Sample records for exploration systems aes

  1. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations...DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of...

  2. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations...DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of...

  3. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations...DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of...

  4. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations...DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of...

  5. 22 CFR 120.30 - The Automated Export System (AES).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false The Automated Export System (AES). 120.30 Section 120.30 Foreign Relations...DEFINITIONS § 120.30 The Automated Export System (AES). The Automated Export System (AES) is the Department of Commerce, Bureau of...

  6. Exploring Area/Delay Tradeoffs in an AES FPGA Implementation

    E-print Network

    Choudhary, Alok

    software implementation with throughputs that are comparable to custom ASIC designs. The recently selected building blocks of secure systems that serve a variety of purposes, including cryptographic hashing, secure compared to that of custom ASIC designs. ­ the reconfigurable nature of FPGAs is especially attractive

  7. Residual BoseEinstein Correlations in Inclusive + \\Gamma Systems and the ae(770) 0 Line

    E-print Network

    Residual Bose­Einstein Correlations in Inclusive � + � \\Gamma Systems and the ae(770) 0 Line Shape distributions as reference samples. In addition they may distort the line shape of the broad ae(770) 0 resonance decaying via � + � \\Gamma . The observed line shape of the ae 0 depends on the details of the production

  8. Aerospace Systems Engineering Required (2) AE 542 Aerospace Systems Engineering I

    E-print Network

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    Electric Propulsion AE 510 Advanced Gas Dynamics AE 514 Boundary Layer Theory AE 538 Combustion Propulsion (Sp) AE 435 Electric Propulsion (Sp) AE 510 Advanced Gas Dynamics (F) AE 514 Boundary Layer Theory Aircraft Flight Mechanics AE 435 Electric Propulsion AE 500-level (choose 2): AE 510 Advanced Gas Dynamics

  9. The near-wake structure of the Atmosphere Explorer C /AE-C/ satellite - A parametric investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samir, U.; Gordon, R.; Brace, L.; Theis, R.

    1979-01-01

    Measurements of ion current, electron temperature, and values of space potential obtained from the cylindrical electrostatic probe on board the Atmosphere Explorer C (AE-C) satellite were used to examine, in a parametric manner, the angular distribution of charge around the satellite. Interest is focused on nighttime equatorial data in the altitude range 275-620 km, which yields a wide range for the parameter R sub D (the radius of the satellite divided by the ambient value of the Debye lengths), including R sub D greater than 100, which is of practical significance to large space platforms. The variations of normalized ion current in the wake zone of the AE-C satellite appear to display an exponential dependence on R sub D for 'constant' values of other relevant parameters. The angular variations of electron temperature and space potential in the close vicinity of the satellite's surface were examined and compared with results from the Explorer 31 satellite. The variation of the ratio of measured to computed space potential with electron temperature was examined using data from both the AE-C and Explorer 31 satellites. It was found that the ratio is greater than unity. Possible causes for the above inequality are discussed.

  10. ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Landers, Robert G.

    ME/AE 381 ­ Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems TWO FLYWHEEL SYSTEM LABORATORY The objective of this laboratory is to design controllers that will regulate the angular position of a two­flywheel system (see tasks: 1. Ignoring Coulomb friction, determine a state­space description of the two flywheel system

  11. Role of stochastic fluctuations in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system: A stochastic model for the AE index variations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Antti Pulkkinen; Alex Klimas; Dimitris Vassiliadis; Vadim Uritsky

    2006-01-01

    A new stochastic model for the AE index variations is developed to investigate the role of stochastic fluctuations in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. In contrast to pioneering stochastic models by Hnat et al. (2003, 2005), here the model is set up for the actual integrated quantity, i.e., AE index itself, instead of differenced variables, i.e., AE(t + ?t) ? AE(t) and

  12. Exploration EVA System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kearney, Lara

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, the President announced a new Vision for Space Exploration. NASA's Office of Exploration Systems has identified Extravehicular Activity (EVA) as a critical capability for supporting the Vision for Space Exploration. EVA is required for all phases of the Vision, both in-space and planetary. Supporting the human outside the protective environment of the vehicle or habitat and allow ing him/her to perform efficient and effective work requires an integrated EVA "System of systems." The EVA System includes EVA suits, airlocks, tools and mobility aids, and human rovers. At the core of the EVA System is the highly technical EVA suit, which is comprised mainly of a life support system and a pressure/environmental protection garment. The EVA suit, in essence, is a miniature spacecraft, which combines together many different sub-systems such as life support, power, communications, avionics, robotics, pressure systems and thermal systems, into a single autonomous unit. Development of a new EVA suit requires technology advancements similar to those required in the development of a new space vehicle. A majority of the technologies necessary to develop advanced EVA systems are currently at a low Technology Readiness Level of 1-3. This is particularly true for the long-pole technologies of the life support system.

  13. ME/AE 381 Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems MINI CNC LABORATORY

    E-print Network

    Landers, Robert G.

    ME/AE 381 ­ Mechanical and Aerospace Control Systems MINI CNC LABORATORY The objective of this laboratory is to design controllers that will regulate the position of three linear axes in a table top CNC tracking controllers in the laboratory using the mini CNC Rapid Development System. Plot the linear axis

  14. Bitstream Encryption and Authentication Using AES-GCM in Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yohei Hori; Akashi Satoh; Hirofumi Sakane; Kenji Toda

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ahigh-speedandsecuredynamicpartialreconfiguration (DPR) system is realized with AES-GCM that guarantees both confidentiality and authenticity of FPGA bitstreams. In DPR systems, bitstream authentication is essential for avoiding fatal damage,caused by unintended bitstreams. An encryption-only system can prevent bitstream cloning and reverse engineering, but cannot prevent erroneous or mali- cious bitstreams from being configured. Authenticated en- cryption is a relatively new concept

  15. Bitstream encryption and authentication with AES-GCM in dynamically reconfigurable systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yohei Hori; Akashi Satoh; Hirofumi Sakane; Kenji Toda

    2008-01-01

    A high-speed and secure dynamic partial reconfiguration (DPR) system is realized with AES-GCM that guarantees both confidentiality and authenticity of FPGA bitstreams. In DPR systems, bitstream authentication is essential for avoiding fatal damage caused by unintended bitstreams. An encryption-only system can prevent bitstream cloning and reverse engineering, but cannot prevent erroneous or malicious bitstreams from being configured. Authenticated encryption is

  16. Evaluation of an Authentic Examination System (AES) for Programming Courses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Torbjörn Jonsson; Pouria Loghmani; Simin Nadjm-Tehrani

    This paper describes our experience with an authentic examination system for programming courses. We briefly describe the architecture of the system, and present results of evaluating the system in real examination situations. Some of the factors studied in detail are the on-line interactions between the students and examiners, the response times and their effects on the pressure experienced by student,

  17. Development of Carbon Dioxide Removal Systems for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Trinh, Diep; Gostowski, Rudy; King, Eric; Mattox, Emily M.; Watson, David; Thomas, John

    2012-01-01

    "NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is pioneering new approaches for rapidly developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit" (NASA 2012). These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must not only blast out of earth's gravity well as during the Apollo moon missions, but also launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, evaluating structured sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach, which is then implemented in a full-scale integrated atmosphere revitalization test. This paper describes the carbon dioxide (CO2) removal hardware design and sorbent screening and characterization effort in support of the Atmosphere Resource Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program. A companion paper discusses development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations for this project.

  18. NASA: Solar System Exploration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This NASA website offers a wide variety of space science-related activities, multimedia, and facts for people of all ages. The website presents the latest news and upcoming space science events. Students and educators can explore NASA's space missions by target, letter, year, and program. Individuals can learn about the history and future of robotic exploration of space through a pictorial timeline. In the Science and Technology link, visitors can find the latest science and technology features, NASA science highlights, science goals, and information on NASA scientists. Kids will enjoy the Roadtrip to Mars interactive module and interesting facts about the planets. Teachers can easily locate activities about the science behind the latest NASA headlines through the Fast Lesson Finder. Everyone can view the images and videos of the planets, spacecraft, technology, and additional subjects.

  19. NASA: Solar System Exploration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This NASA website offers a wide variety of space science-related activities, multimedia, and facts for people of all ages. The website presents the latest news and upcoming space science events. Students and educators can explore space missions by name, decade, target, and nation. In the Science and Technology link, visitors can find the latest science and technology features, NASA science highlights, as well as information about astrobiology and power and propulsion. Kids will enjoy the Alien Safari interactive module and interesting facts about the planets. Teachers can easily locate activities about the science behind the latest NASA headlines through the Fast Lesson Finder. Everyone can view the images and videos of the planets, spacecraft, technology, and additional subjects.

  20. Exobiology in Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C. (editor); Schwartz, Deborah E. (editor); Huntington, Judith L. (editor)

    1992-01-01

    A symposium, 'Exobiology in Solar System Exploration,' was held on 24-26 Aug. 1988. The symposium provided an in-depth investigation of the role of Exobiology in solar system exploration. It is expected that the symposium will provide direction for future participation of the Exobiology community in solar system exploration and alert the Planetary community to the continued importance of an Exobiology Flight Program. Although the focus of the symposium was primarily on Exobiology in solar system exploration missions, several ground based and Earth-orbital projects such as the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, Gas Grain Facility, and Cosmic Dust Collection Facility represent upcoming research opportunities planned to accommodate the goals and objectives of the Exobiology community as well. This report contains papers for all but one of the presentations given at the symposium.

  1. Desktop system for accounting, audit, and research in A&E.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, C J; Brain, S G; Bull, F; Crosby, A C; Ferguson, D G

    1997-01-01

    The development of a database for audit, research, and accounting in accident and emergency (A&E) is described. The system uses a desktop computer, an optical scanner, sophisticated optical mark reader software, and workload management data. The system is highly flexible, easy to use, and at a cost of around 16,000 pounds affordable for larger departments wishing to move towards accounting. For smaller departments, it may be an alternative to full computerisation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9132200

  2. Cluster Chemistry in Electron-Poor Ae-Pt-Cd Systems (Ae=Ca, Sr, Ba): (Sr,Ba)Pt2Cd4, Ca6Pt8Cd16, and Its Known Antitype Er6Pd16Sb8

    SciTech Connect

    Samal, Saroj L. [Ames Laboratory; Gulo, Fakhili [Ames Laboratory; Corbett, John D. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-02-18

    Three new ternary polar intermetallic compounds, cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16, and tetragonal (Sr, Ba)Pt2Cd4 have been discovered during explorations of the Ae–Pt–Cd systems. Cubic Ca6Pt8Cd16 (Fm-3m, Z = 4, a = 13.513(1) Å) contains a 3D array of separate Cd8 tetrahedral stars (TS) that are both face capped along the axes and diagonally bridged by Pt atoms to generate the 3D anionic network Cd8[Pt(1)]6/2[Pt(2)]4/8. The complementary cationic surface of the cell consists of a face-centered cube of Pt(3)@Ca6 octahedra. This structure is an ordered ternary variant of Sc11Ir4 (Sc6Ir8Sc16), a stuffed version of the close relative Na6Au7Cd16, and a network inverse of the recent Er6Sb8Pd16 (compare Ca6Pt8Cd16). The three groups of elements each occur in only one structural version. The new AePt2Cd4, Ae = Sr, Ba, are tetragonal (P42/mnm,Z = 2, a ? 8.30 Å, c ? 4.47 Å) and contain chains of edge-sharing Cd4 tetrahedra along c that are bridged by four-bonded Ba/Sr. LMTO-ASA and ICOHP calculation results and comparisons show that the major bonding (Hamilton) populations in Ca6Pt8Cd16 and Er6Sb8Pd16 come from polar Pt–Cd and Pd–Sb interactions, that Pt exhibits larger relativistic contributions than Pd, that characteristic size and orbital differences are most evident for Sb 5s, Pt8, and Pd16, and that some terms remain incomparable, Ca–Cd versus Er–Pd.

  3. Exploration of the Solar System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Arthur, Jr., Ed.; Grey, Jerry, Ed.

    This review is one of a series of assessments and reviews prepared in the public interest by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The purpose of this review is to outline the potential achievements of solar system exploration and suggest a course of action which will maximize the rewards to mankind. A secondary purpose is…

  4. Social Learning in Population-based Adaptive Systems E. Haasdijk, P. Vogt and A.E. Eiben

    E-print Network

    Vogt, Paul

    Social Learning in Population-based Adaptive Systems E. Haasdijk, P. Vogt and A.E. Eiben Abstract-- The subject of the present investigation is Population-based Adaptive Systems (PAS), as implemented in the NEW and individual learning, inevitably raising the issue of `forgetful populations': individually learned knowledge

  5. Expert systems in seismic exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Denham, L.R.

    1985-02-01

    Artificial intelligence research has produced few practical results in most of its branches. However, expert systems in limited fields of expertise are potentially practical and cost-effective tools in many fields of exploration geophysics. Recent breakthroughs, such as writing expert systems in languages less exotic than Lisp, have made it possible to install a practical expert system on even the smallest computer. A recently published expert system written in Forth compiles a rule base into very compact code, and then uses it to reach decisions based on data supplied by the user. Such a system makes it possible for a small computer to be the geophysicist's advisor on many different subjects, because one expert system can use any number of rule bases. The expert system then becomes a practical tool for standardizing the decision-making process, even in comparatively trivial areas.

  6. AES Water Architecture Study Interim Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The mission of the Advanced Exploration System (AES) Water Recovery Project (WRP) is to develop advanced water recovery systems in order to enable NASA human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit (LEO). The primary objective of the AES WRP is to develop water recovery technologies critical to near term missions beyond LEO. The secondary objective is to continue to advance mid-readiness level technologies to support future NASA missions. An effort is being undertaken to establish the architecture for the AES Water Recovery System (WRS) that meets both near and long term objectives. The resultant architecture will be used to guide future technical planning, establish a baseline development roadmap for technology infusion, and establish baseline assumptions for integrated ground and on-orbit environmental control and life support systems (ECLSS) definition. This study is being performed in three phases. Phase I of this study established the scope of the study through definition of the mission requirements and constraints, as well as indentifying all possible WRS configurations that meet the mission requirements. Phase II of this study focused on the near term space exploration objectives by establishing an ISS-derived reference schematic for long-duration (>180 day) in-space habitation. Phase III will focus on the long term space exploration objectives, trading the viable WRS configurations identified in Phase I to identify the ideal exploration WRS. The results of Phases I and II are discussed in this paper.

  7. Magnetic, Chemical and Rotational Properties of the Herbig Ae/Be Binary System HD 72106

    E-print Network

    C. P. Folsom; G. A. Wade; O. Kochukhov; E. Alecian; C. Catala; S. Bagnulo; J. D. Landstreet; D. A. Hanes

    2007-12-05

    Recently, strong, globally-ordered magnetic fields have been detected in some Herbig Ae and Be (HAeBe) stars, suggesting a possible evolutionary connection to main sequence magnetic chemically peculiar Ap and Bp stars. We have undertaken a detailed study of the binary system HD 72106, which contains a B9 magnetic primary and a HAeBe secondary, using the ESPaDOnS spectropolarimeter mounted on the CFHT. A careful analysis of the very young primary reveals that it has an approximately dipolar magnetic field geometry, strong chemical peculiarities, and strong surface chemical abundance inhomogeneities. Thus the primary is very similar to an Ap/Bp star despite having completed less then 1.5% of its main sequence life, and possibly still being on the pre-main sequence. In contrast, a similar analysis of the secondary reveals solar chemical abundances and no magnetic field.

  8. Asteroid Exploration with Autonomic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Christopher; Hinchey, Mike

    2004-01-01

    NASA is studying advanced technologies for a future robotic exploration mission to the asteroid belt. The prospective ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) mission comprises autonomous agents including worker agents (small spacecra3) designed to cooperate in asteroid exploration under the overall authoriq of at least one ruler agent (a larger spacecraft) whose goal is to cause science data to be returned to Earth. The ANTS team (ruler plus workers and messenger agents), but not necessarily any individual on the team, will exhibit behaviors that qualify it as an autonomic system, where an autonomic system is defined as a system that self-reconfigures, self-optimizes, self-heals, and self-protects. Autonomic system concepts lead naturally to realistic, scalable architectures rich in capabilities and behaviors. In-depth consideration of a major mission like ANTS in terms of autonomic systems brings new insights into alternative definitions of autonomic behavior. This paper gives an overview of the ANTS mission and discusses the autonomic properties of the mission.

  9. Multielement determination of suspended particulate matter by {beta}-ray monitoring system with ICP-AES

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.F.; Huang, M.F. [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu (China); Chiang, P.C. [National Taiwan Univ. (China)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A two-step HNO{sub 3}+HClO{sub 4}/HT(1:2:1, v/v) acid mixture microwave digestion method was utilized to determine the elemental concentrations in the suspended particulates collected on glass fiber filters by beta gauge monitoring system. Total of eight elements including Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, S and Zn has been determined using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Interference from the glass fiber filters and the variation of detection limits of various elements with total suspended particulates (TSP) have also been thoroughly investigated. It was demonstrated that concentrations of Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, S and Zn in suspended particulates could be determined with the proposed method. On the other hand, the determination of Na would be difficult due to significant interference from glass fiber filters of beta gauge monitoring system. In order to examine the applicability of the proposed method, real samples collected from an air pollution episode occurred in Taiwan during the spring of 1995 were analyzed with the suggested method to identify the possible air pollution sources. It was found that {open_quotes}Kosa{close_quotes} aerosols, which is originated from the mainland China, might be the cause of that episode event.

  10. NASA Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA's program for the civilian exploration of space is a challenge to scientists and engineers to help maintain and further develop the United States' position of leadership in a focused sphere of space activity. Such an ambitious plan requires the contribution and further development of many scientific and technological fields. One research area essential for the success of these space exploration programs is Intelligent Robotic Systems. These systems represent a class of autonomous and semi-autonomous machines that can perform human-like functions with or without human interaction. They are fundamental for activities too hazardous for humans or too distant or complex for remote telemanipulation. To meet this challenge, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has established an Engineering Research Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration (CIRSSE). The Center was created with a five year $5.5 million grant from NASA submitted by a team of the Robotics and Automation Laboratories. The Robotics and Automation Laboratories of RPI are the result of the merger of the Robotics and Automation Laboratory of the Department of Electrical, Computer, and Systems Engineering (ECSE) and the Research Laboratory for Kinematics and Robotic Mechanisms of the Department of Mechanical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering, and Mechanics (ME,AE,&M), in 1987. This report is an examination of the activities that are centered at CIRSSE.

  11. Sample introduction systems for the analysis of liquid microsamples by ICP-AES and ICP-MS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    José L. Todolí; Jean M. Mermet

    2006-01-01

    There are many fields in which the available sample volume is the limiting factor for an elemental analysis. Over the last ten years, sample introduction systems used in plasma spectrometry (i.e., Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry, ICP-AES, and Mass Spectrometry, ICP-MS) have evolved in order to expand the field of applicability of these techniques to the analysis of micro-

  12. Comparative Analysis of Continuous Acoustic Emission (AE) Data, Acquired from 12 and 16 Bit Streaming Systems during Rock Deformation Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, J.; Goodfellow, S. D.; Nasseri, M. H.; Reyes-Montes, J. M.; Young, R.

    2013-12-01

    A comparative analysis of continuous acoustic emission (AE) data acquired during a triaxial compression test, using a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system, is presented. A cylindrical sample (diameter 50.1 mm and length 125 mm) of Berea sandstone was triaxally deformed at a confining pressure of 15 MPa and a strain rate of 1.6E-06 s-1. The sample was loaded differentially until failure occurred at approximately ?1 = 160 MPa. AE activity was monitored for the duration of the experiment by an array of 8 broadband piezoelectric transducers coupled to the rock sample. Raw signals were amplified by 40 dB using pre-amplifiers equipped with filter modules with a frequency passband of 100 kHz to 1 MHz. The amplifiers had a split output enabling the measured signal to be fed into a 12-bit and a 16-bit acquisition system. AE waveforms were continuously recorded at 10 MS/s on 8 data acquisition channels per system. Approximately 4,500 events were harvested and source located from the continuous data for each system. P-wave arrivals were automatically picked and event locations calculated using the downhill Simplex method and a time-varying transverse isotropic velocity model based on periodical surveys across the sample. Events detected on the 12-bit and 16-bit systems were compared both in terms of their P-wave picks and their source locations. In the early stages of AE activity, there appeared to be little difference between P-wave picks and hypocenter locations from both data sets. As the experiment progressed into the post-peak stress regime, which was accompanied by an increase in AE rate and amplitude, fewer events could be harvested from the 12-bit data compared to the 16-bit data. This is linked to the observation of a higher signal-to-noise ratio on AE waveforms harvested from the 16-bit stream compared to those from the 12-bit stream, which results in an easier identification of P-wave onsets. Similarly a higher confidence in source location is expected. Analysis of the continuous waveform data in both time and frequency domains was performed to analyse changes in AE energy and frequency content throughout the duration of the experiment. This analysis is particularly relevant as the sample approaches failure, as high rates of induced AE events make it difficult to harvest and analyse individual events. Changes in frequency content have been previously observed and associated with microcrack coalescence and the induction of large fractures both in the laboratory and in the monitoring of reservoir stimulations. The comparative analysis shows that the higher resolution in the 16-bit stream provides greater detail in the identification of onset times of sample failure and particularly the changes in amplitude in the different frequency bands.

  13. AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 420 Finite Element Analysis

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    Propulsion AE 510 Advanced Gas Dynamics AE 514 Boundary Layer Theory AE 538 Combustion Fundamentals Math AE 525 Advanced Composite Materials AE 528 Nonlinear Continuous Media Breadth-AFMCP (choose 1): AE 419 Aircraft Flight Mechanics AE 433 Aerospace Propulsion AE 434 Rocket Propulsion AE 435 Electric

  14. DA Associate Program -AeS Proposal Ongoing development

    E-print Network

    Southampton, University of

    DA Associate Program - AeS Proposal Ongoing development Aryldo G Russo Jr. AeS Group & Research Institute of State of S~ao Paulo (IPT), agrj@aes.com.br Abstract. I would like to present, by this proposal detailed way an introduction of AeS company, the AeS proposal and pilot project and the expected results. 1

  15. Venus Exploration opportunities within NASA's Solar System Exploration roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor; Thompson, Thomas; Cutts, James; Robinson, James

    2006-01-01

    Science goals to understand the origin, history and environment of Venus have been driving international space exploration missions for over 40 years. Past missions include the Magellan and Pioneer-Venus missions by the US; the Venera program by the USSR; and the Vega missions through international cooperation. Furthermore, the US National Research Council (NRC), in the 2003 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Decadal Survey, identified Venus as a high priority target, thus demonstrating a continuing interest in Earth's sister planet. In response to the NRC recommendation, the 2005 NASA SSE Roadmap included a number of potential Venus missions arching through all mission classes from small Discovery, to medium New Frontiers and to large Flagship class missions. While missions in all of these classes could be designed as orbiters with remote sensing capabilities, the desire for scientific advancements beyond our current knowledge - including what we expect to learn from the ongoing ESA Venus Express mission - point to in-situ exploration of Venus.

  16. Correlation between grain growth and disk geometry in Herbig Ae/Be systems

    E-print Network

    B. Acke; M. E. van den Ancker; C. P. Dullemond; R. van Boekel; L. B. F. M. Waters

    2004-04-28

    We have calculated the (sub-)mm spectral indices of 26 Herbig Ae/Be stars, for which we can determine the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED). We find a clear correlation between the strength of the ratio of the near- to mid-infrared excess of these sources, and the slope of the (sub-)mm energy distribution. Based on earlier multi-dimensional modeling of disks around Herbig Ae stars, we interpret this as a correlation between the geometry of the disk (flared or self-shadowed) and the size of the grains: self-shadowed disks have, on average, larger grains than their flared counterparts. These data suggest that the geometry of a young stellar disk evolves from flared to self-shadowed.

  17. Communication System Architecture for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braham, Stephen P.; Alena, Richard; Gilbaugh, Bruce; Glass, Brian; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require effective communications supporting exploration activities and scientific field data collection. Constraints on cost, size, weight and power consumption for all communications equipment make optimization of these systems very important. These information and communication systems connect people and systems together into coherent teams performing the difficult and hazardous tasks inherent in planetary exploration. The communication network supporting vehicle telemetry data, mission operations, and scientific collaboration must have excellent reliability, and flexibility.

  18. AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 402 Orbital Mechanics

    E-print Network

    Gao, Grace Xingxin

    Flow and Heat Transfer AE 416 Applied Aerodynamics AE 419 Aircraft Flight Mechanics AE 433 Aerospace: Managing Advanced Technol II Breadth-AFMCP (choose 1): AE 410 Computational Aerodynamics AE 412 Viscous

  19. Towards Design Space Exploration for Biological Systems

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Towards Design Space Exploration for Biological Systems Simon Polstra , Tessa E. Pronk§ , Andy D computers and cellular systems, methods and models of computation from the domain of computer systems engineering could be applied to model cellular systems. Our aim is to construct a framework that focuses

  20. Exploring Legacy Systems using Types

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arie Van Deursen; Leon Moonen

    2000-01-01

    We show how hypertext-based program understanding tools can achieve new levels of abstraction by using inferred type information for cases where the subject software system is written in a weakly typed language. We propose TYPEEX- PLORER, a tool for browsing COBOL legacy systems based on these types. The paper addresses (1) how types, an in- vented abstraction, can be presented

  1. International solar system exploration - Opportunities and obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. W.; Parks, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review is conducted of the exploration of the solar system carried out with the aid of various types of spacecraft during the past two decades, taking into account also space missions planned for thy next few years. A wealth of information has been obtained regarding the planets and their satellites. However, there remain many important questions concerning the solar system, and a continuation of space exploration for the solution of these questions appears highly desirable, particularly when the comparatively little cost of these missions is taken into account. However, major fiscal limitations within the U.S. economy have led to pressure to postpone any new solar system exploration projects unless there can be major reductions in their cost. A special committee has been studying the options for future low-cost solar system exploration missions, giving attention also to some options for international implementation. Various aspects of joint space projects are examined.

  2. External Resource: Solar System Exploration: Missions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This NASA webpage, Solar System Exploration, allows students to search missions by name, decade, nation, target, mission, and status. Topics: arial, atmospheric, flybys, impact, lander, orbiter, rover, Deep Space Network

  3. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.11 Description of the AES. AES is a voluntary program that allows...

  4. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.11 Description of the AES. AES is a voluntary program that allows...

  5. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.11 Description of the AES. AES is a voluntary program that allows...

  6. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.11 Description of the AES. AES is a voluntary program that allows...

  7. 19 CFR 192.11 - Description of the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Description of the AES. 192.11 Section 192.11 Customs Duties...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.11 Description of the AES. AES is a voluntary program that allows...

  8. Design and implementation of real time AES-128 on real time operating system for multiple FPGA communication

    E-print Network

    Paul, Rourab; Sau, Suman; Chakrabarti, Amlan

    2012-01-01

    Security is the most important part in data communication system, where more randomization in secret keys increases the security as well as complexity of the cryptography algorithms. As a result in recent dates these algorithms are compensating with enormous memory spaces and large execution time on hardware platform. Field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), provide one of the major alternative in hardware platform scenario due to its reconfiguration nature, low price and marketing speed. In FPGA based embedded system we can use embedded processor to execute particular algorithm with the inclusion of a real time operating System (RTOS), where threads may reduce resource utilization and time consumption. A process in the runtime is separated in different smaller tasks which are executed by the scheduler to meet the real time dead line using RTOS. In this paper we demonstrate the design and implementation of a 128-bit Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) both symmetric key encryption and decryption algorithm by de...

  9. Design Space Exploration for The Beamformer System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel D. Gajski; Smita Bakshi

    1993-01-01

    We present a design exploration strategy for the beamformer system, an exampleof a typical DSP system. In order to do so, we first define a parameterizeddesign template for the beamformer and for a FIR filter, since the filteringoperation is a part of the overall beamformer system. We then discuss someapproaches for varying the design parameters for the filter and the

  10. Exploring Systems of Equations using Graphing Calculators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-12-18

    This lesson plan introduces the concept of graphing a system of linear equations. Students will use graphing technology to explore the meaning of the solution of a linear system including solutions that correspond to intersecting lines, parallel lines, and coinciding lines. Students will also do graph linear systems by hand.

  11. Exploring Earth Systems Through STEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Loris; Salmon, Jennifer; Burns, Courtney

    2015-04-01

    During the 2010 school year, grade 8 science teachers at Dwight D. Eisenhower Middle School in Wyckoff, New Jersey, began using the draft of A Framework for K-12 Science Education to transition to the Next Generation Science Standards. In an evolutionary process of testing and revising, teachers work collaboratively to develop problem-based science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) units that integrate earth science, physical science, and life science topics. Students explore the interconnections of Earth's atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere through problem-based learning. Problem-based learning engages students in (1) direct observations in the field and classroom, (2) collection and analysis of data from remote sensors and hand-held sensors, and (3) analysis of physical, mathematical, and virtual models. Students use a variety of technologies and applications in their investigations, for example iPad apps, Google Classroom, and Vernier sensors. Data from NASA, NOAA, non-government organizations, and scientific research papers inspire student questions and spark investigations. Teachers create materials and websites to support student learning. Teachers curate reading, video, simulations, and other Internet resources for students. Because curriculum is standards-based as opposed to textbook-based, teacher participation in workshops and institutes frequently translates into new or improved study units. Recent programs include Toyota International Teacher Program to Costa Rica, Japan Society Going Global, Siemens STEM Academy, U.S. Naval Academy SET Sail, and NJSTA Maitland P. Simmons Memorial Award Summer Institute. Unit themes include weather and climate, introduction to general chemistry and biochemistry, and cells and heredity. Each if the three 12-week units has embedded engineering challenges inspired by current events, community needs, and/or the work of scientists. The unit segments begin with a problem, progress to observations and data collection, and end with an engineering application. English language arts and mathematics skills are developed through performance assessments that include written arguments that require students to state a claim and support the claim with evidence, analysis, and reasoning. Student selected capstone projects are completed during the final three weeks of the school year. Partnerships with universities, research scientists, and science centers are essential to the development of unit challenges. Collaborative projects have included studies of iron cycling in the Ross Sea with scientists from Rutgers University, climate and climate change using NASA data and resources from Liberty Science Center, human and natural impacts on endangered species with San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research, and air quality monitoring with the University of Northern Iowa. Grant funds have supported student research projects involving air quality improvement, urban heat island mitigation, alternative energies, and sustainability.

  12. AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 410 Computational Aerodynamics

    E-print Network

    Gilbert, Matthew

    AE 400-level (choose 2): AE 410 Computational Aerodynamics AE 412 Viscous flow & Heat Transfer AE 416 Applied Aerodynamics AE 419 Aircraft Flight Mechanics AE 433 Aerospace Propulsion AE 434 Rocket Methods In Eng. Other possible electives (examples): ME 411 ONL: Viscous Flow & Heat Transfer CEE 446 ONL

  13. Solar System Exploration, 1995-2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squyres, S.; Varsi, G.; Veverka, J.; Soderblom, L.; Black, D.; Stern, A.; Stetson, D.; Brown, R. A.; Niehoff, J.; Squibb, G.

    1994-01-01

    Goals for planetary exploration during the next decade include: (1) determine how our solar system formed, and understand whether planetary systems are a common phenomenon through out the cosmos; (2) explore the diverse changes that planets have undergone throughout their history and that take place at present, including those that distinguish Earth as a planet; (3) understand how life might have formed on Earth, whether life began anywhere else in the solar system, and whether life (including intelligent beings) might be a common cosmic phenomenon; (4) discover and investigate natural phenomena that occur under conditions not realizable in laboratories; (5) discover and inventory resources in the solar system that could be used by human civilizations in the future; and (6) make the solar system a part of the human experience in the same way that Earth is, and hence lay the groundwork for human expansion into the solar system in the coming century. The plan for solar system exploration is motivated by these goals as well as the following principle: The solar system exploration program will conduct flight programs and supporting data analysis and scientific research commensurate with United States leadership in space exploration. These programs and research must be of the highest scientific merit, they must be responsive to public excitement regarding planetary exploration, and they must contribute to larger national goals in technology and education. The result will be new information, which is accessible to the public, creates new knowledge, and stimulates programs of education to increase the base of scientific knowledge in the general public.

  14. Modular, Intelligent Power Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Button, Robert

    2006-01-01

    NASA's new Space Exploration Initiative demands that vehicles, habitats, and rovers achieve unprecedented levels of reliability, safety, effectiveness, and affordability. Modular and intelligent electrical power systems are critical to achieving those goals. Modular electrical power systems naturally increase reliability and safety through built-in fault tolerance. These modular systems also enable standardization across a multitude of systems, thereby greatly increasing affordability of the programs. Various technologies being developed to support this new paradigm for space power systems will be presented. Examples include the use of digital control in power electronics to enable better performance and advanced modularity functions such as distributed, master-less control and series input power conversion. Also, digital control and robust communication enables new levels of power system control, stability, fault detection, and health management. Summary results from recent development efforts are presented along with expected future technology development needs required to support NASA's ambitious space exploration goals.

  15. Akay, A.E., Ertek, G., Bykzkan, G. "Analyzing the solutions of DEA through information visualization and data mining techniques: SmartDEA framework". "Expert Systems with

    E-print Network

    Yanikoglu, Berrin

    Akçay, A.E., Ertek, G., Büyüközkan, G. "Analyzing the solutions of DEA through information visualization and data mining techniques: SmartDEA framework". "Expert Systems with Applications". 39, pp. 7763 of DEA through information visualization and data mining techniques: SmartDEA framework Alp Eren Akçayaa

  16. Research article Exploring interorganizational systems at

    E-print Network

    Crowston, Kevin

    Research article Exploring interorganizational systems at the industry level of analysis: evidence from the US home mortgage industry Charles W Steinfield1 , M Lynne Markus2 , Rolf T Wigand3 1 Department of Telecommunication, Information Studies, and Media, Michigan State University, East Lansing, USA

  17. Autonomous Exploration: An Integrated Systems Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Marc Bolduc; Eric Bourque; Gregory Dudek; Nicholas Roy; Robert Sim

    1997-01-01

    in more abstract articial intelligence. Robotic systems embody a complex interaction of computation, perception and actuation that depend upon such familiar tasks as recognition and reaction. In order for robots to perform real-world tasks such as navigation, localization and exploration, the subsystems of motion, sensing and computation must be merged into a single, realizable unit that uses the dieren t

  18. Integrated Systems Health Management for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uckun, Serdar

    2005-01-01

    Integrated Systems Health Management (ISHM) is a system engineering discipline that addresses the design, development, operation, and lifecycle management of components, subsystems, vehicles, and other operational systems with the purpose of maintaining nominal system behavior and function and assuring mission safety and effectiveness under off-nominal conditions. NASA missions are often conducted in extreme, unfamiliar environments of space, using unique experimental spacecraft. In these environments, off-nominal conditions can develop with the potential to rapidly escalate into mission- or life-threatening situations. Further, the high visibility of NASA missions means they are always characterized by extraordinary attention to safety. ISHM is a critical element of risk mitigation, mission safety, and mission assurance for exploration. ISHM enables: In-space maintenance and repair; a) Autonomous (and automated) launch abort and crew escape capability; b) Efficient testing and checkout of ground and flight systems; c) Monitoring and trending of ground and flight system operations and performance; d) Enhanced situational awareness and control for ground personnel and crew; e) Vehicle autonomy (self-sufficiency) in responding to off-nominal conditions during long-duration and distant exploration missions; f) In-space maintenance and repair; and g) Efficient ground processing of reusable systems. ISHM concepts and technologies may be applied to any complex engineered system such as transportation systems, orbital or planetary habitats, observatories, command and control systems, life support systems, safety-critical software, and even the health of flight crews. As an overarching design and operational principle implemented at the system-of-systems level, ISHM holds substantial promise in terms of affordability, safety, reliability, and effectiveness of space exploration missions.

  19. Boeing Integrated Defense System : Space Exploration

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2007-12-12

    Space Exploration, a division of Boeing Integrated Defense Systems, is a leading global supplier of reusable and human space systems and services. Headquartered in Houston, the organization comprises more than 4,000 people operating in five locations. The organization s legacy began in the late 1950s with the X-15, spanned to the Apollo missions of the 1960 and 70s, and continues today with the Space Shuttle and International Space Station.

  20. The Solar System: Recent Exploration Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The solar system has been visited by space probes, ranging from the Mariner Mercury-Venus mission exploring inward toward the sun, and continuing through the Voyager probes out into interstellar space and (on its way now) the New Horizons probe to Pluto and the Kuiper belt. This talk examines what we know of the planets of the solar system from probes, and talks about where we will go from here.

  1. Future exploration of the outer solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, T.

    Exploration of the outer solar system is constrained by vast distances, consequent communications and light time limitations, power, and long flight times. Early reconnaissance missions (Pioneer 10 and 11, Voyager 1 and 2) employed relatively fast trajectories resulting in very fast fly-bys. The next generation of exploration (Galileo and Cassini) has been characterized by spacecraft with large propellant systems and relatively slow (gravity assist) trajectories needed energetically to achieve orbit around Jupiter and Saturn. All of these spacecraft utilized radioisotope thermoelectric generators for reliable, but modest power. Future exploration priorities require highly capable spacecraft systems that go into orbit around the primary planet and then perform multiple tasks (e.g. orbiting individual moons and delivering surface and atmospheric scientific probes). To achieve major scientific advances will require significant increases in communication rates, improved instrumentation and high power available for experiments. Fission-powered nuclear electric propulsion is being studied to meet these requirements. A Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter is proposed as the first of this class of new, highly capable missions. The paper will review the scientific rationale for the JIMO mission and prospects for applying these techniques to exploration of Saturn and the other outer planets.

  2. Fabrication of a high performance acoustic emission (AE) sensor to monitor and diagnose disturbances in HTS tapes and magnet systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ju-Hyung Kim; Jung-Bin Song; Young Hun Jeong; Young-Jin Lee; Jong-Hoo Paik; Woo-Seok Kim; Haigun Lee

    2010-01-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced as a non-destructive method to monitor sudden deformation caused by local\\u000a heat concentrations and micro-cracks within superconductors and superconducting magnets. However, the detection of AE signals\\u000a in a high temperature superconductor (HTS) tape is not easy because of its low signal to noise ratio caused by the noise from\\u000a boiling liquid cryogen or

  3. Visually Exploring Worldwide Incidents Tracking System Data

    SciTech Connect

    Chhatwal, Shree D.; Rose, Stuart J.

    2008-01-27

    This paper presents refinements of an existing analytic tool, Juxter, which was developed for the visualization of multi-dimensional categorical data, and explores its application to support exploration and interaction with open source Worldwide Incidents Tracking System (WITS) data. The volume and complexity of data available on terrorism makes it hard to analyze. Information systems that can efficiently and effectively collect, access, analyze, and report terrorist incidents can help in further studies focused on preventing, detecting, and responding to terrorist attacks. Existing interfaces to the WITS data support advanced search capabilities, and geolocation but lack functionality for identifying patterns and trends. To better support efficient browsing we have refined Juxter’s existing capabilities for filtering, selecting, and sorting elements and categories within the visualization.

  4. Micro and Nano Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of micro and nano systems in Space exploration. Included are: an explanation of the rationales behind nano and micro technologies for space exploration, a review of how the devices are fabricated, including details on lithography with more information on Electron Beam (E-Beam) lithography, and X-ray lithography, a review of micro gyroscopes and inchworm Microactuator as examples of the use of MicroElectoMechanical (MEMS) technology. Also included is information on Carbon Nanotubes, including a review of the CVD growth process. These micro-nano systems have given rise to the next generation of miniature X-ray Diffraction, X-ray Fluorescence instruments, mass spectrometers, and terahertz frequency vacuum tube oscillators and amplifiers, scanning electron microscopes and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscope. The nanotechnology has also given rise to coating technology, such as silicon nanotip anti-reflection coating.

  5. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Advanced Exploration Systems

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Advanced Exploration Systems NASA Advisory Council Demonstrations ETD ­ Exploration Technology Development STMD ­ Space Technology Mission Directorate GCD - Game-on" surface exploration and in- space operations, including crew excursion vehicles, advanced space suits

  6. Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Duane

    2012-01-01

    The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) is a project under the Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element managed by the Human Research Program (HRP). The vision for the EMSD is to utilize ISS as a test bed to show that several medical technologies needed for an exploration mission and medical informatics tools for managing evidence and decision making can be integrated into a single system and used by the on-orbit crew in an efficient and meaningful manner. Objectives: a) Reduce and even possibly eliminate the time required for on-orbit crew and ground personnel (which include Surgeon, Biomedical Engineer (BME) Flight Controller, and Medical Operations Data Specialist) to access and move medical data from one application to another. b) Demonstrate that the on-orbit crew has the ability to access medical data/information using an intuitive and crew-friendly software solution to assist/aid in the treatment of a medical condition. c) Develop a common data management framework and architecture that can be ubiquitously used to automate repetitive data collection, management, and communications tasks for all crew health and life sciences activities.

  7. Solar System Exploration: Fast Lesson Finder

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    How does one get around the solar system? Well, that's a tricky question unless you have a lot of time on your hands, but it's certainly easy to learn about the solar system with these useful lessons provided courtesy of NASA. Their Solar System Exploration website includes hundreds of lessons designed for grades K-12, which visitors can navigate by using the helpful tab menus to look for specific types of materials. The tabs include Grade Level, Solar System Body, Mission, and Topic. Visitors looking for high school materials will do well to look at the Globe Visualization Student Activities, which include close examinations of the Earth hydrology, including aspects of air temperature, ozone, salinity, and so on. Additionally, visitors can use the Education section on the left-hand side of the site to learn about scientists' work in the "Through the Eyes of Scientists" features.

  8. Comparison between PKI (RSA-AES) and AEAD (AES-EAX PSK) Cryptography Systems for Use in SMS-Based Secure Transmissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hao Wang; William Emmanuel Yu

    \\u000a In today’s mobile communication systems, security offered by the network operator is often limited to the wireless link. This\\u000a means that data delivered through mobile networks are not sufficiently protected. In the particular growing field of interest\\u000a of machine-to-machine (M2M) communications, these applications typically require a mobile, secure and reliable means of data\\u000a communication. This paper compared two (2) cryptographic

  9. Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Space Explorations Part 2: Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chau, Savio

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews what is currently known about the solar system and the objects that make up the solar system. Information about the individual planets, comets, asteroids and moons is reviewed.

  10. Microarray assays for solar system exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, Andrew; Toporski, Jan; McKay, David S.; Schweitzer, Mary; Pincus, Seth; Pérez-Mercader, Juan; Parro García, Victor

    2001-08-01

    The detection of evidence of extinct and extant life is a key issue in astrobiological research, particularly with respect to future exploration of the solar system. Simple life forms may have evolved and developed on planetary bodies such as Mars or Europa. At this point in time, tests whether life once was or still is present can only be carried out by means of in situ experiments. Here, we discuss the potential and advantages of immunological concepts for life detection and the development of a miniaturized automated immunoassay flight device.

  11. Automated Operations Development for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie; Stetson, Howard K.

    2012-01-01

    Automated space operations command and control software development and its implementation must be an integral part of the vehicle design effort. The software design must encompass autonomous fault detection, isolation, recovery capabilities and also provide single button intelligent functions for the crew. Development, operations and safety approval experience with the Timeliner system on-board the International Space Station (ISS), which provided autonomous monitoring with response and single command functionality of payload systems, can be built upon for future automated operations as the ISS Payload effort was the first and only autonomous command and control system to be in continuous execution (6 years), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week within a crewed spacecraft environment. Utilizing proven capabilities from the ISS Higher Active Logic (HAL) System [1] , along with the execution component design from within the HAL 9000 Space Operating System [2] , this design paper will detail the initial HAL System software architecture and interfaces as applied to NASA s Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in support of the Advanced Exploration Systems, Autonomous Mission Operations project. The development and implementation of integrated simulators within this development effort will also be detailed and is the first step in verifying the HAL 9000 Integrated Test-Bed Component [2] designs effectiveness. This design paper will conclude with a summary of the current development status and future development goals as it pertains to automated command and control for the HDU.

  12. Automated Operations Development for Advanced Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddock, Angie T.; Stetson, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Automated space operations command and control software development and its implementation must be an integral part of the vehicle design effort. The software design must encompass autonomous fault detection, isolation, recovery capabilities and also provide "single button" intelligent functions for the crew. Development, operations and safety approval experience with the Timeliner system onboard the International Space Station (ISS), which provided autonomous monitoring with response and single command functionality of payload systems, can be built upon for future automated operations as the ISS Payload effort was the first and only autonomous command and control system to be in continuous execution (6 years), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week within a crewed spacecraft environment. Utilizing proven capabilities from the ISS Higher Active Logic (HAL) System, along with the execution component design from within the HAL 9000 Space Operating System, this design paper will detail the initial HAL System software architecture and interfaces as applied to NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) in support of the Advanced Exploration Systems, Autonomous Mission Operations project. The development and implementation of integrated simulators within this development effort will also be detailed and is the first step in verifying the HAL 9000 Integrated Test-Bed Component [2] designs effectiveness. This design paper will conclude with a summary of the current development status and future development goals as it pertains to automated command and control for the HDU.

  13. [Application of ICP-AES in automotive hydraulic power steering system fault diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry in automotive hydraulic power steering system fault diagnosis. After having determined Fe, Cu and Al content in the four groups of Buick Regal 2.4 main metal power-steering fluid whose travel course was respectively 2-9 thousand kilometers, 11-18 thousand kilometers, 22-29 thousandkilometers, and 31-40 thousand kilometers, and the database of primary metal content in the Buick Regal 2.4 different mileage power-steering fluid was established. The research discovered that the main metal content increased with increasing mileage and its normal level is between the two trend lines. Determination of the power-steering fluid main metal content and comparison with its database value can not only judge the wear condition of the automotive hydraulic power steering system and maintain timely to avoid the traffic accident, but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced vehicle maintenance costs, and improved service quality. PMID:23586258

  14. Space Launch System for Exploration and Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaus, K.

    2013-12-01

    Introduction: The Space Launch System (SLS) is the most powerful rocket ever built and provides a critical heavy-lift launch capability enabling diverse deep space missions. The exploration class vehicle launches larger payloads farther in our solar system and faster than ever before. The vehicle's 5 m to 10 m fairing allows utilization of existing systems which reduces development risks, size limitations and cost. SLS lift capacity and superior performance shortens mission travel time. Enhanced capabilities enable a myriad of missions including human exploration, planetary science, astrophysics, heliophysics, planetary defense and commercial space exploration endeavors. Human Exploration: SLS is the first heavy-lift launch vehicle capable of transporting crews beyond low Earth orbit in over four decades. Its design maximizes use of common elements and heritage hardware to provide a low-risk, affordable system that meets Orion mission requirements. SLS provides a safe and sustainable deep space pathway to Mars in support of NASA's human spaceflight mission objectives. The SLS enables the launch of large gateway elements beyond the moon. Leveraging a low-energy transfer that reduces required propellant mass, components are then brought back to a desired cislunar destination. SLS provides a significant mass margin that can be used for additional consumables or a secondary payloads. SLS lowers risks for the Asteroid Retrieval Mission by reducing mission time and improving mass margin. SLS lift capacity allows for additional propellant enabling a shorter return or the delivery of a secondary payload, such as gateway component to cislunar space. SLS enables human return to the moon. The intermediate SLS capability allows both crew and cargo to fly to translunar orbit at the same time which will simplify mission design and reduce launch costs. Science Missions: A single SLS launch to Mars will enable sample collection at multiple, geographically dispersed locations and a low-risk, direct return of Martian material. For the Europa Clipper mission the SLS eliminates Venus and Earth flybys, providing a direct launch to the Jovian system, arriving four years earlier than missions utilizing existing launch vehicles. This architecture allows increased mass for radiation shielding, expansion of the science payload and provides a model for other outer planet missions. SLS provides a direct launch to the Uranus system, reducing travel time by two years when compared to existing launch capabilities. SLS can launch the Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST 16 m) to SEL2, providing researchers 10 times the resolution of the James Webb Space Telescope and up to 300 times the sensitivity of the Hubble Space Telescope. SLS is the only vehicle capable of deploying telescopes of this mass and size in a single launch. It simplifies mission design and reduces risks by eliminating the need for multiple launches and in-space assembly. SLS greatly shortens interstellar travel time, delivering the Interstellar Explorer to 200 AU in about 15 years with a maximum speed of 63 km/sec--13.3 AU per year (Neptune orbits the sun at an approximate distance of 30 AU ).

  15. DFA on AES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christophe Giraud

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we describe two different DFA attacks on the AES. The first one uses a theoretical fault model that induces a fault on only one bit of an intermediate result, hence allowing us to obtain the key by using 50 faulty ciphertexts for an AES-128. The second attack uses a more realistic fault model: we assume that we

  16. A Water Recovery System Evolved for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ORourke, Mary Jane E.; Perry, Jay L.; Carter, Donald L.

    2006-01-01

    A new water recovery system designed towards fulfillment of NASA's Vision for Space Exploration is presented. This water recovery system is an evolution of the current state-of-the-art system. Through novel integration of proven technologies for air and water purification, this system promises to elevate existing technology to higher levels of optimization. The novel aspect of the system is twofold: Volatile organic contaminants will be removed from the cabin air via catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase, prior to their absorption into the aqueous phase, and vapor compression distillation technology will be used to process the condensate and hygiene waste streams in addition to the urine waste stream. Oxidation kinetics dictate that removal of volatile organic contaminants from the vapor phase is more efficient. Treatment of the various waste streams by VCD will reduce the load on the expendable ion exchange and adsorption media which follow, and on the aqueous-phase volatile removal assembly further downstream. Incorporating these advantages will reduce the weight, volume, and power requirements of the system, as well as resupply.

  17. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) Exploring the emergence of

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) Exploring the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants ...........................................................................................................4-1 4.1 Relevance of Europa, Ganymede, and Jupiter System Exploration .........................................4-1 4.1.1 Europa and Ganymede: Investigating Habitability

  18. Exploring the Planets: Our Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This resource offers information that will allow students to see just how big each planet and its major satellites are relative to each other in the scale model of the Solar System. Students will see where the planets are in relation to the Sun and to each other and learn just how big the Sun is compared to all the planets in our Solar System. Sections at this site include Planetary Physical Data, Planetary Satellites Physical Data, Relative Sizes of the Planets, Relative Planetary Distances from the Sun, and the Size of the Sun. In addition, each planet has an individual online section that gives an overview of what has been learned through imagery and data obtained from Earth-based and spacecraft exploration.

  19. Mineralogical basis for the interpretation of multi-element (ICP-AES), oxalic acid, and aqua regia partial digestions of stream sediments for reconnaissance exploration geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, S.E.; Mosier, E.L.; Motooka, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have applied partial digestion procedures, primarily oxalic acid and aqua regia leaches, to several regional geochemical reconnaissance studies carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analytical methods. We have chosen to use these two acids because the oxalic acid primarily attacks those compounds formed during secondary geochemical processes, whereas aqua regia will digest the primary sulfide phases as well as secondary phases. Application of the partial digestion technique has proven superior to total digestion because the concentration of metals in hydromorphic compounds and the sulfides is enhanced relative to the metals bound in the unattacked silicate phases. The aqua regia digestion attacks and leaches metals from the mafic chain silicates and the phyllosilicates (coordination number of VI or more), yielding a characteristic geochemical signature, but does not leach appreciable metal from many other silicates. In order to interpret the results from these leach studies, we have initiated an investigation of a large suite of hand-picked mineral separates. The study includes analyses of about two hundred minerals representing the common rock-forming minerals as well as end-member compositions of various silicates, oxides, sulfides, carbonates, sulfates, and some vanadates, molybdates, tungstates, and phosphates. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of leaching by acids of particular lattice sites in specific mineral structures. ?? 1987.

  20. Non-contact damage monitoring by laser AE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enoki, M.; Nishinoiri, S.

    2005-04-01

    AE method is a well-known technique for in-situ monitoring of fracture behavior by attaching piezoelectric transducer. However, conventional AE transducer cannot be used at elevated temperature or severe environment. Laser based ultrasonic (LBU) technique has been developed to characterize materials properties and detect flaws in materials. We developed the AE measurement system with laser interferometer to apply this technique to microfracture evaluation in various materials. AE during sintering of alumina ceramics and thermal spying of alumina powder on steel substrates were successfully measured by laser interferometers. The effect of processing parameters on AE behavior was clearly observed by analyzing AE waveforms. One of the most advantages of this laser AE technique is to estimate the temperature where microcracks are generated. These results could give a feed back to control processing conditions in order to avoid damage in materials. It was concluded that the laser AE method was very useful to detect microcracks in ceramics during fabrication.

  1. Scientific Goals for Exploration of the Outer Solar System

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Scientific Goals for Exploration of the Outer Solar System Explore Diverse Worlds How did the outer planets mold the solar system and create habitable worlds? OPAG Report DRAFT 4 November 2014 #12;2 Outline of this document is to frame the science objectives for exploration of the outer solar system. It is consistent

  2. On the Evolution of Rough Set Exploration System

    E-print Network

    Wojna, Arkadiusz

    On the Evolution of Rough Set Exploration System Jan G. Bazan1 , Marcin S. Szczuka2 , Arkadiusz the idea behind creation of the Rough Set Exploration System (RSES). It is already almost a decade since Exploration System (RSES v. 1.0) in its current incarnation and its further development (RSES v. 2.0) were

  3. Logistics Modeling for Lunar Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andraschko, Mark R.; Merrill, R. Gabe; Earle, Kevin D.

    2008-01-01

    The extensive logistics required to support extended crewed operations in space make effective modeling of logistics requirements and deployment critical to predicting the behavior of human lunar exploration systems. This paper discusses the software that has been developed as part of the Campaign Manifest Analysis Tool in support of strategic analysis activities under the Constellation Architecture Team - Lunar. The described logistics module enables definition of logistics requirements across multiple surface locations and allows for the transfer of logistics between those locations. A key feature of the module is the loading algorithm that is used to efficiently load logistics by type into carriers and then onto landers. Attention is given to the capabilities and limitations of this loading algorithm, particularly with regard to surface transfers. These capabilities are described within the context of the object-oriented software implementation, with details provided on the applicability of using this approach to model other human exploration scenarios. Some challenges of incorporating probabilistics into this type of logistics analysis model are discussed at a high level.

  4. Office of Exploration Systems March 2 -3, 2004

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Office of Exploration Systems March 2 - 3, 2004 Associate Administrator, Office of Exploration Exploration A New Future for U.S. Civil Space Programs · On January 14, 2004, President Bush articulated a new Vision for Space Exploration in the 21st Century · This Vision encompasses a broad range of human

  5. Spacecraft Radio Scintillation and Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woo, Richard

    1993-01-01

    When a wave propagates through a turbulent medium, scattering by the random refractive index inhomogeneities can lead to a wide variety of phenomena that have been the subject of extensive study. The observed scattering effects include amplitude or intensity scintillation, phase scintillation, angular broadening, and spectral broadening, among others. In this paper, I will refer to these scattering effects collectively as scintillation. Although the most familiar example is probably the twinkling of stars (light wave intensity scintillation by turbulence in the Earth's atmosphere), scintillation has been encountered and investigated in such diverse fields as ionospheric physics, oceanography, radio astronomy, and radio and optical communications. Ever since planetary spacecraft began exploring the solar system, scintillation has appeared during the propagation of spacecraft radio signals through planetary atmospheres, planetary ionospheres, and the solar wind. Early studies of these phenomena were motivated by the potential adverse effects on communications and navigation, and on experiments that use the radio link to conduct scientific investigations. Examples of the latter are radio occultation measurements (described below) of planetary atmospheres to deduce temperature profiles, and the search for gravitational waves. However,these concerns soon gave way to the emergence of spacecraft radio scintillation as a new scientific tool for exploring small-scale dynamics in planetary atmospheres and structure in the solar wind, complementing in situ and other remote sensing spacecraft measurements, as well as scintillation measurements using natural (celestial) radio sources. The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and review the solar system spacecraft radio scintillation observations, to summarize the salient features of wave propagation analyses employed in interpreting them, to underscore the unique remote sensing capabilities and scientific relevance of the scintillation measurements, and to highlight some of the scientific results obtained to date. Special emphasis is placed on comparing the remote sensing features of planetary and terrestrial scintillation measurements, and on contrasting spacecraft and natural radio source scintillation measurements. I will first discuss planetary atmospheres and ionospheres, and then the solar wind.

  6. Cross Cutting Structural Design for Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semmes, Edmund B.

    2007-01-01

    The challenge of our new National Space Policy and NASA's Vision for Space Exploration (VSE) is keyed to the development of more effective space access and transportation systems. Optimizing in-space systems through innovative cross cutting structural designs that reduce mass, combine functional requirements and improve performance can significantly advance spacecraft designs to meet the ever growing demands of our new National Space Policy. Dependence on limited structural designs is no longer an option. We must create robust materials, forms, function and evolvable systems. We must advance national policy objectives in the design, development, test and operation of multi-billion dollar new generation crew capsules by enabling them to evolve in meeting the requirements of long duration missions to the moon and mars. This paper discusses several current issues and major design drivers for consideration in structural design of advanced spacecraft systems. Approaches to addressing these multifunctional requirements is presented as well as a discussion on utilizing Functional Analysis System Technique (FAST) in developing cross cutting structural designs for future spacecraft. It will be shown how easy it is to deploy such techniques in any conceptual architecture definition or ongoing preliminary design. As experts in merging mission, safety and life support requirements of the frail human existence into robust vehicle and habitat design, we will conquer the final frontier, harness new resources and develop life giving technologies for mankind through more innovative designs. The rocket equation tells us that a reduction in mass optimizes our propulsive results. Primary and secondary structural elements provide for the containment of gases, fluids and solids; translate and sustain loads/impacts; conduct/radiate thermal energy; shield from the harmful effects of radiation; provide for grounding/bonding of electrical power systems; compartmentalize operational functions; and provide physical interface with multiple systems. How can we redefine, combine, substitute, rearrange and otherwise modify our structural systems to reduce mass? New technologies will be needed to fill knowledge gaps and propagate new design methods. Such an integrated process is paramount in maintaining U.S. leadership and in executing our national policy goals. The cross cutting process can take many forms, but all forms will have a positive affect on the demanding design environment through initial radical thinking. The author will illustrate such cross cutting results achievable through a formal process called FAST. The FAST example will be used to show how a multifunctional structural system concept for long duration spacecraft might be generated.

  7. A Computer Based Educational and Career Exploration System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minor, Frank J.

    The actual workings of the Educational and Career Exploration System (ECES) are described. The functions of the system are divided into three general phases: (1) an occupational information bank for exploring occupations; (2) an educational information bank for exploring training programs and educational areas of study; and (3) a junior…

  8. Systems Verification using Randomized Exploration of Large State Spaces

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Systems Verification using Randomized Exploration of Large State Spaces Nazha Abed, Stavros, but considerable, state space exploration with little memory and time requirements. 1 Introduction To verify system the amount of memory necessary for states storage or reducing the state space to explore. Examples

  9. Active Thermal Control System Development for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westheimer, David

    2007-01-01

    All space vehicles or habitats require thermal management to maintain a safe and operational environment for both crew and hardware. Active Thermal Control Systems (ATCS) perform the functions of acquiring heat from both crew and hardware within a vehicle, transporting that heat throughout the vehicle, and finally rejecting that energy into space. Almost all of the energy used in a space vehicle eventually turns into heat, which must be rejected in order to maintain an energy balance and temperature control of the vehicle. For crewed vehicles, Active Thermal Control Systems are pumped fluid loops that are made up of components designed to perform these functions. NASA has been actively developing technologies that will enable future missions or will provide significant improvements over the state of the art technologies. These technologies have are targeted for application on the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), or Orion, and a Lunar Surface Access Module (LSAM). The technologies that have been selected and are currently under development include: fluids that enable single loop ATCS architectures, a gravity insensitive vapor compression cycle heat pump, a sublimator with reduced sensitivity to feedwater contamination, an evaporative heat sink that can operate in multiple ambient pressure environments, a compact spray evaporator, and lightweight radiators that take advantage of carbon composites and advanced optical coatings.

  10. Matrix Methods for Optimal Manifesting of Multinode Space Exploration Systems

    E-print Network

    Grogan, Paul Thomas

    This paper presents matrix-based methods for determining optimal cargo manifests for space exploration. An exploration system is defined as a sequence of in-space and on-surface transports between multiple nodes coupled ...

  11. Edinburgh Research Explorer A framework for evolutionary systems biology

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer A framework for evolutionary systems biology Citation for published version: Loewe, L 2009, 'A framework for evolutionary systems biology' BMC Systems Biology, vol 3, 27., 10 Research Explorer Published In: BMC Systems Biology Publisher Rights Statement: © 2009 Loewe; licensee Bio

  12. 19 CFR 192.13 - Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges; appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.13 Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  13. 19 CFR 192.12 - Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.12 Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  14. 19 CFR 192.12 - Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.12 Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  15. 19 CFR 192.13 - Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges; appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.13 Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  16. 19 CFR 192.13 - Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges; appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.13 Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  17. 19 CFR 192.12 - Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.12 Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  18. 19 CFR 192.12 - Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.12 Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  19. 19 CFR 192.12 - Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing status...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.12 Criteria for denial of applications requesting AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  20. 19 CFR 192.13 - Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges; appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.13 Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  1. 19 CFR 192.13 - Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges; appeal procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing privileges...Information Through the Automated Export System (AES) § 192.13 Revocation of participants' AES post-departure (Option 4) filing...

  2. Chaotic appearance of the AE index

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Hansen; C. K. Goertz; R. A. Smith

    1991-01-01

    A typical time sequence of AE shows no obvious regularities which suggests either that the magnetosphere is a random (stochastic) system or displays deterministic chaos. To find out whether the magnetosphere is random or chaotic, AE data have been studied by the embedding dimension method to find the correlation dimension of the magnetosphere. The autocorrelation (AC) time scale Ï(AC(Ï)=½AC(0)) is

  3. NASA Advanced Explorations Systems: Concepts for Logistics to Living

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shull, Sarah A.; Howe, A. Scott; Flynn, Michael T.; Howard, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) project strives to enable a largely mission-independent cradle-to-grave-to-cradle approach to minimize logistics contributions to total mission architecture mass. The goals are to engineer logistics materials, common crew consumables, and container configurations to meet the following five basic goals: 1. Minimize intrinsic logistics mass and improve ground logistics flexibility. 2. Allow logistics components to be directly repurposed for on-orbit non-logistics functions (e.g., crew cabin outfitting) thereby indirectly reducing mass/volume. 3. Compact and process logistics that have not been directly repurposed to generate useful on-orbit components and/or compounds (e.g., radiation shielding, propellant, other usable chemical constituents). 4. Enable long-term stable storage and disposal of logistics end products that cannot be reused or repurposed (e.g., compaction for volume reduction, odor control, and maintenance of crew cabin hygienic conditions). 5. Allow vehicles in different mission phases to share logistics resources. This paper addresses the work being done to meet the second goal, the direct repurposing of logistics components to meet other on-orbit needs, through a strategy termed Logistics to Living (L2L). L2L has several areas but can be defined as repurposing or converting logistical items (bags, containers, foam, components, etc.) into useful crew items or life support augmentation on-orbit after they have provided their primary logistics function. The intent is that by repurposing items, dedicated crew items do not have to be launched and overall launch mass is decreased. For non-LEO missions, the vehicle interior volume will be relatively fixed so L2L will enable this volume to be used more effectively through reuse and rearrangement of logistical components. Past work in the area of L2L has already conceptually developed several potential technologies [Howe, Howard 2010]. Several of the L2L concepts that have shown the most potential in the past are based on NASA cargo transfer bags (CTBs) or their equivalents which are currently used to transfer cargo to and from the ISS. A high percentage of all logistics supplies are packaging mass and for a 6-month mission a crew of four might need over 100 CTBs. These CTBs are used for on-orbit transfer and storage but eventually becomes waste after use since down mass is very limited. The work being done in L2L also considering innovative interior habitat construction that integrate the CTBs into the walls of future habitats. The direct integration could provide multiple functions: launch packaging, stowage, radiation protection, water processing, life support augmentation, as well as structure. Reuse of these CTBs would reduce the amount of waste generated and also significantly reduce future up mass requirements for exploration missions. Also discussed here is the L2L water wall , an innovative reuse of an unfolded CTB as a passive water treatment system utilizing forward osmosis. The bags have been modified to have an inner membrane liner that allows them to purify wastewater. They may also provide a structural water-wall element that can be used to provide radiation protection and as a structural divider. Integration of the components into vehicle/habitat architecture and consideration of operations concepts and human factors will be discussed. In the future these bags could be designed to treat wastewater, concentrated brines, and solid wastes, and to dewater solid wastes and produce a bio-stabilized construction element. This paper will describe the follow-on work done in design, fabrication and demonstrations of various L2L concepts, including advanced CTBs for reuse/repurposing, internal outfitting studies and the CTB-based forward osmosis water wall.

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Advanced Exploration Systems

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration Advanced Exploration Systems NASA Advisory Council capabilities to enable human and robotic exploration: Deep Space Habitation Capability: Enable the crew the crew to conduct "hands-on" surface exploration and in-space operations outside habitats and vehicles

  5. Exploring functional structure through system organization: Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network

    E-print Network

    Park, Namkyoo

    Exploring functional structure through system organization: Caenorhabditis elegans neuronal network, systemic organization, modular structure, functional circuit #12; Hyeok Jung Kang1 , Myung-Kyu Choi2, Junho Lee2 , Namkyoo Park*1 *nkpark@snu.ac.kr 1 Photonic Systems

  6. An Integrated System for Multi-Rover Scientific Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tara A. Estlin; Alexander Gray; Tobias Mann; Gregg Rabideau; Rebecca Castaño; Steve A. Chien; Eric Mjolsness

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated system for coordi- nating multiple rover behavior with the overall goal of collecting planetary surface data. The Multi-Rover Science Exploration system integrates concepts from machine learning with planning and scheduling to per- form autonomous scientific exploration by cooperating rovers. The integrated system utilizes a novel ma- chine learning clustering component to analyze science data and

  7. Scientific Goals for Exploration of the Outer Solar System

    E-print Network

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Scientific Goals for Exploration of the Outer Solar System How did the outer planets mold the solar the science objectives for exploration of the outer solar system. It is consistent with Visions and Voyages but will be kept up-to-date as new discoveries are made, models evolve, our understanding of solar system processes

  8. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1996 uses available data from literature, industry, and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on minerals industry direction are drawn from these data.

  9. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Part of an annual review of mines and mineral resources in the U.S. An overview of nonfuel-mineral exploration in 2000 is presented. Principal exploration target was gold exploration in Latin America, Australia, and the U.S. There was a decrease of 18 percent in the exploration budget for gold as compared with the budget for 1999. Statistical information on nonfuel-mineral exploration worldwide is presented, analyzed, and interpreted.

  10. A Novel Visualization System for Expressive Facial Motion Data Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tanasai Sucontphunt; Xiaoru Yuan; Qing Li; Zhigang Deng

    2008-01-01

    Facial emotions and expressive facial motions have become an in- trinsic part of many graphics systems and human computer inter- action applications. The dynamics and high dimensionality of fa- cial motion data make its exploration and processing challenging. In this paper, we propose a novel visualization system for expres- sive facial motion data exploration. Based on Principal Compo- nent Analysis

  11. Intelligent Systems: Shaping the Future of Aeronautics and Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Lohn, Jason; Kaneshige, John

    2004-01-01

    Intelligent systems are nature-inspired, mathematically sound, computationally intensive problem solving tools and methodologies that have become important for NASA's future roles in Aeronautics and Space Exploration. Intelligent systems will enable safe, cost and mission-effective approaches to air& control, system design, spacecraft autonomy, robotic space exploration and human exploration of Moon, Mars, and beyond. In this talk, we will discuss intelligent system technologies and expand on the role of intelligent systems in NASA's missions. We will also present several examples of which some are highlighted m this extended abstract.

  12. Exploring large coherent spin systems with solid state NMR

    E-print Network

    Cho, HyungJoon, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Solid state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) allows us to explore a large coherent spin system and provides an ideal test-bed for studying strongly interacting multiple-spin system in a large Hilbert space. In this thesis, ...

  13. New Thematic Solar System Exploration Products for Scientists and Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, Lesile; Wessen, Alice; Davis, Phil; Lindstrom, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    The next several years are an exciting time in the exploration of the solar system. NASA and its international partners have a veritable armada of spaceships heading out to the far reaches of the solar system. We'll send the first spacecraft beyond our solar system into interstellar space. We'll launch our first mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt and just our second to Mercury (the first in 30 years). We'll continue our intensive exploration of Mars and begin our detailed study of Saturn and its moons. We'll visit asteroids and comets and bring home pieces of the Sun and a comet. This is truly an unprecedented period of exploration and discovery! To facilitate access to information and to provide the thematic context for these missions NASA s Solar System Exploration Program and Solar System Exploration Education Forum have developed several products.

  14. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1997 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Sulvey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  15. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1999 draws upon available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. The report documents data on exploration budgets by region and commodity and identifies significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas. It also discusses government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry. And it presents inferences and observations on mineral industry direction based on these data and discussions.

  16. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.; Porter, K.E.

    1999-01-01

    This summary of international nonfuel mineral exploration activities for 1998 draws on available data from literature, industry and US Geological Survey (USGS) specialists. Data on exploration budgets by region and commodity are reported, significant mineral discoveries and exploration target areas are identified and government programs affecting the mineral exploration industry are discussed. Inferences and observations on mineral industry direction are drawn from these data and discussions.

  17. Explorers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Laz

    2007-11-07

    WEbsites to use for 5th grade Explorers study. Explorers of the Americas - Enchanted Learning'); Explorers of the Americas - Enchanted Learning Lewis Clark - The Journey of the Corps of Discovery Lewis and Clark - The Journey of the Corps of Discovery Gale Group Biography Resources Center Gale Group - Biography Resource Center Discoverer s Web Discoverer's Web The Conquistadors The Conquistadors ...

  18. Covering the Bases: Exploring Alternative Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Terri L.; Garcia, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Since the 1950s, the understanding of how the base 10 system works has been encouraged through alternative base systems (Price 1995; Woodward 2004). If high school students are given opportunities to learn other base systems and analyze what they denote, we believe that they will better understand the structure of base 10 and its operations…

  19. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2005-01-01

    The worldwide budget for nonferrous, nonfuel mineral exploration was expected to increase by 58 percent in 2004 from the 2003 budget, according to Metals Economics Group (MEG) of Halifax, Nova Scotia. The increase comes two years after a five-year period of declining spending for mineral exploration (1998 to 2002). Figures suggest a subsequent 27 percent increase in budgeted expenditures from 2002 to 2003. For the second consecutive year, all regional exploration budget estimates were anticipated to increase.

  20. Participatory Exploration: The Role of the User Contribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skytland, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation explores how NASA can apply the global shift in demographics, the popularity of collaborative technology and the desire for participation to the future of space exploration. Included in this is a review of the evolution of work, the engagement gap, user contribution systems and a case study concerning the "digital astronaut".

  1. Towards Efficient Design Space Exploration of Heterogeneous Embedded Media Systems

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    are developing a modeling and simulation environment which aims at efficient design space exploration version of our prototype modeling and simulation environment to an M-JPEG encoding application, we simulation practice for the design space exploration of heterogeneous embedded systems architectures

  2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exploration Systems Interim Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the following: 1. The Exploration Systems Mission Directorate within NASA. Enabling the Vision for Space Exploration. The Role of the Directorate. 2. Strategic Context and Approach. Corporate Focus. Focused, Prioritized Requirements. Spiral Transformation. Management Rigor. 3. Achieving Directorate Objectives. Strategy to Task Process. Capability Development. Research and Technology Development. 4. Beyond the Horizon. Appendices.

  3. Exploring Ice in the Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module includes several lessons aimed at introducing ice science to students. In the first activity, students share personal ice experience stories through drawing, telling, and writing. This enables the teacher to diagnose personal conceptions about ice. Then students explore a big block of ice. They ask and record their questions and start an ice science notebook. Depending on the nature of the questions, the teacher selects appropriate follow-up activities. Other lessons include: Ice Melts,Ice Floats,Ice Flows, Ice is a Mineral, Life in Icy Places, and Ice in Space. Each lesson includes a kinesthetic activity where students mime and act out ice science concepts, creating a science performance laboratory. These experiences lay the foundation for deeper conceptual understanding in later school years. All lessons include extensive background information, a list of national standards addressed, suggested curriculum extensions, a list of resources and photo gallery.

  4. Systems Verication using Randomized Exploration of Large State Spaces

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nazha Abed; Stavros Tripakis; Jean-Marc Vincent

    System verication is a technique used to improve the cor- rectness of hardware and software systems. It aims to discover bugs in early development steps. A common approach of system verication con- sists of exploring and analyzing the reachable states graph, which repre- sents the system behavior in an exhaustive manner. This graph is often too large to be entirely

  5. Human System Drivers for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.; Steinberg, Susan; Charles, John B.

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of DRM4 in terms of the human system includes the ability to meet NASA standards, the inclusion of the human system in the design trade space, preparation for future missions and consideration of a robotic precursor mission. Ensuring both the safety and the performance capability of the human system depends upon satisfying NASA Space Flight Human System Standards.1 These standards in turn drive the development of program-specific requirements for Near-earth Object (NEO) missions. In evaluating DRM4 in terms of these human system standards, the currently existing risk models, technologies and biological countermeasures were used. A summary of this evaluation is provided below in a structure that supports a mission architecture planning activities. 1. Unacceptable Level of Risk The duration of the DRM4 mission leads to an unacceptable level of risk for two aspects of human system health: A. The permissible exposure limit for space flight radiation exposure (a human system standard) would be exceeded by DRM4. B. The risk of visual alterations and abnormally high intracranial pressure would be too high. 1

  6. Scanning Laser Radar Development for Solar System Exploration Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tratt, D.; Menzies, R.; Bartman, R.; Hemmati, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has recently established an accelerated development initiative to enable high-resolution active optical ranging and terrain mapping capabilities for a series of upcoming Solar System exploration missions.

  7. Ares V: Application to Solar System Scientific Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reh, Kim; Spilker, Tom; Elliott, John; Balint, Tibor; Donahue, Ben; McCormick, Dave; Smith, David B.; Tandon, Sunil; Woodcock, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The following sections describe Ares V performance and its payoff to a wide array of potential solar system exploration missions. Application to potential Astrophysics missions is addressed in Reference 3.

  8. PETROLOGIC CONSTRAINTS ON AMORPHOUS AND CRYSTALLINE MAGNESIUM SILICATES: DUST FORMATION AND EVOLUTION IN SELECTED HERBIG Ae/Be SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, MSC 03 2040, 1-University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-001 (United States); Nuth, Joseph A., E-mail: fransjmr@unm.edu [Astrochemistry Laboratory, Solar System Exploration Division, Code 691, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Infrared Space Observatory, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Herschel Space Observatory surveys provided a wealth of data on the Mg-silicate minerals (forsterite, enstatite), silica, and ''amorphous silicates with olivine and pyroxene stoichiometry'' around Herbig Ae/Be stars. These incredible findings do not resonate with the mainstream Earth Sciences because of (1) disconnecting ''astronomical nomenclature'' and the long existing mineralogical and petrologic terminology of minerals and amorphous materials, and (2) the fact that Earth scientists (formerly geologists) are bound by the ''Principle of Actualism'' that was put forward by James Hutton (1726-1797). This principle takes a process-oriented approach to understanding mineral and rock formation and evolution. This paper will (1) review and summarize the results of laboratory-based vapor phase condensation and thermal annealing experiments, (2) present the pathways of magnesiosilica condensates to Mg-silicate mineral (forsterite, enstatite) formation and processing, and (3) present mineralogical and petrologic implications of the properties and compositions of the infrared-observed crystalline and amorphous dust for the state of circumstellar disk evolution. That is, the IR-observation of smectite layer silicates in HD142527 suggests the break-up of asteroid-like parent bodies that had experienced aqueous alteration. We discuss the persistence of amorphous dust around some young stars and an ultrafast amorphous to crystalline dust transition in HD 163296 that leads to forsterite grains with numerous silica inclusions. These dust evolution processes to form forsterite, enstatite {+-} tridymite could occur due to amorphous magnesiosilica dust precursors with a serpentine- or smectite-dehydroxylate composition.

  9. Colliding Beam Fusion Electric Power System for Mars Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Toole, Joseph A.; Wessel, Frank J.; Rostoker, N.; Binderbauer, M.

    2000-07-01

    Exploration of Mars, by robotic means and eventually manned exploration, will require significant levels of reliable, high-density electric power. An electric power system based on fusion energy possesses distinct advantages. If developed successfully fusion energy sources would be characterized by high fuel energy density, low system mass, modest fuel requirements, and the abundance of fuel sources throughout the Solar System. NASA plans a FY01 new program start with a goal of realizing a fully operational fusion space propulsion system within 20 years; a similar time frame as envisioned for the MARS Exploration Initiative. The development milestones for a planetary-based power system and space propulsion system are synergistic extensions of our existing efforts to develop an Earth-based energy source. This paper reviews the scientific and technology base for our design and describes options for the use of this technology on a Mars mission.

  10. A stereo vision system for support of planetary surface exploration

    E-print Network

    Pollefeys, Marc

    A stereo vision system for support of planetary surface exploration Maarten Vergauwen, Marc contains a stereo head equipped with a pan-tilt mechanism. This vision system is used both for model- ing to the stress that occurs during the flight a recalibra- tion of the stereo vision system is required once

  11. Exploring the Dynamics of Earth Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Dave Bice

    This site from Dave Bice provides links to chapters of a book on learning about Earth systems by modeling them. The guide uses a program called STELLA, which runs on Macs and PCs. Topics covered include an introduction to earth sciences, modelling with STELLA, the rock cycle and the carbon cycle, among others.

  12. Drilling Systems for Extraterrestrial Subsurface Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Zacny; Y. Bar-Cohen; M. Brennan; G. Briggs; G. Cooper; K. Davis; B. Dolgin; D. Glaser; B. Glass; S. Gorevan; J. Guerrero; C. McKay; G. Paulsen; C. Stoker

    2008-01-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an

  13. External Resource: Solar System Exploration: Planets

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    Our galaxy - the Milky Way - is a spiral galaxy with arms extending from the center like a pinwheel. Our solar system is in the Orion arm of the Milky Way. Our Sun is one of about 100 billion stars in the Milky Way. And our galaxy is just one of roughly 1

  14. Toward automated exploration of interactive systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark O. Riedl; Robert St. Amant

    2002-01-01

    The ease with which a user interface can be navigated strongly contributes to its usability. In this paper we describe preliminary results of a project aimed at making the evaluation of user interfaces from this perspective more routine. We have designed a system to carry out an autonomous, exploratory navigation through the graphical user interface of interactive, off-the-shelf software applications.

  15. Exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilburn, D.R.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration budgets fell for a fourth successive year in 2001. These decreases reflected low mineral commodity prices, mineral-market investment reluctance, company failures and a continued trend of company mergers and takeovers.

  16. Drilling systems for extraterrestrial subsurface exploration.

    PubMed

    Zacny, K; Bar-Cohen, Y; Brennan, M; Briggs, G; Cooper, G; Davis, K; Dolgin, B; Glaser, D; Glass, B; Gorevan, S; Guerrero, J; McKay, C; Paulsen, G; Stanley, S; Stoker, C

    2008-06-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an auger. Chip removal via water-ice sublimation (when excavating water-ice-bound formations at pressure below the triple point of water) and pneumatic systems are also possible. Pneumatic systems use the gas or vaporization products of a high-density liquid brought from Earth, gas provided by an in situ compressor, or combustion products of a monopropellant. Drill bits can be divided into coring bits, which excavate an annular shaped hole, and full-faced bits. While cylindrical cores are generally superior as scientific samples, and coring drills have better performance characteristics, full-faced bits are simpler systems because the handling of a core requires a very complex robotic mechanism. The greatest constraints to extraterrestrial drilling are (1) the extreme environmental conditions, such as temperature, dust, and pressure; (2) the light-time communications delay, which necessitates highly autonomous systems; and (3) the mission and science constraints, such as mass and power budgets and the types of drilled samples needed for scientific analysis. A classification scheme based on drilling depth is proposed. Each of the 4 depth categories (surface drills, 1-meter class drills, 10-meter class drills, and deep drills) has distinct technological profiles and scientific ramifications. PMID:18598141

  17. Drilling Systems for Extraterrestrial Subsurface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, K.; Bar-Cohen, Y.; Brennan, M.; Briggs, G.; Cooper, G.; Davis, K.; Dolgin, B.; Glaser, D.; Glass, B.; Gorevan, S.; Guerrero, J.; McKay, C.; Paulsen, G.; Stanley, S.; Stoker, C.

    2008-06-01

    Drilling consists of 2 processes: breaking the formation with a bit and removing the drilled cuttings. In rotary drilling, rotational speed and weight on bit are used to control drilling, and the optimization of these parameters can markedly improve drilling performance. Although fluids are used for cuttings removal in terrestrial drilling, most planetary drilling systems conduct dry drilling with an auger. Chip removal via water-ice sublimation (when excavating water-ice bound formations at pressure below the triple point of water) and pneumatic systems are also possible. Pneumatic systems use the gas or vaporization products of a high-density liquid brought from Earth, gas provided by an in situ compressor, or combustion products of a monopropellant. Drill bits can be divided into coring bits, which excavate an annular shaped hole, and full-faced bits. While cylindrical cores are generally superior as scientific samples, and coring drills have better performance characteristics, full-faced bits are simpler systems because the handling of a core requires a very complex robotic mechanism. The greatest constraints to extraterrestrial drilling are (1) the extreme environmental conditions, such as temperature, dust, and pressure; (2) the light-time communications delay, which necessitates highly autonomous systems; and (3) the mission and science constraints, such as mass and power budgets and the types of drilled samples needed for scientific analysis. A classification scheme based on drilling depth is proposed. Each of the 4 depth categories (surface drills, 1-meter class drills, 10-meter class drills, and deep drills) has distinct technological profiles and scientific ramifications.

  18. Geothermal energy from the Pannonian Basins System: An outcrop analogue study of exploration target horizons in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Götz, Annette E.; Sass, Ingo; Török, Ákos

    2015-04-01

    The characterization of geothermal reservoirs of deep sedimentary basins is supported by outcrop analogue studies since reservoir characteristics are strongly related to the sedimentary facies and thus influence the basic direction of geothermal field development and applied technology (Sass & Götz, 2012). Petro- and thermophysical rock properties are key parameters in geothermal reservoir characterization and the data gained from outcrop samples serve to understand the reservoir system. New data from the Meso- and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of Budapest include carbonates and siliciclastics of Triassic, Eocene, Oligocene and Miocene age, exposed on the western side of the river Danube in the Buda Hills (Götz et al., 2014). Field and laboratory analyses revealed distinct horizons of different geothermal potential and thus, enable to identify and interpret corresponding exploration target horizons in geothermal prone depths in the Budapest region as well as in the Hungarian sub-basins of the Pannonian Basins System (Zala and Danube basins, Great Plain) exhibiting geothermal anomalies. References Götz, A.E., Török, Á., Sass, I., 2014. Geothermal reservoir characteristics of Meso- and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks of Budapest (Hungary). German Journal of Geosciences, 165, 487-493. Sass, I., Götz, A.E., 2012. Geothermal reservoir characterization: a thermofacies concept. Terra Nova, 24, 142-147.

  19. Exploring the opioid system by gene knockout

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brigitte L Kieffer; Claire Gavériaux-Ruff

    2002-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system consists of three opioid peptide precursor genes encoding enkephalins (preproenkephalin, Penk), dynorphins (preprodynorphin, Pdyn) and ?-endorphin (?end), proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and three receptor genes encoding mu-opiod receptor (MOR), delta-opiod receptor (DOR) and kappa-opiod receptor (KOR). In the past years, all six genes have been inactivated in mice by homologous recombination. The analysis of spontaneous behavior in mutant

  20. Secure Multiparty AES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgård, Ivan; Keller, Marcel

    We propose several variants of a secure multiparty computation protocol for AES encryption. The best variant requires 2200 + {{400}over{255}} expected elementary operations in expected 70 + {{20}over{255}} rounds to encrypt one 128-bit block with a 128-bit key. We implemented the variants using VIFF, a software framework for implementing secure multiparty computation (MPC). Tests with three players (passive security against at most one corrupted player) in a local network showed that one block can be encrypted in 2 seconds. We also argue that this result could be improved by an optimized implementation.

  1. Matt Rogers on AES Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy and AES Energy Storage recently agreed to a $17.1M conditional loan guarantee commitment. This project will develop the first battery-based energy storage system to provide a more stable and efficient electrical grid for New York State's high-voltage transmission network. Matt Rogers is the Senior Advisor to the Secretary for Recovery Act Implementation.

  2. Picking a Planet, Exploring Our Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Chari

    2008-11-23

    It is the year 2025 and a large company, Z-Tech, wants to put a hotel in space having it orbit around one of the planets in our solar system. Our 5th grade class has been given a very important job. We have to search for the perfect location for the hotel. Our job is to report back to the company with the planet that is the best place for an orbiting hotel. The Task: You are to write a report recommending which planet should be chosen. Your report should include pictures of the planet you recommended. Here are the questions you should answer in order to report back to Z-Tech with your recommendation. * Which planet will be the ...

  3. Power System for Venus Surface Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Mellott, Kenneth

    2002-01-01

    A radioisotope power and cooling system is designed to provide electrical power for a probe operating on the surface of Venus. Most foreseeable electronics devices and sensors cannot operate at the 450 C ambient surface temperature of Venus. Because the mission duration is substantially long and the use of thermal mass to maintain an operable temperature range is likely impractical, some type of active refrigeration may be required to keep electronic components at a temperature below ambient. The fundamental cooling parameters are the cold sink temperature, the hot sink temperature, and the amount of heat to be removed. In this instance, it is anticipated that electronics would have a nominal operating temperature of 300 C. Due to the highly thermal convective nature of the high-density (90 bar CO2) atmosphere, the hot sink temperature was assumed to be 50 C, which provided a 500 C temperature of the cooler's heat rejecter to the ambient atmosphere. The majority of the heat load on the cooler is from the high temperature ambient surface environment on Venus, with a small contribution of heat generation from electronics and sensors. Both thermoelectric (RTG) and dynamic power conversion systems were analyzed, based on use of a standard isotope (General-purpose heat source, or GPHS) brick. For the radioisotope Stirling power converter configuration designed, the Sage model predicts a thermodynamic power output capacity of 478.1 watts, which slightly exceeds the required 469.1 watts. The hot sink temperature is 1200 C, and the cold sink temperature is 500 C. The required heat input is 1740 watts. This gives a thermodynamic efficiency of 27.48 %. It is estimated that the mechanical efficiency of the power converter design is on the order of 85 %, based on experimental measurements taken from 500-watt power class, laboratory-tested Stirling engines. The overall efficiency is calculated to be 23.36 %. The mass of the power converter is estimated at approximately 21.6 kg. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  4. ADVANCED RADIOISOTOPE HEAT SOURCE AND PROPULSION SYSTEMS FOR PLANETARY EXPLORATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. E. Werner

    2010-09-01

    The exploration of planetary surfaces and atmospheres may be enhanced by increasing the range and mobility of a science platform. Fundamentally, power production and availability of resources are limiting factors that must be considered for all science and exploration missions. A novel power and propulsion system is considered and discussed with reference to a long-range Mars surface exploration mission with in-situ resource utilization. Significance to applications such as sample return missions is also considered. Key material selections for radioisotope encapsulation techniques are presented.

  5. Solar System Exploration Augmented by In-Situ Resource Utilization: Human Mercury and Saturn Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan

    2015-01-01

    Human and robotic missions to Mercury and Saturn are presented and analyzed. Unique elements of the local planetary environments are discussed and included in the analyses and assessments. Using historical studies of space exploration, in-situ resource utilization (ISRU), and industrialization all point to the vastness of natural resources in the solar system. Advanced propulsion benefitted from these resources in many way. While advanced propulsion systems were proposed in these historical studies, further investigation of nuclear options using high power nuclear thermal and nuclear pulse propulsion as well as advanced chemical propulsion can significantly enhance these scenarios. Updated analyses based on these historical visions will be presented. Nuclear thermal propulsion and ISRU enhanced chemical propulsion landers are assessed for Mercury missions. At Saturn, nuclear pulse propulsion with alternate propellant feed systems and Titan exploration with chemical propulsion options are discussed.

  6. Multiple-Agent Air/Ground Autonomous Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Wolfgang; Chao, Tien-Hsin; Tarbell, Mark; Dohm, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous systems of multiple-agent air/ground robotic units for exploration of the surfaces of remote planets are undergoing development. Modified versions of these systems could be used on Earth to perform tasks in environments dangerous or inaccessible to humans: examples of tasks could include scientific exploration of remote regions of Antarctica, removal of land mines, cleanup of hazardous chemicals, and military reconnaissance. A basic system according to this concept (see figure) would include a unit, suspended by a balloon or a blimp, that would be in radio communication with multiple robotic ground vehicles (rovers) equipped with video cameras and possibly other sensors for scientific exploration. The airborne unit would be free-floating, controlled by thrusters, or tethered either to one of the rovers or to a stationary object in or on the ground. Each rover would contain a semi-autonomous control system for maneuvering and would function under the supervision of a control system in the airborne unit. The rover maneuvering control system would utilize imagery from the onboard camera to navigate around obstacles. Avoidance of obstacles would also be aided by readout from an onboard (e.g., ultrasonic) sensor. Together, the rover and airborne control systems would constitute an overarching closed-loop control system to coordinate scientific exploration by the rovers.

  7. Scientific Assessment of NASA's Solar System Exploration Roadmap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    At its June 24-28, 1996, meeting, the Space Studies Board's Committee on Planetary and Lunar Exploration (COMPLEX), chaired by Ronald Greeley of Arizona State University, conducted an assessment of NASA's Mission to the Solar System Roadmap report. This assessment was made at the specific request of Dr. Jurgen Rahe, NASA's science program director for solar system exploration. The assessment includes consideration of the process by which the Roadmap was developed, comparison of the goals and objectives of the Roadmap with published National Research Council (NRC) recommendations, and suggestions for improving the Roadmap.

  8. Advanced Ion Propulsion Technology for Solar System Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John R. Brophy

    This paper describes the examination ofadvanced solar electric propulsion technologies to determine their potential benefits for projected nearandmid-term solar system exploration missions. The advanced technologies include high performancederivatives of the technology, quarter-scale NSTAR systems, and direct-drive Hall-effect thrusterwith anode layer systems and are compared to a baseline represented by the ion propulsion systemtill fly on DS1. The results of this

  9. Pipe Explorer{sup {trademark}} system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system, developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center, has been used to transport various characterizing sensors into piping systems that have been radiologically contaminated. DOE`s nuclear facility decommissioning program must characterize radiological contamination inside piping systems before the pipe can be recycled, remediated, or disposed. Historically, this has been attempted using hand-held survey instrumentation, surveying only the accessible exterior portions of pipe systems. Various measuring difficulties, and in some cases, the inability to measure threshold surface contamination values and worker exposure, and physical access constraints have limited the effectiveness of traditional survey approaches. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system provides a viable alternative.

  10. Nuclear power systems for lunar and Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.; Bozek, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Initial studies of a variety of mission scenarios for the new Space Exploration Initiative, and the technologies necessary to enable or significantly enhance them, have identified the development of advanced space power systems whether solar, chemical or nuclear to be of prime importance. Lightweight, compact, reliable power systems for planetary rovers and a variety of surface vehicles, utility surface power, and power for advanced propulsion systems have been identified as critical needs for these missions. These mission scenarios, the concomitant power system requirements, and the power system options considered are discussed. The significant potential benefits of nuclear power are identified for meeting the power needs of the above applications.

  11. Nuclear power systems for lunar and Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovie, R. J.; Bozek, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Initial studies of a variety of mission scenarios for the new Space Exploration Initiative, and the technologies necessary to enable or significantly enhance them, have identified the development of advanced space power systems whether solar, chemical or nuclear to be of prime importance. Lightweight, compact, reliable power systems for planetary rovers and a variety of surface vehicles, utility surface power, and power for advanced propulsion systems have been identified as critical needs for these missions. These mission scenarios, the concomitant power system requirements, and power system options considered are discussed. The significant potential benefits of nuclear power are identified for meeting the power needs of the above applications.

  12. Radioisotope-based Nuclear Power Strategy for Exploration Systems Development

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, George R.; Houts, Michael G. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Nuclear power will play an important role in future exploration efforts. Its benefits pertain to practically all the different timeframes associated with the Exploration Vision, from robotic investigation of potential lunar landing sites to long-duration crewed missions on the lunar surface. However, the implementation of nuclear technology must follow a logical progression in capability that meets but does not overwhelm the power requirements for the missions in each exploration timeframe. It is likely that the surface power infrastructure, particularly for early missions, will be distributed in nature. Thus, nuclear sources will have to operate in concert with other types of power and energy storage systems, and must mesh well with the power architectures envisioned for each mission phase. Most importantly, they must demonstrate a clear advantage over other non-nuclear options (e.g., solar power, fuel cells) for their particular function. This paper describes a strategy that does this in the form of three sequential system developments. It begins with use of radioisotope generators currently under development, and applies the power conversion technology developed for these units to the design of a simple, robust reactor power system. The products from these development efforts would eventually serve as the foundation for application of nuclear power systems for exploration of Mars and beyond.

  13. Ottoman Archives Explorer: A Retrieval System for Digital Ottoman Archives

    E-print Network

    Güdükbay, Ugur

    for printed and handwritten historical documents. Several methods for character segmentation and recognition; graphics recognition and interpre- tation; optical character recognition; scanning; I.5.1 [Pattern presents Ottoman Archives Explorer, a Content-Based Retrieval (CBR) system based on character recognition

  14. Information technology aided exploration of system design spaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Kiper, James D.; Kalafat, Selcuk

    2004-01-01

    We report on a practical application of information technology techniques to aid system engineers effectively explore large design spaces. We make use of heuristic search, visualization and data mining, the combination of which we have implemented wtihin a risk management tool in use at JPL and NASA.

  15. 3D Laser Scanner for Tele-exploration Robotic Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kai Pervolz; Hartmut Surmann; Stefan May

    Much work has been done on the development of sophisticated sensors for mobile robotics but in the field of tele-exploration simple camera based systems are dominating. Therefore we developed a continuous rotating 3D laser scanner with a camera which fits the requirements of this field very well. Due to its design concept it is easy to integrate on many mobile

  16. Overview of NASA's Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program includes the Orion, Altair, and Lunar Surface Systems project offices. The first two elements, Orion and Altair, are manned space vehicles while the third element is broader and includes several sub-elements including Rovers and a Lunar Habitat. The upcoming planned missions involving these systems and vehicles include several risks and design challenges. Due to the unique thermal environment, many of these risks and challenges are associated with the vehicles' thermal control system. NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) includes the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP). ETDP consists of several technology development projects. The project chartered with mitigating the aforementioned risks and design challenges is the Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project. The risks and design challenges are addressed through a rigorous technology development process that culminates with an integrated thermal control system test. The resulting hardware typically has a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of six. This paper summarizes the development efforts being performed by the technology development project. The development efforts involve heat acquisition and heat rejection hardware including radiators, heat exchangers, and evaporators. The project has also been developing advanced phase change material heat sinks and performing assessments for thermal control system fluids.

  17. Explore

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Created "to champion the selfless acts of others" and "to create a portal into the soul of humanity" the Explore website was created in part with support from the Annenberg Foundation. On this website, visitors can view films that cover themes such as animal rights, poverty, the environment, and spirituality. Clicking on the "Films" tab brings up a grid of recently added films, complete with another section that divides them up by "Places" and Causes". The films range in length from a two to thirty minutes, and visitors can also create their own playlist of films for their own use. Some of the more recently added films of note include "Fish Out of Water" and "Gorillas 98.6% Human". Also, visitors can connect with other parties by using the "Discussions" section to talk about travel, philanthropy, or filmmaking. The "Minds" area features profiles of the filmmakers and others profiled throughout the site, and visitors can filter them by countries and causes.

  18. Visualization of Computer Architecture Simulation Data for System-level Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Visualization of Computer Architecture Simulation Data for System-level Design Space Exploration and design space exploration of multi-core embedded systems. Our results show that our multivariate space. Keywords: Computer architecture simulation, design space exploration, exploratory visualization

  19. Mars Exploration Rover: thermal design is a system engineering activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsuyuki, Glenn T.; Avila, Arturo; Awaya, Henry I.; Krylo, Robert; Novak, Keith; Phillips, Charles

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), were launched in June and July of 2003, repsectively and successfully landed on Mars in early and late January of 2004, repectively. The flight system architecture implemented many successful features of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) system: A cruise stage that transported an entry vehicle that housed the Lander, which in turn, used airbags to cushion the Rover during the landing event.

  20. Architectural exploration and optimization of local memory in embedded systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preeti Ranjan Panda; Nikil D. Dutt; Alexandru Nicolau

    1997-01-01

    Embedded processor-based systems allow for the tailoring of the on-chip memory architecture based on application-specific requirements. We present an analytical strategy for exploring the on-chip memory architecture for a given application, based on a memory performance estimation scheme. The analytical technique has the important advantage of enabling a fast evaluation of candidate memory architectures in the early stages of system

  1. A Modular Robotic System with Applications to Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancher, Matthew D.; Hornby, Gregory S.

    2006-01-01

    Modular robotic systems offer potential advantages as versatile, fault-tolerant, cost-effective platforms for space exploration, but a sufficiently mature system is not yet available. We describe the possible applications of such a system, and present prototype hardware intended as a step in the right direction. We also present elements of an automated design and optimization framework aimed at making modular robots easier to design and use, and discuss the results of applying the system to a gait optimization problem. Finally, we discuss the potential near-term applications of modular robotics to terrestrial robotics research.

  2. Power system requirements and selection for the space exploration initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Biringer, K.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Bartine, D.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Buden, D. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Foreman, J. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)); Harrison, S. (Strategic Defense Initiative Organization, Washington, DC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) seeks to reestablish a US program of manned and unmanned space exploration. The President has called for a program which includes a space station element, a manned habitation of the moon, and a human exploration of Mars. The NASA Synthesis Group has developed four significantly different architectures for the SEI program. One key element of a space exploration effort is the power required to support the missions. The Power Speciality Team of the Synthesis Group was tasked with assessing and evaluating the power requirements and candidate power technologies for such missions. Inputs to the effort came from existing NASA studies as well as other governments agency inputs such as those from DOD and DOE. In addition, there were industry and university briefings and results of solicitations from the AIAA and the general public as part of the NASA outreach effort. Because of the variety of power needs in the SEI program, there will be a need for multiple power system technologies including solar, nuclear and electrochemical. Due to the high rocket masses required to propel payloads to the moon and beyond to Mars, there is great emphasis placed on the need for high power density and high energy density systems. Power system technology development work is needed results will determine the ultimate technology selections. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  3. Exploring the Art and Science of Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansma, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    There has been much discussion of late in the NASA systems engineering community about the fact that systems engineering cannot be just about process and technical disciplines. The belief is that there is both an art and science to systems engineering, and that both aspects are necessary for designing and implementing a successful system or mission. How does one go about differentiating between and characterizing these two aspects? Some say that the art of systems engineering is about designing systems that not only function well, but that are also elegant, beautiful and engaging. What does that mean? How can you tell when a system has been designed with that holistic "art" component? This paper attempts to answer these questions by exploring various ways of looking at the Art and Science of Systems Engineering.

  4. A method for tradespace exploration of systems of systems

    E-print Network

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati

    2009-01-01

    Systems of Systems (SoS) are a current focus of many organizations interested in integrating assets and utilizing new technology to create multi-component systems that deliver value over time. The dynamic composition of ...

  5. Some performance tests of a microarea AES. [Auger Electron Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todd, G.; Poppa, H.

    1978-01-01

    An Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) system which has a submicron analysis capability is described. The system provides secondary electron imaging, as well as micro- and macro-area AES. The resolution of the secondary electron image of an oxidized Al contact pad on a charge-coupled device chip indicates a primary beam size of about 1000 A. For Auger mapping, a useful resolution of about 4000 A is reported

  6. Data explorer: a prototype expert system for statistical analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Aliferis, C.; Chao, E.; Cooper, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    The inadequate analysis of medical research data, due mainly to the unavailability of local statistical expertise, seriously jeopardizes the quality of new medical knowledge. Data Explorer is a prototype Expert System that builds on the versatility and power of existing statistical software, to provide automatic analyses and interpretation of medical data. The system draws much of its power by using belief network methods in place of more traditional, but difficult to automate, classical multivariate statistical techniques. Data Explorer identifies statistically significant relationships among variables, and using power-size analysis, belief network inference/learning and various explanatory techniques helps the user understand the importance of the findings. Finally the system can be used as a tool for the automatic development of predictive/diagnostic models from patient databases. PMID:8130501

  7. Solar system exploration technology requirements and planning process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stetson, Douglas; Varsi, Giulio

    1995-10-01

    The NASA Office of Space Science, in alliance with the Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology, has developed an Integrated Technology Strategy to guide its investments in technology for space science missions. This strategy establishes goals and strategic objectives that ensure that NASA and the nation derive the greatest possible scientific and economic benefits from investments in space science missions and technologies. Within the Office of Space Science, the Solar System Exploration Division, in collaboration with the Office of Space Access and Technology, is developing a Technology Plan to implement these goals and to identify specific technology needs for solar system missions. This paper describes the philosophy, processes, and preliminary results of the systematic process being established for the identification and prioritization of solar system exploration technology needs.

  8. Simulation Based Acquisition for NASA's Office of Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joe

    2004-01-01

    In January 2004, President George W. Bush unveiled his vision for NASA to advance U.S. scientific, security, and economic interests through a robust space exploration program. This vision includes the goal to extend human presence across the solar system, starting with a human return to the Moon no later than 2020, in preparation for human exploration of Mars and other destinations. In response to this vision, NASA has created the Office of Exploration Systems (OExS) to develop the innovative technologies, knowledge, and infrastructures to explore and support decisions about human exploration destinations, including the development of a new Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Within the OExS organization, NASA is implementing Simulation Based Acquisition (SBA), a robust Modeling & Simulation (M&S) environment integrated across all acquisition phases and programs/teams, to make the realization of the President s vision more certain. Executed properly, SBA will foster better informed, timelier, and more defensible decisions throughout the acquisition life cycle. By doing so, SBA will improve the quality of NASA systems and speed their development, at less cost and risk than would otherwise be the case. SBA is a comprehensive, Enterprise-wide endeavor that necessitates an evolved culture, a revised spiral acquisition process, and an infrastructure of advanced Information Technology (IT) capabilities. SBA encompasses all project phases (from requirements analysis and concept formulation through design, manufacture, training, and operations), professional disciplines, and activities that can benefit from employing SBA capabilities. SBA capabilities include: developing and assessing system concepts and designs; planning manufacturing, assembly, transport, and launch; training crews, maintainers, launch personnel, and controllers; planning and monitoring missions; responding to emergencies by evaluating effects and exploring solutions; and communicating across the OExS enterprise, within the Government, and with the general public. The SBA process features empowered collaborative teams (including industry partners) to integrate requirements, acquisition, training, operations, and sustainment. The SBA process also utilizes an increased reliance on and investment in M&S to reduce design risk. SBA originated as a joint Industry and Department of Defense (DoD) initiative to define and integrate an acquisition process that employs robust, collaborative use of M&S technology across acquisition phases and programs. The SBA process was successfully implemented in the Air Force s Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) Program.

  9. 2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey First, we have a few questions about your education at Washington University.

    E-print Network

    Subramanian, Venkat

    Page 1 2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey First-Dual Degree).nmlkj Other (please specify)nmlkj #12;Page 2 2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey2009 Alumni/ae Survey 3. During your undergraduate education at Washington University

  10. NASA's Space Launch System: An Enabling Capability for International Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creech, Stephen D.; May, Todd A.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2014-01-01

    As the program moves out of the formulation phase and into implementation, work is well underway on NASA's new Space Launch System, the world's most powerful launch vehicle, which will enable a new era of human exploration of deep space. As assembly and testing of the rocket is taking place at numerous sites around the United States, mission planners within NASA and at the agency's international partners continue to evaluate utilization opportunities for this ground-breaking capability. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, the SLS rocket will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), equipment, supplies, and major science missions for exploration and discovery. NASA is developing this new capability in an austere economic climate, a fact which has inspired the SLS team to find innovative solutions to the challenges of designing, developing, fielding, and operating the largest rocket in history, via a path that will deliver an initial 70 metric ton (t) capability in December 2017 and then continuing through an incremental evolutionary strategy to reach a full capability greater than 130 t. SLS will be enabling for the first missions of human exploration beyond low Earth in almost half a century, and from its first crewed flight will be able to carry humans farther into space than they have ever voyaged before. In planning for the future of exploration, the International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has created the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths toward a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for these destinations. SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they would need for such missions.

  11. The binarity of Herbig Ae/Be stars observed with Adaptive Optics and spectroscopy. A study of the triple system TY CrA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corporon, Patrice

    1998-03-01

    Multiplicity is a major issue in stellar astrophysics. Firstly, any stellar formation theory must explain the large abundance of multiple systems among Main Sequence and young low-mass T Tauri stars. Secondly, binary studies allow the direct determination of physical parameters. In the case of Herbig Ae/Be (HAeBe) stars, the binarity status is not well known; furthermore, direct mass determination are required to test stellar evolution models for these young intermediate mass objects. The first part of the thesis presents the results of a systematic search for HAeBe binaries in both hemispheres. Two complementary techniques were used to cover a large range of orbital period P: high angular resolution imaging with Adaptive Optics (AO) (binary separation ? between 0.12'' and few arcseconds, i.e. P ? many years), and high resolution visible spectroscopy to study short orbital period (P ?few hours to few months). Among the 68 HAeBe stars observed with ADONIS--ESO and PUEO--CFH AO instruments, 30 binaries (18 discovered) have been detected. 42 HAeBe stars have been surveyed with the CES--ESO and 'ELODIE, AURéLIE--OHP spectrographs. Radial velocity variations were found in 7 targets (4 are new spectroscopic binaries, 3 d. < P < 166 d.). In addition, the 7Li 6 708 Å absorption line (absent feature in simple HAeBe stars spectra) indicates the presence of a cooler companion in 6 HAeBe spectrum binaries, 4 of which are new detections. The observed visual binary frequency for HAeBe stars is of the order of 50%. For short period spectroscopic binaries (P < 100 days), the observed frequency is about 10%. Considering observational bias effects, these estimates are regarded as lower limits for the true HAeBe binary frequency. Based on our multi-color AO images, spectral types of twenty-two visual companions have been determined. A trend is found such that companions of Ae stars are low-mass T Tauri stars (spectral type K--M), while companions of Be stars are intermediate mass stars (A--F). Companions usually have no infrared excess, nor do primaries with massive companions. Furthermore, X-ray emission in some HAeBe stars may well be explained by the presence of a T Tauri companion. However, because of bias effects, great care must be taken about these issues, and complementary observations are needed. Our observations provide clues for binary formation theories, but while fragmentation and capture via a circumstellar disk seem plausible mechanisms, disk instabilities and stellar capture scenarios cannot be ruled out. The second part of the thesis is devoted to the study of TY CrA, the unique triple spectroscopic system among Herbig Ae/Be stars. We found this previously known eclipsing binary to be also a spectroscopic binary of SB2 type (P = 2.9 days), and we obtained the first direct mass determination of an HAeBe star. The orbital motion of a third companion around the central binary has been monitored, and a complete dynamical model of the triple system has been made. Our theoretical investigations show that the stability of the hierarchical system is insured by tidal effects inside the central eclipsing binary. To explain the puzzling subsynchroneous rotation of the primary star, a peculiar orientation, in which the primary is seen pole-on and its rotational axis is perpendicular to its orbital axis, is proposed. The circumstellar environment of TY CrA has been studied. SWS, LWS--ISO data show polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions (some of them never observed from the ground in TY CrA), and O sc i 63, 146 microns and [C II] 158 micron emission lines. These features may well be explained by the presence of a compact HII region and a photodissociation region associated with TY CrA. Adaptive Optics images in the near infrared obtained with and without coronograph show that the dusty environment must be confined very close to the star (< 0.5'' = 65 AU at 130pc).

  12. ERP System Implementation: An Oil and Gas Exploration Sector Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Alok; Mishra, Deepti

    Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems provide integration and optimization of various business processes which leads to improved planning and decision quality, smoother coordination between business units resulting in higher efficiency, and quicker response time to customer demands and inquiries. This paper reports challenges, opportunities and outcome of ERP implementation in Oil & Gas exploration sector. This study will facilitate in understanding transition, constraints and implementation of ERP in this sector and also provide guidelines from lessons learned in this regard.

  13. Local memory exploration and optimization in embedded systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Preeti Ranjan Panda; Nikil D. Dutt; Alexandru Nicolau

    1999-01-01

    Embedded processor-based systems allow for the tailoring of the on-chip memory architecture based on application specific requirements. We present an analytical strategy for exploring the on-chip memory architecture for a given application, based on a memory performance estimation scheme. The analytical technique has the important advantage of enabling a fast evaluation of candidate memory architectures in the early stages of

  14. Design space exploration for multiprocessor-based embedded systems 

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Debashis

    2001-01-01

    DESIGN SPACE EXPLORATION FOR MULTIPROCESSOR-BASED EMBEDDED SYSTEMS A Thesis by DEBASHIS MOHANTY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... of processor model. One is the hardware model where the processor's functionality described at gale-level is mapped onto a FPGA. The visibility of internal states is very low in this method. Other one replaces the processor with a software description...

  15. Cachetiming attacks on AES Daniel J. Bernstein #

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Cache­timing attacks on AES Daniel J. Bernstein # Department of Mathematics, Statistics@cr.yp.to Abstract. This paper demonstrates complete AES key recovery from known­plaintext timings of a network server on another computer. This attack should be blamed on the AES design, not on the particular AES

  16. Framework for the Parametric System Modeling of Space Exploration Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komar, David R.; Hoffman, Jim; Olds, Aaron D.; Seal, Mike D., II

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology for performing architecture definition and assessment prior to, or during, program formulation that utilizes a centralized, integrated architecture modeling framework operated by a small, core team of general space architects. This framework, known as the Exploration Architecture Model for IN-space and Earth-to-orbit (EXAMINE), enables: 1) a significantly larger fraction of an architecture trade space to be assessed in a given study timeframe; and 2) the complex element-to-element and element-to-system relationships to be quantitatively explored earlier in the design process. Discussion of the methodology advantages and disadvantages with respect to the distributed study team approach typically used within NASA to perform architecture studies is presented along with an overview of EXAMINE s functional components and tools. An example Mars transportation system architecture model is used to demonstrate EXAMINE s capabilities in this paper. However, the framework is generally applicable for exploration architecture modeling with destinations to any celestial body in the solar system.

  17. The BS degree in Earth and Space Exploration, Concentration in Exploration Systems Design requires the following core courses

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    the following core courses: SES 100 Introduction to Exploration (3) SES 101 Earth, Solar System, and Universe I (3) SES 102 Earth, Solar System, and Universe II (3) SES 103 Earth, Solar System, and Universe Laboratory I (1) SES 104 Earth, Solar System, and Universe Laboratory II (1) SES 210 Engineering Systems (3

  18. P:\\procedure\\UAVP#19 Page 1 of 2 TITLE FILING SYSTEM OF DOCUMENTATION FOR MAJOR BT PROJECTS (A/E & CM)

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    The following documentation is to be filed in the Contract File Folder in the UAVP office: a. Draft of A/E & CM Program through to the Contract within the Office of the University Architect & Vice President (UAVP Contracts along w/any comments from General Counsel b. Original Contract w/cover letter to firm c

  19. Gravity waves in the thermosphere observed by the AE satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, S. H.; Reber, C. A.; Huang, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    Atmospheric Explorer (AE) satellite data were used to investigate the spectra characteristics of wave-like structure observed in the neutral and ionized components of the thermosphere. Power spectral analysis derived by the maximum entropy method indicate the existence of a broad spectrum of scale sizes for the fluctuations ranging from tens to thousands of kilometers.

  20. Related-key Cryptanalysis of the Full AES-192 and AES-256

    E-print Network

    Related-key Cryptanalysis of the Full AES-192 and AES-256 Alex Biryukov and Dmitry Khovratovich University of Luxembourg Abstract. In this paper we present two related-key attacks on the full AES. For AES higher complexity. The second attack is the first cryptanalysis of the full AES-192. Both our attacks

  1. Design Space Exploration of incompletely specified Embedded Systems by Genetic Algorithms

    E-print Network

    Huss, Sorin A.

    Design Space Exploration of incompletely specified Embedded Systems by Genetic Algorithms Stephan design space exploration algorithm, which jointly determines a complete set of Pareto optimal for new modules in a single optimization run. This design space exploration method is based

  2. Enabling Solar System Exploration with Small Radioisotope Power Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. D. Abelson; T. S. Balint; H. Noravian; J. E. Randolph; C. Satter; G. R. Schmidt; J. H. Shirley

    2005-01-01

    The increased use of smaller spacecraft over the last decade, in combination with studies of potential science applications, has suggested that a wide range of low power missions and applications could be enabled by a new generation of conceptual small radioisotope power systems with power levels in the range of 20 mW to a few 10's of watts. Such systems

  3. Enabling Exploration Through the International Docking System Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, Caris A.

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration missions beyond low earth orbit will likely require international cooperation in order to leverage limited resources. International standards can help enable cooperative missions by providing well understood, predefined interfaces allowing compatibility between unique spacecraft and systems. The International Space Station (ISS) partnership has developed a publically available International Docking System Standard (IDSS) that provides a solution to one of these key interfaces by defining a common docking interface. The docking interface provides a way for even dissimilar spacecraft to dock for exchange of crew and cargo, as well as enabling the assembly of large space systems. This paper provides an overview of the key attributes of the IDSS, an overview of the NASA Docking System (NDS), and the plans for updating the ISS with IDSS compatible interfaces. The NDS provides a state of the art, low impact docking system that will initially be made available to commercial crew and cargo providers. The ISS will be used to demonstrate the operational utility of the IDSS interface as a foundational technology for cooperative exploration.

  4. NASA's RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set. Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could support NASA's RPS technology development planning, and provide an understanding of fuel need trades over the next three decades.

  5. NASA'S RPS Design Reference Mission Set for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's 2006 Solar System Exploration (SSE) Strategic Roadmap identified a set of proposed large Flagship, medium New Frontiers and small Discovery class missions, addressing key exploration objectives. These objectives respond to the recommendations by the National Research Council (NRC), reported in the SSE Decadal Survey. The SSE Roadmap is down-selected from an over-subscribed set of missions, called the SSE Design Reference Mission (DRM) set Missions in the Flagship and New Frontiers classes can consider Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs), while small Discovery class missions are not permitted to use them, due to cost constraints. In line with the SSE DRM set and the SSE Roadmap missions, the RPS DRM set represents a set of missions, which can be enabled or enhanced by RPS technologies. At present, NASA has proposed the development of two new types of RPSs. These are the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), with static power conversion; and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG), with dynamic conversion. Advanced RPSs, under consideration for possible development, aim to increase specific power levels. In effect, this would either increase electric power generation for the same amount of fuel, or reduce fuel requirements for the same power output, compared to the proposed MMRTG or SRG. Operating environments could also influence the design, such that an RPS on the proposed Titan Explorer would use smaller fins to minimize heat rejection in the extreme cold environment; while the Venus Mobile Explorer long-lived in-situ mission would require the development of a new RPS, in order to tolerate the extreme hot environment, and to simultaneously provide active cooling to the payload and other electric components. This paper discusses NASA's SSE RPS DRM set, in line with the SSE DRM set. It gives a qualitative assessment regarding the impact of various RPS technology and configuration options on potential mission architectures, which could support NASA's RPS technology development planning, and provide an understanding of fuel need trades over the next three decades.

  6. Overview of NASA's Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephan, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    The now-cancelled Constellation Program included the Orion, Altair, and Lunar Surface Systems project offices. The first two elements, Orion and Altair, were planned to be manned space vehicles while the third element was much more diverse and included several sub-elements. Among other things, these sub-elements were Rovers and a Lunar Habitat. The planned missions involving these systems and vehicles included several risks and design challenges. Due to the unique thermal operating environment, many of these risks and challenges were associated with the vehicles thermal control system. NASA s Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) consisted of various technology development projects. The project chartered with mitigating the aforementioned thermal risks and design challenges was the Thermal Control System Development for Exploration Project. These risks and design challenges were being addressed through a rigorous technology development process that was planned to culminate with an integrated thermal control system test. Although the technologies being developed were originally aimed towards mitigating specific Constellation risks, the technology development process is being continued within a new program. This continued effort is justified by the fact that many of the technologies are generically applicable to future spacecraft thermal control systems. The current paper summarizes the development efforts being performed by the technology development project. The development efforts involve heat acquisition and heat rejection hardware including radiators, heat exchangers, and evaporators. The project has also been developing advanced phase change material heat sinks and performing a material compatibility assessment for a promising thermal control system working fluid. The to-date progress and lessons-learned from these development efforts will be discussed throughout the paper.

  7. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie; DeVera, Jean; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Nik; Steele, John; Gazda, Daniel; Roberts, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), also known as Orion, will ferry a crew of up to six astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), or a crew of up to four astronauts to the moon. The first launch of CEV is scheduled for approximately 2014. A stored water system on the CEV will supply the crew with potable water for various purposes: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain quality of the water transferred from the Orbiter to the ISS and stored in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs). In the CEV water system, the ionic silver biocide is expected to be depleted from solution due to ionic silver plating onto the surfaces of the materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Since the biocide depletion is expected to occur within a short amount of time after loading the water into the CEV water tanks at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), an additional microbial control is a 0.1 micron point of use filter that will be used at the outlet of the Potable Water Dispenser (PWD). Because this may be the first time NASA is considering a stored water system for longterm missions that does not maintain a residual biocide, a team of experts in materials compatibility, biofilms and point of use filters, surface treatment and coatings, and biocides has been created to pinpoint concerns and perform testing to help alleviate those concerns related to the CEV water system. Results from the test plans laid out in the paper presented to SAE last year (Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Coordination, 2008012083) will be detailed in this paper. Additionally, recommendations for the CEV verification will be described for risk mitigation in meeting the physicochemical and microbiological requirements on the CEV PWS.

  8. Overview of an Integrated Medical System for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Sharmila; Rubin, David

    2013-01-01

    The Exploration Medical Capability (ExMC) element of the NASA Human Research Program (HRP) is charged with addressing the risk of unacceptable health and mission outcomes due to limitations of inflight medical capabilities. The Exploration Medical System Demonstration (EMSD) is a project within the ExMC element aimed at reducing this risk by improving the medical capabilities available for exploration missions. The EMSD project will demonstrate, on the ground and on ISS, the integration of several components felt to be essential to the delivery of medical care during long ]duration missions outside of low Earth orbit. The components of the EMSD include the electronic medical record, assisted medical procedure software, medical consumables tracking technology and RFID ] tagged consumables, video conferencing capability, ultrasound device and probes (ground demonstration only), peripheral biosensors, and the software to allow communication among the various components (middleware). This presentation seeks to inform our international partners of the goals and objectives of the EMSD and to foster collaboration opportunities related to this and future projects.

  9. Expert systems in exploration: can they be cost-effective

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, R.P.J.

    1987-05-01

    PROSPECTOR is the best-known application of an expert system in exploration. Others exist for gamma-ray well logging analysis but are in general company-restricted and not in the open literature. PROSPECTOR, however, is comprised of a large set of elegant subprograms, each designed for a specific goal - generally for hard minerals. The program is expensive, costly to run, and requires a mainframe (usually a LISP machine) for operation. Recently, a microcomputer-based version (u-PROSPECTOR) has become available, but it still follows the formal artificial intelligence (AI) syntax of PROSPECTOR. In the Remote Sensing Laboratory at Stanford, they have been experimenting with low-end ($100-$1000) AI programs. The development of these has been driven by (1) the explosion of availability of microcomputers and (2) the realization by developers that the marketplace has many more Fortran and C-language machines available than the dedicated (and expensive) LISP units. This paper will discuss those commercially available, low-priced AI shells as applied to several of the simplest exploration problems - spectral pattern recognition and texture in radar imagery - and extrapolate their usefulness to more complex decision-making steps in exploration practice.

  10. An inertial fusion propulsion scheme for solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammash, Terry; Galbraith, David L.

    1991-01-01

    The paper analyzes a novel fusion scheme that combines the favorable aspects of both inertial and magnetic confinement approaches as a propulsion device for potential application in solar system exploration. An appropriate set of equations for the plasma dynamics and the magnetic nozzle is used to assess the system's propulsive capability by applying the results to a round trip mission to Mars. It is found that such a device would allow a massive vehicle to make the journey in less than five months. It is shown that catalyzed deuterium-deuterium fuel results in a somewhat poorer propulsion performance than deuterium-tritium though at a significantly lower neutron production. The velocity increment generated by this system and the corresponding trip time are in excellent agreement with the predictions of Irving and Blum (1959).

  11. Quenches and crunchs: Does the system explore in aging the same part of the configuration space explored in equilibrium ?

    E-print Network

    Stefano Mossa; Giancarlo Ruocco; Francesco Sciortino; Piero Tartaglia

    2001-07-06

    Numerical studies are providing novel information on the physical processes associated to physical aging. The process of aging has been shown to consist in a slow process of explorations of deeper and deeper minima of the system potential energy surface. In this article we compare the properties of the basins explored in equilibrium with those explored during the aging process both for sudden temperature changes and for sudden density changes. We find that the hypothesis that during the aging process the system explores the part of the configuration space explored in equilibrium holds only for shallow quenches or for the early aging dynamics. At longer times, systematic deviations are observed. In the case of crunches, such deviations are much more apparent.

  12. Pipe Explorer{trademark} surveying system. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-06-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Chicago Operations Office and the DOE`s Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) developed a Large Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) at Argonne National Laboratory-East (ANL). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate potentially beneficial decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) technologies in comparison with current baseline technologies. The Pipe Explorer{trademark} system was developed by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. (SEA), Albuquerque, NM as a deployment method for transporting a variety of survey tools into pipes and ducts. Tools available for use with the system include alpha, beta and gamma radiation detectors; video cameras; and pipe locator beacons. Different versions of this technology have been demonstrated at three other sites; results of these demonstrations are provided in an earlier Innovative Technology Summary Report. As part of a D and D project, characterization radiological contamination inside piping systems is necessary before pipes can be recycled, remediated or disposed. This is usually done manually by surveying over the outside of the piping only, with limited effectiveness and risk of worker exposure. The pipe must be accessible to workers, and embedded pipes in concrete or in the ground would have to be excavated at high cost and risk of exposure to workers. The advantage of the Pipe Explorer is its ability to perform in-situ characterization of pipe internals.

  13. Mission architecture decision support system for robotic lunar exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, P.; Yung, K. L.

    2009-10-01

    It is common practice in the landing site decision process for planetary or lunar exploration to limit the choice of sites to locations that strictly meet the technical and safety requirements of the lander. The science objective is ultimately implemented within the operational requirements of the mission strategy. In this paper, we present a study that derives the technical requirements of the landing strategy by considering proposed landing sites. The study reviewed the objectives of the future robotic exploration of the Moon and proposed targets from the Apollo era to our time. Three types of strategies are defined, namely, rover missions, immobile landing stations, and impacting probes. The capabilities and restrictions of each system are taken into account and compared to the science objectives of the proposed landing sites. A Geographic Information System (GIS) with lunar datasets was developed and the methodology was implemented. The study concludes with a description of the resulting mission scenarios that were assigned to the targets. The technical requirements for each landing system to fulfil these scientific objectives are derived and the feasibility, based on the technological readiness, is discussed.

  14. Grading NASA's Solar System Exploration Program: A Midterm Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Committee on Assessing the Solar System Exploration Program has reviewed NASA's progress to date in implementing the recommendations made in the National Research Council's (NRC's) solar system exploration decadal survey covering the period 2003-2013, New Frontiers in the Solar System, and in its Mars Architecture report, Assessment of NASA s Mars Architecture 2007-2016. The committee assessed NASA's progress with respect to each individual recommendation in these two reports, assigning an academic-style grade, explaining the rationale for the grade and trend, and offering recommendations for improvement. The committee generally sought to develop recommendations in cases where it determined that the grade, the trend, or both were worrisome and that the achievement of a decadal survey recommendation would require some kind of corrective action on NASA's part. This usually meant that the committee sought to offer a recommendation when the grade was a "C" or lower. However, the committee did offer recommendations in connection with some higher grades when it believed that minor corrective action was possible and desirable. More importantly, the committee did not offer recommendations for some of the activities given lower grades, particularly in the enabling technologies area (Chapter 6), because the committee determined that only the restoration of funding and the development of a strategic technology development program would solve these problems.

  15. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for Space and Lunar Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Ray, Robert E.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2009-01-01

    NASA's newly named Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to mature and develop the avionic and processor technologies required to fulfill NASA's goals for future space and lunar exploration. Over the past year, multiple advancements have been made within each of the individual AAPS technology development tasks that will facilitate the success of the Constellation program elements. This paper provides a brief review of the project's recent technology advancements, discusses their application to Constellation projects, and addresses the project's plans for the coming year.

  16. (abstract) Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard

    1994-01-01

    AES is a low-cost analog of the TES downlooking modes. Because AES operates at ambient temperature, limb-viewing is not possible. The first flight of AES took place in April 1994 on the NASA P3B aircraft out of Wallops Island, VA. While planned as an engineering test flight, spectra were successfully acquired both over the Atlantic Ocean and the area of the Great Dismal Swamp on the Virginia-North Carolina border. At this writing (July 1994), a second series of flights on the NASA DC8 aircraft out of Ames RC,CA is in progress. By the time of the workshop, a third series using the NASA C130 should have been accomplished.

  17. Basic studies on hybrid wheat breeding : VIII. A new male sterility-fertility restoration system in common wheat utilizing the cytoplasms of Aegilops kotschyi and Ae. variabilis.

    PubMed

    Mukai, Y; Tsunewaki, K

    1979-07-01

    The nuclei of 12 common wheats (genome constitution AABBDD) were placed into the cytoplasms of Aegilops kotschyi and Ae. variabilis (both C(u)C(u)S(v)S(v)) by repeated backcrosses. Using these nucleus-cytoplasm hybrids, male sterility-fertility restoration relationship was investigated. Male sterility was expressed by these cytoplasms only in Slm, Splt and Mch. The other nine common wheat nuclei gave normal fertility against these cytoplasms. These cytoplasms were compared with the Triticum timopheevi cytoplasm that is now widely used in the hybrid wheat breeding program in order to investigate their effects on important agronomic traits of the 12 common wheats: The kotschyi and variabilis cytoplasms were as good as the timopheevi cytoplasm in this respect.The F1 hybrid between (kotschyi)- or (variabilis)-Splt and CS showed normal fertility. Segregation of the fertiles and steriles in their F2 generations followed the simple Mendelian fashion, i.e., 3 fertile?1 sterile. Thus, the fertility restoration in this case is mainly controlled by a single dominant gene which will be designated as Rfv1. To determine its location, ditelo-lBS and -lBL of CS were crossed as male parents to male sterile (kotschyi)- and (variabilis)-Splt. The F1 hybrids between the male sterile Spit's and CS ditelo-lBS became male fertile, while those between the male sterile Spit's and CS ditelo-lBL became completely male sterile. Thus, the location of the gene Rfv1 has been determined to be on the short arm of chromosome lB of CS. Furthermore, a close relationship between the fertility-restoring genes and the nucleolus organizer region was pointed out.Finally, the schemes of breeding the male sterile lines of a cultivar with these cytoplasms, and its maintainer line were formulated. The following two points were considered as the advantages of the present male sterility-fertility restoration system over that using the timopheevi cytoplasm in breeding hybrid wheat: (1) easier fertility restoration in F1 hybrids, and (2) no need of breeding the restorer line. PMID:24310337

  18. Number Systems This lab explores the binary, decimal, and hexadecimal number systems.

    E-print Network

    Clair, Bryan

    1 Lab #1 Number Systems PURPOSE This lab explores the binary, decimal, and hexadecimal number's position. Base 10 is called the decimal number system. #12;2 The natural system for computers is to use systems. Upon completion of this lab, students will be able to do the following: · Convert between

  19. Performance Assessment of the Exploration Water Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter. D. Layne; Tabb, David; Perry, Jay

    2008-01-01

    A new water recovery system architecture designed to fulfill the National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Space Exploration Policy has been tested at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This water recovery system architecture evolved from the current state-of-the-art system developed for the International Space Station (ISS). Through novel integration of proven technologies for air and water purification, this system promises to elevate existing system optimization. The novel aspect of the system is twofold. First, volatile organic compounds (VOC) are removed from the cabin air via catalytic oxidation in the vapor phase, prior to their absorption into the aqueous phase. Second, vapor compression distillation (VCD) technology processes the condensate and hygiene waste streams in addition to the urine waste stream. Oxidation kinetics dictate that removing VOCs from the vapor phase is more efficient. Treating the various waste streams by VCD reduces the load on the expendable ion exchange and adsorption media which follows, as well as the aqueous-phase catalytic oxidation process further downstream. This paper documents the results of testing this new architecture.

  20. A personal airbag system for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Sydney; de Weck, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    Airbag-based methods for crew impact attenuation have been highlighted as a potential simple, lightweight means of enabling safe land-landings for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, and the next generation of ballistic shaped spacecraft. To investigate the feasibility of this concept during a nominal 7.62 m/s Orion landing, a full-scale personal airbag system 24% lighter than the Orion baseline has been developed, and subjected to 38 drop tests on land. Through this effort, the system has demonstrated the ability to maintain the risk of injury to an occupant during a 7.85 m/s, 0° impact angle land-landing to within the NASA specified limit of 0.5%. In accomplishing this, the personal airbag system concept has been proven to be feasible. Moreover, the obtained test results suggest that by implementing anti-bottoming airbags to prevent direct contact between the system and the landing surface, the system performance during landings with 0° impact angles can be further improved, by at least a factor of two. Additionally, a series of drop tests from the nominal Orion impact angle of 30° indicated that severe injury risk levels would be sustained beyond impact velocities of 5 m/s. This is a result of the differential stroking of the airbags within the system causing a shearing effect between the occupant seat structure and the spacecraft floor, removing significant stroke from the airbags.

  1. Crew Exploration Vehicle Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuan, George; Peterson, Laurie J.; Vega, Leticia M.

    2010-01-01

    A stored water system on the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) will supply the crew with potable water for: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain the quality of the water, transferred from the orbiter to the International Space Station, stored in contingency water containers. In the CEV water system, a depletion of the ionic silver biocide is expected due to ionic silver-plating onto the surfaces of materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Because this may be the first time NASA is considering a stored water system for long-term missions that do not maintain a residual biocide, a team of experts in materials compatibility, biofilms and point-of-use filters, surface treatment and coatings, and biocides has been created to pinpoint concerns and perform the testing that will help alleviate concerns related to the CEV water system.

  2. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module...component of the Automated Export System (AES) (see, part 192, subpart B,...

  3. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module...component of the Automated Export System (AES) (see, part 192, subpart B,...

  4. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module...component of the Automated Export System (AES) (see, part 192, subpart B,...

  5. 19 CFR 4.76 - Procedures and responsibilities of carriers filing outbound vessel manifest information via the AES.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. 4.76 Section 4.76 Customs Duties...outbound vessel manifest information via the AES. (a) The sea carrier's module...component of the Automated Export System (AES) (see, part 192, subpart B,...

  6. Orbital Stability of Spacecraft Exploring Multiple Asteroid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Keaton; Marchis, F.; Bellerose, J.

    2011-05-01

    Space missions to study the composition and formation histories of multiple asteroid systems require the identification of safe orbits for the observing spacecraft. To identify regions of orbital stability, we developed an n-body simulation and Monte Carlo scheme to test a large selection of orbits around the components of multiple asteroid systems. Our n-body program integrates the equations of motion of the spacecraft, asteroid system components, and the sun for 20 days, taking into account solar radiation pressure on the spacecraft and modeling asteroids as systems of rigid points when their shape model is known. We utilized a Monte Carlo scheme to test the stability of polar and retrograde orbits from uniformly distributed starting positions with normally distributed tangential velocities around each component. We present preliminary results of simulations testing hundreds of thousands of polar and retrograde orbits around the components of the 2001 SN263 near-earth triple asteroid system, and the (90) Antiope doublet and (45) Eugenia triple systems in the main-belt. These systems are potential targets for several space mission concepts, including: the Amor mission to visit and land on the components of 2001 SN263, Jones et al. (LPSC 42, #2695, 2011), the Diversity mission to explore several asteroid systems including (45) Eugenia and (90) Antiope, Marchis et al. (LPSC 42, #2062, 2011), and the ASTER mission to visit a NEA multiple asteroid, Sukhanov et al. (Cosmic Research 48-5, p. 443-450, 2010). Analysis of stable regions in position and velocity may assist in planning scientific orbits and instrumental specifications for such missions.

  7. The application of spread-spectrum system in the area of remote space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fengyu; Wang, Xiaonan

    2009-12-01

    Following the great success of satellite application and aerospace engineering,China has formally startedup moon exploration project,in the future China will execute exploration of more remote object.In this paper, combining the development step of Chinese deep space exploration, the author introduces the current situation of deep exploration techniques home and abroad, meanwhile the author briefly compares the advantage and disadvantage of spread-spectrum deep exploration system and USB deep exploration system, and the author also briefly describes the important status of intending spread-spectrum deep exploration system in the area of deep space exploration. According to the characteristic of deep space exploration, this paper analyzes the problem and key techniques such as spread-spectrum measurement system of remote space orbit, reception of the weak signal and high efficient coding and decoding, super large aperture antenna and antenna array combination technique, high power control amplifier technique, insulating of transmitting and receiving signals applied in deep space exploration,at the same time,the author proposes evolution suggestion of spread-spectrum exploration technique applied in deep space exploration. Meanwhile,through combining the current situation of spread-spectrum exploration system home and abroad,the author analyzes a few key techniques of spread-spectrum exploration system applied in deep space exploration.

  8. Electromagnetic Glitch on the AES Round Counter

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    by Electro- Magnetic Glitch (emg) injection on an up-to-date microcontroller running an aes algorithm-invasive transient fault injection is achieved on the aes round counter. The attack is performed by injecting a very

  9. Active Learning for Directed Exploration of Complex Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burl, Michael C.; Wang, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Physics-based simulation codes are widely used in science and engineering to model complex systems that would be infeasible to study otherwise. Such codes provide the highest-fidelity representation of system behavior, but are often so slow to run that insight into the system is limited. For example, conducting an exhaustive sweep over a d-dimensional input parameter space with k-steps along each dimension requires k(sup d) simulation trials (translating into k(sup d) CPU-days for one of our current simulations). An alternative is directed exploration in which the next simulation trials are cleverly chosen at each step. Given the results of previous trials, supervised learning techniques (SVM, KDE, GP) are applied to build up simplified predictive models of system behavior. These models are then used within an active learning framework to identify the most valuable trials to run next. Several active learning strategies are examined including a recently-proposed information-theoretic approach. Performance is evaluated on a set of thirteen synthetic oracles, which serve as surrogates for the more expensive simulations and enable the experiments to be replicated by other researchers.

  10. Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) Potable Water System Verification Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie; DeVera, Jean; Vega, Leticia; Adam, Nik; Steele, John; Rector, Tony; Gazda, Daniel; Roberts, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV), also known as Orion, will ferry a crew of up to six astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS), or a crew of up to four astronauts to the moon. The first launch of CEV is scheduled for approximately 2014. A stored water system on the CEV will supply the crew with potable water for various purposes: drinking and food rehydration, hygiene, medical needs, sublimation, and various contingency situations. The current baseline biocide for the stored water system is ionic silver, similar in composition to the biocide used to maintain quality of the water transferred from the Orbiter to the ISS and stored in Contingency Water Containers (CWCs). In the CEV water system, the ionic silver biocide is expected to be depleted from solution due to ionic silver plating onto the surfaces of the materials within the CEV water system, thus negating its effectiveness as a biocide. Since the biocide depletion is expected to occur within a short amount of time after loading the water into the CEV water tanks at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC), an additional microbial

  11. Scurit de AES Pierre-Alain Fouque

    E-print Network

    Fouque, Pierre-Alain

    Sécurité de AES Pierre-Alain Fouque jeudi 28 novembre 13 #12;Advanced Encryption Standard widely used and US communication «Top Secret» Information jeudi 28 novembre 13 #12;AES Round S xi xi+1 ki xored to the state (11 Round Keys) AES state jeudi 28 novembre 13 #12;AES SubByte · Non-linear function

  12. Exploring New Physics in the $B\\to ?K$ System

    E-print Network

    Robert Fleischer; Thomas Mannel

    2001-03-12

    Employing the SU(2) isospin symmetry of strong interactions and estimates borrowed from effective field theory, we explore the impact of new physics on the decays $B^\\pm\\to \\phi K^\\pm$ and $B_d\\to \\phi K_S$ in a model-independent manner. To this end, we introduce - in addition to the usual mixing-induced CP asymmetry in $B_d\\to \\phi K_S$ - a set of three observables, which may not only provide smoking-gun signals for new-physics contributions to different isospin channels, but also valuable insights into hadron dynamics. Imposing dynamical hierarchies of amplitudes, we discuss various patterns of these observables, including also scenarios with small and large rescattering processes. Whereas the $B\\to\\phi K$ system provides, in general, a powerful tool to search for indications of new physics, there is also an unfortunate case, where such effects cannot be distinguished from those of the Standard Model.

  13. Mission building blocks for outer solar system exploration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herman, D.; Tarver, P.; Moore, J.

    1973-01-01

    Description of the technological building blocks required for exploring the outer planets with maximum scientific yields under stringent resource constraints. Two generic spacecraft types are considered: the Mariner and the Pioneer. Following a discussion of the outer planet mission constraints, the evolutionary development of spacecraft, probes, and propulsion building blocks is presented. Then, program genealogies are shown for Pioneer and Mariner missions and advanced propulsion systems to illustrate the soundness of a program based on spacecraft modification rather than on the development of new spacecraft for each mission. It is argued that, for minimum costs, technological advancement should occur in an evolutionary manner from mission to mission. While this strategy is likely to result in compromises on specific missions, the realization of the overall objectives calls for an advance commitment to the entire mission series.

  14. Space Codesign: A SystemC Framework for Fast Exploration of Hardware\\/Software Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    El Mostapha Aboulhamid

    Abstract—Electronic System Level has ,brought new abstractions for designing systems, which most designers are not familiar with. The Space Codesign™ SystemC design framework,allows ,designers to easily ,model hardware\\/software-based systems, starting from a high level model and refining down to the chip. We propose a rapid system prototyping toolset that permits co-monitoring of specifications, effortless platform exploration for hardware\\/software partitioning and

  15. Introducing NASA's Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Yvonne

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) is focused on the Moon, near Earth asteroids, and the moons of Mars. Comprised of competitively selected teams across the U.S., a growing number of international partnerships around the world, and a small central office located at NASA Ames Research Center, the institute advances collaborative research to bridge science and exploration goals. As a virtual institute, SSERVI brings unique skills and collaborative technologies for enhancing collaborative research between geographically disparate teams. SSERVI is jointly funded through the NASA Science Mission Directorate and the NASA Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. Current U.S. teams include: Dr. Jennifer L. Heldmann, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA; Dr. William Farrell, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD; Prof. Carlé Pieters, Brown University, Providence, RI; Prof. Daniel Britt, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL; Prof. Timothy Glotch, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY; Dr. Mihaly Horanyi, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO; Dr. Ben Bussey, Johns Hopkins Univ. Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD; Dr. David A. Kring, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX; and Dr. William Bottke, Southwest Research Institute, Boulder, CO. Interested in becoming part of SSERVI? SSERVI Cooperative Agreement Notice (CAN) awards are staggered every 2.5-3yrs, with award periods of five-years per team. SSERVI encourages those who wish to join the institute in the future to engage current teams and international partners regarding potential collaboration, and to participate in focus groups or current team activities now. Joining hand in hand with international partners is a winning strategy for raising the tide of Solar System science around the world. Non-U.S. science organizations can propose to become either Associate or Affiliate members on a no-exchange-of-funds basis. Current international partners include: Canada, Germany, Israel, Netherlands, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, and the United Kingdom. Discussions are ongoing to bring several more partners into the fold. These partnerships have impacted lunar science in a number of ways, resulting in such efforts and groups as the Pan-European Lunar Science Consortium and the Canadian Sudbury Field School. For more information visit sservi.nasa.gov

  16. Supporting exploration and collaboration in scientific workflow systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, L.; Kooper, R.; Bajcsy, P.; Myers, J.

    2007-12-01

    As the amount of observation data captured everyday increases, running scientific workflows will soon become a fundamental step of scientific inquiry. Current scientific workflow systems offer ways to link together data, software and computational resources, but often accomplish this by requiring a deep understanding of the system with a steep learning curve. Thus, there is a need to lower user adoption barriers for workflow systems and improve the plug-and-play functionality of these systems. We created a system that allows the user to easily create and share workflows, data and algorithms. Our goal of lowering user adoption barriers is to support discoveries and to provide means for conducting research more efficiently. Current paradigms for workflow creation focus on the visual programming using a graph based metaphor. This can be a powerful metaphor in the hands of expert users, but can become daunting when graphs become large, the steps in the graph include engineering level steps such as loading and visualizing data, and the users are not very familiar with all the possible tools available. We present a different method of workflow creation that co- exists with the standard graph based editors. The method builds on exploratory interface using a macro- recording style, and focuses on the data being analyzed during the step by step creation of the workflow. Instead of storing data in system specific data structures, the use of more flexible open standards that are platform independent would create systems that are easier to extend and that provide a simple interface for external applications to query and analyze the data and metadata produced. We have explored and implemented a system that stores workflows and related metadata using the Resource Description Framework (RDF) metadata model and that is build on top of the Tupelo data and metadata archiving system. The scientific workflow system connects to shared content repositories, where users can easily share data, workflows, algorithms and annotations. Examples of the above methodologies will be illustrated using a prototype workflow solution called Cyberintegrator and a use case scenario being developed by the Corpus Christi Bay WATERS Network test bed (a group of collaborating domain scientists from Texas and Illinois) involving monitoring, predicting and understanding of the hypoxia problem in Corpus Christi Bay.

  17. Multiplicity of Herbig Ae/Be Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; van der Bliek, Nicole S.; Rodgers, Bernadette; Doppmann, Greg; Bouvier, Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    One of the most interesting constraints on the formation models comes from the study of multiplicity of young stars as a function of mass. While multiplicity studies of low mass T Tauri stars have been quite exhaustive, an unbiased and systematic investigation of multiplicity among Herbig Ae/Be stars is still lacking. We are therefore conducting a photometric and spectroscopic study of multiple systems among Herbig Ae/Be (HAEBE) stars, in order to first detect companions and then investigate their properties. The frequency and degree of multiplicity of HAEBE systems will provide new constraints on their formation mechanism. Our program consists of: 1. high resolution AO imaging to detect close companions. We have data from about 80 stars obtained mainly with NIRI/Altair at Gemini but also with NACO at the VLT; 2. differential JHKL photometry of detected binaries to derive spectral energy distributions of the components of the systems; 3. near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to determine the spectral type of the companions.Our program has already measured NIR spectra of all southern candidates currently known and accessible with GNIRS (21). 4. BVRIJHK imaging (FOV=2.5' & res. 0.8''), to study clustering around HAEBE stars. The spectral information combined with the photometrically calibrated SEDs will allow us to determine the distance and extinction (thereby establishing physical association of companion) and, investigate the nature of the infrared excess in the secondary stars.

  18. Interleaving Methods for Hybrid System-level MPSoC Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Interleaving Methods for Hybrid System-level MPSoC Design Space Exploration Roberta Piscitelli, The Netherlands Email: {r.piscitelli,a.d.pimentel}@uva.nl Abstract--System-level design space exploration (DSE with the number of parameters, traditional design space exploration (DSE) methods fall short. As a consequence

  19. System-level MP-SoC Design Space Exploration Using Tree Visualization

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    System-level MP-SoC Design Space Exploration Using Tree Visualization Toktam Taghavi, Andy D. Keywords-- Design space exploration, multimedia MP-SoC de- sign, visualization, evolutionary algorithms. I and simulation environment is developed for the efficient design space exploration of multimedia embedded systems

  20. Visualization of Multi-Objective Design Space Exploration for Embedded Systems

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Visualization of Multi-Objective Design Space Exploration for Embedded Systems Toktam Taghavi, Andy and simulate systems and their components to explore the wide range of design choices. Such design space exploration is especially needed during the early design stages, where the design space is at its largest. Due

  1. Signature-based Calibration of Analytical Performance Models for System-level Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    . The Sesame system-level simulation framework targets efficient de- sign space exploration of embedded, they can be applied at the early stages of design to perform, for example, Design Space Exploration (DSE-level design space exploration of embedded multimedia systems, allowing rapid performance evaluation

  2. An Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    An Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle by Sydney Do Students #12;2 #12;3 An Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Exploration Vehicle (CEV), the concept of airbag-based crew impact attenuation was identified as being

  3. Future NASA solar system exploration activities: A framework for international cooperation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Bevan M.; Ramlose, Terri; Briggs, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    The goals and approaches for planetary exploration as defined for the NASA Solar System Exploration Program are discussed. The evolution of the program since the formation of the Solar System Exploration Committee (SSEC) in 1980 is reviewed and the primary missions comprising the program are described.

  4. ATHLETE: A Cargo-Handling Vehicle for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    As part of the NASA Exploration Technology Development Program, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is developing a vehicle called ATHLETE: the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer. Each vehicle is based on six wheels at the ends of six multi-degree-of-freedom limbs. Because each limb has enough degrees of freedom for use as a general-purpose leg, the wheels can be locked and used as feet to walk out of excessively soft or other extreme terrain. Since the vehicle has this alternative mode of traversing through or at least out of extreme terrain, the wheels and wheel actuators can be sized for nominal terrain. There are substantial mass savings in the wheel and wheel actuators associated with designing for nominal instead of extreme terrain. These mass savings are comparable-to or larger-than the extra mass associated with the articulated limbs. As a result, the entire mobility system, including wheels and limbs, can be about 25% lighter than a conventional mobility chassis. A side benefit of this approach is that each limb has sufficient degrees-of-freedom to use as a general-purpose manipulator (hence the name "limb" instead of "leg"). Our prototype ATHLETE vehicles have quick-disconnect tool adapters on the limbs that allow tools to be drawn out of a "tool belt" and maneuvered by the limb. A power-take-off from the wheel actuates the tools, so that they can take advantage of the 1+ horsepower motor in each wheel to enable drilling, gripping or other power-tool functions. Architectural studies have indicated that one useful role for ATHLETE in planetary (moon or Mars) exploration is to "walk" cargo off the payload deck of a lander and transport it across the surface. Recent architectural approaches are focused on the concept that the lander descent stage will use liquid hydrogen as a propellant. This is the highest performance chemical fuel, but it requires very large tanks. A natural geometry for the lander is to have a single throttleable rocket engine on the centerline at the bottom, and to have the propellant tanks arranged as compactly as possible around and above that engine, with nearly-straight structural load paths that carry the heavy LO2 tanks as well as the ascent stage or cargo on a top deck. (The requirement for exactly one descent engine stems from the need to avoid symmetry planes in the exhaust plume that can entrain surface particles and loft them up into the system at hypervelocity.) This geometry is especially attractive since abort considerations drive the ascent stage to have as much open space around it as possible, in case the ascent stage needs to fire away from an out-of-control descent stage. These considerations lead to a configuration where the cargo deck of the lander is relatively high off the ground (over 6 meters in current concepts, using a 10-meter diameter launch shroud). These considerations have led some observers to presume that there is a "lander offloading problem". ATHLETE has been demonstrated as a solution to this problem, walking cargo off the high deck. This paper describes the applicability of the ATHLETE concept to exploration of the moon, Mars and even to Near- Earth Objects. Recent field test results for long-range traverse are described, along with plans for testing in the simulated microgravity environment of a NEO.

  5. Addressing Human System Risks to Future Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, W. H.; Francisco, D. R.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    NASA is contemplating future human exploration missions to destinations beyond low Earth orbit, including the Moon, deep-space asteroids, and Mars. While we have learned much about protecting crew health and performance during orbital space flight over the past half-century, the challenges of these future missions far exceed those within our current experience base. To ensure success in these missions, we have developed a Human System Risk Board (HSRB) to identify, quantify, and develop mitigation plans for the extraordinary risks associated with each potential mission scenario. The HSRB comprises research, technology, and operations experts in medicine, physiology, psychology, human factors, radiation, toxicology, microbiology, pharmacology, and food sciences. Methods: Owing to the wide range of potential mission characteristics, we first identified the hazards to human health and performance common to all exploration missions: altered gravity, isolation/confinement, increased radiation, distance from Earth, and hostile/closed environment. Each hazard leads to a set of risks to crew health and/or performance. For example the radiation hazard leads to risks of acute radiation syndrome, central nervous system dysfunction, soft tissue degeneration, and carcinogenesis. Some of these risks (e.g., acute radiation syndrome) could affect crew health or performance during the mission, while others (e.g., carcinogenesis) would more likely affect the crewmember well after the mission ends. We next defined a set of design reference missions (DRM) that would span the range of exploration missions currently under consideration. In addition to standard (6-month) and long-duration (1-year) missions in low Earth orbit (LEO), these DRM include deep space sortie missions of 1 month duration, lunar orbital and landing missions of 1 year duration, deep space journey and asteroid landing missions of 1 year duration, and Mars orbital and landing missions of 3 years duration. We then assessed the likelihood and consequences of each risk against each DRM, using three levels of likelihood (Low: less than or equal to 0.1%; Medium: 0.1%–1.0%; High: greater than or equal to 1.0%) and four levels of consequence ranging from Very Low (temporary or insignificant) to High (death, loss of mission, or significant reduction to length or quality of life). Quantitative evidence from clinical, operational, and research sources were used whenever available. Qualitative evidence was used when quantitative evidence was unavailable. Expert opinion was used whenever insufficient evidence was available. Results: A set of 30 risks emerged that will require further mitigation efforts before being accepted by the Agency. The likelihood by consequence risk assessment process provided a means of prioritizing among the risks identified. For each of the high priority risks, a plan was developed to perform research, technology, or standards development thought necessary to provide suitable reduction of likelihood or consequence to allow agency acceptance. Conclusion: The HSRB process has successfully identified a complete set of risks to human space travelers on planned exploration missions based on the best evidence available today. Risk mitigation plans have been established for the highest priority risks. Each risk will be reassessed annually to track the progress of our risk mitigation efforts.

  6. Dragon exploration system on marine sponge compounds interactions

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Natural products are considered a rich source of new chemical structures that may lead to the therapeutic agents in all major disease areas. About 50% of the drugs introduced in the market in the last 20 years were natural products/derivatives or natural products mimics, which clearly shows the influence of natural products in drug discovery. Results In an effort to further support the research in this field, we have developed an integrative knowledge base on Marine Sponge Compounds Interactions (Dragon Exploration System on Marine Sponge Compounds Interactions - DESMSCI) as a web resource. This knowledge base provides information about the associations of the sponge compounds with different biological concepts such as human genes or proteins, diseases, as well as pathways, based on the literature information available in PubMed and information deposited in several other databases. As such, DESMSCI is aimed as a research support resource for problems on the utilization of marine sponge compounds. DESMSCI allows visualization of relationships between different chemical compounds and biological concepts through textual and tabular views, graphs and relational networks. In addition, DESMSCI has built in hypotheses discovery module that generates potentially new/interesting associations among different biomedical concepts. We also present a case study derived from the hypotheses generated by DESMSCI which provides a possible novel mode of action for variolins in Alzheimer’s disease. Conclusion DESMSCI is the first publicly available (http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/desmsci) comprehensive resource where users can explore information, compiled by text- and data-mining approaches, on biological and chemical data related to sponge compounds. PMID:23415072

  7. ATHLETE: A Limbed Vehicle for Solar System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    As part of the Human-Robot Systems project funded by NASA, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has developed a vehicle called ATHLETE: the All-Terrain Hex-Limbed Extra-Terrestrial Explorer. Each vehicle is based on six wheels at the ends of six multi-degree-of-freedom limbs. Because each limb has enough degrees of freedom for use as a general-purpose leg, the wheels can be locked and used as feet to walk out of excessively soft or other extreme terrain. Since the vehicle has this alternative mode of traversing through or at least out of extreme terrain, the wheels and wheel actuators can be sized for nominal terrain. There are substantial mass savings in the wheel and wheel actuators associated with designing for nominal instead of extreme terrain. These mass savings are comparable-to or larger-than the extra mass associated with the articulated limbs. As a result, the entire mobility system, including wheels and limbs, can be about 25% lighter than a conventional mobility chassis. A side benefit of this approach is that each limb has sufficient degrees-of-freedom to use as a general-purpose manipulator (hence the name "limb" instead of "leg"). Our prototype ATHLETE vehicles have quick-disconnect tool adapters on the limbs that allow tools to be drawn out of a "tool belt" and maneuvered by the limb.

  8. Ares V: Application to Solar System Scientific Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, John; Spilker, Thomas; Reh, Kim; Smith, David; Woodcock, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    The development of the Ares V launch vehicle will provide levels of performance unseen since the days of Apollo. This capability, like the Saturn V before it, is being developed primarily for crewed lunar missions. However, the tremendous jump in performance offered by the Ares V launch system has tremendous potential for the furtherance of robotic solar system exploration missions as well. Preliminary performance assessments indicate that Ares V could deliver 5 times the payload to Mars as compared to the most capable US expendable launch vehicle available today. Beyond Mars, the outer planets offer a number of high-priority investigations with compelling science. Presently, missions to these destinations are only achievable using indirect flights with gravity assist trajectories and, in many cases, suffer from long flight times. An Ares V with an upper stage could capture these missions using direct flights with shorter interplanetary transfer times that would enable extensive in situ investigations and possibly the return of samples to Earth. This paper lays out an estimate of Ares V performance for moderate and high C3 missions, and goes on to discuss a range of revolutionary mission concepts that could be enabled by this significant in-crease in launch capability.

  9. Phylogenetic and temporal dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 CRF01_AE in China.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jingrong; Xin, Ruolei; Yu, Shuangqing; Bai, Lishi; Wang, Weishi; Wu, Tingchen; Su, Xueli; Lu, Hongyan; Pang, Xinghuo; Yan, Hong; Feng, Xia; He, Xiong; Zeng, Yi

    2013-01-01

    To explore the epidemic history of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China, 408 fragments of gag gene sequences of CRF01_AE sampled in 2002-2010 were determined from different geographical regions and risk populations in China. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that the CRF01_AE sequences can be grouped into four clusters, suggesting that at least four genetically independent CRF01_AE descendants are circulating in China, of which two were closely related to the isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. Cluster 1 has the most extensive distribution in China. In North China, cluster 1 and cluster 4 were mainly transmitted through homosexuality.The real substance of the recent HIV-1 epidemic in men who have sex with men(MSM) of North China is a rapid spread of CRF01_AE, or rather two distinctive natives CRF01_AE.The time of the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) of four CRF01_AE clusters ranged from the years 1990.9 to 2003.8 in different regions of China. This is the first phylogenetic and temporal dynamics study of HIV-1 CRF01_AE in China. PMID:23365653

  10. Design of an unmanned Martian polar exploration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldwin, Curt; Chitwood, Denny; Demann, Brian; Ducheny, Jordan; Hampton, Richard; Kuhns, Jesse; Mercer, Amy; Newman, Shawn; Patrick, Chris; Polakowski, Tony

    1994-01-01

    The design of an unmanned Martian polar exploration system is presented. The system elements include subsystems for transportation of material from earth to Mars, study of the Martian north pole, power generation, and communications. Early next century, three Atlas 2AS launch vehicles will be used to insert three Earth-Mars transfer vehicles, or buses, into a low-energy transfer orbit. Capture at Mars will be accomplished by aerobraking into a circular orbit. Each bus contains four landers and a communications satellite. Six of the twelve total landers will be deployed at 60 deg intervals along 80 deg N, and the remaining six landers at 5 deg intervals along 30 deg E from 65 deg N to 90 deg N by a combination of retrorockets and parachutes. The three communications satellites will be deployed at altitudes of 500 km in circular polar orbits that are 120 deg out of phase. These placements maximize the polar coverage of the science and communications subsystems. Each lander contains scientific equipment, two microrovers, power supplies, communications equipment, and a science computer. The lander scientific equipment includes a microweather station, seismometer, thermal probe, x-ray spectrometer, camera, and sounding rockets. One rover, designed for short-range (less than 2 km) excursions from the lander, includes a mass spectrometer for mineral analysis, an auger/borescope system for depth profiling, a deployable thermal probe, and charge coupled device cameras for terrain visualization/navigation. The second rover, designed for longer-range (2-5 km) excursions from the lander, includes radar sounding/mapping equipment, a seismometer, and laser ranging devices. Power for all subsystems is supplied by a combination of solar cells, Ni-H batteries, and radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Communications are sequenced from rovers, sounding rockets, and remote sensors to the lander, then to the satellites, through the Deep Space Network to and from earth.

  11. Radio Aurora Explorer: Mission science and radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcivan, H.; Cutler, J. W.

    2012-04-01

    The Radio Aurora Explorer (RAX) satellite is the first of several satellites funded under the NSF CubeSat-based Space Weather and Atmospheric Research Program. RAX is a ground-to-space bi-static radar remote sensing experiment designed to measure and understand the causes of meter-scale ionospheric irregularities. Also known as field-aligned irregularities (FAI), such non-thermal, coherent fluctuations of electron density occur in response to strong ionospheric flows or plasma density gradients during geomagnetic disturbances and are considered a space weather concern due to disruption to communication and navigation signals. The RAX CubeSat was launched in November 2010 and conducted a single experiment in coordination with the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar. Due to geophysical inactivity, e.g., lack of strong ionospheric electric fields and low ionospheric densities, no FAI were expected or observed. However, the radar receiver payload operation was successfully demonstrated, including the capability to sense signals as low as -110 dBm, the capability of transmitter-receiver synchronization and accurate ranging, processing of 1.2 GB of raw radar data on board in less than 1 hour, and the downlink of the science results within three-four passes. Analysis of the payload data shows that the noise level is sufficiently low. Although the interference level is a concern, it does not appear to significantly limit the measurements. Toward the end of December 2010, the solar power system gradually degraded and the mission terminated in early February 2011 after prolonged loss of contact with the satellite. Meanwhile, RAX II was launched in October 2011 to a polar orbit. This paper describes the RAX science and radar system and presents the results from the first experiment conducted.

  12. Exploring the Earth System through online interactive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coogan, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    Upper level Earth Science students commonly have a strong background of mathematical training from Math courses, however their ability to use mathematical models to solve Earth Science problems is commonly limited. Their difficulty comes, in part, because of the nature of the subject matter. There is a large body of background ';conceptual' and ';observational' understanding and knowledge required in the Earth Sciences before in-depth quantification becomes useful. For example, it is difficult to answer questions about geological processes until you can identify minerals and rocks and understand the general geodynamic implications of their associations. However, science is fundamentally quantitative. To become scientists students have to translate their conceptual understanding into quantifiable models. Thus, it is desirable for students to become comfortable with using mathematical models to test hypotheses. With the aim of helping to bridging the gap between conceptual understanding and quantification I have started to build an interactive teaching website based around quantitative models of Earth System processes. The site is aimed at upper-level undergraduate students and spans a range of topics that will continue to grow as time allows. The mathematical models are all built for the students, allowing them to spend their time thinking about how the ';model world' changes in response to their manipulation of the input variables. The web site is divided into broad topics or chapters (Background, Solid Earth, Ocean and Atmosphere, Earth history) and within each chapter there are different subtopic (e.g. Solid Earth: Core, Mantle, Crust) and in each of these individual webpages. Each webpage, or topic, starts with an introduction to the topic, followed by an interactive model that the students can use sliders to control the input to and watch how the results change. This interaction between student and model is guided by a series of multiple choice questions that the student answers and immediately gets feedback whether the answer is correct or not. This way the students can ensure they understand the concepts before moving on. A discussion forum for the students to discuss the topics is in development and each page has a feedback option to allow both numerical (1-10) and written feedback on how useful the webpage was. By the end of exploring any given process students are expected to understand how the different parameters explored by the model interact to control the results. They should appreciate why the controlling equations look the way they do (all equations needed to develop the models are present in the introduction) and how these interact to control the results. While this is no substitute to students undertaking the calculations for themselves this approach allows a much wider range of topics to be explored quantitatively than if the students have to code all models themselves.

  13. How to Extend the Capabilities of Space Systems for Long Duration Space Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marzwell, Neville I.; Waterman, Robert D.; KrishnaKumar, Kalmanje; Waterman, Susan J.

    2005-01-01

    For sustainable Exploration Missions the need exists to assemble systems-of-systems in space, on the Moon or on other planetary surfaces. To fulfill this need new and innovative system architectures must be developed to be modularized and launched with the present lift capability of existing rocket technology. To enable long duration missions with minimal redundancy and mass, system software and hardware must be reconfigurable. This will enable increased functionality and multiple use of launched assets while providing the capability to quickly overcome components failures. Additional required capability includes the ability to dynamically demate and reassemble individual system elements during a mission in order to recover from failed hardware or to adapt to changes in mission requirements. To meet the Space Exploration goals of Interoperability and Reconfigurability, many challenges must be addressed to transform the traditional static avionics architectures into architectures with dynamic capabilities. The objective of this paper is to introduce concepts associated with reconfigurable computer systems; to review the various needs and challenges associated with reconfigurable avionics space systems; to provide an operational example that illustrates the application to both the Crew Exploration Vehicle and a collection of 'Habot-like' mobile surface elements; to summarize the approaches that address key challenges to the acceptance of a Flexible, Intelligent, Modular, Affordable and Reconfigurable avionics space system.

  14. AN OVERVIEW OF THE U.S. NATIONAL PLANT GERMPLASM SYSTEM'S EXPLORATION PROGRAM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Plant Exploration Program was established by USDA in 1898, several decades before the emergence of the US National Plant Germplasm System (NPGS), and continues to support international and domestic plant explorations for germplasm acquisition. These explorations are designed to fill collection g...

  15. A Case for Visualization-integrated System-level Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    A Case for Visualization-integrated System-level Design Space Exploration Andy D. Pimentel Computer, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Email: andy@science.uva.nl Abstract. Design space exploration plays an essential and ef- fective exploration tools in the early stages of design, where the design space is largest

  16. Logistics Information Systems for Human Space Exploration: State of the Art and Emerging Technologies

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Logistics Information Systems for Human Space Exploration: State of the Art and Emerging an overview of the current state of the art in logistics management for space exploration focused difficulties in mission planning for interplanetary human space exploration is logistics management

  17. Optimizing a Superscalar System using Multi-objective Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Vintan, Lucian N.

    Optimizing a Superscalar System using Multi-objective Design Space Exploration Horia Calborean by several parameters is using methods for Automatic Design Space Exploration (ADSE). Recently we developed a Framework for Automatic Design Space Explorations focused on micro-architectural optimizations

  18. Result Reuse in Design Space Exploration: A Study in System Support for Interactive Parallel Computing

    E-print Network

    Mohri, Mehryar

    management using the specific con- text of Design Space Exploration (DSE) compu- tational studies. DSEs, usedResult Reuse in Design Space Exploration: A Study in System Support for Interactive Parallel of such studies range from exploration of design spaces in engineering to molecular simulations for drug design

  19. System-level design space exploration for security processor prototyping in analytical approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yung Chia Lin; Chung Wen Huang; Jenq Kuen Lee

    2005-01-01

    The customization of architectures in designing the security processor-based systems typically involves time-consuming simulation and sophisticated analysis in the exploration of design spaces. In this paper, we present an analytical modeling strategy for synoptically exploring of the candidate architectures of security processor-based systems. We demonstrate examples to employ our analytical models for design space explorations of embedded security systems to

  20. OpenCV based computer vision of deep-sea visual exploration system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liu Jing-Biao; Cai Wen-Yu

    2008-01-01

    Deep-sea visual exploration system plays an important role in the area of deep-sea expedition. Because of the harsh ocean environment, the deep-sea visual exploration system may face many problems such as high press of deep sea, instantaneous impact, deep-sea surge, local high temperature etc. Therefore, most current deep-sea visual exploration systems are not practicable. In this paper, considering the strongpoint

  1. Major Map: Earth & Space Exploration (Exploration Systems Design) Bachelor of Science (B.S.)

    E-print Network

    Rhoads, James

    if Required Additional Critical Requirement Notes TERM ONE: 0-15 CREDIT HOURS SES 100: Introduction/or a First Year Seminar Grade of C in (MA) SES 101: Earth, Solar System, Universe 3 Grade of C SES 103 SES 102: Earth, Solar System, and Universe II 3 Grade of C SES 104: Earth, Solar System, and Universe

  2. The FUSE satellite is prepped for prelaunch processing at Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Workers in Hangar AE, Cape Canaveral Air Station, begin removing the plastic covering from NASA's Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) satellite before prelaunch processing. FUSE will undergo a functional test of its systems, followed by installation of the flight batteries and solar arrays. Tests are also scheduled for the communications and data systems linking FUSE with the spacecraft control center at The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md. FUSE was developed and will be operated by The Johns Hopkins University under contract to Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. FUSE will investigate the origin and evolution of the lightest elements in the universe - hydrogen and deuterium. In addition, the FUSE satellite will examine the forces and process involved in the evolution of the galaxies, stars and planetary systems by investigating light in the far ultraviolet portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The launch aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket is targeted for May 20 at Launch Complex 17.

  3. Analysis of planetary exploration spacesuit systems and evaluation of a modified partial-gravity simulation technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Patrick Chappell

    2006-01-01

    Building on prior experience during Apollo, NASA now plans to send humans back to the Moon and then on to Mars as part of its Vision for Space Exploration. An integral component for enabling this plan is the development of advanced spacesuit systems. A planetary exploration spacesuit system consists of an astronaut, a spacesuit, and the associated surface systems designed

  4. An Airbag-Based Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

    E-print Network

    An Airbag-Based Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Sydney Do, Olivier L. de Weck February 2011 SSL # 1-11 #12;#12;1 An Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System of Technology. #12;2 #12;3 An Airbag-Based Crew Impact Attenuation System for the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle

  5. The Role of Astrobiology in Solar System Exploration: Report from the NASA Astrobiology Institute to the NRC Solar-System Exploration Steering Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. M. Jakosky; D. J. Des Marais

    2001-01-01

    Astrobiology as related to solar-system exploration addresses far more than just the search for life in our solar system. It is about understanding the planets in our solar system as representing different outcomes in their formation, the nature of processes that affected those outcomes, and how those same processes might have operated elsewhere. It is about understanding planetary evolution and

  6. Ocean Exploration: Exploring Explorations

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson serves as an introduction to the discoveries and benefits that have resulted from exploration of the Earth's deep oceans. Students will be able to describe at least three human benefits from and identify separate examples of deep ocean exploration. All of the lessons emphasize hands-on activities using online data resources, and each inquiry-based activity includes focus questions, learning objectives, teaching time, background information, evaluations and extensions, as well as resources and student handouts.

  7. INSPECT: a dynamic visual query system for geospatial information exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Powell, Alfred M., Jr.; Greene, Geoffrey

    2003-05-01

    This paper presents a visual information exploration tool called INSPECT. INSPECT provides geospatial information analysts with an effective way to visually filter multidimensional data and explore the underlying information contained within it. In geospatial intelligence information analyses, it is necessary to query, visualize and understand the data combined with location information. These operations are not simple since they include complex database queries of both spatial and non-spatial data. Moreover, analysts need to repeatedly query and visualize data until they reach a desirable conclusion. Using INSPECT, analysts are able to experimentally query the database avoiding complex database schema and visualize the results in geospatial context with minimal effort. The tools available with INSPECT include see-through lens visualization, relationship visualization, time varying analysis, saved lens-filter sessions, a data reachback capability, and iterative visual exploration.

  8. Adverse Effects (AEs) of Topical NSAIDs in Older Adults with Osteoarthritis (OA): a Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Makris, UE.; Kohler, MJ.; Fraenkel, L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the literature on reported adverse effects (AEs) associated with topical NSAID use in older adults with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods A systematic search of Medline (1950 to November 2009), Scopus, Embase, Web of Science, Cochrane databases, Dissertation and American College of Rheumatology Meeting Abstracts was performed to identify original randomized controlled trials, case reports, observational studies, editorials or dissertations reporting AEs from topical NSAIDs in older adults with OA. Information was sought on study and participant characteristics, detailed recording of application site and systemic AEs as well as withdrawals due to AEs. Results The initial search yielded 953 articles of which 19 met eligibility criteria. Subjects receiving topical NSAIDs reported up to 39.3% application site AEs, and up to 17.5% systemic AEs. Five cases of warfarin potentiation with topical agents were reported; 1 resulting in gastrointestinal bleeding. In formal trials, the withdrawal rate from AEs ranged from 0-21% in the topical agents, 0-25% in the oral NSAIDs, and 0-16% in the placebo group. Conclusion In summary, although topical NSAIDs are safer than oral NSAIDs (fewer severe gastrointestinal AEs), a substantial proportion of older adults report systemic AEs with topical agents. Moreover, the withdrawal rate due to AEs with topical agents is comparable to that of oral NSAIDs. Given the safety profile and withdrawal rates described in this study, further data are needed to determine the incremental benefits of topical NSAIDs compared to other treatment modalities in older adults with OA. PMID:20360183

  9. Solar Mesosphere Explorer optical-mechanical systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gause, K. A.; Stuart, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    Mission overview of the Solar Mesosphere Explorer is presented along with design analysis and summaries of results. The Solar Mesosphere Explorer is a spin stabilized satellite carrying a complement of four Ebert-Fastie spectrometers and a four-channel Mersenne radiometer. Description of the spectrometer is given including a telescope and its aberrations. The radiometer is also described with consideration given to isothermal and thermal design, a Winston paraboloid, and optical tolerances. These five instruments are for measuring the earth's ozone density and distribution and providing quantitative data about those processes which govern the formation and destruction of ozone.

  10. In-Situ Production of Solar Power Systems for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curreri, Peter A.; Criswell, David R.

    1999-01-01

    Current proposals for developing an extended human presence, beyond space stations, on the Moon and Mars increasingly consider the processing of non-terrestrial materials essential for keeping the Earth launch burden reasonable. Utilization of in-situ resources for construction of lunar and Mars bases will initially require assessment of resource availability followed by the development of economically acceptable and technically feasible extractive processes. In regard to materials processing and fabrication the lower gravity level on the Moon (0.125 g) and Mars (0.367 g) will dramatically change the presently accepted hierarchy of materials in terms of specific properties, a factor which must be understood and exploited. Furthermore, significant changes are expected in the behavior of liquid materials during processing. In casting, for example, mold filling and associated solidification processes have to be reevaluated. Finally microstructural development and therefore material properties, presently being documented through on-going research in microgravity science and applications, needs to be understood and scaled to the reduced gravity environments. One of the most important elements of a human planetary base is power production. Lunar samples and geophysical measurements returned by the Apollo missions provide detailed data on the composition and physical characteristics of the lunar materials and environment. Based on this knowledge and extrapolations of terrestrial industrial experience it is clear that several types of solar-to-electric converters can be manufactured on the Moon. It is conceivable that well over 90% of a solar-to- electric power system could be made from lunar materials. Production and utilization of photovoltaic devices for solar energy production on Earth is primarily driven by the market economy. On Earth a production plant for photovoltaic devices is intimately linked to the planets massive industrial base. A selection of off the shelf refined materials are available as well as cheap fast transportation on demand. The processes takes place (except for the few seconds reprieve in shot towers etc.) under one gravity, with solar radiation significantly modulated by weather, and under conditions where one atmosphere is free and high vacuum is cumbersome and expensive. Off Earth, on lunar or Mars bases, the cost of photovoltaic power is driven by transport costs - Earth launch, deep space transport, landing on the planetary surface. Thus there is a premium for processes that are materials self-sufficient or for closed loop in-situ processes. The lack of differentiated ores on the Moon, and lack of explored minerals on Mars and interplanetary space give a premium to universal/non-ore-specific mineral extractive processes. Initially a semiconductor/photovoltaic production facility will build on no conveniently located industrial base, further increasing the premium on closed loop self sufficient processes.

  11. Exploring the Early Bombardment of the Inner Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottke, W.

    2014-04-01

    The early bombardment history of the Inner Solar System is recorded in a number of interesting places (e.g., the surprisingly high abundance of highly siderophile abundances found in the Earth, Moon, and Mars, the observed impact basins found on Mercury, the Moon and Mars, various properties of main belt asteroids and meteorites, etc.). To date, two dominant scenarios have been used to explain these constraints: (i) most impacts came from the tail end of a monotonically-decreasing impactor population created by planet formation processes, and (ii) most impacts were produced by a terminal cataclysm that caused a spike in the impactor flux starting ~4 Gy ago. Interestingly, using numerical studies linked to the available constraints, we find that both scenarios are needed to explain observations. For (i), we will show that leftover planetesimals from the terrestrial planet region were long-lived enough to hit various worlds long after the end of core formation. The record left behind can be used in interesting ways to probe the nature of terrestrial planet formation. For (ii), we will explore new applications of the so-called Nice model, which provides a plausible dynamical mechanism capable of creating a spike of comets/asteroid impactors. Our results suggest that many "late heavy bombardment" impactors came from an unexpected source, and that they possibly continued to hit Earth, Venus, and Mars well after basin formation terminated on the Moon. Interestingly, the history of the Hadean Earth (ca. 4.0-4.5 billion years ago) may be closely linked to this bombardment. With few known rocks older than ~3.8 Ga, the main constraints from this era come from ancient submillimeter zircon grains. Using our bombardment model, we will argue that the surface of the Hadean Earth was widely reprocessed by impacts through mixing and heating of its uppermost layers. This model not only may explains the Pb-Pb age distribution of ancient zircons but also the absence of most early terrestrial rocks. We predict life originating in the Hadean would need to be both hardy and mobile enough to survive these extreme conditions.

  12. Drill System Development for the Lunar Subsurface Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kris Zacny; Kiel Davis; Gale Paulsen; Dustyn Roberts; Jack Wilson; Wilson Hernandez

    2008-01-01

    Reaching the cold traps at the lunar poles and directly sensing the subsurface regolith is a primary goal of lunar exploration, especially as a means of prospecting for future In Situ Resource Utilization efforts. As part of the development of a lunar drill capable of reaching a depth of two meters or more, Honeybee Robotics has built a laboratory drill

  13. New techniques in astrodynamics for moon systems exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Stefano

    ESA and NASA scientific missions to the Jupiter and Saturn systems will answer fundamental questions on the habitability of icy worlds. The missions include unprecedented challenges, as the spacecraft will be placed in closed, stable orbits near the surface of the moons. This thesis presents methods to design trajectories that tour the moons and ultimately insert the spacecraft into orbits around them, while mitigating the mission costs and/or risks. A first technique is the endgame, a sequence of moon flyby preceding the orbit insertion. Historically, the endgame is designed with two approaches with different results: the vinfinity-leveraging transfer (VILT) approach leads to high-Deltav (hundreds of m/s), short time-of-flight (months) endgames, while the multi-body approach leads to low-Deltav (tens of m/s), long time-of-flight (years) endgames. This work analyzes and develops both approaches. We introduce a fast design method to automatically compute VILT endgames, which were previously designed in an ad-hoc manner. We also derive an important simple quadrature formula for the minimum Deltav attainable with this approach. This formula is the first important result of this work, as it provides a lower bound for assessment studies. We explain and develop the complex multi-body approach introducing the Tisserand-Poincare (T-P) graph, which is the second important result of this work. It provides a link between the two approaches, and shows the intersections between low-energy trajectories around different moons. With the T-P graph we design a five-month transfer between low-altitude orbits at Europa and Ganymede, using almost half the Deltav of the Hohmann transfer. We then focus on missions to low-mass moons, like Enceladus. We show that nontangent VILT (an extension of the traditional VILT) significantly reduce the Deltav while maintaining a satisfactory transfer time (< 4 years in the Saturn system). With a new design method we compute a 52 gravity-assist trajectory from Titan to Enceladus. The time of flight is 2.7 years, and the Deltav is almost 10 times better then the Titan-Enceladus Hohmann-like transfer. This trajectory and the design method are the third important contribution of this work; they enable a new class of missions which were previously considered unfeasible. Finally we study the capture problem, which seeks chaotic trajectories with multiple orbit insertion opportunities. We explore the solution space extending the design techniques used by ESA for the BepiColombo mission capture to Mercury. Such problems are better modeled in the spatial, elliptic, restricted three-body problem, which we analyze in detail. We define new regions of motions and to compute new families of periodic orbits and their stability properties. This analysis is the fourth important contribution of this work. Finally we show that capture trajectories shadow the manifolds of special periodic and quasi periodic orbits. This is the last important contribution of this report, as if both explains the complex dynamics of capture trajectories, and suggests new ways to design them.

  14. SEEDEEP: A System for Exploring and Querying Scientific Deep Web Data Sources

    E-print Network

    Agrawal, Gagan

    SEEDEEP: A System for Exploring and Querying Scientific Deep Web Data Sources Fan Wang Gagan that are hidden behind query forms, thus forming what is re- ferred to as the deep web. In this paper, we propose SEEDEEP, a System for Exploring and quErying scientific DEEP web data sources. SEEDEEP is able

  15. System-level design space exploration for security processor prototyping in analytical approaches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yung-chia Lin; Chung-wen Huang; Jenq Kuen Lee

    2005-01-01

    The customization of architectures in designing the security processor-based systems typically involves time- consuming simulation and sophisticated analysis in the explo- ration of design spaces. In this paper, we present an analytical modeling strategy for synoptically exploring of the candidate ar- chitectures of security processor-based systems. of We demon- strate examples to employ our analytical models for design space explorations

  16. Design Space Pruning through Hybrid Analysis in System-level Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Design Space Pruning through Hybrid Analysis in System-level Design Space Exploration Roberta with the number of parameters, traditional design space exploration methods fall short. This has prompted of Amsterdam, The Netherlands Email: {r.piscitelli,a.d.pimentel}@uva.nl Abstract--System-level design space

  17. Exploration System Mission Directorate and Constellation Program Support for Analogue Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Stephen J.; Voels, Stephen A.; Gerty, Christopher E.

    2008-01-01

    Vision: To create a cross-cutting Earth-based program to minimize cost and risk while maximizing the productivity of planetary exploration missions, by supporting precursor system development and carrying out system integration, testing, training, and public engagement as an integral part of the Vision for Space Exploration.

  18. A system for exploring and visualizing biological pathways from large scale datasets

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keyuan Jiang; Joseph Robertson

    2008-01-01

    The growing accumulation of biological pathway datasets is making it possible to study pathways at genomic scale by exploration and visualization, facilitating the shift of biomedical research to systems-level analyses. Presented in this paper is our ongoing work on developing a system for exploring and visualizing biological pathways for large scale pathway analyses. A pathway repository with a standard data

  19. Exploration Strategies for Model-based Learning in Multi-agent Systems: Exploration Strategies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Carmel; Shaul Markovitch

    1999-01-01

    An agent that interacts with other agents in multi-agent systems can benefit significantly from adapting to the others. When performing active learning, every agent's action affects the interaction process in two ways: The effect on the expected reward according to the current knowledge held by the agent, and the effect on the acquired knowledge, and hence, on future rewards expected

  20. Repeated Differential Properties of the AES-128 and AES-256 Key Schedules Jianyong Huang, Willy Susilo, and Jennifer Seberry

    E-print Network

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Repeated Differential Properties of the AES-128 and AES-256 Key Schedules Jianyong Huang, Willy, wsusilo, jennie}@uow.edu.au Abstract--In this paper, we further study the key schedule of the AES algorithm and present some repeated differential properties of the AES-128 and AES-256 key schedules. We

  1. Efficient AES implementations for ARM based platforms

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kubilay Atasu; Luca Breveglieri; Marco Macchetti

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) contest, started by the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), saw the Rijndael [13] algorithm as its winner [11]. Although the AES is fully defined in terms of functionality, it requires best exploitation of architectural parameters in order to reach the optimum performance on specific architectures. Our work concentrates on ARM cores [1

  2. Multiplicative Masking and Power Analysis of AES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jovan Dj. Golic; Christophe Tymen

    2002-01-01

    Abstract: The recently proposed multiplicative masking countermeasureagainst power analysis attacks on AES is interesting as it does notrequire the costly recomputation and RAM storage of S-boxes for everyrun of AES. This is important for applications where the available spaceis very limited such as the smart card applications. Unfortunately, it ishere shown that this method is in fact inherently vulnerable to

  3. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Moyer, W. R.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1973-01-01

    The following tasks related to the design, construction, and evaluation of a mobile planetary vehicle for unmanned exploration of Mars are discussed: (1) design and construction of a 0.5 scale dynamic vehicle; (2) mathematical modeling of vehicle dynamics; (3) experimental 0.4 scale vehicle dynamics measurements and interpretation; (4) vehicle electro-mechanical control systems; (5) remote control systems; (6) collapsibility and deployment concepts and hardware; (7) design, construction and evaluation of a wheel with increased lateral stiffness, (8) system design optimization; (9) design of an on-board computer; (10) design and construction of a laser range finder; (11) measurement of reflectivity of terrain surfaces; (12) obstacle perception by edge detection; (13) terrain modeling based on gradients; (14) laser scan systems; (15) path selection system simulation and evaluation; (16) gas chromatograph system concepts; (17) experimental chromatograph separation measurements and chromatograph model improvement and evaluation.

  4. Analysis and design of a capsule landing system and surface vehicle control system for Mars exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, D. K.; Lashmet, P. K.; Sandor, G. N.; Shen, C. N.; Smith, E. J.; Yerazunis, S. W.

    1972-01-01

    Investigation of problems related to the design and control of a mobile planetary vehicle to implement a systematic plan for the exploration of Mars has been undertaken. Problem areas receiving attention include: vehicle configuration, control, dynamics, systems and propulsion; systems analysis; terrain modeling and path selection; and chemical analysis of specimens. The following specific tasks have been under study: vehicle model design, mathematical modeling of a dynamic vehicle, experimental vehicle dynamics, obstacle negotiation, electromechanical controls, collapsibility and deployment, construction of a wheel tester, wheel analysis, payload design, system design optimization, effect of design assumptions, accessory optimal design, on-board computer sybsystem, laser range measurement, discrete obstacle detection, obstacle detection systems, terrain modeling, path selection system simulation and evaluation, gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer system concepts, chromatograph model evaluation and improvement.

  5. Towards Efficient Design Space Exploration of Heterogeneous Embedded Media Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andy D. Pimentel; Simon Polstra; Frank Terpstra; A. W. Van Halderen; Joseph E. Coffland; Louis O. Hertzberger

    2002-01-01

    Modern signal processing and multimedia embedded systems increas- ingly have heterogeneous system architectures. In these systems, programmable processors provide flexibility to support multiple applications, while dedicated hardware blocks provide high performance for time-critical application tasks. The heterogeneity of these embedded systems and the varying demands of their grow- ing number of target applications greatly complicate the system design. As part

  6. System-level exploration for pareto-optimal configurations in parameterized systems-on-a-chip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tony Givargis; Frank Vahid; Jörg Henkel

    2001-01-01

    In this work, we provide a technique for efficiently exploring the configuration space of a parameterized system-on-a-chip (SOC) architecture to find all Pareto-optimal configurations. These configurations represent the range of meaningful power and performance tradeoffs that are obtainable by adjusting parameter values for a fixed application mapped onto the SOC architecture. Our approach extensively prunes the potentially large configuration space

  7. The AE-8 trapped electron model environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vette, James I.

    1991-01-01

    The machine sensible version of the AE-8 electron model environment was completed in December 1983. It has been sent to users on the model environment distribution list and is made available to new users by the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC). AE-8 is the last in a series of terrestrial trapped radiation models that includes eight proton and eight electron versions. With the exception of AE-8, all these models were documented in formal reports as well as being available in a machine sensible form. The purpose of this report is to complete the documentation, finally, for AE-8 so that users can understand its construction and see the comparison of the model with the new data used, as well as with the AE-4 model.

  8. New vision solar system exploration missions study: Analysis of the use of biomodal space nuclear power systems to support outer solar system exploration missions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-08

    This report presents the results of an analysis of the capability of nuclear bimodal systems to perform outer solar system exploration missions. Missions of interest include orbiter mission s to Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto. An initial technology baseline consisting of a NEBA 10 kWe, 1000 N thrust, 850 s, 1500 kg bimodal system was selected, and its performance examined against a data base for trajectories to outer solar system planetary destinations to select optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectories for study. A conceptual design for a common bimodal spacecraft capable of performing missions to all the planetary destinations was developed and made the basis of end to end mission designs for orbiter missions to Jupiter, Saturn, and Neptune. Concepts for microspacecraft capable of probing Jupiter`s atmosphere and exploring Titan were also developed. All mission designs considered use the Atlas 2AS for launch. It is shown that the bimodal nuclear power and propulsion system offers many attractive option for planetary missions, including both conventional planetary missions in which all instruments are carried by a single primary orbiting spacecraft, and unconventional missions in which the primary spacecraft acts as a carrier, relay, and mother ship for a fleet of micro spacecraft deployed at the planetary destination.

  9. NEXT Ion Propulsion System Configurations and Performance for Saturn System Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benson, Scott W.; Riehl, John P.; Oleson, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    The successes of the Cassini/Huygens mission have heightened interest to return to the Saturn system with focused robotic missions. The desire for a sustained presence at Titan, through a dedicated orbiter and in-situ vehicle, either a lander or aerobot, has resulted in definition of a Titan Explorer flagship mission as a high priority in the Solar System Exploration Roadmap. The discovery of active water vapor plumes erupting from the tiger stripes on the moon Enceladus has drawn the attention of the space science community. The NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system is well suited to future missions to the Saturn system. NEXT is used within the inner solar system, in combination with a Venus or Earth gravity assist, to establish a fast transfer to the Saturn system. The NEXT system elements are accommodated in a separable Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) module, or are integrated into the main spacecraft bus, depending on the mission architecture and performance requirements. This paper defines a range of NEXT system configurations, from two to four thrusters, and the Saturn system performance capability provided. Delivered mass is assessed parametrically over total trip time to Saturn. Launch vehicle options, gravity assist options, and input power level are addressed to determine performance sensitivities. A simple two-thruster NEXT system, launched on an Atlas 551, can deliver a spacecraft mass of over 2400 kg on a transfer to Saturn. Similarly, a four-thruster system, launched on a Delta 4050 Heavy, delivers more than 4000 kg spacecraft mass. A SEP module conceptual design, for a two thruster string, 17 kW solar array, configuration is characterized.

  10. The roles of humans and robots in exploring the solar system.

    PubMed

    Mendell, W W

    2004-07-01

    Historically, advocates of solar system exploration have disagreed over whether program goals could be entirely satisfied by robotic missions. Scientists tend to argue that robotic exploration is most cost-effective. However, the human space program has a great deal of support in the general public, thereby enabling the scientific element of exploration to be larger than it might be as a stand-alone activity. A comprehensive strategy of exploration needs a strong robotic component complementing and supporting human missions. Robots are needed for precursor missions, for crew support on planetary surfaces, and for probing dangerous environments. Robotic field assistants can provide mobility, access to scientific sites, data acquisition, visualization of the environment, precision operations, sample acquisition and analysis, and expertise to human explorers. As long as space exploration depends on public funds, space exploration must include an appropriate mix of human and robotic activity. PMID:15791731

  11. A magnetic propeller in the cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Graham A.; King, Andrew R.; Horne, Keith

    1997-04-01

    Current treatments of accretion flows in magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs) imply that the criterion for disc formation depends only on the accretion rate and the magnetic field strength, and is independent of the spin rate of the accreting star. The low accretion rate in the moderately magnetic CV AE Aqr should allow disc formation, yet the single-peaked Balmer emission lines show no evidence of a disc. We interpret these data as evidence that the rapidly rotating white dwarf in AE Aqr ejects most of the matter transferred from the secondary. The possibility of such states was pointed out in earlier theoretical work modelling the gas flow as inhomogeneous and diamagnetic. Explicit application of this model to AE Aqr accounts for the observed spin-down of the white dwarf, and gives estimates of the white dwarf magnetic moment and the mass transfer rate as ~10^32 G cm^3 and >~10^17 g s^-1 respectively. We show that AE Aqr is likely to alternate between phases of disc accretion, in which the white dwarf spins up, and propeller states (as observed) in which it spins down. We comment on the likely consequences for other magnetic systems.

  12. Logistics Reduction Technologies for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James L., Jr.; Ewert, Michael K.; Fink, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    Human exploration missions under study are limited by the launch mass capacity of existing and planned launch vehicles. The logistical mass of crew items is typically considered separate from the vehicle structure, habitat outfitting, and life support systems. Although mass is typically the focus of exploration missions, due to its strong impact on launch vehicle and habitable volume for the crew, logistics volume also needs to be considered. NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) Project is developing six logistics technologies guided by a systems engineering cradle-to-grave approach to enable after-use crew items to augment vehicle systems. Specifically, AES LRR is investigating the direct reduction of clothing mass, the repurposing of logistical packaging, the use of autonomous logistics management technologies, the processing of spent crew items to benefit radiation shielding and water recovery, and the conversion of trash to propulsion gases. Reduction of mass has a corresponding and significant impact to logistical volume. The reduction of logistical volume can reduce the overall pressurized vehicle mass directly, or indirectly benefit the mission by allowing for an increase in habitable volume during the mission. The systematic implementation of these types of technologies will increase launch mass efficiency by enabling items to be used for secondary purposes and improve the habitability of the vehicle as mission durations increase. Early studies have shown that the use of advanced logistics technologies can save approximately 20 m(sup 3) of volume during transit alone for a six-person Mars conjunction class mission.

  13. Small space reactor power systems for unmanned solar system exploration missions

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1987-12-01

    A preliminary feasibility study of the application of small nuclear reactor space power systems to the Mariner Mark II Cassini spacecraft/mission was conducted. The purpose of the study was to identify and assess the technology and performance issues associated with the reactor power system/spacecraft/mission integration. The Cassini mission was selected because study of the Saturn system was identified as a high priority outer planet exploration objective. Reactor power systems applied to this mission were evaluated for two different uses. First, a very small 1 kWe reactor power system was used as an RTG replacement for the nominal spacecraft mission science payload power requirements while still retaining the spacecraft's usual bipropellant chemical propulsion system. The second use of reactor power involved the additional replacement of the chemical propulsion system with a small reactor power system and an electric propulsion system. The study also provides an examination of potential applications for the additional power available for scientific data collection. The reactor power system characteristics utilized in the study were based on a parametric mass model that was developed specifically for these low power applications. The model was generated following a neutronic safety and operational feasibility assessment of six small reactor concepts solicited from U.S. industry. This assessment provided the validation of reactor safety for all mission phases and generatad the reactor mass and dimensional data needed for the system mass model.

  14. Metrics for design space exploration of heterogeneous multiprocessor embedded systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Donatella Sciuto; Fabio Salice; Luigi Pomante; William Fornaciari

    2002-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of designing heterogeneous multiprocessor embedded systems. The focus is on a step of the design flow: the definition of innovative metrics for the analysis of the system specification to statically identify the most suitable processing elements class for each system functionality. Experimental results are also included, to show the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed

  15. Exploring Legacy Systems Using Types Arie van Deursen Leon Moonen

    E-print Network

    van Deursen, Arie

    TYPEEX- PLORER, a tool for browsing COBOL legacy systems based on these types. The paper addresses (1- chitecture ­ which is illustrated by using TYPEEXPLORER to browse an industrial COBOL system of 100,000 lines in older languages with very weak type systems. In particular COBOL, the language in which at least 30

  16. Waveform Analysis of AE in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been developed to evaluate damage mechanisms in the testing of composite materials. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. Much more precise source location can also be obtained in comparison to conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. Two successful examples of the application of Modal AE are presented in this work. In the first, the initiation of transverse matrix cracking in cross-ply, tensile coupons was monitored. In these tests, it was documented that the same source mechanism, matrix cracking, can produce widely different AE signal amplitudes dependent on laminate stacking sequence and thickness. These results, taken together with well known propagation effects of attenuation and dispersion of AE signals in composite laminates, cast further doubt on the validity of simple amplitude or amplitude distribution analysis for AE source determination. For the second example, delamination propagation in composite ring specimens was monitored. Pressurization of these composite rings is used to simulate the stresses in a composite rocket motor case. AE signals from delamination propagation were characterized by large amplitude flexural plate mode components which have long signal durations because of the large dispersion of this mode.

  17. Modelling exploration of non-stationary hydrological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kue Bum; Kwon, Hyun-Han; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    Traditional hydrological modelling assumes that the catchment does not change with time (i.e., stationary conditions) which means the model calibrated for the historical period is valid for the future period. However, in reality, due to change of climate and catchment conditions this stationarity assumption may not be valid in the future. It is a challenge to make the hydrological model adaptive to the future climate and catchment conditions that are not observable at the present time. In this study a lumped conceptual rainfall-runoff model called IHACRES was applied to a catchment in southwest England. Long observation data from 1961 to 2008 were used and seasonal calibration (in this study only summer period is further explored because it is more sensitive to climate and land cover change than the other three seasons) has been done since there are significant seasonal rainfall patterns. We expect that the model performance can be improved by calibrating the model based on individual seasons. The data is split into calibration and validation periods with the intention of using the validation period to represent the future unobserved situations. The success of the non-stationary model will depend not only on good performance during the calibration period but also the validation period. Initially, the calibration is based on changing the model parameters with time. Methodology is proposed to adapt the parameters using the step forward and backward selection schemes. However, in the validation both the forward and backward multiple parameter changing models failed. One problem is that the regression with time is not reliable since the trend may not be in a monotonic linear relationship with time. The second issue is that changing multiple parameters makes the selection process very complex which is time consuming and not effective in the validation period. As a result, two new concepts are explored. First, only one parameter is selected for adjustment while the other parameters are set as constant. Secondly, regression is made against climate condition instead of against time. It has been found that such a new approach is very effective and this non-stationary model worked very well both in the calibration and validation period. Although the catchment is specific in southwest England and the data are for only the summer period, the methodology proposed in this study is general and applicable to other catchments. We hope this study will stimulate the hydrological community to explore a variety of sites so that valuable experiences and knowledge could be gained to improve our understanding of such a complex modelling issue in climate change impact assessment.

  18. A New Counselee Assessment/Occupational Exploration System and Its Interest and Aptitude Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    A new counselee assessment/occupational exploration system provides for assessing a counselee's occupational qualifications in relation to an interest- and aptitude-oriented occupational structure and then encouraging occupational exploration in those areas which show the greatest promise of meeting the counselee's interests, values, and…

  19. Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter and Trojan Asteroid Explorer in EJSM (Europa Jupiter System Mission)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sho Sasaki; Masaki Fujimoto; Takeshi Takashima; Hajime Yano; Yasumasa Kasaba; Yukihiro Takahashi; Jun Kimura; Yuichi Tsuda; Ryu Funase; Osamu Mori

    2010-01-01

    Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) is an international mission to explore and Jupiter, its satellites and magnetospheric environment in 2020s. EJSM consists of (1) The Jupiter Europa Orbiter (JEO) by NASA, (2) the Jupiter Ganymede Orbiter (JGO) by ESA, and (3) the Jupiter Magnetospheric Orbiter (JMO) studied by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). In February 2009, NASA and ESA decided

  20. High efficiency dynamic radioisotope power systems for space exploration-a status report

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. E. Hunt

    1993-01-01

    Background on the space exploration program is discussed, and the currently identified NASA exploration missions are contrasted with the missions that were being planned a year ago. Developments in high-efficiency dynamic radioisotope power systems are discussed: and Brayton and Stirling power conversion cycles are compared for the missions planned for the next decade. Issues related to the use of high-efficiency

  1. A composite computational model of liver glucose homeostasis. Part 2: Exploring system behaviour

    E-print Network

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    ForReview Only A composite computational model of liver glucose homeostasis. Part 2: Exploring-DISCIPLINARY SCIENCES Keywords: computational modeling, glucose homeostasis, liver, bifurcation analysis http glucose homeostasis. Part 2: Exploring system behaviour T. Sumner4 , J. Hetherington1,2 , R.M. Seymour1

  2. Exploration systems approach to the Spokane Mountain area uranium deposits, Northeastern Washington

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Babcock; P. Beck; W. Farley; P. Lechler; J. Lindgren; D. Miller; J. Pigott; D. Sayala; R. Trujillo; T. Wayland

    1981-01-01

    Within the gross context of economic exploration techniques developed through case studies of known mineralization, this report of research into the Spokane Mountain uranium deposit integrates the results of numerous field surveys and the application of proven scientific methods with the effects of all tasks weighed against those of similar activities and the costs of alternative methods. An exploration systems

  3. Clickers 201: Exploring the Next Levels of Using Classroom Response Systems in Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noel, Tanya

    2010-01-01

    While there is a wealth of information and resources for new users of classroom response systems, much is yet to be explored, particularly for experienced instructors hoping to leverage this technology further in support of effective learning. In this paper, I highlight recent literature findings, and suggest some areas for future exploration and…

  4. Design Space Abstraction and Metamodeling for Embedded Systems Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Wagner, Flávio Rech

    Design Space Abstraction and Metamodeling for Embedded Systems Design Space Exploration Marcio F. S of Paderborn Fürstenallee, 11, Paderborn, Germany ABSTRACT In this paper, we present a design space exploration-model transformation rules to implement the design con- straints, which guide and prune the design space. The method

  5. Using Dynamic Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration to Develop Value Robust Systems

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    /affordably sustainable over their lifecycle · Developed using products designed for use in various platforms and systemsUsing Dynamic Multi-Attribute Tradespace Exploration to Develop Value Robust Systems INCOSE North. Marvin Sambur, "Systems Engineering for Robustness" means developing systems that are... · Capable

  6. Life Support System Technologies for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewert, Michael K.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Mars Life Support Test series successfully demonstrated integration and operation of advanced technologies for closed-loop life support systems, including physicochemical and biological subsystems. Increased closure was obtained when targeted technologies, such as brine dewatering subsystems, were added to further process life support system byproducts to recover resources. Physicochemical and biological systems can be integrated satisfactorily to achieve desired levels of closure. Imbalances between system components, such as differences in metabolic quotients between human crews and plants, must be addressed. Each subsystem or component that is added to increase closure will likely have added costs, ranging from initial launch mass, power, thermal, crew time, byproducts, etc., that must be factored into break even analysis. Achieving life support system closure while maintaining control of total mass and system complexity will be a challenge.

  7. Cradle-to-Grave Logistic Technologies for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broyan, James L.; Ewert, Michael K.; Shull, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Human exploration missions under study are very limited by the launch mass capacity of exiting and planned vehicles. The logistical mass of crew items is typically considered separate from the vehicle structure, habitat outfitting, and life support systems. Consequently, crew item logistical mass is typically competing with vehicle systems for mass allocation. NASA is Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Logistics Reduction and Repurposing (LRR) Project is developing four logistics technologies guided by a systems engineering cradle-to-grave approach to enable used crew items to augment vehicle systems. Specifically, AES LRR is investigating the direct reduction of clothing mass, the repurposing of logistical packaging, the processing of spent crew items to benefit radiation shielding and water recovery, and the conversion of trash to propulsion supply gases. The systematic implementation of these types of technologies will increase launch mass efficiency by enabling items to be used for secondary purposes and improve the habitability of the vehicle as the mission duration increases. This paper provides a description, benefits, and challenges of the four technologies under development and a status of progress at the mid ]point of the three year AES project.

  8. Spacewalker: Automated Design Space Exploration for Embedded Computer Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Snider

    2001-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of automated design of a computer system for an embedded application. The computer system to be designed consists of a VLIW processor and\\/or a customized systolic array, along with a cache subsystem comprising a data cache, instruction cache and second-level unified cache. Several algorithms for \\

  9. Hierarchical design space exploration for a class of digital systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. Sreenivasa Rao; Fadi J. Kurdahi

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural synthesis approach for a widely used class of digital systems characterized by inherent regularity in their description. This approach relies on a novel modeling or abstraction of the problem domain to facilitate a hierarchical solution method. The modeling is based on exploiting the inherent regularity in the system description to cluster its behavioral operations. The

  10. Supporting exploration and collaboration in scientific workflow systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    L. Marini; R. Kooper; P. Bajcsy; J. Myers

    2007-01-01

    As the amount of observation data captured everyday increases, running scientific workflows will soon become a fundamental step of scientific inquiry. Current scientific workflow systems offer ways to link together data, software and computational resources, but often accomplish this by requiring a deep understanding of the system with a steep learning curve. Thus, there is a need to lower user

  11. Mated Flight Control Issues for Space Exploration Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Kyong B.; Markley, F. Landis; Whorton, Mark S.

    2006-01-01

    Several unique issues related to mated flight control have been broadly identified. These issues include redundancies in subsystems, controllability, command and control authority distribution, information flow across elements, and changes and variability in system characteristics due to variable mated configurations during operations. Architectural options for mated flight control are discussed in the context of evolving space systems.

  12. Exploration of alternative interaction techniques for robotic systems.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Takeo; Inami, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    A robotic system can be considered a computer with the capacity to interact with the real world using sensors and actuators. This article reports on the authors' experiences in developing novel user interfaces for robotic systems, especially in the home environment. High-level control methods that use gestural or speech commands are overly ambiguous or excessively detailed for daily use. The proposed approach is to apply techniques developed in the human-computer interaction field, such as augmented reality and tangible user interfaces, to human-robot interaction. The authors introduce prototype systems such as home appliance control methods using augmented reality, a paper-based method for instructing mobile robots, and various I/O devices to enhance physical interaction with robotic systems. They then discuss lessons learned and directions for future research based on their experiences building these prototype robotic systems and interfaces. PMID:25643399

  13. Polyanionic hydrides from polar intermetallics AeE2 (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba; E = Al, Ga, In).

    PubMed

    Björling, Thomas; Noréus, Dag; Häussermann, Ulrich

    2006-01-25

    The hydrogenation behavior of the polar intermetallic systems AeE2 (Ae = Ca, Sr, Ba; E = Al, Ga, In) has been investigated systematically and afforded the new hydrides SrGa2H2 and BaGa2H2. The structure of these hydrides was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and neutron diffraction of the corresponding deuterides. Both compounds are isostructural to previously discovered SrAl2H2 (space group P3m1, Z = 1, SrGa2H2/D2: a = 4.4010(4)/4.3932(8) A, c = 4.7109(4)/4.699(1) A; BaGa2H2/D2: a = 4.5334(6)/4.5286(5) A, c = 4.9069(9)/4.8991(9) A). The three hydrides SrAl2H2, SrGa2H2, and BaGa2H2 decompose at around 300 degrees C at atmospheric pressure. First-principles electronic structure calculations reveal that H is unambiguously part of a two-dimensional polyanion [E2H2]2- in which each E atom is tetrahedrally coordinated by three additional E atoms and H. The compounds AeE2H2 are classified as polyanionic hydrides. The peculiar feature of polyanionic hydrides is the incorporation of H in a polymeric anion where it acts as a terminating ligand. Polyanionic hydrides provide unprecedented arrangements with both E-E and E-H bonds. The hydrogenation of AeE2 to AeE2H2 takes place at low reaction temperatures (around 200 degrees C), which suggests that the polyanion of the polar intermetallics ([E2]2-) is employed as precursor. PMID:16417371

  14. Jupiter explorer using microspacecraft and bimodal reactor system

    SciTech Connect

    Mondt, J.F. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1996-12-31

    Using second generation microspacecraft and space reactor bimodal systems enables having a fleet of microspacecraft throughout the Jovian Planetary System simultaneously obtaining scientific data of Jupiter and its satellites. The microspacecraft uses new micro-technology and each spacecraft has a dry mass of 10 to 20 kg as described by collins, et al., (1995). The space reactor bimodal system, defined by an Air Force study for Earth orbital missions and reported by Weitzberg, et al., (1995), provides 10 kWe power, 1,000 N thrust, 850 s Isp, with a 1,500 kg system mass. Using this bimodal system, trajectories to Jupiter were examined and an optimal direct and gravity assisted trajectory selected as described by Zubrin and Mondt, (1996). A conceptual design for a spacecraft using the space reactor bimodal system for propulsion and power, that is capable of performing the Jupiter mission of interest, is defined. An end-to-end example mission is defined for Jupiter and its satellites with 11 microspacecraft. This bimodal reactor system produces 1,000 N of thrust at an Isp of 850 s using hydrogen propellant, 1,880 N of thrust at an Isp of 450 s using NH3 propellant. The electric propulsion subsystem consists of ion engines using Xenon propellant with a specific impulse of 5,000 s and a specific mass of 18 kg/kWe. Hydrogen tanks are assumed to have a dry mass equal to 15% of the propellant they contain.

  15. Small Portable PEM Fuel Cell Systems for NASA Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2005-01-01

    Oxygen-Hydrogen PEM-based fuel cell systems are being examined as a portable power source alternative in addition to advanced battery technology. Fuel cell power systems have been used by the Gemini, Apollo, and Space Shuttle programs. These systems have not been portable, but have been integral parts of their spacecraft, and have used reactants from a separate cryogenic supply. These systems typically have been higher in power. They also have had significant ancillary equipment sections that perform the pumping of reactants and coolant through the fuel cell stack and the separation of the product water from the unused reactant streams. The design of small portable fuel cell systems will be a significant departure from these previous designs. These smaller designs will have very limited ancillary equipment, relying on passive techniques for reactant and thermal management, and the reactant storage will be an integral part of the fuel cell system. An analysis of the mass and volume for small portable fuel cell systems was done to evaluate and quantify areas of technological improvement. A review of current fuel cell technology as well as reactant storage and management technology was completed to validate the analysis and to identify technology challenges

  16. On the origin of the peculiar cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beskrovnaya, N. G.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2015-02-01

    The nova-like variable AE Aquarii is a close binary system containing a red dwarf and a magnetized white dwarf rotating with the period of 33 s. A short spin period of the white dwarf is caused by an intensive mass exchange between the system components during a previous epoch. We show that a high rate of disk accretion onto the white dwarf surface resulted in temporary screening of its magnetic field and spin-up of the white dwarf to its present spin period. Transition of the white dwarf to the ejector state occurred at a final stage of the spin-up epoch after its magnetic field had emerged from the accreted plasma due to diffusion. In the frame of this scenario AE Aqr represents a missing link in the chain of Polars evolution and the white dwarf resembles a recycled pulsar.

  17. Unique abilities of hopper spacecraft to enable national objectives for solar system exploration

    E-print Network

    Lanford, Ephraim Robert

    2011-01-01

    In comparison with conventional and other conceived approaches, hopper spacecraft offer unique advantages in exploring Solar System objects beyond Earth. The present work began with a survey - based on documents from the ...

  18. Solar System Exploration -- What Comes Next? - Duration: 31 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Do you think we already know everything about our solar system? Think again. We've barely scratched the surface of what there is to learn. Join NASA as it sends missions to the far ends of the sola...

  19. Exploring project collaboration systems in the building industry 

    E-print Network

    Laepple, Eberhard Sebastian

    2006-10-30

    The use of Web-Based-Collaboration-Systems (WBCS) continues to grow as part of information technology development in the Architecture-Engineering-Construction (AEC) industry. WBCS provide different media channels to support ...

  20. EXPLORATION OF THE ROAD DATABASE FOR NAVIGATION SYSTEMS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lichun SUI; Liqiu MENG

    2001-01-01

    Some new methods for analyzing geo-referenced statistical data are presented in this paper. These methods have combined the techniques of exploratory data analysis with algorithms for data mining. They have been integrated in a prototype software system developed at the Technical University of Munich in cooperation with Navigation Technologies (NavTech) GmbH. The system serves the purpose of value-adding the road

  1. AES Huntington Beach Generation Station Surf Zone

    E-print Network

    , CANADA, UK AND WORLDWIDE #12;· Are landbased sources of bacteria entering the discharge vault in the AES, the discharge vault? In excess of 4,500 microbiological water quality samples were collected during

  2. Protein Explorer: A Petaflops Special-Purpose Computer System for Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Makoto Taiji; Tetsu Narumi; Yousuke Ohno; Noriyuki Futatsugi; Atsushi Suenaga; Naoki Takada; Akihiko Konagaya

    2003-01-01

    We are developing the 'Protein Explorer' system, a petaflops special-purpose computer system for molecular dynamics simulations. The Protein Explorer is a PC cluster equipped with special-purpose engines that calculate nonbonded interactions between atoms, which is the most time-consuming part of the simulations. A dedicated LSI 'MDGRAPE-3 chip' performs these force calculations at a speed of 165 gigaflops or higher. The

  3. Radioisotope Power Systems for In-situ Exploration of Titan and Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balint, Tibor S.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the timeline for the robotic in situ investigation of Titan and Venus, and the use of radioisotope power systems in this exploration. The atmospheric and surface conditions of both sites are reviewed. The presentation also examines the conceptual design of the Venus Mobile Explorer and the Titan orbiter and in situ explorer. After this the presentation reviews the radioisotope power systems for each of the vehicles, with some explanation of the different requirements based on the vastly different environments that they would be investigating

  4. Successfully Attacking Masked AES Hardware Implementations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stefan Mangard; Norbert Pramstaller; Elisabeth Oswald

    2005-01-01

    http:\\/\\/www.iaik.TUGraz.at\\/research\\/sca-lab Abstract. During the last years, several masking schemes for AES have been proposed to secure hardware implementations against DPA attacks. In order to investigate the effectiveness of these countermeasures in prac- tice, we have designed and manufactured an ASIC. The chip features an unmasked and two masked AES-128 encryption engines that can be at- tacked independently. In addition to

  5. Exploring with PAM: Prospecting ANTS Missions for Solar System Surveys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Rilee, M. L.; Curtis, S. A.

    2003-01-01

    ANTS (Autonomous Nano-Technology Swarm), a large (1000 member) swarm of nano to picoclass (10 to 1 kg) totally autonomous spacecraft, are being developed as a NASA advanced mission concept. ANTS, based on a hierarchical insect social order, use an evolvable, self-similar, hierarchical neural system in which individual spacecraft represent the highest level nodes. ANTS uses swarm intelligence attained through collective, cooperative interactions of the nodes at all levels of the system. At the highest levels this can take the form of cooperative, collective behavior among the individual spacecraft in a very large constellation. The ANTS neural architecture is designed for totally autonomous operation of complex systems including spacecraft constellations. The ANTS (Autonomous Nano Technology Swarm) concept has a number of possible applications. A version of ANTS designed for surveying and determining the resource potential of the asteroid belt, called PAM (Prospecting ANTS Mission), is examined here.

  6. Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer optical system: lessons learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conard, Steven J.; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Evans, Jordan P.; Friedman, Scott D.; Kruk, Jeffrey W.; Moos, H. Warren; Ohl, Raymond G.; Sahnow, David J.

    2000-12-01

    The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) is a NASA astrophysics satellite designed to produce high resolution spectra in the far-ultraviolet (90.5-118.7 nm bandpass) with a high effective area (20-70 cm2) and low background detector. It was launched on a three-year mission in June 1999 aboard a Boeing Delta II rocket. The satellite has been performing routine science observations since December 1999. FUSE contains four co-aligned, normal incidence, off-axis parabolic primary mirrors which illuminate separate Rowland circle spectrograph channels equipped with holographically ruled diffraction gratings and microchannel plate detectors. Fine error sensors (slit jaw cameras) operating in the visible on two of the channels are used for target acquisition and guiding. The FUSE mission was first proposed in the late 1980s, and experienced several major conceptual changes prior to fabrication, assembly, and testing, which lasted from 1996 through 1999. During the program, we realized both positive and negative aspects to our design and processes that may apply to other space missions using telescopes and spectrographs. The specific topics we address are requirements, design, component specification, integration, and verification. We also discuss on-orbit alignment and focus. These activities were complicated by unexpected levels of motion between the optical elements, and the logistical problems associated with limited ground contact passes in low Earth orbit. We have developed methods to characterize the motions and mitigate their resultant effects on the science data through a combination of observing techniques and modifications to the data reduction software.

  7. Wanderers in space. Exploration and discovery in the solar system.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, K. R.; Whitney, C. A.

    This book presents the results of a voyage of discovery in the solar system recording more than two decades of extraordinary accomplishments. It includes numerous photos from spacecraft as well as a few works of modern art. Contents: 1. Worlds in motion. 2. The Moon: stepping stone to the planets. 3. Mercury: a battered world. 4. Venus: the veiled planet. 5. The restless Earth. 6. Mars: the red desert. 7. Asteroids, meteors and meteorites. 8. Jupiter: a giant primitive world. 9. Saturn: lord of the rings. 10. Frozen worlds: Uranus, Neptune and Pluto. 11. Comets: icy wanderers. 12. Birth of the solar system.

  8. Optical communications systems and technology for deep-space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesh, James R.

    1989-10-01

    An account is given of architectural and implementational strategies for the creation of planetary and other deep-space optical communications networks, with a view to the developmental requirements of both planetary spacecraft subsystems and an earth-vicinity reception system. Attention is given to prospective technology-development challenges. An open-loop spatial acquisition process is defined, in conjunction with a terrestrial, large-aperture/low-cost 'photon bucket' optical reception telescopic system having an integral, axially-aligned tube-bundle sunshield. An efficient diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser is envisioned as the transmitter.

  9. Using C to build a satellite scheduling expert system: Examples from the Explorer platform planning system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclean, David R.; Tuchman, Alan; Potter, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Recently, many expert systems were developed in a LISP environment and then ported to the real world C environment before the final system is delivered. This situation may require that the entire system be completely rewritten in C and may actually result in a system which is put together as quickly as possible with little regard for maintainability and further evolution. With the introduction of high performance UNIX and X-windows based workstations, a great deal of the advantages of developing a first system in the LISP environment have become questionable. A C-based AI development effort is described which is based on a software tools approach with emphasis on reusability and maintainability of code. The discussion starts with simple examples of how list processing can easily be implemented in C and then proceeds to the implementations of frames and objects which use dynamic memory allocation. The implementation of procedures which use depth first search, constraint propagation, context switching and a blackboard-like simulation environment are described. Techniques for managing the complexity of C-based AI software are noted, especially the object-oriented techniques of data encapsulation and incremental development. Finally, all these concepts are put together by describing the components of planning software called the Planning And Resource Reasoning (PARR) shell. This shell was successfully utilized for scheduling services of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite since May 1987 and will be used for operations scheduling of the Explorer Platform in November 1991.

  10. The pulsar-like white dwarf in AE Aquarii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, Nazar R.

    1998-10-01

    The spindown power of the compact companion in the close binary system AE Aqr essentially exceeds the bolometrical luminosity of the system. The interpretation of this phenomenon under various assumptions about the state and the nature of the primary companion is discussed. It is shown that the rapid braking on the compact companion of AE Aqr can be explained in terms of the pulsar mechanism provided the magnetic moment of the compact star mu ga 1.4 x 10(34) {R_mm G cm(3}) , that implies a magnetic field strength at the surface of the white dwarf of about 50 MG. Under this condition the spindown power is used predominantly for the generation of magneto-dipole waves and particle acceleration. A stream-fed, diskless mass-exchange picture with the average rate of mass transfer dot {M} ~ (0.5/5) x 10(17) {R_mm g s(-1}) is expected in the frame of the suggested model. Similarity of some properties of the X-ray emission observed from AE Aqr and canonical radio pulsars in the ROSAT energy range (e.g. the power law spectrum of pulsing component with alpha ~ -2 and the ratio L_{R_mm X}/L_{R_mm sd} ~ 10(-3) ) allows to suggest common mechanisms of particle acceleration and the polar cap heating in these systems.

  11. MMR immunisation status among Dublin paediatric A&E attenders.

    PubMed

    Murphy, A W; Power, R; Kinlen, D M; Johnson, Z

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to establish the need for opportunistic MMR immunisation among paediatric A&E attenders to the three Dublin paediatric hospitals and to examine the relationship between immunisation status and socioeconomic factors. Design was that of a two month cross sectional study. Survey data was then compared with information on the Eastern Health Board (EHB) records system. Small area and multiple regression analysis of socioeconomic factors derived from participants addresses was also performed. Subjects were 337 children who attended these departments and were aged between fifteen months and five years. For 66% of cases there was a history of MMR immunisation, 30% gave a negative history and 4% did not know. Of those giving a negative history, one third said immunisation had been omitted for no specific reason. EHB records suggested that 39% were immunised, 41% were not and 20% were not on file. Eligibility for the GMS was not associated with failure to immunise. Small area and multiple regression analysis showed little association between immunisation uptake and socioeconomic factors. An opportunistic MMR immunisation policy in A&E Departments would make an important contribution to increasing overall uptake figures. Parental knowledge of the implications of measles and the effectiveness of immunisation needs to be improved. Computerised child health systems must have high data quality standards and access to these systems should be made available in A&E departments. PMID:8194951

  12. Cache-timing attacks on AES Daniel J. Bernstein

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Cache-timing attacks on AES Daniel J. Bernstein Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer. This paper demonstrates complete AES key recovery from known-plaintext timings of a network server on another computer. This attack should be blamed on the AES design, not on the particular AES library used

  13. Efficient Object Exploration and Object Presentation in TeleTA, Teleoperation System with Tactile Feedback

    E-print Network

    Tachi, Susumu

    drive. Proposed sensory system of slave robot (tactile skin to detect contact point and torque sensors teleoperation system TeleTA The robot arm is covered with Kinotex tactile sensor measuring the pressureEfficient Object Exploration and Object Presentation in TeleTA, Teleoperation System with Tactile

  14. Using Genetic Algorithms to Explore Pattern Recognition in the Immune System

    E-print Network

    Forrest, Stephanie

    Using Genetic Algorithms to Explore Pattern Recognition in the Immune System DRAFT July 28, 1993 an immune system model based on binary strings. The purpose of the model is to study the pattern recognition processes and learning that take place at both the individual and species levels in the immune system

  15. Exploring Awareness Related Messaging Through Two Situated-Display-Based Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Cheverst; Daniel Fitton; Mark Rouncefield; Connor Graham

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on our exploration of awareness issues through the design and long-term deployment of two systems: the Hermes office door display system (which enabled staff in a university department to post awareness messages to their door displays) and SPAM (a messaging system for supporting coordination between staff at two associated residential community care facilities). In the case of

  16. 1994 A J H Simons Object-Oriented Type Systems 1 Exploring Object-Oriented Type

    E-print Network

    Simons, Anthony J. H.

    1994 A J H Simons Object-Oriented Type Systems 1 Exploring Object-Oriented Type Systems Tony Simons A.Simons@dcs.shef.ac.uk A J H Simons, Department of Computer Science, Regent Court, University, October 1994 #12; 1994 A J H Simons Object-Oriented Type Systems 2 Overview Motivation Classes and Types

  17. Enabling interactive exploration of cultural heritage: an experience of designing systems

    E-print Network

    Costabile, Maria F.

    1 Enabling interactive exploration of cultural heritage: an experience of designing systems mobile systems. Italy has a rich cultural heritage and the focus here is on the design of systems learning, cultural heritage Corresponding author: ardito@di.uniba.it tel. +39 080 544 3289 fax. +39 080 544

  18. ERP system implementation in SMEs: exploring the influences of the SME context

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ondrej Zach; Bjørn Erik Munkvold; Dag Håkon Olsen

    2012-01-01

    Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are increasingly implementing enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Compared to large enterprises, SMEs differ in a number of inherent characteristics, which are likely to impact the ERP system implementations. The purpose of this study is to explore these influences of the SME context on the ERP system implementation process. SME characteristics are synthesised from relevant

  19. Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes

    E-print Network

    Henderson, Gideon

    Project EARTH-11-DP1: Exploring early solar system processes using Cr isotopes Supervisors: Dr D in the early solar system and the processes that have led to the formation of the terrestrial planets. Stable an effective approach for unravelling the complex chemistry of the early solar system as recorded in meteorites

  20. PHYSICS AND CONTROL: EXPLORING PHYSICAL SYSTEMS BY FEEDBACK

    E-print Network

    experiments, see (Leff and Rex, 1990). An interest in design of quantum computers has become another powerful hardware and software design methods for automated experimental equipment (e.g. accelerators) Conventional is Control of molecular and quantum systems. Al- though some theoretical results have been re- ported

  1. Exploration into technical procedures for vertical integration. [information systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, R. J.; Maw, K. D.

    1979-01-01

    Issues in the design and use of a digital geographic information system incorporating landuse, zoning, hazard, LANDSAT, and other data are discussed. An eleven layer database was generated. Issues in spatial resolution, registration, grid versus polygonal structures, and comparison of photointerpreted landuse to LANDSAT land cover are examined.

  2. Exploring security perception of learning management system (LMS) portal

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohd Faiz Hilmi; Shahrier Pawanchik; Yanti Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    The advancement of information technology has changed the education landscape. Information technology has made e-learning possible and available on a large scale. The main component of an e-learning is a learning management system (LMS). By connected and accessed to the Internet, LMS are exposed to various threats. Proper understanding of these threats combined with strategy and best practices countermeasures will

  3. Exploring the use of ERP systems by SMEs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Tagliavini; P. Faverio; A. Ravarini; F. Pigni; G. Buonanno

    Nowadays most of large companies have been using an ERP system, thus ERP vendors are moving their attention toward small and medium enterprises (SMEs), by offering simplified and cheaper solutions. Such an approach is mostly due to SMEs' lack of internal competence and resources, while most of large companies have been investing time, money and human resources to modify their

  4. Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation

    E-print Network

    2013 Updated based on input from USGS EROS EO project team 3 January 2014 Updated based on input from USGS EROS EO project team 4 February 2014 Updated based on input from USGS EROS EO project team 5........................................................................................................... 1 B. System/Browser requirements

  5. Exploring Power-Performance Tradeoffs in Database Systems

    E-print Network

    Tu, Yicheng

    the above costs are calculated directly from energy consumption, power (i.e., energy consumption per unit-- With the total energy consumption of computing systems increasing in a steep rate, much attention has been paid design has been improving performance. With the significant increase in energy consumption of computers

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Exploration Systems Development

    E-print Network

    Waliser, Duane E.

    up) definitization 28 Orion H Crew Module (CM) structure shipped to Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to initiate Assembly, Integration and Production (AI&P) in the Operations and Checkout (O&C) Building July-program System Design Review GSDO R KDP-B Complete Orion P EFT-1 Crew Module and Service Module Mate Orion R KDP

  7. Space exploration and the history of solar-system volatiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanale, F. P.

    1976-01-01

    The thermochemical history of volatile substances in all solar-system planets, satellites, and planetoids is discussed extensively. The volatiles are viewed as an interface between the abiotic and biotic worlds and as a key to the history of bodies of the solar system. A flowsheet of processes and states is exhibited. Differences in bulk volatiles distribution between the planetary bodies and between the interior, surface, and atmosphere of each body are considered, as well as sinks for volatiles in degassing. The volatiles-rich Jovian and Saturnian satellites, the effect of large-planet magnetosphere sweeps on nearby satellites, volatiles of asteroids and comets, and the crucial importance of seismic, gravity, and libration data are treated. A research program encompassing analysis of the elemental and isotopic composition of rare gas in atmospheres, assay of volatiles-containing phases in regoliths, and examination of present or past atmospheric escape/accretion processes is recommended.

  8. Monitoring Induced Seismicity with AE Sensors : The Influence of Unknown Calibration Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plenkers, Katrin; Kwiatek, Grzegorz; Krüger, Frank

    2013-04-01

    We study the effect that an uncalibrated acoustic-emission (AE) sensor has on amplitude and magnitude using data of the JAGUARS project. The JAGUARS project recorded mining-induced seismicity in Mponeng Gold mine in Carletonville, South Africa in the frequency range 1 kHz < f < 180 kHz combining AE-sensors and accelerometers. Advanced monitoring of induced seismicity in underground structures sometimes includes today the use of high-frequency (f >> 1 kHz) AE monitoring systems. High-frequency monitoring allows the detection of seismic fractures on the centimeter scale and provides therefore important information about the migration of instabilities in the rock. Whereas the temporal-spatial analysis of seismic events recorded with AE sensors provides stable results, the analysis of source parameters including the estimation of magnitudes remains more challenging, because AE sensors are normally not well calibrated and exploit resonance frequencies to allow for high sensitivity. In our study the AE sensors are first calibrated in the frequency range 1kHz to 17 kHz relative to the well calibrated accelerometer. The calibration is possible due to the close employment of both sensor types, which allows to extract the sensor response (including the coupling effect) using signal deconvolution. We estimate three main resonance frequencies at about 2.5 kHz, 6 kHz and 10 kHz. Furthermore we calculate the directivity effect of the AE-sensor that influences the amplitude of the signal by up to - 15 dB. Second, we calculate the effect of the instrument response on the amplitude and the calculation of magnitude by studying synthetic data. We show the significant uncertainty that is introduced owing to the AE sensor response and conclude that source parameters often have high uncertainties and are not reliable for statistcal analsis if the instrument response of the recording AE sensor is not known.

  9. Exploring the Outer Solar System with the ESSENCE Supernova Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, A.C.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Arraki, K.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Kaib, N.A.; /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept.; Wood-Vasey, W.M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Aguilera, C.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Blackman, J.W.; /Australian Natl. U., Canberra; Blondin, S.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Challis, P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Clocchiatti, A.; /Rio de Janeiro, Pont. U. Catol.; Covarrubias, R.; /Kyushu Sangyo U.; Damke, G.; /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.; Davis, T.M.; /Bohr Inst. /Queensland U.; Filippenko, A.V.; /UC, Berkeley; Foley, R.J.; /UC, Berkeley; Garg, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Garnavich, P.M.; /Notre Dame U.; Hicken, M.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U.; Jha, S.; /Harvard U. /SLAC; Kirshner, R.P.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Krisciunas, K.; /Notre Dame U. /Texas A-M; Leibundgut, B.; /Munich, Tech. U. /UC, Berkeley /NOAO, Tucson /Washington U., Seattle, Astron. Dept. /Fermilab /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Chile U., Santiago /Ohio State U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Harvard U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Johns Hopkins U. /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Australian Natl. U., Canberra /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Munich, Tech. U. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys. /Harvard U. /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs. /Texas A-M /Cerro-Tololo InterAmerican Obs.

    2011-11-10

    We report the discovery and orbital determination of 14 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the ESSENCE Supernova Survey difference imaging data set. Two additional objects discovered in a similar search of the SDSS-II Supernova Survey database were recovered in this effort. ESSENCE repeatedly observed fields far from the solar system ecliptic (-21{sup o} < {beta} < -5{sup o}), reaching limiting magnitudes per observation of I {approx} 23.1 and R {approx} 23.7. We examine several of the newly detected objects in detail, including 2003 UC{sub 414}, which orbits entirely between Uranus and Neptune and lies very close to a dynamical region that would make it stable for the lifetime of the solar system. 2003 SS{sub 422} and 2007 TA{sub 418} have high eccentricities and large perihelia, making them candidate members of an outer class of TNOs. We also report a new member of the 'extended' or 'detached' scattered disk, 2004 VN{sub 112}, and verify the stability of its orbit using numerical simulations. This object would have been visible to ESSENCE for only {approx}2% of its orbit, suggesting a vast number of similar objects across the sky. We emphasize that off-ecliptic surveys are optimal for uncovering the diversity of such objects, which in turn will constrain the history of gravitational influences that shaped our early solar system.

  10. Visualization and exploration for recommender systems in enterprise organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karni, Z.; Shapira, L.

    2013-03-01

    Recommender systems seek to predict the interest a user would find in an item, person or social element they had not yet considered, based upon the properties of the item, the user's past experience and similar users. However, recommended items are often presented to the user with no context and no ability to influence the results. We present a novel visualization technique for recommender systems in which, a user can see the items recommended for him, and understand why they were recommended. Focusing on a user, we render a planar visualization listing a set of recommended items. The items are organized such that similar items reside nearby on the screen, centered around realtime generated categories. We use a combination of iconography, text and tag clouds, with maximal use of screen real estate, and keep items from overlapping to produce our results. We apply our visualization to expert relevance maps in the enterprise and a book recommendation system for consumers. The latter is based on Shelfari, a social network for reading and books.

  11. Crew systems: integrating human and technical subsystems for the exploration of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, M. M.; Harrison, A. A.; Summit, J.

    1994-01-01

    Space exploration missions will require combining human and technical subsystems into overall "crew systems" capable of performing under the rigorous conditions of outer space. This report describes substantive and conceptual relationships among humans, intelligent machines, and communication systems, and explores how these components may be combined to complement and strengthen one another. We identify key research issues in the combination of humans and technology and examine the role of individual differences, group processes, and environmental conditions. We conclude that a crew system is, in effect, a social cyborg, a living system consisting of multiple individuals whose capabilities are extended by advanced technology.

  12. Crew systems: integrating human and technical subsystems for the exploration of space.

    PubMed

    Connors, M M; Harrison, A A; Summit, J

    1994-07-01

    Space exploration missions will require combining human and technical subsystems into overall "crew systems" capable of performing under the rigorous conditions of outer space. This report describes substantive and conceptual relationships among humans, intelligent machines, and communication systems, and explores how these components may be combined to complement and strengthen one another. We identify key research issues in the combination of humans and technology and examine the role of individual differences, group processes, and environmental conditions. We conclude that a crew system is, in effect, a social cyborg, a living system consisting of multiple individuals whose capabilities are extended by advanced technology. PMID:8060292

  13. Electric Propulsion Concepts Enabled by High Power Systems for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilland, James; Fiehler, Douglas; Lyons, Valerie

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the latest development in electric propulsion systems being planned for the new Space Exploration initiative. Missions to the Moon and Mars will require these new thrusters to deliver the large quantities of supplies that would be needed to support permanent bases on other worlds. The new thrusters are also being used for unmanned exploration missions that will go to the far reaches of the solar system. This paper is intended to give the reader some insight into several electric propulsion concepts their operating principles and capabilities, as well as an overview of some mission applications that would benefit from these propulsion systems, and their accompanying advanced power systems.

  14. Analysis of planetary exploration spacesuit systems and evaluation of a modified partial-gravity simulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Steven Patrick

    Building on prior experience during Apollo, NASA now plans to send humans back to the Moon and then on to Mars as part of its Vision for Space Exploration. An integral component for enabling this plan is the development of advanced spacesuit systems. A planetary exploration spacesuit system consists of an astronaut, a spacesuit, and the associated surface systems designed to enable completion of mission objectives. This thesis addresses all three aspects, beginning with an examination of the effects of locomotion stability in lunar and Mars gravity from a metabolic energy expenditure standpoint. An experiment to determine the effects of stability on running in reduced gravity was performed with a modified vertical offload partial gravity device. Operations scenarios were also developed, along with engineering analysis to understand the forces and moments involved in partial gravity locomotion. Analysis is presented to assess the applicability of terrestrial exploration systems and to adapt them for planetary exploration. Access systems for partial gravity planetary explorations are described that may allow humans in spacesuits to safely access scientifically significant terrain on the Moon and Mars. Contingency scenarios for effective rescue of astronauts from flat and sloped terrain were also analyzed. Conclusions and recommendations are offered regarding the effectiveness of the simulation technique developed. An Earth-based field testing program plan is presented with the intent of including access systems in the lunar surface system architecture requirements early enough to allow synergies in component design.

  15. AES Encryption and Decryption Using Direct3D 10 API

    E-print Network

    Chiuta, Adrian Marius

    2012-01-01

    Current video cards (GPUs - Graphics Processing Units) are very programmable, have become much more powerful than the CPUs and they are very affordable. In this paper, we present an implementation for the AES algorithm using Direct3D 10 certified GPUs. The graphics API Direct3D 10 is the first version that allows the use of integer operations, making from the traditional GPUs (that works only with floating point numbers), General Purpose GPUs that can be used for a large number of algorithms, including encryption. We present the performance of the symmetric key encryption algorithm - AES, on a middle range GPU and on a middle range quad core CPU. On the testing system, the developed solution is almost 3 times faster on the GPU than on one single core CPU, showing that the GPU can perform as an efficient cryptographic accelerator.

  16. A Comparison of Electric Propulsion Systems for Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiehler, Douglas; Oleson, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Earth-Mars trajectories for multiple solar-powered spacecraft configurations were generated using Hall and ion propulsion systems utilizing the Direct Trajectory Optimization Method. Payload and power trades versus trip time were examined. Performance was compared for purely interplanetary flight and interplanetary flight with estimated spiral in to Mars orbit. Evaluating current ion and Hall thruster technologies, similar payload masses were delivered by each at equivalent trip times, but with the Hall thruster operating at a power level 10 kilowatts, on average, less than the ion thruster. The power difference for equivalent payload delivered should result in a significant cost savings.

  17. PLAN-IT: Scheduling assistant for solar system exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, William C.; Henricks, Julia A.; Wong, Jennifer C.

    1987-01-01

    A frame-based expert scheduling system shell, PLAN-IT, is developed for spacecraft scheduling in the Request Integration Phase, using the Comet Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission as a development base. Basic, structured, and expert scheduling techniques are reviewed. Data elements such as activity representation and resource conflict representation are discussed. Resource constraints include minimum and maximum separation times between activities, percentage of time pointed at specific targets, and separation time between targeted intervals of a given activity. The different scheduling technique categories and the rationale for their selection are also considered.

  18. Integrated Design of AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) Encrypter and Decrypter

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chih-chung Lu; Shau-yin Tseng

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposed a method of integrating the AES encrypter and the AES decrypter into a full functional AES crypto-engine. This method can make it a very low-complexity architecture, especially in saving the hardware resource in implementing the AES (Inv)SubBytes module and (Inv)Mixcolumns module, etc. Most designed modules can be used for both AES encryption and decryption. Besides, the architecture

  19. AE Aquarii represents a new subclass of Cataclysmic Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhsanov, N. R.; Beskrovnaya, N. G.

    2012-08-01

    We analyze properties of the unique nova-like star AE Aquarii identified with a close binary system containing a red dwarf and a very fast rotating magnetized white dwarf. It cannot be assigned to any of the three commonly adopted sub-classes of Cataclysmic Variables: Polars, Intermediate Polars, and Accreting non-magnetized White Dwarfs. Our study has shown that the white dwarf in AE Aqr is in the ejector state and its dipole magnetic moment is µ?1.5 × 1034 G cm3. It switched into this state due to intensive mass exchange between the system components during a previous epoch. A high rate of disk accretion onto the white dwarf surface resulted in temporary screening of its magnetic field and spin-up of the white dwarf to its present spin period. Transition of the white dwarf to the ejector state had occurred at a final stage of the spin-up epoch as its magnetic field emerged from the accreted plasma due to diffusion. In the frame of this scenario AE Aqr represents a missing link in the chain of Polars evolution and the white dwarf resembles a recycled pulsar.

  20. A drill-soil system modelization for future Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finzi, A. E.; Lavagna, M.; Rocchitelli, G.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a first approach to the problem of modeling a drilling process to be carried on in the space environment by a dedicated payload. Systems devoted to work in space present very strict requirements in many different fields such as thermal response, electric power demand, reliability and so on. Thus, models devoted to the operational behaviour simulation represent a fundamental help in the design phase and give a great improvement in the final product quality. As the required power is the crucial constraint within drilling devices, the tool-soil interaction modelization and simulation are finalized to the computation of the power demand as a function of both the drill and the soil parameters. An accurate study of the tool and the soil separately has been firstly carried on and, secondly their interaction has been analyzed. The Dee-Dri system, designed by Tecnospazio and to be part of the lander components in the NASA's Mars Sample Return Mission, has been taken as the tool reference. The Deep-Drill system is a complex rotary tool devoted to the soil perforation and sample collection; it has to operate in a Martian zone made of rocks similar to the terrestrial basalt, then the modelization is restricted to the interaction analysis between the tool and materials belonging to the rock set. The tool geometric modelization has been faced by a finite element approach with a Langrangian formulation: for the static analysis a refined model is assumed considering both the actual geometry of the head and the rod screws; a simplified model has been used to deal with the dynamic analysis. The soil representation is based on the Mohr-Coulomb crack criterion and an Eulerian approach has been selected to model it. However, software limitations in dealing with the tool-soil interface definition required assuming a Langrangian formulation for the soil too. The interaction between the soil and the tool has been modeled by extending the two-dimensional Nishimatsu's theory for rock cutting for rotating perforation tools. A fine analysis on f.e.m. element choice for each part of the tool is presented together with static analysis results. The dynamic analysis results are limited to the first impact phenomenon between the rock and the tool head. The validity of both the theoretical and numerical models is confirmed by the good agreement between simulation results and data coming from the experiments done within the Tecnospazio facilities.

  1. Solar System Exploration - Probing Below the Surface of Mars

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-07-21

    As part of this classroom activity, students will record and graph temperature data to learn about the search for water on Mars. Using models of frozen and ice-free "soils" constructed from readily available materials (a list is provided), they will examine (by periodically measuring temperature and graphing the results) how the ice content of the Martian soil affects the rate at which a warm probe will cool. This activity is part of NASA's Solar System Educators Program, a nationwide network of teachers who lead workshops that show other teachers how to successfully incorporate NASA materials and research into their classes. This activity is correlated to National Science Education Standards and NCTM Principles and Standards for School Mathematics.

  2. The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Transverse Impulse Rocket System (TIRS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanMartin, Alejandro Miguel; Bailey, Erik

    2005-01-01

    In a very short period of time the MER project successfully developed and tested a system, TIRS/DIMES, to improve the probability of success in the presence of large Martian winds. The successful development of TIRS/DIMES played a big role in the landing site selection process by enabling the landing of Spirit on Gusev crater, a site of very high scientific interest but with known high wind conditions. The performance of TIRS by Spirit at Gusev Crater was excellent. The velocity prediction error was small and Big TIRS was fired reducing the impact horizontal velocity from approximately 23 meters per second to approximately 11 meters per second, well within the airbag capabilities. The performance of TIRS by Opportunity at Meridiani was good. The velocity prediction error was rather large (approximately 6 meters per second, a less than 2 sigma value, but TIRS did not fire which was the correct action.

  3. Exploring Manycore Multinode Systems for Irregular Applications with FPGA Prototyping

    SciTech Connect

    Ceriani, Marco; Palermo, Gianluca; Secchi, Simone; Tumeo, Antonino; Villa, Oreste

    2013-04-29

    We present a prototype of a multi-core architecture implemented on FPGA, designed to enable efficient execution of irregular applications on distributed shared memory machines, while maintaining high performance on regular workloads. The architecture is composed of off-the-shelf soft-core cores, local interconnection and memory interface, integrated with custom components that optimize it for irregular applications. It relies on three key elements: a global address space, multithreading, and fine-grained synchronization. Global addresses are scrambled to reduce the formation of network hot-spots, while the latency of the transactions is covered by integrating an hardware scheduler within the custom load/store buffers to take advantage from the availability of multiple executions threads, increasing the efficiency in a transparent way to the application. We evaluated a dual node system irregular kernels showing scalability in the number of cores and threads.

  4. 3/4/13 FW: NAIS Email Notification System Broadcast Message https://bl2prd0310.outlook.com/owa/?ae=Item&t=IPM.Note&id=RgAAAACfXPjWJodXRI0uks9p1JV%2fBwCdsXoj1N3xRJd9Zm9xqMINAAAASwk4AAA28vIat0ag... 1/2

    E-print Network

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    3/4/13 FW: NAIS Email Notification System Broadcast Message https://bl2prd0310.outlook.com/owa/?ae: NAIS Email Notification System Broadcast Message Sponsored Projects Sent:Monday, March 04, 2013 4:08 PM Projects Subject: NAIS Email Notification System Broadcast Message SEQUESTRATION MESSAGE FROM THE OFFICE

  5. Solar system exploration from the Moon: Synoptic and comparative study of bodies in our Planetary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruston, P.; Mumma, M. J.

    1994-06-01

    An observational approach to Planetary Sciences and exploration from Earth applies to a quite limited number of targets, but most of these are spatially complex, and exhibit variability and evolution on a number of temporal scales which lie within the scope of possible observations. Advancing our understanding of the underlying physics requires the study of interactions between the various elements of such systems, and also requires study of the comparative response of both a given object to various conditions and of comparable objects to similar conditions. These studies are best conducted in 'campaigns', i.e. comprehensive programs combining simultaneous coherent observations of every interacting piece of the puzzle. The requirements include both imaging and spectroscopy over a wide spectral range, from UV to IR. While temporal simultaneity of operation in various modes is a key feature, these observations are also conducted over extended periods of time. The moon is a prime site offering long unbroken observation times and high positional stability, observations at small angular separation from the sun, comparative studies of planet Earth, and valuable technical advantages. A lunar observatory should become a central piece of any coherent set of planetary missions, supplying in-situ explorations with the synoptic and comparative data necessary for proper advance planning, correlative observations during the active exploratory phase, and follow-up studies of the target body or of related objects.

  6. MATISSE: the ASDC tool to access and visualize Solar System exploration data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinzi, A.; Capria, M. T.; Palomba, E.; Antonelli, L. A.; Giommi, P.

    2014-04-01

    At the present time planetary exploration data are generally stored in "old style" archives, i.e., common ftp repositories where the user needs to manually search the data by browsing into the directories. However, because of the increasing size of archives, this method is becoming very time consuming, subtracting time to the scientific part of the work. Therefore the ASI Science Data Center Solar System Exploration (ASDC-SSE) group started to implement a tool software to access and visualize data of the planetary exploration mission, thus reducing the time spent looking for the data and, finally, allowing datafusion. The tool, named MATISSE (Multi-instrument Advanced Tool for the Instruments for the Solar System Exploration), during its first year of development has been mainly devoted to data from the ESA Rosetta mission but recently, thanks to its modular structure, it has been expanded to include NASA Dawn data (VIR instrument).

  7. Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis: Exploration Class Simulation Overview and Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DwyerCianciolo, Alicia M.; Davis, Jody L.; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    NASA senior management commissioned the Entry, Descent and Landing Systems Analysis (EDL-SA) Study in 2008 to identify and roadmap the Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) technology investments that the agency needed to make in order to successfully land large payloads at Mars for both robotic and exploration or human-scale missions. The year one exploration class mission activity considered technologies capable of delivering a 40-mt payload. This paper provides an overview of the exploration class mission study, including technologies considered, models developed and initial simulation results from the EDL-SA year one effort.

  8. Computer system evolution requirements for autonomous checkout of exploration vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Tom; Sklar, Mike

    1991-01-01

    This study, now in its third year, has had the overall objective and challenge of determining the needed hooks and scars in the initial Space Station Freedom (SSF) system to assure that on-orbit assembly and refurbishment of lunar and Mars spacecraft can be accomplished with the maximum use of automation. In this study automation is all encompassing and includes physical tasks such as parts mating, tool operation, and human visual inspection, as well as non-physical tasks such as monitoring and diagnosis, planning and scheduling, and autonomous visual inspection. Potential tasks for automation include both extravehicular activity (EVA) and intravehicular activity (IVA) events. A number of specific techniques and tools have been developed to determine the ideal tasks to be automated, and the resulting timelines, changes in labor requirements and resources required. The Mars/Phobos exploratory mission developed in FY89, and the Lunar Assembly/Refurbishment mission developed in FY90 and depicted in the 90 Day Study as Option 5, have been analyzed in detailed in recent years. The complete methodology and results are presented in FY89 and FY90 final reports.

  9. Exploration of the California Current System with seismic oceanography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biescas-Gorriz, B.; Mojica, J. F.; Bornstein, G.; Bartlett, A.; Nedimovic, M. R.; Sallares, V.; Ruddick, B. R.; Carbotte, S. M.; Canales, J.; Carton, H. D.

    2012-12-01

    Seismic oceanography is a discipline that studies physical properties of the oceanic water from multichannel seismic reflection data. Multichannel seismic reflection data image mesoscale structures in the ocean like fronts, eddies and currents with lateral resolution on the order of 10 m. These data reveal the lateral coherence of thermohaline oceanic structures as well as the interactions with the topography. This discipline uses the same instrumentation and software for data acquisition and processing that marine geophysics, but it uses the first 5-6 seconds of the seismic records, which travel through the water column. The "Juan de Fuca Ridge to Trench" survey was carried out in the Cascadia Basin during last June-July 2012. The water column above Cascadia Basin is affected by the California Current System. There were two research vessel involved in this geophysical survey: RV Marcus Langseth, which was in charged of the multichannel seismic reflection data acquisition and the RV Oceanus, which was in charged of the ocean bottom seismometers. We had the opportunity of acquiring XBTs and XSVs simultaneously to the seismic acquisition from the RV Marcus Langseth and the RV Oceanus offered to us the opportunity of doing CTD space-coincident casts of the seismic acquisition, in order to compare the seismic images with the temperature, salinity and sound velocity data. We present in this work the seismic images of two eddies that were recorded in the survey and their comparison with the physical properties of the ocean.

  10. Exploring Science Applications for Unmanned Aircraft Systems Aboard UNOLS Ships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, R.; Lachenmeier, T.; Hatfield, M. C.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks has been expanding the use of small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) for science support from a variety of ships for several years. The ease and safety of flying from research vessels offers the science community lower cost access to overhead surveys of marine mammals without impact on sensitive populations, monitoring of AUV operations and collection of transmitted data, extensive surveys of sea ice during formation, melt, and sea temperatures through multiple seasons. As FAA expands access to the Arctic airspace over the Chukchi, Beaufort, and Bering Seas, the opportunities to employ UAS in science applications will become easier to exploit. This presentation describes the changes coming through new FAA rules, through the Alaska FAA Test Site, the Pan-Pacific UAS Test Range Complex which includes Oregon and Hawaii, and even Iceland. Airspace access advances associated with recent operations including the NASA-sponsored MIZOPEX, whale detection, and forming sea ice work in October will be presented, as well as a glider UAS connected to very high altitude balloons collecting atmospheric data. Development of safety procedures for use of UAS on UNOLS ships will be discussed.

  11. Developing Crew Health Care and Habitability Systems for the Exploration Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurini, Kathy; Sawin, Charles F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper will discuss the specific mission architectures associated with the NASA Exploration Vision and review the challenges and drivers associated with developing crew health care and habitability systems to manage human system risks. Crew health care systems must be provided to manage crew health within acceptable limits, as well as respond to medical contingencies that may occur during exploration missions. Habitability systems must enable crew performance for the tasks necessary to support the missions. During the summer of 2005, NASA defined its exploration architecture including blueprints for missions to the moon and to Mars. These mission architectures require research and technology development to focus on the operational risks associated with each mission, as well as the risks to long term astronaut health. This paper will review the highest priority risks associated with the various missions and discuss NASA s strategies and plans for performing the research and technology development necessary to manage the risks to acceptable levels.

  12. 2010 NASA Exploration Systems Mission Directorate: Lunabotics Mining Competition Systems Engineering Paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    A fast growing approach in determining the best design concept for a problem is to hold a competition in which the rules are based on requirements similar to the actual problem. By going public with such competitions, sponsoring entities receive some of the most innovative engineering solutions in a fraction of the time and cost it would have taken to develop such concepts internally. Space exploration is a large benefactor of such design competitions as seen by the results of X-Prize Foundation and NASA lunar excavation competitions [1]. The results of NASA's past lunar excavator challenges has led to the need for an effective means of collecting lunar regolith in the absence of human beings. The 2010 Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) Lunar Excavation Challenge was created "to engage and retain students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, or STEM, in a competitive environment that may result in innovative ideas and solutions, which could be applied to actual lunar excavation for NASA." [2]. The ESMD Challenge calls for "teams to use telerobotics or autonomous operations to excavate at least 10kg of lunar regolith simulant in a 15 minute time limit" [2]. The Systems Engineering approach was used in accordance with Auburn University's mechanical engineering senior design course (MECH 4240-50) to develop a telerobotic lunar excavator, seen in Fig. 1, that fulfilled requirements imposed by the NASA ESMD Competition Rules. The goal of the senior design project was to have a validated lunar excavator that would be used in the NASA ESMD lunar excavation challenge.

  13. Robust Concept Exploration of Propulsion Systems with Enhanced Model Approximation Capabilities

    E-print Network

    Chen, Wei

    1 Robust Concept Exploration of Propulsion Systems with Enhanced Model Approximation Capabilities at Clemson University Chester J. Pelka Technical Manager Advanced Engine Programs Pratt & Whitney Aircraft E is examined by applying it to the propulsion system conceptual design process at Pratt & Whitney. Various

  14. Understanding the Chena Hot Springs, Alaska, geothermal system using temperature and pressure data from exploration boreholes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kamil Erkan; Gwen Holdmann; Walter Benoit; David Blackwell

    2008-01-01

    Chena Hot Springs is a small, moderate temperature, deep circulating geothermal system, apparently typical of those associated to hot springs of interior Alaska. Multi-stage drilling was used in some exploration boreholes and was found to be useful for understanding subsurface flow characteristics and developing a conceptual model of the system. The results illustrate how temperature profiles illuminate varying pressure versus

  15. System-level Design Space Exploration for Security Processor Prototyping in Analytical Approaches

    E-print Network

    Lee, Jenq-Kuen

    System-level Design Space Exploration for Security Processor Prototyping in Analytical Approaches general analytical model- ing technique for determining a practical design of SPs that meet the security of architectures in designing the security processor-based systems typically involves time- consuming simulation

  16. The Inchworm Deep Drilling System for Kilometer Scale Subsurface Exploration of Europa (IDDS)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Rafeek; S. P. Gorevan; P. W. Bartlett; K. Y. Kong

    2001-01-01

    The Inchworm Deep Drilling System (IDDS) is a compact subsurface transport system capable of accessing regions of astrobiological interest deep below the surface of Jupiter's moon, Europa. The IDDS answers Focus Investigation Area 1 as an innovative concept for implementing subsurface exploration of Europa. The concept is being developed at Honeybee Robotics to reach depths on the order of one

  17. A Robust Concept Exploration Method for Enhancing Productivity in Concurrent Systems Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Chen; Janet K. Allen; Farrokh Mistree

    1997-01-01

    Productivity is of major economic significance in the current competitive global market. Due to growing costs and globalization of the marketplace, improvements in productivity require the creation of a reliable design through concurrent systems analysis in the shortest possible time. This is particularly important for designing complex engineering systems such as aircraft, automobiles and ships. The Robust Concept Exploration Method

  18. On the Calibration of Abstract Performance Models for System-level Design Space Exploration

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    On the Calibration of Abstract Performance Models for System-level Design Space Exploration Andy D,mthompsn,spolstra,cagkan}@science.uva.nl Abstract-- High-level performance modeling and simulation have become a key ingredient of system for such high-level modeling and simulation methods is that they should yield trustworthy performance

  19. Engineering America's Future in Space: Systems Engineering Innovations for Sustainable Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Caruso, Pamela W.; Jones, Carl P.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews systems engineering innovations for Ares I and Ares V launch vehicles. The contents include: 1) NASA's Exploratoin Roadmap; 2) Launch Vehicle Comparisons; 3) Designing the Ares I and Ares V in House; 4) Exploring the Moon; and 5) Systems Engineering Adds Value Throughout the Project Lifecycle.

  20. Exploring the intellectual structures of information systems development: A social action theoretic analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kalle Lyytinen; H. K. Klein

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we explore the intellectual structures upon which the field of information systems development (ISD) is cultivated. The conceptual base of our work comes from the social action theories of Habermas and Etzioni. We propose a framework which reconceptualizes the field in terms of domains, orientations, object systems, and development strategies. Our analysis not only justifies the reflection

  1. Reliability and Availability Analysis for the JPL Remote Exploration and Experimentation System

    E-print Network

    Dharmaraja, S.

    /availability modeling and analysis of the REE system. We carry out this task using fault trees, reliability blockReliability and Availability Analysis for the JPL Remote Exploration and Experimentation System diagrams, stochastic Reward nets and hierarchical models. Our analysis helps to determine the ranges

  2. Operationalizing sustainability: exploring options for environmentally friendly flower bulb production systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Walter A. H. Rossing; Jan Eelco Jansma; Frank J. De Ruijter; Jan Schans

    1997-01-01

    Current production systems for flower bulbs in the Netherlands employ considerable quantities of pesticides and nutrients per unit area. In 1993, an association of growers and environmentalists set out to design new farming systems that meet environmental objectives in addition to economic objectives. To support the design process, an explorative study was carried out to bring together the fragmented agronomic

  3. IMPLEMENTING INFORMATION SYSTEMS TO SUPPORT KNOWLEDGE WORK: AN EXPLORATION OF WORK MOTIFS

    Microsoft Academic Search

    The research presented in this paper is part of a larger study of the organizational impacts of information systems on knowledge work. The phase of the research reported in the paper explores current understanding of information systems implementation issues and asks whether it is adequate to effectively manage the wide range of IS that support knowledge work. Studies that have

  4. A Touring Machine: Prototyping 3D Mobile Augmented Reality Systems for Exploring the Urban Environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Feiner; Blair Macintyre; Tobias Höllerer; Anthony Webster

    1997-01-01

    We describe a prototype system that combines together the overlaid 3D graphics of augmented reality with the untethered freedom of mobile computing. The goal is to explore how these two technologies might together make possible wearable computer systems that can support users in their everyday interactions with the world. We introduce an application that presents information about our univer- sity's

  5. Advanced AE Techniques in Composite Materials Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    1996-01-01

    Advanced, waveform based acoustic emission (AE) techniques have been successfully used to evaluate damage mechanisms in laboratory testing of composite coupons. An example is presented in which the initiation of transverse matrix cracking was monitored. In these tests, broad band, high fidelity acoustic sensors were used to detect signals which were then digitized and stored for analysis. Analysis techniques were based on plate mode wave propagation characteristics. This approach, more recently referred to as Modal AE, provides an enhanced capability to discriminate and eliminate noise signals from those generated by damage mechanisms. This technique also allows much more precise source location than conventional, threshold crossing arrival time determination techniques. To apply Modal AE concepts to the interpretation of AE on larger composite specimens or structures, the effects of modal wave propagation over larger distances and through structural complexities must be well characterized and understood. To demonstrate these effects, measurements of the far field, peak amplitude attenuation of the extensional and flexural plate mode components of broad band simulated AE signals in large composite panels are discussed. These measurements demonstrated that the flexural mode attenuation is dominated by dispersion effects. Thus, it is significantly affected by the thickness of the composite plate. Furthermore, the flexural mode attenuation can be significantly larger than that of the extensional mode even though its peak amplitude consists of much lower frequency components.

  6. Comprehensive processing system for surface data in three-dimensional oil seismic exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Ruifeng, X.; Jun, W.; Yi, X.; Deming, L.; Shouxin, C.; Qingsheng, W. (Survey Teaching and Research Section, Dept. of Architectural Engineering, Xinjiang Industrial College, Urumqi City, Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region (CN))

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses three-dimensional seismic exploration, a new technique in oil seismic exploration, and it needs heavy and complicated processing of surface survey data. Hence, it is the authors' interested problem how people can efficiently process the surface survey data in three-dimensional seismic exploration in the case of limited internal storage and low calculation speed of a personal computer. The authors detail the personal-computer processing system for surface survey data in three-dimensional oil seismic exploration. This system can be used to accomplish both data acquisition and calculation to automatically output result data table, terrain map and cross section. If procedure is designed reasonably, this system can each time process the surface survey data in 800 km{sup 2} three-dimensional seismic grid. The data processing system is interactive, convenient, adaptable and reliable. The system was used to process the surface survey data in three-dimensional seismic exploration in Zhengeer basin. The processed results satisfy design requirements. The processing cost is cheap.

  7. Realization and optimization of AES algorithm on the TMS320DM6446 based on DaVinci technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Wen-bin; Xiao, Fu-hai

    2013-03-01

    The application of AES algorithm in the digital cinema system avoids video data to be illegal theft or malicious tampering, and solves its security problems. At the same time, in order to meet the requirements of the real-time, scene and transparent encryption of high-speed data streams of audio and video in the information security field, through the in-depth analysis of AES algorithm principle, based on the hardware platform of TMS320DM6446, with the software framework structure of DaVinci, this paper proposes the specific realization methods of AES algorithm in digital video system and its optimization solutions. The test results show digital movies encrypted by AES128 can not play normally, which ensures the security of digital movies. Through the comparison of the performance of AES128 algorithm before optimization and after, the correctness and validity of improved algorithm is verified.

  8. Abstract--The design of today's embedded systems involves a complex Design Space Exploration (DSE) process. Typically,

    E-print Network

    Pimentel, Andy D.

    Abstract--The design of today's embedded systems involves a complex Design Space Exploration (DSE of Multi-Objective Design spacE eXploration), to realize the search dynamics of a MOEA and to visualize--Design space exploration, embedded systems, multi-objective evolutionary algorithms, visualization I

  9. Environmental Controls and Life Support System Design for a Space Exploration Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda C.; Rodriguez, Branelle; Vonau, Walt, Jr.; Borrego, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV will aid to expand the human exploration envelope for Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GEO), Near Earth Object (NEO), or planetary missions by using pressurized surface exploration vehicles. The SEV, formerly known as the Lunar Electric Rover (LER), will be an evolutionary design starting as a ground test prototype where technologies for various systems will be tested and evolve into a flight vehicle. This paper will discuss the current SEV ECLSS design, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, and the plan to advance the ECLSS design based on the SEV vehicle and system needs.

  10. Environmental Controls and Life Support System (ECLSS) Design for a Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambaugh, Imelda; Sankaran, Subra

    2010-01-01

    Engineers at Johnson Space Center (JSC) are developing an Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) design for the Space Exploration Vehicle (SEV). The SEV will aid to expand the human exploration envelope for Geostationary Transfer Orbit (GEO), Near Earth Object (NEO), or planetary missions by using pressurized surface exploration vehicles. The SEV, formerly known as the Lunar Electric Rover (LER), will be an evolutionary design starting as a ground test prototype where technologies for various systems will be tested and evolve into a flight vehicle. This paper will discuss the current SEV ECLSS design, any work contributed toward the development of the ECLSS design, and the plan to advance the ECLSS design based on the SEV vehicle and system needs.

  11. Reuniting the Solar System: Integrated Education and Public Outreach Projects for Solar System Exploration Missions and Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowes, Leslie; Lindstrom, Marilyn; Stockman, Stephanie; Scalice, Daniela; Klug, Sheri

    2003-01-01

    The Solar System Exploration Education Forum has worked for five years to foster Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) cooperation among missions and programs in order to leverage resources and better meet the needs of educators and the public. These efforts are coming together in a number of programs and products and in '2004 - The Year of the Solar System.' NASA's practice of having independent E/PO programs for each mission and its public affairs emphasis on uniqueness has led to a public perception of a fragmented solar system exploration program. By working to integrate solar system E/PO, the breadth and depth of the solar system exploration program is revealed. When emphasis is put on what missions have in common, as well as their differences, each mission is seen in the context of the whole program.

  12. Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS): A GIS-based application to marine resources exploitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Tianyun; Liu, Baohua; Zhai, Shikui; Liang, Ruicai; Zheng, Yanpeng

    2007-07-01

    Based on the ArcGIS geographic information system and the ORACLE database management system, this paper reports our studies on the technology of Marine Engineering Geological Exploration Information System (MEGEIS). By analyzing system structure, designing function modules and discussing data management, this paper systematically proposes a framework of technology to integrate, manage, and analyze the seabed information comprehensively. Then, the technology is applied to the design and development of the Bohai Sea Oilfield Paradigm Area Information System. The system can not only meet the practical demands of marine resources exploration and exploitation in the Bohai Sea oilfield, but also serve as a preparatory work in theory and technology for the realization of the ‘Digital Seabed’.

  13. Opportunities within NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate for Engineering Students and Faculty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garner, Lesley

    2008-01-01

    In 2006, NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) launched two new Educational Projects: (1) The ESMID Space Grant Student Project ; and (2) The ESM1D Space Grant Faculty Project. The Student Project consists of three student opportunities: exploration-related internships at NASA Centers or with space-related industry, senior design projects, and system engineering paper competitions. The ESMID Space Grant Faculty Project consists of two faculty opportunities: (1) a summer faculty fellowship; and (2) funding to develop a senior design course.

  14. Near-Earth Objects: Targets for Future Human Exploration, Solar System Science, and Planetary Defense

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Human exploration of near-Earth objects (NEOs) beginning circa 2025 - 2030 is one of the stated objectives of U.S. National Space Policy. Piloted missions to these bodies would further development of deep space mission systems and technologies, obtain better understanding of the origin and evolution of our Solar System, and support research for asteroid deflection and hazard mitigation strategies. This presentation will discuss some of the physical characteristics of NEOs and review some of the current plans for NEO research and exploration from both a human and robotic mission perspective.

  15. A Sensitivity-Based Design Space Exploration Methodology for Embedded Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    WILLIAM FORNACIARI; DONATELLA SCIUTO; CRISTINA SILVANO; VITTORIO ZACCARIA

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a system-level design methodology for the efficient exploration of the architectural parameters of the memory sub-systems, from the energy-delay joint perspective. The aim is to find the best configuration of the memory hierarchy without performing the exhaustive analysis of the parameters space. The target system architecture includes the processor, separated instruction and data caches, the

  16. Complementation studies with co-expressed fragments of human red cell band 3 (AE1): the assembly of the anion-transport domain in xenopus oocytes and a cell-free translation system.

    PubMed Central

    Groves, J D; Wang, L; Tanner, M J

    1998-01-01

    We examined the assembly of the membrane domain of the human red cell anion transporter (band 3; AE1) by co-expression of recombinant N- and C-terminal fragments in Xenopus oocytes and in cell-free translation with canine pancreatic microsomes. Co-immunoprecipitation was performed in non-denaturing detergent solutions using antibodies directed against the N- and C-termini of the membrane domain. Eleven of the twelve fragments were expressed stably in oocytes in the presence or absence of their respective partners. However, the fragment containing from putative span nine to the C-terminus could be detected in oocytes only when co-expressed with its complementary partner containing the first eight spans. Co-expression of pairs of fragments divided in the first, second, third and fourth exofacial loops and in the fourth cytoplasmic loop resulted in a concentration-dependent association, but a pair of fragments divided in the sixth cytoplasmic loop did not co-immunoprecipitate. When two complementary fragments were translated separately in the cell-free system and the purified microsomes were then mixed, co-immunoprecipitation was observed only if the membranes were first fused using polyethylene glycol. This shows that co-immunoprecipitation results from specific interactions within the membrane and is not an artefact of detergent solubilization or immunoprecipitation. We demonstrate that band 3 assembly can occur within the membrane after translation, insertion and initial folding of the individual fragments have been completed. We conclude that most band 3 fragments contain the necessary information to fold in the membrane and adopt a structure that is sufficiently similar to the native protein that it permits correct assembly with its complementary partner. PMID:9576864

  17. Gaining system design knowledge by systematic design space exploration with graph based design languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jens; Rudolph, Stephan

    2014-10-01

    The conceptual design phase in the design of complex systems such as satellite propulsion systems heavily relies on an exploration of the feasible design space. This exploration requires both: topological changes in the potential system architecture and consistent parametrical changes in the dimensioning of the existing system components. Since advanced engineering design techniques nowadays advocate a model-based systems engineering (MBSE) approach, graph-based design languages which embed a superset of MBSE-features are consequently used in this work to systematically explore the feasible design space. Design languages allow the design knowledge to be represented, modeled and executed using model-based transformations and combine this among other features with constraint processing techniques. The execution of the design language shown for the satellite propulsion systems in this work yields topologically varied designs (i.e. the selection of a monergol, a diergol or a coldgas system) with consistent parameters. Based on an a posteriori performance analysis of the automatically generated system designs, novel system knowledge (most notably in form of so-called "topology change points") can be gained and extracted from the original point cloud of numerical results.

  18. Operation and performance of the mars exploration rover imaging system on the martian surface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maki, J.N.; Litwin, T.; Schwochert, M.; Herkenhoff, K.

    2005-01-01

    The Imaging System on the Mars Exploration Rovers has successfully operated on the surface of Mars for over one Earth year. The acquisition of hundreds of panoramas and tens of thousands of stereo pairs has enabled the rovers to explore Mars at a level of detail unprecedented in the history of space exploration. In addition to providing scientific value, the images also play a key role in the daily tactical operation of the rovers. The mobile nature of the MER surface mission requires extensive use of the imaging system for traverse planning, rover localization, remote sensing instrument targeting, and robotic arm placement. Each of these activity types requires a different set of data compression rates, surface coverage, and image acquisition strategies. An overview of the surface imaging activities is provided, along with a summary of the image data acquired to date. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  19. Performance Comparison of the AES Submissions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bruce Schneier; John Kelsey; Doug Whiting; David Wagner; Chris Hall; Niels Ferguson

    1999-01-01

    The principal goal guiding the design of any encryption algorithm must be security. In the real world, however, performance and implementation cost are always of concern. Making the assumption that the major AES candidates are secure (a big assumption, to be sure, but one that is best dealt with in another paper), the most important properties the algorithms will be

  20. Cache-timing attacks on AES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Bernstein

    2005-01-01

    This paper warns against the use of S-boxes in cryptography. In particular, this paper shows that a simple cache-timing attack against AES software reveals some key bits; this paper also discusses some of the obstacles to constant-time array access on modern CPUs.

  1. AE Initiative Summary Business Case Office Supplies

    E-print Network

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    AE Initiative Summary Business Case ­ Office Supplies Business Sponsorship & Ownership Project Name, Tammi Simpson, Lisa Leisure, Rachel Fried, Jeffrey Lewis Business Unit(s): Vice Chancellor for Administration ­ Administrative Excellence Business Process Owner(s): UW-Madison Purchasing (central) Preliminary

  2. Exploring the Dynamic Costs of Process-aware Information Systems through Simulation

    E-print Network

    Ulm, Universität

    example. Keywords: Cost Modeling, Simulation Models, Method Engineering. 1 Introduction Process a model-based approach for systematically investigating the complex cost structures of PAIS engineeringExploring the Dynamic Costs of Process-aware Information Systems through Simulation Bela Mutschler

  3. Reliability and Availability Analysis for the JPL Remote Exploration and Experimentation System

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Chen; Selvamuthu Dharmaraja; Dongyan Chen; Lei Li; Kishor S. Trivedi; Raphael R. Some; Allen P. Nikora

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Remote Exploration and Experimentation (REE) Project, managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, has the vision of bringing commercial supercomputing tech- nology into space, in a form which meets the demanding en- vironmental requirements, to enable a new class of science investigation and discovery. Dependability goals of the REE system are 99% reliability over 5 years and 99% avail-

  4. Fault tolerant capabilities of the Cosmic Background Explorer attitude control system

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Samuel J. Placanica

    1992-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE), which was launched November 18, 1989 from Vandenberg Air Force Base aboard a Delta rocket, has been classified by the scientific community as a major success with regards to the field of cosmology theory. Despite a number of anomalies which have occurred during the mission, the attitude control system (ACS) has performed remarkably well. This

  5. Human support issues and systems for the space exploration initiative: Results from Project Outreach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aroesty, J.; Zimmerman, R.; Logan, J.

    1991-01-01

    The analyses and evaluations of the Human Support panel are discussed. The Human Support panel is one of eight panels created by RAND to screen and analyze submissions to the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) Outreach Program. Submissions to the Human Support panel were in the following areas: radiation protection; microgravity; life support systems; medical care; and human factors (behavior and performance).

  6. Multiple Embedded Inequalities and Cultural Diversity in Educational Systems: A Theoretical and Empirical Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Marie

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the social construction of cultural diversity in education, with a view to social justice. It examines how educational systems organize ethno-cultural difference and how this process contributes to inequalities. Theoretical resources are drawn from social philosophy as well as from recent developments in social organisation…

  7. Retargetable profiling for rapid, early system-level design space exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lukai Cai; Andreas Gerstlauer; Daniel Gajski

    2004-01-01

    Fast and accurate estimation is critical for exploration of any design space in general. As we move to higher levels of abstraction, estimation of complete system designs at each level of abstraction is needed. Estimation should provide a variety of useful metrics relevant to design tasks in different domains and at each stage in the design process.In this paper, we

  8. VDM-RS: A visual data mining system for exploring and classifying remotely sensed images

    E-print Network

    Gruenwald, Le

    applications domains, such as environmental monitoring, change detection, fire risk mapping and land useVDM-RS: A visual data mining system for exploring and classifying remotely sensed images Jianting 2009 Accepted 20 February 2009 Keywords: Data mining Visualization Remote sensing Image classification

  9. External Resource:Round and Round We Go - Exploring Orbits in the Solar System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1900-01-01

    This Journey Through Earth webpage is a program of the National Center for Earth and Space Science. The PDF, Round and Round We Go, focuses on exploring orbits in the solar system. Students will understand how orbits can be used to help categorize objects

  10. Model-Driven Design-Space Exploration for Embedded Systems: The Octopus Toolset

    E-print Network

    Vaandrager, Frits

    Model-Driven Design-Space Exploration for Embedded Systems: The Octopus Toolset Twan Basten1 trajectories become manageable, with high-quality, cost-effective results. This paper introduces the Octopus high-quality and cost-effective products. This work was carried out as part of the Octopus project

  11. Exploration of Process Interaction in Operating Systems: A Pipe-Fork Simulator

    E-print Network

    Robbins, Steven

    Exploration of Process Interaction in Operating Systems: A Pipe-Fork Simulator Steven Robbins- structors to trace through a variety of programs and to show how the processes and pipes are connected scheduling affect the configuration of the processes and pipes as well as the output of the program. Students

  12. Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore Environment

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward Systems Biology in Brown Algae to Explore Acclimation and Adaptation to the Shore,2 Catherine Boyen,1,2 and Anne Siegel4,5 Abstract Brown algae belong to a phylogenetic lineage distantly siliculosus as a model organism for brown algae has represented a framework in which several omics techniques

  13. A systems level strategy for analyzing the cell death network: implication in exploring the

    E-print Network

    Shamir, Ron

    a large population of cells, can be translated into the percent of cell death. Dying cells can displayA systems level strategy for analyzing the cell death network: implication in exploring Sharan2 , E Ruppin2,3 and A Kimchi*,1 The mammalian cell death network comprises three distinct

  14. Exploring Students' Understanding of Ordinary Differential Equations Using Computer Algebraic System (CAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maat, Siti Mistima; Zakaria, Effandi

    2011-01-01

    Ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are one of the important topics in engineering mathematics that lead to the understanding of technical concepts among students. This study was conducted to explore the students' understanding of ODEs when they solve ODE questions using a traditional method as well as a computer algebraic system, particularly…

  15. Epilogue: The Origins of Life in the Solar System and Future Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Lognonne; David Des Marais; François Raulin; Kathryn Fishbaugh

    2007-01-01

    The broad investigation of life in the universe must address its long-term survival (the primary focus of this book) and also its origins. Studies of survival address the evolution of the planetary environment, its habitability, the adaptability of living systems to changing conditions and possibly co-evolution of life with its host planet. Studies of origins explore the conditions necessary for

  16. Epilogue: The Origins of Life in the Solar System and Future Exploration

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philippe Lognonne; David Des Marais; François Raulin; Kathryn Fishbaugh

    The broad investigation of life in the universe must address its long-term survival (the primary focus of this book) and also its origins. Studies of survival address the evolution of the planetary environment, its habitability, the adaptability of living systems to changing conditions and possibly co-evolution of life with its host planet. Studies of origins explore the conditions necessary for

  17. diva: a visualization system for exploring document databases for technology forecasting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Steven Morris; Camille DeYong; Zheng Wu; Sinan Salman; Dagmawi Yemenu

    2002-01-01

    Database Information Visualization and Analysis system (diva) is a computer program that helps perform bibliometric analysis of collections of scientific literature and patents for technology forecasting. Documents, drawn from the technological field of interest, are visualized as clusters on a two dimensional map, permitting exploration of the relationships among the documents and document clusters and also permitting derivation of summary

  18. Correct horse battery staple: Exploring the usability of system-assigned passphrases

    E-print Network

    Correct horse battery staple: Exploring the usability of system-assigned passphrases Richard Shay across the usability metrics we ex- amined. Passphrases and passwords were forgotten at similar rates error-correction to counteract entry mistakes. Passphrase usability did not seem to increase when we

  19. Model-Based Exploration of the Design Space for Heterogeneous Systems on Chip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Holger Blume; H. T. Feldkaemper; Tobias G. Noll

    2005-01-01

    The exploration of the design space for heterogeneous Systems on Chip (SoC) becomes more and more important. As modern SoCs include a variety of different architecture blocks ensuring flexibility as well as highest performance, it is mandatory to prune the design space in an early stage of the design process in order to achieve short innovation cycles for new products.

  20. Opportunities for Model-Based Learning Systems in the Human Exploration of Space

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bill Clancey

    The international space program is at a crossroads: Advanced technology in automation and robotics is motivating moving beyond low Earth orbit for extended lunar stays and multiple-year missions to Mars. This presentation relates the various themes of ITS to new plans for the human-robot exploration of space. Opportunities include: adapting student modeling to the problem of instructing robotic systems in

  1. Exploration and Adaptation in Multiagent Systems: A Model-based Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David Carmel; Shaul Markovitch

    1997-01-01

    Agents that operate in a multi-agent system can benefit significantly from adapting to other agents while interacting with them. This work presents a general architecture for a model- based learning strategy combined with an ex- ploration strategy. This combination enables adaptive agents to learn models of their rivals and to explore their behavior for exploitation in future encounters. We report

  2. Artificial Gravity as a Multi-System Countermeasure for Exploration Class Space Flight Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, William H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's vision for space exploration includes missions of unprecedented distance and duration. However, during 30 years of human space flight experience, including numerous long-duration missions, research has not produced any single countermeasure or combination of countermeasures that is completely effective. Current countermeasures do not fully protect crews in low-Earth orbit, and certainly will not be appropriate for crews journeying to Mars and back over a three-year period. The urgency for exploration-class countermeasures is compounded by continued technical and scientific successes that make exploration class missions increasingly attractive. The critical and possibly fatal problems of bone loss, cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle weakening, neurovestibular disturbance, space anemia, and immune compromise may be alleviated by the appropriate application of artificial gravity (AG). However, despite a manifest need for new countermeasure approaches, concepts for applying AG as a countermeasure have not developed apace. To explore the utility of AG as a multi-system countermeasure during long-duration, exploration-class space flight, eighty-three members of the international space life science and space flight community met earlier this year. They concluded unanimously that the potential of AG as a multi-system countermeasure is indeed worth pursuing, and that the requisite AG research needs to be supported more systematically by NASA. This presentation will review the issues discussed and recommendations made.

  3. Anatomy of porphyry-related Au-Cu-Ag-Mo mineralised systems: Some exploration implications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greg Corbett

    Summary Analyses of exploration and mining case studies as well as magmatic arc geothermal systems have facilitated an understanding of the implications to explorationists of the anatomy of porphyry related Au-Cu-Mo-Ag mineralising systems. Deeply eroded magmatic source rocks tend to host sub economic mineralisation, which may become focused in the highly prospective in overlying apophyses to spine-like polyphasal intrusions. Buried

  4. Experience with the EM60 electromagnetic system for geothermal exploration in Nevada

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Wilt; N. E. Goldstein; M. Stark; J. R. Haught; H. F. Morrison

    1981-01-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) surveys at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Over 40 soundings were made in Panther Canyon (Grass Valley), near Winnemucca; Soda Lakes, near Fallon; and McCoy, west of Austin, to test and demonstrate the applicability of LBL's EM-60 system to geothermal exploration. The EM-60 is a frequency-domain system using three-component magnetic detection.

  5. Exploring the Solar System Teacher Workshop: Lessons Learned and Teacher Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Allen, J. S.; Allen, C. C.; Eskridge, G.; Tobola, K.; Stocco, K.

    1996-03-01

    In June 1995 JSC planetary scientists conducted a three week teacher workshop on "Exploring the Solar System (Ex SS)" as part of the NASA Science Teacher Enhancement Program (STEP). The scientists were assisted by the JSC education branch and two lead teachers who had previously helped develop the meteorite educational activities. Additional support was provided by the Lunar and Planetary Institute, Space Center Houston, and the University of Houston, Clear Lake. Funding for the workshop which included teacher stipends and tuition for 3 hours college credit at UHCL came primarily from the STEP at NASA headquarters education office, with limited support for exploration activities from code SX.

  6. Wearing on Her Nerves Exploring the Interrelation between the Nervous and Muscular Systems

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kathleen G. Brown

    2011-01-01

    This case study is designed to integrate important aspects of the nervous and muscular system portions of an anatomy and physiology course. Students follow the story of “Kathy,” whose symptoms involve both sensory and motor components of the nervous system. The students must recognize the key factors of nerve transmission, examine where there could be interruption, and recognize how the interruption would affect body function. They also need to identify the role that the nervous system plays in muscular function. Through the case, students explore the relationship between both body systems, consider how one affects the other, and discover how function can be affected by external factors.

  7. A Titan Explorer Mission Utilizing Solar Electric Propulsion and Chemical Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cupples, Michael; Coverstone, Vicki

    2003-01-01

    Mission and Systems analyses were performed for a Titan Explorer Mission scenario utilizing medium class launch vehicles, solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) for primary interplanetary propulsion, and chemical propulsion for capture at Titan. An examination of a range of system factors was performed to determine their affect on the payload delivery capability to Titan. The effect of varying the launch vehicle, solar array power, associated number of SEPS thrusters, chemical propellant combinations, tank liner thickness, and tank composite overwrap stress factor was investigated. This paper provides a parametric survey of the aforementioned set of system factors, delineating their affect on Titan payload delivery, as well as discussing aspects of planetary capture methodology.

  8. Further Observations on the Structure of the AES Algorithm

    E-print Network

    Seberry, Jennifer

    Further Observations on the Structure of the AES Algorithm Beomsik Song and Jennifer Seberry Centre on the structure of the AES algorithm relating to the cyclic properties of the functions used in this cipher. We note that the maximal period of the linear layer of the AES algorithm is short, as previously observed

  9. AES implementation on Smart Card Pongnukit Juthamas, Tingthanathikul Witit

    E-print Network

    1 AES implementation on Smart Card Pongnukit Juthamas, Tingthanathikul Witit Abstract-- This paper card. The AES implementation is the one of many techniques and will be presented in this paper. The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a symmetric-key block cipher algorithm, which is defined

  10. New AES software speed records Daniel J. Bernstein1

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    New AES software speed records Daniel J. Bernstein1 and Peter Schwabe2 1 Department of Computer, Netherlands peter@cryptojedi.org Abstract. This paper presents new speed records for AES software, taking advantage of (1) architecture-dependent reduction of instructions used to compute AES and (2

  11. AE5 Security Notions Definitions Implicit in the CAESAR Call

    E-print Network

    Rogaway, Phillip

    AE5 Security Notions Definitions Implicit in the CAESAR Call Chanathip Namprempre1 and Phillip A call for authenticated-encryption (AE) mechanisms, CAESAR, was recently put forward by Dan Bernstein [3]. One surprising feature of the call is the unusual AE interface it describes. The user who wants

  12. Fault Based Cryptanalysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES)

    E-print Network

    Fault Based Cryptanalysis of the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) Johannes Bl¨omer1 and Jean we describe several fault attacks on the Ad- vanced Encryption Standard (AES). First, using optical, Samyde [SA,QS], we present an implemen- tation independent fault attack on AES. This attack is able

  13. Provably Secure Masking of AES Johannes Blomer1

    E-print Network

    Provably Secure Masking of AES Johannes Bl¨omer1 , Jorge Guajardo2 , and Volker Krummel1 1, previous AES randomization tech- niques have based their security on heuristics and experiments. Thus, flaws have been found which make AES randomized implementations still vulnerable to side

  14. The Poly1305AES messageauthentication code Daniel J. Bernstein #

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    @cr.yp.to Abstract. Poly1305­AES is a state­of­the­art message­authentication code suitable for a wide variety sees at most 2 64 authenticated messages, and the attacker attempts D forgeries. Poly1305­AES can 1 Introduction This paper introduces and analyzes Poly1305­AES, a state­of­the­art secret

  15. The Poly1305AES messageauthentication code Daniel J. Bernstein #

    E-print Network

    Bernstein, Daniel

    @cr.yp.to Abstract. Poly1305­AES is a state­of­the­art message­authentication code suitable for a wide variety sees at most 2 64 authenticated messages, and the attacker attempts D forgeries. Poly1305­AES can Introduction This paper introduces and analyzes Poly1305­AES, a state­of­the­art secret­key message

  16. Differential Fault Analysis of AES: Towards Reaching its Limits

    E-print Network

    Differential Fault Analysis of AES: Towards Reaching its Limits Sk Subidh Ali1 , Debdeep. In this paper we present a theoretical analysis of the limits of the Differential Fault Analysis (DFA) of AES. The work has been compared to other works and also the optimal limits of Differential Fault Analysis of AES

  17. National Geothermal Data System: A Geothermal Data System for Exploration and Development

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, Lee [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Richard, Stephen [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Patten, Kim [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Love, Diane [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Coleman, Celia [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey); Chen, Genhan [Executive Office of the State of Arizona (Arizona Geological Survey)

    2012-09-30

    Geothermal-relevant geosciences data from all 50 states (www.stategeothermaldata.org), federal agencies, national labs, and academic centers are being digitized and linked in a distributed online network funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Data System (GDS) to foster geothermal energy exploration and development through use of interactive online ‘mashups,’data integration, and applications. Emphasis is first to make as much information as possible accessible online, with a long range goal to make data interoperable through standardized services and interchange formats. A growing set of more than thirty geoscience data content models is in use or under development to define standardized interchange formats for: aqueous chemistry, borehole temperature data, direct use feature, drill stem test, seismic event hypocenter, fault feature, geologic contact feature, geologic unit feature, thermal/hot spring description, metadata, quaternary fault, volcanic vent description, well header feature, borehole lithology log, crustal stress, gravity, heat flow/temperature gradient, permeability, and feature description data like developed geothermal systems, geologic unit geothermal characterization, permeability, production data, rock alteration description, rock chemistry, and thermal conductivity. Map services are also being developed for isopach maps, aquifer temperature maps, and several states are working on geothermal resource overview maps. Content models are developed based on existing community datasets to encourage widespread adoption and promulgate content quality standards. Geoscience data and maps from other GDS participating institutions, or “nodes” (e.g., U.S. Geological Survey, Southern Methodist University, Oregon Institute of Technology, Stanford University, the University of Utah) are being supplemented with extensive land management and land use resources from the Western Regional Partnership (15 federal agencies and 5 Western states) to provide access to a comprehensive, holistic set of data critical to geothermal energy development. As of May 2012 , we have nearly 37,000 records registered in the system catalog, and 550,075 data resources online, along with hundreds of Web services to deliver integrated data to the desktop for free downloading or online use. The data exchange mechanism is built on the U.S. Geoscience Information Network (USGIN, http://usgin.org and http://lab.usgin.org) protocols and standards developed as a partnership of the Association of American State Geologists (AASG) and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Keywords Data

  18. Impact of solar system exploration on theories of chemical evolution and the origin of life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Devincenzi, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    The impact of solar system exploration on theories regarding chemical evolution and the origin of life is examined in detail. Major findings from missions to Mercury, Venus, the moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan are reviewed and implications for prebiotic chemistry are discussed. Among the major conclusions are: prebiotic chemistry is widespread throughout the solar system and universe; chemical evolution and the origin of life are intimately associated with the origin and evolution of the solar system; the rate, direction, and extent of prebiotic chemistry is highly dependent upon planetary characteristics; and continued exploration will increase understanding of how life originated on earth and allow better estimates of the likelihood of similar processes occurring elsewhere.

  19. Detection of accreting circumstellar gas around weak emission-line Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, C. A.; Perez, M. R.; The, P. S.

    1993-01-01

    Archival and recent International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) high dispersion spectra of late B stars which reveal the presence of accreting gas with velocities as high as 350 km/s, collisional ionization of the accreting gas to temperatures above the stellar T(sub eff), and column densities intermediate between those observed toward classical Herbig Ae/Be stars and the nearby proto-planetary system beta Pictoris are presented. One of the stars HD 176386, while lacking obvious optical signatures of youth, is a member of the R CrA star formation region, and with an inferred age of 2.8 Myr has not yet arrived on the zero-age main sequence (ZAMS). The other object, an isolated, field B star with pronounced IR excess due to warm, circumstellar dust, 51 Oph, exhibits only modest H(alpha) emission. The combination of high velocity, accreting gas in systems with IR excesses due to circumstellar dust suggests that not only are these objects candidate proto-planetary systems, but that they may represent an extension to higher stellar masses of the weak-emission pre-main sequence (PMS) stars.

  20. Human Factors Engineering as a System in the Vision for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Smith, Danielle; Holden, Kritina

    2006-01-01

    In order to accomplish NASA's Vision for Exploration, while assuring crew safety and productivity, human performance issues must be well integrated into system design from mission conception. To that end, a two-year Technology Development Project (TDP) was funded by NASA Headquarters to develop a systematic method for including the human as a system in NASA's Vision for Exploration. The specific goals of this project are to review current Human Systems Integration (HSI) standards (i.e., industry, military, NASA) and tailor them to selected NASA Exploration activities. Once the methods are proven in the selected domains, a plan will be developed to expand the effort to a wider scope of Exploration activities. The methods will be documented for inclusion in NASA-specific documents (such as the Human Systems Integration Standards, NASA-STD-3000) to be used in future space systems. The current project builds on a previous TDP dealing with Human Factors Engineering processes. That project identified the key phases of the current NASA design lifecycle, and outlined the recommended HFE activities that should be incorporated at each phase. The project also resulted in a prototype of a webbased HFE process tool that could be used to support an ideal HFE development process at NASA. This will help to augment the limited human factors resources available by providing a web-based tool that explains the importance of human factors, teaches a recommended process, and then provides the instructions, templates and examples to carry out the process steps. The HFE activities identified by the previous TDP are being tested in situ for the current effort through support to a specific NASA Exploration activity. Currently, HFE personnel are working with systems engineering personnel to identify HSI impacts for lunar exploration by facilitating the generation of systemlevel Concepts of Operations (ConOps). For example, medical operations scenarios have been generated for lunar habitation in order to identify HSI requirements for the lunar communications architecture. Throughout these ConOps exercises, HFE personnel are testing various tools and methodologies that have been identified in the literature. A key part of the effort is the identification of optimal processes, methods, and tools for these early development phase activities, such as ConOps, requirements development, and early conceptual design. An overview of the activities completed thus far, as well as the tools and methods investigated will be presented.

  1. SEEDS-The international postgraduate master program for preparing young systems engineers for space exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vallerani, Ernesto; Chiocchia, Gianfranco; Messidoro, Piero; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Viola, Nicole

    2013-02-01

    SpacE Exploration and Development Systems (SEEDS) initiative originated from Politecnico di Torino and Thales Alenia Space Italy in 2005. It aimed at establishing a postgraduate international master course in space exploration and development systems to offer an opportunity to young engineers to get prepared for the future of Europe in space exploration. SEEDS project has been shared with Supaero Toulouse in France and with University of Bremen (together with the Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity, ZARM) in Germany. SEEDS course comprises of two different steps in sequence: an initial learning phase and a project work phase. The distinguishing feature of SEEDS is without any doubt the project work phase, which includes the preparatory work and the conceptual design activities, performed in three European sites to develop a limited number of building blocks identified during the preparatory work. The first year of activity started in November 2005. Five years of activities have passed since then and five project works have been successfully completed, dealing with various space exploration themes. The paper focuses on the description of SEEDS master course, in terms of master course structure, applied methodology and students team organization, and on the main results achieved, in terms of project work activities and development of future space workforce. The positive experience of five years of SEEDS is brought to evidence and lessons learned are discussed in view of SEEDS continuation.

  2. AE mass spectrometer antechamber study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herzog, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    The formation of CO2 and H2O in a gold plated antechamber was investigated when a beam of oxygen is introduced. It was found that at room temperature the formation of CO2 and H2O is negligibly small. However, at the top temperature (197 C) which could be achieved with the existing system, both products were formed in significant quantities. Desorption of CO2 and H2O at this temperature is still slow and incomplete which accounts for the delayed response to the beam conditions. Although the catalytic reactions take place already with molecular oxygen, the reactions are significantly enhanced if the oxygen beam is partially dissociated.

  3. The Poly1305AES Message-Authentication Code

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Daniel J. Bernstein

    2005-01-01

    Poly1305-AES is a state-of-the-art message-authentication code suitable for a wide variety of applications. Poly1305-AES computes a 16-byte authenticator of a variable-length message, using a 16-byte AES key, a 16-byte additional key, and a 16-byte nonce. The security of Poly1305-AES is very close to the security of AES; the security gap is at most 14DdL=16e=2 106 if messages have at most

  4. The design of integrated demodulation system of optical fiber hydrophone array for oceanic oil exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kai; Shi, Qingping; Tian, Changdong; Duan, Fajie; Zhang, Min; Liao, Yanbiao; Zhu, Yaoqiang

    2011-11-01

    An integrated demodulation system of optical fiber hydrophone array is designed in the paper for the application of oceanic oil exploration. The characteristic of artificial seismic signal, sensed and collected by piezoelectric hydrophone sensor used in the actual situation, is analyzed by joint time-frequency analysis. Based on this, parameters of the optical fiber hydrophone sensitivity and modulation frequency are designed with redundancy, ensuring that the upper limit of dynamic range of fiber optic hydrophone demodulation system can meet the requirements in the same operating conditions of sea trials, as those of piezoelectric sensor system.

  5. Evaluation of the MSFC facsimile camera system as a tool for extraterrestrial geologic exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, E. W.; Alderman, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Utility of the Marshall Space Flight (MSFC) facsimile camera system for extraterrestrial geologic exploration was investigated during the spring of 1971 near Merriam Crater in northern Arizona. Although the system with its present hard-wired recorder operates erratically, the imagery showed that the camera could be developed as a prime imaging tool for automated missions. Its utility would be enhanced by development of computer techniques that utilize digital camera output for construction of topographic maps, and it needs increased resolution for examining near field details. A supplementary imaging system may be necessary for hand specimen examination at low magnification.

  6. Air and Water System (AWS) Design and Technology Selection for the Vision for Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Harry; Kliss, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper considers technology selection for the crew air and water recycling systems to be used in long duration human space exploration. The specific objectives are to identify the most probable air and water technologies for the vision for space exploration and to identify the alternate technologies that might be developed. The approach is to conduct a preliminary first cut systems engineering analysis, beginning with the Air and Water System (AWS) requirements and the system mass balance, and then define the functional architecture, review the International Space Station (ISS) technologies, and discuss alternate technologies. The life support requirements for air and water are well known. The results of the mass flow and mass balance analysis help define the system architectural concept. The AWS includes five subsystems: Oxygen Supply, Condensate Purification, Urine Purification, Hygiene Water Purification, and Clothes Wash Purification. AWS technologies have been evaluated in the life support design for ISS node 3, and in earlier space station design studies, in proposals for the upgrade or evolution of the space station, and in studies of potential lunar or Mars missions. The leading candidate technologies for the vision for space exploration are those planned for Node 3 of the ISS. The ISS life support was designed to utilize Space Station Freedom (SSF) hardware to the maximum extent possible. The SSF final technology selection process, criteria, and results are discussed. Would it be cost-effective for the vision for space exploration to develop alternate technology? This paper will examine this and other questions associated with AWS design and technology selection.

  7. Crustal stress, seismicity, acoustic emission (AE), and tectonics: the Kefallinì;a (Greece) case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregori, G. P.; Poscolieri, M.; Paparo, G.; Ventrice, G.; de Simone, S.; Rafanelli, C.

    2009-04-01

    New inferences - confirming previous results (see references)- are presented dealing with a few years Acoustic Emission (AE) records collected at Kefallinìa (Ionian Islands, Greece). A physical distinction between HF (high frequency) vs. LF (low frequency) AE is required. Step-wise changes of the AE underground conductivity are evidenced, and can be suitably handled. "Smooth" results concern (i) the annual variation, (ii) some long-lasting stress "solitons" crossing through the area, and (iii) tidal effects. In particular, every AE station can be operated like a monitoring station both for Earth's tides and for the free oscillations of the Earth. In addition, Kefallinìa exhibits a much peculiar groundwater circulation, in which conduit flow is dominant, that originates a specific (and unique) AE effect. By means of AE time-series analysis, "extreme" or "catastrophic" events can be also monitored and possibly related to relevant tectonic occurrences (either earthquakes, or maybe other occasional phenomena). They can be investigated, and have a regional - rather than local - character. Therefore, every interpretation based on a single station record - being biased by some arbitrariness - can only result indicative. A standardized procedure and software is proposed for routine AE data handling and analysis. References.: Lagios et al., 2004. In Proc. SCI 2004 (The 8th World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatic), Orlando, Florida, July 1004, 6 pp. Poscolieri et al., 2006. In. G. Cello and B. D. Malamud, (eds), 2006. Geol. Soc. London, Special Publ., 261, 63-78. Poscolieri et al., 2006a. Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 6, 961-971.

  8. AE0200 CINEMA AL CAMPUS Descripci: els amants del cinema tenen la possibilitat de veure una

    E-print Network

    Oro, Daniel

    AE0200 CINEMA AL CAMPUS AE0210 AE0220 Descripció: els amants del cinema tenen la possibilitat de Sessions/durada: 30 / 75h ACTIVITAT COMPUTABLE A LES ASSIGNATURES: (consultau-ne les guies docents) AE0210 CINEMACAMPUS AE0211 AE0212 Descripció: la idea de donar a conèixer les particularitats del cinema com

  9. Exhausting Demirci-Seluk Meet-in-the-Middle Attacks against Reduced-Round AES

    E-print Network

    Fouque, Pierre-Alain

    Exhausting Demirci-Selçuk Meet-in-the-Middle Attacks against Reduced-Round AES Patrick Derbez1 Demirci and Selçuk meet-in-the-middle attacks on AES. We find a way to automatically model SPN block on AES and we show new improved attacks against 8-rounds of AES-192 and AES-256. 1 Introduction The AES

  10. Space Nuclear Power and Propulsion - a basic Tool for the manned Exploration of the Solar System

    SciTech Connect

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hamilton, Booz Allen [ESA/ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, P.O. Box 29, NL-2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2004-07-01

    Humanity has started to explore space more than 40 years ago. Numerous spacecraft have left the Earth in this endeavour, but while unmanned spacecraft were already sent out on missions, where they would eventually reach the outer limits of the Solar System, manned exploration has always been confined to the tiny bubble of the Earth's gravitational well, stretching out at maximum to our closest celestial companion - the Moon - during the era of the Apollo programme in the late 60's and early 70's. When mankind made its giant leap, the exploration of our cosmic neighbour was seen as the initial step for the manned exploration of the whole Solar System. Consequently ambitious research and development programmes were undertaken at that time to enable what seemed to be the next logical steps: the establishment of a permanent settled base on the Moon and the first manned mission to Mars in the 80's. Nuclear space power and propulsion played an important role in these entire future scenarios, hence ambitious development programmes were undertaken to make these technologies available. Unfortunately the 70's-paradigm shift in space policies did not only bring an end to the Apollo programme, but it also brought a complete halt to all of these technology programmes and confined the human presence in space to a tiny bubble including nothing more than the Earth's sphere and a mere shell of a few hundred kilometres of altitude, too small to even include the Moon. Today, after more than three decades, manned exploration of the Solar System has become an issue again and so are missions to Moon and Mars. However, studies and analyses show that all of these future plans are hampered by today's available propulsion systems and by the problematic of solar power generation at distances at and beyond of Mars, a problem, however, that can readily be solved by the utilisation of space nuclear reactors and propulsion systems. This paper intends to provide an overview on the various fission- and fusion-based Nuclear Power and Propulsion system concepts and tries to compare these systems' different working principles and technical implementations with each other. The overview and comparison will be complemented by a closer look at ongoing activities related to research and development in this area and by an outlook on what kind of systems might be employed to carry the first astronauts to Mars and beyond. (autho0008.

  11. Multiplicity of Herbig Ae/Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Sandrine; van der Bliek, Nicole; Brandvig, Ben; Bouvier, Jerome; Rodgers, Bernadette; Doppmann, Greg; Woodward, Chick

    2005-08-01

    Theories on star formation have treated the formation of low mass, intermediate mass and high mass stars distinctly. However it is not at all clear that there is a difference in the formation of these three groups. In fact, as many stars form in clusters, it is very likely that stars of different masses actually form and evolve together. We are conducting a photometric and spectroscopic study of multiples around Herbig Ae/Be (HAEBE) stars, to investigate the nature of the companions. HAEBE stars are PMS stars of intermediate mass, spanning the mass range between low-mass T Tauri stars and high mass stars. Hence, they fill an important parameter space in addressing the question of whether high mass and low-mass stars form the same way. Here we propose to obtain high resolution AO imaging to search for multiples amongst Herbig Ae/Be stars, continuing the work by Bouvier & Corporon (2001).

  12. Simplified Adaptive Multiplicative Masking for AES

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elena Trichina; Domenico De Seta; Lucia Germani

    2002-01-01

    Software counter measures against side channel attacks considerably hinder performance of cryptographic algorithms in terms\\u000a of memory or execution time or both. The challenge is to achieve secure implementation with as little extra cost as possible.\\u000a In this paper we optimize a counter measure for the AES block cipher consisting in transforming a boolean mask to a multiplicative\\u000a mask prior

  13. Oscillations, Flares, and Tomography of AE Aquarii

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Keith Horne

    1992-01-01

    AE Aquarii is the most rapidly spinning of the magnetic cataclysmic variables. Its 16.5 and 33s oscillations and large aperiodic flaring have been studied at radio, optical, x-ray, and TeV gamma-ray energies but never before in the UV. Accretion onto the magnetic poles of the white dwarf is thought to produce rotating x-ray searchlight beams that irradiate the surrounding accretion

  14. An ASIC Implementation of the AES SBoxes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Johannes Wolkerstorfer; Elisabeth Oswald; Mario Lamberger

    2002-01-01

    This article presents a hardware implementation of the SBoxes from the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The SBoxes substitute\\u000a an 8-bit input for an 8-bit output and are based on arithmetic operations in the finite field GF(28). We show that a calculation of this function and its inverse can be done efficiently with combinational logic. This approach\\u000a has advantages over a

  15. Challenges in verification and validation of autonomous systems for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brat, Guillaume; Jonsson, Ari

    2005-01-01

    Space exploration applications offer a unique opportunity for the development and deployment of autonomous systems, due to limited communications, large distances, and great expense of direct operation. At the same time, the risk and cost of space missions leads to reluctance to taking on new, complex and difficult-to-understand technology. A key issue in addressing these concerns is the validation of autonomous systems. In recent years, higher-level autonomous systems have been applied in space applications. In this presentation, we will highlight those autonomous systems, and discuss issues in validating these systems. We will then look to future demands on validating autonomous systems for space, identify promising technologies and open issues.

  16. A Geothermal GIS for Nevada: Defining Regional Controls and Favorable Exploration Terrains for Extensional Geothermal Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coolbaugh, M.F.; Taranik, J.V.; Raines, G.L.; Shevenell, L.A.; Sawatzky, D.L.; Bedell, R.; Minor, T.B.

    2002-01-01

    Spatial analysis with a GIS was used to evaluate geothermal systems in Nevada using digital maps of geology, heat flow, young faults, young volcanism, depth to groundwater, groundwater geochemistry, earthquakes, and gravity. High-temperature (>160??C) extensional geothermal systems are preferentially associated with northeast-striking late Pleistocene and younger faults, caused by crustal extension, which in most of Nevada is currently oriented northwesterly (as measured by GPS). The distribution of sparse young (160??C) geothermal systems in Nevada are more likely to occur in areas where the groundwater table is shallow (<30m). Undiscovered geothermal systems may occur where groundwater levels are deeper and hot springs do not issue at the surface. A logistic regression exploration model was developed for geothermal systems, using young faults, young volcanics, positive gravity anomalies, and earthquakes to predict areas where deeper groundwater tables are most likely to conceal geothermal systems.

  17. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Volume 1; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g., missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  18. Exploration of Network Alternatives for Middleware-centric Embedded System Design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Franco Fummi; Giovanni Perbellini; Davide Quaglia; R. Trenti

    2010-01-01

    The paper addresses the design-space exploration of network alternatives for complex distributed systems of embedded devices, e.g., for smart power grid or telecommunication services. While past research mainly provided efficient programming abstractions and HW\\/SW simulation tools, this work introduces the network perspective in the verification of different design solutions (e.g., different task decomposition and assignment to network nodes). To do

  19. Design space exploration algorithm for heterogeneous multi-processor embedded system design

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ireneusz Karkowski; Henk Corporaal

    1998-01-01

    Single-chip multi-processor embedded system becomesnowadays a feasible and very interesting option. What isneeded however is an environment that supports the designerin transforming an algorithmic specification into a suitableparallel implementation. In this paper we present anddemonstrate an important component of such an environment - an efficient design space exploration algorithm. The algorithm can be used to semi-automatically find the bestparallelization of

  20. Review of Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Integrated Hazard Development Process. Appendices; Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smiles, Michael D.; Blythe, Michael P.; Bejmuk, Bohdan; Currie, Nancy J.; Doremus, Robert C.; Franzo, Jennifer C.; Gordon, Mark W.; Johnson, Tracy D.; Kowaleski, Mark M.; Laube, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    The Chief Engineer of the Exploration Systems Development (ESD) Office requested that the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) perform an independent assessment of the ESD's integrated hazard development process. The focus of the assessment was to review the integrated hazard analysis (IHA) process and identify any gaps/improvements in the process (e.g. missed causes, cause tree completeness, missed hazards). This document contains the outcome of the NESC assessment.

  1. Roche tomography of cataclysmic variables -- III. Starspots on AE Aqr

    E-print Network

    C. A. Watson; V. S. Dhillon; T. Shahbaz

    2006-02-17

    We present a Roche tomography reconstruction of the secondary star in the cataclysmic variable AE Aqr. The tomogram reveals several surface inhomogeneities that are due to the presence of large, cool starspots. In addition to a number of lower-latitude spots, the maps also show the presence of a large high latitude spot similar to that seen in Doppler images of rapidly-rotating isolated stars, and a relative paucity of spots at a latitude of 40 degrees. In total, we estimate that some 18 per cent of the Northern hemisphere of AE Aqr is spotted. We have also applied the entropy landscape technique to determine accurate parameters for the binary system. We obtain optimal masses of M_1 = 0.74 solar masses, M_2 = 0.50 solar masses, a systemic velocity = -63 km/s and an orbital inclination of i = 66 degrees. Given that this is the first study to successfully image starspots on the secondary star in a cataclysmic variable, we discuss the role that further studies of this kind may play in our understanding of these binaries.

  2. Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing team: An examination of LA-ICP-AES in a mobile configuration. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has identified the need for field-deployable elemental analysis devices that are safer, faster, and less expensive than the fixed laboratory procedures now used to screen hazardous waste sites. As a response to this need, the Technology Integration Program (TIP) created a mobile, field-deployable laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-AES) sampling and analysis prototype. Although the elemental. screening prototype has been successfully field-tested, continued marketing and technical development efforts are required to transfer LA-ICP-AES technology to the commercial sector. TIP established and supported a student research and design group called the Integrated Design for Marketing and Manufacturing (IDMM) team to advance the technology transfer of mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES. The IDMM team developed a conceptual design (which is detailed in this report) for a mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES sampling and analysis system, and reports the following findings: Mobile, field-deployable LA-ICP-AES is commercially viable. Eventual regulatory acceptance of field-deployable LA-ICP-AES, while not a simple process, is likely. Further refinement of certain processes and components of LA-ICP-AES will enhance the device`s sensitivity and accuracy.

  3. Japanese future plans for exploration of primitive bodies in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Makoto; Yano, Hajime; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    More than two years has passed since the exploration of Itokawa by Hayabusa spacecraft. For the first time, we saw real appearance of a very small solar system body, whose size is only about 500 m in length. We had a lot of scientific results form the observation of Hayabusa, and we got many clues to know the origin and evolution of the solar system. As working for Hayabusa, we have also considered post-Hayabusa missions. Since the Itokawa is an S-type asteroid, next target should be a C-type asteroid, because these two types are abundant in the main asteroid belt. The next mission to Hayabusa is 'Hayabusa-2', which will explore C-type asteroid. The spacecraft is quite similar to Hayabusa, so we can save time for manufacturing it. The current target asteroid of Hayabusa-2 is 1999 JU3, which is intensively observed in 2007 and 2008. At the same time, we were also considering much more advanced mission after Hayabusa-2, and this mission is called 'Hayabusa-Mk2.' The target of Hayabusa-Mk2 should be much more primitive objects such as P-type or D-type asteroids, CAT, and comets, and the spacecraft is a newly developed one. In this way, we (=JAXA) are considering programmatic missions for the exploration of primitive bodies. Since there are many small bodies in the solar system, we should have such strategic approach. From 2006, Hayabusa-Mk2 is also considered under the scheme of Cosmic Vision of ESA with the European study group for small bodies of the solar system. And it was proposed to Cosmic Vision with the name of 'Marco Polo.' It has passed the first selection so now we are in the assessment phase. The spacecraft, for which Japan is responsible, is based on the idea of Hayabusa-Mk2, but we reconsider it to have a large lander and a new sampling system from Europe. There are four principal purposes for asteroid exploration, that is, science, spaceguard, resources, and manned mission. The science is the main target and we want to know the origin and evolution of the solar system and the life. And now, the other purposes, spaceguard and resources, are becoming important, too. Moreover Near Earth Asteroids are now considered as good targets for manned missions after the Moon but before Mars. The long-ranged exploration plan and international collaborations will be more important from now on.

  4. Information Exploration System for Sickle Cell Disease and Repurposing of Hydroxyfasudil

    PubMed Central

    Essack, Magbubah; Radovanovic, Aleksandar; Bajic, Vladimir B.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a fatal monogenic disorder with no effective cure and thus high rates of morbidity and sequelae. Efforts toward discovery of disease modifying drugs and curative strategies can be augmented by leveraging the plethora of information contained in available biomedical literature. To facilitate research in this direction we have developed a resource, Dragon Exploration System for Sickle Cell Disease (DESSCD) (http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/desscd/) that aims to promote the easy exploration of SCD-related data. Description The Dragon Exploration System (DES), developed based on text mining and complemented by data mining, processed 419,612 MEDLINE abstracts retrieved from a PubMed query using SCD-related keywords. The processed SCD-related data has been made available via the DESSCD web query interface that enables: a/information retrieval using specified concepts, keywords and phrases, and b/the generation of inferred association networks and hypotheses. The usefulness of the system is demonstrated by: a/reproducing a known scientific fact, the “Sickle_Cell_Anemia–Hydroxyurea” association, and b/generating novel and plausible “Sickle_Cell_Anemia–Hydroxyfasudil” hypothesis. A PCT patent (PCT/US12/55042) has been filed for the latter drug repurposing for SCD treatment. Conclusion We developed the DESSCD resource dedicated to exploration of text-mined and data-mined information about SCD. No similar SCD-related resource exists. Thus, we anticipate that DESSCD will serve as a valuable tool for physicians and researchers interested in SCD. PMID:23762313

  5. An exploration of alternative intersection designs in the context of Safe System.

    PubMed

    Candappa, Nimmi; Logan, David; Van Nes, Nicole; Corben, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Fatal and serious injury crashes persist at intersections despite current efforts to address this. Little research specifically investigates the role played by existing intersection design in perpetuating serious intersection crash outcomes despite an increasing move to incorporate Safe System design on to roads. This paper identifies design principles deemed important to align intersection design with Safe System approaches, including exploring the impact of speed and angle on overall kinetic energy of a crash. Existing as well as new intersection designs are presented that are believed to incorporate the identified principles. An assessment is made of the alignment of the new and existing designs with the identified principles. PMID:25173928

  6. Exploring Mars

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This module from the Mars Exploration Curriculum serves as an introduction to studying Mars in the classroom develops students' understanding of Mars, the solar system, and planetary exploration. The module introduces many of the intriguing riddles posed by Mars and provides teachers a variety of ways to integrate the study of Mars into their classrooms.

  7. Design Space Exploration and System Optimization with SymTA\\/S-- Symbolic Timing Analysis for Systems

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Arne Hamann; Marek Jersak; Kai Richter; Rolf Ernst

    2004-01-01

    The increasing complexity of heterogeneous SoC and distributed systems confronts the system designer with problems how to determine reasonable design alternatives leading to well functioning systems. Ideally, a designer would try all possible system configuration and choose the best one regarding specific system requirements. Unfortu- nately, such an approach is not possible because the high number of design parameters in

  8. Exploring the implication of climate process uncertainties within the Earth System Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, B.; Lambert, F. H.; McNeal, D.; Harris, G.; Sexton, D.; Boulton, C.; Murphy, J.

    2011-12-01

    Uncertainties in the magnitude of future climate change have been a focus of a great deal of research. Much of the work with General Circulation Models has focused on the atmospheric response to changes in atmospheric composition, while other processes remain outside these frameworks. Here we introduce an ensemble of new simulations, based on an Earth System configuration of HadCM3C, designed to explored uncertainties in both physical (atmospheric, oceanic and aerosol physics) and carbon cycle processes, using perturbed parameter approaches previously used to explore atmospheric uncertainty. Framed in the context of the climate response to future changes in emissions, the resultant future projections represent significantly broader uncertainty than existing concentration driven GCM assessments. The systematic nature of the ensemble design enables interactions between components to be explored. For example, we show how metrics of physical processes (such as climate sensitivity) are also influenced carbon cycle parameters. The suggestion from this work is that carbon cycle processes represent a comparable contribution to uncertainty in future climate projections as contributions from atmospheric feedbacks more conventionally explored. The broad range of climate responses explored within these ensembles, rather than representing a reason for inaction, provide information on lower likelihood but high impact changes. For example while the majority of these simulations suggest that future Amazon forest extent is resilient to the projected climate changes, a small number simulate dramatic forest dieback. This ensemble represents a framework to examine these risks, breaking them down into physical processes (such as ocean temperature drivers of rainfall change) and vegetation processes (where uncertainties point towards requirements for new observational constraints).

  9. Enabling technologies for space exploration systems: The STEPS project results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messidoro, Piero; Perino, Maria Antonietta; Boggiatto, Dario

    2013-05-01

    The project STEPS (Sistemi e Tecnologie per l'EsPlorazione Spaziale) is a joint development of technologies and systems for Space Exploration supported by Regione Piemonte, the European Regional Development Fund (E.R.D.F.) 2007-2013, Thales Alenia Space Italia (TAS-I), SMEs, Universities and public Research Centres belonging to the network "Comitato Distretto Aerospaziale del Piemonte" the Piedmont Aerospace District (PAD) in Italy. The project first part terminated in May 2012 with a final demonstration event that summarizes the technological results of research activities carried-out during a period the three years and half. The project developed virtual and hardware demonstrators for a range of technologies for the descent, soft landing and surface mobility of robotic and manned equipment for Moon and Mars exploration. The two key hardware demonstrators—a Mars Lander and a Lunar Rover—fit in a context of international cooperation for the exploration of Moon and Mars, as envisaged by Space Agencies worldwide. The STEPS project included also the development and utilization of a system of laboratories equipped for technology validation, teleoperations, concurrent design environments, and virtual reality simulation of the Exploration Systems in typical Moon and Mars environments. This paper presents the reached results in several technology domains like: vision-based GNC for the last portion of Mars Entry, Descent and Landing sequence, Hazard avoidance and complete spacecraft autonomy; Autonomous Rover Navigation, based on the determination of the terrain morphology by a stereo camera; Mobility and Mechanisms providing an Integrated Ground Mobility System, Rendezvous and Docking equipment, and protection from Environment effects; innovative Structures such as Inflatable, Smart and Multifunction Structures, an Active Shock Absorber for safe landing, balance restoring and walking; Composite materials Modelling and Monitoring; Human-machine interface features of a predictive Command and Control System; Energy Management systems based on Regenerative Fuel Cells; aerothermodynamic solutions for Atmospheric Re-entry of Commercial Transportation Systems; novel Design and Development Tools, such as a Rover S/W simulator and prototypes of the DEM viewer and of a S/W Rock Creator/visualizator. The paper also provides perspectives on the proposed STEPS 2 project that will likely continue the development of a subset of the above technologies in view of their possible in-flight validation within next five years.

  10. Cascade Storage and Delivery System for a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yagoda, Evan; Swickrath, Michael; Stambaugh, Imelda

    2012-01-01

    NASA is developing a Multi Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) for missions beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The MMSEV is a pressurized vehicle used to extend the human exploration envelope for Lunar, Near Earth Object (NEO), and Deep Space missions. The Johnson Space Center is developing the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) for the MMSEV. The MMSEV s intended use is to support longer sortie lengths with multiple Extra Vehicular Activities (EVAs) on a higher magnitude than any previous vehicle. This paper presents an analysis of a high pressure oxygen cascade storage and delivery system that will accommodate the crew during long duration Intra Vehicular Activity (IVA) and capable of multiple high pressure oxygen fills to the Portable Life Support System (PLSS) worn by the crew during EVAs. A cascade is a high pressure gas cylinder system used for the refilling of smaller compressed gas cylinders. Each of the large cylinders are filled by a compressor, but the cascade system allows small cylinders to be filled without the need of a compressor. In addition, the cascade system is useful as a "reservoir" to accommodate low pressure needs. A regression model was developed to provide the mechanism to size the cascade systems subject to constraints such as number of crew, extravehicular activity duration and frequency, and ullage gas requirements under contingency scenarios. The sizing routine employed a numerical integration scheme to determine gas compressibility changes during depressurization and compressibility effects were captured using the Soave-Redlich-Kwong (SRK) equation of state. A multi-dimensional nonlinear optimization routine was used to find the minimum cascade tank system mass that meets the mission requirements. The sizing algorithms developed in this analysis provide a powerful framework to assess cascade filling, compressor, and hybrid systems to design long duration vehicle ECLSS architecture. 1

  11. Collaborative systems thinking : an exploration of the mechanisms enabling team systems thinking

    E-print Network

    Lamb, Caroline Marie

    2009-01-01

    Aerospace systems are among the most complex anthropogenic systems and require large quantities of systems knowledge to design successfully. Within the aerospace industry, an aging workforce places those with the most ...

  12. Novel Evaluation Methods for Complex Systems via Adaptive Sequential Exploration of Variables Interactions 

    E-print Network

    Al Rashdan, Ahmad Y. M.

    2014-12-01

    Tree of d? ..................... 141 Figure 55. Integrated Odd and Even Parameters of 2469ae in 18b=xxx of d? ............ 144 Figure 56. Integrated Odd and Even Parameters of 9e in Subtrees 18b=011,101,111 of d... Odd and Even Parameters of 189 in Subtrees de=xx of PPF ...... 173 Figure 66. Integrated Odd and Even Parameters of 18 in Subtrees 49e=xxx of 2ab=101 of PPF...

  13. Nuclear Electric Propulsion: A ``Better, Safer, Cheaper'' Transportation System for Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, John S.; George, Jeffrey A.; Gefert, Leon P.; Doherty, Michael P.; Sefcik, Robert J.

    1994-07-01

    NASA has completed a preliminary mission and systems study of nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) systems for ``split-sprint'' human exploration and related robotic cargo missions to Mars. This paper describes the study, the mission architecture selected, the NEP system and technology development needs, proposed development schedules, and estimated development costs. Since current administration policy makers have delayed funding for key technology development activities that could make Mars exploration missions a reality in the near future, NASA will have time to evaluate various alternate mission options, and it appears prudent to ensure that Mars mission plans focus on astronaut and mission safety, while reducing costs to acceptable levels. The split-sprint nuclear electric propulsion system offers trip times comparable to nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems, while providing mission abort opportunities that are not possible with ``reference'' mission architectures. Thus, NEP systems offer short transit times for the astronauts, reducing the exposure of the crew to intergalactic cosmic radiation. The high specific impulse of the NEP system, which leads to very low propellant requirements, results in significantly lower ``initial mass in low earth orbit'' (IMLEO). Launch vehicle packaging studies show that the NEP system can be launched, assembled, and deployed, with about one less 240-metric-ton heavy lift launch vehicle (HLLV) per mission opportunity - a very large cost savings! Technology development cost of the nuclear reactor for an NEP system would be shared with the proposed nuclear surface power systems, since nuclear systems will be required to provide substantial electrical power on the surface of Mars. The NEP development project plan proposed includes evolutionary technology development for nuclear electric propulsion systems that expands upon SP-100 (Space Power - 100 kw) technology that has been developed for lunar and Mars surface nuclear power, and small NEP systems for interplanetary probes. System upgrades are expected to evolve that will result in even shorter trip times, improved payload capabilities, and enhanced safety and reliability. Non-nuclear technology development for the NEP system is estimated to cost about $721 M (1993 $). Nuclear technology development costs are not included in the costs in this report, since these costs will be incurred in the nuclear surface power development program. NEP Phase A/B studies are estimated to cost about $154 M. Flight system hardware development (Phase C/D) is estimated to cost about $2.8 B, and fabrication of flight hardware is estimated to be about $7.8 B for four mission opportunities in 2009, 2011, 2014, and 2016.

  14. Geophysical technique for mineral exploration and discrimination based on electromagnetic methods and associated systems

    DOEpatents

    Zhdanov; Michael S. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2008-01-29

    Mineral exploration needs a reliable method to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and economic mineralization. A method and system includes a geophysical technique for subsurface material characterization, mineral exploration and mineral discrimination. The technique introduced in this invention detects induced polarization effects in electromagnetic data and uses remote geophysical observations to determine the parameters of an effective conductivity relaxation model using a composite analytical multi-phase model of the rock formations. The conductivity relaxation model and analytical model can be used to determine parameters related by analytical expressions to the physical characteristics of the microstructure of the rocks and minerals. These parameters are ultimately used for the discrimination of different components in underground formations, and in this way provide an ability to distinguish between uneconomic mineral deposits and zones of economic mineralization using geophysical remote sensing technology.

  15. Sources of Cognitive Exploration: Genetic Variation in the Prefrontal Dopamine System Predicts Openness/Intellect

    PubMed Central

    DeYoung, Colin G.; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A.; Gray, Jeremy R.; Eastman, Maria; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2011-01-01

    The personality trait Openness/Intellect reflects the tendency to be imaginative, curious, perceptive, artistic, and intellectual—all characteristics that involve cognitive exploration. Little is known about the biological basis of Openness/Intellect, but the trait has been linked to cognitive functions of prefrontal cortex, and the neurotransmitter dopamine plays a key role in motivation to explore. The hypothesis that dopamine is involved in Openness/Intellect was supported by examining its association with two genes that are central components of the prefrontal dopaminergic system. In two demographically different samples (children: N = 608; adults: N = 214), variation in the dopamine D4 receptor gene (DRD4) and the catechol-O-methyltransferase gene (COMT) predicted Openness/Intellect, as main effects in the child sample and in interaction in adults. PMID:21804655

  16. NEEMO 15: Evaluation of human exploration systems for near-Earth asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Abercromby, Andrew F.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2013-08-01

    The NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 15 mission was focused on evaluating techniques for exploring near-Earth asteroids (NEAs). It began with a University of Delaware autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) systematically mapping the coral reef for hundreds of meters surrounding the Aquarius habitat. This activity is akin to the type of "far-field survey" approach that may be used by a robotic precursor in advance of a human mission to a NEA. Data from the far-field survey were then examined by the NEEMO science team and follow-up exploration traverses were planned, which used Deepworker single-person submersibles. Science traverses at NEEMO 15 were planned according to a prioritized list of objectives developed by the science team. These objectives were based on review and discussion of previous related marine science research, including previous marine science saturation missions conducted at the Aquarius habitat. AUV data were used to select several areas of scientific interest. The Deepworker science traverses were then executed at these areas of interest during 4 days of the NEEMO 15 mission and provided higher resolution data such as coral species distribution and mortality. These traverses are analogous to the "near-field survey" approach that is expected to be performed by a Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle (MMSEV) during a human mission to a NEA before extravehicular activities (EVAs) are conducted. In addition to the science objectives that were pursued, the NEEMO 15 traverses provided an opportunity to test newly developed software and techniques. Sample collection and instrument deployment on the NEA surface by EVA crew would follow the "near-field survey" in a human NEA mission. Sample collection was not necessary for the purposes of the NEEMO science objectives; however, the engineering and operations objectives during NEEMO 15 were to evaluate different combinations of vehicles, crew members, tools, and equipment that could be used to perform these science objectives on a NEA. Specifically, the productivity and acceptability of simulated NEA exploration activities were systematically quantified and compared when operating with different combinations of crew sizes and exploration systems including MMSEVs, EVA jet packs, and EVA translation devices. Data from NEEMO 15 will be used in conjunction with data from software simulations, parametric analysis, other analog field tests, anchoring models, and integrated testing at Johnson Space Center to inform the evolving architectures and exploration systems being developed by the Human Spaceflight Architecture Team.

  17. Flight experience of solar mesosphere explorer's power system over high temperatures ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faber, Jack; Hurley, Daniel

    1987-01-01

    The performance of the power system on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite for the life of the mission and the techniques used to ensure power system health are summarized. Early in the mission high cell imbalances in one of the batteries resulted in a loading scheme which attempted to minimize the cell imbalances without causing an undervoltage condition. A short term model of the power system allowed planners to predict depth of discharge using the latest available data. Due to expected orbital shifts the solar arrays experience extended periods of no eclipse. This has required special conditioning schemes to keep the batteries healthy when the eclipses return. Analysis of the SME data indicates long term health of the SME power system as long as the conditioning scheme is continued.

  18. Developing an Automated Science Analysis System for Mars Surface Exploration for MSL and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulick, V. C.; Hart, S. D.; Shi, X.; Siegel, V. L.

    2004-01-01

    We are developing an automated science analysis system that could be utilized by robotic or human explorers on Mars (or even in remote locations on Earth) to improve the quality and quantity of science data returned. Three components of this system (our rock, layer, and horizon detectors) [1] have been incorporated into the JPL CLARITY system for possible use by MSL and future Mars robotic missions. Two other components include a multi-spectral image compression (SPEC) algorithm for pancam-type images with multiple filters and image fusion algorithms that identify the in focus regions of individual images in an image focal series [2]. Recently, we have been working to combine image and spectral data, and other knowledge to identify both rocks and minerals. Here we present our progress on developing an igneous rock detection system.

  19. Flight experience of solar mesosphere explorer's power system over high temperatures ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faber, Jack; Hurley, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    The performance of the power system on the Solar Mesosphere Explorer (SME) satellite for the life of the mission and the techniques used to ensure power system health are summarized. Early in the mission high cell imbalances in one of the batteries resulted in a loading scheme which attempted to minimize the cell imbalances without causing an undervoltage condition. A short term model of the power system allowed planners to predict depth of discharge using the latest available data. Due to expected orbital shifts the solar arrays experience extended periods of no eclipse. This has required special conditioning schemes to keep the batteries healthy when the eclipses return. Analysis of the SME data indicates long term health of the SME power system as long as the conditioning scheme is continued.

  20. Parametric Analysis of Life Support Systems for Future Space Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swickrath, Michael J.; Anderson, Molly S.; Bagdigian, Bob M.

    2010-01-01

    Having adopted a flexible path approach to space exploration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is in a process of evaluating future targets for space exploration. In order to maintain the welfare of a crew during future missions, a suite of life support technology is responsible for oxygen and water generation, carbon dioxide control, the removal of trace concentrations of organic contaminants, processing and recovery of water, and the storage and reclamation of solid waste. For each particular life support subsystem, a variety competing technologies either exist or are under aggressive development efforts. Each individual technology has strengths and weaknesses with regard to launch mass, power and cooling requirements, volume of hardware and consumables, and crew time requirements for operation. However, from a system level perspective, the favorability of each life support architecture is better assessed when the sub-system technologies are analyzed in aggregate. In order to evaluate each specific life support system architecture, the measure of equivalent system mass (ESM) was employed to benchmark system favorability. Moreover, the results discussed herein will be from the context of loop-closure with respect to the air, water, and waste sub-systems. Specifically, closure relates to the amount of consumables mass that crosses the boundary of the vehicle over the lifetime of a mission. As will be demonstrated in this manuscript, the optimal level of loop closure is heavily dependent upon mission requirements such as duration and the level of extra- vehicular activity (EVA) performed. Sub-system level trades were also considered as a function of mission duration to assess when increased loop closure is practical. Although many additional factors will likely merit consideration in designing life support systems for future missions, the ESM results described herein provide a context for future architecture design decisions toward a flexible path program.

  1. Engineering America's Future in Space: Systems Engineering Innovations for Sustainable Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Jones, Carl P.

    2008-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) delivers space transportation solutions for America's complex missions, ranging from scientific payloads that expand knowledge, such as the Hubble Space Telescope, to astronauts and lunar rovers destined for voyages to the Moon. Currently, the venerable Space Shuttle, which has been in service since 1981, provides U.S. capability for both crew and cargo to low-Earth orbit to construct the International Space Station, before the Shuttle is retired in 2010, as outlined in the 2006 NASA Strategic Plan. I In the next decade, NASA will replace this system with a duo of launch vehicles: the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle/Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and the Ares V Cargo Launch Vehicle/Altair Lunar Lander. The goals for this new system include increased safety and reliability, coupled with lower operations costs that promote sustainable space exploration over a multi-decade schedule. This paper will provide details of the in-house systems engineering and vehicle integration work now being performed for the Ares I and planned for the Ares V. It will give an overview of the Ares I system-level test activities, such as the ground vibration testing that will be conducted in the Marshall Center's Dynamic Test Stand to verify the integrated vehicle stack's structural integrity against predictions made by modern modeling and simulation analysis. It also will give information about the work in progress for the Ares I-X developmental test flight planned in 2009 to provide key data before the Ares I Critical Design Review. Activities such as these will help prove and refine mission concepts of operation, while supporting the spectrum of design and development tasks being performed by Marshall's Engineering Directorate, ranging from launch vehicles and lunar rovers to scientific spacecraft and associated experiments. Ultimately, the work performed will lead to the fielding of a robust space transportation solution that will carry international explorers and essential payloads for sustainable scientific discovery beyond planet Earth.

  2. Development of NASA's Small Fission Power System for Science and Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Marc A.; Mason, Lee S.; Bowman, Cheryl L.; Poston, David I.; McClure, Patrick R.; Creasy, John; Robinson, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of our solar system has brought many exciting challenges to our nations scientific and engineering community over the past several decades. As we expand our visions to explore new, more challenging destinations, we must also expand our technology base to support these new missions. NASAs Space Technology Mission Directorate is tasked with developing these technologies for future mission infusion and continues to seek answers to many existing technology gaps. One such technology gap is related to compact power systems (1 kWe) that provide abundant power for several years where solar energy is unavailable or inadequate. Below 1 kWe, Radioisotope Power Systems have been the workhorse for NASA and will continue to be used for lower power applications similar to the successful missions of Voyager, Ulysses, New Horizons, Cassini, and Curiosity. Above 1 kWe, fission power systems become an attractive technology offering a scalable modular design of the reactor, shield, power conversion, and heat transport subsystems. Near term emphasis has been placed in the 1-10kWe range that lies outside realistic radioisotope power levels and fills a promising technology gap capable of enabling both science and human exploration missions. History has shown that development of space reactors is technically, politically, and financially challenging and requires a new approach to their design and development. A small team of NASA and DOE experts are providing a solution to these enabling FPS technologies starting with the lowest power and most cost effective reactor series named Kilopower that is scalable from approximately 1-10 kWe.

  3. Exploration of the Saturn System by the Cassini Mission: Observations with the Cassini Infrared Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbas, Mian M.

    2014-01-01

    The Cassini mission is a joint NASA-ESA international mission, launched on October 17, 1997 with 12 instruments on board, for exploration of the Saturn system. A composite Infrared Spectrometers is one of the major instruments. Successful insertion of the spacecraft in Saturn's orbit for an extended orbital tour occurred on July 1, 2004. The French Huygens-Probe on board, with six instruments was programmed for a soft landing on Titan's surface occurred in January 2005. The broad range scientific objectives of the mission are: Exploration of the Saturn system for investigations of the origin, formation, & evolution of the solar system, with an extensive range of measurements and the analysis of the data for scientific interpretations. The focus of research dealing with the Cassini mission at NASA/MSFC in collaboration with the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, JPL, as well as the research teams at Oxford/UK and Meudon Observatory/France, involves the Infrared observations of Saturn and its satellites, for measurements of the thermal structure and global distributions of the atmospheric constituents. A brief description of the Cassini spacecraft, the instruments, the objectives, in particular with the infrared observations of the Saturn system will be given. The analytical techniques for infrared radiative transfer and spectral inversion programs, with some selected results for gas constituent distributions will be presented.

  4. Space suits and life support systems for the exploration of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuznetz, Lawrence H.; Gwynne, Owen

    1992-01-01

    The requirements and technologies needed for space suits to be used for the manned exploration of Mars are examined. Alternative concepts are proposed for both the space suit and the portable life support system (collectively called the Extravehicular Mobility Unit, or EMU) needed for Mars exploration. EMU system requirements are outlined. It is pointed out that the most fundamental difference between a Mars EMU and those that preceded it is that the design of a Mars EMU must be driven by science and permanent habitability requirements, while all prior EMU designs have been driven by engineering requirements. The EMU weight issues are discussed, and the system mass and mobility concerns are addressed, along with the backpack-to-body-weight ratio. The challenges of thermal and cosmic radiation protection, micrometeorite protection, and EMU system and crew heat rejection are dealt with briefly, as well as the physiological issues of pressure regulation and bacterial or contaminant isolation. A mathematical model is then presented for evaluation of candidate EMU designs and for concept optimization and selection. Lead technology issues are also discussed.

  5. Exploring Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    With a temperature higher than the inside of your oven and atmospheric pressure equal to that a kilometer under the ocean, the surface of Venus is one of the most hostile environments in the solar system, and Venus exploration presents a challenge to technology. This lecture presents mission trade-offs and discusses a proposed mission concept for rover and aircraft based exploration of the surface and atmosphere of Venus. Several approaches to the technology, electronics, mechanical parts, and power systems, are discussed.

  6. Case study of AES Barbers Point, Inc.

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, S.

    1994-12-31

    The AES Barbers Point plant is a $383 million coal-fired cogeneration facility. The plant is the first major coal-fired electric power producer in the Hawaiian Islands, and is the largest single supplier of electricity to Hawaiian Electric Company (BECO). The plant is capable of supplying over 189 megawatts of electricity, approximately 18 percent of the electricity needs of Oahu, the most densely populated island in the Hawaiian chain. In addition to the electricity generated, the state-of-the-art plant produces 30,000 pounds of steam per hour for the Chevron USA oil refinery at Barbers Point.

  7. BOREAS AES READAC Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected and processed data related to surface atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from one READAC meteorology station in Hudson Bay, Saskatchewan. Parameters include day, time, type of report, sky condition, visibility, mean sea level pressure, temperature, dewpoint, wind, altimeter, opacity, minimum and maximum visibility, station pressure, minimum and maximum air temperature, a wind group, precipitation, and precipitation in the last hour. The data were collected non-continuously from 24-May-1994 to 20-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  8. BOREAS AES MARSII Surface Meteorological Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atkinson, G. Barrie; Funk, Barry; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Knapp, David E. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    Canadian AES personnel collected several data sets related to surface and atmospheric meteorological conditions over the BOREAS region. This data set contains 15-minute meteorological data from six MARSII meteorology stations in the BOREAS region in Canada. Parameters include site, time, temperature, dewpoint, visibility, wind speed, wind gust, wind direction, two cloud groups, precipitation, and station pressure. Temporally, the data cover the period of May to September 1994. Geo-graphically, the stations are spread across the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files, and are classified as AFM-Staff data.

  9. On a Site of X-ray Emission in AE Aquarii

    E-print Network

    N. R. Ikhsanov

    2006-02-09

    An analysis of recently reported results of XMM-Newton observations of AE Aqr within a hypothesis that the detected X-ray source is located inside the Roche lobe of the white dwarf is presented. I show this hypothesis to be inconsistent with the currently adopted model of mass-transfer in the system. Possible solutions of this problem are briefly discussed.

  10. Self-healing thermoset using encapsulated epoxy-amine healing chemistry Henghua Jin a,e

    E-print Network

    Sottos, Nancy R.

    Self-healing thermoset using encapsulated epoxy-amine healing chemistry Henghua Jin a,e , Chris L xxx Keywords: Hollow microcapsule Amine microcapsule Fracture toughness a b s t r a c t Self-healing, resulting in poor resistance to crack initiation and growth. Inspired by living systems, self-healing

  11. 81545911 -1 -AES/sbf/lil 11/19/2013

    E-print Network

    81545911 - 1 - AES/sbf/lil 11/19/2013 BEFORE THE PUBLIC UTILITIES COMMISSION OF THE STATE, is attached to this Ruling as Attachment A. F I L E D 11-19-13 11:35 AM #12;R.11-05-005 AES/sbf/lil - 2-05-005 AES/sbf/lil - 3 - incorporate by reference or attach a party's prior informal comments to staff

  12. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 3, AUGUST 2001 389 Exploring the Power Flow Solution Space Boundary

    E-print Network

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    .) Techniques for exploring the power flow solution space boundary therefore have an important role to playIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 16, NO. 3, AUGUST 2001 389 Exploring the Power Flow Solution Space Boundary Ian A. Hiskens, Senior Member and Robert J. Davy Abstract--A knowledge

  13. AE Alumni Seek to Endow Award in Memory of AE Student Records Staff Assistant, Sharron Williams

    E-print Network

    Guiltinan, Mark

    It is hard to believe, but it has been almost six years since the AE Department's long-time staff assistant-to resource; she may be most well known for her ever-present candy jar, warm smile, and wealth of advice

  14. Unlocking the black box: exploring the link between high-performance work systems and performance.

    PubMed

    Messersmith, Jake G; Patel, Pankaj C; Lepak, David P; Gould-Williams, Julian

    2011-11-01

    With a growing body of literature linking systems of high-performance work practices to organizational performance outcomes, recent research has pushed for examinations of the underlying mechanisms that enable this connection. In this study, based on a large sample of Welsh public-sector employees, we explored the role of several individual-level attitudinal factors--job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and psychological empowerment--as well as organizational citizenship behaviors that have the potential to provide insights into how human resource systems influence the performance of organizational units. The results support a unit-level path model, such that department-level, high-performance work system utilization is associated with enhanced levels of job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and psychological empowerment. In turn, these attitudinal variables were found to be positively linked to enhanced organizational citizenship behaviors, which are further related to a second-order construct measuring departmental performance. PMID:21787040

  15. Earth Exploration Toolbook Chapter : Using GLOBE Data to Study the Earth System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Nick Haddad

    2004-01-01

    This Earth Exploration Toolbook chapter guides users through the process of locating and graphing data that has been collected by students who participate in the GLOBE Program. Users access the online GLOBE graphing tool and produce a graph comparing four Earth system variables over two complete years. Data include Maximum Air Temperature, Soil Moisture (at depths of both 10 cm and 90 cm), and Rainfall recorded in Greenville, Pennsylvania. As they investigate this specific case study, users discover patterns in the data that reveal seasonal changes in soil moisture. The patterns provide opportunities to discuss such Earth system concepts as the reservoir, the flux or flow of moisture between different reservoirs, and the role of solar energy in driving Earth system processes.

  16. Overview of Potable Water Systems on Spacecraft Vehicles and Applications for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Laurie J.; Callahan, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Providing water necessary to maintain life support has been accomplished in spacecraft vehicles for over forty years. This paper will investigate how previous U.S. space vehicles provided potable water. The water source for the spacecraft, biocide used to preserve the water on-orbit, water stowage methodology, materials, pumping mechanisms, on-orbit water requirements, and water temperature requirements will be discussed. Where available, the hardware used to provide the water and the general function of that hardware will also be detailed. The Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV or Orion) water systems will be generically discussed to provide a glimpse of how similar they are to water systems in previous vehicles. Conclusions on strategies that could be used for CEV based on previous spacecraft water systems will be made in the form of questions and recommendations.

  17. Developmental Systems Science: Exploring the Application of Systems Science Methods to Developmental Science Questions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Brown Urban; Nathaniel D. Osgood; Patricia L. Mabry

    2011-01-01

    Developmental science theorists fully acknowledge the wide array of complex interactions among biology, behavior, and environment that together give rise to development. However, despite this conceptual understanding of development as a system, developmental science has not fully applied analytic methods commensurate with this systems perspective. This article provides a brief introduction to systems science, an approach to problem solving that

  18. Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM): Exploration Of The Jovian System And Its Icy Satellites

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Olivier Grasset; R. Pappalardo; R. Greeley; M. Blanc; M. Dougherty; E. Bunce; J. Lebreton; L. Prockter; D. Senske

    2009-01-01

    The Europa Jupiter System Mission (EJSM) would be an international mission with the overall theme of investigating the emergence of habitable worlds around gas giants. Its goals are to (1) Determine whether the Jupiter system harbors habitable worlds and (2) Characterize the processes that are operating within the Jupiter system. NASA and ESA have concluded a detailed joint study of

  19. Highly Survivable Avionics Systems for Long-Term Deep Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alkalai, L.; Chau, S.; Tai, A. T.

    2001-01-01

    The design of highly survivable avionics systems for long-term (> 10 years) exploration of space is an essential technology for all current and future missions in the Outer Planets roadmap. Long-term exposure to extreme environmental conditions such as high radiation and low-temperatures make survivability in space a major challenge. Moreover, current and future missions are increasingly using commercial technology such as deep sub-micron (0.25 microns) fabrication processes with specialized circuit designs, commercial interfaces, processors, memory, and other commercial off the shelf components that were not designed for long-term survivability in space. Therefore, the design of highly reliable, and available systems for the exploration of Europa, Pluto and other destinations in deep-space require a comprehensive and fresh approach to this problem. This paper summarizes work in progress in three different areas: a framework for the design of highly reliable and highly available space avionics systems, distributed reliable computing architecture, and Guarded Software Upgrading (GSU) techniques for software upgrading during long-term missions. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Thermal design of the IUE hydrazine auxiliary propulsion system. [International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skladany, J. T.; Kelly, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The International Ultraviolet Explorer is a large astronomical observatory scheduled to be placed in a three-axis stabilized synchronous orbit in the fourth quarter of 1977. The Hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion System (HAPS) must perform a number of spacecraft maneuvers to achieve a successful mission. This paper describes the thermal design which accomplishes temperature control between 5 and 65 C for all orbital conditions by utilizing multilayer insulation and commandable component heaters. A primary design criteria was the minimization of spacecraft power by the selective use of the solar environment. The thermal design was carefully assessed and verified in both spacecraft thermal balance and subsystem solar simulation testing.

  1. Using an immune system model to explore mate selection in genetic algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C. F. (Chien-Feng)

    2003-01-01

    In the setting of multimodal function optimization, engineering and machine learning, identifying multiple peaks and maintaining subpopulations of the search space are two central themes when Genetic Algorithms (GAs) are employed. In this paper, an immune system model is adopted to develop a framework for exploring the role of mate selection in GAs with respect to these two issues. The experimental results reported in the paper will shed more light into how mate selection schemes compare to traditional selection schemes. In particular, we show that dissimilar mating is beneficial in identifying multiple peaks, yet harmful in maintaining subpopulations of the search space.

  2. Databases, data integration, and expert systems: new directions in mineral resource assessment and mineral exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCammon, Richard B.

    1994-01-01

    Overcoming future difficulties in searching for ore deposits deeper in the earth's crust will require closer attention to the collection and analysis of more diverse types of data and to more efficient use of current computer technologies. Computer technologies of greatest interest include methods of storage and retrieval of resource information, methods for integrating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data, and the introduction of advanced computer technologies such as expert systems, multivariate techniques, and neural networks. Much experience has been gained in the past few years in applying these technologies. More experience is needed if they are to be implemented for everyday use in future assessments and exploration.

  3. Multiple Lookup Table-Based AES Encryption Algorithm Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jin; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Huixin

    Anew AES (Advanced Encryption Standard) encryption algorithm implementation was proposed in this paper. It is based on five lookup tables, which are generated from S-box(the substitution table in AES). The obvious advantages are reducing the code-size, improving the implementation efficiency, and helping new learners to understand the AES encryption algorithm and GF(28) multiplication which are necessary to correctly implement AES[1]. This method can be applied on processors with word length 32 or above, FPGA and others. And correspondingly we can implement it by VHDL, Verilog, VB and other languages.

  4. Power and Propulsion System Design for Near-Earth Object Robotic Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, John Steven; Randolph, Thomas M.; Landau, Damon F.; Bury, Kristen M.; Malone, Shane P.; Hickman, Tyler A.

    2011-01-01

    Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) are exciting targets for exploration; they are relatively easy to reach but relatively little is known about them. With solar electric propulsion, a vast number of interesting NEOs can be reached within a few years and with extensive flexibility in launch date. An additional advantage of electric propulsion for these missions is that a spacecraft can be small, enabling a fleet of explorers launched on a single vehicle or as secondary payloads. Commercial, flight-proven Hall thruster systems have great appeal based on their performance and low cost risk, but one issue with these systems is that the power processing units (PPUs) are designed for regulated spacecraft power architectures which are not attractive for small NEO missions. In this study we consider the integrated design of power and propulsion systems that utilize the capabilities of existing PPUs in an unregulated power architecture. Models for solar array and engine performance are combined with low-thrust trajectory analyses to bound spacecraft design parameters for a large class of NEO missions, then detailed array performance models are used to examine the array output voltage and current over a bounded mission set. Operational relationships between the power and electric propulsion systems are discussed, and it is shown that both the SPT-100 and BPT-4000 PPUs can perform missions over a solar range of 0.7 AU to 1.5 AU - encompassing NEOs, Venus, and Mars - within their operable input voltage ranges. A number of design trades to control the array voltage are available, including cell string layout, array offpointing during mission operations, and power draw by the Hall thruster system.

  5. Earth Orbiting Support Systems for commercial low Earth orbit data relay: Assessing architectures through tradespace exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palermo, Gianluca; Golkar, Alessandro; Gaudenzi, Paolo

    2015-06-01

    As small satellites and Sun Synchronous Earth Observation systems are assuming an increased role in nowadays space activities, including commercial investments, it is of interest to assess how infrastructures could be developed to support the development of such systems and other spacecraft that could benefit from having a data relay service in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), as opposed to traditional Geostationary relays. This paper presents a tradespace exploration study of the architecture of such LEO commercial satellite data relay systems, here defined as Earth Orbiting Support Systems (EOSS). The paper proposes a methodology to formulate architectural decisions for EOSS constellations, and enumerate the corresponding tradespace of feasible architectures. Evaluation metrics are proposed to measure benefits and costs of architectures; lastly, a multicriteria Pareto criterion is used to downselect optimal architectures for subsequent analysis. The methodology is applied to two case studies for a set of 30 and 100 customer-spacecraft respectively, representing potential markets for LEO services in Exploration, Earth Observation, Science, and CubeSats. Pareto analysis shows how increased performance of the constellation is always achieved by an increased node size, as measured by the gain of the communications antenna mounted on EOSS spacecraft. On the other hand, nonlinear trends in optimal orbital altitude, number of satellites per plane, and number of orbital planes, are found in both cases. An upward trend in individual node memory capacity is found, although never exceeding 256 Gbits of onboard memory for both cases that have been considered, assuming the availability of a polar ground station for EOSS data downlink. System architects can use the proposed methodology to identify optimal EOSS constellations for a given service pricing strategy and customer target, thus identifying alternatives for selection by decision makers.

  6. Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for a Flexible Space Exploration Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Smith, Leigh M.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to develop advanced avionic and processor technologies anticipated to be used by NASA s currently evolving space exploration architectures. The AAPS project is a part of the Exploration Technology Development Program, which funds an entire suite of technologies that are aimed at enabling NASA s ability to explore beyond low earth orbit. NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) manages the AAPS project. AAPS uses a broad-scoped approach to developing avionic and processor systems. Investment areas include advanced electronic designs and technologies capable of providing environmental hardness, reconfigurable computing techniques, software tools for radiation effects assessment, and radiation environment modeling tools. Near-term emphasis within the multiple AAPS tasks focuses on developing prototype components using semiconductor processes and materials (such as Silicon-Germanium (SiGe)) to enhance a device s tolerance to radiation events and low temperature environments. As the SiGe technology will culminate in a delivered prototype this fiscal year, the project emphasis shifts its focus to developing low-power, high efficiency total processor hardening techniques. In addition to processor development, the project endeavors to demonstrate techniques applicable to reconfigurable computing and partially reconfigurable Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs). This capability enables avionic architectures the ability to develop FPGA-based, radiation tolerant processor boards that can serve in multiple physical locations throughout the spacecraft and perform multiple functions during the course of the mission. The individual tasks that comprise AAPS are diverse, yet united in the common endeavor to develop electronics capable of operating within the harsh environment of space. Specifically, the AAPS tasks for the Federal fiscal year of 2010 are: Silicon-Germanium (SiGe) Integrated Electronics for Extreme Environments, Modeling of Radiation Effects on Electronics, Radiation Hardened High Performance Processors (HPP), and and Reconfigurable Computing.

  7. Drills, Scoops, Grinders, Brushing Tools, Crushers, and Sample Manipulation Systems Enabling Mars Exploration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zacny, Kris; Davis, Kiel; Paulsen, Gale; Gorevan, Steven; Mumm, Erik

    In the last decade, Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanism Corporation has developed over a dozen planetary drill systems, scoops, grinders, crushers and sample manipulation systems. These systems were built to meet specific requirements such as reaching certain depths, exhibiting certain levels of autonomy, acquiring samples of certain sizes and integrity (e.g. core vs. powder). They were built to operate at restricted power values. Most of the systems were tested either in the planetary analogs such as the Arctic, and/or laboratory, and/or environmental chambers and for this reason are at different Technology Readiness Levels. The presentation will cover a range of various drill systems as well as flight hardware developed by Honeybee Robotics. The existing flight hardware includes Rock Abrasion Tool on Mars Exploration Rovers currently operating on the surface of Mars, a Phoenix Scoop with a small drill called the RASP (the Phoenix lander is scheduled to land on Mars on May 25th), and the Sample Manipulation System that will be launched to Mars onboard of Mars Science Laboratory Rover in 2009. The presentation will focus on science enabled but these different instruments as well as challengers in developing a flight-ready hardware and operating the hardware from Earth.

  8. Potential Applications for Radioisotope Power Systems in Support of Human Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Colozza, Anthony J.; Schmitz, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPS) for space applications have powered over 27 U.S. space systems, starting with Transit 4A and 4B in 1961, and more recently with the successful landing of the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity in August 2012. RPS enable missions with destinations far from the Sun with faint solar flux, on planetary surfaces with dense or dusty atmospheres, and at places with long eclipse periods where solar array sizes and energy storage mass become impractical. RPS could also provide an enabling capability in support of human exploration activities. It is envisioned that with the higher power needs of most human mission concepts, a high efficiency thermal-to-electric technology would be required such as the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope generator (ASRG). The ASRG should be capable of a four-fold improvement in efficiency over traditional thermoelectric RPS. While it may be impractical to use RPS as a main power source, many other applications could be considered, such as crewed pressurized rovers, in-situ resource production of propellants, back-up habitat power, drilling, any mobile or remote activity from the main base habitat, etc. This paper will identify potential applications and provide concepts that could be a practical extension of the current ASRG design in providing for robust and flexible use of RPS on human exploration missions.

  9. Integrated Modeling and Simulation Verification, Validation, and Accreditation Strategy for Exploration Systems Mission Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    2006-01-01

    Models and simulations (M&S) are critical resources in the exploration of space. They support program management, systems engineering, integration, analysis, test, and operations and provide critical information and data supporting key analyses and decisions (technical, cost and schedule). Consequently, there is a clear need to establish a solid understanding of M&S strengths and weaknesses, and the bounds within which they can credibly support decision-making. Their usage requires the implementation of a rigorous approach to verification, validation and accreditation (W&A) and establishment of formal process and practices associated with their application. To ensure decision-making is suitably supported by information (data, models, test beds) from activities (studies, exercises) from M&S applications that are understood and characterized, ESMD is establishing formal, tailored W&A processes and practices. In addition, to ensure the successful application of M&S within ESMD, a formal process for the certification of analysts that use M&S is being implemented. This presentation will highlight NASA's Exploration Systems Mission Directorate (ESMD) management approach for M&S W&A to ensure decision-makers receive timely information on the model's fidelity, credibility, and quality.

  10. NASA's Space Launch System: A New Capability for Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crumbly, Christopher M.; May, Todd A.; Robinson, Kimberly F.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and other high-priority payloads into deep space. Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with human missions beyond the Moon and then go on to transport astronauts or robots to distant places such as asteroids and Mars. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, SLS will start with 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket that launched astronauts to the Moon 40 years ago. From there it will evolve into the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, via an upgrade approach that will provide building blocks for future space exploration. This paper will explain how NASA will execute this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology, from the initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability through a block upgrade approach to an evolved 130-t capability, and will detail the progress that has already been made toward a first launch in 2017. This paper will also explore the requirements needed for human missions to deep-space destinations and for game-changing robotic science missions, and the capability of SLS to meet those requirements and enable those missions, along with the evolution strategy that will increase that capability. The International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has worked together to create the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths towards a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for all three destinations. The SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they would need for extended trips to asteroids, the Moon, and Mars. SLS also offers substantial capability to support robotic science missions, offering benefits such as improved mass margins and radiation mitigation, and reduced mission durations. The SLS rocket, using significantly higher characteristic energy (C3), can more quickly and effectively take the mission directly to its destination, reducing trip time and cost. As this paper will explain, the SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations by providing the robust space launch capability to deliver sustainable solutions for advanced exploration.

  11. NASA's Space Launch System: A New Capability for Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Kimberly F.; Creech, Stephen D.; May, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will launch the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and other high-priority payloads into deep space. Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with human missions beyond the Moon and then go on to transport astronauts or robots to distant places such as asteroids and Mars. Developed with the goals of safety, affordability, and sustainability in mind, SLS will start with 10 percent more thrust than the Saturn V rocket that launched astronauts to the Moon 40 years ago. From there it will evolve into the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown, via an upgrade approach that will provide building blocks for future space exploration. This paper will explain how NASA will execute this development within flat budgetary guidelines by using existing engines assets and heritage technology, from the initial 70 metric ton (t) lift capability through a block upgrade approach to an evolved 130-t capability, and will detail the progress that has already been made toward a first launch in 2017. This paper will also explore the requirements needed for human missions to deep-space destinations and for game-changing robotic science missions, and the capability of SLS to meet those requirements and enable those missions, along with the evolution strategy that will increase that capability. The International Space Exploration Coordination Group, representing 12 of the world's space agencies, has worked together to create the Global Exploration Roadmap, which outlines paths towards a human landing on Mars, beginning with capability-demonstrating missions to the Moon or an asteroid. The Roadmap and corresponding NASA research outline the requirements for reference missions for all three destinations. The SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they would need for extended trips to asteroids, the Moon, and Mars. SLS also offers substantial capability to support robotic science missions, offering benefits such as improved mass margins and radiation mitigation, and reduced mission durations. The SLS rocket, using significantly higher C3 energies, can more quickly and effectively take the mission directly to its destination, reducing trip time and cost. As this paper will explain, the SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations by providing the robust space launch capability to deliver sustainable solutions for advanced exploration.

  12. NEEMO 15: Evaluation of Human Exploration Systems for Near-Earth Asteroids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Steven P.; Gernhardt, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) 15 mission was focused on near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) exploration techniques evaluation. It began with a University of Delaware autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) systematically mapping the coral reef for hundreds of meters surrounding the Aquarius habitat. This activity is akin to the type of "far field survey" approach that may be used by a robotic precursor in advance of a human mission to a NEA. Data from the far-field survey were then examined by the NEEMO science team and follow-up exploration traverses were planned, which used Deepworker single-person submersibles. Science traverses at NEEMO 15 were planned according to a prioritized list of scientific objectives developed by the science team based on review and discussion of previous related marine science research including previous marine science saturation missions conducted at the Aquarius habitat. AUV data was used to select several areas of scientific interest. The Deepworker science traverses were then executed at these areas of interest during 4 days of the NEEMO 15 mission and provided higher resolution data such as coral species distribution and mortality. These traverses are analogous to the "near field survey" approach that is expected to be performed by a multi mission space exploration vehicle (MMSEV) during a human mission to a NEA before conducting extravehicular activities (EVA)s. In addition to the science objectives that were pursued, the NEEMO 15 science traverses provided an opportunity to test newly developed software and techniques. Sample collection and instrument deployment on the NEA surface by EVA crew would follow the "near field survey" in a human NEA mission. Sample collection was not necessary for the purposes of the NEEMO science objectives; however, the engineering and operations objectives during NEEMO 15 were to evaluate different combinations of vehicles, crewmembers, tools, and equipment that could be used to perform these tasks on a NEA. Specifically, the productivity and acceptability of simulated NEA exploration activities were systematically quantified and compared when operating with different combinations of crew sizes and exploration systems including MMSEVs, EVA jet packs, and EVA translation devices.

  13. Demonstration of a Particle Impact Monitoring System for Crewed Space Exploration Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opiela, J. N.; Liou, J.-C.; Corsaro, R.; Giovane, F.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2011-01-01

    When micrometeorite or debris impacts occur on a space habitat, crew members need to be quickly informed of the likely extent of damage, and be directed to the impact location for possible repairs. The goal of the Habitat Particle Impact Monitoring System (HIMS) is to develop a fully automated, end-to-end particle impact detection system for crewed space exploration modules, both in space and on the surfaces of Solar System bodies. The HIMS uses multiple thin film piezo-polymer vibration sensors to detect impacts on a surface, and computer processing of the acoustical signals to characterize the impacts. Development and demonstration of the HIMS is proceeding in concert with NASA's Habitat Demonstration Unit (HDU) Project. The HDU Project is designed to develop and test various technologies, configurations, and operational concepts for exploration habitats. This paper describes the HIMS development, initial testing, and HDU integration efforts. Initial tests of the system on the HDU were conducted at NASA?s 2010 Desert Research and Technologies Studies (Desert-RATS). Four sensor locations were assigned near the corners of a rectangular pattern. To study the influence of wall thickness, three sets of four sensors were installed at different layer depths: on the interior of the PEM wall, on the exterior of the same wall, and on the exterior of a layer of foam insulation applied to the exterior wall. Once the system was activated, particle impacts were periodically applied by firing a pneumatic pellet gun at the exterior wall section. Impact signals from the sensors were recognized by a data acquisition system when they occurred, and recorded on a computer for later analysis. Preliminary analysis of the results found that the HIMS system located the point of impact to within 8 cm, provided a measure of the impact energy / damage produced, and was insensitive to other acoustic events. Based on this success, a fully automated version of this system will be completed and demonstrated as part of a crew "Caution/Warning" system at the 2011 Desert-RATS, along with a crew response procedure.

  14. Experience with the EM-60 electromagnetic system for geothermal exploration in Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Stark, M.; Haught, J.R.; Morrison, H.F.

    1981-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted controlled-source electromagnetic (EM) surveys at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Over 40 soundings were made in Panther Canyon (Grass Valley), near Winnemucca; Soda Lakes, near Fallon; and McCoy, west of Austin, to test and demonstrate the applicability of LBL's EM-60 system to geothermal exploration. The EM-60 is a frequency-domain system using three-component magnetic detection. Typically, +-65 A is applied to an 100-m-diameter four-turn horizontal loop, generating a dipole moment >10/sup 6/ MKS over the frequency range 10/sup -3/ to 10/sup -3/ Hz. With such a source loop, soundings were made, at transmitter-receiver separations of up to 4 km, providing a maximum depth of penetration of 4 km.

  15. Quantum Physics Exploring Gravity in the Outer Solar System: The Sagas Project

    E-print Network

    P. Wolf; Ch. J. Bordé; A. Clairon; L. Duchayne; A. Landragin; P. Lemonde; G. Santarelli; W. Ertmer; E. Rasel; F. S. Cataliotti; M. Inguscio; G. M. Tino; P. Gill; H. Klein; S. Reynaud; C. Salomon; E. Peik; O. Bertolami; P. Gil; J. Páramos; C. Jentsch; U. Johann; A. Rathke; P. Bouyer; L. Cacciapuoti; D. Izzo; P. De Natale; B. Christophe; P. Touboul; S. G. Turyshev; J. D. Anderson; M. E. Tobar; F. Schmidt-Kaler; J. Vigué; A. Madej; L. Marmet; M-C. Angonin; P. Delva; P. Tourrenc; G. Metris; H. Müller; R. Walsworth; Z. H. Lu; L. Wang; K. Bongs; A. Toncelli; M. Tonelli; H. Dittus; C. Lämmerzahl; G. Galzerano; P. Laporta; J. Laskar; A. Fienga; F. Roques; K. Sengstock

    2008-08-12

    We summarise the scientific and technological aspects of the SAGAS (Search for Anomalous Gravitation using Atomic Sensors) project, submitted to ESA in June 2007 in response to the Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 call for proposals. The proposed mission aims at flying highly sensitive atomic sensors (optical clock, cold atom accelerometer, optical link) on a Solar System escape trajectory in the 2020 to 2030 time-frame. SAGAS has numerous science objectives in fundamental physics and Solar System science, for example numerous tests of general relativity and the exploration of the Kuiper belt. The combination of highly sensitive atomic sensors and of the laser link well adapted for large distances will allow measurements with unprecedented accuracy and on scales never reached before. We present the proposed mission in some detail, with particular emphasis on the science goals and associated measurements.

  16. Preliminary System Analysis of In Situ Resource Utilization for Mars Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Donald; Andringa, Jason; Easter, Robert; Smith, Jeffrey H .; Wilson, Thomas; Clark, D. Larry; Payne, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    We carried out a system analysis of processes for utilization of Mars resources to support human exploration of Mars by production of propellants from indigenous resources. Seven ISRU processes were analyzed to determine mass. power and propellant storage volume requirements. The major elements of each process include C02 acquisition, chemical conversion, and storage of propellants. Based on a figure of merit (the ratio of the mass of propellants that must be brought from Earth in a non-ISRU mission to the mass of the ISRU system. tanks and feedstocks that must be brought from Earth for a ISRU mission) the most attractive process (by far); is one where indigenous Mars water is accessible and this is processed via Sabatier/Electrolysis to methane and oxygen. These processes are technically relatively mature. Other processes with positive leverage involve reverse water gas shift and solid oxide electrolysis.

  17. NPS alternate techsat satellite, design project for AE-4871

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This project was completed as part of AE-4871, Advanced Spacecraft Design. The intent of the course is to provide experience in the design of all the major components in a spacecraft system. Team members were given responsibility for the design of one of the six primary subsystems: power, structures, propulsion, attitude control, telemetry, tracking and control (TT&C), and thermal control. In addition, a single member worked on configuration control, launch vehicle integration, and a spacecraft test plan. Given an eleven week time constraint, a preliminary design of each subsystem was completed. Where possible, possible component selections were also made. Assistance for this project came principally from the Naval Research Laboratory's Spacecraft Technology Branch. Specific information on components was solicited from representatives in industry. The design project centers on a general purpose satellite bus that is currently being sought by the Strategic Defense Initiative.

  18. Low-dimensional chaos in magnetospheric activity from AE time series

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. V. Vassiliadis; A. S. Sharma; T. E. Eastman; K. Papadopoulos

    1990-01-01

    The magnetospheric response to the solar wind input, as represented by the time series measurements of the AE index, has been examined using phase space reconstruction techniques. The system was found to behave as a low-dimensional chaotic system with a fractal dimension of 3.6 and has a Kolmogorov entropy <0.2\\/min. These are indicative that the dynamics of the system can

  19. NASA's Space Launch System: A Flagship for Exploration Beyond Earth's Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit in an austere economic climate. This fact drives the SLS team to find innovative solutions to the challenges of designing, developing, fielding, and operating the largest rocket in history. To arrive at the current SLS plan, government and industry experts carefully analyzed hundreds of architecture options and arrived at the one clear solution to stringent requirements for safety, affordability, and sustainability over the decades that the rocket will be in operation. This paper will explore ways to fit this major development within the funding guidelines by using existing engine assets and hardware now in testing to meet a first launch by 2017. It will explain the SLS Program s long-range plan to keep the budget within bounds, yet evolve the 70 metric ton (t) initial lift capability to 130-t lift capability after the first two flights. To achieve the evolved configuration, advanced technologies must offer appropriate return on investment to be selected through a competitive process. For context, the SLS will be larger than the Saturn V that took 12 men on 6 trips for a total of 11 days on the lunar surface over 4 decades ago. Astronauts train for long-duration voyages on the International Space Station, but have not had transportation to go beyond Earth orbit in modern times, until now. NASA is refining its mission manifest, guided by U.S. Space Policy and the Global Exploration Roadmap. Launching the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle s (MPCV s) first autonomous certification flight in 2017, followed by a crewed flight in 2021, the SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they need for extended trips to asteroids, Lagrange Points, and Mars. In addition, the SLS will accommodate high-priority science experiments. SLS affordability initiatives include streamlining interfaces, applying risk-based insight into contracted work, centralizing systems engineering and integration, and nurturing a learning culture that continually benchmarks its performance against successful ventures. As this paper will explain, the SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations by harnessing business and technological innovations to deliver sustainable solutions for space exploration.

  20. NASA's Space Launch System: A Flagship for Exploration Beyond Earth's Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration s (NASA) Space Launch System (SLS) Program, managed at the Marshall Space Flight Center, is making progress toward delivering a new capability for exploration beyond Earth orbit in an austere economic climate. This fact drives the SLS team to find innovative solutions to the challenges of designing, developing, fielding, and operating the largest rocket in history. To arrive at the current SLS plan, government and industry experts carefully analyzed hundreds of architecture options and arrived at the one clear solution to stringent requirements for safety, affordability, and sustainability over the decades that the rocket will be in operation. This paper will explore ways to fit this major development within the funding guidelines by using existing engine assets and hardware now in testing to meet a first launch by 2017. It will explain the SLS Program s long-range plan to keep the budget within bounds, yet evolve the 70 metric ton (t) initial lift capability to 130-t lift capability after the first two flights. To achieve the evolved configuration, advanced technologies must offer appropriate return on investment to be selected through a competitive process. For context, the SLS will be larger than the Saturn V that took 12 men on 6 trips for a total of 11 days on the lunar surface over 4 decades ago. Astronauts train for long-duration voyages on the International Space Station, but have not had transportation to go beyond Earth orbit in modern times, until now. NASA is refining its mission manifest, guided by U.S. Space Policy and the Global Exploration Roadmap. Launching the Orion Multi-Purpose Cargo Vehicle s first autonomous certification flight in 2017, followed by a crewed flight in 2021, the SLS will offer a robust way to transport international crews and the air, water, food, and equipment they need for extended trips to asteroids, Lagrange Points, and Mars. In addition, the SLS will accommodate high-priority science experiments. SLS affordability initiatives include streamlining interfaces, applying risk-based insight into contracted work, centralizing systems engineering and integration, and nurturing a learning culture that continually benchmarks its performance against successful ventures. As this paper will explain, the SLS is making measurable progress toward becoming a global infrastructure asset for robotic and human scouts of all nations by harnessing business and technological innovations to deliver sustainable solutions for space exploration.