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Sample records for explosives detection systems

  1. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  2. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema

    Klinger, Jeff

    2013-05-28

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  3. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; J. Keith Jewell; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury; Jeffery B. Klinger

    2005-12-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks potentially carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-min measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  4. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  5. Explosive simulants for testing explosive detection systems

    DOEpatents

    Kury, John W.; Anderson, Brian L.

    1999-09-28

    Explosives simulants that include non-explosive components are disclosed that facilitate testing of equipment designed to remotely detect explosives. The simulants are non-explosive, non-hazardous materials that can be safely handled without any significant precautions. The simulants imitate real explosives in terms of mass density, effective atomic number, x-ray transmission properties, and physical form, including moldable plastics and emulsions/gels.

  6. Explosives detection system and method

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Jewell, James K.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Derr, Kurt W.

    2007-12-11

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  7. Idaho Explosives Detection System: Development and Enhancements

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L Reber; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Ann E. Egger; Paul J. Petersen

    2007-12-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying bulk explosives into military bases. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of sodium iodide (NaI) detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A computer connects to the system by Ethernet and is able to control the system remotely. The system was developed to detect bulk explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. In 2004, a full-scale prototype IEDS system was built for testing and continued development. System performance was successfully tested using different types of real explosives with a variety of cargo at the INL from November 2005 through February 2006. Recently, the first deployable prototype system was constructed and shipped to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio and will be in operation by March 2007. The capability of passively detecting radiological material within a delivery truck has also been added.

  8. Method and system for detecting explosives

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Jewell, James K.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Seabury, Edward H.; Blackwood, Larry G.; Edwards, Andrew J.; Derr, Kurt W.

    2009-03-10

    A method of detecting explosives in a vehicle includes providing a first rack on one side of the vehicle, the rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a second rack on another side of the vehicle, the second rack including a neutron generator and a plurality of gamma ray detectors; providing a control system, remote from the first and second racks, coupled to the neutron generators and gamma ray detectors; using the control system, causing the neutron generators to generate neutrons; and performing gamma ray spectroscopy on spectra read by the gamma ray detectors to look for a signature indicative of presence of an explosive. Various apparatus and other methods are also provided.

  9. Method and system for detecting an explosive

    DOEpatents

    Reber, Edward L.; Rohde, Kenneth W.; Blackwood, Larry G.

    2010-12-07

    A method and system for detecting at least one explosive in a vehicle using a neutron generator and a plurality of NaI detectors. Spectra read from the detectors is calibrated by performing Gaussian peak fitting to define peak regions, locating a Na peak and an annihilation peak doublet, assigning a predetermined energy level to one peak in the doublet, and predicting a hydrogen peak location based on a location of at least one peak of the doublet. The spectra are gain shifted to a common calibration, summed for respective groups of NaI detectors, and nitrogen detection analysis performed on the summed spectra for each group.

  10. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of explosives detection systems. 1544.213...: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.213 Use of explosives detection systems. (a) Use of explosive detection equipment. If TSA so requires by an amendment to an aircraft...

  11. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use of explosives detection systems. 1544.213...: AIR CARRIERS AND COMMERCIAL OPERATORS Operations § 1544.213 Use of explosives detection systems. (a) Use of explosive detection equipment. If TSA so requires by an amendment to an aircraft...

  12. Universal explosive detection system for homeland security applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Vincent Y.; Bromberg, Edward E. A.

    2010-04-01

    L-3 Communications CyTerra Corporation has developed a high throughput universal explosive detection system (PassPort) to automatically screen the passengers in airports without requiring them to remove their shoes. The technical approach is based on the patented energetic material detection (EMD) technology. By analyzing the results of sample heating with an infrared camera, one can distinguish the deflagration or decomposition of an energetic material from other clutters such as flammables and general background substances. This becomes the basis of a universal explosive detection system that does not require a library and is capable of detecting trace levels of explosives with a low false alarm rate. The PassPort is a simple turnstile type device and integrates a non-intrusive aerodynamic sampling scheme that has been shown capable of detecting trace levels of explosives on shoes. A detailed description of the detection theory and the automated sampling techniques, as well as the field test results, will be presented.

  13. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inspection of photographic equipment and film. (1) At locations at which an aircraft operator or TSA uses an... and advise them to remove all X-ray, scientific, and high-speed film from checked baggage before... photographic equipment and film packages without exposure to an explosives detection system. (2) If...

  14. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inspection of photographic equipment and film. (1) At locations at which an aircraft operator or TSA uses an... and advise them to remove all X-ray, scientific, and high-speed film from checked baggage before... photographic equipment and film packages without exposure to an explosives detection system. (2) If...

  15. 49 CFR 1544.213 - Use of explosives detection systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inspection of photographic equipment and film. (1) At locations at which an aircraft operator or TSA uses an... and advise them to remove all X-ray, scientific, and high-speed film from checked baggage before... photographic equipment and film packages without exposure to an explosives detection system. (2) If...

  16. Extension of a standoff explosive detection system to CBRN threats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Alan; Waterbury, Rob; Rose, Jeremy; Pohl, Ken; Eisterhold, Megan; Thorn, Thelma; Lee, Keesoo; Dottery, Ed

    2010-04-01

    Recent progress has been made on an explosive laser standoff detection system called TREDS-2 constructed from COTS components. The TREDS-2 system utilizes combination of Laser Induced Breakdown (LIBS), Townsend Effect Plasma Spectroscopy (TEPS) and Raman spectroscopy techniques with chemometric algorithms to detect hazardous materials. Extension of the detection capability of the TREDS-2 system on the real-time point detection of chemical, biological, radioactive, and nuclear threats has been tested and presented in this report. System performance of surface detection of a variety of CBRNE materials is shown. An overview of improvements to the explosives detection capabilities is given first. Challenges to sensing some specific CBRN threats are then discussed, along with the initial testing of TREDS-2 on CBRN surrogates on a limited number of surfaces. Signal processing using chemometric algorithms are shown as a demonstration of the system's capabilities. A path forward for using the specific technologies is also provided, as well as a discussion of the advantages that each technology brings to the CBRNE detection effort.

  17. Gamma detectors in explosives and narcotics detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Zubarev, E. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Porohovoi, S. Yu.; Rapatskii, V. L.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Sadovskii, A. B.; Salamatin, A. V.; Salmin, R. A.; Slepnev, V. M.; Andreev, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma detectors based on BGO crystals were designed and developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These detectors are used in explosives and narcotics detection systems. Key specifications and design features of the detectors are presented. A software temperature-compensation method that makes it possible to stabilize the gamma detector response and operate the detector in a temperature range from -20 to 50°C is described.

  18. neu-VISION: an explosives detection system for transportation security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warman, Kieffer; Penn, David

    2008-04-01

    Terrorists were targeting commercial airliners long before the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Despite heightened security measures, commercial airliners remain an attractive target for terrorists, as evidenced by the August 2006 terrorist plot to destroy as many as ten aircraft in mid-flight from the United Kingdom to the United States. As a response to the security threat air carriers are now required to screen 100-percent of all checked baggage for explosives. The scale of this task is enormous and the Transportation Security Administration has deployed thousands of detection systems. Although this has resulted in improved security, the performance of the installed systems is not ideal. Further improvements are needed and can only be made with new technologies that ensure a flexible Concept of Operations and provide superior detection along with low false alarm rates and excellent dependability. To address security needs Applied Signal Technology, Inc. is developing an innovative and practical solution to meet the performance demands of aviation security. The neu-VISION TM system is expected to provide explosives detection performance for checked baggage that both complements and surpasses currently deployed performance. The neu-VISION TM system leverages a 5 year R&D program developing the Associated Particle Imaging (API) technique; a neutron based non-intrusive material identification and imaging technique. The superior performance afforded by this neutron interrogation technique delivers false alarm rates much lower than deployed technologies and "sees through" dense, heavy materials. Small quantities of explosive material are identified even in the cluttered environments.

  19. Wireless system for explosion detection in underground structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chikhradze, M.; Bochorishvili, N.; Akhvlediani, I.; Kukhalashvili, D.; Kalichava, I.; Mataradze, E.

    2009-06-01

    Considering the growing threat of terrorist or accidental explosions in underground stations, underground highway and railway sections improvement of system for protecting people from explosions appears urgent. Current automatic protective devices with blast identification module and blast damping absorbers of various designs as their basic elements cannot be considered effective. Analysis revealed that low reliability of blast detection and delayed generation of start signal for the activation of an absorber are the major disadvantages of protective devices. Besides the transmission of trigger signal to an energy absorber through cable communication reduces the reliability of the operation of protective device due to a possible damage of electric wiring under blast or mechanical attack. This paper presents the outcomes of the studies conducted to select accurate criteria for blast identification and to design wireless system of activation of defensive device. The results of testing of blast detection methods (seismic, EMP, optical, on overpressure) showed that the proposed method, which implies constant monitoring of overpressure in terms of its reliability and response speed, best meets the requirements. Proposed wireless system for explosions identification and activation of protective device consists of transmitter and receiver modules. Transmitter module contains sensor and microprocessor equipped with blast identification software. Receiver module produces activation signal for operation of absorber. Tests were performed in the underground experimental base of Mining Institute. The time between the moment of receiving signal by the sensor and activation of absorber - 640 microsecond; distance between transmitter and receiver in direct tunnel - at least 150m; in tunnel with 900 bending - 50m. This research is sponsored by NATO's Public Diplomacy Division in the framework of "Science for Peace".

  20. Liquid explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Lowell J.

    1994-03-01

    A Liquid Explosives Screening System capable of scanning unopened bottles for liquid explosives has been developed. The system can be operated to detect specific explosives directly, or to verify the labeled or bar-coded contents of the container. In this system nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to interrogate the liquid. NMR produces an extremely rich data set and many parameters of the NMR response can be determined simultaneously. As a result, multiple NMR signatures may be defined for any given set of liquids, and the signature complexity then selected according to the level of threat.

  1. Recent development of two new UV Raman standoff explosive detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waterbury, Rob; Babnick, Robert; Cooper, Justin L.; Ford, Alan R.; Herrera, Francisco; Hopkins, Adam J.; Pohl, Ken; Profeta, Luisa T. M.; Sandoval, Juan; Vunck, Darius

    2016-05-01

    Alakai Defense Systems has created two new short range UV Raman standoff explosive detection sensors. These are called the Critical Infrastructure Protection System (CIPS) and Portable Raman Improvised Explosive Detection System (PRIED) and work at standoff ranges of 10cm and 1-10m respectively. Both these systems are designed to detect neartrace quantities of explosives and Homemade Explosives. A short description of the instruments, design trades, and CONOPS of each design is presented. Data includes a wide variety of explosives, precursors, TIC/TIM's, narcotics, and CWA simulants

  2. A non-imaging polarized terahertz passive system for detecting and identifying concealed explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karam, Mostafa A.; Meyer, Doug

    2011-06-01

    Existing terahertz THz systems for detecting concealed explosives are not capable of identifying explosive type which leads to higher false alarm rates. Moreover, some of those systems are imaging systems that invade personal privacy, and require more processing and computational resources. Other systems have no polarization preference which makes them incapable of capturing the geometric features of an explosive. In this study a non-imaging polarized THz passive system for detecting and identifying concealed explosives overcoming the forgoing shortcomings is developed. The system employs a polarized passive THz sensor in acquiring emitted data from a scene that may have concealed explosives. The acquired data are decomposed into their natural resonance frequencies, and the number of those frequencies is used as criteria in detecting the explosive presence. If the presence of an explosive is confirmed, a set of physically based retrieval algorithms is used in extracting the explosive dielectric constant/refractive index value from natural resonance frequencies and amplitudes of associated signals. Comparing the refractive index value against a database of refractive indexes of known explosives identifies the explosive type. As an application, a system having a dual polarized radiometer operating within the frequency band of 0.62- 0.82 THz is presented and used in detecting and identifying person borne C-4 explosive concealed under a cotton garment. The system showed higher efficiencies in detecting and identifying the explosive.

  3. Using Gunshot Detection Systems to Fight Explosive Fishing Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showen, R. L.; Dunson, J. C.; Woodman, G.; Christopher, S.; Wilson, S.

    2015-12-01

    Blast fishing (using explosives to catch fish) causes extensive damage to coral reefs, especially in the Coral Triangle in Southeast Asia. Subsistence fishermen and larger consortiums, often with criminal links, throw an explosive into a school of fish, killing all sea life within range. This unsustainable practice is becoming more prevalent, and threatens the protein supply of as many as a billion people. Ending blast fishing will require combined technical and societal methods aimed at both deterring the practice, and catching those responsible. Our work aims to significantly improve enforcement. We are re-purposing SST's ShotSpotter gunshot detection system, (trusted and valued by police around the world), substituting hydrophones for the present microphones. Using multilateration and trained human reviewers, the system can give prompt blast alerts, location data, and acoustic waveforms to law enforcement officials. We hope to establish a prototype system in Malaysia in 2015, and have already secured governmental approvals for installation and tests with local law enforcement. The Scubazoo media firm in Malaysia is working with resorts, dive operations, and celebrity sponsors, and is planning to produce videos to illustrate the severity of the problem to both governments and the public. Because there is little hard data concerning the prevalence of blast fishing in either marine protected areas or open waters, the system can also indicate to the world the actual blast rates and patterns of use. The Teng Hoi environmental NGO in Hong Kong showed in 2004 that acoustic waves from typical bombs propagate on the order of 20 km, so an underwater locator system with a small number of sensors can feasibly cover a sizable coral region. Our present plans are to mount sensors on piers, buoys, and boats, but if possible we would also like to integrate with other existing acoustic arrays to strengthen the fight against blast fishing.

  4. Particle generators for the calibration and testing of narcotic and explosive vapor/particle detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, John P.; Hallowell, Susan F.; Hoglund, David E.

    1994-03-01

    A review of data on narcotics and explosives particulates is presented. Methods to generate particles of narcotics and explosives will be discussed with respect to resulting particle size distribution and mass output. The application of these standards to the testing of narcotic and explosive particle detection systems will be addressed.

  5. Compact standoff Raman system for detection of homemade explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Bates, David E.; Acosta, Tayro E.

    2010-04-01

    We present data on standoff detection of chemicals used in synthesis of homemade explosives (HME) using a compact portable standoff Raman system developed at the University of Hawaii. Data presented in this article show that good quality Raman spectra of various organic and inorganic chemicals, including hazardous chemicals such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, sulfur, nitrobenzene, benzene, acetone, and gasoline, can be easily obtained from remote distances with a compact standoff Raman system utilizing only a regular 85 mm Nikon camera lens as collection optics. Raman spectra of various chemicals showing clear Raman fingerprints obtained from targets placed at 50 m distance in daylight with 1 to 10 second of integration time are presented in this article. A frequency-doubled mini Nd:YAG pulsed laser source (532 nm, 30 mJ/pulse, 20 Hz, pulse width 8 ns) is used in an oblique geometry to excite the target located at 50 m distance. The standoff Raman system uses a compact spectrograph of size 10 cm (length) × 8.2 cm (width) × 5.2 cm (height) with spectral coverage from 100 to 4500 cm-1 Stokes-Raman shifted from 532 nm laser excitation and is equipped with a gated thermo-electrically cooled ICCD detector. The system is capable of detecting both the target as well as the atmospheric gases before the target. Various chemicals could be easily identified through glass, plastic, and water media. Possible applications of the standoff Raman system for homeland security and environmental monitoring are discussed.

  6. A virtual prototype for an explosives detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Seed, T.; Berman, B.L.; Zahrt, J.D.

    1993-10-01

    The development of the resonance-absorption based explosives detection system (EDS), as initially planned, involved the parallel development of a high-current proton accelerator (with a long development time) and the other detection subsystems. The design approach for the latter was to develop a capability for computer modeling the essential processes of each subsystem, benchmark these models by experiment, and link the models, i.e., creating a virtual prototype, to explore the effect of subsystem design changes on the EDS system performance. Additionally, when the EDS prototype system was completed, the linked models would be used to investigate further trade-offs in defining an airport system. Most of the necessary subsystem modeling was completed and used in subsystem design. Linking of all of the subsystems was accomplished to some degree or another. There are many physical and mathematical processes that take place between the acceleration of the proton beam and the final display of the reconstructed image. Figure 1 summarizes these processes and indicates which code was used to model each particular process. Section II reports on the modeling of the proton beam incident on a {sup 13}C target. The gamma-ray output is the desired output from this phase of modeling. Section III describes the tools used to investigate the transport of the gamma-rays through computer simulated phantoms (suitcases). Two different codes were used in this investigation: a Monte Carlo photon transport code and a ray tracing code. One benchmark between these codes was accomplished. Section IV is concerned with the model calculations performed on single detectors. The calculations again were performed with a Monte Carlo transport code. The reconstruction code, used throughout in the simulations and as the workhorse in the analysis of the real experiments. The authors conclude, in Section VII, with the assessment of the simulation/virtual prototyping of the real experiment.

  7. Chemical sensing system for classification of mine-like objects by explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, W.B.; Rodacy, P.J.; Jones, E.E.; Gomez, B.J.; Woodfin, R.L.

    1998-04-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted research in chemical sensing and analysis of explosives for many years. Recently, that experience has been directed towards detecting mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) by sensing the low-level explosive signatures associated with these objects. The authors focus has been on the classification of UXO in shallow water and anti-personnel/anti tank mines on land. The objective of this work is to develop a field portable chemical sensing system which can be used to examine mine-like objects (MLO) to determine whether there are explosive molecules associated with the MLO. Two sampling subsystems have been designed, one for water collection and one for soil/vapor sampling. The water sampler utilizes a flow-through chemical adsorbent canister to extract and concentrate the explosive molecules. Explosive molecules are thermally desorbed from the concentrator and trapped in a focusing stage for rapid desorption into an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS). The authors describe a prototype system which consists of a sampler, concentrator-focuser, and detector. The soil sampler employs a light-weight probe for extracting and concentrating explosive vapor from the soil in the vicinity of an MLO. The chemical sensing system is capable of sub-part-per-billion detection of TNT and related explosive munition compounds. They present the results of field and laboratory tests on buried landmines which demonstrate their ability to detect the explosive signatures associated with these objects.

  8. Chemical sensing system for classification of minelike objects by explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Jones, Edwin E.; Gomez, Bernard J.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    1998-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has conducted research in chemical sensing and analysis of explosives for many years. Recently, that experience has been directed towards detecting mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) by sensing the low-level explosive signatures associated with these objects. Our focus has been on the classification of UXO in shallow water and anti-personnel/anti tank mines on land. The objective of this work is to develop a field portable chemical sensing system which can be used to examine mine-like objects (MLO) to determine whether there are explosive molecules associated with the MLO. Two sampling subsystems have been designed, one for water collection and one for soil/vapor sampling. The water sampler utilizes a flow-through chemical adsorbent canister to extract and concentrate the explosive molecules. Explosive molecules are thermally desorbed from the concentrator and trapped in a focusing stage for rapid desorption into an ion-mobility spectrometer (IMS). We will describe a prototype system which consists of a sampler, concentrator-focuser, and detector. The soil sampler employs a light-weight probe for extracting and concentrating explosive vapor from the soil in the vicinity of an MLO. The chemical sensing system is capable of sub-part-per-billion detection of TNT and related explosive munition compounds. We will present the results of field and laboratory tests on buried landmines, which demonstrate our ability to detect the explosive signatures associated with these objects.

  9. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    A-prototype explosives detection system that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear resonance absorption techniques is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection- alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  10. Prototype explosives-detection system based on nuclear-resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1994-06-01

    A prototype explosives-detection system (EDS) that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear-resonance absorption technique is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  11. RoboHound:developing sample collection and preconcentration hardware for a remote trace explosives detection system.

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, David J.; Denning, David J.; Hobart, Clinton G.; Lenz, Michael C.; Anderson, Robert J.; Carlson, Dennis L.; Hunter, John Anthony; Gladwell, T. Scott; Mitchell, Mary-Anne; Hannum, David W.; Baumann, Mark J.

    2005-09-01

    The RoboHound{trademark} Project was a three-year, multiphase project at Sandia National Laboratories to build and refine a working prototype trace explosive detection system as a tool for a commercial robot. The RoboHound system was envisioned to be a tool for emergency responders to test suspicious items (i.e., packages or vehicles) for explosives while maintaining a safe distance. The project investigated combining Sandia's expertise in trace explosives detection with a wheeled robotic platform that could be programmed to interrogate suspicious items remotely for the presence of explosives. All of the RoboHound field tests were successful, especially with regards to the ability to collect and detect trace samples of RDX. The project has gone from remote sampling with human intervention to a fully automatic system that requires no human intervention until the robot returns from a sortie. A proposal is being made for additional work leading towards commercialization.

  12. An explosives detection system for airline security using coherent x-ray scattering technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Robert W.; Mahdavieh, Jacob; Smith, Richard C.; Subramanian, Ravi

    2008-08-01

    L-3 Communications Security and Detection Systems (SDS) has developed a new system for automated alarm resolution in airline baggage Explosive Detection Systems (EDS) based on coherent x-ray scattering spectroscopy. The capabilities of the system were demonstrated in tests with concealed explosives at the Transportation Security Laboratory and airline passenger baggage at Orlando International Airport. The system uses x-ray image information to identify suspicious objects and performs targeted diffraction measurements to classify them. This extra layer of detection capability affords a significant reduction in the rate of false alarm objects that must presently be resolved by opening passenger bags for hand inspection.

  13. Physical Limitations of Neutron-Based Explosives Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip; Barzilov, Alexander; Paschal, Jon; Hopper, Lindsay; Moore, Ryan; Board, Jeremy; Houchins, Eric; Rice, Ian; Howard, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Recent events in Madrid and London have once again focused attention on the problem of threat detection using elemental analysis. Neutron-based systems are utilized to perform bulk chemical analysis due to their high chemical specificity and their fairly rapid response time. While there are many acronyms for these systems, their working principle is typically to interrogate the sample with a beam of neutrons and to identify and quantify secondary particle emissions (e.g. photons) and relate these emissions back to number of atoms present of a given element. These systems perform optimally when their designers and operators are aware of the physical limitations inherent in these devices. For example, minimum detection limits are strongly constrained by the signal-to-noise ratio in a given system. The purpose of this paper is not to denigrate any of these systems but to discuss the strengths and limitations of various approaches.

  14. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.J.; Cappiello, C.C.

    1996-05-01

    A laboratory prototype system has been developed for the experimental evaluation of an explosives detection technique based on nuclear resonance absorption of gamma rays in nitrogen. Major subsystems include a radiofrequency quadrupole proton accelerator and associated beam transport system, a high-power gamma-ray production target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection system, and an image- processing/detection-alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  15. Explosives and landmine detection using an artificial olfactory system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Joel E.; Waggoner, L. Paul; Kauer, John S.

    2004-09-01

    We are developing a portable, artificial olfactory system based on multiple attributes of the sense of smell to identify air-borne odors, including those associated with buried landmines. Brief (1-2 sec) air samples are drawn over an array of optically-interrogated, cross-reactive chemical sensors. These consist of polymers with high sensitivity and relatively narrow specificity for nitroaromatics (Timothy Swager, MIT), as well as those with broader responses, thus permitting discrimination among substances that may be confused for nitroaromatics. Biologically-based pattern matching algorithms automatically identify odors as one of several to which the device has been trained. In discrimination tests, after training to one concentration of 6 odors, the device gave 95% correct identification when tested at the original plus three different concentrations. Thus, as required in real world applications, the device can identify odors at multiple concentrations without explicitly training on each. In sensitivity tests, the device showed 100% detection and no false alarms for the landmine-related compound DNT at concentrations as low as 500 pp-trillion (quantified by GC/MS) - 10 times lower than average canine behavioral thresholds. To investigate landmine detection capabilities, field studies were conducted at Ft. Leonard Wood, MO. In calibration tests, signals from buried PMA1A anti-personnel landmines were clearly discriminated from background. In a limited 9 site "blind" test, PMA1A detection was 100% with false alarms of 40%. Although requiring further development, these data indicate that a device with appropriate sensors and exploiting olfactory principles can detect and discriminate low concentration vapor signatures, including those of buried landmines.

  16. Detection of bulk explosives using the GPR only portion of the HSTAMIDS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabony, Joshua; Carlson, Douglas O.; Duvoisin, Herbert A., III; Torres-Rosario, Juan

    2010-04-01

    The legacy AN/PSS-14 (Army-Navy Portable Special Search-14) Handheld Mine Detecting Set (also called HSTAMIDS for Handheld Standoff Mine Detection System) has proven itself over the last 7 years as the state-of-the-art in land mine detection, both for the US Army and for Humanitarian Demining groups. Its dual GPR (Ground Penetrating Radar) and MD (Metal Detection) sensor has provided receiver operating characteristic curves (probability of detection or Pd versus false alarm rate or FAR) that routinely set the mark for such devices. Since its inception and type-classification in 2003 as the US (United States) Army standard, the desire for use of the AN/PSS-14 against alternate threats - such as bulk explosives - has recently become paramount. To this end, L-3 CyTerra has developed and tested bulk explosive detection and discrimination algorithms using only the Stepped Frequency Continuous Wave (SFCW) Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) portion of the system, versus the fused version that is used to optimally detect land mines. Performance of the new bulk explosive algorithm against representative zero-metal bulk explosive target and clutter emplacements is depicted, with the utility to the operator also described.

  17. Portable raman explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven; Scharff, Robert J

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in portable Raman instruments have dramatically increased their application to emergency response and forensics, as well as homeland defense. This paper reviews the relevant attributes and disadvantages of portable Raman spectroscopy, both essentially and instrumentally, to the task of explosives detection in the field.

  18. Mobile TNA system to detect explosives and drugs concealed in cars and trucks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendahan, Joseph; Gozani, Tsahi

    1998-12-01

    The drug problem in the U.S. is serious and efforts to fight it are constrained by the lack of adequate means to curb the inflow of smuggled narcotics into the country through cargo containers. Also, events such as the disastrous explosion in Oklahoma City, the IRA bombing in London, and the bombing of the U.S. military residence in Dharan make the development of new tools for the detection of explosives and drugs in vehicles imperative. Thermal neutron analysis (TNA) technology, developed for the detection of explosives in suitcases, and detection of landmines and unexploded ordnance is presently being applied to the nonintrusive detection of significant amounts of explosives and drugs concealed in cars, trucks and large cargo containers. TNA technology is based on the analysis of characteristic gamma rays emitted following thermal neutron capture. A TNA system can be used in a variety of operational scenarios, such as inspection before an unloaded cargo container from a spit is moved to temporary storage, inspection of trucks unloaded from a ferry, or inspection of vehicles parked close to Federal building or military bases. This paper will discuss the detection process and operational scenarios, and will present results from recent simulations and measurements.

  19. Miniaturized Explosive Preconcentrator for Use in a Man-Portable Field Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, David W.; Linker, Kevin L.; Parmeter, John E.; Rhykerd, Charles L.; Varley, Nathan R.

    1999-08-02

    We discuss the design and testing of a miniaturized explosives preconcentrator that can be used to enhance the capabilities of man-portable field detection systems, such as those based on ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). The preconcentrator is a smaller version of a similar device that was developed recently at Sandia National Laboratories for use in a trace detection portal that screens personnel for explosives. Like its predecessor, this preconcentrator is basically a filtering device that allows a small amount of explosive residue in a large incoming airflow to be concentrated into a much smaller air volume via adsorption and resorption, prior to delivery into a chemical detector. We discuss laboratory testing of this preconcentrator interfaced to a commercially available IMS-based detection system, with emphasis on the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX). The issues investigated include optimization of the preconcentrator volume and inlet airflow, the use of different types of adsorbing surfaces within the preconcentrator, Wd preconcentrator efficiency and concentration factor. We discuss potential field applications of the preconcentrator, as well as avenues for further investigations and improvements.

  20. Spot test kit for explosives detection

    DOEpatents

    Pagoria, Philip F; Whipple, Richard E; Nunes, Peter J; Eckels, Joel Del; Reynolds, John G; Miles, Robin R; Chiarappa-Zucca, Marina L

    2014-03-11

    An explosion tester system comprising a body, a lateral flow membrane swab unit adapted to be removeably connected to the body, a first explosives detecting reagent, a first reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the first reagent holder and dispenser containing the first explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the first explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body, a second explosives detecting reagent, and a second reagent holder and dispenser operatively connected to the body, the second reagent holder and dispenser containing the second explosives detecting reagent and positioned to deliver the second explosives detecting reagent to the lateral flow membrane swab unit when the lateral flow membrane swab unit is connected to the body.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator.

    PubMed

    Bergaoui, K; Reguigui, N; Gary, C K; Brown, C; Cremer, J T; Vainionpaa, J H; Piestrup, M A

    2014-12-01

    An explosive detection system based on a Deuterium-Deuterium (D-D) neutron generator has been simulated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP5). Nuclear-based explosive detection methods can detect explosives by identifying their elemental components, especially nitrogen. Thermal neutron capture reactions have been used for detecting prompt gamma emission (10.82MeV) following radiative neutron capture by (14)N nuclei. The explosive detection system was built based on a fully high-voltage-shielded, axial D-D neutron generator with a radio frequency (RF) driven ion source and nominal yield of about 10(10) fast neutrons per second (E=2.5MeV). Polyethylene and paraffin were used as moderators with borated polyethylene and lead as neutron and gamma ray shielding, respectively. The shape and the thickness of the moderators and shields are optimized to produce the highest thermal neutron flux at the position of the explosive and the minimum total dose at the outer surfaces of the explosive detection system walls. In addition, simulation of the response functions of NaI, BGO, and LaBr3-based γ-ray detectors to different explosives is described. PMID:25154568

  2. Potential for detection of explosive and biological hazards with electronic terahertz systems.

    PubMed

    Choi, Min Ki; Bettermann, Alan; van der Weide, D W

    2004-02-15

    The terahertz (THz) regime (0.1-10 THz) is rich with emerging possibilities in sensing, imaging and communications, with unique applications to screening for weapons, explosives and biohazards, imaging of concealed objects, water content and skin. Here we present initial surveys to evaluate the possibility of sensing plastic explosives and bacterial spores using field-deployable electronic THz techniques based on short-pulse generation and coherent detection using nonlinear transmission lines and diode sampling bridges. We also review the barriers and approaches to achieving greater sensing-at-a-distance (stand-off) capabilities for THz sensing systems. We have made several reflection measurements of metallic and non-metallic targets in our laboratory, and have observed high contrast relative to reflection from skin. In particular, we have taken small quantities of energetic materials such as plastic explosives and a variety of Bacillus spores, and measured them in transmission and in reflection using a broadband pulsed electronic THz reflectometer. The pattern of reflection versus frequency gives rise to signatures that are remarkably specific to the composition of the target, even though the target's morphology and position is varied. Although more work needs to be done to reduce the effects of standing waves through time-gating or attenuators, the possibility of mapping out this contrast for imaging and detection is very attractive. PMID:15306524

  3. Liquids and homemade explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellenbogen, Michael; Bijjani, Richard

    2009-05-01

    Excerpt from the US Transportation Security Agency website: "The ban on liquids, aerosols and gels was implemented on August 10 after a terrorist plot was foiled. Since then, experts from around the government, including the FBI and our national labs have analyzed the information we now have and have conducted extensive explosives testing to get a better understanding of this specific threat." In order to lift the ban and ease the burden on the flying public, Reveal began an extensive effort in close collaboration with the US and several other governments to help identify these threats. This effort resulted in the successful development and testing of an automated explosive detection system capable of resolving these threats with a high probability of detection and a low false alarm rate. We will present here some of the methodology and approach we took to address this problem.

  4. Explosive Microsphere Particle Standards for Trace Explosive Detection Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staymates, Matthew; Fletcher, Robert; Gillen, Greg

    2007-11-01

    Increases in Homeland Security measures have led to a substantial deployment of trace explosive detection systems within the United States and US embassies around the world. One such system is a walk-through portal which aerodynamically screens people for trace explosive particles. Another system is a benchtop instrument that can detect explosives from swipes used to collect explosive particles from surfaces of luggage and clothing. The National Institute of Standards and Technology is involved in a chemical metrology program to support the operational deployment and effective utilization of trace explosive and narcotic detection devices and is working to develop a measurement infrastructure to optimize, calibrate and standardize these instruments. Well characterized test materials are essential for validating the performance of these systems. Particle size, chemical composition, and detector response are particularly important. Here, we describe one method for producing monodisperse polymer microspheres encapsulating trace explosives, simulants, and narcotics using a sonicated co-flow Berkland nozzle. The nozzle creates uniform droplets that undergo an oil/water emulsion process and cure to form hardened microspheres containing the desired analyte. Issues such as particle size, particle uniformity and levels of analyte composition will be discussed.

  5. Trace Explosive Detection Using Nanosensors

    SciTech Connect

    Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2008-01-01

    Selective and sensitive detection of explosives is very important in countering terrorist threats. Detecting trace explosives has become a very complex and expensive endeavor because of a number of factors, such as the wide variety of materials that can be used as explosives, the lack of easily detectable signatures, the vast number of avenues by which these weapons can be deployed, and the lack of inexpensive sensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. High sensitivity and selectivity, combined with the ability to lower the deployment cost of sensors using mass production, is essential in winning the war on explosives-based terrorism. Nanosensors have the potential to satisfy all the requirements for an effective platform for the trace detection of explosives.

  6. Transport calculations in support of simulation of nuclear-based explosive detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Shayer, Z.; Bendahan, J.; Schulze, M.

    1993-12-31

    Explosives concealed in trucks or large containers can be detected utilizing a system based on pulse fast neutron analysis (PFNA) or thermal neutron analysis (TNA). These systems are able to determine the spatial distribution of the various elements in interrogated volume. In the design of the above systems, the charged and neutral particles are traced from the source through their arrival time in the detectors. On-line analysis of the signals from the detectors is used to identify the materials which constitute the sample employing statistical and inverse methods. An extensive research program to develop the computational capability to model this process is underway. The results will produce an optimized and cost effective design of a TNA and PFNA system.

  7. Detection and dispersal of explosives by ants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Achal, Steve; Faust, Anthony A.; Puckrin, Eldon; House, Andrew; Reynolds, Damon; McDougall, William; Asquini, Adam

    2009-05-01

    The ability of animals to detect explosives is well documented. Mammalian systems, insects and even single celled organisms have all been studied and in a few cases employed to detect explosives. This paper will describe the potential ability of ants to detect, disperse and possibly neutralize bulk explosives. In spring 2008 a team of DRDC and Itres scientists conducted experiments on detecting surface-laid and buried landmines, improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and their components. Measurements were made using state-of-the-art short wave and thermal infrared hyperspectral imagers mounted on a personnel lift. During one of the early morning measurement sessions, a wispy, long linear trail was seen to emanate several meters from piles of explosives that were situated on the ground. Upon close visual inspection, it was observed that ants had found the piles of explosives and were carrying it to their ant hill, a distance of almost 20 meters from the piles. Initial analysis of the hyperspectral images clearly revealed the trail to the ant hill of explosives, despite being present in quantities not visible to the unaided eye. This paper details these observations and discusses them in the context of landmine and IED detection and neutralization. Possible reasons for such behaviour are presented. A number of questions regarding the behaviour, many pertinent to the use of ants in a counter-landmine/IED role, are presented and possible methods of answering them are discussed. Anecdotal evidence from deminers of detection and destruction of explosives by ants are presented.

  8. Lidar Detection of Explosives Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, Sergei M.; Gorlov, Evgeny V.; Zharkov, Victor I.; Panchenko, Yury N.

    2016-06-01

    The possibility of remote detection of traces of explosives using laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence (LF/LIF) is studied. Experimental data on the remote visualization of traces of trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexogen (RDX), trotyl-hexogen (Comp B), octogen (HMX), and tetryl with a scanning lidar detector of traces of nitrogen-containing explosives at a distance of 5 m are presented.

  9. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, C.G.

    1990-08-01

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs.

  10. Portable standoff Raman system for fast detection of homemade explosives through glass, plastic, and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Anupam K.; Sharma, Shiv K.; Acosta, Tayro E.; Porter, John N.; Lucey, Paul G.; Bates, David E.

    2012-06-01

    The University of Hawaii has been developing portable remote Raman systems capable of detecting chemicals in daylight from a safe standoff distance. We present data on standoff detection of chemicals used in the synthesis of homemade explosives (HME) using a portable standoff Raman system utilizing an 8-inch telescope. Data show that good-quality Raman spectra of various hazardous chemicals such as ammonium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate, sulfur, nitrobenzene, benzene, acetone, various organic and inorganic chemicals etc. could be easily obtained from remote distances, tested up to 120 meters, with a single-pulse laser excitation and with detection time less than 1 μs. The system uses a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG pulsed laser source (532 nm, 100 mJ/pulse, 15 Hz, pulse width 10 ns) capable of firing a single or double pulse. The double-pulse configuration also allows the system to perform standoff LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) at 50 m range. In the standoff Raman detection, the doublepulse sequence simply doubles the signal to noise ratio. Significant improvement in the quality of Raman spectra is observed when the standoff detection is made with 1s integration time. The system uses a 50-micron slit and has spectral resolution of 8 cm-1. The HME chemicals could be easily detected through clear and brown glass bottles, PP and HDPE plastic bottles, and also through fluorescent plastic water bottles. Standoff Raman detection of HME chemical from a 10 m distance through non-visible concealed bottles in plastic bubble wrap packaging is demonstrated with 1 s integration time. Possible applications of the standoff Raman system for homeland security and environmental monitoring are discussed.

  11. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    ScienceCinema

    Atkinson, David

    2014-07-24

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  12. Advancing Explosives Detection Capabilities: Vapor Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, David

    2012-10-15

    A new, PNNL-developed method provides direct, real-time detection of trace amounts of explosives such as RDX, PETN and C-4. The method selectively ionizes a sample before passing the sample through a mass spectrometer to detect explosive vapors. The method could be used at airports to improve aviation security.

  13. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOEpatents

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Phelan, James M.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  14. Explosive vapor detection payload for small robots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stimac, Phil J.; Pettit, Michael; Wetzel, John P.; Haas, John W.

    2013-05-01

    Detection of explosive hazards is a critical component of enabling and improving operational mobility and protection of US Forces. The Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) developed by the US Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is addressing this challenge for dismounted soldiers. Under the AMDS program, ARA has developed a vapor sampling system that enhances the detection of explosive residues using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) sensors. The Explosives Hazard Trace Detection (EHTD) payload is designed for plug-and-play installation and operation on small robotic platforms, addressing critical Army needs for more safely detecting concealed or exposed explosives in areas such as culverts, walls and vehicles. In this paper, we describe the development, robotic integration and performance of the explosive vapor sampling system, which consists of a sampling "head," a vapor transport tube and an extendable "boom." The sampling head and transport tube are integrated with the boom, allowing samples to be collected from targeted surfaces up to 7-ft away from the robotic platform. During sample collection, an IR lamp in the sampling head is used to heat a suspected object/surface and the vapors are drawn through the heated vapor transport tube to an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) for detection. The EHTD payload is capable of quickly (less than 30 seconds) detecting explosives such as TNT, PETN, and RDX at nanogram levels on common surfaces (brick, concrete, wood, glass, etc.).

  15. Feasibility studies on explosive detection and homeland security applications using a neutron and x-ray combined computed tomography system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, V.; Srivastava, A.; Lee, H. K.; Liu, X.

    2013-05-01

    The successful creation and operation of a neutron and X-ray combined computed tomography (NXCT) system has been demonstrated by researchers at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. The NXCT system has numerous applications in the field of material characterization and object identification in materials with a mixture of atomic numbers represented. Presently, the feasibility studies have been performed for explosive detection and homeland security applications, particularly in concealed material detection and determination of the light atomic number materials. These materials cannot be detected using traditional X-ray imaging. The new system has the capability to provide complete structural and compositional information due to the complementary nature of X-ray and neutron interactions with materials. The design of the NXCT system facilitates simultaneous and instantaneous imaging operation, promising enhanced detection capabilities of explosive materials, low atomic number materials and illicit materials for homeland security applications. In addition, a sample positioning system allowing the user to remotely and automatically manipulate the sample makes the system viable for commercial applications. Several explosives and weapon simulants have been imaged and the results are provided. The fusion algorithms which combine the data from the neutron and X-ray imaging produce superior images. This paper is a compete overview of the NXCT system for feasibility studies of explosive detection and homeland security applications. The design of the system, operation, algorithm development, and detection schemes are provided. This is the first combined neutron and X-ray computed tomography system in operation. Furthermore, the method of fusing neutron and X-ray images together is a new approach which provides high contrast images of the desired object. The system could serve as a standardized tool in nondestructive testing of many applications, especially in

  16. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  17. New high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Jenkins, Anthony; Ribiero, K.; Napoli, J.

    1994-03-01

    A new patented ion trap mobility spectrometer design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electrical-field-driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC, and LSD are reported.

  18. Optimal dynamic detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven; Mcgrane, Shawn D; Greenfield, Margo T; Scharff, R J; Rabitz, Herschel A; Roslund, J

    2009-01-01

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off distances, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring optimal dynamic detection to exploit the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity of explosives signatures while reducing the influence of noise and the signals from background interferents in the field (increase selectivity). These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal nonlinear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe sub-pulses. With sufficient bandwidth, the technique is capable of intrinsically providing orthogonal broad spectral information for data fusion, all from a single optimal pulse.

  19. Explosive Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this project was to determine the feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices (INDs). The studies were carried out using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The model results were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements are presented in this report. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another.

  20. Explosion suppression system

    DOEpatents

    Sapko, Michael J.; Cortese, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    An explosion suppression system and triggering apparatus therefor are provided for quenching gas and dust explosions. An electrically actuated suppression mechanism which dispenses an extinguishing agent into the path ahead of the propagating flame is actuated by a triggering device which is light powered. This triggering device is located upstream of the propagating flame and converts light from the flame to an electrical actuation signal. A pressure arming device electrically connects the triggering device to the suppression device only when the explosion is sensed by a further characteristic thereof beside the flame such as the pioneer pressure wave. The light powered triggering device includes a solar panel which is disposed in the path of the explosion and oriented between horizontally downward and vertical. Testing mechanisms are also preferably provided to test the operation of the solar panel and detonator as well as the pressure arming mechanism.

  1. Explosives Detection and Identification by PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    E. H. Seabury; A. J. Caffrey

    2006-04-01

    The feasibility of using field-portable prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) to detect and identify explosives in improvised nuclear devices has been studied computationally, using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Monte Carlo results, in turn were tested experimentally using explosive simulants and the PINS PGNAA system developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The results of the MCNP calculations and PINS measurements have been previously reported. In this report we describe measurements performed on actual explosives and compare the results with calculations. The calculations and measurements were in good agreement and indicate that most explosives are readily distinguishable from one another by PGNAA

  2. Review of Nuclear Methodologies for Explosive Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womble, Phillip C.; Vourvopoulos, George; Novikov, Ivan; Paschal, Jon

    2001-10-01

    Nuclear techniques show a number of advantages for non-destructive elemental characterization. These include the ability to examine bulk quantities with speed, high elemental specificity, and no memory effects from the previously measured object. These qualities are important for an effective detection system for explosives and drugs. High explosives (TNT, RDX, C-4, etc.) are composed primarily of the chemical elements hydrogen, carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Many innocuous materials are also primarily composed of these same elements. These elements, however, are found in each material with very different elemental ratios and concentrations. It is thus possible to identify and differentiate e.g. TNT from paraffin. For narcotics, the C/O ratio is at least a factor of two larger than the innocuous materials. Explosives have been shown to be differentiated by the utilization of both C/O ratio and N/O ratios. The problem of identifying explosives is thus reduced to the problem of elemental identification and quantization. We will review the methods of explosive detection with emphasis on nuclear techniques. We will discuss where improvements are desired on current techniques for landmine detection and unexploded ordnance.

  3. Explosives detection using quantum cascade laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Suarez, John R.; Pollock, Yadira S.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2013-05-01

    An infrared spectroscopy based explosives detection system using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) as excitation source was used to record mid infrared spectral signals of highly energetic materials (HEM) deposited on real world substrates such as travel baggage, cardboard and wood. The HEMs used were nitroaromatic military explosive trinitrotoluene (TNT), aliphatic nitrate ester pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN) and aliphatic nitramine hexahydrotrinitrotriazine (RDX). Various deposition methods including sample smearing, spin coating, spray deposition and partial immersion were evaluated for preparing samples and standards used as part of the study. Chemometrics statistical routines such as principal component analysis (PCA) regression with various preprocessing steps were applied to the recorded infrared spectra of explosives deposited as trace contaminants on target substrates. The results show that the dispersive infrared vibrational technique investigated using QCL is useful for detection of HEMs in the types of substrates studied.

  4. Differential thermal analysis microsystem for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; Boisen, A.

    2011-06-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride membrane incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of 3 different kinds of explosives (TNT, RDX and PETN). This project is carried out under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  5. Concealed explosive detection on personnel using a wideband holographic millimeter-wave imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Collins, H. D.; Hall, Thomas E.; Severtsen, Ronald H.

    1996-06-01

    A novel wideband millimeter-wave imaging system is presently being developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that will allow rapid inspection of personnel for concealed explosives, handguns, or other threats. Millimeter-wavelength electromagnetic waves are effective for this application since they readily penetrate common clothing materials, while being partially reflected from the person under surveillance as well as any concealed items. To form an image rapidly, a linear array of 128 antennas is used to electronically scan over a horizontal aperture of 0.75 meters, while the linear array is mechanically swept over a vertical aperture of 2 meters. At each point over this 2-D aperture, coherent wideband data reflected from the target is gathered using wide-beamwidth antennas. The data is recorded coherently, and reconstructed (focused) using an efficient image reconstruction algorithm developed at PNNL. This algorithm works in the near-field of both the target and the scanned aperture and preserves the diffraction limited resolution of less than one-wavelength. The wide frequency bandwidth is used to provide depth resolution, which allows the image to be fully focused over a wide range of depths, resulting in a full 3-D image. This is not possible in a normal optical (or quasi-optical) imaging system. This system has been extensively tested using concealed metal and plastic weapons, and has recently been tested using real plastic explosives (C-4 and RDX) and simulated liquid explosives concealed on personnel. Millimeter-waves do not penetrate the human body, so it is necessary to view the subject from several angles in order to fully inspect for concealed weapons. Full animations containing 36 - 72 frames recorded from subjects rotated by 5 - 10 degrees, have been found to be extremely useful for rapid, effective inspection of personnel.

  6. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration for trace explosives detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, Kevin Lane

    2004-05-01

    A trace explosives detection system typically contains three subsystems: sample collection, preconcentration, and detection. Sample collection of trace explosives (vapor and particulate) through large volumes of airflow helps reduce sampling time while increasing the amount of dilute sample collected. Preconcentration of the collected sample before introduction into the detector improves the sensitivity of the detector because of the increase in sample concentration. By combining large-volume sample collection and preconcentration, an improvement in the detection of explosives is possible. Large-volume sampling and preconcentration is presented using a systems level approach. In addition, the engineering of large-volume sampling and preconcentration for the trace detection of explosives is explained.

  7. Explosives detection with quadrupole resonance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Thorson, Benjamin D.; Beevor, Simon; West, Rebecca; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1997-02-01

    The increase in international terrorist activity over the past decade has necessitated the exploration of new technologies for the detection of plastic explosives. Quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA) has proven effective as a technique for detecting the presence of plastic, sheet, and military explosive compounds in small quantities, and can also be used to identify narcotics such as heroin and cocaine base. QRA is similar to the widely used magnetic resonance (MR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques, but has the considerable advantage that the item being inspected does not need to be immersed in a steady, homogeneous magnetic field. The target compounds are conclusively identified by their unique quadrupole resonance frequencies. Quantum magnetics has develop and introduced a product line of explosives and narcotics detection devices based upon QRA technology. The work presented here concerns a multi-compound QRA detection system designed to screen checked baggage, cargo, and sacks of mail at airports and other high-security facilities. The design philosophy and performance are discussed and supported by test results from field trials conducted in the United States and the United Kingdom. This detection system represents the current state of QRA technology for field use in both commercial and government sectors.

  8. Explosive detection program at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, F.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief, general description of the Explosive Detection Program at Sandia National Laboratories is given. The six major topics of the program are: (1) Coated or Uncoated Metallic Preconcentrators; (2) a Derivatization Study; (3) a Portable Ion Mobility Spectrometer; (4) an Explosive Screening Portal; (5) Mass Spectrometer Development; and (6) an Explosive Vapor Generator.

  9. Explosives Detection: Exploitation of the Physical Signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, David

    2010-10-01

    Explosives based terrorism is an ongoing threat that is evolving with respect to implementation, configuration and materials used. There are a variety of devices designed to detect explosive devices, however, each technology has limitations and operational constraints. A full understanding of the signatures available for detection coupled with the array of detection choices can be used to develop a conceptual model of an explosives screening operation. Physics based sensors provide a robust approach to explosives detection, typically through the identification of anomalies, and are currently used for screening in airports around the world. The next generation of detectors for explosives detection will need to be more sensitive and selective, as well as integrate seamlessly with devices focused on chemical signatures. An appreciation for the details of the physical signature exploitation in cluttered environments with time, space, and privacy constraints is necessary for effective explosives screening of people, luggage, cargo, and vehicles.

  10. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coburn, M.D.; Stinecipher, M.M.

    1981-11-17

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  11. Ammonium nitrate explosive systems

    DOEpatents

    Stinecipher, Mary M.; Coburn, Michael D.

    1981-01-01

    Novel explosives which comprise mixtures of ammonium nitrate and an ammonium salt of a nitroazole in desired ratios are disclosed. A preferred nitroazole is 3,5-dinitro-1,2,4-triazole. The explosive and physical properties of these explosives may readily be varied by the addition of other explosives and oxidizers. Certain of these mixtures have been found to act as ideal explosives.

  12. REMUS100 AUV with an integrated microfluidic system for explosives detection.

    PubMed

    Adams, André A; Charles, Paul T; Veitch, Scott P; Hanson, Alfred; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Kusterbeck, Anne W

    2013-06-01

    Quantitating explosive materials at trace concentrations in real-time on-site within the marine environment may prove critical to protecting civilians, waterways, and military personnel during this era of increased threat of widespread terroristic activity. Presented herein are results from recent field trials that demonstrate detection and quantitation of small nitroaromatic molecules using novel high-throughput microfluidic immunosensors (HTMI) to perform displacement-based immunoassays onboard a HYDROID REMUS100 autonomous underwater vehicle. Missions were conducted 2-3 m above the sea floor, and no HTMI failures were observed due to clogging from biomass infiltration. Additionally, no device leaks were observed during the trials. HTMIs maintained immunoassay functionality during 2 h deployments, while continuously sampling seawater absent without any pretreatment at a flow rate of 2 mL/min. This 20-fold increase in the nominal flow rate of the assay resulted in an order of magnitude reduction in both lag and assay times. Contaminated seawater that contained 20-175 ppb trinitrotoluene was analyzed. PMID:23539095

  13. Remote detection of explosives using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fulton, Jack

    2011-05-01

    Stand-off detection of potentially hazardous small molecules at distances that allow the user to be safe has many applications, including explosives and chemical threats. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, with EYZtek, Inc. of Ohio, developed a prototype stand-off, eye-safe Raman spectrometer. With a stand-off distance greater than twenty meters and scanning optics, this system has the potential of addressing particularly difficult challenges in small molecule detection. An overview of the system design and desired application space is presented.

  14. SERS substrate for detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Chou, Alison; Jaatinen, Esa; Buividas, Ricardas; Seniutinas, Gediminas; Juodkazis, Saulius; Izake, Emad L; Fredericks, Peter M

    2012-12-01

    A novel gold coated femtosecond laser nanostructured sapphire surface - an "optical nose" - based on surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for detecting vapours of explosive substances was investigated. Four different nitroaromatic vapours at room temperature were tested. Sensor responses were unambiguous and showed response in the range of 0.05-15 μM at 25 °C. The laser fabricated substrate nanostructures produced up to an eight-fold increase in Raman signal over that observed on the unstructured portions of the substrate. This work demonstrates a simple sensing system that is compatible with commercial manufacturing practices to detect taggants in explosives which can undertake as part of an integrated security or investigative mission. PMID:23085837

  15. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    SciTech Connect

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  16. Aspects of image recognition in Vivid Technologies' dual-energy x-ray system for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilbert, Richard F.; Krug, Kristoph D.

    1993-04-01

    The Vivid Rapid Explosives Detection Systems is a true dual energy x-ray machine employing precision x-ray data acquisition in combination with unique algorithms and massive computation capability. Data from the system's 960 detectors is digitally stored and processed by powerful supermicro-computers organized as an expandable array of parallel processors. The algorithms operate on the dual energy attenuation image data to recognize and define objects in the milieu of the baggage contents. Each object is then systematically examined for a match to a specific effective atomic number, density, and mass threshold. Material properties are determined by comparing the relative attenuations of the 75 kVp and 150 kVp beams and electronically separating the object from its local background. Other heuristic algorithms search for specific configurations and provide additional information. The machine automatically detects explosive materials and identifies bomb components in luggage with high specificity and throughput, X-ray dose is comparable to that of current airport x-ray machines. The machine is also configured to find heroin, cocaine, and US currency by selecting appropriate settings on-site. Since January 1992, production units have been operationally deployed at U.S. and European airports for improved screening of checked baggage.

  17. Explosives detection: a challenge for physical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Steinfeld, J I; Wormhoudt, J

    1998-01-01

    The detection of explosives, energetic materials, and their associated compounds for security screening, demining, detection of unexploded ordnance, and pollution monitoring is an active area of research. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. This review focuses on techniques such as optical and mass spectrometry and chromatography for detection of trace amounts of explosives with short response times. We also review techniques for detecting the decomposition fragments of these materials. Molecular data for explosive compounds are reviewed where available. PMID:15012428

  18. An automatic detection system for buried explosive hazards in FL-LWIR and FL-GPR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, K.; Keller, J. M.; Anderson, D. T.; Barclay, D. B.

    2012-06-01

    Improvements to an automatic detection system for locating buried explosive hazards in forward-looking longwave infrared (FL-LWIR) imagery, as well as the system's application to detection in confidence maps and forwardlooking ground penetrating radar (FL-GPR) data, are discussed. The detection system, described in previous work, utilizes an ensemble of trainable size-contrast filters and the mean-shift algorithm in Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) coordinates. Improvements of the raw detection algorithm include weighted mean-shift within the individual size-contrast filters and a secondary classification step which exacts cell structured image space features, including local binary patterns (LBP), histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), edge histogram descriptor (EHD), and maximally stable extremal regions (MSER) segmentation based shape information, from one or more looks and classifies the resulting feature vector using a support vector machine (SVM). FL-LWIR specific improvements include elimination of the need for multiple models due to diurnal temperature variation. The improved algorithm is assessed on FL-LWIR and FL-GPR data from recent collections at a US Army test site.

  19. Method and apparatus for detecting explosives

    DOEpatents

    Moore, David Steven

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus is provided for detecting explosives by thermal imaging. The explosive material is subjected to a high energy wave which can be either a sound wave or an electromagnetic wave which will initiate a chemical reaction in the explosive material which chemical reaction will produce heat. The heat is then sensed by a thermal imaging device which will provide a signal to a computing device which will alert a user of the apparatus to the possibility of an explosive device being present.

  20. FAA bulk technology overview for explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novakoff, Alan K.

    1993-04-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the leading federal agency responsible for encouraging and fostering the development of a safe, secure, and efficient national airspace system (NAS). Our goal is to establish an operating environment that ensures a threat-free system to preclude acts of terrorism and fatalities. As part of the process to meet this goal, our research and development activities continually search for technologies to ensure aviation security. Recent acts of terrorism against the aviation community have demonstrated an increasing level of sophistication in the design and deployment of explosive devices. In order to prevent the introduction of explosives onto an aircraft they must be detected prior to passenger and baggage loading. The Bulk Detection program is one method of developing a number of technologies that 'see' into and 'alarm' on suspect baggage. These detection devices must be capable of providing this serve with a confidence commensurate with the state-of-the- art available today. This program utilizes the expertise of government agencies, universities and industries working toward constructing their plans and executing their designs to produce the best available equipment.

  1. Explosive Vapor Detection Using Microcantilever Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnaduwage, Lal A

    2004-01-01

    MEMS-based microcantilever platforms have been used to develop extremely sensitive explosive vapour sensors. Two unique approaches of detecting of explosive vapours are demonstrated. In the first approach a cantilever beam coated with a selective layer undergoes bending and resonance frequency variation due to explosive vapour adsorption. The resonance frequency variation is due to mass loading while adsorption-induced cantilever bending is due to a differential stress due molecular adsorption. In the second approach that does not utilize selective coatings for speciation, detection is achieved by deflagration of adsorbed explosive molecules. Deflagration of adsorbed explosive molecules causes the cantilever to bend due to released heat while its resonance frequency decreases due to mass unloading.

  2. Portable sensors for drug and explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leginus, Joseph M.

    1994-03-01

    Westinghouse Electric is developing portable, hand-held sensors capable of detecting numerous drugs of abuse (cocaine, heroin, amphetamines) and explosives (trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate, nitroglycerin). The easy-to-use system consists of a reusable electronics module and disposable probes. The sensor illuminates and detects light transmitted through optical cells of the probe during an antibody-based latex agglutination reaction. Each probe contains all the necessary reagents to carry out a test in a single step. The probe has the ability to lift minute quantities of samples from a variety of surfaces and deliver the sample to a reaction region within the device. The sensor yields a qualitative answer in 30 to 45 seconds and is able to detect illicit substances at nanogram levels.

  3. High Explosive Radio Telemetry System

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, R.R.; Crawford, T.R.; Johnson, R.L.; Mclaughlin, B.M.

    1998-11-04

    This paper overviews the High Explosive Radio Telemetry (HERT) system, under co-development by Los Alamos National Laboratories and Allied Signal Federal Manufacturing & Technologies. This telemetry system is designed to measure the initial performance of an explosive package under flight environment conditions, transmitting data from up to 64 sensors. It features high speed, accurate time resolution (10 ns) and has the ability to complete transmission of data before the system is destroyed by the explosion. In order to affect the resources and performance of a flight delivery vehicle as little as possible, the system is designed such that physical size, power requirements, and antenna demands are as small as possible.

  4. A flag-based algorithm and associated neutron interrogation system for the detection of explosives in sea-land cargo containers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, A. L.; Kearfott, K. J.

    2015-07-01

    Recent efforts in the simulation of sea-land cargo containers in active neutron interrogation scenarios resulted in the identification of several flags indicating the presence of conventional explosives. These flags, defined by specific mathematical manipulations of the neutron and photon spectra, have been combined into a detection algorithm for screening cargo containers at international borders and seaports. The detection algorithm's steps include classifying the cargo type, identifying containers filled with explosives, triggering in the presence of concealed explosives, and minimizing the number of false positives due to cargo heterogeneity. The algorithm has been implemented in a system that includes both neutron and photon detectors. This system will take about 10 min to scan a container and cost approximately 1M to construct. Dose calculations resulted in estimates of less than 0.5 mSv for a person hidden in the container, and an operator annual dose of less than 0.9 mSv.

  5. Advances in neutron based bulk explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, Tsahi; Strellis, Dan

    2007-08-01

    Neutron based explosive inspection systems can detect a wide variety of national security threats. The inspection is founded on the detection of characteristic gamma rays emitted as the result of neutron interactions with materials. Generally these are gamma rays resulting from thermal neutron capture and inelastic scattering reactions in most materials and fast and thermal neutron fission in fissile (e.g.235U and 239Pu) and fertile (e.g.238U) materials. Cars or trucks laden with explosives, drugs, chemical agents and hazardous materials can be detected. Cargo material classification via its main elements and nuclear materials detection can also be accomplished with such neutron based platforms, when appropriate neutron sources, gamma ray spectroscopy, neutron detectors and suitable decision algorithms are employed. Neutron based techniques can be used in a variety of scenarios and operational modes. They can be used as stand alones for complete scan of objects such as vehicles, or for spot-checks to clear (or validate) alarms indicated by another inspection system such as X-ray radiography. The technologies developed over the last two decades are now being implemented with good results. Further advances have been made over the last few years that increase the sensitivity, applicability and robustness of these systems. The advances range from the synchronous inspection of two sides of vehicles, increasing throughput and sensitivity and reducing imparted dose to the inspected object and its occupants (if any), to taking advantage of the neutron kinetic behavior of cargo to remove systematic errors, reducing background effects and improving fast neutron signals.

  6. Modeling of Qr Sensors for Optimized Explosives Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, Hector; Bussandri, Alejandro; Derby, Kevin

    Quadrupole Resonance (QR) sensors have the unique capability of detecting explosives with remarkably high detection rates and low number of false alarms. The sensitivity of a QR-based sensor in inductive detection can be assessed in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), which determines the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curves of the detector and provides a fundamental limitation to the performance of the QR explosive detection system. The main goal of the QR sensor design is, therefore, to maximize the SNR to achieve the highest possible detection performance with the lowest number of nuisances.

  7. Pixelated diffraction signatures for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Flynn, Daniel; Reid, Caroline; Christodoulou, Christiana; Wilson, Matt; Veale, Matthew C.; Seller, Paul; Speller, Robert

    2012-06-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) is a technique which can be used to improve the detection and characterisation of explosive materials. This study has performed EDXRD measurements of various explosive compounds using a novel, X-ray sensitive, pixelated, energy resolving detector developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK (RAL). EDXRD measurements are normally performed at a fixed scattering angle, but the 80×80 pixel detector makes it possible to collect both spatially resolved and energy resolved data simultaneously. The detector material used is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), which can be utilised at room temperature and gives excellent spectral resolution. The setup uses characteristics from both energy dispersive and angular dispersive scattering techniques to optimise specificity and speed. The purpose of the study is to develop X-ray pattern "footprints" of explosive materials based on spatial and energy resolved diffraction data, which can then be used for the identification of such materials hidden inside packages or baggage. The RAL detector is the first energy resolving pixelated detector capable of providing an energy resolution of 1.0-1.5% at energies up to 150 keV. The benefit of using this device in a baggage scanner would be the provision of highly specific signatures to a range of explosive materials. We have measured diffraction profiles of five explosives and other compounds used to make explosive materials. High resolution spectra have been obtained. Results are presented to show the specificity of the technique in finding explosives within baggage.

  8. Explosives detection by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garroway, Allen N.; Buess, Michael L.; Yesinowski, James P.; Miller, Joel B.; Krauss, Ronald A.

    1994-10-01

    Pure nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) of 14N nuclei is quite promising as a method for detecting explosives such as RDX and contraband narcotics such as cocaine and heroin in quantities of interest. Pure NQR is conducted without an external applied magnetic field, so potential concerns about damage to magnetically encoded data or exposure of personnel to large magnetic fields are not relevant. Because NQR frequencies of different compounds are quite distinct, we do not encounter false alarms from the NQR signals of other benign materials. We have constructed a laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector which interrogates a volume of 300 liters (10 ft3). This paper presents abbreviated results from a demonstration of the laboratory prototype NQR explosives detector conducted at the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center in May 1994 on RDX-based explosives.

  9. NQR detection of explosive simulants using RF atomic magnetometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monti, Mark C.; Alexson, Dimitri A.; Okamitsu, Jeffrey K.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a highly selective spectroscopic method that can be used to detect and identify a number of chemicals of interest to the defense, national security, and law enforcement community. In the past, there have been several documented attempts to utilize NQR to detect nitrogen bearing explosives using induction sensors to detect the NQR RF signatures. We present here our work on the NQR detection of explosive simulants using optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers. RF atomic magnetometers can provide an order of magnitude (or more) improvement in sensitivity versus induction sensors and can enable mitigation of RF interference, which has classically has been a problem for conventional NQR using induction sensors. We present the theory of operation of optically pumped RF atomic magnetometers along with the result of laboratory work on the detection of explosive simulant material. An outline of ongoing work will also be presented along with a path for a fieldable detection system.

  10. System for analysis of explosives

    DOEpatents

    Haas, Jeffrey S.

    2010-06-29

    A system for analysis of explosives. Samples are spotted on a thin layer chromatography plate. Multi-component explosives standards are spotted on the thin layer chromatography plate. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in a solvent mixture and chromatography is allowed to proceed. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 1. The thin layer chromatography plate is heated. The thin layer chromatography plate is dipped in reagent 2.

  11. Reagent Selection Methodology for a Novel Explosives Detection Platform

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-01

    This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Marvin Warner, a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in the individual pieces of antibodies used to set up a chemical reaction that will give off light just by mixing reagents together with a sample that contains an explosive molecule. This technology would help detect if explosives are present with just the use of a handheld system or container.

  12. Reagent Selection Methodology for a Novel Explosives Detection Platform

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2012-12-31

    This video describes research being conducted by Dr. Marvin Warner, a research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in the individual pieces of antibodies used to set up a chemical reaction that will give off light just by mixing reagents together with a sample that contains an explosive molecule. This technology would help detect if explosives are present with just the use of a handheld system or container.

  13. Detection of bottled explosives by near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Sato-Akaba, Hideo

    2013-10-01

    Bottled liquids are not allowed through the security gate in the airport, because liquid explosives have been used by the terrorists. However, passengers have a lot of trouble if they cannot bring their own bottles. For example, a mother would like to carry her own milk in the airplane for her baby. Therefore the detection technology of liquid explosives should be developed as soon as possible. This paper shows that near infrared spectroscopy can detect bottled explosives quickly. The transmission method cannot deal with milk in the sense of liquid inspection. Here we examined the reflection method to the test of milk. The inspection method with light cannot make test for the metal can. We also use ultrasonic method to check metal can simultaneously in order to expand test targets.

  14. Canine detection odor signatures for explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Marc; Johnston, J. M.; Cicoria, Matt; Paletz, E.; Waggoner, L. Paul; Edge, Cindy C.; Hallowell, Susan F.

    1998-12-01

    Dogs are capable of detecting and discriminating a number of compounds constituting a complex odor. However, they use only a few of these to recognize a substance. The focus of this research is to determine the compounds dogs learn to use in recognizing explosives. This is accomplished by training dogs under behavioral laboratory conditions to respond differentially on separate levers to 1) blank air, 2) a target odor, such as an explosive, and 3) all other odors (non-target odors). Vapor samples are generated by a serial dilution vapor generator whose operation and output is characterized by GC/MS. Once dogs learn this three-lever discrimination, testing sessions are conducted containing a number of probe trials in which vapor from constituent compounds of the target is presented. Which lever the dogs respond to on these probe trials indicates whether they can smell the compound at all (blank lever) or whether it smells like toe target odor (e.g., the explosive) or like something else. This method was conducted using TNT, C-4, and commercial dynamite. The data show the dogs' reactions to each of the constituent compounds tested for each explosive. Analysis of these data reveal the canine detection odor signature for these explosives.

  15. Vapor generation methods for explosives detection research

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Ewing, Robert G.; Atkinson, David A.

    2012-12-01

    The generation of calibrated vapor samples of explosives compounds remains a challenge due to the low vapor pressures of the explosives, adsorption of explosives on container and tubing walls, and the requirement to manage (typically) multiple temperature zones as the vapor is generated, diluted, and delivered. Methods that have been described to generate vapors can be classified as continuous or pulsed flow vapor generators. Vapor sources for continuous flow generators are typically explosives compounds supported on a solid support, or compounds contained in a permeation or diffusion device. Sources are held at elevated isothermal temperatures. Similar sources can be used for pulsed vapor generators; however, pulsed systems may also use injection of solutions onto heated surfaces with generation of both solvent and explosives vapors, transient peaks from a gas chromatograph, or vapors generated by s programmed thermal desorption. This article reviews vapor generator approaches with emphasis on the method of generating the vapors and on practical aspects of vapor dilution and handling. In addition, a gas chromatographic system with two ovens that is configurable with up to four heating ropes is proposed that could serve as a single integrated platform for explosives vapor generation and device testing. Issues related to standards, calibration, and safety are also discussed.

  16. Comparison of terahertz technologies for detection and identification of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beigang, René; Biedron, Sandra G.; Dyjak, Slawomir; Ellrich, Frank; Haakestad, Magnus W.; Hübsch, Daniel; Kartaloglu, Tolga; Ozbay, Ekmel; Ospald, Frank; Palka, Norbert; Puc, Uroš; Czerwińska, ElŻbieta; Sahin, Asaf B.; Sešek, Aleksander; Trontelj, Janez; Å vigelj, Andrej; Altan, Hakan; van Rheenen, Arthur D.; Walczakowski, Michał

    2014-05-01

    We present results on the comparison of different THz technologies for the detection and identification of a variety of explosives from our laboratory tests that were carried out in the framework of NATO SET-193 "THz technology for stand-off detection of explosives: from laboratory spectroscopy to detection in the field" under the same controlled conditions. Several laser-pumped pulsed broadband THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) systems as well as one electronic frequency-modulated continuous wave (FMCW) device recorded THz spectra in transmission and/or reflection.

  17. Conjugated polymer sensors for explosive vapor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Turnbull, Graham A.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2011-10-01

    Explosive sensing is a promising, emerging application for conjugated polymers. One exciting potential area of application is to clear landmines left after military actions. In this work, we demonstrate three ways to detect 10 partsper- billion of the model explosive, 1,4-dinitrobenzene (DNB): by monitoring fluorescence intensity, by measuring fluorescence lifetime, and by distributed-feedback (DFB) laser emission. A quenching of the fluorescence is observed upon DNB exposure. The reversibility of the quenching process has been demonstrated by purging with nitrogen.

  18. Detection of Chemical Precursors of Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Certain selected chemicals associated with terrorist activities are too unstable to be prepared in final form. These chemicals are often prepared as precursor components, to be combined at a time immediately preceding the detonation. One example is a liquid explosive, which usually requires an oxidizer, an energy source, and a chemical or physical mechanism to combine the other components. Detection of the oxidizer (e.g. H2O2) or the energy source (e.g., nitromethane) is often possible, but must be performed in a short time interval (e.g., 5 15 seconds) and in an environment with a very small concentration (e.g.,1 100 ppm), because the target chemical(s) is carried in a sealed container. These needs are met by this invention, which provides a system and associated method for detecting one or more chemical precursors (components) of a multi-component explosive compound. Different carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are loaded (by doping, impregnation, coating, or other functionalization process) for detecting of different chemical substances that are the chemical precursors, respectively, if these precursors are present in a gas to which the CNTs are exposed. After exposure to the gas, a measured electrical parameter (e.g. voltage or current that correlate to impedance, conductivity, capacitance, inductance, etc.) changes with time and concentration in a predictable manner if a selected chemical precursor is present, and will approach an asymptotic value promptly after exposure to the precursor. The measured voltage or current are compared with one or more sequences of their reference values for one or more known target precursor molecules, and a most probable concentration value is estimated for each one, two, or more target molecules. An error value is computed, based on differences of voltage or current for the measured and reference values, using the most probable concentration values. Where the error value is less than a threshold, the system concludes that the target

  19. Fluorescence based explosive detection: from mechanisms to sensory materials.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Wang, Ying; Lei, Yu

    2015-11-21

    The detection of explosives is one of the current pressing concerns in global security. In the past few decades, a large number of emissive sensing materials have been developed for the detection of explosives in vapor, solution, and solid states through fluorescence methods. In recent years, great efforts have been devoted to develop new fluorescent materials with various sensing mechanisms for detecting explosives in order to achieve super-sensitivity, ultra-selectivity, as well as fast response time. This review article starts with a brief introduction on various sensing mechanisms for fluorescence based explosive detection, and then summarizes in an exhaustive and systematic way the state-of-the-art of fluorescent materials for explosive detection with a focus on the research in the recent 5 years. A wide range of fluorescent materials, such as conjugated polymers, small fluorophores, supramolecular systems, bio-inspired materials and aggregation induced emission-active materials, and their sensing performance and sensing mechanism are the centerpiece of this review. Finally, conclusions and future outlook are presented and discussed. PMID:26335504

  20. Explosives detection studies using Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fink, C.L.; Micklich, B.J.; Sagalovsky, L.; Smith, D.L.; Yule, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) is being investigated for detection of explosives in luggage or air cargo. We present here the principle results of a two-year study of a few-view tomographic FNTS system using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP to simulate neutron transmission through simple luggage phantoms and Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves to determine system performance. Elemental distributions along projections through the interrogated object are obtained by analyzing MCNP generated neutron transmission data. Transmission data for few (3-5) angles and relatively coarse resolution ({approximately}2 cm) are used to create a tomographic reconstruction of elemental distributions within the object. The elemental unfolding and tomographic reconstruction algorithms and the concept of transmission-derived cross sections for use in elemental analysis have been validated by application to experimental data. Elemental distributions are combined in an explosives detection algorithm to provide an indication of the presence or absence of explosives. The algorithm in current use, termed the ``equivalent explosive`` algorithm, determines the quantity of explosive that can be formed using the measured amount of the constituent elements in each pixel. Reconstruction and explosives detection algorithms have been applied to a series of randomly packed suitcases to generated ROC that describe system performance in terms of the probability of detection and of false alarms. System studies have been performed to study the operational characteristics and limitations of a FNTS system, and to determine the system`s sensitivity to several important parameters such as neutron source reaction and incident particle energy, flight path length, and the position of the interrogated object.

  1. Detection and classification of explosive compounds utilizing laser ion mobility spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langmeier, A.; Heep, W.; Oberhuettinger, C.; Oberpriller, H.; Kessler, M.; Goebel, J.; Mueller, G.

    2009-05-01

    Detection of explosives by ion mobility spectroscopy has become common in recent years. We demonstrate explosive detection with a novel Laser Ion Mobility Spectrometer (LIMS) developed at EADS Innovation Works. A Laser operating at 266nm was used for the two-photon ionisation of dopant and calibrant substances. Quantitative measurements of trace residues of explosives have been performed to quantify the sensitivity of the LIMS system. Findings demonstrate the suitability of this technique as a screening tool for explosive compounds.

  2. Explosive Detection in Aviation Applications Using CT

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Crawford, C R

    2011-02-15

    CT scanners are deployed world-wide to detect explosives in checked and carry-on baggage. Though very similar to single- and dual-energy multi-slice CT scanners used today in medical imaging, some recently developed explosives detection scanners employ multiple sources and detector arrays to eliminate mechanical rotation of a gantry, photon counting detectors for spectral imaging, and limited number of views to reduce cost. For each bag scanned, the resulting reconstructed images are first processed by automated threat recognition algorithms to screen for explosives and other threats. Human operators review the images only when these automated algorithms report the presence of possible threats. The US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has requirements for future scanners that include dealing with a larger number of threats, higher probability of detection, lower false alarm rates and lower operating costs. One tactic that DHS is pursuing to achieve these requirements is to augment the capabilities of the established security vendors with third-party algorithm developers. A third-party in this context refers to academics and companies other than the established vendors. DHS is particularly interested in exploring the model that has been used very successfully by the medical imaging industry, in which university researchers develop algorithms that are eventually deployed in commercial medical imaging equipment. The purpose of this paper is to discuss opportunities for third-parties to develop advanced reconstruction and threat detection algorithms.

  3. Explosives detection and identification using surface plasmon-coupled emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ja, Shiou-Jyh

    2012-06-01

    To fight against the explosives-related threats in defense and homeland security applications, a smarter sensing device that not only detects but differentiates multiple true threats from false positives caused by environmental interferents is essential. A new optical detection system is proposed to address these issues by using the temporal and spectroscopic information generated by the surface plasmon coupling emission (SPCE) effect. Innovative SPCE optics have been designed using Zemax software to project the fluorescence signal into clear "rainbow rings" on a CCD with subnanometer wavelength resolution. The spectroscopic change of the fluorescence signal and the time history of such changes due to the presence of a certain explosive analyte are unique and can be used to identify explosives. Thanks to high optical efficiency, reporter depositions as small as 160-μm in diameter can generate a sufficient signal, allowing a dense array of different reporters to be interrogated with wavelength multiplexing and detect a wide range of explosives. We have demonstrated detection and classification of explosives, such as TNT, NT, NM, RDX, PETN, and AN, with two sensing materials in a prototype.

  4. Photofragmentation of nitro-based explosives with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Monterola, Maria Pamela P; Smith, Benjamin W; Omenetto, Nicolò; Winefordner, James D

    2008-08-01

    A simple, fast, reliable, sensitive and potentially portable explosive detection device was developed employing laser photofragmentation (PF) followed by heterogeneous chemiluminescence (CL) detection. The PF process involves the release of NO(x(x = 1,2)) moieties from explosive compounds such as TNT, RDX, and PETN through a stepwise excitation-dissociation process using a 193 nm ArF laser. The NO(x(x = 1,2)) produced upon PF is subsequently detected by its CL reaction with basic luminol solution. The intensity of the CL signal was detected by a thermoelectrically cooled photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency and negligible dark current counts. The system was able to detect trace amounts of explosives in various forms in real time under ambient conditions. Detection limits of 3 ppbv for PETN, 2 ppbv for RDX, and 34 ppbv for TNT were obtained. It was also demonstrated that the presence of PETN residue within the range of 61 to 186 ng/cm(2) can be detected at a given signal-to-background ratio of 10 using a few microjoules of laser energy. The technique also demonstrated its potential for the direct analysis of trace explosive in soil. An LOD range of 0.5-4.3 ppm for PETN was established, which is comparable to currently available techniques. PMID:18551285

  5. Electronic Nose for Detection of Explosives.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oakes, Landon; Dobrokhotov, Vladimir

    2010-03-01

    The ability to sense the environment is of critical importance for a broad array of applications ranging from ecosystem health, hazardous materials avoidance/chemical warfare to medical applications. In this research project we use the self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-functionalized nanoparticle-decorated nanosprings as a novel design for sensing vapors associated with explosives. The common requirements for any sensor application are sensitivity, selectivity, refreshability, repeatability, low cost of manufacture, and ease of use. The project goal is to answer these needs through the use of mats of functionalized metal nanoparticle-coated nanosprings as a novel type of low-cost nanomaterials-based gas sensor. The advantage of this approach is that very dilute quantities of airborne explosive products can be accumulated over a few seconds to a few minutes onto our high surface area nanospring electrodes. This will facilitate electronic detection, which in contrast to optical detection methods reduces false positive signals, reduces detector sizes and complexity.

  6. Detecting underwater improvised explosive threats (DUIET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Terry

    2010-04-01

    Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) have presented a major threat in the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. These devices are powerful homemade land mines that can be small and easily hidden near roadsides. They are then remotely detonated when Coalition Forces pass by either singly or in convoys. Their rapid detection, classification and destruction is key to the safety of troops in the area. These land based bombs will have an analogue in the underwater theater especially in ports, lakes, rivers and streams. These devices may be used against Americans on American soil as an element of the global war on terrorism (GWOT) Rapid detection and classification of underwater improvised explosive devices (UIED) is critical to protecting innocent lives and maintaining the day to day flow of commerce. This paper will discuss a strategy and tool set to deal with this potential threat.

  7. Solid state gas sensors for detection of explosives and explosive precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yun

    The increased number of terrorist attacks using improvised explosive devices (IEDs) over the past few years has made the trace detection of explosives a priority for the Department of Homeland Security. Considerable advances in early detection of trace explosives employing spectroscopic detection systems and other sensing devices have been made and have demonstrated outstanding performance. However, modern IEDs are not easily detectable by conventional methods and terrorists have adapted to avoid using metallic or nitro groups in the manufacturing of IEDs. Instead, more powerful but smaller compounds, such as TATP are being more frequently used. In addition, conventional detection techniques usually require large capital investment, labor costs and energy input and are incapable of real-time identification, limiting their application. Thus, a low cost detection system which is capable of continuous online monitoring in a passive mode is needed for explosive detection. In this dissertation, a thermodynamic based thin film gas sensor which can reliably detect various explosive compounds was developed and demonstrated. The principle of the sensors is based on measuring the heat effect associated with the catalytic decomposition of explosive compounds present in the vapor phase. The decomposition mechanism is complicated and not well known, but it can be affected by many parameters including catalyst, reaction temperature and humidity. Explosives that have relatively high vapor pressure and readily sublime at room temperature, like TATP and 2, 6-DNT, are ideal candidate for vapor phase detection using the thermodynamic gas sensor. ZnO, W2O 3, V2O5 and SnO2 were employed as catalysts. This sensor exhibited promising sensitivity results for TATP, but poor selectivity among peroxide based compounds. In order to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of the thermodynamic sensor, a Pd:SnO2 nanocomposite was fabricated and tested as part of this dissertation. A

  8. PINS Measurements and Simulations for Stand-Off Detection of High Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    E.H. Seabury

    2011-07-01

    There has been some interest in the ability of Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System's (PINS) ability to detect high explosives at a distance. In order to assess the system's ability to perform this task, laboratory experiments on simulated or mock explosives and Monte Carlo simulations using MCNP on both mock and real explosives have been performed. The simulations and experiments on mock explosives have essentially identical configurations, allowing the models to be confirmed with experiment. This provides greater confidence in the simulations on real explosives without the need for experiment on live explosives.

  9. Remote detection of explosives using trained canines

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.

    1983-03-01

    Use of dogs is a search method which combines high probability of detection, speed of search, and low cost. It was concluded that the canine could be used for explosive screening of personnel, but that it was imperative that the dog be in a position remote from employees and employee traffic. A study was made of the design of booths and air flow for this purpose. Results of tests and conclusions are given and discussed. (DLC)

  10. Raman and photothermal spectroscopies for explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finot, Eric; Brulé, Thibault; Rai, Padmnabh; Griffart, Aurélien; Bouhélier, Alexandre; Thundat, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Detection of explosive residues using portable devices for locating landmine and terrorist weapons must sat- isfy the application criteria of high reproducibility, specificity, sensitivity and fast response time. Vibrational spectroscopies such as Raman and infrared spectroscopies have demonstrated their potential to distinguish the members of the chemical family of more than 30 explosive materials. The characteristic chemical fingerprints in the spectra of these explosives stem from the unique bond structure of each compound. However, these spectroscopies, developed in the early sixties, suffer from a poor sensitivity. On the contrary, MEMS-based chemical sensors have shown to have very high sensitivity lowering the detection limit down to less than 1 picogram, (namely 10 part per trillion) using sensor platforms based on microcantilevers, plasmonics, or surface acoustic waves. The minimum amount of molecules that can be detected depends actually on the transducer size. The selectivity in MEMS sensors is usually realized using chemical modification of the active surface. However, the lack of sufficiently selective receptors that can be immobilized on MEMS sensors remains one of the most critical issues. Microcantilever based sensors offer an excellent opportunity to combine both the infrared photothermal spectroscopy in their static mode and the unique mass sensitivity in their dynamic mode. Optical sensors based on localized plasmon resonance can also take up the challenge of addressing the selectivity by monitoring the Surface Enhanced Raman spectrum down to few molecules. The operating conditions of these promising localized spectroscopies will be discussed in terms of reliability, compactness, data analysis and potential for mass deployment.

  11. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2014-07-24

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  12. Scientists train honeybees to detect explosives

    SciTech Connect

    2008-03-21

    Members of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Stealthy Insect Sensor Project team have been able to harness the honeybee's exceptional olfactory sense by using the bees' natural reaction to nectar, a proboscis extension reflex (sticking out their tongue) to record an unmistakable response to a scent. Using Pavlovian techniques, researchers were able to train the bees to give a positive detection response via the PER when exposed to vapors from TNT, C4, and TATP explosives. The Stealthy Insect Sensor Project was born out of a global threat from the growing use of improvised explosive devices or IEDs, especially those that present a critical vulnerability for American military troops in Iraq and Afghanistan, and as an emerging danger for civilians worldwide. Current strategies to detect explosives are expensive and, in the case of trained detection dogs, too obtrusive to be used very discreetly. With bees however, they are small and discreet, offering the element of surprise. They're also are inexpensive to maintain and even easier to train than dogs. As a result of this need, initial funding for the work was provided by a development grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

  13. Standoff trace detection of explosives with infrared hyperspectral imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, F.; Hugger, S.; Jarvis, J.-P.; Yang, Q. K.; Zaum, F.; Ostendorf, R.; Schilling, Ch.; Bronner, W.; Driad, R.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.

    2015-05-01

    In this work we present a hyperspectral image sensor based on MIR-laser backscattering spectroscopy for contactless detection of explosive substance traces. The spectroscopy system comprises a tunable Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) with a tuning range of 7.5 μm to 9.5 μm as an illumination source and a high performance MCT camera for collecting the backscattered light. The resulting measurement data forms a hyperspectral image, where each pixel vector contains the backscattering spectrum of a specific location in the scene. The hyperspectral image data is analyzed for traces of target substances using a state of the art target detection algorithm (the Adaptive Matched Subspace Detector) together with an appropriate background extraction method. The technique is eye-safe and allows imaging detection of a large variety of explosive substances including PETN, RDX, TNT and Ammonium Nitrate. For short stand-off detection distances (<3 m), residues of explosives at an amount of just a few 10 μg, i.e. traces corresponding to a single fingerprint, could be detected. For larger concentration of explosives, stand-off detection over distances of up to 20 m has already been demonstrated.

  14. Sandia Explosive Inventory and Information System

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The Explosive Inventory and Information System (EIS) is being developed and implemented by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to incorporate a cradle to grave structure for all explosives and explosive containing devices and assemblies at SNL from acquisition through use, storage, reapplication, transfer or disposal. The system does more than track all material inventories. It provides information on material composition, characteristics, shipping requirements; life cycle cost information, plan of use; and duration of ownership. The system also provides for following the processes of explosive development; storage review; justification for retention; Resource, Recovery and Disposition Account (RRDA); disassembly and assembly; and job description, hazard analysis and training requirements for all locations and employees involved with explosive operations. In addition, other information systems will be provided through the system such as the Department of Energy (DOE) and SNL Explosive Safety manuals, the Navy`s Department of Defense (DoD) Explosive information system, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) Handbook of Explosives.

  15. Micro-calorimetric sensor for trace explosive particle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Jesper K.; Greve, Anders; Privorotskaya, N.; Senesac, L.; Thundat, T.; King, W. P.; Boisen, A.

    2010-04-01

    A micro differential thermal analysis (DTA) system is used for detection of trace explosive particles. The DTA system consists of two silicon micro chips with integrated heaters and temperature sensors. One chip is used for reference and one for the measurement sample. The sensor is constructed as a small silicon nitride bridge incorporating heater elements and a temperature measurement resistor. In this manuscript the DTA system is described and tested by measuring calorimetric response of DNT (2,4-Dinitrotoluene). The design of the senor is described and the temperature uniformity investigated using finite element modelings and Raman temperature measurements. The functionality is tested using two different kinds of explosive deposition techniques and calorimetric responses are obtained. Under the framework of the Xsense project at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) which combines four independent sensing techniques, these micro DNT sensors will be included in handheld explosives detectors with applications in homeland security and landmine clearance.

  16. Liquid explosive detection using near infrared LED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Ito, Shiori; Sato-Akaba, Hideo; Miyato, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    A bottle scanner to detect liquid explosive has been developed using technologies of near infrared. Its detection rate of liquid explosive is quite high and its false alarm rate of safe liquids quite low. It uses a light source with wide spectrum such as a halogen lamp. Recently a variety of LEDs have been developed and some of them have near infrared spectrum. Here a near infrared LED is tested as a light source of the liquid explosive detector. Three infrared LEDs that have a main peak of spectrum at 901nm, 936nm, and 1028 nm have been used as a light source to scan liquids. Spectrum widths of these LEDs are quite narrow typically less than 100 nm. Ten typical liquids have been evaluated by these LEDs and the correlation coefficients of a spectrum by an LED and a tungsten lamp were more than 0.98. This experiment shows that the infrared LED can be used as a light source for the liquid scanner. An LED has some merits, such as long life of more than some ten thousand hours and small consumption electric power of less than 0.2 W. When the LED is used as a light source for the liquid scanner, it is also more compact and handy.

  17. Nanomaterial-Based Biosensors for Detection of Pesticides and Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Lin, Yuehe

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, we describe nanomaterial-based biosensors for detecting OP pesticides and explosives. CNTs and functionalized silica nanoparticles have been chosen for this study. The biosensors were combined with the flow-injection system, providing great advantages for onsite, real-time, and continuous detection of environmental pollutants such as OPs and TNT. The sensors take advantage of the electrocatalytic properties of CNTs, which makes it feasible to achieve a sensitive electrochemical detection of the products from enzymatic reactions at low potential. This approach uses a large aspect ratio of silica nanoparticles, which can be used as a carrier for loading a large amount of electroactive species, such as poly(guanine), for amplified detection of explosives. These methods offer a new environmental monitoring tool for rapid, inexpensive, and highly sensitive detection of OPs or TNT compounds.

  18. Optical detection of explosives: spectral signatures for the explosive bouquet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborn, Tabetha; Kaimal, Sindhu; Causey, Jason; Burns, William; Reeve, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Research with canines suggests that sniffer dogs alert not on the odor from a pure explosive, but rather on a set of far more volatile species present in an explosive as impurities. Following the explosive trained canine example, we have begun examining the vapor signatures for many of these volatile impurities utilizing high resolution spectroscopic techniques in several molecular fingerprint regions. Here we will describe some of these high resolution measurements and discuss strategies for selecting useful spectral signature regions for individual molecular markers of interest.

  19. Standoff detection of explosive molecules using nanosecond gated Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Soo Gyeong

    2013-06-01

    Recently, improvised explosive device (IED) has been a serious threat for many countries. One of the approaches to alleviate this threat is standoff detection of explosive molecules used in IEDs. Raman spectroscopy is a prospective method among many technologies under research to achieve this goal. It provides unique information of the target materials, through which the ingredients used in IEDs can be analyzed and identified. The main problem of standoff Raman spectroscopic detection is the large background noise hindering weak Raman signals from the target samples. Typical background noise comes from both ambient fluorescent lights indoor and sunlight outdoor whose intensities are usually much larger than that of Raman scattering from the sample. Under the proper condition using pulse laser and ICCD camera with nanosecond pulse width and gating technology, we succeed to separate and remove these background noises from Raman signals. For this experiment, we build an optical system for standoff detection of explosive molecules. We use 532 nm, 10 Hz, Q-switching Nd:YAG laser as light source, and ICCD camera triggered by laser Qswitching time with proper gate delay regarding the flight time of Raman from target materials. Our detection system is successfully applied to detect and identify more than 20 ingredients of IEDs including TNT, RDX, and HMX which are located 10 to 54 meters away from the system.

  20. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, Margo T; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Scharff, R. Jason; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared ({approx}750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  1. Global Positioning System detection and energy estimation of the ionospheric wave caused by the 13 July 2003 explosion of the Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dautermann, Thomas; Calais, Eric; Mattioli, Glen S.

    2009-02-01

    Volcanic explosions or shallow earthquakes are known to trigger acoustic and gravity waves that propagate in the atmosphere at infrasonic speeds. At ionospheric heights, coupling between neutral particles and free electrons induces variations of electron density detectable with dual-frequency Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements. Using GPS data collected in the Caribbean, we identified an ionospheric perturbation after a major volcanic explosion at the Soufrière Hills Volcano (Montserrat, Lesser Antilles) on 13 July 2003. Spectral analysis reveals peaks centered at 1 and 4 mHz, similar to those in previous observations and consistent with theory, suggesting both gravity and acoustic wave components. We retrieve a horizontal velocity of ˜624 m/s for the acoustic component, which implies upward propagation at ˜33°, consistent with ray-tracing results. We model the acoustic wave using an N-wave pressure source at ground level combined with ray tracing to propagate the neutral pressure wave; this accounts for the dispersive characteristics of the atmosphere while conserving total acoustic energy. Plasma velocity is derived from neutral velocity using a finite difference solution of the magnetohydrodynamic momentum equation. The continuity equation for charge densities is used to compute corresponding electron density variations, which are then numerically integrated along satellite-to-receiver line of sights, simultaneously accounting for the satellite displacements. We minimize the misfit between observed and model waveforms to estimate a total acoustic energy release of 1.53 × 1010 J for the primary explosion event at Soufrière Hills Volcano associated with the peak dome collapse. This method can be applied to any explosion of sufficient magnitude, provided GPS data are available at near to medium range from the source.

  2. Coded-aperture Raman imaging for standoff explosive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCain, Scott T.; Guenther, B. D.; Brady, David J.; Krishnamurthy, Kalyani; Willett, Rebecca

    2012-06-01

    This paper describes the design of a deep-UV Raman imaging spectrometer operating with an excitation wavelength of 228 nm. The designed system will provide the ability to detect explosives (both traditional military explosives and home-made explosives) from standoff distances of 1-10 meters with an interrogation area of 1 mm x 1 mm to 200 mm x 200 mm. This excitation wavelength provides resonant enhancement of many common explosives, no background fluorescence, and an enhanced cross-section due to the inverse wavelength scaling of Raman scattering. A coded-aperture spectrograph combined with compressive imaging algorithms will allow for wide-area interrogation with fast acquisition rates. Coded-aperture spectral imaging exploits the compressibility of hyperspectral data-cubes to greatly reduce the amount of acquired data needed to interrogate an area. The resultant systems are able to cover wider areas much faster than traditional push-broom and tunable filter systems. The full system design will be presented along with initial data from the instrument. Estimates for area scanning rates and chemical sensitivity will be presented. The system components include a solid-state deep-UV laser operating at 228 nm, a spectrograph consisting of well-corrected refractive imaging optics and a reflective grating, an intensified solar-blind CCD camera, and a high-efficiency collection optic.

  3. Trace Explosive Detection using Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, Adam R; Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George; Finot, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Satisfying the conditions of high sensitivity and high selectivity using portable sensors that are also reversible is a challenge. Miniature sensors such as microcantilevers offer high sensitivity but suffer from poor selectivity due to the lack of sufficiently selective receptors. Although many of the mass deployable spectroscopic techniques provide high selectivity, they do not have high sensitivity. Here, we show that this challenge can be overcome by combining photothermal spectroscopy on a bimaterial microcantilever with the mass induced change in the cantilever's resonance frequency. Detection using adsorption-induced resonant frequency shift together with photothermal deflection spectroscopy shows extremely high selectivity with a subnanogram limit of detection for vapor phase adsorbed explosives, such as pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclotrimethylene trinitramine (RDX), and trinitrotoluene (TNT).

  4. Low cost mobile explosive/drug detection devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozani, T.; Bendahan, J.

    1999-06-01

    Inspection technologies based on Thermal Neutron Analysis (TNA®) and/or Fast Neutron Analysis (FNA) are the basis for relatively compact and low-cost, material-sensitive devices for a wide variety of inspection needs. The TNA allows the use of either isotropic neutron sources such as a 252Cf, or electronic neutron generators such as the d-T sealed neutron generator tubes. The latter could be used in a steady state mode or in slow (>μs) pulsing mode, to separate the thermal neutron capture signatures following the pulse from the combination of the FNA plus TNA signatures during the pulse. Over the years, Ancore Corporation has built and is continuing to develop a variety of inspection devices based on its TNA and FNA technologies: SPEDS—an explosive detection device for small parcels, portable electronics, briefcases and other similar carry-on items; MDS—a system for the detection or confirmation of buried mines; VEDS—a system for the detection of varied amounts of explosives and/or drugs concealed in passenger vehicles, pallets, lightly loaded trucks or containers, etc.; ACD—a device to clear alarms from a primary, non-specific explosive detection system for passenger luggage. The principle and performance of these devices will be shown and discussed.

  5. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kercel, S.W.; Burlage, R.S.; Patek, D.R.; Smith, C.M.; Hibbs, A.D.; Rayner, T.J.

    1997-04-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. (QM) are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, none has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  6. Novel methods for detecting buried explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kercel, Stephen W.; Burlage, Robert S.; Patek, David R.; Smith, Cyrus M.; Hibbs, Andrew D.; Rayner, Timothy J.

    1997-07-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Quantum Magnetics, Inc. are exploring novel landmine detection technologies. Technologies considered here include bioreporter bacteria, swept acoustic resonance, nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), and semiotic data fusion. Bioreporter bacteria look promising for third-world humanitarian applications; they are inexpensive, and deployment does not require high-tech methods. Swept acoustic resonance may be a useful adjunct to magnetometers in humanitarian demining. For military demining, NQR is a promising method for detecting explosive substances; of 50,000 substances that have been tested, one has an NQR signature that can be mistaken for RDX or TNT. For both military and commercial demining, sensor fusion entails two daunting tasks, identifying fusible features in both present-day and emerging technologies, and devising a fusion algorithm that runs in real-time on cheap hardware. Preliminary research in these areas is encouraging. A bioreporter bacterium for TNT detection is under development. Investigation has just started in swept acoustic resonance as an approach to a cheap mine detector for humanitarian use. Real-time wavelet processing appears to be a key to extending NQR bomb detection into mine detection, including TNT-based mines. Recent discoveries in semiotics may be the breakthrough that will lead to a robust fused detection scheme.

  7. Time-of-flight mass spectrometry for explosives trace detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersson, Anna; Elfving, Anders; Elfsberg, Mattias; Hurtig, Tomas; Johansson, Niklas; Al-Khalili, Ahmed; Käck, Petra; Wallin, Sara; Östmark, Henric

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents the ongoing development of a laser ionization mass spectrometric system to be applied for screening for security related threat substances, specifically explosives. The system will be part of a larger security checkpoint system developed and demonstrated within the FP7 project EFFISEC to aid border police and customs at outer border checks. The laser ionization method of choice is SPI (single photon ionization), but the system also incorporates optional functionalities such as a cold trap and/or a particle concentrator to facilitate detection of minute amounts of explosives. The possibility of using jet-REMPI as a verification means is being scrutinized. Automated functionality and user friendliness is also considered in the demo system development.

  8. Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for standoff explosives detection : LDRD 138733 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Linker, Kevin Lane

    2009-09-01

    Continued acts of terrorism using explosive materials throughout the world have led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially technologies that have a potential for remote or standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the benefit of the possible use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff explosives detection equipment. Standoff detection of explosives is currently one of the most difficult problems facing the explosives detection community. Increased domestic and troop security could be achieved through the remote detection of explosives. An effective remote or standoff explosives detection capability would save lives and prevent losses of mission-critical resources by increasing the distance between the explosives and the intended targets and/or security forces. Many sectors of the US government are urgently attempting to obtain useful equipment to deploy to our troops currently serving in hostile environments. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the potential benefits of utilizing quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff detection systems. This report documents the potential opportunities that Sandia National Laboratories can contribute to the field of QCL development. The following is a list of areas where SNL can contribute: (1) Determine optimal wavelengths for standoff explosives detection utilizing QCLs; (2) Optimize the photon collection and detection efficiency of a detection system for optical spectroscopy; (3) Develop QCLs with broader wavelength tunability (current technology is a 10% change in wavelength) while maintaining high efficiency; (4) Perform system engineering in the design of a complete detection system and not just the laser head; and (5) Perform real-world testing with explosive materials with commercial prototype detection systems.

  9. Remote Detection of Explosive Molecules by a Microfluidic SERS Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piorek, Brian; Lee, Seung Joon; Moskovits, Martin; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Meinhart, Carl

    2007-11-01

    Free-surface microfluidics (FSF) is combined with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to detect trace explosives vapors at room temperature and pressure. A free surface, with a large surface to volume ratio, is created using an open microchannel. Since surface tension is a dominant force at the microscale, it can be used to confine the fluid in the microchannel and create a pressure gradient to drive the flow with velocities ranging from ˜ 1um/s - 1mm/s. The curvature of the free surface is measured by confocal microscopy in order to determine the local Laplace pressure in the free-surface microchannel flow. The system has been used for the molecular-specific detection of vapor emanated from explosives such as DNT, TNT and picric acid. The system does not show signs of performance degradation from common interferents such as saturated gasoline vapor and perfume.

  10. Possibilities for standoff Raman detection applications for explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallin, Sara; Pettersson, Anna; Önnerud, Hans; Östmark, Henric; Nordberg, Markus; Ceco, Ema; Ehlerding, Anneli; Johansson, Ida; Käck, Petra

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of the Raman-based standoff detection methods developed at FOI for the purpose of standoff explosives detection. The methods concerned are Raman imaging for particle detection and Resonance Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for vapor detection. These methods are today reaching a maturity level that makes it possible to consider applications such as trace residue field measurements, on site post blast analysis and other security of explosives related applications. The paper will look into future possible applications of these technologies. Our group has extensive activities in applications of the technology, among others in projects for the Seventh Framework Program of the European Union. Some of these possible applications will be described and a look into future development needs will be made. As far as possible, applicability will be discussed with a view on realistic explosives trace availability for detection. Necessary data to make such realistic applicability assessment is not always available and a brief discussion on the applicability of using the developed Raman technology to obtain this kind of data will also be made. The aspects of transitioning from research to practical applications, considering also eye-safety of the system, will be discussed as well.

  11. Mass spectrometric detection of solid and vapor explosive materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stott, William R.; Green, D.; Mercado, Alvaro G.

    1994-10-01

    The detection by chemical sensors of explosive devices in a terrorist or contraband scenario usually involves the acquisition of material in the vapor or solid form. Whether in the vapor form in ambient air or in solid form in a matrix of innocuous material, the chemical compounds may be present at very low concentrations or may be present in concentrations higher by orders of magnitude. In this study, a characterization of a tandem mass spectrometer detection system has been made to evaluate a variety of parameters as it relates to explosive chemicals in both the vapor and solid phases. In particular, a range of concentrations of standard solutions of RDX, PETN and TNT have been injected in determine the sensitivity, dynamic range, and lower level of detection of the SCIEX contraband tandem quadrupole mass spectrometer. Techniques for the introduction of samples include heated nebulization and direct injection/thermal desorption from a real time sampler belt. As well, explosive vapors produced by a special generator were injected in a 1 l/min stream of room air and used to characterize instrumental performance. Solid material was presented in a form simulating fingerprint material and then transferred to the detector using a real time sampling system and then thermally desorbed into the mass spectrometer ionization chamber.

  12. Photoluminescent detection of dissolved underwater trace explosives.

    PubMed

    Langston, Tye

    2010-01-01

    A portable, rapid, and economical method for in situ trace explosive detection in aqueous solutions was demonstrated using photoluminescence. Using europium/ thenoyltrifluoroacetone as the reagent, dissolved nitroglycerin was fluorescently tagged and detected in seawater solutions without sample preparation, drying, or preconcentration. The chemical method was developed in a laboratory setting and demonstrated in a flow-through configuration using lightweight, inexpensive, commercial components by directly injecting the reagents into a continually flowing seawater stream using a small amount of organic solvent (approximately 8% of the total solution). Europium's vulnerability to vibrational fluorescence quenching by water provided the mode of detection. Without nitroglycerin in the seawater solution, the reagent's fluorescence was quenched, but when dissolved nitroglycerin was present, it displaced the water molecules from the europium/thenoyltrifluoroacetone compound and restored fluorescence. This effort focused on developing a seawater sensor, but performance comparisons were made to freshwater. The method was found to perform better in freshwater and it was shown that certain seawater constituents (such as calcium) have an adverse impact. However, the concentrations of these constituents are not expected to vary significantly from the natural seawater used herein. PMID:20364240

  13. Improved thermal neutron activation sensor for detection of bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.; Andrews, H. Robert; Clifford, Edward T. H.; Mosquera, Cristian M.

    2012-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield and Bubble Technology Industries have been developing thermal neutron activation (TNA) sensors for detection of buried bulk explosives since 1994. First generation sensors, employing an isotopic source and NaI(Tl) gamma ray detectors, were deployed by Canadian Forces in 2002 as confirmation sensors on the ILDS teleoperated, vehicle-mounted, multi-sensor anti-tank landmine detection systems. The first generation TNA could detect anti-tank mines buried 10 cm or less in no more than a minute, but deeper mines and those significantly displaced horizontally required considerably longer times. Mines as deep as 30 cm could be detected with long counting times (1000 s). The second generation TNA detector is being developed with a number of improvements aimed at increasing sensitivity and facilitating ease of operation. Among these are an electronic neutron generator to increase sensitivity for deeper and horizontally displaced explosives; LaBr3(Ce) scintillators, to improve time response and energy resolution; improved thermal and electronic stability; improved sensor head geometry to minimize spatial response nonuniformity; and more robust data processing. This improved sensitivity can translate to either decreased counting times, decreased minimum detectable explosive quantities, increased maximum sensor-to-target displacement, or a trade off among all three. Experiments to characterize the performance of the latest generation TNA in detecting buried landmines and IEDs hidden in culverts were conducted during 2011. This paper describes the second generation system. The experimental setup and methodology are detailed and preliminary comparisons between the performance of first and second generation systems are presented.

  14. Development in the Detection and Identification of Explosive Residues.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, A D

    1992-06-01

    In the past 2 decades, developments in the sensitivity and selectivity of instrument detectors have significantly improved the detection limits for explosives, particularly nitrated organic compounds. Significant improvements have also been made in clean up and recovery procedures for explosive residues. Methods which also have met the criterion of proven effectiveness in identifying explosive components in "real-world" residues from test explosions have been incorporated into systematic analysis protocols for explosive residues. This article first reviews developments in the application of both traditional and novel methods to analysis of unreacted explosives and explosive residues. Compounds used to formulate commercial, military, and "homemade" explosives are then cross-referenced to the analytical methods that have been specifically applied to them, both as pure chemicals and in explosive mixtures. The subsequent focus is on the combinations of methods used to systematically analyze and positively identify residues from improvised explosive devices, from handswabs derived from persons suspected of handling explosives, and from organic gunshot residue. Technology is available to positively identify virtually any unreacted explosive in residue, but no one method can detect all components of all explosives. Investigators and the courts are best served by well-equipped forensic science laboratories staffed with scientists who have gained experience by the successful analysis of post-blast residues from an explosives range and have comprehensive reference collections of physical material, analytical data, and literature. The greatest progress has been made with respect to nitrated organic compounds, but the new generation of commercial explosive slurries and emulsions which are primarily formulated with inorganic salts and non-nitrated organic compounds offer an ongoing challenge. PMID:26267286

  15. Visible Hyperspectral Imaging for Standoff Detection of Explosives on Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2010-11-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

  16. Explosions within a Deep Crater: Detection from Land and Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, A. K.; Dehn, J.; De Angelis, S.

    2012-12-01

    Many volcanoes in the North Pacific exhibit small scale explosive activity. This activity is typified by small explosions throwing ash, blocks, and spatter out of a central vent located within a crater. This material can be thrown out onto the flanks of the volcano if the vent is near enough to the crater rim. However, at some volcanoes, the vent is tens to hundreds of meters below the crater rim. The crater walls constrain the erupted material, causing it to fall back into the vent. Infill of material clogs the vent and can cause future explosions to become muffled. The depth of the crater also inhibits clear views of the vent for satellite remote sensing. In order for a satellite to record an image of a very deep vent, it requires very near vertical pass angle (satellite zenith angle). This viewing geometry is rare, meaning that the majority of images at such volcanoes will show the flanks or the crater walls, not the actual vent or crater floor. A method was developed for using satellite data to monitor the frequency of small explosive activity at numerous volcanoes. By determining the frequency of small explosions seen as thermal features in satellite imagery, a baseline of activity was determined. Any changes from this baseline are then used to indicate possible changes in the volcanic system or eruptive activity of the volcano. This method was used on data collected at Mt. Chuginadak (Cleveland) in Alaska, Karymsky Volcano in Russia, and Stromboli Volcano in Italy with good results. The method was then applied to Shishaldin Volcano in Alaska but was not as useful in determining the activity of the volcano due to the depth of Shishaldin's central crater (400m). This highlights the importance of multi-disciplinary and multi-sensor research to determine the actual activity at a volcano. For this project, explosions at Shishaldin Volcano were counted in both satellite data (thermal anomalies) and seismic data (explosion signals) for a time period from 2008

  17. Detecting buried explosive hazards with handheld GPR and deep learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besaw, Lance E.

    2016-05-01

    Buried explosive hazards (BEHs), including traditional landmines and homemade improvised explosives, have proven difficult to detect and defeat during and after conflicts around the world. Despite their various sizes, shapes and construction material, ground penetrating radar (GPR) is an excellent phenomenology for detecting BEHs due to its ability to sense localized differences in electromagnetic properties. Handheld GPR detectors are common equipment for detecting BEHs because of their flexibility (in part due to the human operator) and effectiveness in cluttered environments. With modern digital electronics and positioning systems, handheld GPR sensors can sense and map variation in electromagnetic properties while searching for BEHs. Additionally, large-scale computers have demonstrated an insatiable appetite for ingesting massive datasets and extracting meaningful relationships. This is no more evident than the maturation of deep learning artificial neural networks (ANNs) for image and speech recognition now commonplace in industry and academia. This confluence of sensing, computing and pattern recognition technologies offers great potential to develop automatic target recognition techniques to assist GPR operators searching for BEHs. In this work deep learning ANNs are used to detect BEHs and discriminate them from harmless clutter. We apply these techniques to a multi-antennae, handheld GPR with centimeter-accurate positioning system that was used to collect data over prepared lanes containing a wide range of BEHs. This work demonstrates that deep learning ANNs can automatically extract meaningful information from complex GPR signatures, complementing existing GPR anomaly detection and classification techniques.

  18. Sensor array and preconcentrator for the detection of explosives in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodka, Marc D.; Shpil, J. Cory; Schnee, Vincent P.; Polcha, J. Michael P.

    2012-06-01

    A sensor system has been constructed that is capable of detecting and discriminating between various explosives presented in ocean water with detection limits at the 10-100 parts per trillion level. The sensor discriminates between different compounds using a biologically-inspired fluorescent polymer sensor array, which responds with a unique fluorescence quenching pattern during exposure to different analytes. The sensor array was made from commercially available fluorescent polymers coated onto glass beads, and was demonstrated to discriminate between different electron-withdrawing analytes delivered in salt water solutions, including the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and tetryl, the explosive hydrolysis products 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene and 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene, as well as other explosive-related compounds and explosive simulants. Sensitivities of 10-100 parts per trillion were achieved by employing a preconcentrator (PC) upstream of the sensor inlet. The PC consists of the porous polymer Tenax, which captures explosives from contaminated water as it passes through the PC. As the concentration of explosives in water decreased, longer loading times were required to concentrate a detectable amount of explosives within the PC. Explosives accumulated within the PC were released to the sensor array by heating the PC to 190 C. This approach yielded preconcentration factors of up to 100-1000x, however this increased sensitivity towards lower concentrations of explosives was achieved at the expense of proportionally longer sampling times. Strategies for decreasing this sampling time are discussed.

  19. Digital micromirror devices in Raman trace detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glimtoft, Martin; Svanqvist, Mattias; Ågren, Matilda; Nordberg, Markus; Östmark, Henric

    2016-05-01

    Imaging Raman spectroscopy based on tunable filters is an established technique for detecting single explosives particles at stand-off distances. However, large light losses are inherent in the design due to sequential imaging at different wavelengths, leading to effective transmission often well below 1 %. The use of digital micromirror devices (DMD) and compressive sensing (CS) in imaging Raman explosives trace detection can improve light throughput and add significant flexibility compared to existing systems. DMDs are based on mature microelectronics technology, and are compact, scalable, and can be customized for specific tasks, including new functions not available with current technologies. This paper has been focusing on investigating how a DMD can be used when applying CS-based imaging Raman spectroscopy on stand-off explosives trace detection, and evaluating the performance in terms of light throughput, image reconstruction ability and potential detection limits. This type of setup also gives the possibility to combine imaging Raman with non-spatially resolved fluorescence suppression techniques, such as Kerr gating. The system used consists of a 2nd harmonics Nd:YAG laser for sample excitation, collection optics, DMD, CMOScamera and a spectrometer with ICCD camera for signal gating and detection. Initial results for compressive sensing imaging Raman shows a stable reconstruction procedure even at low signals and in presence of interfering background signal. It is also shown to give increased effective light transmission without sacrificing molecular specificity or area coverage compared to filter based imaging Raman. At the same time it adds flexibility so the setup can be customized for new functionality.

  20. The detection of bulk explosives using nuclear-based techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Gozani, T.; Seher, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    In 1986 we presented a rationale for the detection of bulk explosives based on nuclear techniques that addressed the requirements of civil aviation security in the airport environment. Since then, efforts have intensified to implement a system based on thermal neutron activation (TNA), with new work developing in fast neutron and energetic photon reactions. In this paper we will describe these techniques and present new results from laboratory and airport testing. Based on preliminary results, we contended in our earlier paper that nuclear-based techniques did provide sufficiently penetrating probes and distinguishable detectable reaction products to achieve the FAA operational goals; new data have supported this contention. The status of nuclear-based techniques for the detection of bulk explosives presently under investigation by the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is reviewed. These include thermal neutron activation (TNA), fast neutron activation (FNA), the associated particle technique, nuclear resonance absorption, and photoneutron activation. The results of comprehensive airport testing of the TNA system performed during 1987-88 are summarized. From a technical point of view, nuclear-based techniques now represent the most comprehensive and feasible approach for meeting the operational criteria of detection, false alarms, and throughput. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Explosion prevention in dry dust collection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hokanson, J. C.; Magott, R. J.; Tranbarger, O.; Petino, G.; Seals, W. O.

    1983-01-01

    To reduce the risk of dust explosions in propellant and explosive manufacturing plants, dust is captured as it is generated and transported through ducts to filters, separators, or collectors. However, the dust collection systems may potentially contribute to the accident potential within the plant. A series of site visits was made to measure the electrostatic potential buildup and the dust concentration levels in ducting actually present during normal plant operations. These data provide a base of plant operating conditions upon which one may evaluate the safety of dry dust collection systems. A survey was conducted to determine if off-the-shelf instrumentation exists which will measure dust concentrations dynamically at levels within the explosive range. Most dust explosive characterizations are conducted using the Hartmann apparatus. This instrument is useful for evaluating relative characteristics of dusts. However, it has been shown that this instrument underpredicts both the peak pressure and the pressure rise rate for full-scale explosions. In designing explosion venting or explosion-resistant structures, data obtained in larger chambers are needed to allow the prediction of full-scale trends. A series of experiments was conducted using 40 and 1000 liter vessels to characterize the peak pressure and pressure rise rate for several explosive dusts.

  2. Nuclear quadrupole resonance detection of explosives: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Joel B.

    2011-06-01

    Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) is a spectroscopic technique closely related to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). These techniques, and NQR in particular, induce signals from the material being interrogated that are very specific to the chemical and physical structure of the material, but are relatively insensitive to the physical form of the material. NQR explosives detection exploits this specificity to detect explosive materials, in contrast to other well known techniques that are designed to detect explosive devices. The past two decades have seen a large research and development effort in NQR explosives detection in the United States aimed at transportation security and military applications. Here, I will briefly describe the physical basis for NQR before discussing NQR developments over the past decade, with particular emphasis on landmine detection and the use of NQR in combating IED's. Potential future directions for NQR research and development are discussed.

  3. Explosives detection using photoneutrons produced by X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yigang; Li, Yuanjing; Wang, Haidong; Li, Tiezhu; Wu, Bin

    2007-08-01

    The detection of explosives has become a critical issue after recent terrorist attacks. This paper describes research on explosives detection using photoneutrons from a photoneutron convertor that consists of 20 kg heavy water in an aluminum container whose shape was optimized to most effectively convert X-rays to photoneutrons. The X-rays were produced by a 9 MeV electron accelerator with an average electron current of 100 μA, resulted in a photoneutron yield of >10 11 n/s. Monte-Carlo simulations show that the radiation field is composed of X-ray pulses, fast neutron pulses and thermal neutrons. Both the X-ray and fast neutron pulses are 5 μs wide with a 300 Hz repetition frequency. The thermal neutron flux, which is higher than 10 4 n/cm 2/s, is essentially time invariant. A time shielding circuit was developed for the spectrometry system to halt the sampling process during the intense X-ray pulses. Paraffin, boron carbide and lead were used to protect the detector from interference from the X-rays, fast neutrons, thermal neutrons and background γ-rays coming from the system materials induced by photoneutrons. 5″×5″ NaI (Tl) scintillators were chosen as the detectors to detect the photoneutrons induced γ-rays from the inspected explosive simulant. Nitrogen (6.01 cps) 10.828 MeV γ-rays were detected with one detector from a 50 kg carbamide block placed 60 cm in front of the detector. A collimator was used to reduce the number of background 10.828 MeV γ-rays coming from the nitrogen in the air to improve the signal to background ratio from 0.136 to 1.81. A detector array of seven 5″×5″ NaI (Tl) detectors was used to measure the 2-D distributions of N and H in the sample. The combination of photoneutron analysis and X-ray imaging shows promise for enhancing explosives detection capabilities.

  4. Direct real-time detection of vapors from explosive compounds.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Robert G; Clowers, Brian H; Atkinson, David A

    2013-11-19

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX, and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances was demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a nonradioactive ionization source coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was accomplished in less than 5 s at ambient temperature without sample preconcentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provided a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3(-) and NO3(-)·HNO3), enabled highly sensitive explosives detection from explosive vapors present in ambient laboratory air. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicated detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284, and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX, and NG, respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations sampled in ambient laboratory air, including double base propellants, plastic explosives, and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN, and RDX product ions. PMID:24090362

  5. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. S.; Yu, B.; Fischer, H.; Chen, W.; Yalin, A. P.

    2015-03-01

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  6. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. S. Yu, B.; Fischer, H.; Chen, W.; Yalin, A. P.

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  7. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors. PMID:19913995

  8. Visible hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of explosives on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Blake, Thomas A.; Mendoza, Albert; Johnson, Timothy J.

    2010-10-01

    There is an ever-increasing need to be able to detect the presence of explosives, preferably from standoff distances of tens of meters. This paper presents an application of visible hyperspectral imaging using anomaly, polarization, and spectral identification approaches for the standoff detection (13 meters) of nitroaromatic explosives on realistic painted surfaces based upon the colorimetric differences between tetryl and TNT which are enhanced by solar irradiation.

  9. Tagged neutron capabilities for detecting hidden explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Belichenko, S. G.; Bestaev, R. R.; Gavryuchenkov, A. V.; Karetnikov, M. D.

    2015-05-01

    The work is devoted to illegal materials detection via tagged neutron method (TNM). The detection of hazardous substances is based on recording of gamma radiation from a neutron-irradiated object and analysis of its elemental composition. As against other neutron radiation methods the TNM enables to obtain 3D distribution of elements in the inspected area. The results of experimental part of the research show operational capabilities (probabilities of missing and false alarm) of a portable TNM inspection system when inspecting small hand-luggage-type objects.

  10. Ultrafast laser based coherent control methods for explosives detection

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The detection of explosives is a notoriously difficult problem, especially at stand-off, due to their (generally) low vapor pressure, environmental and matrix interferences, and packaging. We are exploring Optimal Dynamic Detection of Explosives (ODD-Ex), which exploits the best capabilities of recent advances in laser technology and recent discoveries in optimal shaping of laser pulses for control of molecular processes to significantly enhance the standoff detection of explosives. The core of the ODD-Ex technique is the introduction of optimally shaped laser pulses to simultaneously enhance sensitivity to explosives signatures while dramatically improving specificity, particularly against matrix materials and background interferences. These goals are being addressed by operating in an optimal non-linear fashion, typically with a single shaped laser pulse inherently containing within it coherently locked control and probe subpulses. Recent results will be presented.

  11. Detection of Plastic Explosive Traces in the Human Thermal Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gowadia, Huban A.; Settles, Gary S.

    1998-11-01

    Aviation security requires the detection of explosive devices which terrorists, posing as passengers, may conceal beneath their clothing. Our goal is to understand the generation, transport, and collection of trace signals from such concealed explosives, which are found in the natural convective plume produced by the human body. Previous work (APS/DFD96, CG10) has visualized this plume and shown that concealed volatile explosives (e.g. TNT) produce a detectable vapor signal therein. Plastic explosives, on the other hand, have vanishingly low vapor pressures and are thus considered very difficult to detect. Present experiments use a dispersal chamber to collect and sample the plumes of human subjects wearing concealed gauze patches containing milligrams of RDX, the primary component of plastic explosives such as C-4. These experiments address the effects of agitation, clothing, temperature and humidity on trace detectability. Further experiments address the effects of oily vs. dry skin, contaminated clothing vs. gauze patches, and residual contamination left on skin previously in contact with RDX. The key role of airborne contaminated textile fibers is noted. Knowledge thus gained contributes to the design of an explosive detection portal for aviation security screening. (Research supported by FAA Grant 93-G-052.)

  12. Direct Real-Time Detection of Vapors from Explosive Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert G.; Clowers, Brian H.; Atkinson, David A.

    2013-10-03

    The real-time detection of vapors from low volatility explosives including PETN, tetryl, RDX and nitroglycerine along with various compositions containing these substances is demonstrated. This was accomplished with an atmospheric flow tube (AFT) using a non-radioactive ionization source and coupled to a mass spectrometer. Direct vapor detection was demonstrated in less than 5 seconds at ambient temperature without sample pre-concentration. The several seconds of residence time of analytes in the AFT provides a significant opportunity for reactant ions to interact with analyte vapors to achieve ionization. This extended reaction time, combined with the selective ionization using the nitrate reactant ions (NO3- and NO3-•HNO3), enables highly sensitive explosives detection. Observed signals from diluted explosive vapors indicate detection limits below 10 ppqv using selected ion monitoring (SIM) of the explosive-nitrate adduct at m/z 349, 378, 284 and 289 for tetryl, PETN, RDX and NG respectively. Also provided is a demonstration of the vapor detection from 10 different energetic formulations, including double base propellants, plastic explosives and commercial blasting explosives using SIM for the NG, PETN and RDX product ions.

  13. The limit of detection for explosives in spectroscopic differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Vishwanathan, Karthik; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2011-05-01

    In the wake of recent terrorist attacks, such as the 2008 Mumbai hotel explosion or the December 25th 2009 "underwear bomber", our group has developed a technique (US patent #7368292) to apply differential reflection spectroscopy to detect traces of explosives. Briefly, light (200-500 nm) is shone on a surface such as a piece of luggage at an airport. Upon reflection, the light is collected with a spectrometer combined with a CCD camera. A computer processes the data and produces in turn a differential reflection spectrum involving two adjacent areas of the surface. This differential technique is highly sensitive and provides spectroscopic data of explosives. As an example, 2,4,6, trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct features in differential reflectograms near 420 nm. Similar, but distinctly different features are observed for other explosives. One of the most important criteria for explosive detection techniques is the limit of detection. This limit is defined as the amount of explosive material necessary to produce a signal to noise ratio of three. We present here, a method to evaluate the limit of detection of our technique. Finally, we present our sample preparation method and experimental set-up specifically developed to measure the limit of detection for our technology. This results in a limit ranging from 100 nano-grams to 50 micro-grams depending on the method and the set-up parameters used, such as the detector-sample distance.

  14. Portable thin layer chromatography for field detection of explosives and propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satcher, Joe H.; Maienschein, Jon L.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Racoveanu, Ana; Carman, M. Leslie; Whipple, Richard E.; Reynolds, John G.

    2012-06-01

    A field deployable detection kit for explosives and propellants using thin layer chromatography (TLC) has been developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The chemistry of the kit has been modified to allow for field detection of propellants (through propellant stabilizers), military explosives, peroxide explosives, nitrates and inorganic oxidizer precursors. For many of these target analytes, the detection limit is in the μg to pg range. A new miniaturized, bench prototype, field portable TLC (Micro TLC) kit has also been developed for the detection and identification of common military explosives. It has been demonstrated in a laboratory environment and is ready for field-testing. The kit is comprised of a low cost set of commercially available components specifically assembled for rapid identification needed in the field and identifies the common military explosives: HMX, RDX, Tetryl, Explosive D or picric acid, and TNT all on one plate. Additional modifications of the Micro TLC system have been made with fluorescent organosilicon co-polymer coatings to detect a large suite of explosives.

  15. Explosive hazard detection using synthetic aperture acoustic sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brewster, E.; Keller, J. M.; Stone, K.; Popescu, M.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we develop an approach to detect explosive hazards designed to attack vehicles from the side of a road, using a side looking synthetic aperture acoustic (SAA) sensor. This is done by first processing the raw data using a back-projection algorithm to form images. Next, an RX prescreener creates a list of possible targets, each with a designated confidence. Initial experiments are performed on libraries of the highest confidence hits for both target and false alarm classes generated by the prescreener. Image chips are extracted using pixel locations derived from the target's easting and northing. Several feature types are calculated from each image chip, including: histogram of oriented gradients (HOG), and generalized column projection features where the column aggregator takes the form of the minimum, maximum, mean, median, mode, standard deviation, variance, and the one-dimensional fast Fourier transform (FFT). A support vector machine (SVM) classifier is then utilized to evaluate feature type performance during training and testing in order to determine whether the two classes are separable. This will be used to build an online detection system for road-side explosive hazards.

  16. Measurements and standards for bulk-explosives detection.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Larry; Bateman, Fred; Bergstrom, Paul; Cerra, Frank; Glover, Jack; Minniti, Ronaldo; Seltzer, Stephen; Tosh, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Recent years have seen a dramatic expansion in the application of radiation and isotopes to security screening. This has been driven primarily by increased incidents involving improvised explosive devices as well as their ease of assembly and leveraged disruption of transportation and commerce. With global expenditures for security-screening systems in the hundreds of billions of dollars, there is a pressing need to develop, apply, and harmonize standards for x-ray and gamma-ray screening systems used to detect explosives and other contraband. The National Institute of Standards and Technology has been facilitating the development of standard measurement tools that can be used to gauge the technical performance (imaging quality) and radiation safety of systems used to screen luggage, persons, vehicles, cargo, and left-behind objects. After a review of this new suite of national standard test methods, test objects, and radiation-measurement protocols, we highlight some of the technical trends that are enhancing the revision of baseline standards. Finally we advocate a more intentional use of technical-performance standards by security stakeholders and outline the advantages this would accrue. PMID:22136814

  17. Detection of explosives by positive corona discharge ion mobility spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Ilbeigi, Vahideh

    2010-04-15

    In this work, thermal decomposition has been used to detect explosives by IMS in positive polarity. Explosives including Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), Cyclo-1,3,5-Trimethylene-2,4,6-Trinitramine (RDX), 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dihydro-5-nitro-3H-1,2,4-triazol-3-one (NTO), 1,3,5,7-Tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), have been evaluated at temperatures between 150 and 250 degrees C in positive polarity in air. Explosives yield NO(x) which causes NO(+) peak to increase. Additional peaks may be used to identify the type of explosive. The limit of detection for RDX, HMX, PETN, NTO, and TNT were obtained to be 1, 10, 40, 1000, and 1000 ng, respectively. PMID:20004055

  18. Explosives detection portal for high-volume personnel screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parmeter, John E.; Linker, Kevin L.; Rhykerd, Charles L.; Hannum, David W.; Bouchier, Francis A.

    1998-12-01

    We discuss a trace explosive detection portal for high-volume personnel screening, which has been developed recently at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), using funding provided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safeguards and Security (OSS). This portal screens individuals for explosives using noninvasive means to collect explosive residue in the forms of vapor and particulate contamination. The portal combines a commercially available ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator developed at SNL to perform detection of explosives. The prototype portal has undergone one series of tests at the Albuquerque International Airport, and we are now proceeding to develop an improved, second-generation portal, and to find a company to market the portal.

  19. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionizataion and triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry for explosives vapor detection

    SciTech Connect

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G.; Hart, K.J.; Glish, G.L.; Grant, B.C.; Chambers, D.M.

    1993-08-01

    The detection and identification of trace vapors of hidden high explosives is an excellent example of a targeted analysis problem. It is desirable to push to ever lower levels the quantity or concentration of explosives material that provides an analytical signal, while at the same time discriminating against all other uninteresting material. The detection system must therefore combine high sensitivity with high specificity. This report describes the philosophy behind the use of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization, which is a sensitive, rugged, and convenient means for forming anions from explosives molecules, with tandem mass spectrometry, which provides unparalleled specificity in the identification of explosives-related ions. Forms of tandem mass spectrometry are compared and contrasted to provide a summary of the characteristics to be expected from an explosives detector employing mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry. The instrument developed for the FAA, an atmospheric sampling glow discharge/triple quadrupole mass spectrometer, is described in detail with particular emphasis on the ion source/spectrometer interface and on the capabilities of the spectrometer. Performance characteristics of the system are also described as they pertain to explosives of interest including a description of an automated procedure for the detection and identification of specific explosives. A comparison of various tandem mass spectrometers mated with atmospheric sampling glow discharge is then described and preliminary studies with a vapor preconcentration system provided by the FAA will be described.

  20. Detection of vehicle-based improvised explosives using ultra-trace detection equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mark; Sikes, John; Prather, Mark; Wichert, Clint

    2005-05-01

    Vehicle-borne improvised explosive devices (VBIEDs) have become the weapon of choice for insurgents in Iraq. At the same time, these devices are becoming increasingly sophisticated and effective. VBIEDs can be difficult to detect during visual inspection of vehicles. This is especially true when explosives have been hidden behind a vehicle"s panels, inside seat cushions, under floorboards, or behind cargo. Even though the explosive may not be visible, vapors of explosive emanating from the device are often present in the vehicle, but the current generation of trace detection equipment has not been sensitive enough to detect these low concentrations of vapor. This paper presents initial test results using the Nomadics Fido sensor for detection of VBIEDs. The sensor is a small, explosives detector with unprecedented levels of sensitivity for detection of nitroaromatic explosives. Fido utilizes fluorescence quenching of novel polymer materials to detect traces of explosive vapor emanating from targets containing explosives. These materials, developed by collaborators at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), amplify the quenching response that occurs when molecules of explosive bind to films of the polymer. These materials have enabled development of sensors with performance approaching that of canines trained to detect explosives. The ability of the sensor to detect explosives in vehicles and on persons who have recently been in close proximity to explosives has recently been demonstrated. In these tests, simulated targets were quickly and easily detected using a Fido sensor in conjunction with both direct vapor and swipe sampling methods. The results of these tests suggest that chemical vapor sensing has utility as a means of screening vehicles for explosives at checkpoints and on patrols.

  1. Lidar Detection of Explosive Vapors in the Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrovnikov, S. M.; Vorozhtsov, A. B.; Gorlov, E. V.; Zharkov, V. I.; Maksimov, E. M.; Panchenko, Yu. N.; Sakovich, G. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results of studying the feasibility of remote detection of explosive vapors in the atmosphere based on the lidar principle using the method of laser fragmentation/laser-induced fluorescence. A project of the mobile, automated, fast-response scanning UV lidar for explosives detection at distances of 10-50 m is presented. Experimental data on the detection of trinitrotoluene (TNT), hexogen (RDX), and Composition B (CompB) vapors at a distance of 13 m are given. The threshold sensitivity of the lidar detector of explosive vapors is estimated. For TNT vapors, the threshold sensitivity of the lidar detector is estimated to be 1•10-12 g/cm-3 for the detection probability P = 97%.

  2. Multidimensional detection of explosives and explosive signatures via laser electrospray mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Flanigan, Paul M., IV; Perez, Johnny J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2012-06-01

    Nitro- and inorganic-based energetic material is vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant, 70 femtosecond laser pulses prior to electrospray post-ionization and transfer into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of a nitro-based energetic molecule, cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), adsorbed on metal and dielectric surfaces indicate nonresonant vaporization of intact molecules, demonstrating the universality of laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS) technique for explosives. In addition, RDX is analyzed at a distance of 2 meters to demonstrate the remote detection capability of LEMS. Finally, the analysis and multivariate statistical classification of inorganic-based explosives containing ammonium nitrate, chlorate, perchlorate, black powder, and an organic-based explosive is presented, further expanding the capabilities of the LEMS technique for detection of energetic materials.

  3. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  4. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Alistair P.; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  5. Real-time change detection for countering improvised explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Wouw, Dennis W. J. M.; van Rens, Kris; van Lint, Hugo; Jaspers, Egbert G. T.; de With, Peter H. N.

    2014-03-01

    We explore an automatic real-time change detection system to assist military personnel during transport and surveillance, by detection changes in the environment with respect to a previous operation. Such changes may indicate the presence of Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs), which can then be bypassed. While driving, images of the scenes are acquired by the camera and stored with their GPS positions. At the same time, the best matching reference image (from a previous patrol) is retrieved and registered to the live image. Next a change mask is generated by differencing the reference and live image, followed by an adaptive thresholding technique. Post-processing steps such as Markov Random Fields, local texture comparisons and change tracking, further improve time- and space-consistency of changes and suppress noise. The resulting changes are visualized as an overlay on the live video content. The system has been extensively tested on 28 videos, containing over 10,000 manually annotated objects. The system is capable of detecting small test objects of 10 cm3 at a range of 40 meters. Although the system shows an acceptable performance in multiple cases, the performance degrades under certain circumstances for which extensions are discussed.

  6. Recent advances and remaining challenges for the spectroscopic detection of explosive threats.

    PubMed

    Fountain, Augustus W; Christesen, Steven D; Moon, Raphael P; Guicheteau, Jason A; Emmons, Erik D

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Army initiated a program through the Edgewood Chemical Biological Center to identify viable spectroscopic signatures of explosives and initiate environmental persistence, fate, and transport studies for trace residues. These studies were ultimately designed to integrate these signatures into algorithms and experimentally evaluate sensor performance for explosives and precursor materials in existing chemical point and standoff detection systems. Accurate and validated optical cross sections and signatures are critical in benchmarking spectroscopic-based sensors. This program has provided important information for the scientists and engineers currently developing trace-detection solutions to the homemade explosive problem. With this information, the sensitivity of spectroscopic methods for explosives detection can now be quantitatively evaluated before the sensor is deployed and tested. PMID:25061781

  7. Use of UV Sources for Detection and Identification of Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hug, William; Reid, Ray; Bhartia, Rohit; Lane, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of Raman and native fluorescence emission using ultraviolet (UV) sources (<400 nm) on targeted materials is suitable for both sensitive detection and accurate identification of explosive materials. When the UV emission data are analyzed using a combination of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis, chemicals and biological samples can be differentiated based on the geometric arrangement of molecules, the number of repeating aromatic rings, associated functional groups (nitrogen, sulfur, hydroxyl, and methyl), microbial life cycles (spores vs. vegetative cells), and the number of conjugated bonds. Explosive materials can be separated from one another as well as from a range of possible background materials, which includes microbes, car doors, motor oil, and fingerprints on car doors, etc. Many explosives are comprised of similar atomic constituents found in potential background samples such as fingerprint oils/skin, motor oil, and soil. This technique is sensitive to chemical bonds between the elements that lead to the discriminating separability between backgrounds and explosive materials.

  8. Terahertz reflection spectroscopy for the detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy-Hoppa, Megan R.; Fitch, Michael J.; Osiander, Robert

    2008-02-01

    Terahertz (THz) technology has been demonstrated as a promising tool for detection of explosives and is being developed for aviation screening and sensing of improvised explosive devices. THz radiation is attractive for many applications due to its ability to penetrate through a wide range of dielectric materials including clothing, paper, cardboard, plastics, and wood. Of course, metals block THz waves as is the case for microwave, IR, and visible light. Our work has involved investigating the reflection spectroscopy of a variety of materials including explosives such as RDX and PETN, plastic explosive taggants such as DMDNB, and other organic materials. We have also investigated the changes of the reflection spectra in varying grades of sucrose. Spectral differences are observed between three grades of crystalline sugar in the region from 0.1 to 1 THz. By exploiting the unique spectral features, the discrimination capabilities of THz reflection spectroscopy points to the broad applicability of identifying a wide variety of materials.

  9. Observations on military exploitation of explosives detection technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; de Ruiter, C. J.; Ehlerding, Anneli; McFee, John E.; Svinsås, Eirik; van Rheenen, Arthur D.

    2011-06-01

    Accurate and timely detection of explosives, energetic materials, and their associated compounds would provide valuable information to military commanders in a wide range of military operations: protection of fast moving convoys from mobile or static IED threats; more deliberate countermine and counter-IED operations during route or area clearance; and static roles such as hasty or deliberate checkpoints, critical infrastructure protection and support to public security. The detection of hidden explosive hazards is an extremely challenging problem, as evidenced by the fact that related research has been ongoing in many countries for at least seven decades and no general purpose solution has yet been found. Technologies investigated have spanned all major scientific fields, with emphasis on the physical sciences, life sciences, engineering, robotics, computer technology and mathematics. This paper will present a limited, operationally-focused overview of the current status of detection technologies. Emphasis will be on those technologies that directly detect the explosive hazard, as opposed to those that detect secondary properties of the threat, such as the casing, associated wires or electronics. Technologies that detect explosives include those based on nuclear radiation and terahertz radiation, as well as trace and biological detection techniques. Current research areas of the authors will be used to illustrate the practical applications.

  10. Development of a trace explosives detection portal for personnel screening

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Linker, K.L.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.; Bouchier, F.A.; Hannum, D.W.

    1998-08-01

    The authors discuss the development, design, and operation of a walk-through trace detection portal designed to screen personnel for explosives. Developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) with primary funding from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and additional support from the Department of Energy office of Safeguards and Security, this portal is intended primarily for use in airport terminals and in other localities where a very high throughput of pedestrian traffic is combined with stringent security requirements. The portal is capable of detecting both vapor and particulate contamination, with the collection of explosive material being based upon the entrainment of that material in air flows over the body of the person being screened. This portal is capable of detecting most types of common high explosives of interest to the FAA. The authors discuss the results of field testing of the portal in the Albuquerque International Airport in September, 1997 and more recent steps towards commercialization of the portal.

  11. Detection of explosives using THz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Châteauneuf, Marc; Dubois, Jacques; Allard, Jean-François; Houde, Daniel; Morris, Denis

    2007-06-01

    Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) are a major threat to Canadian and allies troups involved in peacekeeping and minor conflict operations and despite their relative low technology they represent a major challenge in terms of detection and countermeasures. In order to provide tools to detect these threats, Defence Research & Development Canada - Valcartier initiated a research project to the feasibility of using terahertz (THz) radiations to detect and identify the presence of commonly used explosives and concealed weapons in a standoff method. This paper presents the initial results of the first year of the project and the future directions. A compact THz time domain spectroscopy was developed to build a THz signature table of commonly used explosives.

  12. A Critical Review of Ion Mobility Spectrometry for the Detection of Explosives and Explosive Related Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Robert Gordon; Atkinson, David Alan; Eiceman, G. A.; Ewing, G. J.

    2001-05-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry has become the most successful and widely used technology for the detection of trace levels of nitro-organic explosives on handbags and carry on-luggage in airports throughout the US. The low detection limits are provided by the efficient ionization process, namely, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) reactions in negative polarity. An additional level of confidence in a measurement is imparted by characterization of ions for mobilities in weak electric fields of a drift tube at ambient pressure. Findings from over 30 years of investigations into IMS response to these explosives have been collected and assessed to allow a comprehensive view of the APCI reactions characteristic of nitro-organic explosives. Also, the drift tube conditions needed to obtain particular mobility spectra have been summarized. During the past decade, improvements have occurred in IMS on the understanding of reagent gas chemistries, the influence of temperature on ion stability, and sampling methods. In addition, commercial instruments have been refined to provide fast and reliable measurements for on-site detection of explosives. The gas phase ion chemistry of most explosives is mediated by the fragile C---ONO2 bonds or the acidity of protons. Thus, M- or M·Cl- species are found with only a few explosives and loss of NO2, NO3 and proton abstraction reactions are common and complicating pathways. However, once ions are formed, they appear to have stabilities on time scales equal to or longer than ion drift times from 5–20 ms. As such, peak shapes in IMS are suitable for high selectivity and sensitivity.

  13. Gamma-Ray Imaging for Explosives Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deNolfo, G. A.; Hunter, S. D.; Barbier, L. M.; Link, J. T.; Son, S.; Floyd, S. R.; Guardala, N.; Skopec, M.; Stark, B.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a gamma-ray imaging camera (GIC) for active interrogation of explosives being developed by NASA/GSFC and NSWCICarderock. The GIC is based on the Three-dimensional Track Imager (3-DTI) technology developed at GSFC for gamma-ray astrophysics. The 3-DTI, a large volume time-projection chamber, provides accurate, approx.0.4 mm resolution, 3-D tracking of charged particles. The incident direction of gamma rays, E, > 6 MeV, are reconstructed from the momenta and energies of the electron-positron pair resulting from interactions in the 3-DTI volume. The optimization of the 3-DTI technology for this specific application and the performance of the GIC from laboratory tests is presented.

  14. SENNA: device for explosives' detection based on nanosecond neutron analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Andrey; Evsenin, Alexey; Osetrov, Oleg; Vakhtin, Dmitry; Gorshkov, Igor

    2006-05-01

    Portable device for explosives' detection (SENNA) based on Nanosecond Neutron Analysis (NNA) / Associated Particles Technique (APT) has been created and tested. SENNA is a single suitcase weighting 35 kg; it is remotely controlled from any PC-compatible computer. Inside is an APT neutron generator with a 3×3 matrix of semiconductor detectors of associated alpha-particles, two BGO-based detectors of gamma-rays, fully-digital data acquisition electronics, data analysis and decision-making software, and batteries. Detection technology is based on determining chemical composition of the concealed substance by analyzing secondary gamma-rays from interaction of tagged fast neutrons with its material. A combination of position-sensitive alpha-detector and time-of-flight analysis allows one to determine the location of the detected material within the inspected volume and its approximate mass. Fully digital data acquisition electronics is capable of performing alpha-gamma coincidence analysis at very high counting rates, which leads to reduction of the detection time down to dozens of seconds. SENNA's scenario-driven automatic decisionmaking algorithm based of "fuzzy logic" mechanism allows one to detect not only standard military or industrial explosives, but also improvised explosives (including those containing no nitrogen), even if their chemical composition differs from that of standard explosives. SENNA can also be "trained" to detect other hazardous materials, such as chemical/toxic materials, if their chemical composition is in any way different from that of the surrounding materials.

  15. Explosives Classifications Tracking System User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Genoni, R.P.

    1993-10-01

    The Explosives Classification Tracking System (ECTS) presents information and data for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) explosives classifications of interest to EM-561, Transportation Management Division, other DOE facilities, and contractors. It is intended to be useful to the scientist, engineer, and transportation professional, who needs to classify or transport explosives. This release of the ECTS reflects upgrading of the software which provides the user with an environment that makes comprehensive retrieval of explosives related information quick and easy. Quarterly updates will be provided to the ECTS throughout its development in FY 1993 and thereafter. The ECTS is a stand alone, single user system that contains unclassified, publicly available information, and administrative information (contractor names, product descriptions, transmittal dates, EX-Numbers, etc.) information from many sources for non-decisional engineering and shipping activities. The data is the most up-to-date and accurate available to the knowledge of the system developer. The system is designed to permit easy revision and updating as new information and data become available. These, additions and corrections are welcomed by the developer. This user manual is intended to help the user install, understand, and operate the system so that the desired information may be readily obtained, reviewed, and reported.

  16. Standoff detection of explosive residues on unknown surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Neste, C. W.; Liu, Xunchen; Gupta, Manisha; Kim, Seonghwan; Tsui, Ying; Thundat, T.

    2012-06-01

    Standoff identification of explosive residues may offer early warnings to many hazards plaguing present and future military operations. The greatest challenge is posed by the need for molecular recognition of trace explosive compounds on real-world surfaces. Most techniques that offer eye-safe, long-range detection fail when unknown surfaces with no prior knowledge of the surface spectral properties are interrogated. Inhomogeneity in the surface concentration and optical absorption from background molecules can introduce significant reproducibility challenges for reliable detection when surface residue concentrations are below tens of micrograms per square centimeter. Here we present a coupled standoff technique that allows identification of explosive residues concentrations in the sub microgram per square centimeter range on real-world surfaces. Our technique is a variation of standoff photoacoustic spectroscopy merged with ultraviolet chemical photodecomposition for selective identification of explosives. We demonstrate the detection of standard military grade explosives including RDX, PETN, and TNT along with a couple of common compounds such as diesel and sugar. We obtain identification at several hundred nanograms per centimeter square at a distance of four meters.

  17. Training Protocols for the Detection of Explosive Vapors in Interior Spaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, James M.; Webb, Stephen W.

    2007-07-01

    Computational fluid dynamics simulations for dispersal of explosive vapors in interior spaces have been performed including details of typical ventilation systems. The interior spaces investigated include an office area, a single-family house, and a warehouse store. Explosive vapor sources are defined in the various interior spaces, and contours of the vapor concentration in the interior spaces relative to the source concentration are presented for relative concentrations down to 10-5. Training protocols for detection of explosive vapors in interior spaces should include an awareness of the time to equilibrium evident in these simulations as well as the significance of ventilation zones.3

  18. Igloo containment system for improvised explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Dyckes, G.W.

    1980-09-01

    A method for containing or partially containing the blast and dispersal of radioactive particulate from improvised explosive devices is described. The containment system is restricted to devices located in fairly open areas at ground level, e.g., devices concealed in trucks, vans, transportainers, or small buildings which are accessible from all sides.

  19. Liquid explosive detection from outside of the bottle by IR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Yamauchi, Yuji

    2009-05-01

    Liquid explosives have been used in terrorism recently. Inspection of bottles becomes very important, because these liquid explosive or it raw materials can be carried by bottles easily. Hydrogen peroxide is typical raw materials of liquid explosives. It was difficult to evaluate concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the drink in the bottle, because of similarity of its optical properties to those of water. Using near infrared spectrum and multivariate statistical analysis, concentration of percent order of hydrogen peroxide in the bottle can be evaluated from outside of the bottle instantly. Hydrogen peroxide has been detected in not only a clear PET or glass bottle but also a colored glass bottle. Hydrogen peroxide mixed by soft drink such as coke or orange juice with pulp also detected by this method easily. This technique can be applied to inspection of a bottle at airport security so on.

  20. Liquid explosive detection from outside of the bottle by NIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itozaki, Hideo; Yamauchi, Yuji

    2009-09-01

    Liquid explosives have recently been used in terrorism. Inspection of bottles has become very important, because these liquid explosives and their raw materials can be easily carried in bottles. Hydrogen peroxide is a typical raw material of liquid explosives. It was difficult to evaluate the concentration of hydrogen peroxide a bottled drink, because of the similarity of its optical properties to those of water. Using the near-infrared spectrum and multivariate statistical analysis, concentrations of a percent order of hydrogen peroxide can be evaluated from outside of the bottle instantly. Hydrogen peroxide has been detected not only in clear PET or glass bottles but also in colored glass bottles. Hydrogen peroxide mixed with soft drink such as coke or orange juice with pulp was also easily detected by this method. This technique can be applied to the inspection of bottles at airport security and so on.

  1. Ambient pressure laser desorption and laser-induced acoustic desorption ion mobility spectrometry detection of explosives.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Sven; Walte, Andreas; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2013-11-19

    The development of fast, mobile, and sensitive detection systems for security-relevant substances is of enormous importance. Because of the low vapor pressures of explosives and improvised explosive devices, adequate sampling procedures are crucial. Ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) are fast and sensitive instruments that are used as detection systems for explosives. Ambient pressure laser desorption (APLD) and ambient pressure laser-induced acoustic desorption (AP-LIAD) are new tools suitable to evaporate explosives in order to detect them in the vapor phase. Indeed, the most important advantage of APLD or AP-LIAD is the capability to sample directly from the surface of interest without any transfer of the analyte to other surfaces such as wipe pads. A much more gentle desorption, compared to classical thermal-based desorption, is possible with laser-based desorption using very short laser pulses. With this approach the analyte molecules are evaporated in a very fast process, comparable to a shock wave. The thermal intake is reduced considerably. The functionality of APLD and AP-LIAD techniques combined with a hand-held IMS system is shown for a wide range of common explosives such as EGDN (ethylene glycol dinitrate), urea nitrate, PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate), HMTD (hexamethylene triperoxide diamine), RDX (hexogen), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), and TNT (trinitrotoluene). Detection limits down to the low nanogram range are obtained. The successful combination of IMS detection and APLD/AP-LIAD sampling is shown. PMID:24116702

  2. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  3. Canine detection odor signatures for mine-related explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, James M.; Williams, Marc; Waggoner, L. Paul; Edge, Cindy C.; Dugan, Regina E.; Hallowell, Susan F.

    1998-09-01

    Dogs are capable of detecting and discriminating a number of compounds constituting a complex odor. However, they use only a few of these to recognize a substance. The focus of this research is to determine the compounds dogs learn to use in recognizing explosives used in land mines. This is accomplished by training dogs under behavioral laboratory conditions to respond differentially on separate levers to (1) blank air, (2) a target odor such as an explosive, and (3) all other odors (non-target odors). Vapor samples are generated by a serial dilution vapor generator whose operation and output is characterized by GC/MS. Once dogs learn this three-lever discrimination, testing sessions are conducted containing a number of probe trials in which vapor from constituent compounds is presented. Which lever the dogs respond to on these probe trials indicates whether they can smell the compound at all (blank lever) or whether it smells like the target odor (e.g., the explosive) or like something else. This method was conducted using TNT and C-4. The data show the dogs' reactions to each of the constituent compounds tested for each explosive. Analysis of these data reveal the canine detection odor signature for these explosives.

  4. Active spectral imaging for standoff detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A

    2011-12-31

    Laser methods of standoff detection of explosive traces on surfaces of objects are considered. These methods are based on active formation of multi- and hyperspectral images of an object examined. The possibilities of these methods and the prospects of their development are discussed. Emphasis is laid on the justification of the most preferred field of application of the technique under consideration.

  5. Radiotomographical Detection of Ionosphere Disturbances Caused by Ground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreeva, E. S.; Gokhberg, M. B.; Kunitsyn, V. E.; Tereshchenko, E. D.; Khudukon, B. Z.; Shalimov, S. L.

    2001-01-01

    Long-lived local disturbances of the ionospheric density over the site of ground industrial explosions were detected by the ionosphere radiotomography method. It is assumed that the density anomalies arise because of the initiation of vortex motion in a neutral component after acoustic impulse passage.

  6. Detection of Explosives by Millimeter-wave Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sheen, David M.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Hall, Thomas E.

    2007-08-30

    Millimeter-wave imaging has emerged over the last several years as an effective method for screening people for non-metallic weapons, including explosives. Millimeter-waves are effective for personnel screening, since the waves pass through common clothing materials and are reflected by the human body and any concealed objects. Completely passive imaging systems have also been developed that rely on the natural thermal emission of millimeter-waves from the body and concealed objects. Millimeter-waves are non-ionizing and are harmless to people at low or moderate power levels. Active and passive imaging systems have been developed by several research groups, with several commercial imaging sensors becoming available recently. These systems provide images revealing concealed items, and as such, do not specifically identify detected materials. Rather, they provide indications of unusual concealed items. The design of practical, effective, high-speed (real-time or near real-time) imaging systems presents a number of scientific and engineering challenges, and this chapter will describe the current state-of-the-art in active and passive millimeter-wave imaging for personnel screening. Numerous imaging results are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the techniques described. The authors have been involved in the development of active wideband millimeter-wave imaging systems at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) since 1991.

  7. Merging Infrasound and Electromagnetic Signals as a Means for Nuclear Explosion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkenazy, Joseph; Lipshtat, Azi; Kesar, Amit S.; Pistinner, Shlomo; Ben Horin, Yochai

    2016-04-01

    The infrasound monitoring network of the CTBT consists of 60 stations. These stations are capable of detecting atmospheric events, and may provide approximate location within time scale of a few hours. However, the nature of these events cannot be deduced from the infrasound signal. More than two decades ago it was proposed to use the electromagnetic pulse (EMP) as a means of discriminating nuclear explosion from other atmospheric events. An EMP is a unique signature of nuclear explosion and is not detected from chemical ones. Nevertheless, it was decided to exclude the EMP technology from the official CTBT verification regime, mainly because of the risk of high false alarm rate, due to lightning electromagnetic pulses [1]. Here we present a method of integrating the information retrieved from the infrasound system with the EMP signal which enables us to discriminate between lightning discharges and nuclear explosions. Furthermore, we show how spectral and other characteristics of the electromagnetic signal emitted from a nuclear explosion are distinguished from those of lightning discharge. We estimate the false alarm probability of detecting a lightning discharge from a given area of the infrasound event, and identifying it as a signature of a nuclear explosion. We show that this probability is very low and conclude that the combination of infrasound monitoring and EMP spectral analysis may produce a reliable method for identifying nuclear explosions. [1] R. Johnson, Unfinished Business: The Negotiation of the CTBT and the End of Nuclear Testing, United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, 2009.

  8. Detection of explosives with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian-Qian; Liu, Kai; Zhao, Hua; Ge, Cong-Hui; Huang, Zhi-Wen

    2012-12-01

    Our recent work on the detection of explosives by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is reviewed in this paper. We have studied the physical mechanism of laser-induced plasma of an organic explosive, TNT. The LIBS spectra of TNT under single-photon excitation are simulated using MATLAB. The variations of the atomic emission lines intensities of carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen versus the plasma temperature are simulated too. We also investigate the time-resolved LIBS spectra of a common inorganic explosive, black powder, in two kinds of surrounding atmospheres, air and argon, and find that the maximum value of the O atomic emission line SBR of black powder occurs at a gate delay of 596 ns. Another focus of our work is on using chemometic methods such as principle component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) to distinguish the organic explosives from organic materials such as plastics. A PLS-DA model for classification is built. TNT and seven types of plastics are chosen as samples to test the model. The experimental results demonstrate that LIBS coupled with the chemometric techniques has the capacity to discriminate organic explosive from plastics.

  9. Ultra-portable explosives sensor based on a CMOS fluorescence lifetime analysis micro-system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Rae, Bruce R.; Henderson, Robert K.; Gong, Zheng; Mckendry, Jonathan; Gu, Erdan; Dawson, Martin D.; Turnbull, Graham A.; Samuel, Ifor D. W.

    2011-09-01

    This work explores the use of a green-light-emitting copolymer as a chemosensor to detect nitroaromatic-based explosive vapors by recording photoluminescence (PL) and time-resolved PL decay. We show successful detection of 10 ppb 1,4-dinitrobenzene (DNB) vapor. Both a conventional time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) device and CMOS time-resolved fluorescence lifetime micro-system are used in the DNB detection. An ultra-portable on-site explosive sensor based on the micro-system has also been demonstrated. This gives rise to the potential for real-time, reliable, inexpensive organic/inorganic hybrid explosives detection.

  10. Multichannel Detection and Differentiation of Explosives with a Quantum Dot Array.

    PubMed

    Peveler, William J; Roldan, Alberto; Hollingsworth, Nathan; Porter, Michael J; Parkin, Ivan P

    2016-01-26

    The sensing and differentiation of explosive molecules is key for both security and environmental monitoring. Single fluorophores are a widely used tool for explosives detection, but a fluorescent array is a more powerful tool for detecting and differentiating such molecules. By combining array elements into a single multichannel platform, faster results can be obtained from smaller amounts of sample. Here, five explosives are detected and differentiated using quantum dots as luminescent probes in a multichannel platform: 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), tetryl (2,4,6-trinitrophenylmethylnitramine), cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN). The sharp, variable emissions of the quantum dots, from a single excitation wavelength, make them ideal for such a system. Each color quantum dot is functionalized with a different surface receptor via a facile ligation process. These receptors undergo nonspecific interactions with the explosives, inducing variable fluorescence quenching of the quantum dots. Pattern analysis of the fluorescence quenching data allows for explosive detection and identification with limits-of-detection in the ppb range. PMID:26579950

  11. Standoff detection of explosive materials by differential reflection spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Anna M.; Hummel, Rolf E.; Schöllhorn, Claus; Holloway, Paul H.

    2006-10-01

    It is shown that 2, 4, 6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT) displays strong and distinct structures in differential reflectograms, near 420 nm and 250 nm. These characteristic peaks are not observed from approximately two dozen organic and inorganic substances which we tested and which may be in or on a suitcase. This exclusivity infers an ideal technique for explosives detection in mass transit and similar locations. The described technique for detection of explosives is fast, inexpensive, reliable, portable, and is applicable from some distance, that is, it does not require contact with the surveyed substance. Moreover, we have developed a curve discrimination program for field applications of the technique. Other explosives such as 1, 3, 5-trinitro-1, 3, 5 triazacyclohexane (RDX), 1, 3, 5, 7-Tetranitro-1, 3, 5, 7- tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), 2, 4, 6, N-Tetranitro-N-methylaniline (Tetryl), Pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), and nitroglycerin have also been investigated and demonstrate similar, but unique, characteristic spectra. The technique utilizes near-ultraviolet to visible light reflected from two spots on the same sample surface yielding a differential reflectogram corresponding to the absorption of the sample. The origin of the spectra is attributed to the highest occupied molecular orbital to lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) transitions of the respective explosive molecule. Experiments using transmission spectrophotometry have also been performed to compliment and confirm the specific transitions. The results are supported by computer modeling of the molecular orbitals that yield UV and visible transitions.

  12. Application of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) Curves for Explosives Detection Using Different Sampling and Detection Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Young, Mimy; Fan, Wen; Raeva, Anna; Almirall, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Reported for the first time are receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves constructed to describe the performance of a sorbent-coated disk, planar solid phase microextraction (PSPME) unit for non-contact sampling of a variety of volatiles. The PSPME is coupled to ion mobility spectrometers (IMSs) for the detection of volatile chemical markers associated with the presence of smokeless powders, model systems of explosives containing diphenylamine (DPA), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (2,4-DNT) and nitroglycerin (NG) as the target analytes. The performance of the PSPME-IMS was compared with the widely accepted solid-phase microextraction (SPME), coupled to a GC-MS. A set of optimized sampling conditions for different volume containers (1–45 L) with various sample amounts of explosives, were studied in replicates (n = 30) to determine the true positive rates (TPR) and false positive detection rates (FPR) for the different scenarios. These studies were obtained in order to construct the ROC curves for two IMS instruments (a bench-top and field-portable system) and a bench top GC-MS system in low and high clutter environments. Both static and dynamic PSPME sampling were studied in which 10–500 mg quantities of smokeless powders were detected within 10 min of static sampling and 1 min of dynamic sampling.

  13. Laminography using resonant neutron attenuation for detection of drugs and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveman, R. A.; Feinstein, R. L.; Bendahan, J.; Gozani, T.; Shea, P.

    1997-02-01

    Resonant neutron attenuation has been shown to be usable for assaying elements which constitute explosives, cocaine, and heroin. By careful analysis of attenuation measurements, the determination of the presence or absence of explosives can be determined. Simple two dimensional radiographic techniques only give results for areal density and consequently will be limited in their effectiveness. Classical tomographic techniques are both computationally very intensive and place strict requirements on the quality and amount of data acquired. These requirements and computations take time and are likely to be very difficult to perform in real time. Simulation studies described in this article have shown that laminographic image reconstruction can be used effectively with resonant neutron attenuation measurements to interrogate luggage for explosives or drugs. The design of the system described in this article is capable of pseudo-three dimensional image reconstruction of all of the elemental densities pertinent to explosive and drug detection.

  14. Fingerprinting postblast explosive residues by portable capillary electrophoresis with contactless conductivity detection.

    PubMed

    Kobrin, Eeva-Gerda; Lees, Heidi; Fomitšenko, Maria; Kubáň, Petr; Kaljurand, Mihkel

    2014-04-01

    A portable capillary electrophoretic system with contactless conductivity detection was used for fingerprint analysis of postblast explosive residues from commercial organic and improvised inorganic explosives on various surfaces (sand, concrete, metal witness plates). Simple extraction methods were developed for each of the surfaces for subsequent simultaneous capillary electrophoretic analysis of anions and cations. Dual-opposite end injection principle was used for fast (<4 min) separation of 10 common anions and cations from postblast residues using an optimized separation electrolyte composed of 20 mM MES, 20 mM l-histidine, 30 μM CTAB and 2 mM 18-crown-6. The concentrations of all ions obtained from the electropherograms were subjected to principal component analysis to classify the tested explosives on all tested surfaces, resulting in distinct cluster formations that could be used to verify (each) type of the explosive. PMID:24375169

  15. Chemicapacitive microsensors for detection of explosives and TICs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Sanjay V.; Hobson, Stephen T.; Cemalovic, Sabina; Mlsna, Todd E.

    2005-10-01

    Seacoast Science develops chemical sensors that use polymer-coated micromachined capacitors to measure the dielectric permittivity of an array of selectively absorbing materials. We present recent results demonstrating the sensor technology's capability to detect components in explosives and toxic industrial chemicals. These target chemicals are detected with functionalized polymers or network materials, chosen for their ability to adsorb chemicals. When exposed to vapors or gases, the permittivity of these sorbent materials changes depending on the strength of the vapor-sorbent interaction. Sensor arrays made of ten microcapacitors on a single chip have been previously shown to detect vapors of organic compounds (chemical warfare agents, industrial solvents, fuels) and inorganic gases (SO2, CO2, NO2). Two silicon microcapacitor structures were used, one with parallel electrode plates and the other with interdigitated "finger-like" electrodes. The parallel-plates were approximately 300 μm wide and separated by 750 nm. The interdigitated electrodes were approximately 400 μm long and were elevated above the substrate to provide faster vapor access. Eight to sixteen of these capacitors are fabricated on chips that are 5 x 2 mm and are packaged in less than 50 cm3 with supporting electronics and batteries, all weighing less than 500 grams. The capacitors can be individually coated with different materials creating a small electronic nose that produces different selectivity patterns in response to different chemicals. The resulting system's compact size, low-power consumption and low manufacturing costs make the technology ideal for integration into various systems for numerous applications.

  16. Non-aerosol detection of explosives with a continuous flow immunosensor.

    PubMed

    Shriver-Lake, Lisa C; Charles, Paul T; Kusterbeck, Anne W

    2003-10-01

    Contamination of groundwater, soil, and the marine environment by explosives is a global issue. Identification, characterization and remediation are all required for a site recognized as contaminated with 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) or hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX). For each step, a method to accurately measure the contaminant level is needed. This paper reviews some of the current methods with emphasis on a single biosensor developed in our laboratory. Current regulatory methods require samples to be sent off-site to a certified laboratory resulting in time delays up to a month. A continuous flow biosensor for detection of explosives has been developed and tested for the rapid field screening of environmental samples. The detection system is based on a displacement immunoassay in which monoclonal antibodies to (TNT) and RDX are immobilized on solid substrates, allowed to bind fluorescently labeled antigens, and then exposed to explosives in aqueous samples. Explosive compounds present in the sample displace proportional amounts of the fluorescent label, which can then be measured to determine the original TNT or RDX concentration. The system can accurately detect ppb to ppt levels of explosives in groundwater or seawater samples and in extracts of contaminated soil. The biosensor has applications in environmental monitoring at remediation sites or in the location of underwater unexploded ordnance. PMID:12920500

  17. Parameters of explosives detection through tagged neutron method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagdasaryan, Kh. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Belichenko, S. G.; Bestaev, R. R.; Gavryuchenkov, A. V.; Karetnikov, M. D.

    2015-06-01

    The potentialities of tagged neutron method (TNM) for explosives detection are examined on the basis of an idealized geometrical model. The model includes ING-27 14 MeV neutron generator with a built-in α-detector, a LYSO γ-detector and samples of material to be identified of approximately 0.3 kg each: explosives imitators (trinitrotoluene - TNT, tetryl, RDX and ammonium nitrate), legal materials (sugar, water, silk and polyethylene). The samples were unshielded or shielded by a paper layer of various thicknesses. The experimental data were interpreted by numerical simulation using a Poisson distribution of signals with the statistical parameters defined experimentally. The detection parameters were obtained by a pattern classification theory and a Bayes classifier.

  18. Apparatus and methods for real-time detection of explosives devices

    SciTech Connect

    Blackburn, Brandon W; Hunt, Alan W; Chichester, David L

    2014-01-07

    The present disclosure relates, according to some embodiments, to apparatus, devices, systems, and/or methods for real-time detection of a concealed or camouflaged explosive device (e.g., EFPs and IEDs) from a safe stand-off distance. Apparatus, system and/or methods of the disclosure may also be operable to identify and/or spatially locate and/or detect an explosive device. An apparatus or system may comprise an x-ray generator that generates high-energy x-rays and/or electrons operable to contact and activate a metal comprised in an explosive device from a stand-off distance; and a detector operable to detect activation of the metal. Identifying an explosive device may comprise detecting characteristic radiation signatures emitted by metals specific to an EFP, an IED or a landmine. Apparatus and systems of the disclosure may be mounted on vehicles and methods of the disclosure may be performed while moving in the vehicle and from a safe stand-off distance.

  19. Explosives (and other threats) detection using pulsed neutron interrogation and optimized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strellis, Dan A.; Elsalim, Mashal; Gozani, Tsahi

    2011-06-01

    We have previously reported results from a human-portable system using neutron interrogation to detect contraband and explosives. We summarized our methodology for distinguishing threat materials such as narcotics, C4, and mustard gas in the myriad of backgrounds present in the maritime environment. We are expanding our mission for the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) to detect Special Nuclear Material (SNM) through the detection of multiple fission signatures without compromising the conventional threat detection performance. This paper covers our initial investigations into using neutrons from compact pulsed neutron generators via the d(D,n)3He or d(T,n)α reactions with energies of ~2.5 and 14 MeV, respectively, for explosives (and other threats) detection along with a variety of gamma-ray detectors. Fast neutrons and thermal neutrons (after successive collisions) can stimulate the emission of various threat detection signatures. For explosives detection, element-specific gamma-ray signatures via the (n,n'γ) inelastic scattering reaction and the (n,'γ) thermal capture reaction are detected. For SNM, delayed gamma-rays following fission can be measured with the same detector. Our initial trade-off investigations of several gamma-ray detectors types (NaI, CsI, LaBr3, HPGe) for measuring gamma-ray signatures in a pulsed neutron environment for potential application in a human-portable active interrogation system are covered in this paper.

  20. Detection of explosives traces on documents by attenuated total reflection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boreysho, A. S.; Bertseva, E. V.; Korepanov, V. S.; Morosov, A. V.; Savin, A. V.; Strakhov, S. Y.

    2007-06-01

    The technical devices of explosives trace detection are discussed in this work. The attenuated total reflection method (ATR) is considered for detection of explosives traces on different things (documents, clothes, fingers). The results of experiments with Fourier spectrometer and ATR attachment for explosive trace detection are presented. The optical scheme and design of the compact testing device are discussed. The device includes the document information scanner and at the same time - the trace detector of explosives on the document cover.

  1. Gamma-ray nuclear resonance absorption (γ-NRA) for explosives detection in air cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartsky, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Engler, G.; Goldschmidt, A.; Feldman, G.; Bar, D.; Sayag, E.; Katz, D.; Krauss, R. A.

    1999-06-01

    The γ-NRA method has been utilized to detect explosives concealed in aviation containers loaded with a variety of cargo. In γ-NRA, gamma-rays at an energy of 9.17 MeV undergo a resonant nuclear attenuation component proportional to the integrated density of 14N nuclei along the line of sight from source to detector. When inspecting objects in transmission mode, projected images of nitrogen density of their contents can be generated. In an experiment performed earlier this year at the Dynamitron accelerator lab. of Birmingham Univ., U.K., diverse items such as passenger bags, electronic equipment, paper goods and mixed cargo were scanned along with explosives simulants. The results from this run will be presented and anticipated performance ratings of an operational explosives detection system (EDS) discussed.

  2. A new vacuum insulated tandem accelerator for detection of explosives and special nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, J. Paul; Powell, James; Murzina, Marina; Dudnikov, Vadim; Ivanov, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    This paper describes a radiation source that can be used to actively interrogate containers, trucks, trains, cars, etc to determine the presence and location of chemical explosives and special nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium. Active interrogation methods using high energy photon or neutron sources to induce fission are the only feasible option for detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) because passive detection methods are easily compromised by even moderate amounts of shielding. For detection of chemical explosives, the same active interrogation device can be used to produce resonant photons that can detect nitrogen that is used in most chemical explosives. The accelerator based system described here produces a penetrating beam of high energy photons or neutrons that can "see" inside a sealed container. If chemical explosives or special nuclear materials are present, they will emit a characteristic signal that is detected and interpreted by electronic sensors. Shielded "dirty bombs" can be detected by the attenuation of high energy photons caused by the density of the shield material. The interrogating source of radiation is based upon a new high current negative ion source and high current tandem accelerator. The accelerator accelerates ions and projects them onto an appropriately designed target. The target converts the energy of the ion beam into a high energy highly penetrating photon or neutron beam. The beam is made to pass through the container. If explosives, special nuclear materials or shielded dirty bombs are present, the beam together with a suitable detection system uniquely identifies the location, amount and density of material.

  3. Detection of explosives via photolytic cleavage of nitroesters and nitramines.

    PubMed

    Andrew, Trisha L; Swager, Timothy M

    2011-05-01

    The nitramine-containing explosive RDX and the nitroester-containing explosive PETN are shown to be susceptible to photofragmentation upon exposure to sunlight. Model compounds containing nitroester and nitramine moieties are also shown to fragment upon exposure to UV irradiation. The products of this photofragmentation are reactive, electrophilic NO(x) species, such as nitrous and nitric acid, nitric oxide, and nitrogen dioxide. N,N-Dimethylaniline is capable of being nitrated by the reactive, electrophilic NO(x) photofragmentation products of RDX and PETN. A series of 9,9-disubstituted 9,10-dihydroacridines (DHAs) are synthesized from either N-phenylanthranilic acid methyl ester or a diphenylamine derivative and are similarly shown to be rapidly nitrated by the photofragmentation products of RDX and PETN. A new (turn-on) emission signal at 550 nm is observed upon nitration of DHAs due to the generation of fluorescent donor-acceptor chromophores. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, the presence of ca. 1.2 ng of RDX and 320 pg of PETN can be detected by DHA indicators in the solid state upon exposure to sunlight. The nitration of aromatic amines by the photofragmentation products of RDX and PETN is presented as a unique, highly selective detection mechanism for nitroester- and nitramine-containing explosives and DHAs are presented as inexpensive and impermanent fluorogenic indicators for the selective, standoff/remote identification of RDX and PETN. PMID:21452828

  4. Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL) based sensor for the detection of explosive compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normand, Erwan; Howieson, Iain; McCulloch, Michael; Black, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Following Cascade Technologies first success at using Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL) for trace gas detection in the continuous emission monitoring market, the core technology platform is now being developed towards homeland security applications. This paper will highlight the potential of QCL based trace gas sensor for detecting vapours of explosives. Furthermore we will present results that let foresee the use of such technologies at addressing security gaps for protection against terrorism in infrastructures where high throughput screening of individuals or items is required. Preliminary measurements have shown that rapid identification, or fingerprinting, of explosive is achievable in 10ms at extrapolated sensitivities in the sub-part per billion range. The experiments were carried out with support form the Home Office Scientific Development Branch (HOSDB) in the UK and were focused at selecting a variety of explosive compounds and showing their detection using a novel sniffer platform system based on the use of quantum cascade lasers. Preliminary studies on the technology have indicated that direct fingerprinting (detection - identification) of explosive compounds such as NG and tagging agents such as EGDN by sniffing surrounding ambient air is achievable. Furthermore these studies have also indicated that detection of such compounds on packaging used to ship the sealed compounds is possible, making this platform a strong contender for detection through cross contamination on material that have been in contact with each other. Additionally, it was also possible to detect breakdown products associated with sample material NG providing a further capability that could be exploited to enhance the detection and identification of explosive compounds.

  5. Thermal neutron analysis (TNA) explosive detection based on electronic neutron generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, W. C.; Mahood, D. B.; Ryge, P.; Shea, P.; Gozani, T.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal neutron analysis explosive detection systems have been developed and demonstrated for inspection of checked airline baggage and for detection of buried land mines. Thermal neutrons from a moderated neutron source impinge on the inspected object, and the resulting capture gamma ray signatures provide detection information. Isotopic neutron sources, e.g. 252Cf, are compact, economical and reliable, but they are subject to the licensing requirements, safety concerns and public perception problems associated with radioactive material. These are mitigated by use of an electronic neutron generator — an ion accelerator with a target producing neutrons by a nuclear reaction such as D(d, n) 3He or 9Be(d, n) 10B. With suitable moderator designs based on neutron transport codes, operational explosive detection systems can be built and would provide effective alternatives to radioactive neutron sources. Calculations as well as laboratory and field experience with three generator types will be presented.

  6. Associated particle technique in single-sided geometry for detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Tushar Kashyap, Yogesh; Shukla, Mayank; Agrawal, Ashish; Bajpai, Shefali; Patel, Tarun; Sinha, Amar

    2015-03-23

    Associated particle technique (APT) for detection of explosives is well established but has been implemented mostly for fixed portal systems. In certain situations, a portable system is required where the suspect object cannot be moved from site. This paper discusses the development of a portable APT system in single-sided geometry which can be transported to site and requires only one-sided access to the object. The system comprised D-T neutron source and bismuth germanate (BGO) detectors fixed on a portable module. Different aspects of the system have been discussed such as background contribution, time selection, and elemental signatures. The system was used to detect benign samples and explosive simulants under laboratory condition. The elemental ratios obtained by analyzing the gamma spectra show good match with the theoretical ratios.

  7. Trace detection of explosives using an in-line high-volume sampler, preconcentrator, and Fido explosives detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, Russ; Sikes, John

    2010-04-01

    This paper shall demonstrate the results of a prototype system to detect explosive objects and obscured contaminated targets. By combining a high volume sampling nozzle with an inline 2-stage preconcentrator and a Fido, greater standoff is achieved than with the Fido alone. The direct application of this system is on the Autonomous Mine Detection System (AMDS) but could be deployed on a large variety of robotic platforms. It is being developed under the auspices of the U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC Night Vision and Electronic Sensors Directorate, Countermine Division. This device is one of several detection tools and technologies to be used on the AMDS. These systems will have multiple, and at times, overlapping objectives. One objective is trace detection on the surface of an unknown potential target. By increasing the standoff capabilities of the detector, the fine manipulation of the robot deploying the detector is less critical. Current detectors used on robotic systems must either be directly in the vapor plume or make direct contact with the target. By increasing the standoff, detection is more easily and quickly achieved. The end result detector must overcome cross-contamination, sample throughput, and environmental issues. The paper will provide preliminary results of the prototype system to include data, and where feasible, video of testing results.

  8. Design and validation of inert homemade explosive simulants for X-ray-based inspection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faust, Anthony A.; Nacson, Sabatino; Koffler, Bruce; Bourbeau, Éric; Gagne, Louis; Laing, Robin; Anderson, C. J.

    2014-05-01

    Transport Canada (TC), the Canadian Armed Forces, and other public security agencies have an interest in the assessment of the potential utility of advanced explosives detection technologies to aid in the detection and interdiction of commercial grade, military grade, and homemade or improvised explosives (HME or IE). The availability of suitable, non-hazardous, non-toxic, explosive simulants is of concern when assessing the potential utility of such detection systems. Lack of simulants limits the training opportunities, and ultimately the detection probability, of security personnel using these systems. While simulants for commercial and military grade explosives are available for a wide variety of detection technologies, the design and production of materials to simulate improvised explosives has not kept pace with this emerging threat. Funded by TC and the Canadian Safety and Security Program, Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC), Visiontec Systems, and Optosecurity engaged in an effort to develop inert, non-toxic Xray interrogation simulants for IE materials such as ammonium nitrate, potassium chlorate, and triacetone triperoxide. These simulants were designed to mimic key X-ray interrogation-relevant material properties of real improvised explosives, principally their bulk density and effective atomic number. Different forms of the simulants were produced and tested, simulating the different explosive threat formulations that could be encountered by front line security workers. These simulants comply with safety and stability requirements, and as best as possible match form and homogeneity. This paper outlines the research program, simulant design, and validation.

  9. A Neutron Based Scanner to Detect Explosives in Small, Sealed Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Koltick, D.; Sword, E.

    2009-03-10

    A scanning system has been designed for portal protection applications, with the capability of detecting explosive materials after an initial scan of 30 seconds. The scanner operates using the principle of neutron induced return gamma-ray spectrometry. This system utilizes high purity germanium detectors, a neutron generator based on deuterium-tritium fusion and a unique neutron reflector and guide design. The neutron reflector amplifies the flux and alters the energy spectrum of neutrons produced by the generator. A depleted uranium reflector is shown to perform 7.3 times better than no reflector, and is found to perform 1.5 times better than a tungsten reflector using MCNP simulation. This improvement is due to neutron knockout and induced fission occurring in depleted uranium. The system is capable of detecting 300 g of explosives with 90% detection probability, which includes a 15% rescan rate after a 30 second initial scan.

  10. A Portable System for Nuclear, Chemical Agent and Explosives Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W.E.; Buckley, W.M.; Kreek, S.A.; Caffrey, A.J.; Mauger, G.J.; Lavietes, A.D.; Dougan, A.D.

    2000-09-29

    The FRIS/PINS hybrid integrates the LLNL-developed Field Radionuclide Identification System (FRIS) with the INEEL-developed Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) chemical assay system to yield a combined general radioisotope, special nuclear material, and chemical weapons/explosives detection and identification system. The PINS system uses a neutron source and a high-purity germanium {gamma}-ray detector. The FRIS system uses an electrochemically cooled germanium detector and its own analysis software to detect and identify special nuclear material and other radioisotopes. The FRIS/PINS combined system also uses the electromechanically-cooled germanium detector. There is no other currently available integrated technology that can combine an active neutron interrogation and analysis capability for CWE with a passive radioisotope measurement and identification capability for special nuclear material.

  11. Hand-Held Devices Detect Explosives and Chemical Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Ion Applications Inc., of West Palm Beach, Florida, partnered with Ames Research Center through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) agreements to develop a miniature version ion mobility spectrometer (IMS). While NASA was interested in the instrument for detecting chemicals during exploration of distant planets, moons, and comets, the company has incorporated the technology into a commercial hand-held IMS device for use by the military and other public safety organizations. Capable of detecting and identifying molecules with part-per-billion sensitivity, the technology now provides soldiers with portable explosives and chemical warfare agent detection. The device is also being adapted for detecting drugs and is employed in industrial processes such as semiconductor manufacturing.

  12. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Short Jr., Billy Joe

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  13. Effectiveness of quality-control aids in verifying K-9-team explosive detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallowell, Susan F.; Fischer, Douglas S.; Brasher, Jeffrey D.; Malone, Robert L.; Gresham, Garold L.; Rae, Cathy

    1997-02-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and supporting agencies conducted a developmental test and evaluation (DTE) to determine if quality control aids (QCAs) could be developed that would provide effective surrogates to actual explosives used for training and testing K-9 explosives detection teams. Non-detonable surrogates are required to alleviate logistics and contamination issues with explosives used sa training aids. Comparative K-9 team detection performance for explosives used as training aids and QCAs configurations of each explosive type were evaluated to determine the optimal configuration for the QCA configuration of each explosive type were evaluated to determine the optimal configuration for the QCAs. The configurations were a paper patch impregnated with a solution of the explosive, a cloth pouch filed with small amounts of solid explosive, and the non-hazardous explosive for security training and testing material. The DTE was conducted at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Texas, where the K-9 teams undergo initial training. Six FAA certified operational teams participated. All explosives and QCAs were presented to the K-9 teams using a 10 scent box protocol. The results show that K-9 team as are more sensitive to explosives than the candidate QCAs. More importantly, it was discovered that the explosives at Lackland AFB are cross-contaminated, meaning that explosives possessed volatile artifacts from other explosives. There are two potential hypotheses explaining why the dogs did not detect the QCAs. First, the cross-contamination of Lackland training explosives may mean that K-9 teams are only trained to detect the explosives with the most volatile chemical signatures. Alternatively, the QCA configurations may have been below the trained detection threshold of the K-9s. It is recommended that K-9 teams train on uncontaminated odors from properly designed QCAs to ensure that dogs respond to the appropriate explosive components, and not some

  14. Ag-ZnO nanostructure for ANTA explosive molecule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaik, Ummar Pasha; Sangani, L. D. Varma; Gaur, Anshu; Mohiddon, Md. Ahamad; Krishna, M. Ghanashyam

    2016-05-01

    Ag/ZnO nanostructure for surface enhanced Raman scattering application in the detection of ANTA explosive molecule is demonstrated. A highly rough ZnO microstructure was achieved by rapid thermal annealing of metallic Zn film. Different thickness Ag nanostructures are decorated over these ZnO microstructures by ion beam sputtering technique. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies carried out over Ag/ZnO substrates have shown three orders higher enhancement compared to bare Ag nanostructure deposited on the same substrate. The reasons behind such huge enhancement are discussed based on the morphology of the sample.

  15. The detection and recognition of underground nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argo, P.; Clark, R. A.; Douglas, A.; Gupta, V.; Hassard, J.; Lewis, P. M.; Maguire, P. K. H.; Playford, K.; Ringdal, F.

    1995-07-01

    This paper reports on a joint meeting of the Royal Astronomical Society's Joint Association for Geophysics and VERTIC (the Verification Technology Information Centre) held in London in 1992. The topics presented focused on the detection and recognition of underground nuclear explosions. The objective of the meeting was to emphasize the multi-methodological approach that is important in verifying compliance with test-ban treaties. An overview of seismological monitoring was followed by a discussion of the technical and scientific aspects of a global seismic monitoring network, and in particular of the 1991 experiment to test the large-scale international exchange of seismic data between recording stations and data centres world-wide. The current capabilities of satellite remote-sensing were presented, and their use explained in terms of both the provision of information for monitoring the development of foreign nuclear testing programmes and also for providing sufficient information for the evaluation of treaty compliance. A review of radio-isotope sampling showed how the isotopic signature of both air and ground based sampling programmes can be diagnostic of the nuclear source. Finally, previously classified research on the ionospheric effects of underground nuclear explosions was presented, the generated acoustic waves disturbing the ionosphere and producing detectable changes in the reflection of radio and radar signals which have potential as a monitoring technique.

  16. Trace Explosives Detection by Photoluminescence with Applications to Time-Resolved Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouldin, Kimberly

    2003-10-01

    Trace explosive detection field methods based on chemical reactions have until recently utilized only colorimetric products. To increase the sensitivity of such detection, a field explosive test kit which produces a product that is both colorimetric and luminescent is studied. Detection sensitivity can be gained by taking advantage of the luminescence of these products, something that has not been done to date. When the appropriate chemistry is chosen for explosive detection, time-resolved imaging techniques may again be applicable. Thus, in this talk, the possibilities of taking trace explosives detection to this next level will be discussed.

  17. Standoff detection of explosives and buried landmines using fluorescent bacterial sensor cells.

    PubMed

    Kabessa, Yossef; Eyal, Ori; Bar-On, Ofer; Korouma, Victor; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Agranat, Aharon J

    2016-05-15

    A standoff detection scheme for buried landmines and concealed explosive charges is presented. The detection procedure consists of the following: Live bacterial sensor strains, genetically engineered to produce a dose-dependent amount of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of explosives' vapors, are encapsulated and spread on the suspected area. The fluorescence produced by the bacteria in response to traces of the explosive material in their microenvironment is remotely detected by a phase-locked optoelectronic sampling system. This scheme enables fast direct access to a large minefield area, while obviating the need to endanger personnel and equipment. Moreover, the employment of phase locking detection efficiently isolates the bacterial sensors' fluorescent output from the background optical signals. This facilitates the application of bacterial sensors in an outdoor environment, where control of background illumination is not possible. Using this system, we demonstrate standoff detection of 2,4-DNT both in aqueous solution and when buried in soil, by sensor bacteria either in liquid culture or agar-immobilized, respectively, at a distance of 50 m in a realistic optically noisy environment. PMID:26774094

  18. Tracing explosive in solvent using quantum cascade laser with pulsed electric discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seong-Wook; Tian, Chao; Martini, Rainer; Chen, Gang; Chen, I-chun Anderson

    2014-11-03

    We demonstrated highly sensitive detection of explosive dissolved in solvent with a portable spectroscopy system (Q-MACS) by tracing the explosive byproduct, N{sub 2}O, in combination with a pulsed electric discharge system for safe explosive decomposition. Using Octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX), the gas was monitored and analyzed by Q-MACS and the presence of the dissolved explosive clearly detected. While HMX presence could be identified directly in the air above the solutions even without plasma, much better results were achieved under the decomposition. The experiment results give an estimated detection limit of 10 ppb, which corresponds to a 15 pg of HMX.

  19. Trace detection and discrimination of explosives using electrochemical potentiometric gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Praveen K; Brosha, Eric L; Mukundan, Rangachary; Linker, Kevin L; Brusseau, Charles; Garzon, Fernando H

    2011-06-15

    In this article, selective and sensitive detection of trace amounts of pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) is demonstrated. The screening system is based on a sampling/concentrator front end and electrochemical potentiometric gas sensors as the detector. Preferential hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide(s) mixed potential sensors based on lanthanum strontium chromite and Pt electrodes with yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid electrolyte were used to capture the signature of the explosives. Quantitative measurements based on hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxide sensor responses indicated that the detector sensitivity scaled proportionally with the mass of the explosives (1-3 μg). Moreover, the results showed that PETN, TNT, and RDX samples could be discriminated from each other by calculating the ratio of nitrogen oxides to hydrocarbon integrated area under the peak. Further, the use of front-end technology to collect and concentrate the high explosive (HE) vapors make intrinsically low vapor pressure of the HE less of an obstacle for detection while ensuring higher sensitivity levels. In addition, the ability to use multiple sensors each tuned to basic chemical structures (e.g., nitro, amino, peroxide, and hydrocarbon groups) in HE materials will permit the construction of low-cost detector systems for screening a wide spectrum of explosives with lower false positives than present-day technologies. PMID:21435779

  20. The use of triangle diagram in the detection of explosive and illicit drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudac, Davorin; Baricevic, Martina; Obhodas, Jasmina; Franulovic, Andrej; Valkovic, Vladivoj

    2010-04-01

    A tagged neutron inspection system has been used for the detection of explosive and illicite drugs. Simulant of the RDX explosive was measured in different environments and its gamma ray spectra were compared with the gamma ray spectra of benign materials like paper, sugar and rise. "Fingerprint" of the RDX simulant was found by detecting the nitrogen as well as by making the triangle plot which coordinates show the carbon and oxygen content and density. Density was obtained by measuring the intensity of the transmited tagged neutrons. Hence, the presence of the simulant can be confirmed by using two different methods. The possibility of using the triangle plot for detection of illicit drugs like heroin, cocain and marihuana is also discused.

  1. High-throughput baggage scanning employing x-ray diffraction for accurate explosives detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Michael C.; Partain, Larry D.

    2003-07-01

    X-ray systems dominate the installed base of airport baggage scanning systems for explosives detection. The majority are conveyer systems with projection line scanners. These systems can achieve a high throughput but exhibit a high false positive rate and require significant operator involvement. Systems employing computed tomography (CT) are currently being installed at a rapid rate. These can provide good discrimination of levels of xray absorption coefficient and can largely circumvent superimposition effects. Nonetheless CT measures only x-ray absorption coefficient per voxel which does not provide a means of specific material identification resulting in many false positives, and it is relatively straightforward to configure explosive materials so that they are undetectable by CT systems. Diffraction-based x-ray systems present a solution to this problem. They detect and measure atomic layer spacings in crystalline and microcrystalline materials with high sensitivity. This provides a means of specific material identification. The majority of explosive compounds are well crystallized solids at room temperature. X-ray diffraction systems using both conventional wavelength-dispersive diffraction and fixed-angle, multi-wavelength diffraction for improved throughput are described. Large-area, flat-panel x-ray detector technology coupled with an extended x-ray source will permit a full 3D volumetric x-ray diffraction scan of a bag in a single pass, (patent pending).

  2. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A. ); Peters, C.W. )

    1992-01-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by electronic collimation'' (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  3. APSTNG: Neutron interrogation for detection of nuclear and CW weapons, explosives, and drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, E.; Dickerman, C.E.; De Volpi, A.; Peters, C.W.

    1992-07-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed- portal requirements for nondestructive verification of sealed munitions and detection of contraband explosives and drugs. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14-MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron inelastic scattering and fission reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in chemical warfare agents, explosives, and drugs, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system; a collimator is not required since scattered neutrons are removed by ``electronic collimation`` (detected neutrons not having the proper flight time to be uncollided are discarded). The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs.

  4. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, H.O.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-15

    Apparatus and method are disclosed for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives. 4 figs.

  5. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the optical emission produced thereby is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  6. Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof

    DOEpatents

    Funsten, Herbert O.; McComas, David J.

    1999-01-01

    Apparatus and method for rapid detection of explosives residue from the deflagration signature thereof. A property inherent to most explosives is their stickiness, resulting in a strong tendency of explosive particulate to contaminate the environment of a bulk explosive. An apparatus for collection of residue particulate, burning the collected particulate, and measurement of the ultraviolet emission produced thereby, is described. The present invention can be utilized for real-time screening of personnel, cars, packages, suspected devices, etc., and provides an inexpensive, portable, and noninvasive means for detecting explosives.

  7. Combined pre-concentration and real-time in-situ chemical detection of explosives in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dock, Matthew L.; Harper, Ross J.; Knobbe, Ed

    2010-04-01

    ICx Nomadics has developed the first known real-time sensor system that is capable of detecting chemical signatures emanating from underwater explosives, based upon the same amplifying fluorescent polymer (AFP) fluorescence-quenching transduction mechanism that the Fido® family of explosives detectors utilizes. The SeaPup is capable of real-time detection of the trace chemical signatures emanating from submerged explosive compounds and has been successfully tested on various marine platforms, including a crawler robot, an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), and a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV). The present work is focused on advances in underwater in-situ chemical sensing; wherein trace amounts of dissolved explosive compounds may be detected and discriminated from other chemical species found in the marine environment. Recent progress with the SeaPup platform have focused on increasing the sensitivity of the AFP matrix through the development of a preconcentration system designed to harvest explosive analytes from a larger sample volume over a predetermined period of time. This permits real time monitoring of chemical plumes during the approach to a potential source, combined with the lowered limit of detection from extended sampling of targeted items. SeaPup has been shown to effectively map "explosive scent plumes" emanating from an underwater source of TNT, and the preconcentration system has previously been demonstrated to enhance sensitivity be over 2 orders of magnitude in a time window of minutes.

  8. APSTNG: neutron interrogation for detection of explosives, drugs, and nuclear and chemical warfare materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Edgar A.; Peters, Charles W.

    1993-02-01

    A recently developed neutron diagnostic probe system has the potential to satisfy a significant number of van-mobile and fixed-portal requirements for nondestructive detection, including monitoring of contraband explosives, drugs, and weapon materials, and treaty verification of sealed munitions. The probe is based on a unique associated-particle sealed-tube neutron generator (APSTNG) that interrogates the object of interest with a low-intensity beam of 14- MeV neutrons generated from the deuterium-tritium reaction and that detects the alpha-particle associated with each neutron. Gamma-ray spectra of resulting neutron reactions identify nuclides associated with all major chemicals in explosives, drugs, and chemical warfare agents, as well as many pollutants and fissile and fertile special nuclear material. Flight times determined from detection times of the gamma-rays and alpha-particles yield a separate coarse tomographic image of each identified nuclide. The APSTNG also forms the basis for a compact fast-neutron transmission imaging system that can be used along with or instead of the emission imaging system. Proof-of-concept experiments have been performed under laboratory conditions for simulated nuclear and chemical warfare munitions and for explosives and drugs. The small and relatively inexpensive APSTNG exhibits high reliability and can be quickly replaced. Surveillance systems based on APSTNG technology can avoid the large physical size, high capital and operating expenses, and reliability problems associated with complex accelerators.

  9. Microcantilever technology for law enforcement and anti-terrorism applications: chemical, biological, and explosive material detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. D.; Rogers, B.; Whitten, R.

    2005-05-01

    The remarkable sensitivity, compactness, low cost, low power-consumption, scalability, and versatility of microcantilever sensors make this technology among the most promising solutions for detection of chemical and biological agents, as well as explosives. The University of Nevada, Reno, and Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc (NNTS) are currently developing a microcantilever-based detection system that will measure trace concentrations of explosives, toxic chemicals, and biological agents in air. A baseline sensor unit design that includes the sensor array, electronics, power supply and air handling has been created and preliminary demonstrations of the microcantilever platform have been conducted. The envisioned device would measure about two cubic inches, run on a small watch battery and cost a few hundred dollars. The device could be operated by untrained law enforcement personnel. Microcantilever-based devices could be used to "sniff out" illegal and/or hazardous chemical and biological agents in high traffic public areas, or be packaged as a compact, low-power system used to monitor cargo in shipping containers. Among the best detectors for such applications at present is the dog, an animal which is expensive, requires significant training and can only be made to work for limited time periods. The public is already accustomed to explosives and metal detection systems in airports and other public venues, making the integration of the proposed device into such security protocols straightforward.

  10. Stand-off explosive detection utilizing low power stimulated emission nuclear quadrupole resonance detection and subwavelength focusing wideband super lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolos, John; Mouyos, William; Feng, Judy; Chase, Walter

    2015-05-01

    The need for advanced techniques to detect improvised explosive devices (IED) at stand-off distances greater than ten (10) meters has driven AMI Research and Development (AMI) to develop a solution to detect and identify the threat utilizing a forward looking Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) combined with our CW radar technology Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) detection system. The novel features include a near-field sub-wavelength focusing antenna, a wide band 300 KHz to 300 MHz rapidly scanning CW radar facilitated by a high Q antenna/tuner, and an advanced processor utilizing Rabi transitions where the nucleus oscillates between states under the time dependent incident electromagnetic field and alternately absorbs energy from the incident field while emitting coherent energy via stimulated emission. AMI's Sub-wavelength Focusing Wide Band Super Lens uses a Near-Field SAR, making detection possible at distances greater than ten (10) meters. This super lens is capable of operating on the near-field and focusing electromagnetic waves to resolutions beyond the diffraction limit. When applied to the case of a vehicle approaching an explosive hazard the methodologies of synthetic aperture radar is fused with the array based super resolution and the NQR data processing detecting the explosive hazard.

  11. Detection and identification of explosive RDX by THz diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-Bo; Chen, Yunqing; Bastiaans, Glenn J; Zhang, X-C

    2006-01-01

    The reflection spectrum of the explosive RDX was acquired from a diffuse reflection measurement using a THz time-domain spectroscopy system in combination with a diffuse reflectance accessory. By applying the Kramers-Kronig transform to the reflection spectrum, the absorption spectrum (0.2-1.8 THz) was obtained. It agrees with the result from a transmission measurement and distinguishes RDX from other materials. The effect of the reference spectrum was examined by using both a Teflon pellet and a copper plate as references. The strong absorption of RDX at 0.82 THz allowed it to be identified by the diffuse reflection measurement even when the RDX sample was covered with certain optically opaque materials. Our investigation demonstrates that THz technique is capable of detecting and identifying hidden RDX-related explosives in a diffuse reflection mode, which is crucial for the standoff detection in the real world applications. PMID:19503355

  12. Trace vapor detection of hydrogen peroxide: An effective approach to identification of improvised explosive devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Miao

    Vapor detection has been proven as one of the practical, noninvasive methods suitable for explosives detection among current explosive detection technologies. Optical methods (especially colorimetric and fluorescence spectral methods) are low in cost, provide simple instrumentation alignment, while still maintaining high sensitivity and selectivity, these factors combined facilitate broad field applications. Trace vapor detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) represents an effective approach to noninvasive detection of peroxide-based explosives, though development of such a sensor system with high reliability and sufficient sensitivity (reactivity) still remains challenging. Three vapor sensor systems for H2O2 were proposed and developed in this study, which exploited specific chemical reaction towards H2O2 to ensure the selectivity, and materials surface engineering to afford efficient air sampling. The combination of these features enables expedient, cost effective, reliable detection of peroxide explosives. First, an expedient colorimetric sensor for H2O2 vapor was developed, which utilized the specific interaction between Ti(oxo) and H2O2 to offer a yellow color development. The Ti(oxo) salt can be blended into a cellulose microfibril network to produce tunable interface that can react with H2O2. The vapor detection limit can reach 400 ppb. To further improve the detection sensitivity, a naphthalimide based fluorescence turn-on sensor was designed and developed. The sensor mechanism was based on H2O2-mediated oxidation of a boronate fluorophore, which is nonfluorescent in ICT band, but becomes strongly fluorescent upon conversion into the phenol state. The detection limit of this sensory material was improved to be below 10 ppb. However, some technical factors such as sensor concentration, local environment, and excitation intensity were found difficult to control to make the sensor system sufficiently reproducible. To solve the problem, we developed a

  13. Defence Research and Development Canada: Suffield research on nuclear methods for detection of buried bulk explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFee, John E.; Faust, Anthony A.

    2011-06-01

    Defence R&D Canada - Suffield has conducted research and development on nuclear methods for detection of bulk explosives since 1994. Initial efforts were directed at confirmation of the presence of bulk explosives in land mines and improvised explosive devices (IEDs). In close collaboration with a few key Canadian companies, methods suitable for vehicle-mounted or fixed position applications and those suitable for person- or small robotportable roles have been studied. Vehicle-mounted systems mainly employ detection of characteristic radiation, whereas person-portable systems use imaging of back scattered radiation intensity distributions. Two key design tenets have been reduction of personnel shielding by the use of teleoperation and custom design of sensors to address the particular problem, rather than adapting an existing sensor to a problem. This is shown in a number of recent research examples. Among vehicle-mounted systems, recent research to improve the thermal neutron analysis (TNA) sensors, which were put into service with the Canadian Forces in 2002, are discussed. Research on fast neutron analysis (FNA) and associated particle imaging (API), which can augment or replace TNA, depending on the application, are described. Monoenergetic gamma ray induced photoneutron spectroscopy is a novel method which has a number of potential advantages and disadvantages over TNA and FNA. Sources, detectors and geometries have been identified and modelling studies have suggested feasibility. Among person-portable systems, research on neutron backscatter imaging and X-ray coded aperture backscatter imaging are discussed.

  14. Explosive detection using high-volume vapor sampling and analysis by trained canines and ultra-trace detection equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Mark; Sikes, John; Prather, Mark

    2004-09-01

    The dog's nose is an effective, highly-mobile sampling system, while the canine olfactory organs are an extremely sensitive detector. Having been trained to detect a wide variety of substances with exceptional results, canines are widely regarded as the 'gold standard' in chemical vapor detection. Historically, attempts to mimic the ability of dogs to detect vapors of explosives using electronic 'dogs noses' has proven difficult. However, recent advances in technology have resulted in development of detection (i.e., sampling and sensor) systems with performance that is rapidly approaching that of trained canines. The Nomadics Fido was the first sensor to demonstrate under field conditions the detection of landmines with performance approaching that of canines. More recently, comparative testing of Fido against canines has revealed that electronic vapor detection, when coupled with effective sampling methods, can produce results comparable to that of highly-trained canines. The results of these comparative tests will be presented, as will recent test results in which explosives hidden in cargo were detected using Fido with a high-volume sampling technique. Finally, the use of canines along with electronic sensors will be discussed as a means of improving the performance and expanding the capabilities of both methods.

  15. HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R

    2010-05-02

    Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

  16. An Orientation to Explosive Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Betty W.

    1987-01-01

    Provides an overview of various types of explosives. Classifies and describes explosives as initiating or primary explosives, low explosives, and high (secondary explosives). Discusses detonating devices, domestic explosive systems, the sensitivity of explosives, explosive reactions, and emergency responses. (TW)

  17. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  18. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  19. GPS detection and monitoring of underground nuclear explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jihye; Grejner-Brzezinska, Dorota; von Frese, Ralph; Morton, Yu; Gaya-Pique, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies by Park et al. (2011) revealed that an underground nuclear explosion (UNE) induces the acoustic-gravity waves, which disturb the ionosphere and generate the traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID). GPS technique allows for the ionospheric disturbance observation with high accuracy, which, in turn, enables detection of the TID induced by the UNE. This study suggests the detection and verification method of the TID using GPS observations. TID waves can be identified from the continuous data span of the total electron content (TEC) along the ray path between the GPS satellites and the observing stations. Since the TID is a high frequency and low amplitude signal, it should be properly isolated from the raw TEC observation. In this study, we applied the numerical derivative method, referred to as the numerical third order horizontal 3-point derivative method. The detected TID-like signals can be verified by its array signature under the assumption that the TID induced from a point source tends to propagate with the constant speed. Moreover, the location of the point source can be computed using the array pattern of TID observations from multiple GPS stations. In this study, two UNEs conducted by the U.S. in 1992 and two UNEs conducted by North Korea in 2006 and 2009 were investigated. The propagation speed of the U.S. UNEs was about 573 m/s and 740 m/s, respectively, while the recent North Korean UNEs propagation speed was less than 300 m/s. This result can be explained by the explosion yields and the depth of the UNEs: the depth of the US UNEs were about 0.3 km with the explosion yield of up to 20 kiloton, while the North Korean UNEs were at about 1 km depth with the yield of less than a few kilotons. In addition, we observed that the TID waves from these four UNE events were highly correlative, and distinguished from waveforms due to other types of events, such as an earthquake. As a case study, we selected the recent Tohoku earthquake of 2011, and

  20. Imaging stand-off detection of explosives by quantum cascade laser based backscattering spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Frank; Hugger, Stefan; Kinzer, Michel; Hinkov, Borislav; Aidam, Rolf; Bronner, Wolfgang; Lösch, Rainer; Yang, Quankui; Degreif, Kai; Schnürer, Frank; Schweikert, Wenka

    2010-09-01

    In this contribution we present the results of an imaging stand-off detection system based on a mid-IR external-cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL) with a broad tunable range of 200 cm-1. Traces of TNT (trinitrotoluene) and PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate) as well as various non-hazardous substances such as flour or skin cream on different substrate-materials were investigated by illuminating them with the EC-QC laser and collecting the diffusely backscattered light. By tuning the EC-QCL across the significant absorption spectra we were able to detect the explosives

  1. Position-adaptive explosive detection concepts for swarming micro-UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selmic, Rastko R.; Mitra, Atindra

    2008-04-01

    We have formulated a series of position-adaptive sensor concepts for explosive detection applications using swarms of micro-UAV's. These concepts are a generalization of position-adaptive radar concepts developed for challenging conditions such as urban environments. For radar applications, this concept is developed with platforms within a UAV swarm that spatially-adapt to signal leakage points on the perimeter of complex clutter environments to collect information on embedded objects-of-interest. The concept is generalized for additional sensors applications by, for example, considering a wooden cart that contains explosives. We can formulate system-of-systems concepts for a swarm of micro-UAV's in an effort to detect whether or not a given cart contains explosives. Under this new concept, some of the members of the UAV swarm can serve as position-adaptive "transmitters" by blowing air over the cart and some of the members of the UAV swarm can serve as position-adaptive "receivers" that are equipped with chem./bio sensors that function as "electronic noses". The final objective can be defined as improving the particle count for the explosives in the air that surrounds a cart via development of intelligent position-adaptive control algorithms in order to improve the detection and false-alarm statistics. We report on recent simulation results with regard to designing optimal sensor placement for explosive or other chemical agent detection. This type of information enables the development of intelligent control algorithms for UAV swarm applications and is intended for the design of future system-of-systems with adaptive intelligence for advanced surveillance of unknown regions. Results are reported as part of a parametric investigation where it is found that the probability of contaminant detection depends on the air flow that carries contaminant particles, geometry of the surrounding space, leakage areas, and other factors. We present a concept of position

  2. Receiver Operating Characteristic Analysis for Detecting Explosives-related Threats

    SciTech Connect

    Oxley, Mark E; Venzin, Alexander M

    2012-11-14

    The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) are interested in developing a standardized testing procedure for determining the performance of candidate detection systems. This document outlines a potential method for judging detection system performance as well as determining if combining the information from a legacy system with a new system can signicantly improve performance. In this document, performance corresponds to the Neyman-Pearson criterion applied to the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curves of the detection systems in question. A simulation was developed to investigate how the amount of data provided by the vendor in the form of the ROC curve eects the performance of the combined detection system. Furthermore, the simulation also takes into account the potential eects of correlation and how this information can also impact the performance of the combined system.

  3. Ultimate Levels of Explosives Detection via Tagged Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batyaev, V. F.; Belichenko, S. G.; Bestaev, R. R.; Gavryuchenkov, A. V.

    2014-02-01

    Capabilities of the Tagged Neutron (TN) method for detection and identification of explosives materials (EM) are explored using an idealized geometrical model that includes a 14 MeV neutron generator with an integrated alpha detector, a gamma-ray detector based on BGO/LYSO crystals, and irradiated samples in the form of simulated EM (TNT, tetryl, RDX, etc.) or benign material (BM) such as cotton, paper, etc. Research was carried out under the framework of computational simulations of neutron physics processes by Monte Carlo methods as well as experimental measurements using an ING-27 neutron generator produced by VNIIA. The work resulted in a comparison between measured and simulated ROC (receiver operating characteristics) curves obtained via integration of analytically expressed functions of irradiation time, mass, and type of EM and BM. Experimental results indicate that 0.3 kg of tetryl simulant located 45 cm from the neutron generator is detected in 97% of cases after a one minute measurement, with the false-alarm rate being highly dependent on the type of BM present: from ˜0% in the case of water to ˜5% in the case of silk. Comparison of simulated and experimental data for these results shows they are in agreement in cases where the simulations account for neutron scattering from the object and background effects.

  4. Explosive destruction system for disposal of chemical munitions

    DOEpatents

    Tschritter, Kenneth L.; Haroldsen, Brent L.; Shepodd, Timothy J.; Stofleth, Jerome H.; DiBerardo, Raymond A.

    2005-04-19

    An explosive destruction system and method for safely destroying explosively configured chemical munitions. The system comprises a sealable, gas-tight explosive containment vessel, a fragment suppression system positioned in said vessel, and shaped charge means for accessing the interior of the munition when the munition is placed within the vessel and fragment suppression system. Also provided is a means for treatment and neutralization of the munition's chemical fills, and means for heating and agitating the contents of the vessel. The system is portable, rapidly deployable and provides the capability of explosively destroying and detoxifying chemical munitions within a gas-tight enclosure so that there is no venting of toxic or hazardous chemicals during detonation.

  5. Detection of explosives as negative ions directly from surfaces using a miniature mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Nathaniel L; Kothari, Sameer; Huang, Guangming; Salazar, Gary; Cooks, R Graham

    2010-06-15

    A miniature mass spectrometer was modified by incorporating a conversion dynode detector system and the appropriate electronics to allow the detection of negatively charged ions. The system was fitted with a discontinuous atmospheric pressure interface to allow external ionization by desorption electrospray ionization (DESI). It was used to identify the explosives 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-trinitrophenyl-N-methylnitramine (Tetryl), and octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocane (HMX) present in trace amounts on surfaces (500 pg/cm(2) to 1 microg/cm(2)) both individually and as components of mixtures. Detection of explosives was demonstrated in the presence of an interfering matrix. A large surface (5 cm x15 cm) on which 1 microg/cm(2) samples of TNT, Tetryl, and HMX had been spotted randomly was interrogated in 22 s in the full scan mode, and signals characteristic of each of the explosives were observed in the DESI mass spectrum. PMID:20496904

  6. THE APPLICATION OF SINGLE PARTICLE AEROSOL MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR THE DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES AND CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A

    2006-10-23

    Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) was evaluated as a real-time detection technique for single particles of high explosives. Dual-polarity time-of-flight mass spectra were obtained for samples of 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), 1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazinane (RDX), and pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN); peaks indicative of each compound were identified. Composite explosives, Comp B, Semtex 1A, and Semtex 1H were also analyzed, and peaks due to the explosive components of each sample were present in each spectrum. Mass spectral variability with laser fluence is discussed. The ability of the SPAMS system to identify explosive components in a single complex explosive particle ({approx}1 pg) without the need for consumables is demonstrated. SPAMS was also applied to the detection of Chemical Warfare Agent (CWA) simulants in the liquid and vapor phases. Liquid simulants for sarin, cyclosarin, tabun, and VX were analyzed; peaks indicative of each simulant were identified. Vapor phase CWA simulants were adsorbed onto alumina, silica, Zeolite, activated carbon, and metal powders which were directly analyzed using SPAMS. The use of metal powders as adsorbent materials was especially useful in the analysis of triethyl phosphate (TEP), a VX stimulant, which was undetectable using SPAMS in the liquid phase. The capability of SPAMS to detect high explosives and CWA simulants using one set of operational conditions is established.

  7. Quantum cascade laser-based screening portal for the detection of explosive precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Ruth; Normand, Erwan; Howieson, Iain; McCulloch, Michael; Black, Paul; Lewis, Colin; Foulger, Brian

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, quantum cascade lasers (QCL) have been proven in robust, high-performance gas analyzers designed for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) in harsh environments. In 2006, Cascade Technologies reported progress towards adapting its patented technology for homeland security applications by publishing initial results on explosive compound detection. This paper presents the performance and results from a QCL-based people screening portal developed during the past year and aimed at the detection of precursors used in the make up of improvised explosive devices (IED). System tests have been carried out on a large number of potential interferents, together with target precursor materials, reinforcing original assumptions that compound fingerprinting can be effectively demonstrated using this technique. Results have shown that an extremely high degree of specificity can be achieved with a sub-second response time. Furthermore, it has been shown that unambiguous precursor signature recognition can be extended to compound mixtures associated with the intermediate stages in the make up of IEDs, whilst maintaining interferent immunity. The portal sensitivity was configured for parts per billion (ppb) detection level thresholds, but is currently being reconfigured for sub-ppb detection. In summary, the results obtained from the QCL based portal indicate that development of a low cost detection system, with enhanced features such as low false positive and high throughput screening of individuals or items, is possible. Development and testing was carried out with the support of the UK government.

  8. Multi-band sensor-fused explosive hazards detection in forward-looking ground penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, Timothy C.; Becker, John; Pinar, Anthony; Schulz, Timothy J.

    2014-05-01

    Explosive hazard detection and remediation is a pertinent area of interest for the U.S. Army. There are many types of detection methods that the Army has or is currently investigating, including ground-penetrating radar, thermal and visible spectrum cameras, acoustic arrays, laser vibrometers, etc. Since standoff range is an important characteristic for sensor performance, forward-looking ground-penetrating radar has been investigated for some time. Recently, the Army has begun testing a forward-looking system that combines L-band and X-band radar arrays. Our work focuses on developing imaging and detection methods for this sensor-fused system. In this paper, we investigate approaches that fuse L-band radar and X-band radar for explosive hazard detection and false alarm rejection. We use multiple kernel learning with support vector machines as the classification method and histogram of gradients (HOG) and local statistics as the main feature descriptors. We also perform preliminary testing on a context aware approach for detection. Results on government furnished data show that our false alarm rejection method improves area-under-ROC by up to 158%.

  9. Evaluation of femtosecond laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for explosive residue detection.

    PubMed

    De Lucia, Frank C; Gottfried, Jennifer L; Miziolek, Andrzej W

    2009-01-19

    Recently laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been investigated as a potential technique for trace explosive detection. Typically LIBS is performed using nanosecond laser pulses. For this work, we have investigated the use of femtosecond laser pulses for explosive residue detection at two different fluences. Femtosecond laser pulses have previously been shown to provide several advantages for laser ablation and other LIBS applications. We have collected LIBS spectra of several bulk explosives and explosive residues at different pulse durations and energies. In contrast to previous femtosecond LIBS spectra of explosives, we have observed atomic emission peaks for the constituent elements of explosives - carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen. Preliminary results indicate that several advantages attributed to femtosecond pulses are not realized at higher laser fluences. PMID:19158854

  10. Detection of explosive events by monitoring acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J P; Rock, D R; Shaeffer, D L; Warshaw, S I

    1999-10-07

    The Black Thunder Coal Mine (BTCM) near Gillette, Wyoming was used as a test bed to determine the feasibility of detecting explosion-induced geomagnetic disturbances with ground-based induction magnetometers. Two magnetic observatories were fielded at distances of 50 km and 64 km geomagnetically north from the northernmost edge of BTCM. Each observatory consisted of three separate but mutually orthogonal magnetometers, Global Positioning System (GPS) timing, battery and solar power, a data acquisition and storage system, and a three-axis seismometer. Explosions with yields of 1 to 3 kT of TNT equivalent occur approximately every three weeks at BTCM. We hypothesize that explosion-induced acoustic waves propagate upward and interact collisionally with the ionosphere to produce ionospheric electron density (and concomitant current density) perturbations which act as sources for geomagnetic disturbances. These disturbances propagate through an ionospheric Alfven waveguide that we postulate to be leaky (due to the imperfectly conducting lower ionospheric boundary). Consequently, wave energy may be observed on the ground. We observed transient pulses, known as Q-bursts, with pulse widths about 0.5 s and with spectral energy dominated by the Schumann resonances. These resonances appear to be excited in the earth-ionosphere cavity by Alfven solitons that may have been generated by the explosion-induced acoustic waves reaching the ionospheric E and F regions and that subsequently propagate down through the ionosphere to the atmosphere. In addition, we observe late time (> 800 s) ultra low frequency (ULF) geomagnetic perturbations that appear to originate in the upper F region ({approximately}300 km) and appear to be caused by the explosion-induced acoustic wave interacting with that part of the ionosphere. We suggest that explosion-induced Q-bursts may be discriminated from naturally occurring Q-bursts by association of the former with the late time explosion-induced ULF