxygens very similar to those obtained by CMD with nondissociable SPC/E water, thereby confirming that the less computationally intensive CMD simulations provide accurate H-bond information. Utilizing this H-bond information within the refined MUSIC model, along with manually adjusted Ti-O surface bond lengths that are nonetheless within 0.05 A of those obtained from static density functional theory (DFT) calculations and measured in X-ray reflectivity experiments (as well as bulk crystal values), give surface protonation constants that result in a calculated zero net proton charge pH value (pHznpc) at 25 degrees C that agrees quantitatively with the experimentally determined value (5.4+/-0.2) for a specific rutile powder dominated by the (110) crystal face. Moreover, the predicted pHznpc values agree to within 0.1 pH unit with those measured at all temperatures between 10 and 250 degrees C. A slightly smaller manual adjustment of the DFT-derived Ti-O surface bond lengths was sufficient to bring the predicted pHznpcvalue of the rutile (110) surface at 25 degrees C into quantitative agreement with the experimental value (4.8+/-0.3) obtained from a polished and annealed rutile (110) single crystal surface in contact with dilute sodium nitrate solutions using second harmonic generation (SHG) intensity measurements as a function of ionic strength

  4. Towards Accurate Microscopic Calculation of Solvation Entropies: Extending the Restraint Release Approach to Studies of Solvation Effects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Nidhi; Warshel, Arieh

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of the solvation entropies is a major conceptual and practical challenge. On the one hand, it is interesting to quantify the factors that are responsible for the solvation entropies in solutions, while on the other, it is essential to be able to assess the contributions of the solvation entropies to the binding free energies and related properties. In fact, the solvation entropies are neglected in almost all the studies of the binding entropies. The main problem is that widely used approaches, such as the quasiharmonic (QH) approximation do not provide reliable results particularly, in cases of shallow potential and multidimensional surfaces while brute force evaluations of the entropic effects by simulating temperature dependence of the free energy converges very slowly. This paper addresses the above issue by starting with an analysis of the factors that are responsible for the negative solvation entropy of ions, showing that it is not due to the change in the solvent vibration modes or to the solvent force constant but to the changes in the solvent configurational space upon change in the solute charges. We begin by clarifying that when one deals with aqueous solutions, it is easy to evaluate the corresponding entropic effect by the Langevin dipole(LD) treatment. However, in this work we are interested in developing a general microscopic tool that can be used to study similar effects in the proteins. To this end, we explore the ability of our restraint release (RR) approach to evaluate the solvation entropy. We start this analysis by reviewing the foundation of this approach and in particular, the requirements of minimizing the enthalpy contribution to the RR free energy. We then establish that our approach is not a specialized harmonic treatment but a rather powerful approach. Moving to the main topic of this work, we demonstrate that the RR approach provides quantitative results for the solvation entropies of monovalent and divalent ions and

  5. Effect of ionic size on solvate stability of glyme-based solvate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Mandai, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Kazuki; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Nozawa, Risa; Masu, Hyuma; Ueno, Kazuhide; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2015-01-29

    A series of binary mixtures composed of glymes (triglyme, G3; tetraglyme, G4; pentaglyme, G5) and alkali-metal bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide salts (M[TFSA]; M = Li, Na, and K) were prepared, and the correlation between the composition and solvate stability was systematically investigated. Their phase diagrams and Raman spectra suggested complexation of the glymes with M[TFSA] in 1:1 and/or 2:1 molar ratio(s). From isothermal stability measurements, it was found that the formation of structurally stable complexes in the solid state did not necessarily ensure their thermal stability in the liquid state, especially in the case of 2:1 complexes, where uncoordinating or highly exchangeable glyme ligands existed in the molten complexes. The phase-state-dependent Raman spectra also supported the presence of free glymes in certain liquid complexes. The effect of the electric field induced by the alkali-metal cations on the oxidative stability of certain glyme complexes was examined by linear sweep voltammetry and quantum chemical calculations. Although the actual oxidative stability of complexes did not necessarily reflect the calculated HOMO energy levels of the glymes, the strong electric field induced by the smaller M(+) cations and proper coordination structures impart high stability to the glyme complexes. The results of thermogravimetry of complexes with different M(+) cations revealed that a balance of competitive interactions of the M(+) ions with the glymes and [TFSA](-) anions predominates the thermal stability. PMID:25530321

  6. Optimizing the affinity and specificity of ligand binding with the inclusion of solvation effect.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Wang, Jin

    2015-09-01

    Solvation effect is an important factor for protein-ligand binding in aqueous water. Previous scoring function of protein-ligand interactions rarely incorporates the solvation model into the quantification of protein-ligand interactions, mainly due to the immense computational cost, especially in the structure-based virtual screening, and nontransferable application of independently optimized atomic solvation parameters. In order to overcome these barriers, we effectively combine knowledge-based atom-pair potentials and the atomic solvation energy of charge-independent implicit solvent model in the optimization of binding affinity and specificity. The resulting scoring functions with optimized atomic solvation parameters is named as specificity and affinity with solvation effect (SPA-SE). The performance of SPA-SE is evaluated and compared to 20 other scoring functions, as well as SPA. The comparative results show that SPA-SE outperforms all other scoring functions in binding affinity prediction and "native" pose identification. Our optimization validates that solvation effect is an important regulator to the stability and specificity of protein-ligand binding. The development strategy of SPA-SE sets an example for other scoring function to account for the solvation effect in biomolecular recognitions. PMID:26111900

  7. Theoretical study of the formation of mercury (Hg2+) complexes in solution using an explicit solvation shell in implicit solvent calculations.

    PubMed

    Afaneh, Akef T; Schreckenbach, Georg; Wang, Feiyue

    2014-09-25

    The structures and harmonic vibrational frequencies of water clusters (H2O)n, n = 1-10, have been computed using the M06-L/, B3LYP/, and CAM-BLYP/cc-pVTZ levels of theories. On the basis of the literature and our results, we use three hexamer structures of the water molecules to calculate an estimated "experimental" average solvation free energy of [Hg(H2O)6](2+). Aqueous formation constants (log K) for Hg(2+) complexes, [Hg(L)m(H2O)n](2-mq), L = Cl(-), HO(-), HS(-), and S(2-), are calculated using a combination of experimental (solvation free energies of ligands and Hg(2+)) and calculated gas- and liquid-phase free energies. A combined approach has been used that involves attaching n explicit water molecules to the Hg(2+) complexes such that the first coordination sphere is complete, then surrounding the resulting (Hg(2+)-Lm)-(OH2)n cluster by a dielectric continuum, and using suitable thermodynamic cycles. This procedure significantly improves the agreement between the calculated log K values and experiment. Thus, for some neutral and anionic Hg(II) complexes, particularly Hg(II) metal ion surrounded with homo- or heteroatoms, augmenting implicit solvent calculations with sufficient explicit water molecules to complete the first coordination sphere is required-and adequate-to account for strong short-range hydrogen bonding interactions between the anion and the solvent. Calculated values for formation constants of Hg(2+) complexes with S(2-) and SH(-) are proposed. Experimental measurements of these log K values have been lacking or controversial. PMID:25076413

  8. Solvation of chromone using combined Discrete/SCRF models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemán, Carlos; Galembeck, Sergio E.

    1998-06-01

    The solvation of chromone has been investigated using three different combined Discrete/SCRF models. Four chromone-H 2O complexes and one chromone-4H 2O complex were obtained from geometry optimizations at the HF/6-31G(d) level. Three SCRF methods (PCM/6-31G(d), PCM/AM1 and SM2/AM1) were applied to such complexes in order to: (1) evaluate the reliability of the combined Discrete/SCRF models; (2) investigate the effects of the explicit water molecules on the free energy of solvation; and (3) analyze the characteristics of the different solvation sites of chromone. The results show that explicit solvent molecules exert a large influence on the free energy of solvation of a given molecular system providing some information about the solvation sites. Thus, the interaction of the carbonyl oxygen of chromone with the explicit water molecules is stronger than interaction provided by the ether oxygen, providing the complexes with the former interaction a more hydrophobic free energy of solvation than those with the latter. On the other hand, the comparison of the free energies of solvation for solutes with explicit water molecules in the first hydration shell and the free energies of solvation of the molecular system computed in an all-continuum approach reveals that the combined Discrete/SCRF models constitute a very reasonable strategy.

  9. Age effects on explicit and implicit memory

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Emma V.; Berry, Christopher J.; Shanks, David R.

    2013-01-01

    It is well-documented that explicit memory (e.g., recognition) declines with age. In contrast, many argue that implicit memory (e.g., priming) is preserved in healthy aging. For example, priming on tasks such as perceptual identification is often not statistically different in groups of young and older adults. Such observations are commonly taken as evidence for distinct explicit and implicit learning/memory systems. In this article we discuss several lines of evidence that challenge this view. We describe how patterns of differential age-related decline may arise from differences in the ways in which the two forms of memory are commonly measured, and review recent research suggesting that under improved measurement methods, implicit memory is not age-invariant. Formal computational models are of considerable utility in revealing the nature of underlying systems. We report the results of applying single and multiple-systems models to data on age effects in implicit and explicit memory. Model comparison clearly favors the single-system view. Implications for the memory systems debate are discussed. PMID:24065942

  10. Solvation Effects on Structure and Charge Distribution in Anionic Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, J. Mathias

    2015-03-01

    The interaction of ions with solvent molecules modifies the properties of both solvent and solute. Solvation generally stabilizes compact charge distributions compared to more diffuse ones. In the most extreme cases, solvation will alter the very composition of the ion itself. We use infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected ions to probe how solvation affects the structures and charge distributions of metal-CO2 cluster anions. We gratefully acknowledge the National Science Foundation for funding through Grant CHE-0845618 (for graduate student support) and for instrumentation funding through Grant PHY-1125844.

  11. Solvation free energies in [bmim]-based ionic liquids: Anion effect toward solvation of amino acid side chain analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, Muhammad Alif Mohammad; Micaêlo, Nuno; Abdul Rahman, Mohd Basyaruddin

    2014-11-01

    Stochastic molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the solvation free energy of 15 neutral amino acid side chain analogues in aqueous and five, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium ([BMIM])-based ionic liquids. The results in aqueous were found highly correlated with previous experimental and simulation data. Meanwhile, [BMIM]-based RTILs showed better solvation thermodynamics than water to an extent that they were capable of solvating molecules immiscible in water. Non-polar analogues showed stronger solvation in hydrophobic RTIL anions such as [PF6]- and [Tf2N]- while polar analogues showed stronger solvation in the more hydrophilic RTIL anions such as [Cl]-, [TfO]- and [BF4]-.

  12. Explicit Form Focus Instruction: The Effects on Implicit and Explicit Knowledge of ESL Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebadi, Mandana Rohollahzadeh; Saad, Mohd Rashid Mohd; Abedalaziz, Nabil

    2014-01-01

    The study examines the effect of explicit form focus instruction and specifically metalinguistic information feedback on the development of both implicit and explicit knowledge of adult English as a Second Language (ESL) learners. Ninety-one subjects at the lower intermediate level were carefully selected through placement test at one of the…

  13. Solvation effects on the band edge positions of photocatalysts from first principles.

    PubMed

    Ping, Yuan; Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A

    2015-11-11

    The band edge positions of photocatalysts relative to the redox potentials of water play an important role in determining the efficiency of photoelectrochemical cells. These band positions depend on the structure of the solid-liquid interface, but direct ab initio molecular dynamics calculations of these interfaces, while expected to be accurate, are too computationally demanding for high-throughput materials screening. Thus rapid theoretical screening of new photocatalyst materials requires simplified continuum solvation models that are suitable for treating solid-liquid interfaces. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of the recently developed CANDLE and SaLSA continuum solvation models for predicting solvation effects on the band positions of several well-studied surfaces [Si(111), TiO2(110), IrO2(110) and WO3(001)] in water. We find that the solvation effects vary considerably, ranging from <0.5 eV for hydrophobic surfaces, 0.5-1 eV for many hydrophilic oxide surfaces, to ∼2 eV for oxygen-deficient surfaces. The solvation model predictions are in excellent agreement (within ∼0.1 eV) with ab initio molecular dynamics results where available, and in good agreement (within ∼0.2-0.3 eV) with experimental measurements. We also predict the energetics for surface oxygen vacancies and their effect on the band positions of the hydrated WO3(001) surface, leading to an explanation for why the solvation shift observed experimentally is substantially larger than predicted for the ideal surface. Based on the correlation between solvation shift and the type of surface and solvent, we suggest approaches to engineer the band positions of surfaces in aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. PMID:26513300

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Ion Solvation in Polymer Melts: Effects of Dielectric Inhomogeneity and Chain Connectivity on Solvation Energy of Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lijun; Nakamura, Issei

    We study the ion solvation in block copolymer melts and polymer blends using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations, polymers are formed through the connection of beads that provide the dielectric response. Thus, we highlight the effect of the dielectric contrast between different species on the solvation energy of ions. We demonstrate the local enrichment of higher-dielectric components near ions, which corresponds well with the result of mean-field theories. Moreover, the chain connectivity significantly affects the reorientation of molecular dipoles in response to the electrostatic field from ions. Thus, we illustrate the marked difference in the solvation energy between the block copolymer and polymer blend. Importantly, the solvation energy substantially depends on the chain length of the polymers, in stark contrast to the Born solvation energy. We also show that our simulation results exhibit striking similarity to the result of the recent self-consistent mean field theories. However, for strongly correlated dipoles and ions, our simulations provide qualitatively opposite behaviors to these results, suggesting further development of the theoretical frameworks. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21474112 and 21404103). We are grateful to the Computing Center of Jilin Province for essential support.

  15. Solvation and Acid Strength Effects on Catalysis by Faujasite Zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Gounder, Rajamani P.; Jones, Andrew J.; Carr, Robert T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2012-02-01

    Kinetic, spectroscopic, and chemical titration data indicate that differences in monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation and methanol dehydration turnover rates (per H+) among FAU zeolites treated thermally with steam (H-USY) and then chemically with ammonium hexafluorosilicate (CDHUSY) predominantly reflect differences in the size and solvating properties of their supercage voids rather than differences in acid strength. The number of protons on a given sample was measured consistently by titrations with Na+, with CH3 groups via reactions of dimethyl ether, and with 2,6-di-tert-butylpyridine during methanol dehydration catalysis; these titration values were also supported by commensurate changes in acidic OH infrared band areas upon exposure to titrant molecules. The number of protons, taken as the average of the three titration methods, was significantly smaller than the number of framework Al atoms (Alf) obtained from X-ray diffraction and 27Al magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on H-USY (0.35 H+/Alf) and CD-HUSY (0.69 H+/Alf). These data demonstrate that the ubiquitous use of Alf sites as structural proxies for active H+ sites in zeolites can be imprecise, apparently because distorted Al structures that are not associated with acidic protons are sometimes detected as Alf sites. Monomolecular isobutane cracking and dehydrogenation rate constants, normalized non-rigorously by the number of Alf species, decreased with increasing Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples and became undetectable at sub-stoichiometric exchange levels (0.32 and 0.72 Na+/Alf ratios, respectively), an unexpected finding attributed incorrectly in previous studies to the presence of minority ‘‘super-acidic’’ sites. These rate constants, when normalized rigorously by the number of residual H+ sites were independent of Na+ content on both H-USY and CD-HUSY samples, reflecting the stoichiometric replacement of protons that are uniform in

  16. Incorporation of solvation effects into the fragment molecular orbital calculations with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hirofumi; Okiyama, Yoshio; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-11-01

    We developed FMO-PB method, which incorporates solvation effects into the Fragment Molecular Orbital calculation with the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. This method retains good accuracy in energy calculations with reduced computational time. We calculated the solvation free energies for polyalanines, Alpha-1 peptide, tryptophan cage, and complex of estrogen receptor and 17 β-estradiol to show the applicability of this method for practical systems. From the calculated results, it has been confirmed that the FMO-PB method is useful for large biomolecules in solution. We also discussed the electric charges which are used in solving the Poisson-Boltzmann equation.

  17. Solvation free energies of alanine peptides: the effect of flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C; Asthagiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2013-12-27

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular H-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waals interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  18. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthigiri, Dilipkumar; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic (ΔGel), van der Waals cavity-formation (ΔGvdw), and total (ΔG) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with fixed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ΔGel, and components ΔGvdw, and ΔG, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being γel, γvdw, and γ, respectively. Both γel and γ were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and γvdw was negative for fixed peptides. That γvdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that γvdw should be positive. A negative γvdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ΔGvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas. When we computed ΔGvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, γvdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ΔGvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We find few intramolecular h-bonds but show that the intramolecular van der Waal’s interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis. The large fluctuations in the vdw energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult. PMID:24328358

  19. Solvation Free Energies of Alanine Peptides: The Effect of Flexibility

    SciTech Connect

    Kokubo, Hironori; Harris, Robert C.; Asthagiri, Dilip; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2013-12-03

    The electrostatic (?Gel), cavity-formation (?Gvdw), and total (?G) solvation free energies for 10 alanine peptides ranging in length (n) from 1 to 10 monomers were calculated. The free energies were computed both with xed, extended conformations of the peptides and again for some of the peptides without constraints. The solvation free energies, ?Gel, ?Gvdw, and ?G, were found to be linear in n, with the slopes of the best-fit lines being gamma_el, gamma_vdw, and gamma, respectively. Both gamma_el and gamma were negative for fixed and flexible peptides, and gamma_vdw was negative for fixed peptides. That gamma_vdw was negative was surprising, as experimental data on alkanes, theoretical models, and MD computations on small molecules and model systems generally suggest that gamma_vdw should be positive. A negative gamma_vdw seemingly contradicts the notion that ?Gvdw drives the initial collapse of the protein when it folds by favoring conformations with small surface areas, but when we computed ?Gvdw for the flexible peptides, thereby allowing the peptides to assume natural ensembles of more compact conformations, gamma-vdw was positive. Because most proteins do not assume extended conformations, a ?Gvdw that increases with increasing surface area may be typical for globular proteins. An alternative hypothesis is that the collapse is driven by intramolecular interactions. We show that the intramolecular van der Waal's interaction energy is more favorable for the flexible than for the extended peptides, seemingly favoring this hypothesis, but the large fluctuations in this energy may make attributing the collapse of the peptide to this intramolecular energy difficult.

  20. Effects of Explicit Instructions, Metacognition, and Motivation on Creative Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Eunsook; O'Neil, Harold F.; Peng, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Effects of explicit instructions, metacognition, and intrinsic motivation on creative homework performance were examined in 303 Chinese 10th-grade students. Models that represent hypothesized relations among these constructs and trait covariates were tested using structural equation modelling. Explicit instructions geared to originality were…

  1. DFT SOLVATION STUDIES OF CARBOHYDRATES: THE EFFECT OF DIFFERENT HYDRATION MODELS ON THE INTERNAL COORDINATES AND ALPH/BETA-ANOMERIC RATIOS OF EPIMERS OF GLUCOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play an important role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a better comparison with experimental data. One way to include solvation effects is via the use of continuum solvation models such as COSMO. Another possibil...

  2. Ab initio molecular dynamics of solvation effects on reactivity at electrified interfaces.

    PubMed

    Herron, Jeffrey A; Morikawa, Yoshitada; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2016-08-23

    Using ab initio molecular dynamics as implemented in periodic, self-consistent (generalized gradient approximation Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) density functional theory, we investigated the mechanism of methanol electrooxidation on Pt(111). We investigated the role of water solvation and electrode potential on the energetics of the first proton transfer step, methanol electrooxidation to methoxy (CH3O) or hydroxymethyl (CH2OH). The results show that solvation weakens the adsorption of methoxy to uncharged Pt(111), whereas the binding energies of methanol and hydroxymethyl are not significantly affected. The free energies of activation for breaking the C-H and O-H bonds in methanol were calculated through a Blue Moon Ensemble using constrained ab initio molecular dynamics. Calculated barriers for these elementary steps on unsolvated, uncharged Pt(111) are similar to results for climbing-image nudged elastic band calculations from the literature. Water solvation reduces the barriers for both C-H and O-H bond activation steps with respect to their vapor-phase values, although the effect is more pronounced for C-H bond activation, due to less disruption of the hydrogen bond network. The calculated activation energy barriers show that breaking the C-H bond of methanol is more facile than the O-H bond on solvated negatively biased or uncharged Pt(111). However, with positive bias, O-H bond activation is enhanced, becoming slightly more facile than C-H bond activation. PMID:27503889

  3. Effects of cation and anion solvation on ion transport in functionalized perfluoropolyethers electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timachova, Ksenia; Chintapalli, Mahati; Olsen, Kevin; Desimone, Joseph; Balsara, Nitash

    Advances in polymer electrolytes for use in lithium batteries have been limited by the incorporation of selective lithium binding groups that provide necessary solvation for the lithium but ultimately restrict the mobility of the lithium ions relative to anions. Perfluoropolyether electrolytes (PFPE) are a new class of nonflammable liquid polymer electrolytes that have been functionalized with solvating groups for both lithium ions and fluorinated anions. PFPEs with different endgroups mixed with LiN(SO2CF3)2 salt have shown substantial differences in conductivity and allows us to investigate the effects of varying solvating environments on ion transport. To study the independent motion of cations and anions in these systems, the individual diffusion coefficients of the Li + and (SO2CF3)2 - ions were measured using pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR). Comparing conductivity calculated using these diffusion coefficients with electrochemical measurements yields an estimation for the number of charge carrier in the system. The amount of salt dissociation, not the mobility of the salt, is the primary driver of differences in electrochemical conductivities between PFPEs with different solvating groups.

  4. COMPUTER SIMULATIONS WITH EXPLICIT SOLVENT: Recent Progress in the Thermodynamic Decomposition of Free Energies and in Modeling Electrostatic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Ronald M.; Gallicchio, Emilio

    1998-10-01

    This review focuses on recent progress in two areas in which computer simulations with explicit solvent are being applied: the thermodynamic decomposition of free energies, and modeling electrostatic effects. The computationally intensive nature of these simulations has been an obstacle to the systematic study of many problems in solvation thermodynamics, such as the decomposition of solvation and ligand binding free energies into component enthalpies and entropies. With the revolution in computer power continuing, these problems are ripe for study but require the judicious choice of algorithms and approximations. We provide a critical evaluation of several numerical approaches to the thermodynamic decomposition of free energies and summarize applications in the current literature. Progress in computer simulations with explicit solvent of charge perturbations in biomolecules was slow in the early 1990s because of the widespread use of truncated Coulomb potentials in these simulations, among other factors. Development of the sophisticated technology described in this review to handle the long-range electrostatic interactions has increased the predictive power of these simulations to the point where comparisons between explicit and continuum solvent models can reveal differences that have their true physical origin in the inherent molecularity of the surrounding medium.

  5. Effects of geometry and chemistry on hydrophobic solvation.

    PubMed

    Harris, Robert C; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2014-10-14

    Inserting an uncharged van der Waals (vdw) cavity into water disrupts the distribution of water and creates attractive dispersion interactions between the solvent and solute. This free-energy change is the hydrophobic solvation energy (ΔG(vdw)). Frequently, it is assumed to be linear in the solvent-accessible surface area, with a positive surface tension (γ) that is independent of the properties of the molecule. However, we found that γ for a set of alkanes differed from that for four configurations of decaalanine, and γ = -5 was negative for the decaalanines. These findings conflict with the notion that ΔG(vdw) favors smaller A. We broke ΔG(vdw) into the free energy required to exclude water from the vdw cavity (ΔG(rep)) and the free energy of forming the attractive interactions between the solute and solvent (ΔG(att)) and found that γ < 0 for the decaalanines because -γ(att) > γ(rep) and γ(att) < 0. Additionally, γ(att) and γ(rep) for the alkanes differed from those for the decaalanines, implying that none of ΔG(att), ΔG(rep), and ΔG(vdw) can be computed with a constant surface tension. We also showed that ΔG(att) could not be computed from either the initial or final water distributions, implying that this quantity is more difficult to compute than is sometimes assumed. Finally, we showed that each atom's contribution to γ(rep) depended on multibody interactions with its surrounding atoms, implying that these contributions are not additive. These findings call into question some hydrophobic models. PMID:25258413

  6. Effects of geometry and chemistry on hydrophobic solvation

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robert C.; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2014-01-01

    Inserting an uncharged van der Waals (vdw) cavity into water disrupts the distribution of water and creates attractive dispersion interactions between the solvent and solute. This free-energy change is the hydrophobic solvation energy (ΔGvdw). Frequently, it is assumed to be linear in the solvent-accessible surface area, with a positive surface tension (γ) that is independent of the properties of the molecule. However, we found that γ for a set of alkanes differed from that for four configurations of decaalanine, and γ = −5 was negative for the decaalanines. These findings conflict with the notion that ΔGvdw favors smaller A. We broke ΔGvdw into the free energy required to exclude water from the vdw cavity (ΔGrep) and the free energy of forming the attractive interactions between the solute and solvent (ΔGatt) and found that γ < 0 for the decaalanines because −γatt > γrep and γatt < 0. Additionally, γatt and γrep for the alkanes differed from those for the decaalanines, implying that none of ΔGatt, ΔGrep, and ΔGvdw can be computed with a constant surface tension. We also showed that ΔGatt could not be computed from either the initial or final water distributions, implying that this quantity is more difficult to compute than is sometimes assumed. Finally, we showed that each atom’s contribution to γrep depended on multibody interactions with its surrounding atoms, implying that these contributions are not additive. These findings call into question some hydrophobic models. PMID:25258413

  7. Spin-State Energetics of Fe(III) and Ru(III) Aqua Complexes: Accurate ab Initio Calculations and Evidence for Huge Solvation Effects.

    PubMed

    Radoń, Mariusz; Gąssowska, Katarzyna; Szklarzewicz, Janusz; Broclawik, Ewa

    2016-04-12

    Aqua complexes of transition metals are useful models for understanding the electronic structure of metal-oxide species relevant in photocatalytic water splitting. Moreover, spin-forbidden d-d transitions of aqua complexes provide valuable experimental data of spin-state energetics, which can be used for benchmarking of computational methods. Here, low-energy spin states of Fe(III) and Ru(III) aqua complexes are studied with an array of DFT and high-level wave function methods (CASPT2, RASPT2, NEVPT2, CCSD(T)-F12, and other coupled cluster methods up to full CCSDT). The results from single-reference and multireference methods are cross-checked, and the amount of multireference character for both considered spin states of [Fe(H2O)6](3+) is carefully analyzed. In addition to small [M(H2O)6](3+) clusters (M = Fe, Ru), we also employ larger models [M(H2O)6·(H2O)12](3+), with explicit water molecules in the second coordination sphere, to describe the situation in aqueous solution. By comparing the results for both types of models, our calculations evidence large and systematic solvation effects on the spin-state energetics. It is found that, due to the interaction with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the second coordination sphere, the first coordination sphere undergoes a noticeable contraction and deformation. In consequence, the presence of solvation shell affects the relative energies of spin states by as much as 3-4 × 10(3) cm(-1) (∼10 kcal/mol). Once this solvation effect is accounted for, the spin-state energetics from CCSD(T) and NEVPT2 calculations turn out to be in an excellent agreement with the experimental estimates, which was not the case for isolated [M(H2O)6](3+) species is gas phase. We thus postulate that significant discrepancies between theory and experimental data for [Fe(H2O)6](3+) that were previously reported in the literature may be plausibly resolved and attributed to the neglect of explicit solvation effects and also, to some extent, to

  8. Role of Solvation Effects in Protein Denaturation: From Thermodynamics to Single Molecules and Back

    PubMed Central

    England, Jeremy L.; Haran, Gilad

    2011-01-01

    Protein stability often is studied in vitro through the use of urea and guanidinium chloride, chemical cosolvents that disrupt protein native structure. Much controversy still surrounds the underlying mechanism by which these molecules denature proteins. Here we review current thinking on various aspects of chemical denaturation. We begin by discussing classic models of protein folding and how the effects of denaturants may fit into this picture through their modulation of the collapse, or coil-globule transition, which typically precedes folding. Subsequently, we examine recent molecular dynamics simulations that have shed new light on the possible microscopic origins of the solvation effects brought on by denaturants. It seems likely that both denaturants operate by facilitating solvation of hydrophobic regions of proteins. Finally, we present recent single-molecule fluorescence studies of denatured proteins, the analysis of which corroborates the role of denaturants in shifting the equilibrium of the coil-globule transition. PMID:21219136

  9. Solvation effect on kinetic rate constant of reactions in supercritical solvents

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, A.A.; Cummings, P.T. |; Kalyuzhnyi, Yu.V.

    1998-03-01

    A statistical mechanical analysis of the solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near and supercritical solvents is presented to understand the experimental findings regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects. This is an extension of the solvation formalism of Chialvo and Cummings to the analysis of the microscopic basis for the macroscopic pressure and temperature effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions conducted in the compressible region of the solvent phase diagram. This analysis is illustrated with integral equations calculations involving Lennard-Jones infinitely dilute quaternary systems to describe the species in solution during the reaction of triplet benzophenone ({sup 3}BP) with a cosolvent (either O{sub 2} or 1,4-cyclohexadiene) in supercritical CO{sub 2} along the supercritical isotherms T{sub r} = 1.01 and 1.06. The role of the species molecular asymmetries and consequently their solvation behavior in determining the thermodynamic pressure and temperature effects on the kinetic rate constant of reactions at near-critical conditions are discussed.

  10. Highly effective configurational assignment using bisthioureas as chiral solvating agents in the presence of DABCO.

    PubMed

    Bian, Guangling; Fan, Hongjun; Huang, Huayin; Yang, Shiwei; Zong, Hua; Song, Ling; Yang, Genjin

    2015-03-20

    A highly effective (1)H NMR method for determining the absolute configurations of various chiral α-hydroxyl acids and their derivatives has been developed with the use of bisthioureas (R)-CSA 1 and (S)-CSA 1 as chiral solvating agents in the presence of DABCO, giving distinguishable proton signals with up to 0.66 ppm chemical shift nonequivalence. Computational modeling studies were performed with Gaussian09 to reveal the chiral recognition mechanism. PMID:25751415

  11. Solvent effects of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate: solvation and dynamic behavior of polar and apolar solutes.

    PubMed

    Lesch, Volker; Heuer, Andreas; Holm, Christian; Smiatek, Jens

    2015-04-01

    We study the solvation properties of the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([EMIM](+)[ACE](-)) and the resulting dynamic behavior for differently charged model solutes at room temperature via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of 300 ns length and 200 ns equilibration time. The solutes are simple model spheres which are either positively or negatively charged with a valency of one, or uncharged. The numerical findings indicate a distinct solvation behavior with the occurrence of well-pronounced solvation shells whose composition significantly depends on the charge of the solute. All the results of our simulations evidence the existence of a long-range perturbation effect in presence of the solutes. Our findings validate the dominance of electrostatic interactions with regard to unfavorable entropic ordering effects which elucidates the enthalpic character of the solvation process in ionic liquids for charged solutes. PMID:25680082

  12. Olanzapine solvates.

    PubMed

    Cavallari, Cristina; Santos, Beatriz Pérez-Artacho; Fini, Adamo

    2013-11-01

    Olanzapine was crystallized from 12 organic solvents alone or in mixture, by cooling in the freezer, by slow evaporation of the solvent, or by suspending olanzapine powder for some time in the solvent. All the samples thus obtained were examined by thermal analysis (differential scanning calorimetry-DSC and thermogravimetry-TG) to certify the formation of a solvate, the presence of polymorph (form 1 or 2) in the desolvated olanzapine, comparing the different profile of the thermograms, and to calculate the stoichiometry of the possible solvate. According to the DSC thermogram, the solvents can be divided into four classes: those that do not form solvates and leave olanzapine form 1 (ethyl acetate, toluene, diethyl ether, and acetone); those that form solvate and leave form 1 of olanzapine after desolvation (methanol, 1- and 2-propanol); those that after desolvation of the solvate show a polymorph transition in the thermogram indicating the presence of form 2 of olanzapine (ethanol); other solvents (tetrahydrofuran, chloroform, acetonitrile) give solvate thermograms, where this last thermal trace is only poorly evident. With few exceptions, each solvent forms solvate both when pure and in mixture (10%, v/v, in ethyl acetate). Methanol monosolvate displays complex thermogram and thermogravimetric desolvation profiles, depending on the crystallization experimental conditions, used to prepare the solvates. Dichloromethane solvate was found by X-ray diffraction analysis to be amorphous and, on heating during DSC analysis, allowed the crystallization of both form 1 and 2, with different weight ratio, according to the experimental conditions of the solvate preparation. PMID:23963777

  13. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained.

  14. Explicit-water theory for the salt-specific effects and Hofmeister series in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhnyi, Yuriy V; Vlachy, Vojko

    2016-06-01

    Effects of addition of salts on stability of aqueous protein solutions are studied theoretically and the results are compared with experimental data. In our approach, all the interacting species, proteins, ions, and water molecules, are accounted for explicitly. Water molecules are modeled as hard spheres with four off-center attractive square-well sites. These sites serve to bind either another water or to solvate the ions or protein charges. The ions are represented as charged hard spheres, and decorated by attractive sites to allow solvation. Spherical proteins simultaneously possess positive and negative groups, represented by charged hard spheres, attached to the surface of the protein. The attractive square-well sites, mimicking the protein-protein van der Waals interaction, are located on the surface of the protein. To obtain numerical results, we utilized the energy route of Wertheim's associative mean spherical approximation. From measurable properties, we choose to calculate the second virial coefficient B2, which is closely related to the tendency of proteins to aggregate and eventually crystalize. Calculations are in agreement with experimental trends: (i) For low concentration of added salt, the alkali halide salts follow the inverse Hofmeister series. (ii) At higher concentration of added salt, the trend is reversed. (iii) When cations are varied, the salts follow the direct Hofmeister series. (iv) In contrast to the colloidal theories, our approach correctly predicts the non-monotonic behavior of B2 upon addition of salts. (v) With respect to anions, the theory predicts for the B2 values to follow different sequences below and above the iso-ionic point, as also confirmed experimentally. (vi) A semi-quantitative agreement between measured and calculated values for the second virial coefficient, as functions of pH of solution and added salt type and concentration, is obtained. PMID:27276970

  15. Solvation effects on reactions of triplet benzophenone in supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.B.; Brennecke, J.F.; Chateauneuf, J.E.

    1995-05-01

    Laser flash photolysis of the hydrogen abstraction reaction of triplet benzophenone ({sup 3}BP) from 2-propanol and 1,4-cyclohexadiene in supercritical ethane and fluoroform was investigated. Bimolecular rate constants based on bulk concentrations decrease with an increase in pressure along both isotherms studied. These results corroborate previous studies in CO{sub 2} that show increased reaction rates due to enhanced local compositions of cosolvent around the {sup 3}BP solute. Analysis of the results includes prediction of the thermodynamic pressure effect on the rate constant, which suggests an increase in the rate constant with pressure, as well as the effects of increased local cosolvent concentrations about {sup 3}BP. Spectroscopic measurements of the local composition of 2-propanol about a solute in supercritical CO{sub 2} are used to explain the apparent discrepancy between experiment and prediction, providing reasonable evidence that the local environment can influence kinetically controlled reactions in supercritical fluids.

  16. Probing solvation effects at conical intersections by ultrafast photoelectron imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soep, Benoit; Poisson, Lionel; Raffael, Kevin; Mestdagh, Jean Michel

    2007-03-01

    The electronic excitation of polyatomic molecules is generally followed by relaxation of the electronic energy to the ground state or to metastable, low lying states such as triplet states in hydrocarbons. It can be extremely rapid whenever conical intersections between the surfaces are at play, owing to their structural changes. Since, in general, relaxation is observed in condensed phases, it is essential to conduct the relevant experiments in the presence of a perturbing medium, here the surface of an argon cluster. We address the coupling of two excited configurations in a molecule possessing charge transfer intermediates thus prone to medium effects. We shall compare here the observation of the free and deposited molecule at the surface of argon clusters. The effect of the cluster and the possibility to record significant photoelectron spectra is thus described that represents an innovation for large systems. We made use of the anisotropy of the photoelectron angular distribution of the electrons to unravel the dynamics of the several excited configurations that are traversed during the electronic relaxation.

  17. Effect of explicit dimension instruction on speech category learning

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Yi, Han-Gyol; Smayda, Kirsten E.; Maddox, W. Todd

    2015-01-01

    Learning non-native speech categories is often considered a challenging task in adulthood. This difficulty is driven by cross-language differences in weighting critical auditory dimensions that differentiate speech categories. For example, previous studies have shown that differentiating Mandarin tonal categories requires attending to dimensions related to pitch height and direction. Relative to native speakers of Mandarin, the pitch direction dimension is under-weighted by native English speakers. In the current study, we examined the effect of explicit instructions (dimension instruction) on native English speakers' Mandarin tone category learning within the framework of a dual-learning systems (DLS) model. This model predicts that successful speech category learning is initially mediated by an explicit, reflective learning system that frequently utilizes unidimensional rules, with an eventual switch to a more implicit, reflexive learning system that utilizes multidimensional rules. Participants were explicitly instructed to focus and/or ignore the pitch height dimension, the pitch direction dimension, or were given no explicit prime. Our results show that instruction instructing participants to focus on pitch direction, and instruction diverting attention away from pitch height resulted in enhanced tone categorization. Computational modeling of participant responses suggested that instruction related to pitch direction led to faster and more frequent use of multidimensional reflexive strategies, and enhanced perceptual selectivity along the previously underweighted pitch direction dimension. PMID:26542400

  18. Effect of explicit dimensional instruction on speech category learning.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Bharath; Yi, Han-Gyol; Smayda, Kirsten E; Maddox, W Todd

    2016-02-01

    Learning nonnative speech categories is often considered a challenging task in adulthood. This difficulty is driven by cross-language differences in weighting critical auditory dimensions that differentiate speech categories. For example, previous studies have shown that differentiating Mandarin tonal categories requires attending to dimensions related to pitch height and direction. Relative to native speakers of Mandarin, the pitch direction dimension is underweighted by native English speakers. In the current study, we examined the effect of explicit instructions (dimension instruction) on native English speakers' Mandarin tone category learning within the framework of a dual-learning systems (DLS) model. This model predicts that successful speech category learning is initially mediated by an explicit, reflective learning system that frequently utilizes unidimensional rules, with an eventual switch to a more implicit, reflexive learning system that utilizes multidimensional rules. Participants were explicitly instructed to focus and/or ignore the pitch height dimension, the pitch direction dimension, or were given no explicit prime. Our results show that instruction instructing participants to focus on pitch direction, and instruction diverting attention away from pitch height, resulted in enhanced tone categorization. Computational modeling of participant responses suggested that instruction related to pitch direction led to faster and more frequent use of multidimensional reflexive strategies and enhanced perceptual selectivity along the previously underweighted pitch direction dimension. PMID:26542400

  19. Development and application of QM/MM methods to study the solvation effects and surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dibya, Pooja Arora

    2010-01-01

    Quantum mechanical (QM) calculations have the advantage of attaining high-level accuracy, however QM calculations become computationally inefficient as the size of the system grows. Solving complex molecular problems on large systems and ensembles by using quantum mechanics still poses a challenge in terms of the computational cost. Methods that are based on classical mechanics are an inexpensive alternative, but they lack accuracy. A good trade off between accuracy and efficiency is achieved by combining QM methods with molecular mechanics (MM) methods to use the robustness of the QM methods in terms of accuracy and the MM methods to minimize the computational cost. Two types of QM combined with MM (QM/MM) methods are the main focus of the present dissertation: the application and development of QM/MM methods for solvation studies and reactions on the Si(100) surface. The solvation studies were performed using a discreet solvation model that is largely based on first principles called the effective fragment potential method (EFP). The main idea of combining the EFP method with quantum mechanics is to accurately treat the solute-solvent and solvent-solvent interactions, such as electrostatic, polarization, dispersion and charge transfer, that are important in correctly calculating solvent effects on systems of interest. A second QM/MM method called SIMOMM (surface integrated molecular orbital molecular mechanics) is a hybrid QM/MM embedded cluster model that mimics the real surface.3 This method was employed to calculate the potential energy surfaces for reactions of atomic O on the Si(100) surface. The hybrid QM/MM method is a computationally inexpensive approach for studying reactions on larger surfaces in a reasonably accurate and efficient manner. This thesis is comprised of four chapters: Chapter 1 describes the general overview and motivation of the dissertation and gives a broad background of the computational methods that have been employed in this work

  20. Effective interactions between nanoparticles: Creating temperature-independent solvation environments for self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Hari O. S.; Shrivastav, Gourav; Agarwal, Manish; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2016-06-01

    The extent to which solvent-mediated effective interactions between nanoparticles can be predicted based on structure and associated thermodynamic estimators for bulk solvents and for solvation of single and pairs of nanoparticles is studied here. As a test of the approach, we analyse the strategy for creating temperature-independent solvent environments using a series of homologous chain fluids as solvents, as suggested by an experimental paper [M. I. Bodnarchuk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 11967 (2010)]. Our conclusions are based on molecular dynamics simulations of Au140(SC10H21)62 nanoparticles in n-alkane solvents, specifically hexane, octane, decane and dodecane, using the TraPPE-UA potential to model the alkanes and alkylthiols. The 140-atom gold core of the nanocrystal is held rigid in a truncated octahedral geometry and the gold-thiolate interaction is modeled using a Morse potential. The experimental observation was that the structural and rheological properties of n-alkane solvents are constant over a temperature range determined by equivalent solvent vapour pressures. We show that this is a consequence of the fact that long chain alkane liquids behave to a good approximation as simple liquids formed by packing of monomeric methyl/methylene units. Over the corresponding temperature range (233-361 K), the solvation environment is approximately constant at the single and pair nanoparticle levels under good solvent conditions. However, quantitative variations of the order of 10%-20% do exist in various quantities, such as molar volume of solute at infinite dilution, entropy of solvation, and onset distance for soft repulsions. In the opposite limit of a poor solvent, represented by vacuum in this study, the effective interactions between nanoparticles are no longer temperature-independent with attractive interactions increasing by up to 50% on decreasing the temperature from 361 K to 290 K, accompanied by an increase in emergent anisotropy due to

  1. Effective interactions between nanoparticles: Creating temperature-independent solvation environments for self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Hari O S; Shrivastav, Gourav; Agarwal, Manish; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2016-06-28

    The extent to which solvent-mediated effective interactions between nanoparticles can be predicted based on structure and associated thermodynamic estimators for bulk solvents and for solvation of single and pairs of nanoparticles is studied here. As a test of the approach, we analyse the strategy for creating temperature-independent solvent environments using a series of homologous chain fluids as solvents, as suggested by an experimental paper [M. I. Bodnarchuk et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 132, 11967 (2010)]. Our conclusions are based on molecular dynamics simulations of Au140(SC10H21)62 nanoparticles in n-alkane solvents, specifically hexane, octane, decane and dodecane, using the TraPPE-UA potential to model the alkanes and alkylthiols. The 140-atom gold core of the nanocrystal is held rigid in a truncated octahedral geometry and the gold-thiolate interaction is modeled using a Morse potential. The experimental observation was that the structural and rheological properties of n-alkane solvents are constant over a temperature range determined by equivalent solvent vapour pressures. We show that this is a consequence of the fact that long chain alkane liquids behave to a good approximation as simple liquids formed by packing of monomeric methyl/methylene units. Over the corresponding temperature range (233-361 K), the solvation environment is approximately constant at the single and pair nanoparticle levels under good solvent conditions. However, quantitative variations of the order of 10%-20% do exist in various quantities, such as molar volume of solute at infinite dilution, entropy of solvation, and onset distance for soft repulsions. In the opposite limit of a poor solvent, represented by vacuum in this study, the effective interactions between nanoparticles are no longer temperature-independent with attractive interactions increasing by up to 50% on decreasing the temperature from 361 K to 290 K, accompanied by an increase in emergent anisotropy due to

  2. Deuterium isotope effect on femtosecond solvation dynamics in an ionic liquid microemulsion: an excitation wavelength dependence study.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Dibyendu Kumar; Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Adhikari, Aniruddha; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2010-04-01

    The deuterium isotope effect on the solvation dynamics and the anisotropy decay of coumarin 480 (C480) in a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL) microemulsion is studied by femtosecond up-conversion. The microemulsion consists of the RTIL 1-pentyl-3-methyl-imidazolium tetra-fluoroborate ([pmim][BF(4)]) in triton X-100 (TX-100)/benzene. Replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O in the microemulsion causes retardation of solvation dynamics. The average solvation time of C480 (tau(s)) in RTIL microemulsion with 5 wt % D(2)O is approximately 1.5-1.7 times slower compared to that in the H(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion. This suggests that the main species in the microemulsion responsible for solvation is the water molecules. In both D(2)O and H(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion, the solvation dynamics exhibits marked dependence on the excitation wavelength (lambda(ex)) and becomes about 15 times faster as lambda(ex) increases from 375 to 435 nm. This is ascribed to the structural heterogeneity in the RTIL microemulsion. For lambda(ex) = 375 nm, the region near the TX-100 surfactant is probed where bound water molecules cause slow solvation dynamics. At 435 nm, the RTIL pool is selected where the water molecules are more mobile and hence gives rise to faster solvation. The average time constant of anisotropy decay shows opposite dependence on lambda(ex) and increases about 2.5-fold from 180 ps at lambda(ex) = 375 nm to 500 ps at lambda(ex) = 435 nm for D(2)O containing RTIL microemulsion. The slower anisotropy decay at lambda(ex) = 435 nm is ascribed to the higher viscosity of RTIL which causes greater friction at the core. PMID:20235504

  3. The effects of charge transfer on the aqueous solvation of ions

    SciTech Connect

    Soniat, Marielle; Rick, Steven W.

    2012-07-28

    Ab initio-based charge partitioning of ionic systems results in ions with non-integer charges. This charge-transfer (CT) effect alters both short- and long-range interactions. Until recently, the effects of CT have been mostly neglected in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The method presented in this paper for including charge transfer between ions and water is consistent with ab initio charge partitioning and does not add significant time to the simulation. The ions of sodium, potassium, and chloride are parameterized to reproduce dimer properties and aqueous structures. The average charges of the ions from MD simulations (0.900, 0.919, and -0.775 for Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, and Cl{sup -}, respectively) are consistent with quantum calculations. The hydration free energies calculated for these ions are in agreement with experimental estimates, which shows that the interactions are described accurately. The ions also have diffusion constants in good agreement with experiment. Inclusion of CT results in interesting properties for the waters in the first solvation shell of the ions. For all ions studied, the first shell waters acquire a partial negative charge, due to the difference between water-water and water-ion charge-transfer amounts. CT also reduces asymmetry in the solvation shell of the chloride anion, which could have important consequences for the behavior of chloride near the air-water interface.

  4. Solvation force induced by short range, exact dissipative particle dynamics effective surfaces on a simple fluid and on polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Goicochea, Armando Gama; Alarcón, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The thermodynamic properties of a simple fluid confined by effective wall forces are calculated using Monte Carlo simulations in the grand canonical ensemble. The solvation force produced by polymer brushes of two different lengths is obtained also. For the particular type of model interactions used, known as the dissipative particle dynamics method, we find that it is possible to obtain an exact, simple expression for the effective force induced by a planar wall composed of identical particles that interact with those in the fluid. We show that despite the short range of all forces in the model, the solvation force can be finite at relatively large distances and therefore does not depend only on the range of the interparticle or solvent-surface forces. As for the polymer brushes, we find that the shape of the solvation force profiles is in fair agreement with scaling and self-consistent field theories. The applications and possible extensions of this work are discussed. PMID:21219016

  5. Modeling solvation effects in real-space and real-time within density functional approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado, Alain; Corni, Stefano; Pittalis, Stefano; Rozzi, Carlo Andrea

    2015-10-14

    The Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM) can be used in conjunction with Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent extension (TDDFT) to simulate the electronic and optical properties of molecules and nanoparticles immersed in a dielectric environment, typically liquid solvents. In this contribution, we develop a methodology to account for solvation effects in real-space (and real-time) (TD)DFT calculations. The boundary elements method is used to calculate the solvent reaction potential in terms of the apparent charges that spread over the van der Waals solute surface. In a real-space representation, this potential may exhibit a Coulomb singularity at grid points that are close to the cavity surface. We propose a simple approach to regularize such singularity by using a set of spherical Gaussian functions to distribute the apparent charges. We have implemented the proposed method in the OCTOPUS code and present results for the solvation free energies and solvatochromic shifts for a representative set of organic molecules in water.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Hydration Effects on Solvation, Diffusivity, and Permeability in Chitosan/Chitin Films.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Marshall T; Greeley, Duncan A; Kit, Kevin M; Keffer, David J

    2016-09-01

    The effects of hydration on the solvation, diffusivity, solubility, and permeability of oxygen molecules in sustainable, biodegradable chitosan/chitin food packaging films were studied via molecular dynamics and confined random walk simulations. With increasing hydration, the membrane has a more homogeneous water distribution with the polymer chains being fully solvated. The diffusivity increased by a factor of 4 for oxygen molecules and by an order of magnitude for water with increasing the humidity. To calculate the Henry's constant and solubility of oxygen in the membranes with changing hydration, the excess chemical potential was calculated via free energy perturbation, thermodynamic integration and direct particle deletion methods. The simulations predicted a higher solubility and permeability for the lower humidity, in contradiction to experimental results. All three methods for calculating the solubility were in good agreement. It was found that the Coulombic interactions in the potential caused the oxygen to bind too strongly to the protonated amine group. Insight from this work will help guide molecular modeling of chitosan/chitin membranes, specifically permeability measurements for small solute molecules. Efforts to chemically tailor chitosan/chitin membranes to favor discrete as opposed to continuous aqueous domains could reduce oxygen permeability. PMID:27487964

  7. A Density Functional Theory Evaluation of Hydrophobic Solvation: Ne, Ar and Kr in a 50-Water Cluster. Implications for the Hydrophobic Effect

    PubMed Central

    Kobko, Nadya; Marianski, Mateusz; Asensio, Amparo; Wieczorek, Robert; Dannenberg, J. J.

    2011-01-01

    The physical explanation for the hydrophobic effect has been the subject of disagreement. Physical organic chemists tend to use a explanation related to pressure, while many biochemists prefer an explanation that involves decreased entropy of the aqueous solvent. We present DFT calculations at the B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) and X3LYP/6-31G(d,p) levels on the solvation of three noble gases (Ne, Ar, and Kr) in clusters of 50 waters. Vibrational analyses show no substantial decreases in the vibrational entropies of the waters in any of the three clusters. The observed positive free energies of transfer from the gas phase or from nonpolar solvents to water appear to be due to the work needed to make a suitable hole in the aqueous solvent. We distinguish between hydrophobic solvations (explicitly studied here) and the hydrophobic effect that occurs when a solute (or transition state) can decrease its volume through conformational change (which is not possible for the noble gases). PMID:22666658

  8. Physical Modeling of Aqueous Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Fennell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the free energies of solvating molecules in water. Computational modeling usually involves either detailed explicit-solvent simulations, or faster computations, which are based on implicit continuum approximations or additivity assumptions. These simpler approaches often miss microscopic physical details and non-additivities present in experimental data. We review explicit-solvent modeling that identifies the physical bases for the errors in the simpler approaches. One problem is that water molecules that are shared between two substituent groups often behave differently than waters around each substituent individually. One manifestation of non-additivities is that solvation free energies in water can depend not only on surface area or volume, but on other properties, such as the surface curvature. We also describe a new computational approach, called Semi-Explicit Assembly, that aims to repair these flaws and capture more of the physics of explicit water models, but with computational efficiencies approaching those of implicit-solvent models. PMID:25143658

  9. Do Macromolecular Crowding Agents Exert Only an Excluded Volume Effect? A Protein Solvation Study.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Sanjib K; Gautam, Saurabh; Biswas, Saikat; Kundu, Jayanta; Chowdhury, Pramit K

    2015-11-01

    The effect of macromolecular crowding on protein structure and dynamics has mostly been explained on the basis of the excluded volume effect, its origin being entropic. In recent times a progressive shift in this view has been taking place with increasing emphasis on soft interactions that are enthalpic by nature. Using very low concentrations (1-10 g/L) of both synthetic (dextran- and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based) and protein (α-synuclein and myoglobin)-based crowders, we have shown that the solvation of probe molecule ANS (1-anilinonapthalene-8-sulfonate) bound to serum proteins bovine serum albumin (BSA) and human serum albumin (HSA) is significantly modulated in both a protein- and crowder-dependent fashion. Since under such conditions the effect of excluded volume is appreciably low, we propose that our observations are direct evidence of soft interactions between the macromolecular crowding agents used and the serum proteins. Moreover, our data reveal, that since at these low crowder concentrations major perturbations to the protein structure are unlikely to take place while minor perturbations might not be readily visible, protein solvation provides a unique spectral signature for capturing such local dynamics, thereby allowing one to decouple hard-sphere interactions from soft sphere ones. Furthermore, since fast fluctuations are known to play a major role in determining the functional characteristics of proteins and enzymes, our results suggest that such motions are prone to be modulated even when the cellular crowding conditions are quite relaxed. In other words, by the time the excluded volume effects come into the picture in the physiological milieu, modulations of functionally important protein motions that need a relatively lower activation energy have already taken place as a result of the aforementioned enthalpic (soft) interactions. PMID:26452170

  10. The effect of air on solvated electron chemistry at a plasma/liquid interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Bartels, David M.; Mohan Sankaran, R.; Go, David B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmas in contact with liquids initiate complex chemistry that leads to the generation of a wide range of reactive species. For example, in an electrolytic configuration with a cathodic plasma electrode, electrons from the plasma are injected into the solution, leading to solvation and ensuing reactions. If the gas contains oxygen, electronegative oxygen molecules may react with the plasma electrons via attachment to reduce the electron flux to the solution reducing the production of solvated electrons or produce reactive oxygen species that quickly scavenge solvated electrons in solution. Here, we applied a total internal reflection absorption spectroscopy technique to compare the concentration of solvated electrons produced in solution by an argon plasma containing various amounts of oxygen, nitrogen, and air. Our measurements indicate that in oxygen or air ambients, electron attachment in the plasma phase greatly attenuates the electron flux incident on the liquid surface. The remaining electrons then solvate but are quickly scavenged by reactive oxygen species in the liquid phase.

  11. Solvation effects are responsible for the reduced inhibitor affinity of some HIV-1 PR mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, F.; Villaverde, M. C.; Davis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The formulation of HIV-1 PR inhibitors as anti-viral drugs has been hindered by the appearance of protease strains that present drug resistance to these compounds. The mechanism by which the HIV-1 PR mutants lower their affinity for the inhibitor is not yet fully understood. We have applied a modified Poisson-Boltzmann method to the evaluation of the molecular interactions that contribute to the lowering of the inhibitor affinity to some polar mutants at position 82. These strains present drug resistance behavior and hence are ideally suited for these studies. Our results indicate that the reduction in binding affinity is due to the solvation effects that penalize the binding to the more polar mutants. The inhibitor binding ranking of the different mutants can be explained from the analysis of the different components of our free energy scoring function. PMID:9144773

  12. Solvation effects for polymers at an interface: a hybrid self-consistent field-density functional theory approach.

    PubMed

    Bryk, Paweł; MacDowell, Luis G

    2011-11-28

    Using polyatomic density functional theory of Kierlik and Rosinberg, we show that Wertheim's thermodynamic perturbation theory (TPT) incorporates solvation effects in a systematic, although simplified form. We derive two approximate solvation potentials, which require the knowledge of the correlation function in the reference unbonded fluid only. The theoretical predictions are tested against many-chain Monte Carlo simulations for moderate chain lengths. The predictions of the end-to-end distance in the bulk are in a reasonable agreement with simulations for the TPT(M-1) approximation, while the simpler TPT2_e approximation leads to the solvation potential that is shorter ranged and considerably less accurate. The resulting conformations are used in the subsequent self-consistent field theory calculations of hard-sphere polymers at a hard wall. While the incorporation of the solvation effects has little impact on the density profiles, the predictions of the components of the end-to-end distance vector as a function of the distance to the wall are much improved. PMID:22128953

  13. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nathan P.; Branson, Mark; Burt, Melissa A.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Randall, David A.; Tziperman, Eli

    2014-01-01

    The effect of clouds on climate remains the largest uncertainty in climate change predictions, due to the inability of global climate models (GCMs) to resolve essential small-scale cloud and convection processes. We compare preindustrial and quadrupled CO2 simulations between a conventional GCM in which convection is parameterized and a “superparameterized” model in which convection is explicitly simulated with a cloud-permitting model in each grid cell. We find that the global responses of the two models to increased CO2 are broadly similar: both simulate ice-free Arctic summers, wintertime Arctic convection, and enhanced Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) activity. Superparameterization produces significant differences at both CO2 levels, including greater Arctic cloud cover, further reduced sea ice area at high CO2, and a stronger increase with CO2 of the MJO. PMID:25024204

  14. [Effects of color on implicit and explicit memory tests].

    PubMed

    Wippich, W; Mecklenbräuker, S; Baumann, R

    1994-01-01

    We report two experiments that explore why recent investigations of implicit memory did not find any effects of color information on test performance. The argument that previous failures to find effects of repetition priming were due to an arbitrary association between objects and colors was found to be wanting. To the contrary, both experiments showed no or small effects of repetition for objects paired with their prototypical colors. A second argument according to which subjects attend to the colors at encoding did not fare much better. More importantly, however, we found strong effects of repetition priming with a conceptual implicit memory measure, whereas previous research had relied exclusively on perceptual tests of implicit memory. In both experiments, the subjects were asked to choose a suitable color for each object at testing. No instructions about remembering the objects were given. The results demonstrated strong preferences for the previously seen colors in the color-choice task. Furthermore, this effect was present to the same extent with picture objects and with object names, corroborating the conceptual nature of the implicit memory measure. Finally, we observed many functional dissociations with explicit measures of memory for color information, demonstrating implicit use of memory in the conceptual choice-test for colors. PMID:7941623

  15. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    PubMed

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores. PMID:27116477

  16. Corrosion Thermodynamics of Magnesium and Alloys from First Principles as a Function of Solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limmer, Krista; Williams, Kristen; Andzelm, Jan

    Thermodynamics of corrosion processes occurring on magnesium surfaces, such as hydrogen evolution and water dissociation, have been examined with density functional theory (DFT) to evaluate the effect of impurities and dilute alloying additions. The modeling of corrosion thermodynamics requires examination of species in a variety of chemical and electronic states in order to accurately represent the complex electrochemical corrosion process. In this study, DFT calculations for magnesium corrosion thermodynamics were performed with two DFT codes (VASP and DMol3), with multiple exchange-correlation functionals for chemical accuracy, as well as with various levels of implicit and explicit solvation for surfaces and solvated ions. The accuracy of the first principles calculations has been validated against Pourbaix diagrams constructed from solid, gas and solvated charged ion calculations. For aqueous corrosion, it is shown that a well parameterized implicit solvent is capable of accurately representing all but the first coordinating layer of explicit water for charged ions.

  17. Effect of temperature on the dynamics of benzophenone anion solvation in alcohol

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Jonah, C.D.

    1996-04-25

    The solvation of the benzophenone anion in 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and 1-butanol has been measured over the temperature range -10 to -50{degree}C. The initial spectra of the benzophenone anion were very similar in all three alcohols. The final spectrum of the benzophenone anion in 2-propanol is less blue-shifted (17nm) than the spectrum of the anion in 1-propanol and 1-butanol. The activation energies for solvation are 22 kJ/mol for 1-propanol and 1-butanol and 16 kJ/mol for 2-propanol, which are similar to the energy for hydrogen bond breakage in the pure solvents. This suggests that the solvent H-bond breakage plays an important role in anion solvation. 37 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Anion solvation in alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Jonah, C.D.; Xujia, Zhang; Lin, Yi

    1996-03-01

    Anion solvation is measured in alcohols using pump-probe pulse radiolysis and the activation energy of solvation is determined. Solvation of an anion appears to be different than excited state solvation. The continuum dielectric model does not appear to explain the results.

  19. Anion Solvation in Carbonate Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-11-16

    With the correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. As of now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. As a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  20. Solvation forces between rough surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Frink, L.J.; van Swol, F.

    1998-04-01

    We investigate the role of surface roughness on solvation forces and solvation free energies. Roughness is introduced by dividing a surface into an array of square tiles that are then randomly displaced in the direction perpendicular to the wall. The integrated wall strength of these tiled surfaces is independent of the surface roughness and hence this class of rough walls is ideally suited for isolating roughness effects. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations of a Lennard-Jones fluid confined in a slit pore with rough walls to generate the solvation interactions as a function of roughness, tile size, and surface area. The simulation data are compared to a simple superposition approximation of smooth wall solvation interactions (obtained from simulation or density functional theory), based on a distribution of wall separations. We find that this approximation provides a surprisingly accurate route to the solvation interaction of rough surfaces. In general, increased roughness leads to a reduction of oscillations in the solvation forces and surface free energies. However, nonmonotonic behavior of the oscillation amplitude with roughness can be observed for finite surfaces. The washing out of the oscillations found for large surface roughness produces a solvation force that exhibits a broad repulsive peak with separation. The broad repulsion is a consequence of the resistance to squeezing out fluid from the smallest gaps between two opposing rough surfaces. It is as much a reflection of packing effects as are the solvation oscillations for perfectly smooth pores. In addition, we present results for patterned and undulating surfaces produced by an analogous modification of the one-body external field for smooth walls. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for a number of experimental systems including self-assembled monolayers, microporous materials, protein solutions, and DNA crystals. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Attitudinal effects of degrading themes and sexual explicitness in video materials.

    PubMed

    Golde, J A; Strassberg, D S; Turner, C M; Lowe, K

    2000-07-01

    This study examined the independent and interactive effects of sexual explicitness and degrading themes toward women on mens' attitudes following exposure to video presentations of male-female interactions. Subjects were 83 male college students who viewed video vignettes under one of four stimulus conditions: (a) sexually explicit/degrading, (b) sexually explicit/nondegrading, (c) nonexplicit/degrading, and (d) nonexplicit/nondegrading. Results revealed that men exposed to degrading material, regardless of explicitness, were significantly more likely to express attitudes supportive of rape, while explicitness had no significant main or interactive effect on these attitudes. Further, the interaction of explicitness with degradation was found to impact scores on a measure of sexual callousness. Theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:10904993

  2. Solvation effect on conformations of 1,2:dimethoxyethane: Charge-dependent nonlinear response in implicit solvent models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhishek K.; Freed, Karl F.

    2008-01-01

    The physical content of and, in particular, the nonlinear contributions from the Langevin-Debye model are illustrated using two applications. First, we provide an improvement in the Langevin-Debye model currently used in some implicit solvent models for computer simulations of solvation free energies of small organic molecules, as well as of biomolecular folding and binding. The analysis is based on the implementation of a charge-dependent Langevin-Debye (qLD) model that is modified by subsequent corrections due to Onsager and Kirkwood. Second, the physical content of the model is elucidated by discussing the general treatment within the LD model of the self-energy of a charge submerged in a dielectric medium for three different limiting conditions and by considering the nonlinear response of the medium. The modified qLD model is used to refine an implicit solvent model (previously applied to protein dynamics). The predictions of the modified implicit solvent model are compared with those from explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations for the equilibrium conformational populations of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME), which is the shortest ether molecule to reproduce the local conformational properties of polyethylene oxide, a polymer with tremendous technological importance and a wide variety of applications. Because the conformational population preferences of DME change dramatically upon solvation, DME is a good test case to validate our modified qLD model. The present analysis of the modified qLD model provides the motivation and tools for studying a wide variety of other interesting systems with heterogeneous dielectric properties and spatial anisotropy.

  3. Drug design for cardiovascular disease: the effect of solvation energy on Rac1-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Norbert; Arrigo, Patrizio; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    'OMICS' techniques have deeply changed the drug discovery process. The availability of many different potential druggable genes, generated by these new techniques, have exploited the complexity of new lead compounds screening. 'Virtual screening', based on the integration of different analytical tools on high performance hardware platforms, has speeded up the search for new chemical entities suitable for experimental validation. Docking is a key step in the screening process. The aim of this paper is the evaluation of binding differences due to solvation. We have compared two commonly used software, one of which takes into account solvation, on a set of small molecules (Morpholines, flavonoids and imidazoles) which are able to target the RAC1 protein--a cardiovascular target. We have evaluated the degree of agreement between the two different programs using a machine learning approach combined with statistical test. Our analysis, on a sample of small molecules, has pointed out that 35% of the molecules seem to be sensitive to solvation. This result, even though quite preliminary, stresses the need to combine different algorithms to obtain a more reliable filtered set of ligands. PMID:22255029

  4. Production of solvated electrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, J. K.

    1969-01-01

    Current research, both theoretical and experimental, relating to the production and kinetics of interactions of solvated electrons is reviewed. Particular attention is focused on solvated electrons generated by ionizing radiation in water, alcohols, and organic systems.

  5. Molecular Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computers: a Study of Polar Versus Nonpolar Media Effects in Small Molecule Solvation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debolt, Stephen Edward

    Solvent effects were studied and described via molecular dynamics (MD) and free energy perturbation (FEP) simulations using the molecular mechanics program AMBER. The following specific topics were explored:. Polar solvents cause a blue shift of the rm nto pi^* transition band of simple alkyl carbonyl compounds. The ground- versus excited-state solvation effects responsible for the observed solvatochromism are described in terms of the molecular level details of solute-solvent interactions in several modeled solvents spanning the range from polar to nonpolar, including water, methanol, and carbon tetrachloride. The structure and dynamics of octanol media were studied to explore the question: "why is octanol/water media such a good biophase analog?". The formation of linear and cyclic polymers of hydrogen-bonded solvent molecules, micelle-like clusters, and the effects of saturating waters are described. Two small drug-sized molecules, benzene and phenol, were solvated in water-saturated octanol. The solute-solvent structure and dynamics were analysed. The difference in their partitioning free energies was calculated. MD and FEP calculations were adapted for parallel computation, increasing their "speed" or the time span accessible by a simulation. The non-cyclic polyether ionophore salinomycin was studied in methanol solvent via parallel FEP. The path of binding and release for a potassium ion was investigated by calculating the potential of mean force along the "exit vector".

  6. Ionic size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel resulted from the nonuniform size-modified PNP equations.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yu; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    Ionic finite size can impose considerable effects to both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a solvated molecular system, such as the solvation energy, ionic concentration, and transport in a channel. As discussed in our former work [B. Lu and Y. C. Zhou, Biophys. J. 100, 2475 (2011)], a class of size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) models can be uniformly studied through the general nonuniform size-modified PNP (SMPNP) equations deduced from the extended free energy functional of Borukhov et al. [I. Borukhov, D. Andelman, and H. Orland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 435 (1997)] This work focuses on the nonuniform size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel for real biomolecular systems. The main contributions are: (1) we prove that for solvation energy calculation with nonuniform size effects (through equilibrium SMPNP simulation), there exists a simplified approximation formulation which is the same as the widely used one in PB community. This approximate form avoids integration over the whole domain and makes energy calculations convenient. (2) Numerical calculations show that ionic size effects tend to negate the solvation effects, which indicates that a higher molecular solvation energy (lower absolute value) is to be predicted when ionic size effects are considered. For both calculations on a protein and a DNA fragment systems in a 0.5M 1:1 ionic solution, a difference about 10 kcal/mol in solvation energies is found between the PB and the SMPNP predictions. Moreover, it is observed that the solvation energy decreases as ionic strength increases, which behavior is similar as those predicted by the traditional PB equation (without size effect) and by the uniform size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. (3) Nonequilibrium SMPNP simulations of ion permeation through a gramicidin A channel show that the ionic size effects lead to reduced ion current inside the channel compared with the results

  7. Ionic size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel resulted from the nonuniform size-modified PNP equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Yu; Tu, Bin; Lu, Benzhuo

    2014-05-01

    Ionic finite size can impose considerable effects to both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium properties of a solvated molecular system, such as the solvation energy, ionic concentration, and transport in a channel. As discussed in our former work [B. Lu and Y. C. Zhou, Biophys. J. 100, 2475 (2011)], a class of size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann (PB)/Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) models can be uniformly studied through the general nonuniform size-modified PNP (SMPNP) equations deduced from the extended free energy functional of Borukhov et al. [I. Borukhov, D. Andelman, and H. Orland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 435 (1997)] This work focuses on the nonuniform size effects to molecular solvation energy and to ion current across a channel for real biomolecular systems. The main contributions are: (1) we prove that for solvation energy calculation with nonuniform size effects (through equilibrium SMPNP simulation), there exists a simplified approximation formulation which is the same as the widely used one in PB community. This approximate form avoids integration over the whole domain and makes energy calculations convenient. (2) Numerical calculations show that ionic size effects tend to negate the solvation effects, which indicates that a higher molecular solvation energy (lower absolute value) is to be predicted when ionic size effects are considered. For both calculations on a protein and a DNA fragment systems in a 0.5M 1:1 ionic solution, a difference about 10 kcal/mol in solvation energies is found between the PB and the SMPNP predictions. Moreover, it is observed that the solvation energy decreases as ionic strength increases, which behavior is similar as those predicted by the traditional PB equation (without size effect) and by the uniform size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation. (3) Nonequilibrium SMPNP simulations of ion permeation through a gramicidin A channel show that the ionic size effects lead to reduced ion current inside the channel compared with the results

  8. The AGBNP2 Implicit Solvation Model

    PubMed Central

    Gallicchio, Emilio; Paris, Kristina; Levy, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    The AGBNP2 implicit solvent model, an evolution of the Analytical Generalized Born plus Non-Polar (AGBNP) model we have previously reported, is presented with the aim of modeling hydration effects beyond those described by conventional continuum dielectric representations. A new empirical hydration free energy component based on a procedure to locate and score hydration sites on the solute surface is introduced to model first solvation shell effects, such as hydrogen bonding, which are poorly described by continuum dielectric models. This new component is added to the Generalized Born and non-polar AGBNP terms. Also newly introduced is an analytical Solvent Excluded Volume (SEV) model which improves the solute volume description by reducing the effect of spurious high-dielectric interstitial spaces present in conventional van der Waals representations. The AGBNP2 model is parametrized and tested with respect to experimental hydration free energies of small molecules and the results of explicit solvent simulations. Modeling the granularity of water is one of the main design principles employed for the the first shell solvation function and the SEV model, by requiring that water locations have a minimum available volume based on the size of a water molecule. It is shown that the new volumetric model produces Born radii and surface areas in good agreement with accurate numerical evaluations of these quantities. The results of molecular dynamics simulations of a series of mini-proteins show that the new model produces conformational ensembles in substantially better agreement with reference explicit solvent ensembles than the original AGBNP model with respect to both structural and energetics measures. PMID:20419084

  9. Solvated Electrons in Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilich, Predrag-Peter; McCormick, Kathleen R.; Atkins, Adam D.; Mell, Geoffrey J.; Flaherty, Timothy J.; Bruck, Martin J.; Goodrich, Heather A.; Hefel, Aaron L.; Juranic, Nenad; Seleem, Suzanne

    2010-01-01

    A novel experiment is described in which solvated electrons in liquid ammonia reduce a benzyl alcohol carbon without affecting the aromatic ring. The reductive activity of solvated electrons can be partially or completely quenched through the addition of electron scavengers to the reaction mixture. The effectiveness of these scavengers was found…

  10. Relativistic and Solvation Effects on the Stability of Gold(III) Halides in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Theilacker, Kolja; Schlegel, H Bernhard; Kaupp, Martin; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2015-10-19

    The redox stability of gold halide complexes in aqueous solution has been examined quantum-chemically by a systematic comparison of scalar- and nonrelativistic pseudopotential calculations, using both COSMO and D-COSMO-RS solvent models for water. After a computational benchmarking of density-functional methods against CCSD(T) results for the gas phase decomposition AuX4(-) → AuX2(-) + X2, B3LYP calculations have been used to establish solvent contributions. While relativity clearly enhances the stability of AuX4(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I) complexes against X2 elimination, solvation favors the lower oxidation state. Solvation and relativity are nonadditive, due to the relativistic reduction of bond polarity. At scalar relativistic D-COSMO-RS level, the reaction AuX4(-) ⇌ AuX2(-) + X2 is computed to be endergonic, except for X = I, where it is slightly exergonic. Under the chosen conditions, partial hydrolysis of AuCl4(-) to AuCl3OH(-) is exergonic. The latter complex in turn is stable against Cl2 elimination. The disproportionation 3 AuCl2(-) ⇌ AuCl4(-) + 2 Au(s) + 2 Cl(-) is clearly exergonic. All of the computed reaction energies at scalar relativistic D-COSMO-RS level agree well with the observed speciation in dilute pH-neutral solutions at ambient temperatures. PMID:26421633

  11. Accuracy of exchange-correlation functionals and effect of solvation on the surface energy of copper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Matthew; Zhuang, Houlong L.; Mathew, Kiran; Dirschka, William; Hennig, Richard G.

    2013-06-01

    Surface energies are important for predicting the shapes of nanocrystals and describing the faceting and roughening of surfaces. Copper surfaces are of particular interest in recent years since they are the preferred surfaces for growing graphene using chemical vapor deposition. In this study we calculate the surface energies of copper for the three low-index facets (111), (100), and (110) and one high-index facet, (210), using density-functional theory with both the local-density approximation and various parametrizations of the generalized-gradient approximation to the exchange-correlation functional. To assess the accuracy of the different functionals, we obtain the average surface energies of an isotropic crystal using a broken-bond model. We use this method, which can be generalized to other crystal structures, to compare calculated surface energies to experimental surface energies for fcc crystals. We find that the recent exchange-correlation functionals AM05 and PBEsol are the most accurate functionals for calculating the surface energies of copper. To determine how solvents affect the surface energies of copper, we perform calculations using a continuum solvation model. We find that aqueous solvation changes the overall magnitude of the surface energies only slightly but leads to more isotropic surface energies.

  12. Explicit drain current model of junctionless double-gate field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesayan, Ashkhen; Prégaldiny, Fabien; Sallese, Jean-Michel

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents an explicit drain current model for the junctionless double-gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor. Analytical relationships for the channel charge densities and for the drain current are derived as explicit functions of applied terminal voltages and structural parameters. The model is validated with 2D numerical simulations for a large range of channel thicknesses and is found to be very accurate for doping densities exceeding 1018 cm-3, which are actually used for such devices.

  13. Atomic decomposition of the protein solvation free energy and its application to amyloid-beta protein in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2011-07-01

    We report the development of an atomic decomposition method of the protein solvation free energy in water, which ascribes global change in the solvation free energy to local changes in protein conformation as well as in hydration structure. So far, empirical decomposition analyses based on simple continuum solvation models have prevailed in the study of protein-protein interactions, protein-ligand interactions, as well as in developing scoring functions for computer-aided drug design. However, the use of continuum solvation model suffers serious drawbacks since it yields the protein free energy landscape which is quite different from that of the explicit solvent model and since it does not properly account for the non-polar hydrophobic effects which play a crucial role in biological processes in water. Herein, we develop an exact and general decomposition method of the solvation free energy that overcomes these hindrances. We then apply this method to elucidate the molecular origin for the solvation free energy change upon the conformational transitions of 42-residue amyloid-beta protein (Aβ42) in water, whose aggregation has been implicated as a primary cause of Alzheimer's disease. We address why Aβ42 protein exhibits a great propensity to aggregate when transferred from organic phase to aqueous phase.

  14. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model.

    PubMed

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this "CANDLE" model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile. PMID:25681887

  15. The charge-asymmetric nonlocally determined local-electric (CANDLE) solvation model

    SciTech Connect

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.

    2015-02-14

    Many important applications of electronic structure methods involve molecules or solid surfaces in a solvent medium. Since explicit treatment of the solvent in such methods is usually not practical, calculations often employ continuum solvation models to approximate the effect of the solvent. Previous solvation models either involve a parametrization based on atomic radii, which limits the class of applicable solutes, or based on solute electron density, which is more general but less accurate, especially for charged systems. We develop an accurate and general solvation model that includes a cavity that is a nonlocal functional of both solute electron density and potential, local dielectric response on this nonlocally determined cavity, and nonlocal approximations to the cavity-formation and dispersion energies. The dependence of the cavity on the solute potential enables an explicit treatment of the solvent charge asymmetry. With four parameters per solvent, this “CANDLE” model simultaneously reproduces solvation energies of large datasets of neutral molecules, cations, and anions with a mean absolute error of 1.8 kcal/mol in water and 3.0 kcal/mol in acetonitrile.

  16. MTS-MD of Biomolecules Steered with 3D-RISM-KH Mean Solvation Forces Accelerated with Generalized Solvation Force Extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Omelyan, Igor; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-04-14

    We developed a generalized solvation force extrapolation (GSFE) approach to speed up multiple time step molecular dynamics (MTS-MD) of biomolecules steered with mean solvation forces obtained from the 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation (three-dimensional reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure). GSFE is based on a set of techniques including the non-Eckart-like transformation of coordinate space separately for each solute atom, extension of the force-coordinate pair basis set followed by selection of the best subset, balancing the normal equations by modified least-squares minimization of deviations, and incremental increase of outer time step in motion integration. Mean solvation forces acting on the biomolecule atoms in conformations at successive inner time steps are extrapolated using a relatively small number of best (closest) solute atomic coordinates and corresponding mean solvation forces obtained at previous outer time steps by converging the 3D-RISM-KH integral equations. The MTS-MD evolution steered with GSFE of 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces is efficiently stabilized with our optimized isokinetic Nosé-Hoover chain (OIN) thermostat. We validated the hybrid MTS-MD/OIN/GSFE/3D-RISM-KH integrator on solvated organic and biomolecules of different stiffness and complexity: asphaltene dimer in toluene solvent, hydrated alanine dipeptide, miniprotein 1L2Y, and protein G. The GSFE accuracy and the OIN efficiency allowed us to enlarge outer time steps up to huge values of 1-4 ps while accurately reproducing conformational properties. Quasidynamics steered with 3D-RISM-KH mean solvation forces achieves time scale compression of conformational changes coupled with solvent exchange, resulting in further significant acceleration of protein conformational sampling with respect to real time dynamics. Overall, this provided a 50- to 1000-fold effective speedup of conformational sampling for these systems, compared to conventional MD

  17. Rationalization of the solvation effects on the AtO+ ground-state change.

    PubMed

    Ayed, Tahra; Réal, Florent; Montavon, Gilles; Galland, Nicolas

    2013-09-12

    (211)At radionuclide is of considerable interest as a radiotherapeutic agent for targeted alpha therapy in nuclear medicine, but major obstacles remain because the basic chemistry of astatine (At) is not well understood. The AtO(+) cationic form might be currently used for (211)At-labeling protocols in aqueous solution and has proved to readily react with inorganic/organic ligands. But AtO(+) reactivity must be hindered at first glance by spin restriction quantum rules: the ground state of the free cation has a dominant triplet character. Investigating AtO(+) clustered with an increasing number of water molecules and using various flavors of relativistic quantum methods, we found that AtO(+) adopts in solution a Kramers restricted closed-shell configuration resembling a scalar-relativistic singlet. The ground-state change was traced back to strong interactions, namely, attractive electrostatic interactions and charge transfer, with water molecules of the first solvation shell that lift up the degeneracy of the frontier π* molecular orbitals (MOs). This peculiarity brings an alternative explanation to the highly variable reproducibility reported for some astatine reactions: depending on the production protocols (with distillation in gas-phase or "wet chemistry" extraction), (211)At may or may not readily react. PMID:23944251

  18. Prediction of cosolvent effect on solvation free energies and solubilities of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide based on fully atomistic molecular simulations.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Andrey I; Kiselev, Michael G

    2014-10-01

    The solubility of organic compounds in supercritical fluids can be dramatically affected by addition of a suitable cosolvent (entrainer) at small concentrations. This makes the screening of the best-suited cosolvent an important task for the supercritical technology. The present study aims to improve our fundamental understanding of solvation in supercritical CO2 with cosolvents. We address the following questions: (1) How does the solvation free energy depend on the chemical class of an organic solute and the chemical nature of co-solvents? (2) Which intermolecular interactions determine the effect of a cosolvent on the solubility of organic compounds? We performed extensive calculations of solvation free energies of monofunctional organic molecules at infinite dilution in supercritical media by the Bennett's acceptance ratio method based on fully atomistic molecular dynamics sampling. Sixteen monofunctional organic molecules were solvated in pure sc-CO2 and sc-CO2 with addition of 6 molar % of cosolvents of different chemical nature: ethanol, acetone, and n-hexane. Cosolvent-induced solubility enhancement (CISE) factors were also calculated. It was found that formation of significant number of hydrogen bonds between a solute and cosolvent molecules leads to a profound solubility enhancement. The cosolvent effect is proportional to the number of hydrogen bonds. When polar cosolvents do not form hydrogen bonds with solutes, the CISE correlates with the dipole moment of solute molecules. However, the electrostatic interactions have a small impact on the solubility enhancement compared to hydrogen bonding. Addition of a nonpolar cosolvent, n-hexane, has a very little effect on the solvation Gibbs free energy of studied small organic molecules. The observed trends were discussed in line with available experimental data. PMID:25181254

  19. Readily Made Solvated Electrons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibanez, Jorge G.; Guerra-Millan, Francisco J.; Hugerat, Muhamad; Vazquez-Olavarrieta, Jorge L.; Basheer, Ahmad; Abu-Much, Riam

    2011-01-01

    The existence of solvated electrons has been known for a long time. Key methods for their production (i.e., photoionization of reducing ions, water radiolysis, and the reaction between H[middle dot] and OH[superscript -]) are unsuitable for most school laboratories. We describe a simple experiment to produce liquid ammonia and solvated electrons…

  20. The Instructional Effect of Stimulus-Explicitness in Facilitating Student Achievement of Varied Educational Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Thomas C.; Dwyer, Francis M.

    In order to investigate the relative effectiveness of specific media attributes on student performance on criterion tests, a comparison was made of the effectiveness of two levels of stimulus explicitness in visuals in facilitating student achievement on criterion tests of knowledge, comprehension, and total understanding. Subjects were 171…

  1. Polarization effects on the solvation dynamics of coumarin C153 in ionic liquids: Components and their cross-correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmollngruber, Michael; Schröder, Christian; Steinhauser, Othmar

    2013-05-01

    The solvation dynamics of coumarin C153 dissolved in three selected molecular ionic liquids - EMIM+BF_4^-, EMIM+TfO-, and BMIM+BF_4^- - was studied by molecular dynamics simulations including polarization forces. The solvation response function was decomposed with respect to permanent and induced charge distributions, cationic and anionic contributions, and translational and non-translational motions. The latter decomposition was accomplished by an appropriate multipole expansion. Furthermore, the difference in solvation energy was resolved radially. The dynamics in the sub-picosecond regime was elucidated as the mutual translational motion of the solute and the cage formed by the first solvation shell. For a qualitative interpretation, solvent molecules can be reduced to "quasi-atomic" ions carrying a net charge at their molecular center of mass. Towards a quantitative description, the dipole moment serves as a measure of charge anisotropy.

  2. Modeling effects of explicit and nonexplicit sexual stimuli on the sexual anxiety and behavior of women.

    PubMed

    Wishnoff, R

    1978-09-01

    This study focused on the specific effects of explicit and nonexplicit sexual stimuli on anxious, coitally inexperienced women. Using Bandura's social learning theory as the thoretical framework, the consequences of modeling behavior on an individual's response patterns were examined. Responses indicating sexual anxiety level, preferred sexual behavior, and manifest anxiety level were recorded. Forty-five women were selected based on their scores on the Short Manifest Anxiety Scale. The subjects were then randomly placed into three treatment groups: explicit, nonexplicit, and control. Analysis of the data revealed significant differences among the women in each of the three groups regarding sexual behavior. Sexual anxiety levels also differed between women in the explicit and control groups. Pre- and posttest manifest anxiety scores also showed a significant difference in the explicit-group women. It has been shown that anxious, coitally inexperienced women who are exposed to sexually explicit stimuli in a controlled situation will have lower sexual anxiety levels, have lowered manifest anxiety levels, and be more willing to participate in a greater variety of sexual behaviors under appropriate circumstances. The results of this study may aid those in the helping professions gain a better understanding of the effects sexual stimuli have on certain individuals. PMID:568923

  3. The effects of local prevalence and explicit expectations on search termination times

    PubMed Central

    Kita, Shinichi; Wolfe, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    In visual search tasks, the relative proportions of target-present and -absent trials have important effects on behavior. Miss error rates rise as target prevalence decreases (Wolfe, Horowitz, & Kenner, Nature 435, 439–440, 2005). At the same time, search termination times on target-absent trials become shorter (Wolfe & Van Wert, Current Biology 20, 121–124, 2010). These effects must depend on some implicit or explicit knowledge of the current prevalence. What is the nature of that knowledge? In Experiment 1, we conducted visual search tasks at three levels of prevalence (6%, 50%, and 94%) and analyzed performance as a function of “local prevalence,” the prevalence over the last n trials. The results replicated the usual effects of overall prevalence but revealed only weak or absent effects of local prevalence. In Experiment 2, the overall prevalence in a block of trials was 20%, 50%, or 80%. However, a 100%-valid cue informed observers of the prevalence on the next trial. These explicit cues had a modest effect on target-absent RTs, but explicit expectation could not explain the full prevalence effect. We conclude that observers predict prevalence on the basis of an assessment of a relatively long prior history. Each trial contributes a small amount to that assessment, and this can be modulated but not overruled by explicit instruction. PMID:22006528

  4. Assessing implicit models for nonpolar mean solvation forces: The importance of dispersion and volume terms

    PubMed Central

    Wagoner, Jason A.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2006-01-01

    Continuum solvation models provide appealing alternatives to explicit solvent methods because of their ability to reproduce solvation effects while alleviating the need for expensive sampling. Our previous work has demonstrated that Poisson-Boltzmann methods are capable of faithfully reproducing polar explicit solvent forces for dilute protein systems; however, the popular solvent-accessible surface area model was shown to be incapable of accurately describing nonpolar solvation forces at atomic-length scales. Therefore, alternate continuum methods are needed to reproduce nonpolar interactions at the atomic scale. In the present work, we address this issue by supplementing the solvent-accessible surface area model with additional volume and dispersion integral terms suggested by scaled particle models and Weeks–Chandler–Andersen theory, respectively. This more complete nonpolar implicit solvent model shows very good agreement with explicit solvent results and suggests that, although often overlooked, the inclusion of appropriate dispersion and volume terms are essential for an accurate implicit solvent description of atomic-scale nonpolar forces. PMID:16709675

  5. Lithium ion solvation by ethylene carbonates in lithium-ion battery electrolytes, revisited by density functional theory with the hybrid solvation model and free energy correction in solution.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Lansac, Yves; Lee, Hochun; Hong, Seung-Tae; Jang, Yun Hee

    2016-09-14

    Complex formation between lithium (Li(+)) ions and electrolyte molecules would affect the ionic conductivity through the electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We hence revisit the solvation number of Li(+) in the most commonly used ethylene carbonate (EC) electrolyte. The solvation number n of Li(+)(EC)n in the first solvation shell of Li(+) is estimated on the basis of the free energy calculated by the density functional theory combined with a hybrid solvation model where the explicit solvation shell of Li(+) is immersed in a free volume of an implicit bulk solvent. This new hybrid solvation (implicit and explicit) model predicts the most probable solvation number (n = 4) and solvation free energy (-91.3 kcal mol(-1)) of Li(+) in a good agreement with those predicted by calculations employing simpler solvation models (either implicit or explicit). The desolvation (n = 2) of Li(0)(EC)n upon reduction near anodes is also well described with this new hybrid model. PMID:27506245

  6. Transfer-of-Training Effects in Processing Instruction: The Role of Form-Related Explicit Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Justin P.; DeMil, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effects of processing instruction (PI), structured input (SI), and form-related explicit information (FREI) on a primary target form (i.e., third-person Spanish accusative clitics) and on a secondary form (i.e., third-person Spanish dative clitics). Participants included 151 adult learners enrolled in a beginning-level…

  7. Effects of Explicit Timing on Elementary Students' Oral Reading Rates of Word Phrases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cates, Gary L.; Rhymer, Katrina N.

    2006-01-01

    An ABAB withdrawal design was used to investigate the effects of explicit timing on accurate oral reading rate of sight word phrases of four elementary students demonstrating difficulty with reading. During baseline the students were exposed to flash cards with sight word phrases and asked to read them out loud and were not made aware that they…

  8. Differential Effects of Explicit Form-Focused Instruction on Morphosyntactic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu, Hainu; Lyster, Roy

    2014-01-01

    This study explores whether and to what degree explicit form-focused instruction (FFI) facilitates the use of morphosyntactic forms in second language oral production and also whether it has differential effects on morphosyntactic forms with different linguistic variables. Twenty-seven university-level Chinese EFL participants were randomly…

  9. The Relative Effects of Explicit Correction and Recasts on Two Target Structures via Two Communication Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of negative feedback type (i.e., explicit correction vs. recasts), communication mode (i.e., face-to-face communication vs. synchronous computer-mediated communication), and target structure salience (i.e., salient vs. nonsalient) on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. Forty-eight native speakers of…

  10. The Effects of Explicit Teaching of Metastrategic Knowledge on Low- And High-Achieving Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zohar, Anat; Peled, Bracha

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of explicit teaching of metastrategic knowledge (MSK) on gains of low-achieving (LA) and high-achieving (HA) 5th grade students (N=41). Gains in reasoning scores of students from the Experimental group (compared to students from the control group) were obtained on the strategic and on the metastrategic level. Gains…

  11. The Effect of Implicit and Explicit Rules on Customer Greeting and Productivity in a Retail Organization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Rebecca A.; Houmanfar, Ramona; Smith, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of presenting organizational information through implicit and explicit rules on sales-related target behaviors in a retail setting. Results indicated that when organizational information was presented in a specific form, productivity was increased and maintained longer than when presented in…

  12. The Effects of Explicit Instruction with Manipulatives on the Fraction Skills of Students with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agrawal, Jugnu

    2013-01-01

    This single-subject multiple-baseline across participants study was designed to investigate the effects of explicit instruction with manipulatives on the conceptual and procedural knowledge of addition and subtraction of like and unlike fractions of elementary school students with autism. This study included six 8- to 12-year-old students with…

  13. Effectiveness of Explicit and Constructivist Mathematics Instruction for Low-Achieving Students in the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kroesbergen, Evelyn H.; Van Luit, Johannes E.H.; Maas, Cora J.M.

    2004-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of smallgroup constructivist and explicit mathematics instruction in basic multiplication on low-achieving students' performance and motivation. A total of 265 students (aged 8-11 years) from 13 general and 11 special elementary schools for students with learning and/or behavior disorders participated in the…

  14. The Effects of Explicit and Implicit Pragmatic Instruction on the Development of Compliments and Compliment Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebadi, Saman; Pourzandi, Mahsa

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the effects of explicit and implicit instructions in the development of EFL learners' speech acts of complimenting (Cs) and complimenting response (CRs). The participants in this research were 56 intermediate EFL learners from a language center, participating as members of intact classes that were divided into three groups of…

  15. The Effect of Explicit Embedded Reflective Instruction on Nature of Science Understandings in Advanced Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koksal, Mustafa Serdar; Cakiroglu, Jale; Geban, Omer

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of explicit-embedded-reflective (EER) instruction in nature of science (NOS) understandings of ninth-grade advanced science students. This study was conducted with 71 students, who were divided into three groups, by using non-equivalent quasi-experimental design. In the treatment…

  16. Effects of Labeling on Preschoolers' Explicit False Belief Performance: Outcomes of Cognitive Flexibility or Inhibitory Control?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Low, Jason; Simpson, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    Executive function mechanisms underpinning language-related effects on theory of mind understanding were examined in a sample of 165 preschoolers. Verbal labels were manipulated to identify relevant perspectives on an explicit false belief task. In Experiment 1 with 4-year-olds (N = 74), false belief reasoning was superior in the fully and…

  17. Origin of Asymmetric Solvation Effects for Ions in Water and Organic Solvents Investigated Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations: The Swain Acity-Basity Scale Revisited.

    PubMed

    Reif, Maria M; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2016-08-25

    The asymmetric solvation of ions can be defined as the tendency of a solvent to preferentially solvate anions over cations or cations over anions, at identical ionic charge magnitudes and effective sizes. Taking water as a reference, these effects are quantified experimentally for many solvents by the relative acity (A) and basity (B) parameters of the Swain scale. The goal of the present study is to investigate the asymmetric solvation of ions using molecular dynamics simulations, and to connect the results to this empirical scale. To this purpose, the charging free energies of alkali and halide ions, and of their hypothetical oppositely charged counterparts, are calculated in a variety of solvents. In a first set of calculations, artificial solvent models are considered that present either a charge or a shape asymmetry at the molecular level. The solvation asymmetry, probed by the difference in charging free energy between the two oppositely charged ions, is found to encompass a term quadratic in the ion charge, related to the different solvation structures around the anion and cation, and a term linear in the ion charge, related to the solvation structure around the uncharged ion-sized cavity. For these simple solvent models, the two terms are systematically counteracting each other, and it is argued that only the quadratic term should be retained when comparing the results of simulations involving physical solvents to experimental data. In a second set of calculations, 16 physical solvents are considered. The theoretical estimates for the acity A are found to correlate very well with the Swain parameters, whereas the correlation for B is very poor. Based on this observation, the Swain scale is reformulated into a new scale involving an asymmetry parameter Σ, positive for acitic solvents and negative for basitic ones, and a polarity parameter Π. This revised scale has the same predictive power as the original scale, but it characterizes asymmetry in an

  18. Entropy and enthalpy convergence of hydrophobic solvation beyond the hard-sphere limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmeier, Felix; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R.

    2011-02-01

    The experimentally well-known convergence of solvation entropies and enthalpies of different small hydrophobic solutes at universal temperatures seems to indicate that hydrophobic solvation is dominated by universal water features and not so much by solute specifics. The reported convergence of the denaturing entropy of a group of different proteins at roughly the same temperature as hydrophobic solutes was consequently argued to indicate that the denaturing entropy of proteins is dominated by the hydrophobic effect and used to estimate the hydrophobic contribution to protein stability. However, this appealing picture was subsequently questioned since the initially claimed universal convergence of denaturing entropies holds only for a small subset of proteins; for a larger data collection no convergence is seen. We report extensive simulation results for the solvation of small spherical solutes in explicit water with varying solute-water potentials. We show that convergence of solvation properties for solutes of different radii exists but that the convergence temperatures depend sensitively on solute-water potential features such as stiffness of the repulsive part and attraction strength, not so much on the attraction range. Accordingly, convergence of solvation properties is only expected for solutes of a homologous series that differ in the number of one species of subunits (which attests to the additivity of solvation properties) or solutes that are characterized by similar solute-water interaction potentials. In contrast, for peptides that arguably consist of multiple groups with widely disperse interactions with water, it means that thermodynamic convergence at a universal temperature cannot be expected, in general, in agreement with experimental results.

  19. Extended solvent-contact model for protein solvation: test cases for dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwanho; Kang, Hongsuk; Park, Hwangseo

    2013-05-01

    Solvation effects are critically important in the structural stabilization and functional optimization of proteins. Here, we propose a new solvation free energy function for proteins, and test its applicability in predicting the solvation free energies of dipeptides. The present solvation model involves the improvement of the previous solvent-contact model assuming that the molecular solvation free energy could be given by the sum over the individual atomic contributions. In addition to the existing solvent-contact term, the modified solvation free energy function includes the self-solvation term that reflects the effects of intramolecular interactions in the solute molecule on solute-solvent interactions. Four kinds of atomic parameters should be determined in this solvation model: atomic fragmental volume, maximum atomic occupancy, atomic solvation, and atomic self-solvation parameters. All of these parameters for 16 atom types are optimized with a standard genetic algorithm in such a way to minimize the difference between the solvation free energies of dipeptides obtained from high-level quantum chemical calculations and those predicted by the solvation free energy function. The solvation free energies of dipeptides estimated from the new solvation model are in good agreement with the quantum chemical results. Therefore, the optimized solvation free energy function is expected to be useful for examining the structural and energetic features of proteins in aqueous solution. PMID:23548585

  20. Supramolecular Interactions in Secondary Plant Cell Walls: Effect of Lignin Chemical Composition Revealed with the Molecular Theory of Solvation.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Rodrigo L; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Skaf, Munir S; Kovalenko, Andriy

    2015-01-01

    Plant biomass recalcitrance, a major obstacle to achieving sustainable production of second generation biofuels, arises mainly from the amorphous cell-wall matrix containing lignin and hemicellulose assembled into a complex supramolecular network that coats the cellulose fibrils. We employed the statistical-mechanical, 3D reference interaction site model with the Kovalenko-Hirata closure approximation (or 3D-RISM-KH molecular theory of solvation) to reveal the supramolecular interactions in this network and provide molecular-level insight into the effective lignin-lignin and lignin-hemicellulose thermodynamic interactions. We found that such interactions are hydrophobic and entropy-driven, and arise from the expelling of water from the mutual interaction surfaces. The molecular origin of these interactions is carbohydrate-π and π-π stacking forces, whose strengths are dependent on the lignin chemical composition. Methoxy substituents in the phenyl groups of lignin promote substantial entropic stabilization of the ligno-hemicellulosic matrix. Our results provide a detailed molecular view of the fundamental interactions within the secondary plant cell walls that lead to recalcitrance. PMID:26263115

  1. Supramolecular effects in redox chemistry. Local solvation in basket-handle iron porphyrins containing an increasing number of secondary amide groups

    SciTech Connect

    Lexa, D.; Maillard, P.; Momenteau, M.; Saveant, J.M.

    1987-03-26

    Local solvation can be created by including dipolar groups in a molecular superstructure attached to a reacting center. Changes in reactivity of the latter ensue in a manner which is reminiscent of the modulation of the reactivity of the prosthetic groups by surrounding protein chains in enzymatic systems. Quite large effects can thus be obtained as shown by an electrochemical study of two redox reactions, Fe(II) + e/sup -/ in equilibrium Fe(I)/sup -/, Fe(I)/sup -/ + e/sup -/ in equilibrium Fe(0)/sup 2 -/, in a series of basket-handle iron prophyrins including an increasing number of secondary amide groups in the chains. The local solvation which results from the electrostatic interaction between the CONH dipoles and the negatively charged porphyrin centers is shown to build up as more and more CONH groups are included and to depend upon the distance between these groups and the reacting center.

  2. Driving experience moderates the effect of implicit versus explicit threat priming on hazard perception test.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Yaakov; Rosenbloom, Tova

    2016-07-01

    Due to the controversial evidence regarding the efficacy of threat campaigns on driving behavior, we addressed the effects of explicit vs. implicit threats. As in other areas of advertisements, we hypothesized that an implicit threat would be more effective, i.e., generate more anxiety than an explicit threat. Furthermore, we hypothesized that such effects would be moderated by driving experience: more experienced drivers when threatened will rely on driving skills and perform in a less cautious manner vs. less experienced drivers who have not yet acquired these skills, and therefore will tend to calm their fear by exercising more caution. Driving behavior in this experimental design was addressed by the Hazard Perception (HP) task. Results were as expected. Anxiety was higher under implicit vs. explicit threat. HP scores however were overall the same for both groups. Implicit priming generated less-cautious behavior in high-experienced drivers while generating more caution for less-experienced drivers. Demonstrating in a single experiment all three driving patterns following threat, namely, no change in driving behavior (whole sample), more cautious driving behavior (less-experience) and less cautious behavior (more-experience), potentially comprises an important step in resolving the aforementioned disparity concerning effects of threat campaigns on driving behavior. PMID:27042988

  3. Structural Effects of Solvation by 18-Crown-6 on Gaseous Peptides and TrpCage after Electrospray Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, James G.; Hendricks, Nathan G.; Julian, Ryan R.

    2016-08-01

    Significant effort is being employed to utilize the inherent speed and sensitivity of mass spectrometry for rapid structural determination of proteins; however, a thorough understanding of factors influencing the transition from solution to gas phase is critical for correct interpretation of the results from such experiments. It was previously shown that combined use of action excitation energy transfer (EET) and simulated annealing can reveal detailed structural information about gaseous peptide ions. Herein, we utilize this method to study microsolvation of charged groups by retention of 18-crown-6 (18C6) in the gas phase. In the case of GTP (CEGNVRVSRE LAGHTGY), solvation of the 2+ charge state leads to reduced EET, whereas the opposite result is obtained for the 3+ ion. For the mini-protein C-Trpcage, solvation by 18C6 leads to dramatic increase in EET for the 3+ ion. Examination of structural details probed by molecular dynamics calculations illustrate that solvation by 18C6 alleviates the tendency of charged side chains to seek intramolecular solvation, potentially preserving native-like structures in the gas phase. These results suggest that microsolvation may be an important tool for facilitating examination of native-like protein structures in gas phase experiments.

  4. Computer simulation of protein solvation, hydrophobic mapping, and the oxygen effect in radiation biology

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, L.R.; Garcia, A.E.; Hummer, G.

    1997-08-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Hydrophobic effects are central to the structural stability of biomolecules, particularly proteins, in solution but are not understood at a molecular level. This project developed a new theoretical approach to calculation of hydrophobic effects. This information theory approach can be implemented with experimental, including computer simulation-experimental, information. The new theory is consistent with, builds upon, and subsumes previous integral equation and scaled particle statistical thermodynamic modes of hydrophobic effects. the new theory is sufficiently simple to permit application directly to complex biomolecules in solution and to permit further expansion to incorporate more subtle effects.

  5. The Effects of the Explicit Inquiry Routine on the Performance of Students with Learning Disabilities on One-Variable Equations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheuermann, Amy M.; Deshler, Donald D.; Schumaker, Jean B.

    2009-01-01

    This study determined the effects of the Explicit Inquiry Routine (EIR), a teaching routine, on the math performance of 14 middle-school students with math learning disabilities. The routine integrates validated mathematical teaching practices from general education (inquiry, dialogue) and special education (intensive, explicit instruction) to…

  6. Effects of Explicit Instruction in Cognitive and Metacognitive Reading Strategies on Iranian EFL Students' Reading Performance and Strategy Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aghaie, Reza; Zhang, Lawrence Jun

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of explicit teaching of reading strategies on English-as-a-foreign-language (EFL) students' reading performance in Iran. The study employed a questionnaire adapted from Chamot and O'Malley's (1994) cognitive and metacognitive strategies framework. To test the effects of explicit teaching of cognitive and…

  7. Polar solvation and electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-13

    The report is divided into the following sections: completion of previous studies on solvation dynamics, dipole lattice studies, inertial components of solvation response, simple models of solvation dynamics, rotational dynamics and dielectric friction, intramolecular electron transfer reactions, and intermolecular donor-acceptor complexes.

  8. Structural and energetic effects of the use of polarisable water to solvate proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Stephan J.; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F.

    2015-09-01

    Using a non-polarisable model (simple-point-charge (SPC)) for liquid water and two polarisable water models (COS/G2, COS/D), the effect of introducing molecular polarisability into the solvent upon protein structure and energetics is investigated for eight proteins, hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL), major cold shock protein (CspA), protein G (GP), chorismate mutase (CM), the C-terminal domain of the ribosomal protein L7/L12 (RB), the amino terminal domain of phage 434 repressor (GRP), a 12-residue β-hairpin (DNV) and the GCN trigger peptide (GTP), using MD simulation, one 50 ns simulation and four additional 20 ns simulations for each protein and each water model. The differences in overall structural and energetic properties of the proteins induced by the three different water models are small, except for the amino-terminal domain of phage 434 repressor (GRP). The polarisable COS/G2 water model induces a slightly stronger interaction with the proteins modelled using the GROMOS 54A7 force field than the non-polarisable SPC water model, while for the polarisable COS/D water model the opposite effect is observed.

  9. Abnormal cerebral effective connectivity during explicit emotional processing in adults with autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Fonlupt, Pierre; Hubert, Bénédicte; Tardif, Carole; Gepner, Bruno; Deruelle, Christine

    2008-01-01

    Several recent studies suggest that autism may result from abnormal communication between brain regions. We directly assessed this hypothesis by testing the presence of abnormalities in a model of the functional cerebral network engaged during explicit emotion processing in adults with high functioning autism or Asperger syndrome. Comparison of structural equation models revealed abnormal patterns of effective connectivity, with the prefrontal cortex as a key site of dysfunction. These findings provide evidence that abnormal long-range connectivity between structures of the ‘social brain’ could explain the socio-emotional troubles that characterize the autistic pathology. PMID:19015104

  10. Crossovers in supercooled solvation water: Effects of hydrophilic and hydrophobic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatini Titantah, John; Karttunen, Mikko

    2015-05-01

    Systematic 8 ns ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) were performed to study the structure and dynamics of water in bulk and close to hydrophobic (CH3) and hydrophilic (carbonyl) groups of tetramethylurea (TMU). Dynamical behaviour showed two crossovers: The first around the hydrophobic group at TX =256 +/- 4 \\text{K} , and the second at 265+/- 5 \\text{K} related to the relative strengths of water-water and water-carbonyl hydrogen bonds (HBs). For bulk water, relaxation times appear to diverge at Tc = 213+/- 10 \\text{K} , rendering support to the liquid-liquid critical point hypothesis. To identify the effects due to the hydrophilic carbonyl group, systems of water with one methane molecule were used as references. Our findings are related to the structural and thermodynamic transitions reported for proteins in solution and may play a role in cold denaturation.

  11. Solvation chemical shifts of perylenic antenna molecules from molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Nergiz; Mareš, Jiří; Sundholm, Dage; Vaara, Juha

    2014-10-28

    Solvation-induced shifts in molecular properties can be realistically simulated by employing a dynamic model with explicit solvent molecules. In this work, (13)C NMR chemical shifts of various candidate antenna molecules for dye-sensitised solar cells have been studied by using density-functional theory calculations both in vacuo and by employing a dynamic solvation model. The solvent effects were investigated using instantaneous molecular dynamics snapshots containing the antenna molecule and surrounding acetonitrile solvent molecules. Such calculations take into account the main mechanisms of solvation-induced chemical shifts. We have analysed the contributions to the solvent shift due to the solvent susceptibility anisotropy, changes in the density of the virtual orbital space and the accessibility of the excited states to the pronouncedly local magnetic hyperfine operator. We present Lorentzian-broadened chemical shift stick spectra in which a comparison of the in vacuo and dynamic-solvation model results is graphically illustrated. The results show that the solvent-accessible atoms at the perimeter of the solute are influenced by the virtual states of the solvent molecules, which are visible to the hyperfine operators of the perimeter nuclei. This enables efficient coupling of the ground state of the solute to the magnetically allowed excited states, resulting in a positive chemical shift contribution of the perimeter nuclei. As a result of solvation, the chemical shift signals of perimeter nuclei are found to be displaced towards larger chemical shift values, whereas the nuclei of the inner region of the solute molecules show the opposite trend. The solvent susceptibility anisotropy is found to cause a small and practically constant contribution. PMID:25222796

  12. DFT SOLVATION STUDIES OF CARBOHYDRATES: DETERMINATION OF ACCURATE ALPHA/BETA-ANOMERIC RATIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Solvents play an important role in carbohydrate structure. Therefore, it is important to include solvation effects in calculations to allow a better comparison with experimental data. One way to include solvation effects is via the use of continuum solvation models such as COSMO. Another possibil...

  13. Solvation effects on chemical shifts by embedded cluster integral equation theory.

    PubMed

    Frach, Roland; Kast, Stefan M

    2014-12-11

    The accurate computational prediction of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) parameters like chemical shifts represents a challenge if the species studied is immersed in strongly polarizing environments such as water. Common approaches to treating a solvent in the form of, e.g., the polarizable continuum model (PCM) ignore strong directional interactions such as H-bonds to the solvent which can have substantial impact on magnetic shieldings. We here present a computational methodology that accounts for atomic-level solvent effects on NMR parameters by extending the embedded cluster reference interaction site model (EC-RISM) integral equation theory to the prediction of chemical shifts of N-methylacetamide (NMA) in aqueous solution. We examine the influence of various so-called closure approximations of the underlying three-dimensional RISM theory as well as the impact of basis set size and different treatment of electrostatic solute-solvent interactions. We find considerable and systematic improvement over reference PCM and gas phase calculations. A smaller basis set in combination with a simple point charge model already yields good performance which can be further improved by employing exact electrostatic quantum-mechanical solute-solvent interaction energies. A larger basis set benefits more significantly from exact over point charge electrostatics, which can be related to differences of the solvent's charge distribution. PMID:25377116

  14. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  15. Biomolecular electrostatics and solvation: a computational perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Pengyu; Chun, Jaehun; Thomas, Dennis G.; Schnieders, Michael J.; Marucho, Marcelo; Zhang, Jiajing; Baker, Nathan A.

    2012-01-01

    An understanding of molecular interactions is essential for insight into biological systems at the molecular scale. Among the various components of molecular interactions, electrostatics are of special importance because of their long-range nature and their influence on polar or charged molecules, including water, aqueous ions, proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, and membrane lipids. In particular, robust models of electrostatic interactions are essential for understanding the solvation properties of biomolecules and the effects of solvation upon biomolecular folding, binding, enzyme catalysis, and dynamics. Electrostatics, therefore, are of central importance to understanding biomolecular structure and modeling interactions within and among biological molecules. This review discusses the solvation of biomolecules with a computational biophysics view towards describing the phenomenon. While our main focus lies on the computational aspect of the models, we provide an overview of the basic elements of biomolecular solvation (e.g., solvent structure, polarization, ion binding, and nonpolar behavior) in order to provide a background to understand the different types of solvation models. PMID:23217364

  16. Effect of ionic liquid on the native and denatured state of a protein covalently attached to a probe: Solvation dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chattoraj, Shyamtanu; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2012-08-01

    Effect of a room temperature ionic liquid (RTIL, [pmim][Br]) on the solvation dynamics of a probe covalently attached to a protein (human serum albumin (HSA)) has been studied using femtosecond up-conversion. For this study, a solvation probe, 7-diethylamino-3-(4-maleimidophenyl)-4-methylcoumarin (CPM) has been covalently attached to the lone cysteine group (cys-34) of the protein HSA. Addition of 1.5 M RTIL or 6 M GdnHCl causes a red shift of the emission maxima of CPM bound to HSA by 3 nm and 12 nm, respectively. The average solvation time ⟨τs⟩ decreases from 650 ps (in native HSA) to 260 ps (˜2.5 times) in the presence of 1.5 M RTIL and to 60 ps (˜11 times) in the presence of 6 M GdnHCl. This is ascribed to unfolding of the protein by RTIL or GdnHCl and therefore making the probe CPM more exposed. When 1.5 M RTIL is added to the protein denatured by 6 M GdnHCl in advance, a further ˜5 nm red shift along with further ˜2 fold faster solvent relaxation (⟨τ⟩ ˜30 ps) is observed. Our previous fluorescence correlation spectroscopy study [D. K. Sasmal, T. Mondal, S. Sen Mojumdar, A. Choudhury, R. Banerjee, and K. Bhattacharyya, J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 13075 (2011), 10.1021/jp207829y] suggests that addition of RTIL to the protein denatured by 6 M GdnHCl causes a reduction in hydrodynamic radius (rh). It is demonstrated that in the presence of RTIL and GdnHCl, though the protein is structurally more compact, the local environment of CPM is very different from that in the native state.

  17. KECSA-Movable Type Implicit Solvation Model (KMTISM)

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computation of the solvation free energy for chemical and biological processes has long been of significant interest. The key challenges to effective solvation modeling center on the choice of potential function and configurational sampling. Herein, an energy sampling approach termed the “Movable Type” (MT) method, and a statistical energy function for solvation modeling, “Knowledge-based and Empirical Combined Scoring Algorithm” (KECSA) are developed and utilized to create an implicit solvation model: KECSA-Movable Type Implicit Solvation Model (KMTISM) suitable for the study of chemical and biological systems. KMTISM is an implicit solvation model, but the MT method performs energy sampling at the atom pairwise level. For a specific molecular system, the MT method collects energies from prebuilt databases for the requisite atom pairs at all relevant distance ranges, which by its very construction encodes all possible molecular configurations simultaneously. Unlike traditional statistical energy functions, KECSA converts structural statistical information into categorized atom pairwise interaction energies as a function of the radial distance instead of a mean force energy function. Within the implicit solvent model approximation, aqueous solvation free energies are then obtained from the NVT ensemble partition function generated by the MT method. Validation is performed against several subsets selected from the Minnesota Solvation Database v2012. Results are compared with several solvation free energy calculation methods, including a one-to-one comparison against two commonly used classical implicit solvation models: MM-GBSA and MM-PBSA. Comparison against a quantum mechanics based polarizable continuum model is also discussed (Cramer and Truhlar’s Solvation Model 12). PMID:25691832

  18. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software

    PubMed Central

    Gaalswyk, Kari

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  19. An explicit-solvent conformation search method using open software.

    PubMed

    Gaalswyk, Kari; Rowley, Christopher N

    2016-01-01

    Computer modeling is a popular tool to identify the most-probable conformers of a molecule. Although the solvent can have a large effect on the stability of a conformation, many popular conformational search methods are only capable of describing molecules in the gas phase or with an implicit solvent model. We have developed a work-flow for performing a conformation search on explicitly-solvated molecules using open source software. This method uses replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) to sample the conformational states of the molecule efficiently. Cluster analysis is used to identify the most probable conformations from the simulated trajectory. This work-flow was tested on drug molecules α-amanitin and cabergoline to illustrate its capabilities and effectiveness. The preferred conformations of these molecules in gas phase, implicit solvent, and explicit solvent are significantly different. PMID:27280078

  20. Quantifying solvated electrons' delocalization.

    PubMed

    Janesko, Benjamin G; Scalmani, Giovanni; Frisch, Michael J

    2015-07-28

    Delocalized, solvated electrons are a topic of much recent interest. We apply the electron delocalization range EDR(r;u) (J. Chem. Phys., 2014, 141, 144104) to quantify the extent to which a solvated electron at point r in a calculated wavefunction delocalizes over distance u. Calculations on electrons in one-dimensional model cavities illustrate fundamental properties of the EDR. Mean-field calculations on hydrated electrons (H2O)n(-) show that the density-matrix-based EDR reproduces existing molecular-orbital-based measures of delocalization. Correlated calculations on hydrated electrons and electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters illustrates how electron correlation tends to move surface- and cavity-bound electrons onto the cluster or cavity surface. Applications to multiple solvated electrons in lithium-ammonia clusters provide a novel perspective on the interplay of delocalization and strong correlation central to lithium-ammonia solutions' concentration-dependent insulator-to-metal transition. The results motivate continued application of the EDR to simulations of delocalized electrons. PMID:25994586

  1. Solvation and thermal effects on the optical properties of naturaldyes: a case study on the flavylium cyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, Arrigo; Malcioglu, Baris; Gebauer, Ralph; Varsano, Daniele; Baroni, Stefano

    2011-03-01

    We present a first-principles study of the effects of both hydration and thermal dynamics on the optical properties of a natural anthocyanin dye, namely, cyanin (Cya), in aqueous solution. We combine Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approaches to simulate the time evolution of UV-vis spectrum of the hydrated Cya molecule at room temperature [2,3]. The spectrum of the dye calculated in the gas phase is characterized by two peaks in the red and in the blue, which would bring about a greenish hue incompatible with the dark purple coloration observed in nature. Describing the effect of the water solvent through a polarizable continuum model does not modify qualitatively the resulting picture. An explicit simulation of both solvent and thermal effects using ab-initio molecular dynamics results instead in a spectrum that is compatible with the observed coloration. This result is analyzed in terms of the spectroscopic effects of molecular distortions, induced by thermal fluctuations.

  2. Explicit accounting of electronic effects on the Hugoniot of porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Bishnupriya; Menon, S. V. G.

    2016-03-01

    A generalized enthalpy based equation of state, which includes thermal electron excitations explicitly, is formulated from simple considerations. Its application to obtain Hugoniot of materials needs simultaneous evaluation of pressure-volume curve and temperature, the latter requiring solution of a differential equation. The errors involved in two recent papers [Huayun et al., J. Appl. Phys. 92, 5917 (2002); 92, 5924 (2002)], which employed this approach, are brought out and discussed. In addition to developing the correct set of equations, the present work also provides a numerical method to implement this approach. Constant pressure specific heat of ions and electrons and ionic enthalpy parameter, needed for applications, are calculated using a three component equation of state. The method is applied to porous Cu with different initial porosities. Comparison of results with experimental data shows good agreement. It is found that temperatures along the Hugoniot of porous materials are significantly modified due to electronic effects.

  3. Solvation Behavior of Short-chain Polystyrene Sulfonate in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions: A Molecular Dyamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Simonson, J Michael {Mike}

    2005-01-01

    We analyze the solvation behavior of short-chain polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) in aqueous electrolyte solutions by isothernal-isochoric molecular dynamics simulation to determine the solvation effects on the structure and conformation of the polyelectrolyte as a function of the aqueous environment. To that end, we study these aqueous systems including the explicit atomistic description of water, the PSS chain, and their interactions with all species in solution. In addition, we investigate the effect of the degree of sulfonation and its distribution along the PSS chain on the resulting conformation as well as solvation structure. Moreover, we assess the impact of added salts on the net charge of the PSS backbone, placing emphasis on the valence of the counterion and the extent of the ion-pair formation between the sulfonate group and the counterions. Finally, we present evidence for the so-called like-charge attraction between sulfonate groups through the formation of counterion-mediated interchain sulfonate-sulfonate and water-mediated intrachain sulfonate-sulfonate bridges, as well as between unlike counterion-counterion interactions.

  4. Bond-valence methods for pKa prediction. II. Bond-valence, electrostatic, molecular geometry, and solvation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bickmore, Barry R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Tadanier, Christopher J.; Bylaska, Eric J.; Doud, Darrin

    2006-08-15

    In a previous contribution, we outlined a method for predicting (hydr)oxy-acid and oxide surface acidity constants based on three main factors: bond valence, Me?O bond ionicity, and molecular shape. Here electrostatics calculations and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are used to qualitatively show that Me?O bond ionicity controls the extent to which the electrostatic work of proton removal departs from ideality, bond valence controls the extent of solvation of individual functional groups, and bond valence and molecular shape controls local dielectric response. These results are consistent with our model of acidity, but completely at odds with other methods of predicting acidity constants for use in multisite complexation models. In particular, our ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of solvated monomers clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding between (hydr)oxo-groups and water molecules adjusts to obey the valence sum rule, rather than maintaining a fixed valence based on the coordination of the oxygen atom as predicted by the standard MUSIC model.

  5. Solvation and Reaction in Ionic Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Maroncelli, Mark

    2015-01-15

    The long-range goal of our DOE-sponsored research is to obtain a fundamental understanding of solvation effects on photo-induced charge transfer and related processes. Much of the focus during the past funding period has been on studies of ionic liquids and on characterizing various reactions with which to probe the nature of this interesting new solvent medium.

  6. Effect of Explicit and Implicit Instruction on Free Written Response Task Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andringa, Sible; de Glopper, Kees; Hacquebord, Hilde

    2011-01-01

    A classroom study was designed to test the hypothesis that explicit knowledge is used by second-language (L2) learners in a free written response task if that knowledge is present. Eighty-one 12-18-year-old learners of Dutch as an L2 took part in a computer-assisted language learning experiment receiving either explicit or implicit instruction…

  7. The Effects of Explicit Spelling Instruction in the Spanish EFL Classroom: Diagnosis, Development and Durability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canado, Maria Luisa Perez

    2006-01-01

    This paper aims to shed light on the explicit-implicit paradigm contention in connection with the foreign language area of English spelling. To this end, it frames the subject against the backdrop of the prolonged dispute between implicit, whole language, top-down, or whole-to-part approaches and explicit, traditional, bottom-up, or part-to-whole…

  8. The Effect of Explicit Instruction on Strategic Reading in a Literacy Methods Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iwai, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the impact of explicit instruction on metacognitive reading strategies among 18 K-8 teacher candidates in a literacy methods course. They received weekly explicit intervention about these strategies over one semester. Collected data included pre- and post-scores of the Metacognitive Awareness of Reading Strategies Inventory…

  9. Effective Reading Instruction for Struggling Readers: The Role of Direct/Explicit Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupley, William H.; Blair, Timothy R.; Nichols, William D.

    2009-01-01

    Struggling readers are more likely to learn essential reading skills and strategies if the direct or explicit model of instruction is part of the teacher's repertoire of teaching methods. Directly/explicitly teaching reading means imparting new information to students through meaningful teacher-student interactions and teacher guidance of student…

  10. Aptitude-Treatment Interaction Effects on Explicit Rule Learning: A Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hwu, Fenfang; Pan, Wei; Sun, Shuyan

    2014-01-01

    Finding the match between individuals and educational treatments is the aim of both educators and the aptitude-treatment interaction research paradigm. Using the latent growth curve analysis, the present study investigates the interaction between the type of explicit instructional approaches (deductive vs. explicit-inductive) and the level of…

  11. The next trial will be conflicting! Effects of explicit congruency pre-cues on cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Julie M; Smallwood, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    The dual mechanisms of control account proposed a role for proactive and reactive mechanisms in minimizing or resolving interference in conflict tasks. Proactive mechanisms are activated in advance of stimulus onset and lead to preparatory biasing of attention in a goal-directed fashion. Reactive mechanisms are triggered post-stimulus onset. Using an explicit, trial-by-trial pre-cueing procedure in a 4-choice color-word Stroop task, we investigated effects of congruency pre-cues on cognitive control. Under conditions of stimulus uncertainty (i.e., each word was associated with multiple, equally probable responses), pre-cue benefits were observed on incongruent trials when cues were 100% valid but not when they were 75% valid. These benefits were selectively found at the longest cue-to-stimulus interval (2,000 ms), consistent with a preparation-dependent proactive control mechanism. By contrast, when a reactive strategy of switching attention to the irrelevant dimension to predict the single correlated response was viable, pre-cue benefits were observed on incongruent trials for all cue-to-stimulus intervals including the shortest that afforded only 500 ms to prepare. The findings (a) suggest a restricted role for the preparation-dependent biasing of attention via proactive control in response to explicit, trial-by-trial pre-cues while (b) highlighting strategies that lead to pre-cue benefits but which appear to reflect primarily reactive use of the information afforded by the pre-cues. We conclude that pre-cues, though available in advance of stimulus onset, may stimulate proactive or reactive minimization of interference. PMID:25522873

  12. Can explicit visual feedback of postural sway efface the effects of sensory manipulations on mediolateral balance performance?

    PubMed

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine M P; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2016-02-01

    Explicit visual feedback on postural sway is often used in balance assessment and training. However, up-weighting of visual information may mask impairments of other sensory systems. We therefore aimed to determine whether the effects of somatosensory, vestibular, and proprioceptive manipulations on mediolateral balance are reduced by explicit visual feedback on mediolateral sway of the body center of mass and by the presence of visual information. We manipulated sensory inputs of the somatosensory system by transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation on the feet soles (TENS) of the vestibular system by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) and of the proprioceptive system by muscle-tendon vibration (VMS) of hip abductors. The effects of these manipulations on mediolateral sway were compared with a control condition without manipulation under three visual conditions: explicit feedback of sway of the body center of mass (FB), eyes open (EO), and eyes closed (EC). Mediolateral sway was quantified as the sum of energies in the power spectrum and as the energy at the dominant frequencies in each of the manipulation signals. Repeated-measures ANOVAs were used to test effects of each of the sensory manipulations, of visual conditions and their interaction. Overall, sensory manipulations increased body sway compared with the control conditions. Absence of normal visual information had no effect on sway, while explicit feedback reduced sway. Furthermore, interactions of visual information and sensory manipulation were found at specific dominant frequencies for GVS and VMS, with explicit feedback reducing the effects of the manipulations but not effacing these. PMID:26631143

  13. Clustering of metal atoms in organic media. II. Effect of support on nickel catalysts prepared by solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, K.; Klabunde, K.J.

    1982-02-26

    Highly dispersed Ni/support catalysts were prepared from toluene-solvated nickel atoms (solvated metal atom dispersed or SMAD). Catalysts were prepared on MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SiO/sub 2/, and carbon, and their activities were tested for hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane, hydrogenation of toluene, dehydrogenation of isopropyl alcohol, and methanation of carbon monoxide. Conventional catalysts were also studied and compared with the SMAD systems. The effect of the support on SMAD catalyst activities was minimal for hydrogenolysis of methylcyclopentane, hydrogenation of toluene, and dehydration of isopropyl alcohol. However, conventional catalysts showed a significant effect of support when these reactions were studied. This difference between SMAD and conventional catalysts is attributed to the presence of an insulating layer of carbonaceous species between Ni and the support in the SMAD systems. Conversely, catalyst activity for methanation of carbon monoxide was significantly affected by support, especially MgO. This phenomenon reflects a synergistic effect of MgO when Ni is present, where CO can be adsorbed readily on MgO which apparently aids in the initial CO reduction step. The SMAD method in combination with high surface area supports yields highly dispersed catalysts with very small particle sizes. Carbon, a support with a particularly high surface area, allows formation of the smallest particle sizes, and this phenomenon is believed to indicate a direct dependency ofmetal particle size on the surface area of the support. The implications of this finding on the mechanism of particle formation are discussed, as well as the observation of optimum nickel particle size effects for the reactions studied. 5 figures, 4 tables.

  14. Interfacial solvation thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Ben-Amotz, Dor

    2016-10-19

    Previous studies have reached conflicting conclusions regarding the interplay of cavity formation, polarizability, desolvation, and surface capillary waves in driving the interfacial adsorptions of ions and molecules at air-water interfaces. Here we revisit these questions by combining exact potential distribution results with linear response theory and other physically motivated approximations. The results highlight both exact and approximate compensation relations pertaining to direct (solute-solvent) and indirect (solvent-solvent) contributions to adsorption thermodynamics, of relevance to solvation at air-water interfaces, as well as a broader class of processes linked to the mean force potential between ions, molecules, nanoparticles, proteins, and biological assemblies. PMID:27545849

  15. Effects of Intravenous Ketamine on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Suicidality in Treatment-Resistant Depression

    PubMed Central

    Price, Rebecca B.; Nock, Matthew K.; Charney, Dennis S.; Mathew, Sanjay J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Intravenous ketamine has shown rapid antidepressant effects in early trials, making it a potentially attractive candidate for depressed patients at imminent risk of suicide. The Implicit Association Test (IAT), a performance-based measure of association between two concepts, may have utility in suicide assessment. Methods Twenty-six patients with treatment-resistant depression were assessed for suicidality 2 hours prior to, and 24 hours following, a single subanesthetic dose of intravenous ketamine using the suicidality item of the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-SI). Ten patients also completed IATs assessing implicit suicidal associations at comparable time points. In a second study, 9 patients received thrice-weekly ketamine infusions over a 12-day period. Results 24-hours after a single infusion, MADRS-SI scores were reduced by an average of 2.08 points on a 0–6 scale (p<.001; d=1.37), and 81% of patients received a rating of 0 or 1 post-infusion. Implicit associations between self- and escape-related words were also reduced following ketamine (p=.003; d=1.36), with reductions correlated across implicit and explicit measures. MADRS-SI reductions were sustained for 12 days by repeated-dose ketamine (2.9-point mean reduction; p<.001; d=2.42). Conclusions These preliminary findings support the premise that ketamine has rapid beneficial effects on suicidal cognition and warrants further study. PMID:19545857

  16. Hydrophobic Solvation: Aqueous Methane Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konrod, Oliver; Lankau, Timm

    2007-01-01

    A basic introduction to concept of a solvation shell around an apolar solute as well as its detection is presented. The hydrophobic solvation of toluene is found to be a good teaching example which connects macroscopic, phenomenological thermodynamic results with an atomistic point of view.

  17. Tuned range separated hybrid functionals for solvated low bandgap oligomers

    SciTech Connect

    Queiroz, Thiago B. de Kümmel, Stephan

    2015-07-21

    The description of charge transfer excitations has long been a challenge to time dependent density functional theory. The recently developed concept of “optimally tuned range separated hybrid (OT-RSH) functionals” has proven to describe charge transfer excitations accurately in many cases. However, describing solvated or embedded systems is yet a challenge. This challenge is not only computational but also conceptual, because the tuning requires identifying a specific orbital, typically the highest occupied one of the molecule under study. For solvated molecules, this orbital may be delocalized over the solvent. We here demonstrate that one way of overcoming this problem is to use a locally projected self-consistent field diagonalization on an absolutely localized molecular orbital expansion. We employ this approach to determine ionization energies and the optical gap of solvated oligothiophenes, i.e., paradigm low gap systems that are of relevance in organic electronics. Dioxane solvent molecules are explicitly represented in our calculations, and the ambiguities of straightforward parameter tuning in solution are elucidated. We show that a consistent estimate of the optimal range separated parameter (ω) at the limit of bulk solvation can be obtained by gradually extending the solvated system. In particular, ω is influenced by the solvent beyond the first coordination sphere. For determining ionization energies, a considerable number of solvent molecules on the first solvation shell must be taken into account. We demonstrate that accurately calculating optical gaps of solvated systems using OT-RSH can be done in three steps: (i) including the chemical environment when determining the range-separation parameter, (ii) taking into account the screening due to the solvent, and (iii) using realistic molecular geometries.

  18. The Effectiveness of a Skill Based Explicit Phonics Reading Program K-2 as Measured by Student Performance and Teacher Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dakin, Alexandra B.

    This study focuses on the effectiveness and advantages of using an explicit phonics based reading program in kindergarten through second grade. The methods of decoding words that teachers introduce to the beginning readers must prove to be effective in introducing and building reading skills. Most recent studies have revisited and concurred with…

  19. Separating Cue Encoding from Target Processing in the Explicit Task-Cuing Procedure: Are There "True" Task Switch Effects?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arrington, Catherine M.; Logan, Gordon D.; Schneider, Darryl W.

    2007-01-01

    Six experiments were conducted to separate cue encoding from target processing in explicitly cued task switching to determine whether task switch effects could be separated from cue encoding effects and to determine the nature of the representations produced by cue encoding. Subjects were required to respond to the cue, indicating which cue was…

  20. Differential geometry based solvation model. III. Quantum formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Wei, Guo-Wei

    2011-01-01

    to many other classic and quantum models. By using experimental data, we show that the present quantum formulation of our differential geometry based multiscale solvation model improves the prediction of our earlier models, and outperforms some explicit solvation model. PMID:22112067

  1. The Effect of Implicit-Explicit Followership Congruence on Benevolent Leadership: Evidence from Chinese Family Firms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Benevolent leadership, a traditional Chinese leadership style generated under the influence of Confucianism, has been under growing discussion since its proposal. However, existing research has focused mainly on the consequences of benevolent leadership, and research probing into its antecedents is scarce. To fill such research gap, the current study aims to explore the effect of the congruence between implicit positive followership prototype (PFP) and explicit positive followership trait (PFT) on benevolent leadership. Polynomial regression combined with the response surface methodology was used to test the hypotheses herein. The results, based on a sample of 241 leader-follower dyads from four Chinese family firms, indicated the following: (1) benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP is congruent with follower PFT than when they are incongruent; (2) in cases of congruence, benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP and follower PFT are both high rather than low; (3) in the case of incongruence, there is no significant difference for the level of benevolent leadership in two scenarios: "low leader PFP - high follower PFT" and "high leader PFP - low follower PFT". PMID:27375514

  2. The Effect of Implicit–Explicit Followership Congruence on Benevolent Leadership: Evidence from Chinese Family Firms

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Benevolent leadership, a traditional Chinese leadership style generated under the influence of Confucianism, has been under growing discussion since its proposal. However, existing research has focused mainly on the consequences of benevolent leadership, and research probing into its antecedents is scarce. To fill such research gap, the current study aims to explore the effect of the congruence between implicit positive followership prototype (PFP) and explicit positive followership trait (PFT) on benevolent leadership. Polynomial regression combined with the response surface methodology was used to test the hypotheses herein. The results, based on a sample of 241 leader–follower dyads from four Chinese family firms, indicated the following: (1) benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP is congruent with follower PFT than when they are incongruent; (2) in cases of congruence, benevolent leadership is higher when leader PFP and follower PFT are both high rather than low; (3) in the case of incongruence, there is no significant difference for the level of benevolent leadership in two scenarios: “low leader PFP – high follower PFT” and “high leader PFP – low follower PFT”. PMID:27375514

  3. Tobacco industry manipulation messages in anti-smoking public service announcements: the effect of explicitly versus implicitly delivering messages.

    PubMed

    Shadel, William G; Fryer, Craig S; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah

    2010-05-01

    Message content in anti-smoking public service announcements (PSAs) can be delivered explicitly (directly with concrete statements) or implicitly (indirectly via metaphor), and the method of delivery may affect the efficacy of those PSAs. The purpose of this study was to conduct an initial test of this idea using tobacco industry manipulation PSAs in adolescents. A 2 (age: 11-14 years old; 15-17 years old)x2 (message delivery: implicit, explicit) mixed model design was used. There was a significant main effect of message delivery: Tobacco industry manipulation PSAs that delivered their messages explicitly were associated with stronger levels of smoking resistance self-efficacy compared to tobacco industry manipulation PSAs that delivered their messages implicitly. No significant main effects of age were found nor were any interactions between age and message delivery. These results suggest that message delivery factors should be taken into account when designing anti-smoking PSAs. PMID:20071100

  4. Anthropogenic Aerosol Effects on Sea Surface Temperatures: Mixed-Layer Ocean Experiments with Explicit Aerosol Representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallafior, Tanja; Folini, Doris; Wild, Martin; Knutti, Reto

    2014-05-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols affect the Earth's radiative balance both through direct and indirect effects. These effects can lead to a reduction of the incoming solar radiation at the surface, i.e. dimming, which may lead to a change in sea surface temperatures (SST) or SST pattern. This, in turn, may affect precipitation patterns. The goal of the present work is to achieve an estimate of the equilibrium SST changes under anthropogenic aerosol forcing since industrialisation. We show preliminary results from mixed-layer ocean (MLO) experiments with explicit aerosol representation performed with ECHAM6-HAM. The (fixed) MLO heat flux into the deep ocean was derived from atmosphere only runs with fixed climatological SSTs (1961-1990 average) and present day (year 2000) aerosols and GHG burdens. Some experiments we repeated with an alternative MLO deep ocean heat flux (based on pre-industrial conditions) to test the robustness of our results with regard to this boundary condition. The maximum surface temperature responses towards anthropogenic aerosol and GHG forcing (separately and combined) were derived on a global and regional scale. The same set of experiments was performed with aerosol and GHG forcings representative of different decades over the past one and a half centuries. This allows to assess how SST patterns at equilibrium changed with changing aerosol (and GHG) forcing. Correlating SST responses with the change in downward clear-sky and all-sky shortwave radiation provides a first estimate of the response to anthropogenic aerosols. Our results show a clear contrast in hemispheric surface temperature response, as expected from the inter-hemispheric asymmetry of aerosol forcing The presented work is part of a project aiming at quantifying the effect of anthropogenic aerosol forcing on SSTs and the consequences for global precipitation patterns. Results from this study will serve as a starting point for further experiments involving a dynamic ocean model, which

  5. Effects of Explicit Convection on Global Land-atmosphere Coupling in the Superparameterized CAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Pritchard, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    Many global climate models are prone to producing land-atmosphere coupling dynamics that are too strong and simplistic. Cumulus and convection parameterizations are natural culprits but the effect of bypassing them with explicitly resolved convection on global land-atmosphere coupling dynamics has not been explored systematically. We apply a suite of modern land-atmosphere coupling diagnostics to isolate the effect of cloud superparameterization (SP) in the Community Atmosphere Model v3.5, focusing on both the land segment (i.e., soil moisture and evapotranspiration relationship) and atmospheric segment (i.e., evapotranspiration and precipitation relationship) in the water pathway of the land-atmosphere feedback loop. Comparing SPCAM3.5 and conventional CAM3.5 in daily timescale, our results show that the Super-Parameterized model reduces the coupling strength in the Central Great Plain in American, and reverses the terrestrial segment coupling sign (from negative to positive) over India. Which are consistent with previous studies and are favorable improvements on the known issues reported in literatures. Analysis of the triggering feedback strength (TFS) and amount feedback strength (AFS) shows that SPCAM3.5 favorably reproduces the patterns of these indices over North America, with probability of afternoon precipitation enhanced by high evaporative fraction along the eastern United States and Mexico, while conventional CAM3.5 does not capture this signal. The links in the soil moisture-precipitation feedback loop are further explored through applying the mixing diagram approach to the diurnal cycles of the land surface and planetary boundary layer variables.

  6. Lipid solvation effects contribute to the affinity of Gly-xxx-Gly motif-mediated helix-helix interactions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rachel M; Rath, Arianna; Melnyk, Roman A; Deber, Charles M

    2006-07-18

    Interactions between transmembrane helices are mediated by the concave Gly-xxx-Gly motif surface. Whether Gly residues per se are sufficient for selection of this motif has not been established. Here, we used the in vivo TOXCAT assay to measure the relative affinities of all 18 combinations of Gly, Ala, and Ser "small-xxx-small" mutations in glycophorin A (GpA) and bacteriophage M13 major coat protein (MCP) homodimers. Affinity values were compared with the accessibility to a methylene-sized probe of the total surface area of each helix monomer as a measure of solvation by membrane components. A strong inverse correlation was found between nonpolar-group lipid accessibility and dimer affinity (R = 0.75 for GpA, p = 0.013, and R = 0.81 for MCP, p = 0.004), suggesting that lipid as a poor membrane protein solvent, conceptually analogous to water in soluble protein folding, can contribute to dimer stability and help to define helix-helix interfaces. PMID:16834324

  7. Assessing the performance of implicit solvation models at a nucleic acid surface

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Feng; Wagoner, Jason A.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2008-01-01

    Implicit solvation models are popular alternatives to explicit solvent methods due to their ability to “pre-average” solvent behavior and thus reduce the need for computationally-expensive sampling. Previously, we have demonstrated that Poisson-Boltzmann models for polar solvation and integral-based models for nonpolar solvation can reproduce explicit solvation forces in a low-charge density protein system. In the present work, we examine the ability of these continuum models to describe solvation forces at the surface of a RNA hairpin. While these models do not completely describe all of the details of solvent behavior at this highly-charged biomolecular interface, they do provide a reasonable description of average solvation forces and therefore show significant promise for developing more robust implicit descriptions of solvent around nucleic acid systems for use in biomolecular simulation and modeling. Additionally, we observe fairly good transferability in the nonpolar model parameters optimized for protein systems, suggesting its robustness for modeling general nonpolar solvation phenomena in biomolecular systems. PMID:18688533

  8. Implicit and Explicit Attitudes Predict Smoking Cessation: Moderating Effects of Experienced Failure to Control Smoking and Plans to Quit

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark C.; Sherman, Steven J.; Seo, Dong-Chul; Macy, Jon

    2010-01-01

    The current study tested implicit and explicit attitudes as prospective predictors of smoking cessation in a Midwestern community sample of smokers. Results showed that the effects of attitudes significantly varied with levels of experienced failure to control smoking and plans to quit. Explicit attitudes significantly predicted later cessation among those with low (but not high or average) levels of experienced failure to control smoking. Conversely, however, implicit attitudes significantly predicted later cessation among those with high levels of experienced failure to control smoking, but only if they had a plan to quit. Because smoking cessation involves both controlled and automatic processes, interventions may need to consider attitude change interventions that focus on both implicit and explicit attitudes. PMID:21198227

  9. POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF A FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN ON BACHMAN'S SPARROWS (AIMOPHILA AESTIVALIS): LINKING A SPATIALLY EXPLICIT MODEL WITH GIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    By combining a spatially explicit, individual-based population simulation model with a geographic information system, this study simulated the potential effects of a U.S. Forest management plan on the population dynamics of Bachman's Sparrow at the Savannah River Site, South Caro...

  10. Reexamining Effects of Form-Focused Instruction on L2 Pronunciation Development: The Role of Explicit Phonetic Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    The present study examines whether and to what degree providing explicit phonetic information (EI) at the beginning of form-focused instruction (FFI) on second language pronunciation can enhance the generalizability and magnitude of FFI effectiveness by increasing learners' ability to notice a new phone. Participants were 49 Japanese learners of…

  11. More on the Effects of Explicit Information in Instructed SLA: A Partial Replication and a Response to Fernandez (2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, Nicholas; Culmana, Hillah; VanPattena, Bill

    2009-01-01

    The role of explicit information (EI) as an independent variable in instructed SLA is largely underresearched. Using the framework of processing instruction, however, a series of offline studies has found no effect for EI (e.g., Benati, 2004; Sanz & Morgan-Short, 2004; VanPatten & Oikkenon, 1996). Fernandez (2008) presented two online experiments…

  12. Explicit Self-Regulated Strategy Development Versus Reciprocal Questioning: Effects on Expository Reading Comprehension Among Struggling Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Linda H.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of 2 rigorous strategic approaches to reading comprehension for 32 5th-grade students who struggle with reading were investigated. The first approach, TWA (Think before reading, think While reading, think After reading), was taught following explicit self-regulated strategy development instructional procedures (K. R. Harris & S.…

  13. The Effects of Explicit Reading Strategy Instruction and Cooperative Learning on Reading Comprehension in Fourth Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencioni, Gina M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of explicit direct instruction and cooperative learning on reading comprehension in fourth grade students. A quasi-experimental design was used. There were six cognitive and three affective measures used to collect quantitative data. Cognitive measures included California State Test scores,…

  14. The Effects of Explicit Instruction on the Reading Performance of Adolescent English Language Learners with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Deborah K.

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to determine the effects of explicit phonics instruction and sight word instruction on the letter-sound identification and word reading of 13- to 15-year-old English language learners in the eighth grade who were identified as having intellectual disabilities (ID). Using a randomized single-subject design, four Hispanic students…

  15. Explicit Rap Music Lyrics and Attitudes toward Rape: The Perceived Effects on African American College Students' Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wade, Bruce H.; Thomas-Gunnar, Cynthia A.

    1993-01-01

    Examines the effects of rap music on the attitudes and behaviors of students in historically black colleges. Interviews with 38 females indicate that they find explicit lyrics inappropriate and harmful to society, but they feel that rap music accurately represents some of the realities of gender relations between black males and females. (SLD)

  16. Collisional Family Formation and Scaling Laws: Effects of Porosity and Explicit Formation of Spinning Aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Jutzi, M.; Richardson, D. C.; Benz, W.

    2008-09-01

    Main belt asteroid families are the products of impact events. In recent years, we have been able for the first time to simulate the formation of families and reproduce their main properties. The fragmentation of the asteroid was computed using a 3D SPH hydrocode and the mutual gravitational interaction of the generated fragments was computed with a parallel N-body code (pkdgrav). In our previous simulations, all fragments during the gravitational phase were treated as spheres. We have improved our model by implementing a semi-rigid body approximation. The shapes and spins of the aggregates are preserved as clumps reaccumulate. We will present simulations of asteroid family formation including this explicit formation of spinning aggregates. Our model can provide some clues regarding the likely physical structure (surface, internal) of small bodies resulting from reaccumulation. Our earlier model of fragmentation was adapted to brittle materials with no porosity at microscales, limiting it to the study of families of S taxonomic type, believed to be composed of such material. Dark (C) type asteroids, Kuiper Belt objects and comets are believed to contain microporosity. We have extended our hydrocode to include the effect of porosity at a sub-resolution scale by adapting the so-called P-alpha model. A first validation at laboratory scale has been performed. We will show its application to dark-type family formation and to the characterization of the impact energy threshold for disruption (Q*D) of porous bodies as a function of their size. This work is supported by the ESA Advanced Concept Team (Ariadna study "NEO Encounter 2029"), the French Programme National de Planétologie, the Swiss National Science Foundation, NASA under Grant NNX08AM39G issued through the Office of Space Science, the NSF under Grant AST0708110, the cooperation program CNRS-JSPS 2008. We also thank the Mésocentre de Calcul-SIGAMM (Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, France).

  17. Perceived Effects of Sexually Explicit Internet Content: The Third-Person Effect in Singapore.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Wei; Koo, Soh Hoon

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the third-person effect of pornography on the Internet. Notes that congruent with the third-person effect, students from a major Singapore university judged pornographic material on the Internet to have a greater impact on others than on themselves. Reveals evidence for a perceived social distance corollary with children to be more…

  18. Effects of Explicit Rules in Learning to Spell Open- and Closed-Syllable Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilte, Maartje; Reitsma, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    Second graders (N=222; 7.7 years of age) practiced with open- and closed-syllable words in a computer-assisted training program and appropriate spelling rules were either explicitly provided during practice or not. Also, children practiced either with a small set of exemplars or with a large set; the latter condition was expected to promote the…

  19. The Effects of Mindfulness versus Thought Suppression on Implicit and Explicit Measures of Experiential Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hooper, Nic; Villatte, Matthieu; Neofotistou, Evi; McHugh, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The current study aimed to provide an implicit measure of experiential avoidance (EA). Fifty undergraduate participants were exposed to an implicit (Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure: IRAP) and an explicit (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II: AAQ II) measure of EA. Subsequently participant's response latencies on viewing a negatively…

  20. Structural effect of glyme-Li(+) salt solvate ionic liquids on the conformation of poly(ethylene oxide).

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhengfei; McDonald, Samila; Fitzgerald, Paul A; Warr, Gregory G; Atkin, Rob

    2016-06-01

    The conformation of 36 kDa polyethylene oxide (PEO) dissolved in three glyme-Li(+) solvate ionic liquids (SILs) has been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and rheology as a function of concentration and compared to a previously studied SIL. The solvent quality of a SIL for PEO can be tuned by changing the glyme length and anion type. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) reveals that PEO is dissolved in the SILs through Li(+)-PEO coordinate bonds. All SILs (lithium triglyme bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ([Li(G3)]TFSI), lithium tetraglyme bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)imide ([Li(G4)]BETI), lithium tetraglyme perchlorate ([Li(G4)]ClO4) and the recently published [Li(G4)]TFSI) are found to be moderately good solvents for PEO but solvent quality decreases in the order [Li(G4)]TFSI ∼ [Li(G4)]BETI > [Li(G4)]ClO4 > [Li(G3)]TFSI due to decreased availability of Li(+) for PEO coordination. For the same glyme length, the solvent qualities of SILs with TFSI(-) and BETI(-) anions ([Li(G4)]TFSI and [Li(G4)]BETI) are very similar because they weakly coordinate with Li(+), which facilitates Li(+)-PEO interactions. [Li(G4)]ClO4 presents a poorer solvent environment for PEO than [Li(G4)]BETI because ClO4(-) binds more strongly to Li(+) and thereby hinders interactions with PEO. [Li(G3)]TFSI is the poorest PEO solvent of these SILs because G3 binds more strongly to Li(+) than G4. Rheological and radius of gyration (Rg) data as a function of PEO concentration show that the PEO overlap concentrations, c* and c**, are similar in the three SILs. PMID:27189677

  1. Single-Molecule Solvation-Shell Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leary, E.; Höbenreich, H.; Higgins, S. J.; van Zalinge, H.; Haiss, W.; Nichols, R. J.; Finch, C. M.; Grace, I.; Lambert, C. J.; McGrath, R.; Smerdon, J.

    2009-02-01

    We present a new route to single-molecule sensing via solvation shells surrounding a current-carrying backbone molecule. As an example, we show that the presence of a water solvation shell “gates” the conductance of a family of oligothiophene-containing molecular wires, and that the longer the oligothiophene, the larger is the effect. For the longest example studied, the molecular conductance is over 2 orders of magnitude larger in the presence of a shell comprising just 10 water molecules. A first principles theoretical investigation of electron transport through the molecules, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method, shows that water molecules interact directly with the thiophene rings, significantly shifting transport resonances and greatly increasing the conductance. This reversible effect is confirmed experimentally through conductance measurements performed in the presence of moist air and dry argon.

  2. Preferential solvation: dividing surface vs excess numbers.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Seishi; Matubayasi, Nobuyuki

    2014-04-10

    How do osmolytes affect the conformation and configuration of supramolecular assembly, such as ion channel opening and actin polymerization? The key to the answer lies in the excess solvation numbers of water and osmolyte molecules; these numbers are determinable solely from experimental data, as guaranteed by the phase rule, as we show through the exact solution theory of Kirkwood and Buff (KB). The osmotic stress technique (OST), in contrast, purposes to yield alternative hydration numbers through the use of the dividing surface borrowed from the adsorption theory. However, we show (i) OST is equivalent, when it becomes exact, to the crowding effect in which the osmolyte exclusion dominates over hydration; (ii) crowding is not the universal driving force of the osmolyte effect (e.g., actin polymerization); (iii) the dividing surface for solvation is useful only for crowding, unlike in the adsorption theory which necessitates its use due to the phase rule. KB thus clarifies the true meaning and limitations of the older perspectives on preferential solvation (such as solvent binding models, crowding, and OST), and enables excess number determination without any further assumptions. PMID:24689966

  3. Solvation in supercritical water

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, H.D. ); Cummings, P.T.; Karaborni, S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the solvation structure in supercritical water composed with that in ambient water and in simple supercritical solvents. Molecular dynamics studies have been undertaken of systems that model ionic sodium and chloride, atomic argon, and molecular methanol in supercritical aqueous solutions using the simple point charge model of Berendsen for water. Because of the strong interactions between water and ions, ionic solutes are strongly attractive in supercritical water, forming large clusters of water molecules around each ion. Methanol is found to be a weakly-attractive solute in supercritical water. The cluster of excess water molecules surrounding a dissolved ion or polar molecule in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to the solvent clusters surrounding attractive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. Likewise, the deficit of water molecules surrounding a dissolved argon atom in supercritical aqueous solutions is comparable to that surrounding repulsive solutes in simple supercritical fluids. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule in supercritical water was found to be about one third the number in ambient water. The number of hydrogen bonds per water molecule surrounding a central particle in supercritical water was only mildly affected by the identify of the central particle--atom, molecule, or ion. These results should be helpful in developing a qualitative understanding of important processes that occur in supercritical water. 29 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Effects of Reliability and Global Context on Explicit and Implicit Measures of Sensed Hand Position in Cursor-Control Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Miya K.; Heuer, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    In a cursor-control task in which the motion of the cursor is rotated randomly relative to the movement of the hand, the sensed directions of hand and cursor are mutually biased. In our previous study, we used implicit and explicit measures of the bias of sensed hand direction toward the direction of the cursor and found different characteristics. The present study serves to explore further differences and commonalities of these measures. In Experiment 1, we examined the effects of different relative reliabilities of visual and proprioceptive information on the explicitly and implicitly assessed bias of sensed hand direction. In two conditions, participants made an aiming movement and returned to the start position immediately or after a delay of 6 s during which the cursor was no longer visible. The unimodal proprioceptive information on final hand position in the delayed condition served to increase its relative reliability. As a result, the bias of sensed hand direction toward the direction of the cursor was reduced for the explicit measure, with a complementary increase of the bias of sensed cursor direction, but unchanged for the implicit measure. In Experiment 2, we examined the influence of global context, specifically of the across-trial sequence of judgments of hand and cursor direction. Both explicitly and implicitly assessed biases of sensed hand direction did not significantly differ between the alternated condition (trial-to-trial alternations of judgments of hand and cursor direction) and the blocked condition (judgments of hand or cursor directions in all trials). They both substantially decreased from the alternated to the randomized condition (random sequence of judgments of hand and cursor direction), without a complementary increase of the bias of sensed cursor direction. We conclude that our explicit and implicit measures are equally sensitive to variations of coupling strength as induced by the variation of global context in Experiment 2, but

  5. Stress Effects on Working Memory, Explicit Memory, and Implicit Memory for Neutral and Emotional Stimuli in Healthy Men

    PubMed Central

    Luethi, Mathias; Meier, Beat; Sandi, Carmen

    2008-01-01

    Stress is a strong modulator of memory function. However, memory is not a unitary process and stress seems to exert different effects depending on the memory type under study. Here, we explored the impact of social stress on different aspects of human memory, including tests for explicit memory and working memory (for neutral materials), as well as implicit memory (perceptual priming, contextual priming and classical conditioning for emotional stimuli). A total of 35 young adult male students were randomly assigned to either the stress or the control group, with stress being induced by the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST). Salivary cortisol levels were assessed repeatedly throughout the experiment to validate stress effects. The results support previous evidence indicating complex effects of stress on different types of memory: A pronounced working memory deficit was associated with exposure to stress. No performance differences between groups of stressed and unstressed subjects were observed in verbal explicit memory (but note that learning and recall took place within 1 h and immediately following stress) or in implicit memory for neutral stimuli. Stress enhanced classical conditioning for negative but not positive stimuli. In addition, stress improved spatial explicit memory. These results reinforce the view that acute stress can be highly disruptive for working memory processing. They provide new evidence for the facilitating effects of stress on implicit memory for negative emotional materials. Our findings are discussed with respect to their potential relevance for psychiatric disorders, such as post traumatic stress disorder. PMID:19169362

  6. Solvation Effects on the Static and Dynamic First-Order Electronic and Vibrational Hyperpolarizabilities of Uracil: A Polarized Continuum Model Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Alparone, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Electronic (βe) and vibrational (βv) first-order hyperpolarizabilities of uracil were determined in gas and water solution using the Coulomb-attenuating Density Functional Theory level with the Dunning's correlation-consistent aug-cc-pVDZ basis set. Frequency-dependent βe values were computed for the Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) and Electric Optical Pockels Effect (EOPE) nonlinear optical phenomena. The Polarized Continuum Model was employed to study the solvent effects on the electronic and vibrational properties. The introduction of solvation contributions increases the βe(static) value by ca. 110%. In comparison, smaller enhancements are found for the βe(EOPE) and βe(SHG) data evaluated at the typical wavelength of 694 nm (by 40–50%). The gas-water hyperpolarizability difference was rationalised through a density analysis study. The magnitudes of the vibrational first-order hyperpolarizabilities are comparable to their electronic counterparts and noticeably increase in solution: βv(EOPE) ~ βe(EOPE) in aqueous phase at λ = 694 nm. Analysis of the IR and Raman spectra is useful to elucidate the most important contributing modes to the vibrational first-order hyperpolarizabilities. PMID:24453886

  7. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-01

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  8. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yigit, Cemil; Dzubiella, Joachim; Heyda, Jan

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions.

  9. Charged patchy particle models in explicit salt: Ion distributions, electrostatic potentials, and effective interactions.

    PubMed

    Yigit, Cemil; Heyda, Jan; Dzubiella, Joachim

    2015-08-14

    We introduce a set of charged patchy particle models (CPPMs) in order to systematically study the influence of electrostatic charge patchiness and multipolarity on macromolecular interactions by means of implicit-solvent, explicit-ion Langevin dynamics simulations employing the Gromacs software. We consider well-defined zero-, one-, and two-patched spherical globules each of the same net charge and (nanometer) size which are composed of discrete atoms. The studied mono- and multipole moments of the CPPMs are comparable to those of globular proteins with similar size. We first characterize ion distributions and electrostatic potentials around a single CPPM. Although angle-resolved radial distribution functions reveal the expected local accumulation and depletion of counter- and co-ions around the patches, respectively, the orientation-averaged electrostatic potential shows only a small variation among the various CPPMs due to space charge cancellations. Furthermore, we study the orientation-averaged potential of mean force (PMF), the number of accumulated ions on the patches, as well as the CPPM orientations along the center-to-center distance of a pair of CPPMs. We compare the PMFs to the classical Derjaguin-Verwey-Landau-Overbeek theory and previously introduced orientation-averaged Debye-Hückel pair potentials including dipolar interactions. Our simulations confirm the adequacy of the theories in their respective regimes of validity, while low salt concentrations and large multipolar interactions remain a challenge for tractable theoretical descriptions. PMID:26277163

  10. Solvation and kinetic isotope effects in H and D abstraction reactions from formate ions by D, H, and Mu atoms in aqueous solutions.

    SciTech Connect

    Lossack, A. M.; Roduner, E.; Bartels, D. M.; Chemistry; Univ. of Stuttgart

    2001-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance free induction decay attenuation and muon spin rotation measurements were performed in the temperature range of liquid water for the reactions of the hydrogen isotopes D, H, and Mu with undeuterated and deuterated formate ions. Accurate rate constants were determined, and excellent Arrhenius behavior represented bywas found in all cases. Ab initio calculations at the MP2 and the QCISD level with the aug-cc-pvDZ basis set reveal that the reaction has no electronic barrier in the gas phase. This contrasts with quite sizeable activation energies observed in aqueous solution, and it suggests that the barrier is entirely solvent induced. Calculations at the above mentioned ab initio level using a polarized dielectric continuum for the solvated reaction system restore a realistic barrier and confirm this interpretation. It is shown that the solvent effect is a consequence of a pronounced change of polarization of the system along the reaction path. It may be more appropriate to describe the reaction as a consecutive electron-proton transfer rather than an H atom abstraction.

  11. Li(+) solvation in glyme-Li salt solvate ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kazuhide; Tatara, Ryoichi; Tsuzuki, Seiji; Saito, Soshi; Doi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Kazuki; Mandai, Toshihiko; Matsugami, Masaru; Umebayashi, Yasuhiro; Dokko, Kaoru; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2015-03-28

    Certain molten complexes of Li salts and solvents can be regarded as ionic liquids. In this study, the local structure of Li(+) ions in equimolar mixtures ([Li(glyme)]X) of glymes (G3: triglyme and G4: tetraglyme) and Li salts (LiX: lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)amide (Li[TFSA]), lithium bis(pentafluoroethanesulfonyl)amide (Li[BETI]), lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (Li[OTf]), LiBF4, LiClO4, LiNO3, and lithium trifluoroacetate (Li[TFA])) was investigated to discriminate between solvate ionic liquids and concentrated solutions. Raman spectra and ab initio molecular orbital calculations have shown that the glyme molecules adopt a crown-ether like conformation to form a monomeric [Li(glyme)](+) in the molten state. Further, Raman spectroscopic analysis allowed us to estimate the fraction of the free glyme in [Li(glyme)]X. The amount of free glyme was estimated to be a few percent in [Li(glyme)]X with perfluorosulfonylamide type anions, and thereby could be regarded as solvate ionic liquids. Other equimolar mixtures of [Li(glyme)]X were found to contain a considerable amount of free glyme, and they were categorized as traditional concentrated solutions. The activity of Li(+) in the glyme-Li salt mixtures was also evaluated by measuring the electrode potential of Li/Li(+) as a function of concentration, by using concentration cells against a reference electrode. At a higher concentration of Li salt, the amount of free glyme diminishes and affects the electrode reaction, leading to a drastic increase in the electrode potential. Unlike conventional electrolytes (dilute and concentrated solutions), the significantly high electrode potential found in the solvate ILs indicates that the solvation of Li(+) by the glyme forms stable and discrete solvate ions ([Li(glyme)](+)) in the molten state. This anomalous Li(+) solvation may have a great impact on the electrode reactions in Li batteries. PMID:25733406

  12. The solvation structure of alprazolam.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Akshay; Johnston, Andrew J; Varathan, Luxmmi; McLain, Sylvia E; Biggin, Philip C

    2016-08-10

    Alprazolam is a benzodiazepine that is commonly prescribed for the treatment of anxiety and other related disorders. Like other benzodiazepines, it is thought to exert its effect through interaction with GABAA receptors. However, it has also been described as a potent and selective protein interaction inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) proteins. Indeed, the only crystal structure of alprazolam bound to a protein is a complex between alprazolam and the BRD4 bromodomain. The structure shows that the complex also involves many water interactions that mediate contacts between the drug and the protein, a scenario that exists in many drug-protein complexes. How such waters relate to solvation patterns of small molecules may improve our understanding of what dictates their appearance or absence in bridging positions within complexes and thus will be important in terms of future rational drug-design. Here, we use neutron diffraction in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to provide a detailed analysis of how water molecules interact with alprazolam in methanol/water mixtures. The agreement between the neutron diffraction and the molecular dynamics is extremely good. We discuss the results in the context of drug design. PMID:27465367

  13. Molecular correlations and solvation in simple fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Marco A. A.; Widom, B.

    2010-06-01

    We study the molecular correlations in a lattice model of a solution of a low-solubility solute, with emphasis on how the thermodynamics is reflected in the correlation functions. The model is treated in the Bethe-Guggenheim approximation, which is exact on a Bethe lattice (Cayley tree). The solution properties are obtained in the limit of infinite dilution of the solute. With h11(r), h12(r), and h22(r) the three pair correlation functions as functions of the separation r (subscripts 1 and 2 referring to solvent and solute, respectively), we find for r ≥2 lattice steps that h22(r)/h12(r)≡h12(r)/h11(r). This illustrates a general theorem that holds in the asymptotic limit of infinite r. The three correlation functions share a common exponential decay length (correlation length), but when the solubility of the solute is low the amplitude of the decay of h22(r) is much greater than that of h12(r), which in turn is much greater than that of h11(r). As a consequence the amplitude of the decay of h22(r) is enormously greater than that of h11(r). The effective solute-solute attraction then remains discernible at distances at which the solvent molecules are essentially no longer correlated, as found in similar circumstances in an earlier model. The second osmotic virial coefficient is large and negative, as expected. We find that the solvent-mediated part W(r ) of the potential of mean force between solutes, evaluated at contact, r =1, is related in this model to the Gibbs free energy of solvation at fixed pressure, ΔGp∗, by (Z /2)W(1)+ΔGp∗≡pv0, where Z is the coordination number of the lattice, p is the pressure, and v0 is the volume of the cell associated with each lattice site. A large, positive ΔGp∗ associated with the low solubility is thus reflected in a strong attraction (large negative W at contact), which is the major contributor to the second osmotic virial coefficient. In this model, the low solubility (large positive ΔGp∗) is due partly to an

  14. Molecular correlations and solvation in simple fluids.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marco A A; Widom, B

    2010-06-01

    We study the molecular correlations in a lattice model of a solution of a low-solubility solute, with emphasis on how the thermodynamics is reflected in the correlation functions. The model is treated in the Bethe-Guggenheim approximation, which is exact on a Bethe lattice (Cayley tree). The solution properties are obtained in the limit of infinite dilution of the solute. With h(11)(r), h(12)(r), and h(22)(r) the three pair correlation functions as functions of the separation r (subscripts 1 and 2 referring to solvent and solute, respectively), we find for r > or = 2 lattice steps that h(22)(r)/h(12)(r) is identical with h(12)(r)/h(11)(r). This illustrates a general theorem that holds in the asymptotic limit of infinite r. The three correlation functions share a common exponential decay length (correlation length), but when the solubility of the solute is low the amplitude of the decay of h(22)(r) is much greater than that of h(12)(r), which in turn is much greater than that of h(11)(r). As a consequence the amplitude of the decay of h(22)(r) is enormously greater than that of h(11)(r). The effective solute-solute attraction then remains discernible at distances at which the solvent molecules are essentially no longer correlated, as found in similar circumstances in an earlier model. The second osmotic virial coefficient is large and negative, as expected. We find that the solvent-mediated part W(r) of the potential of mean force between solutes, evaluated at contact, r = 1, is related in this model to the Gibbs free energy of solvation at fixed pressure, DeltaG(p)(*), by (Z/2)W(1) + DeltaG(p)(*) is identical with pv(0), where Z is the coordination number of the lattice, p is the pressure, and v(0) is the volume of the cell associated with each lattice site. A large, positive DeltaG(p)(*) associated with the low solubility is thus reflected in a strong attraction (large negative W at contact), which is the major contributor to the second osmotic virial coefficient

  15. Structure and dynamics of solvated hydrogenoxalate and oxalate anions: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Kroutil, Ondřej; Minofar, Babak; Kabeláč, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogenoxalate (charge -1) and oxalate (charge -2) anions and their solvated forms were studied by various computational techniques. Ab initio quantum chemical calculations in gas phase, in implicit solvent and microsolvated (up to 32 water molecules) environment were performed in order to explore a potential energy surface of both anions. The solvation envelope of water molecules around them and the role of water on the conformation of the anions was revealed by means of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulations and optimization procedures. The structure of the anions was found to be dependent on the number of water molecules in the solvation shell. A subtle interplay between intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding dictates the final conformation and thus an explicit solvent model is necessary for a proper description of this phenomena. Graphical Abstract Solvated hydrogenoxalate and oxalate anions. PMID:27538930

  16. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density using proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, B. Montgomery

    2011-01-01

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenological models are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many, large, complex systems where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum, but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy. PMID:21765968

  17. Fast Calculations of Electrostatic Solvation Free Energy from Reconstructed Solvent Density Using Proximal Radial Distribution Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Bin; Wong, Ka-Yiu; Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2011-07-07

    Although detailed atomic models may be applied for a full description of solvation, simpler phenomenologicalmodels are particularly useful to interpret the results for scanning many large, complex systems, where a full atomic model is too computationally expensive to use. Among the most costly are solvation free-energy evaluations by simulation. Here we develop a fast way to calculate electrostatic solvation free energy while retaining much of the accuracy of explicit solvent free-energy simulation. The basis of our method is to treat the solvent not as a structureless dielectric continuum but as a structured medium by making use of universal proximal radial distribution functions. Using a deca-alanine peptide as a test case, we compare the use of our theory with free-energy simulations and traditional continuum estimates of the electrostatic solvation free energy.

  18. Small molecule solvation changes due to the presence of salt are governed by the cost of solvent cavity formation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Li, Libo; Fennell, Christopher J; Dill, Ken A

    2014-12-14

    We are interested in the free energies of transferring nonpolar solutes into aqueous NaCl solutions with salt concentrations upwards of 2 M, the Hofmeister regime. We use the semi-explicit assembly (SEA) computational model to represent these electrolyte solutions. We find good agreement with experiments (Setschenow coefficients) on 43 nonpolar and polar solutes and with TIP3P explicit-solvent simulations. Besides being much faster than explicit solvent calculations, SEA is more accurate than the PB models we tested, successfully capturing even subtle salt effects in both the polar and nonpolar components of solvation. We find that the salt effects are mainly due to changes in the cost of forming nonpolar cavities in aqueous NaCl solutions, and not mainly due to solute-ion electrostatic interactions. PMID:25494789

  19. Effect of Vapor Pressure Scheme on Multiday Evolution of SOA in an Explicit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Taylor, J.; Madronich, S.; Aumont, B.; Camredon, M.; Emmons, L. K.; Tyndall, G. S.; Valorso, R.

    2011-12-01

    Recent modeling of the evolution of Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) has led to the critically important prediction that SOA mass continues to increase for several days after emission of primary pollutants. This growth of organic aerosol in dispersing plumes originating from urban point sources has direct implications for regional aerosol radiative forcing. We investigate the robustness of predicted SOA mass growth downwind of Mexico City in the model GECKO-A (Generator of Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere), by assessing its sensitivity to the choice of vapor pressure prediction scheme. We also explore the implications for multi-day SOA mass growth of glassification / solidification of SOA constituents during aging. Finally we use output from the MOZART-4 chemical transport model to evaluate our results in the regional and global context.

  20. Effects of explicit teacher-implemented phoneme awareness instruction in 4-year-olds.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Ann A; Osterhouse, Heather; Wickham, Katherine; Mcnutt, Robert; Shao, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether gains would be observed in an integrated group of 4-year-olds when phoneme awareness skills were explicitly taught by trained early childhood educators. In a quasi-experimental design with a delayed treatment approach, one classroom (N = 14) was randomly assigned to receive the instructional program in fall, while a second classroom (N = 10) served as a control and subsequently received the program in spring. Baseline assessment of speech and language skills indicated there were four participants with speech and/or language impairments. The teacher training involved an initial workshop and weekly hour-long mentoring meetings; the program was provided for 20 min a day, 4 d a week, for 10 weeks. Outcome measures of phoneme awareness and letter knowledge skills were obtained from non-standardized tasks administered pre-instruction and post-instruction, at mid-year and end-year points. When each classroom received the phoneme instruction, participants made gains in letter knowledge and phoneme level skills in comparison with group performance under regular instruction. These gains were statistically significant for phoneme blending and letter knowledge. Using an aggregate of all outcome measures, the gain for each classroom when under instruction was statistically significant as compared with when that same classroom was receiving the regular curriculum. Children with speech and/or language impairment responded more variably. Gains in the more difficult phoneme awareness skill of blending suggest the potential for marked change with an intensive, explicit classroom instruction and hold promise for SLPs collaborating with preschool teachers to provide time-efficient PA instruction. PMID:25000374

  1. The effect of explicit, inquiry instruction on freshman college science majors' understanding of the nature of science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenyon, Lisa Orvik

    Reform efforts have placed strong emphasis on teaching practices that should help students learn about the nature of science. Researchers have examined two general instructional approaches, explicit and implicit, believed to be useful in teaching science. Of these two approaches, researchers emphasize explicit instruction as the more effective approach when enhancing students' views of the scientific endeavor (Abd-El-Khalick & Lederman, 2000; Bell, 2001; Billeh & Hasan, 1975; Carey & Stauss, 1968; Schwartz et al., 2000). Furthermore, recent studies (Schwartz et al ., 2000, 2001) indicate that teaching science inquiry through investigative activities and reflective discussions have demonstrated to be most effective for understanding science. The purpose of this study was to describe the effect of explicit, inquiry instruction on the understanding of freshman college science majors regarding the nature of science. Participants included 74 freshman college science majors, 50 students in the experimental group and 24 students in the control group. The experimental group was exposed to the treatment of the study, which took place in a Succeeding in Science course. The course content included explicit instruction on the nature of science, emphasizing scientific inquiry and the processes that scientists carry out in their work. The course reflected three aspects of inquiry-based science that are discussed in the Inquiry and the National Science Education Standards (2000) which are (1) to learn the principles and concepts of science; (2) to participate in scientific investigations; and (3) to reflect on the epistemology of science. The research design of this study used a pretest-posttest instrument, The Views of Nature of Science Questionnaire Form C (VNOS-C) (Lederman et al., 2001) and an essay paper at the end of the course to assess students' understanding about the nature of science. The results from the VNOS-C were analyzed using analysis of covariance in which the

  2. Extension of the FACTS Implicit Solvation Model to Membranes.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Pacheco, Martín; Vancea, Ioan; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-08-12

    The generalized Born (GB) formalism can be used to model water as a dielectric continuum. Among the different implicit solvent models using the GB formalism, FACTS is one of the fastest. Here, we extend FACTS so that it can represent a membrane environment. This extension is accomplished by considering a position dependent dielectric constant and empirical surface tension parameter. For the calculation of the effective Born radii in different dielectric environments we present a parameter-free approximation to Kirkwood's equation, which uses the Born radii obtained with FACTS for the water environment as input. This approximation is tested for the calculation of self-free energies, pairwise interaction energies in solution and solvation free energies of complete protein conformations. The results compare well to those from the finite difference Poisson method. The new implicit membrane model is applied to estimate free energy insertion profiles of amino acid analogues and in molecular dynamics simulations of melittin, WALP23 and KALP23, glycophorin A, bacteriorhodopsin, and a Clc channel dimer. In all cases, the results agree qualitatively with experiments and explicit solvent simulations. Moreover, the implicit membrane model is only six times slower than a vacuum simulation. PMID:26588287

  3. Solvent Reaction Field Potential inside an Uncharged Globular Protein: A Bridge between Implicit and Explicit Solvent Models?

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The solvent reaction field potential of an uncharged protein immersed in Simple Point Charge/Extended (SPC/E) explicit solvent was computed over a series of molecular dynamics trajectories, intotal 1560 ns of simulation time. A finite, positive potential of 13 to 24 kbTec−1 (where T = 300K), dependent on the geometry of the solvent-accessible surface, was observed inside the biomolecule. The primary contribution to this potential arose from a layer of positive charge density 1.0 Å from the solute surface, on average 0.008 ec/Å3, which we found to be the product of a highly ordered first solvation shell. Significant second solvation shell effects, including additional layers of charge density and a slight decrease in the short-range solvent-solvent interaction strength, were also observed. The impact of these findings on implicit solvent models was assessed by running similar explicit-solvent simulations on the fully charged protein system. When the energy due to the solvent reaction field in the uncharged system is accounted for, correlation between per-atom electrostatic energies for the explicit solvent model and a simple implicit (Poisson) calculation is 0.97, and correlation between per-atom energies for the explicit solvent model and a previously published, optimized Poisson model is 0.99. PMID:17949217

  4. The Effectiveness of Using an Explicit Language Learning Strategy-Based Instruction in Developing Secondary School Students' EFL Listening Comprehension Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amin, Iman Abdul-Reheem; Amin, Magdy Mohammad; Aly, Mahsoub Abdul-Sadeq

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at exploring the effectiveness of using explicit language learning strategy-based instruction in developing secondary school students' EFL listening comprehension skills. It was hypothesized that using explicit strategy-based instruction would develop students' EFL listening comprehension skill and its sub-skills. The…

  5. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  6. Trypsin-Ligand Binding Free Energies from Explicit and Implicit Solvent Simulations with Polarizable Potential

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Dian; Zhang, Jiajing; Duke, Robert E.; Li, Guohui; Ren, Pengyu

    2009-01-01

    We have calculated the binding free energies of a series of benzamidine-like inhibitors to trypsin with a polarizable force field using both explicit and implicit solvent approaches. Free energy perturbation has been performed for the ligands in bulk water and in protein complex with molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated binding free energies are well within the accuracy of experimental measurement and the direction of change is predicted correctly in call cases. We analyzed the molecular dipole moments of the ligands in gas, water and protein environments. Neither binding affinity nor ligand solvation free energy in bulk water shows much dependence on the molecular dipole moments of the ligands. Substitution of the aromatic or the charged group in the ligand results in considerable change in the solvation energy in bulk water and protein whereas the binding affinity varies insignificantly due to cancellation. The effect of chemical modification on ligand charge distribution is mostly local. Replacing benzene with diazine has minimal impact on the atomic multipoles at the amidinium group. We have also utilized an implicit solvent based end-state approach to evaluate the binding free energies of these inhibitors. In this approach, the polarizable multipole model combined with Poisson-Boltzmann/surface area (PMPB/SA) provides the electrostatic interaction energy and the polar solvation free energy. Overall the relative binding free energies obtained from the PMPB/SA model are in good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:19399779

  7. Effects of brief mindful acceptance induction on implicit dysfunctional attitudes and concordance between implicit and explicit dysfunctional attitudes.

    PubMed

    Keng, Shian-Ling; Seah, Stanley T H; Tong, Eddie M W; Smoski, Moria

    2016-08-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions have been shown to be effective in alleviating depressive symptoms. While much work has examined the effects of mindfulness training on subjective symptoms and experiences, and less is known regarding whether mindfulness training may alter relatively uncontrollable cognitive processes associated with depressed mood, particularly implicit dysfunctional attitudes. The present study examined the effects of a brief mindful acceptance induction on implicit dysfunctional attitudes and degree of concordance between implicit and explicit dysfunctional attitudes in the context of sad mood. A total of 79 adult participants with elevated depressive symptoms underwent an autobiographical mood induction procedure before being randomly assigned to mindful acceptance or thought wandering inductions. Results showed that the effect of mindful acceptance on implicit dysfunctional attitude was significantly moderated by trait mindfulness. Participants high on trait mindfulness demonstrated significant improvements in implicit dysfunctional attitudes following the mindful acceptance induction. Those low on trait mindfulness demonstrated significantly worse implicit dysfunctional attitudes following the induction. Significantly greater levels of concordance between implicit and explicit dysfunctional attitudes were observed in the mindful acceptance condition versus the thought wandering condition. The findings highlight changes in implicit dysfunctional attitudes and improvements in self-concordance as two potential mechanisms underlying the effects of mindfulness-based interventions. PMID:27236073

  8. Combined effects of solvation and aggregation propensity on the final supramolecular structures adopted by hydrophobic, glycine-rich, elastin-like polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Salvi, Anna M; Moscarelli, Pasquale; Bochicchio, Brigida; Lanza, Giuseppe; Castle, James E

    2013-05-01

    Previous work on elastin-like polypeptides (ELPs) made of hydrophobic amino acids of the type XxxGlyGlyZzzGly (Xxx, Zzz = Val, Leu) has consistently shown that differing dominant supramolecular structures were formed when the suspending media were varied: helical, amyloid-like fibers when suspended in water and globules evolving into "string of bead" structures, poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), or cigar-like bundles, poly(ValGlyGlyLeuGly), when suspended in methyl alcohol. Comparative experiments with poly(LeuGlyGlyValGly) have further indicated that the interface energy plays a significant role and that solvation effects act in concomitance with the intrinsic aggregation propensity of the repeat sequence. Continuing our investigation on ELPs using surface (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy) and bulk (circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) techniques for their characterization, here we have compared the effect of suspending solvents (H(2)O, dimethylsulfoxide, ethylene glycol, and MeOH) on poly(ValGlyGlyValGly), the polypeptide most inclined to form long and well-refined helical fibers in water, searching for the signature of intermolecular interactions occurring between the polypeptide chains in the given suspension. The influence of sequence specificities has been studied by comparing poly(ValGlyGlyValGly) and poly(LeuGlyGlyValGly) with a similar degree of polymerization. Deposits on substrates of the polypeptides were characterized taking into account the differing evaporation rate of solvents, and tests on their stability in ultra high vacuum were performed. Finally, combining experimental and computational studies, we have revaluated the three-dimensional modeling previously proposed for the supramolecular assembly in water of poly(ValGlyGlyValGly). The results were discussed and rationalized also in the light of published data. PMID:23426573

  9. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom's test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  10. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-01

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom's test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  11. Order and correlation contributions to the entropy of hydrophobic solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Maoyuan; Besford, Quinn Alexander; Mulvaney, Thomas; Gray-Weale, Angus

    2015-03-21

    The entropy of hydrophobic solvation has been explained as the result of ordered solvation structures, of hydrogen bonds, of the small size of the water molecule, of dispersion forces, and of solvent density fluctuations. We report a new approach to the calculation of the entropy of hydrophobic solvation, along with tests of and comparisons to several other methods. The methods are assessed in the light of the available thermodynamic and spectroscopic information on the effects of temperature on hydrophobic solvation. Five model hydrophobes in SPC/E water give benchmark solvation entropies via Widom’s test-particle insertion method, and other methods and models are tested against these particle-insertion results. Entropies associated with distributions of tetrahedral order, of electric field, and of solvent dipole orientations are examined. We find these contributions are small compared to the benchmark particle-insertion entropy. Competitive with or better than other theories in accuracy, but with no free parameters, is the new estimate of the entropy contributed by correlations between dipole moments. Dipole correlations account for most of the hydrophobic solvation entropy for all models studied and capture the distinctive temperature dependence seen in thermodynamic and spectroscopic experiments. Entropies based on pair and many-body correlations in number density approach the correct magnitudes but fail to describe temperature and size dependences, respectively. Hydrogen-bond definitions and free energies that best reproduce entropies from simulations are reported, but it is difficult to choose one hydrogen bond model that fits a variety of experiments. The use of information theory, scaled-particle theory, and related methods is discussed briefly. Our results provide a test of the Frank-Evans hypothesis that the negative solvation entropy is due to structured water near the solute, complement the spectroscopic detection of that solvation structure by

  12. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li+ in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li+ is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K+ and Cl- species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl- shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li+Cl-, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  13. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-07

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li{sup +} in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li{sup +} is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K{sup +} and Cl{sup −} species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl{sup −} shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li{sup +}Cl{sup −}, contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements.

  14. Lithium solvation in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile mixtures.

    PubMed

    Semino, Rocío; Zaldívar, Gervasio; Calvo, Ernesto J; Laria, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulation results pertaining to the solvation of Li(+) in dimethyl sulfoxide-acetonitrile binary mixtures. The results are potentially relevant in the design of Li-air batteries that rely on aprotic mixtures as solvent media. To analyze effects derived from differences in ionic size and charge sign, the solvation of Li(+) is compared to the ones observed for infinitely diluted K(+) and Cl(-) species, in similar solutions. At all compositions, the cations are preferentially solvated by dimethyl sulfoxide. Contrasting, the first solvation shell of Cl(-) shows a gradual modification in its composition, which varies linearly with the global concentrations of the two solvents in the mixtures. Moreover, the energetics of the solvation, described in terms of the corresponding solute-solvent coupling, presents a clear non-ideal concentration dependence. Similar nonlinear trends were found for the stabilization of different ionic species in solution, compared to the ones exhibited by their electrically neutral counterparts. These tendencies account for the characteristics of the free energy associated to the stabilization of Li(+)Cl(-), contact-ion-pairs in these solutions. Ionic transport is also analyzed. Dynamical results show concentration trends similar to those recently obtained from direct experimental measurements. PMID:25481154

  15. Explicit formulas for 2nd-order driving terms due to sextupoles and chromatic effects of quadrupoles.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C-X. )

    2012-04-25

    Optimization of nonlinear driving terms have become a useful tool for designing storage rings, especially modern light sources where the strong nonlinearity is dominated by the large chromatic effects of quadrupoles and strong sextupoles for chromaticity control. The Lie algebraic method is well known for computing such driving terms. However, it appears that there was a lack of explicit formulas in the public domain for such computation, resulting in uncertainty and/or inconsistency in widely used codes. This note presents explicit formulas for driving terms due to sextupoles and chromatic effects of quadrupoles, which can be considered as thin elements. The computation is accurate to the 4th-order Hamiltonian and 2nd-order in terms of magnet parameters. The results given here are the same as the APS internal note AOP-TN-2009-020. This internal nte has been revised and published here as a Light Source Note in order to get this information into the public domain, since both ELEGANT and OPA are using these formulas.

  16. On the accuracy limits of orbital expansion methods: Explicit effects of k-functions on atomic and molecular energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeev, Edward F.; Allen, Wesley D.; Hernandez, Rigoberto; Sherrill, C. David; Schaefer, Henry F.

    2003-05-01

    For selected first- and second-row atoms, correlation-optimized Gaussian k functions have been determined and used in the construction of septuple-ζ basis sets for the correlation-consistent cc-pVXZ and aug-cc-pVXZ series. Restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) and second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) total and pair energies were computed for H, N, O, F, S, H2, N2, HF, H2O, and (H2O)2 to demonstrate the consistency of the new septuple-ζ basis sets as extensions of the established (aug)-cc-pVXZ series. The pV7Z and aug-pV7Z sets were then employed in numerous extrapolation schemes on the test species to probe the accuracy limits of the conventional MP2 method vis-à-vis explicitly correlated (MP2-R12/A) benchmarks. For (singlet, triplet) pairs, (X+1/2)-n functional forms with n=(3, 5) proved best for extrapolations. The (mean abs. relative error, std. dev.) among the 73 singlet pair energies in the dataset is (1.96%, 0.54%) and (1.72%, 0.51%) for explicit computations with the pV7Z and aug-pV7Z basis sets, respectively, but only (0.07%, 0.09%) after two-point, 6Z/7Z extrapolations with the (X+1/2)-3 form. The effects of k functions on molecular relative energies were examined by application of the septuple-ζ basis sets to the barrier to linearity and the dimerization energy of water. In the former case, an inherent uncertainty in basis set extrapolations persists which is comparable in size to the error (≈20 cm-1) in explicit aug-pV7Z computations, revealing fundamental limits of orbital expansion methods in the domain of subchemical accuracy (0.1 kcal mol-1).

  17. Alphabetical knowledge from whole words training: effects of explicit instruction and implicit experience on learning script segmentation.

    PubMed

    Bitan, T; Karni, A

    2003-05-01

    We investigated the possibility that pattern segmentation skills, specifically, phonological decoding, evolve implicitly in adult readers given training in an artificial script. In this Morse-like script each phoneme was represented by 2-3 discrete symbols. Subjects were trained in five consecutive sessions, on reading six nonsense words using a forced choice task that required translating symbol strings to sound patterns written in Latin letters. Three training conditions were compared within subject in terms of the time-course of learning and the ability to generalize the acquired knowledge (transfer): alphabetical whole words with letter decoding instruction (Explicit); alphabetical whole words (Implicit), and non-alphabetical whole words (Arbitrary). In separate blocks in each training session, a visual-matching task was administered using the same stimuli. Our results show: (a). that while all three training conditions were equally effective in terms of magnitude and time-course of learning accurate translation, each training condition resulted in a different type of knowledge (i.e. differential transfer). (b). Declarative knowledge of letters evolved from training on whole words only in subjects with previous experience in Explicit training. However, even with declarative knowledge of the specific letters subjects did not develop general letter segmentation skills. (c). Contrary to the robust transfer of learning gains to different stimuli within a given task, there was no significant transfer across tasks indicating that the locus of learning was task dependent. Altogether our results suggest that even given explicit letter instruction, training on word decoding may result in letter recognition rather than in alphabetic segmentation skills. PMID:12706213

  18. Electron Solvation in Liquid Ammonia: Lithium, Sodium, Magnesium, and Calcium as Electron Sources.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2016-03-10

    A free electron in solution, known as a solvated electron, is the smallest possible anion. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms serve as electron donors in solvents that mediate outer-sphere electron transfer. We report herein ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of lithium, sodium, magnesium, and calcium in liquid ammonia at 250 K. By analyzing the electronic properties and the ionic and solvation structures and dynamics, we systematically characterize these metals as electron donors and ammonia molecules as electron acceptors. We show that the solvated metal strongly modifies the properties of its solvation shells and that the observed effect is metal-specific. Specifically, the radius and charge exhibit major impacts. The single solvated electron present in the alkali metal systems is distributed more uniformly among the solvent molecules of each metal's two solvation shells. In contrast, alkaline earth metals favor a less uniform distribution of the electron density. Alkali and alkaline earth atoms are coordinated by four and six NH3 molecules, respectively. The smaller atoms, Li and Mg, are stronger electron donors than Na and Ca. This result is surprising, as smaller atoms in a column of the periodic table have higher ionization potentials. However, it can be explained by stronger electron donor-acceptor interactions between the smaller atoms and the solvent molecules. The structure of the first solvation shell is sharpest for Mg, which has a large charge and a small radius. Solvation is weakest for Na, which has a small charge and a large radius. Weak solvation leads to rapid dynamics, as reflected in the diffusion coefficients of NH3 molecules of the first two solvation shells and the Na atom. The properties of the solvated electrons established in the present study are important for radiation chemistry, synthetic chemistry, condensed-matter charge transfer, and energy sources. PMID:26886153

  19. Radiolytic yields of solvated electrons in ionic liquid and its solvation dynamics at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musat, Raluca M.; Kondoh, Takafumi; Gohdo, Masao; Yoshida, Yoichi; Takahashi, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    We present an investigation of the solvated electron in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (P14NTf2) using pulse radiolytic techniques. Temperature-dependent studies reveal that the yield of the solvated electron decreases with decreasing temperature. The lower initial yield measured indicates that we have a loss of some electrons before they become fully solvated. There may be a high probability that the excess dry electrons (pre-solvated electron) react before the electron solvation is completed because the solvation dynamics is slowing down with decreasing temperature.

  20. Variational Optimization of an All-Atom Implicit Solvent Force Field to Match Explicit Solvent Simulation Data.

    PubMed

    Bottaro, Sandro; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B

    2013-12-10

    The development of accurate implicit solvation models with low computational cost is essential for addressing many large-scale biophysical problems. Here, we present an efficient solvation term based on a Gaussian solvent-exclusion model (EEF1) for simulations of proteins in aqueous environment, with the primary aim of having a good overlap with explicit solvent simulations, particularly for unfolded and disordered states - as would be needed for multiscale applications. In order to achieve this, we have used a recently proposed coarse-graining procedure based on minimization of an entropy-related objective function to train the model to reproduce the equilibrium distribution obtained from explicit water simulations. Via this methodology, we have optimized both a charge screening parameter and a backbone torsion term against explicit solvent simulations of an α-helical and a β-stranded peptide. The performance of the resulting effective energy function, termed EEF1-SB, is tested with respect to the properties of folded proteins, the folding of small peptides or fast-folding proteins, and NMR data for intrinsically disordered proteins. The results show that EEF1-SB provides a reasonable description of a wide range of systems, but its key advantage over other methods tested is that it captures very well the structure and dimension of disordered or weakly structured peptides. EEF1-SB is thus a computationally inexpensive (~ 10 times faster than Generalized-Born methods) and transferable approximation for treating solvent effects. PMID:24748852

  1. Effects of supported electronic text and explicit instruction on science comprehension by students with autism spectrum disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Victoria Floyd

    Supported electronic text (eText), or text that has been altered to increase access and provide support to learners, may promote comprehension of science content for students with disabilities. According to CAST, Book Builder(TM) uses supported eText to promote reading for meaning for all students. Although little research has been conducted in the area of supported eText for students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), technology (e.g., computer assisted instruction) has been used for over 35 years to instruct students with ASD in academic areas. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a supported eText and explicit instruction on the science vocabulary and comprehension of four middle school students with ASD. Researchers used a multiple probe across participants design to evaluate the Book Builder (TM) program on measures of vocabulary, literal comprehension, and application questions. Results indicated a functional relation between the Book Builder(TM) and explicit instruction (i.e., model-lead-test, examples and non-examples, and referral to the definition) and the number of correct responses on the probe. In addition, students were able to generalize concepts to untrained exemplars. Finally, teachers and students validate the program as practical and useful.

  2. The generalizability of gender bias: Testing the effects of contextual, explicit, and implicit sexism on labor arbitration decisions.

    PubMed

    Girvan, Erik J; Deason, Grace; Borgida, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Decades of social-psychological research show that gender bias can result from features of the social context and from individual-level psychological predispositions. Do these sources of bias impact legal decisions, which are frequently made by people subject to factors that have been proposed to reduce bias (training and accountability)? To answer the question, we examined the potential for 3 major social-psychological theories of gender bias (role-congruity theory, ambivalent sexism, and implicit bias) to predict outcomes of labor arbitration decisions. In the first study, undergraduate students and professional arbitrators made decisions about 2 mock arbitration cases in which the gender of the employee-grievants was experimentally manipulated. Student participants' decisions showed the predicted gender bias, whereas the decisions of experienced professionals did not. Individual-level attitudes did not predict the extent of the observed bias and accountability did not attenuate it. In the second study, arbitrators' explicit and implicit gender attitudes were significant predictors of their decisions in published cases. The laboratory and field results suggest that context, expertise, and implicit and explicit attitudes are relevant to legal decision-making, but that laboratory experiments alone may not fully capture the nature of their effect on legal professionals' decisions in real cases. PMID:26030450

  3. Affinity of HIV-1 antibody 2G12 with monosaccharides: a theoretical study based on explicit and implicit water models.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yuka; Ueno-Noto, Kaori; Takano, Keiko

    2014-04-01

    In order to develop potential ligands to HIV-1 antibody 2G12 toward HIV-1 vaccine, binding mechanisms of the antibody 2G12 with the glycan ligand of D-mannose and D-fructose were theoretically examined. D-Fructose, whose molecular structure is slightly different from D-mannose, has experimentally shown to have stronger binding affinity to the antibody than that of D-mannose. To clarify the nature of D-fructose's higher binding affinity over D-mannose, we studied interaction between the monosaccharides and the antibody using ab initio fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method considering solvation effect as implicit model (FMO-PCM) as well as explicit water model. The calculated binding free energies of the glycans were qualitatively well consistent with the experimentally reported order of their affinities with the antibody 2G12. In addition, the FMO-PCM calculation elucidated the advantages of D-fructose over D-mannose in the solvation energy as well as the entropic contribution term obtained by MD simulations. The effects of explicit water molecules observed in the X-ray crystal structure were also scrutinized by means of FMO methods. Significant pair interaction energies among D-fructose, amino acids, and water molecules were uncovered, which indicated contributions from the water molecules to the strong binding ability of D-fructose to the antibody 2G12. These FMO calculation results of explicit water model as well as implicit water model indicated that the strong binding of D-fructose over D-mannose was due to the solvation effects on the D-fructose interaction energy. PMID:24583603

  4. Effects of Explicit Subtraction Instruction on Fifth Grade Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Danielle

    2009-01-01

    This study involved an investigation of the effects of strategy instruction integrated with the concrete-representational-abstract teaching sequence on students with learning disabilities. A multiple probe design across subjects with one replication was used in this study. Two sets of data were analyzed to determine effectiveness of the…

  5. Explicit Input Enhancement: Effects on Target and Non-Target Aspects of Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gascoigne, Carolyn

    2006-01-01

    Many recent studies have examined the effectiveness of various types of input enhancement. The following study expands this line of inquiry to include technological applications of language learning by comparing the effectiveness of the computer application of diacritics to a traditional pen-and-paper process among beginning students of French and…

  6. Co-solvation effect on the binding mode of the α-mangostin/β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex

    PubMed Central

    Rungnim, Chompoonut; Phunpee, Sarunya; Kunaseth, Manaschai; Namuangruk, Supawadee; Rungsardthong, Kanin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cyclodextrins (CDs) have been extensively utilized as host molecules to enhance the solubility, stability and bioavailability of hydrophobic drug molecules through the formation of inclusion complexes. It was previously reported that the use of co-solvents in such studies may result in ternary (host:guest:co-solvent) complex formation. The objective of this work was to investigate the effect of ethanol as a co-solvent on the inclusion complex formation between α-mangostin (α-MGS) and β-CD, using both experimental and theoretical studies. Experimental phase-solubility studies were carried out in order to assess complex formation, with the mechanism of association being probed using a mathematical model. It was found that α-MGS was poorly soluble at low ethanol concentrations (0–10% v/v), but higher concentrations (10–40% v/v) resulted in better α-MGS solubility at all β-CD concentrations studied (0–10 mM). From the equilibrium constant calculation, the inclusion complex is still a binary complex (1:1), even in the presence of ethanol. The results from our theoretical study confirm that the binding mode is binary complex and the presence of ethanol as co-solvent enhances the solubility of α-MGS with some effects on the binding affinity with β-CD, depending on the concentration employed. PMID:26734079

  7. Effects of explicit knowledge and predictability on auditory distraction and target performance.

    PubMed

    Max, Caroline; Widmann, Andreas; Schröger, Erich; Sussman, Elyse

    2015-11-01

    This study tested effects of task requirements and knowledge on auditory distraction effects. This was done by comparing the response to a pitch change (an irrelevant, distracting tone feature) that occurred predictably in a tone sequence (every 5th tone) under different task conditions. The same regular sound sequence was presented with task conditions varying in what information the participant was given about the predictability of the pitch change, and when this information was relevant for the task to be performed. In all conditions, participants performed a tone duration judgment task. Behavioral and event-related brain potential (ERP) measures were obtained to measure distraction effects and deviance detection. Predictable deviants produced behavioral distraction effects in all conditions. However, the P3a amplitude evoked by the predictable pitch change was largest when participants were uninformed about the regular structure of the sound sequence, showing an effect of knowledge on involuntary orienting of attention. In contrast, the mismatch negativity (MMN) component was only modulated when the regularity was relevant for the task and not by stimulus predictability itself. P3a and behavioral indices of distraction were not fully concordant. Overall, our results show differential effects of knowledge and predictability on auditory distraction effects indexed by neurophysiological (P3a) and behavioral measures. PMID:26386396

  8. A new organized media: glycerol:N,N-dimethylformamide mixtures/AOT/n-heptane reversed micelles. The effect of confinement on preferential solvation.

    PubMed

    Durantini, Andrés M; Falcone, R Dario; Silber, Juana J; Correa, N Mariano

    2011-05-19

    In this work we investigate the behavior of the glycerol (GY):N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) mixture in homogeneous and sodium 1,4-bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/n-heptane reversed micelles (RMs) media. To achieve this goal we have used the solvatochromic behavior of 1-methyl-8-oxyquinolinium betaine (QB) as an absorption probe, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). QB shows strong preferential solvation when it is dissolved in the GY:DMF mixture, and, as QB is a good hydrogen bond acceptor molecular probe, it is preferentially solvated by the GY-DMF hydrogen-bonded (H-bonded) species. On the other hand, when the GY:DMF mixture was investigated in AOT RMs, the results show that the mixture is encapsulated in the polar core of the AOT RMs. DLS confirms the formation of the GY:DMF/AOT/n-heptane RMs since an increase in the W(s)=([GY]+[DMF])/[AOT] values causes an increment in the RMs droplets sizes. The solvatochromic behavior of QB, which resides at the AOT RMs interface, shows that QB is mostly solvated by GY molecules, especially at low W(s) values. Thus, it seems that upon encapsulation inside the polar core of the AOT RMs, the GY-DMF interaction diminishes due to the strong AOT-GY interaction. (1)H NMR chemical shifts of GY and DMF measured in the different AOT RMs investigated shows that GY and DMF behave practically as noninteracting solvents inside the RMs. PMID:21517031

  9. Applications of Optical Spectroscopy in Studies on Energy & Electron Transfer and Solvation Effects in Nanoscale and Molecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Megan H. J.

    This thesis describes three investigations, ranging in subject matters, all of which relating to systems capable of photoinduced reactions involving energy or electron transfer. The phenomenon and the effects of environment in the various systems are explored using different methodologies of optical spectroscopy. As the chapters progress, different investigations introduce and build on fundamental concepts encountered and in complexity of the methodologies used to explore the systems. The first chapter introduces the preparation of water-soluble CdSe nanocrystal clusters. The clusters, created using a protein, are 3-D close-packed self-assemblies of nanocrystals. Due to this close-packed nature, electronic interactions between the nanocrystals allow for energy migration within the cluster. The structural and optical properties of the clusters were described. Then using steady-state spectroscopy, properties of the original nanocrystals were compared to that of the cluster to determine the consequence of nanocrystal coupling interactions and their potential use toward the development of artificial light-harvesting systems. In the second chapter, CdSe nanocrystals are functionalized with a unique electro-active polymer, and the electron transfer between the nanocrystal and the electro-active polymer adsorbate is investigated. Using fluorescence decay measurements, the electron transfer reaction inherent to the system with respect to a comprehensive range of dielectric solvents was explored. The study illustrates the high complexity of seemingly typical nanocrystal-based systems and provides general awareness of what factors need to be considered when dealing with such systems. The final chapter starts with an informal review of ultrafast nonlinear spectroscopy, focusing on two methods, three-pulse photon echo peak shift (3PEPS) and two-dimensional photon echo (2DPE) electronic spectroscopy, and how they are related. A straightforward approach for extracting 3PEPS data

  10. Application of Roof-Shape Amines as Chiral Solvating Agents for Discrimination of Optically Active Acids by NMR Spectroscopy: Study of Match-Mismatch Effect and Crystal Structure of the Diastereomeric Salts.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Riddhi; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Bedekar, Ashutosh V

    2016-09-01

    Optically active roof-shape amines were prepared and scanned as chiral solvating agents to study molecular recognition of acids by NMR analysis. Three types of amines were studied to establish a match-mismatch effect for structurally diverse acid analytes. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis was performed on the diastereomeric salts of roof-shape amines and both isomers of mandelic acid to establish molecular conformation and correlate the absolute configuration with the observed NMR shift. The present system also recognizes the two isomers of weakly acidic BINOL and its derivatives. PMID:27484455

  11. The Effects of Explicit Instruction on the Writing Ability of a Student with Noonan Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asaro-Saddler, Kristie; Saddler, Bruce; Ellis-Robinson, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we sought to determine the effectiveness of a sentence creation intervention on the sentence writing ability of a young writer with Noonan Syndrome. Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by shortness in stature, with neck and ear anomalies, hypertelorism, ptosis of the eyelids, low set ears, and instances…

  12. The Role of Exposure Condition in the Effectiveness of Explicit Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Yucel

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study that investigated the effects of two feedback exposure conditions on the acquisition of two Turkish morphemes. The study followed a randomized experimental design with an immediate and a delayed posttest. Forty-two Chinese-speaking learners of Turkish were randomly assigned to one of three groups: receivers,…

  13. Long-ranged solvation forces in a fluid with short-ranged interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertsin, Alexander J.; Grunze, Michael

    2003-05-01

    The grand canonical Monte Carlo technique is used to calculate the solvation force and interfacial tension in a simple Lennard-Jones fluid confined between two solid walls. Emphasis is placed on large wall-to-wall separations, where the oscillations of density and solvation force due to layering effects have decayed. Despite the short range of the fluid-fluid and fluid-wall interaction potentials used, the solvation force shows an unsuspectedly long-ranged behavior, remaining quite perceptible up to a separation of 100 molecular diameters. It is also found that the sign of the solvation force at large separations is not uniquely determined by the sign of the interfacial tension: The walls that are "philic" with respect to the constrained fluid may well exhibit both repulsive and attractive solvation forces.

  14. Free energy calculations on the relative solvation free energies of benzene, anisole, and 1,2,3-trimethoxygenzene: Theoretical and experimental analysis of aromatic methoxy solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Kuyper, L.F.; Hunter, R.N. ); Ashton, D. ); Merz, K.M. Jr.; Kollman, P.A. )

    1991-08-22

    The authors have carried out experimental determinations of the free energy of solvation of anisole, 1,2-dimethoxybenzene (DMB), and 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene (TMB) in water and perturbation free energy calculations on the relative aqueous solvation free energies of benzene, anisole, and TMB. The measured differences between the relative experimental free energies of solvation of benzene, anisole, DMB, and TMB support the concept of near additivity of aromatic methoxy group contributions to such gas phase to water transfer free energies. Calculated differences in solvation free energies were shown to be sensitive to the choice of electrostatic charge distribution model. Quantum mechanical electrostatic potential fit charge models from STO-3G, 4-31G, and 6-31G* basis sets were compared for their ability to reproduce the relative free energies of solvation found experimentally. The 6-31G* basis sets were compared for their ability to reproduce the relative free energies of solvation found experimentally. The 6-31G* charge model was the best in this regard and the STO-3G model was next in quality, but the 4-31G model significantly overestimated the effect of O-CH{sub 3} substitution on solvation free energies. Models based on scaled 4-31G charges also produced reasonable results.

  15. Spin crossover and solvate effects in 1D Fe{sup II} chain compounds containig Bis(dipyridylamine)-linked triazine ligands.

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, , T. M.; Moubaraki, B.; Turner, D. R.; Halder, G. J.; Chastanet, G.; Neville, S. M.; Cashion, J. D.; Letard, J. F.; Batten, S. R.; Murray, K. S.

    2011-03-01

    A series of 1D polymeric FeII spin crossover (SCO) compounds of type trans-[FeII(NCX)2(L)] Solvent has been synthesised {l_brace}L = DPPyT = 1-[4,6-bis(dipyridin-2-ylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yl]pyridin-4(1H)-one for 1-4{r_brace}; NCX = NCS- for 1 and 2, NCSe- for 3 and 4; Solvent = 2.5CH2Cl2 for 1, 2CHCl3 {center_dot} 0.5CH3OH for 2 and 4, CH2Cl2 for 3; L = DPT (6-phenoxy-N2,N2,N4,N4-tetra-2-pyridinyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) for 5; NCX = NCS- for 5; Solvent = 2CH3OH {center_dot} H2O for 5; L = DQT {l_brace}4-[4,6-bis(dipyridin-2-ylamino)-1,3,5-triazin-2-yloxy]phenol{r_brace} for 6-8; NCX- = NCS- for 6; Solvent = 2CH2Cl2 for 6; NCX- = NCSe- for 7; Solvent = CH2Cl2 {center_dot} CH2ClCH2Cl for 7; NCX- = NCSe- for 8; Solvent = 1.5CH2Cl2 {center_dot} 0.5CH3OH for 8. Two mononuclear complexes, trans-[FeII(NCS)2(DPT)2] {center_dot} 2CH3OH (9) and trans-[FeII(NCSe)2(DPT)2] {center_dot} 2CH3OH (10), contained the L ligand in a terminal bidentate coordination mode. As well as variations made in the NCX- ligands, variations were also made in substituent groups on the s-triazine 'core' of L to investigate their intermolecular/supramolecular role in crystal packing and, thus, their influence on SCO properties. All the complexes crystallised as solvates, and the influence of the latter on the magnetism and spin transitions was explored. A wide range of physical methods was employed, as a function of temperature, viz. crystallography, PXRD (synchrotron), susceptibilities, LIESST and Moessbauer effect, in order to probe magnetostructural correlations in these 1D families. New examples of half-crossovers, with ordered -LS-HS-LS-HS- intrachain states existing below T1/2, have been observed and comparisons made to related one- or two-step systems. All the observed transitions are gradual and non-hysteretic, and brief comments are made in relation to recent theoretical models for cooperativity, developed elsewhere.

  16. Effects of sleep loss, time of day, and extended mental work on implicit and explicit learning of sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heuer, H.; Spijkers, W.; Kiesswetter, E.; Schmidtke, V.

    1998-01-01

    Tacit knowledge is part of many professional skills and can be studied experimentally with implicit-learning paradigms. The authors explored the effects of 2 different stressors, loss of sleep and mental fatigue, on implicit learning in a serial-response time (RT) task. In the 1st experiment, 1 night of sleep deprivation was shown to impair implicit but not explicit sequence learning. In the 2nd experiment, no impairment of both types of sequence learning was found after 1.5 hr of mental work. Serial-RT performance, in contrast, suffered from both stressors. These findings suggest that sleep deprivation induces specific risks for automatic, skill-based behavior that are not present in consciously controlled performance.

  17. Why direct effects of predation complicate the social brain hypothesis: And how incorporation of explicit proximate behavioral mechanisms might help.

    PubMed

    van der Bijl, Wouter; Kolm, Niclas

    2016-06-01

    A growing number of studies have found that large brains may help animals survive by avoiding predation. These studies provide an alternative explanation for existing correlative evidence for one of the dominant hypotheses regarding the evolution of brain size in animals, the social brain hypothesis (SBH). The SBH proposes that social complexity is a major evolutionary driver of large brains. However, if predation both directly selects for large brains and higher levels of sociality, correlations between sociality and brain size may be spurious. We argue that tests of the SBH should take direct effects of predation into account, either by explicitly including them in comparative analyses or by pin-pointing the brain-behavior-fitness pathway through which the SBH operates. Existing data and theory on social behavior can then be used to identify precise candidate mechanisms and formulate new testable predictions. PMID:27174816

  18. Picosecond dynamics of benzophenone anion solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Jonah, C.D. )

    1993-01-14

    The dynamics of benzophenone anion solvation in alcohols are studied by pulse-radiolysis techniques. The solvation process is characterized by the blue shift of the transient absorption spectrum of the anion and is faster for the smaller alcohols. The anion is solvated more slowly than the electron in the same solvent, but the solvation times of both are similar to [tau][sub 2], the solvent dielectric relaxation time. The familiar phenomenological two-state model of solvation was found to be inappropriate for describing the anion solvation process. A multistate process appears to be a more appropriate description. The authors modeled the kinetics of the spectral relaxation. In most cases, nearly quantitative agreement between the calculated and observed spectra is achieved. The characteristic relaxation times for the alcohol solvents around the anions were also reproduced. 50 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. A unifying modeling of plant shoot gravitropism with an explicit account of the effects of growth.

    PubMed

    Bastien, Renaud; Douady, Stéphane; Moulia, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Gravitropism, the slow reorientation of plant growth in response to gravity, is a major determinant of the form and posture of land plants. Recently a universal model of shoot gravitropism, the AC model, was presented, in which the dynamics of the tropic movement is only determined by the conflicting controls of (1) graviception that tends to curve the plants toward the vertical, and (2) proprioception that tends to keep the stem straight. This model was found to be valid for many species and over two orders of magnitude of organ size. However, the motor of the movement, the elongation, was purposely neglected in the AC model. If growth effects are to be taken into account, it is necessary to consider the material derivative, i.e., the rate of change of curvature bound to expanding and convected organ elements. Here we show that it is possible to rewrite the material equation of curvature in a compact simplified form that directly expresses the curvature variation as a function of the median elongation and of the distribution of the differential growth. By using this extended model, called the ACĖ model, growth is found to have two main destabilizing effects on the tropic movement: (1) passive orientation drift, which occurs when a curved element elongates without differential growth, and (2) fixed curvature, when an element leaves the elongation zone and is no longer able to actively change its curvature. By comparing the AC and ACĖ models to experiments, these two effects are found to be negligible. Our results show that the simplified AC mode can be used to analyze gravitropism and posture control in actively elongating plant organs without significant information loss. PMID:24782876

  20. Lithium pinacolone enolate solvated by hexamethylphosphoramide.

    PubMed

    Guang, Jie; Liu, Qiyong Peter; Hopson, Russell; Williard, Paul G

    2015-06-17

    We report the crystal structure of a substoichiometric, HMPA-trisolvated lithium pinacolone enolate tetramer (LiOPin)4·HMPA3 abbreviated as T3. In this tetramer one HMPA binds to lithium more strongly than the other two causing a reduction in spatial symmetry with corresponding loss of C3 symmetry. A variety of NMR experiments, including HMPA titration, diffusion coefficient-formula weight (D-FW) analysis, and other multinuclear one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques reveal that T3 is the major species in hydrocarbon solution when more than 0.6 equiv of HMPA is present. Due to a small amount of moisture from HMPA or air leaking into the solution, a minor complex was identified and confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis as a mixed aggregate containing enolate, lithium hydroxide, and HMPA in a 4:2:4 ratio, [(LiOPin)4·(LiOH)2·HMPA4], that we refer to as pseudo-T4. A tetra-HMPA-solvated lithium cyclopentanone enolate tetramer was also prepared and characterized by X-ray diffraction, leading to the conclusion that steric effects dominate the formation and solvation of the pinacolone aggregates. An unusual mixed aggregate consisting of pinacolone enolate, lithium diisopropyl amide, lithium oxide, and HMPA in the ratio 5:1:1:2 is also described. PMID:25933508

  1. Maleic acid solvation in mixed water-ethanol solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usacheva, T. R.; Kuz'mina, I. A.; Sharnin, V. A.; Tukumova, I. R.

    2012-04-01

    Heat effects of maleic acid dissolution in mixed water-ethanol solvents at 298.15 K are determined by means of calorimetry. A rise in exothermicity of maleic acid solvation is observed upon changes in the solvent copmosition in the direction of H2O → EtOH, the minimum being at ˜0.2 mol fraction of EtOH.

  2. Anthropogenic effects on global riverine sediment and water discharge - a spatially explicit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, S.; Kettner, A. J.; Syvitski, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in global riverine water discharge and suspended sediment flux over a 50-year period, 1960-2010 are studied, applying a new version of the WBMsed (WBMsed v.2.0) global hydrological water balance model. A new floodplain component is introduced to better represent water and sediment dynamics during periods of overbank discharge. Validated against data from 16 globally distributed stations, WBMsed v.2.0 simulation results show considerable improvement over the original model. Anthropogenic impact on sediment and water discharge is evaluated by comparing global scale simulations with and without human drivers and parameters (agricultural land use, water intake form aquifers and rivers, sediment trapping in reservoirs, and human-induced soil erosion). The results show that, on average, global riverine sediment flux is reduced by approximately 25% by anthropogenic activities (almost exclusively due to trapping in reservoirs) while water discharge is reduced by about 2%. These results correspond to previous analysis by other research groups. Substantial global and intra-basin variability is observed (see Figure 1) for the first time. In some regions an opposite anthropogenic effect on sediment and water discharge was predicted (e.g. west Mississippi Basin, Rio Grande River, Indian subcontinent). We discuss the western part of the Mississippi Basin as an example of this intriguing anthropogenic impact. Figure 1. Percent change between disturbed and pristine simulations (with and without human footprint respectively) for sediment flux (top) and water discharge (bottom).

  3. Solvates of Dasatinib: Diversity and Isostructurality.

    PubMed

    Sarceviča, Inese; Grante, Ilze; Belyakov, Sergey; Rekis, Toms; Bērziņš, Kārlis; Actiņš, Andris; Orola, Liāna

    2016-04-01

    A series of dasatinib crystalline forms were obtained, and a hierarchical cluster analysis of their powder X-ray diffraction patterns was performed. The resulting dendrogram implies 3 structural groups. The crystal structures of several solvates representing 2 of these groups were determined. The crystal structure analysis confirms the isostructurality of solvates within structural group I and suggests a correlation between solvent molecule size and trends in crystal structures within this group. In addition, the formation relationships in 2-solvent media between different dasatinib solvate groups were determined. The formation preference of solvates was found to follow the ranking group I > group III > group II. PMID:27019962

  4. Explicit Nature of Science and Argumentation Instruction in the Context of Socioscientific Issues: An Effect on Student Learning and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khishfe, Rola

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: to (a) investigate the influence of explicit nature of science (NOS) and explicit argumentation instruction in the context of a socioscientific issue on the argumentation skills and NOS understandings of students, and (b) explore the transfer of students' NOS understandings and argumentation skills…

  5. Viscosity and Solvation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses theories underlying the phenomena of solution viscosities, involving the Jones and Dole equation, B-coefficient determination, and flickering cluster model. Indicates that viscosity measurements provide a basis for the study of the structural effects of ions in aqueous solutions and are applicable in teaching high school chemistry. (CC)

  6. Effect of solvation on induce-fit molecular recognition in supercritical fluid to organic crystals immobilized on a quartz crystal microbalance.

    PubMed

    Naito, M; Sasaki, Y; Dewa, T; Aoyama, Y; Okahata, Y

    2001-11-01

    The inclusion behavior of guest molecules to a solid apohost of an orthogonal anthracene-bis(resorcinol)tetraol (1) was investigated in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) by using a 9 MHz quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM). Compound 1 forms crystals composed of molecular-sheet bound together by an extensive hydrogen-bonded network. The selective binding of gaseous ethyl acetate to the apohost-immobilized QCM in scCO(2) was observed, and the inclusion amount of ethyl acetate showed a drastic increase above a threshold concentration, [Guest](th) = 0.08 M, and the apparent Gibbs' free energy for the binding was DeltaG(app) = -1.3 kcal mol(-1). Similar selective bindings of ethyl acetate or ethanol had been observed in the gas phase and in water: [Guest](th) = 0.002 M with DeltaG(app) = -3.5 kcal mol(-1) and [Guest](th) = 0.5 M with DeltaG(app) = -0.41 kcal mol(-1), respectively. These values obtained in scCO(2) were intermediate between those in the gas and water phases. Since various physical properties (viscosity, density, polarity, diffusion constant, and solvation) of supercritical fluid are known to be intermediate between gas and liquid, these values clearly reflect the solvation behavior of guest molecules. Thus, the lower solvation of guest molecules indicates the lower threshold concentration and the larger binding energy in the following order: in air > in scCO(2) > in water. PMID:11686709

  7. Electronic absorption spectra and solvatochromic shifts by the vertical excitation model: solvated clusters and molecular dynamics sampling.

    PubMed

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-01-22

    A physically realistic treatment of solvatochromic shifts in liquid-phase electronic absorption spectra requires a proper account for various short- and long-range equilibrium and nonequilibrium solute-solvent interactions. The present article demonstrates that such a treatment can be accomplished using a mixed discrete-continuum approach based on the two-time-scale self-consistent state-specific vertical excitation model (called VEM) for electronic excitation in solution. We apply this mixed approach in combination with time-dependent density functional theory to compute UV/vis absorption spectra in solution for the n → π* ((1)A2) transition for acetone in methanol and in water, the π → π* ((1)A1) transition for para-nitroaniline (PNA) in methanol and in water, the n → π* ((1)B1) transition for pyridine in water, and the n → π* ((1)B1) transition for pyrimidine in water. Hydrogen bonding and first-solvation-shell-specific complexation are included by means of explicit solvent molecules, and solute-solvent dispersion is included by using the solvation model with state-specific polarizability (SMSSP). Geometries of microsolvated clusters were treated in two different ways, (i) using single liquid-phase global-minimum solute-solvent clusters containing up to two explicit solvent molecules and (ii) using solute-solvent cluster snapshots derived from molecular dynamics (MD) trajectories. The calculations in water involve using VEM/TDDFT excitation energies and oscillator strengths computed over 200 MD-derived solute-solvent clusters and convoluted with Gaussian functions. We also calculate ground- and excited-state dipole moments for interpretation. We find that inclusion of explicit solvent molecules generally improves the agreement with experiment and can be recommended as a way to include the effect of hydrogen bonding in solvatochromic shifts. PMID:25159827

  8. Continuum estimates of rotational dielectric friction and polar solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Maroncelli, M.

    1997-01-01

    Dynamical solvation data recently obtained with the probe solute coumarin 153 are used to test the reliability of dielectric continuum models for estimating dielectric friction effects. In particular, the predictions of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of rotational dielectric friction are examined in some detail. The analysis undertaken here uncovers an error made in virtually all previous applications of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig formalism. The error involves neglect of the solvent{close_quote}s electronic polarizability when calculating dielectric friction constants. In highly polar solvents the effect of this neglect is shown to be minor, so that the results of past studies should not be appreciably altered. However, in weakly polar and especially in nondipolar solvents, the proper inclusion of electronic polarizability terms is essential. The equivalence between the Nee{endash}Zwanzig theory of dielectric friction and more general continuum treatments of polar solvation dynamics is also demonstrated. This equivalence enables the use of solvation data to test the reliability of the Nee{endash}Zwanzig description of electrical interactions between a solute and solvent that form the core of this and related continuum theories of dielectric friction. Comparisons to experimental data show that, with the important exception of nondipolar solvents, such continuum treatments provide reasonably accurate ({plus_minus}40{percent}) predictors of time-dependent solvation and/or dielectric friction. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A; Wei, G W

    2011-12-01

    computation, thanks to the equivalence of the Laplace-Beltrami operator in the two representations. The coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved with an iterative procedure to reach a steady state, which delivers desired solvent-solute interface and electrostatic potential for problems of interest. These quantities are utilized to evaluate the solvation free energies and protein-protein binding affinities. A number of computational methods and algorithms are described for the interconversion of Lagrangian and Eulerian representations, and for the solution of the coupled PDE system. The proposed approaches have been extensively validated. We also verify that the mean curvature flow indeed gives rise to the minimal molecular surface and the proposed variational procedure indeed offers minimal total free energy. Solvation analysis and applications are considered for a set of 17 small compounds and a set of 23 proteins. The salt effect on protein-protein binding affinity is investigated with two protein complexes by using the present model. Numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and to those obtained by using other theoretical methods in the literature. PMID:21279359

  10. Differential geometry based solvation model II: Lagrangian formulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhan; Baker, Nathan A.; Wei, G. W.

    2010-01-01

    the purpose of computation, thanks to the equivalence of the Laplace-Beltrami operator in the two representations. The coupled partial differential equations (PDEs) are solved with an iterative procedure to reach a steady state, which delivers desired solvent-solute interface and electrostatic potential for problems of interest. These quantities are utilized to evaluate the solvation free energies and protein-protein binding affinities. A number of computational methods and algorithms are described for the interconversion of Lagrangian and Eulerian representations, and for the solution of the coupled PDE system. The proposed approaches have been extensively validated. We also verify that the mean curvature flow indeed gives rise to the minimal molecular surface (MMS) and the proposed variational procedure indeed offers minimal total free energy. Solvation analysis and applications are considered for a set of 17 small compounds and a set of 23 proteins. The salt effect on protein-protein binding affinity is investigated with two protein complexes by using the present model. Numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and to those obtained by using other theoretical methods in the literature. PMID:21279359